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The District Ledger Sep 19, 1914

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Array '■■ 'Amm
iff
«      'WHS
Industrial Unity Is Strength
The Official Organ of. District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
\
Political iJhity Is Victory
No. 3, Vol. vin.
%
<*
r«v
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
M.
COLORADO MlliSS AND
PEACE PROPSALS
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., Sept. 15.—
The proposition of President Wilson
-for the settlement of the coal mining
stride in Colorado was accepted by
tlie officials of the United Mine
Workers of Aemrica in a letter sent to
the President and made public today.
The acceptance, however, ia subject
to approval of Colorado mineworkers,
who met today in Trinidad to take
action on the proposal. William
Green, International Secretary-Treasurer of the miners, said he believed
the Colorado miners would sanction
the settlement
Reply to President
■The letter, which is Jn reply to
President Wilson's communication of
September 5, recommending a settlement of the strike, follows, in part:
"We have welshed well and thoughtfully 'both the sentiments expressed lu
your personal letter and the proposed
tentative basis for the adjustment of
the coal mining strike in Colorado, the
the acceptance of which you urge with
very deep earnestness.
"The organization which we have
the honor to represent stands for industrial peace. We favor the establishment of right relations between
employers and employes to the end
that strikes may be rendered unnecessary. Having proper regard for these
alme, we sought in the beginning to
avoid an industrial conflict in Colorado.
"We repeatedly asked for a meeting
with, the mine owners witli the object
ia view of entering into contractual
relations with them, so that peace
might prevail. Had this been done we
are confident that the awful industrial
struggle which has been going on in
Colorado could have been averted, instead of bloodshed, bitterness, industrial strife and economic waste there
could have been established' through-
—out—6re-TO*ai™ii6ids peace, prosprRy"
and harmonious cooperation.
Working Agreement Sought
"It is our judgment that employers
and employes, through their chosen
representatives, ought to meet and set'
tie their differences hy mutual agreement. A direct working agreement,
entered into ln a friendly spirit, makes
for abiding permanent industrial
peace. This, we believe, ought to be
done hy the miners and operators of
Colorado. However,, we are mindful
of the suffering and waste which this
strike  has   thus tar Imposed and the
additional   sacrifice   which will   he
made If lt continues.
SOCIALIST   PARTY
A dance will he held in the Social-'
ist hall on Saturday, the 19th, commencing at 8 p. m.   Price as usual.
The regular business meeting will be
held on Sunday, September 20tb.
of the State to the extent that a state
of war has practically , existed for
some time, and,
Whereas, a temporary peace is maintained by the presence of the Federal
troops,
Therefore, there should he established a three-years' truce, subject
to:
1. The enforcement of mining and
labor laws of the State.
2. That all striking miners who
have not been found guilty of violation of the law shall be given employment by the employer they formerly worked for, and where the place
of the employe has been filled, he
shall be given employment as a
miner at the same or other mines of
the company.
3. Intimidation of union and nonunion men strictly prohibited.
4. Current scale of wages, rules
and regulations for each mine to be
printed ahd posted.   "
5. Bach mine to have a grievance
committee to be selected by majority
ballot at a meeting called for the purpose, in which all employes (except
officials of the company) have the
right to participate.
.Members of said committee must he
eieployed at least six months' at tan
individual mine before being eligible.
..Married men to be in the majority
on each committee.
Grievances to be first taken up individually with the proper officer of
th* company. Falling adjustment,
they can refer, to their local grievance
committee for further consideration
with the mine officials.- Still failing
agreement, the matter shall be submitted to a committee composed of
three men to be appointed 'by the
President of the United States, and
which shall be representative of both
WT«3r"wlttr a third member to act
as umpire, whenever necessary. This*
commission shall, during fhe three
years of truce serve as adjusters or
referees, in all disputes (whether individual or collective) affecting
wages, -working and social conditions.
Said commission shall devote primarily all the necessary ttme to the
consideration and adjustment of such
disputes.
6. It ls understood as a condition ot
the creation of said commission, that
during the life time of the truce—
(a) The claim tor contractual re-
lat'-m* is to be wnhed, hut this shall
IMPORTANT NOTICE TO L. O.O. M.
MEMBERS .
Next meeting will be held on Monday Sept 21, when matters of importance will be discussed. Members
should take particular note to see
that their dues are paid before next
pay-day, as if they, neglect this precaution -they will be out of benefits in
the ovent of sickness. The secretary
will be in attendance from 7 p. ra. to
receive dues. After the 21st the
weekly meetings will be resumed.
PATRIOTIC  FUND
A meeting will be held in the council chamber on Friday, September 18,
at 8 p. m., to consider the formation
of a committee to handle a branch of
the Patriotic". .'Fund in Pernie. As
most peoplevjjje aware, the object of
this fund is render assistance to the
families and - "-dependants of those
fighting or engaged in navy or military service. 'The object should appeal to all and. is worthy of your support. Whether you agree with the
war or not, get to the meeting and express your opinion of the best way to
handle this fund. Women and children are not doing the fighting, but
mey will do the suffering, therefore,
tt is your duty to assist.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
KEEP   AWAY
We are requested by the sec- ♦
retary of* the Hillcrest Local ♦
to advise all men to stay away ♦
from that camp for the preeejit, ♦
as there are more than suffic- ♦
ient men to fill positions. ♦
Notice wiil be given through ♦
these columns when conditions ♦
are normal. ♦
BDRIONTOX, Sept. 16.-JTho opening of the Provincial Legislature has
been definitely fixed for Wednesday,
October 7th.
COMPANY CENSURED
FOR DEATH OF MINER
Latest War News
Uncertain Whether Germans Plan
Fight to Finish or Further Continuance of Retreat
to
"The failure of this plan means that i respondent, is published in Paris,
the French are masters of the valley     An official statement declares that
LONDON, Sept 16.—The second
great battle in northern France since
the southward sweep of the German
Invaders met its check, now apparently is in progress to the north of the
River Aisne. The opposing lines are
arrayed from Argonne through Rethel
to Chateau-Porclen and near the practise camp of Soissons, where the
commanders of tbe French summer
manoeuvers contemplated cavalry
training on a large scale for this very
date.
Whether the Germans purpose ,to
fight to a finish at this position, or
plan merely to cover their retreat to
the River Meuse, is not yet clear, but
the German commanders are showing
much of the skill In retreat and in
keeping their armies intact that the
allies displayed a fortnight ago.
The German rush into France and
back, thus far, has brought no decisive results, and until a pitched battle on a gigantic scale has been fought
aBd-wonr-netUi-er-side-wi!H>64a-a-po»- ■
sition to assert that it has obtained
more than the opening advantage in
the war game, according to observers
here.
The Allies have retrieved their position and have turned the tables on
the Invaders, bat the next movomay
be with the Germans, whose armies
are still in great force, despite the fact
that they have suffered severely during the last week.
of TouFand Verdun. Therefore the
army of the crown prince Frederick
William, and the Duke of Wurtemberg
will 'be unable to cross the .Meuse and
will have to go farther north and' attempt to pass by the Stenay Gap."
Von Kluck Safe,' So Is Paris!
LONDON, Sept. 16.—While some
disappointment is expressed here that
the rout of the German armies in
France, descriptions of which have appeared iu the London papers for the
past few days, has been productive
of no such sensational results aa the
surrender of Von Kluck's army, it
must be recognized that very tangible
results have followed the offensive attacks. An attack on Paris bas been
made impossible for some time to
come without one of those dramatic
whirls of fortune which followed the
appearance of the Uhlans at Senlis.
That ihe allies have been unable to
pursue the advantage gained when
they fought the passage of the Aisne,
is explained' on the ground that the
Germans   destroyed   all the   bridges.
and that neither the British nor the-
French can get their material over
the river on pontoons. The German
army is said to be the only one in
the world possessing pontoon bridges
capable of   supporting heavy   trans
ports..
.«*»
SUMMARY OF WAR SITUATION
jici< i.*-ov«nt the voluntary agreement
"Feeling keenly, therefore, onr re- ] b t veen any employer and their employes during the life of this truce,
(b)   No mine guard*   to   he   em-
sponslbllltles as the representatives ct
oir organization, we accept your proposed basis of'settlement of tlie Colorado strlko—subject, of course, to Uie
apprsral of tbe miners of Oolorado. A
convention of tbe representatives of
the miners of Colorado will be held at
Trinidad, Co)., Tuesday, September 15,
at which time action will bo taken
thereon,
"We sincerely appreciate tho personal concern which you have manifested tn the Colorado strike. Speaking as you do, in tbo name of all the
people of our great nation, wo fsel it
our duty to respond to your earnost
wish. We do so. therefore, as we trust
ln the true spirit of American citizen-
ship." I   *
The acceptance is signed by John P.
White, president; Frank J. Hayes, vice
president; William Green, secretary-
treasurer.~-«pokeunsn-Kovlew.
TIUNIADAD, Colo., Sept. 15.—Today, one yoar after the meters do-
elded to strike for an enforcement cf
Colorado mining laws. lit officers and
members of tho United Mine Work
ers of Amorlca ara moating here to
decide wbotber of not thoy wiil -eon-
sldor a phut ot conciliation suggested
by President Woodrow Wilson.
Tha text of tbo proposed agreement
Is oa follows:
Whereas, the industrial conflict In
ployed, but this does not preclude the
employment of necessary watchmen.
(c) In tbe establishment of the
truce tbe presence or the Federal or
State troops should become unnecessary.
(d) There shall he no picketing,
parading, colonising or mass campaigning hy representatives of sny
lahor organisation of miners tbat are
parties to this truce, which will Interfere with tho working operations
of any mino during tbe aald period of
threo years.
Retrest in That Direction Cut Off and
Germans Must Go Farther North
LODON, Sept. |C—Renter's   Pari*
corespondent says:
"Tho rellof of Fort Troyon Is likely
to have an Important bearing on the
fate of Ute German army. The Germans were Investing Fort Troyon
and the neighboring forts between
Toul and Verdun with the object of
opening a way of retreat on their left.
An official French statement issued
in Paris at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, stated tbat the German army
was fighting a defensive batUe along
Its front from Noyon, a town on the
Olse river, four miles northeast of
Complegne, to a point north of Verdun. This would Indicate a hattie
line ot approximately 110 miles, with
the extreme west at a point fifty-five
miles northeast of Paris.
A report tbat the German Emperor
will go to the scene ot operations In
Bast Prussia, credited to a Berlin cor-
the Servian invaders in Hungary have
been defeated along the whole line.
Demonstrations against Italy's attitude of neutrality were suppressed
by military forcefc in Rome last night.
According to advices received in
Rome, probably from an Austrian
source, two Austrian armies in
Galicia have effected a junction at
Rzeszow, thirty-two miles north of
Przemysl.
It is announced at Tokio that Japanese scouts have occupied the railway station, five miles from Kiau
Chau bay.
The German right wing, in its retreat, abandoned Soissons Monday, at
the same time leaving also the southern bank of the River Aisne. The
German retirement northward continued during the night, according to a
dispatch from Soissons.
More than 4,500 German prisoners
arrived at Lublin on Monday, in Russian Poland, according to advices from
Petrograd. 	
""THereTTThe" usual diversity of
stories regarding the Austro Servian
operation. The Austria general staff
claims to have driven the Serbs out
of the Province of Banat and from
eastern Slavonia, The Serbs now say
they are bombarding the Hungarian
town of Orsdva. •    " '" "*~
The Belgian commission which
went to Washington to protest against
alleged German atrocities in 'Belgium,
was received Wednesday by President
Wilson who promised "my mtost attentive perusal and my throughtful
consideration of the document cnn
taining the result of an Investigation
made by a judicial committee appointed by the Belgian government.
The British official press bureau
gave out the statement Wednesday
that the general position along the
Aisne river "continues very favorable,
and that the   enemy's   loss   is very
heavy."
That Felika Malgium, tha Russian
miner who was killed in the u'.ine .at
Coalhurst on September llrd, came to
his death as a result of negligence on
the part of the Canadian Coke r.ad
Coal Company, was the gist of -.he
verdict rendered by the coroner's jur;.
empanelled to inquire into liis death
last week.
The jury viewed the remains shortly after his death, but adjourned for a
week.
Malglum was hit by a runaway car
loaded with timbers. The cars had
been sent down the "empty" track,
and traveled the grade at a high rate
of speed. Under ordinary circumstances they would have been stopped
on the level prepared i^r the concentration of empties, but the fact tliat
they were loaded gave tlnm tuffirtent
momentum to pass this point, and
gain another steep grade, on which
.Malgium was working.
He heard the cars comin?, and escaped the first one, but wns caught by
the second, knocked down, cud severely injured, so that he died a few
hours later in the Diamond City hospital. The jury held that the company should have taken suficlent precautions for the stopping of the cars
at the concentration point. A. E.
Humphries was the coroner, and the
following were jurymen: \V. T. lioy,
R. Scott, A. J. Spence, A. .1. Collier,
H. C. Otis and Ed S. Puli-v-. The inquest was held at the Mount-id Police barracks.
COMMUNICATED
(The Editor does not hold himself
responsible for opinions expressed, in
communications. Contributors must
send name and address, but if they
wish to subscribe under nom de plume
of England and of Protestauts, was a
paying proposition for a guy who
could rub it in thick on the "bhoys
of the Clan-na-Geal." About tliat
time, however, the British government promised the patriots home
rule; this made them patriotic and
since then there has been a slump in
the market for rebels. This might account for R. W. changing his creed.
IJut let us proceed witb the "Lessons:"
"Iu 'both cases the officials controlled. The tactics were the same,
duly a part of the mii^rs being called
upon to strike. Iu both cases the
men .were sold, the only difference
being that the miners on the island
know they are sold, while the men in
Glace Bay did not realize until (he
strike was well over. In both cases
the labor bleeders gained the aid of
the politicians to accomplish their
nefarious end."
Seeing that trade union officials are
referred to throughout the article as
"labor bleeders," let me state that II.
W. is not the inventor of that coin,
and that over thirty years ago J. Kier
Hardie, M. P., when secretary for
the Ayrshire miners in Scotland was
continuously referred to as a "labor
bleeder" by the capitalist press of
Great 'Britain.
R. W. tben goes on to connect a
priest in Glace Bay with assisting
the "practical parasitic leaders whose
only love for the miners is excited by
a slice of the wealth they produce."
After making the "labor bleeders" responsible for the suffering of the
Island workers, and for the persecutions of thc miners and their wives
and families in West Virginia and
Colorado, he winds up a violent declamation thus:
•Vou, 'Mr. Labor Bleeder, sitting In
c*n—ao—so,—proviueu—Tne"
dition is complied with.
nrsr con-
LESSONS   OF   THE    VANCOUVER
ISLAND  STRIKE
FERNIE JOTTINGS
are
(e) During said truce the decisions
of the commission In esses submitted
shall be final and binding on employers and employes,
(f) There shall be no suspension of
work pending tb* ln.ve*-»lg»tloft and
reaching ot a decision on any dlsputo.
te) The suspension of s mine over
six consecutive days by tbe company
may bo authorised for causo satisfactory to the commission, but not pend-
Ine any dispute.
(b) Wilful violations of aay of
theso conditions will be sabjsct to
eetb penal-Hoi aa may bo imposed by
tho commission.
Oa account of tho mntnai benefit*
derived from tbo truce*, tho employer!
wad employes should oach pay oo*-
ibo coal mlalag flolds of Colorado has| half of tbo expenses of tbo comma-
dltmptol the tmtm ot tbooo oeeuou
Subscribers-
Final Notice
AlUrtoptombtratHhtDttibtcrlplloBiiwtpaWiflU.
mmm wm ht wraotod mm our lkt It k iaimoOlo,
btfiaff ifftitf lo tbt bmimmA prfot of ttttwtal, lo com
Ham tmtibtg tio popor If NtoBftpttoM me mi poldgp,
whilo tht nto (910-0 ftr yem) to mmIi at to placo tte
prico witfeia ttMgt ti afl- Thoro wtll bt m tmtim tm
Uca, to pUiuo w*Ush your labol aad nolo doto bt exjA\
Dr. and Mrs. Gladwin of Corbin
spending a few days in the city.
A. J. King, chief Inspector of customs at Oroat Falls, Montana, ts In
tbo city on official business.
Joo fleul, tho alleged Incendiary of
Michel, has elected to be tried by
jury at the fall aiiliea.
Sherwood Herchmer and family left
on Tueaday morning for a month's
visit to coast cities.
Marriage licenses wero Issued on
September 6tb to Samuel Orr and
Amy Panny Smith, both of Pernio.
Venerable Archdeacon Deer of
Kaslo apont Sunday and Monday In
tho city, and read ths Isaaona In
Christ's church at tho soldiers* sorvlco Sunday evening.
N. F. Kendall, manager of tho
Bank of Montreal, Hosmor, and Mrs,
Keodall. spent Wednesday In the city.
Tbo bank at Hosmor li to bo closed
at tbo ond of Soptombor.
Tto stity-thlH anniversary oarviee
of organisation of tho Kobokabs will
bo observed oo tua«ay neat, September Mb, or Kttkor Rabekah todge
No. to, when members will gather In
tbo K. 9. HaU at » p. m. aad parade
*t ♦.£: Vs.;.A'. ;V;,-;1 L. ~-s.,U, J.,
few-dial Itv-rttMln* 1* Hrtfi^ffl to M1
mtmfttr* of trtio it. 1 O. O. P„ and
vlsttlaf btotlrm.
Tbo Bather Wahshah Lot* No. 10,
annoanco thetr eighth annual ban for
»»«**»*#» &*vt*tt*mi Um. to mo **o-
torta Rail, tbo Rsbakaha have o town-
wide rspatatloa tor tbooo fuaetlona,
aad It tbo catering ttm have ao eoosl
la tbo Provinco, Carrie's orchestra
has been eagagad aad • oood tlmo ts
iMHMie tm-^-M
YtT-tftittwtmt.
Jury.   Ityon request for ball, It was ing. One perfectly reliable old gentle-
amount   being   W.000, m*n wno** ■ fl«M   °r forty-seven
bushels to the acre, hut thirty bushel*
I per acre was more common.   There
was en abundance of help, as many
11,500   each   were
granted, the
Two sureties of
given and tbe prisoner deposited
13,000 and wss allowed his liberty until tbo fail assises. Dan MacDonald.
wbo somo time ago elected for trial hy
Jury and bad beon allowed out on
13,000 ball, reelected for speedy trial
on a charge of assault with Intent to
do grievous bodily hsrm, pleading not
guilty.   After hearing tho evidence,
Alberta farmers went down there
thresh.
to
TO OUR FORIION BROTHIRS
If you should be stopped by an officer of the law  and   asked   what is
your name and nationality, itlve him
his honor adjudged McDonsId guilty j*ho Informstlon n»ked for without the
of the otttnot and nfter lecturing him  «"**f"t hesltstmn. ** bt* 1* d-Vng th!*
severely. Imposed a flno of $50 and In «i» performance of his duty and In
convenTIonTlncreased your salaries to
the tune of some $14,000 a year.   Had
you the Interests of you employers at
heart this money you would have used
to increase the numbers of organize™
in the field, but no!    Instead of increasing the number   of   organizer?,
. they  were - reduced..   Our own local..
organizer, recommended by our District Board Member and appointed by
President  John  P.  White, was discharged by J. P. White on the recommendation of the man who tried (but
failed) to sell the Island miners without being caught."
The nbove statements, In our opinion, give the show awny, by disclosing
tho writer's motive for unlng the Insli
on President White, and if we read
between the lines ko can easily seo
why J. !'. W. deserves tlw« flogging.
Had J. P. White accepted the service*
of this ex-hater of Prot-pRtantlsm and
placed him on the list of organlieri,
thereby enabling him to become a labor bleeder, all would be fine and
dandy, but apparently, there was noth-
Um doiiiK. Al'u-r a d«*«per«le attempt
to prove that J. V. White's religion
j was reftpomlble for all the defeats tho
11'. M. W. liave met with since hts elec
tion. the writer adds:
"I would not like to think that this
Beaver Mine3, Sept. 14
To the Editor of the Ledger:
Dear Sir:-—Under the above hell
ing, the first of a series of articles attacking the U. M. W. of A. and ms-
peclally John P. White, president, ni'-
peared iu last Saturday's Issue of the
Western Clarion, of the 12th lust.
The article is rather long to reproduce In the Ledger, but In "OJd
John's" opinion It should lie lead, as
it will serve as an excellent nntidote
for all suffering from spasms through
reading war news.
We are accustomed to seeing dope
of this description In the yellow Journals controlled by Rockefeller, .Morgan & Co., but this ls the first time we
have noticed such stuff appearing in
the CInrlon:
"At Inst the strike of the coal miners of Vancourpr Island hns boon ot-,
flclally declared off.    Tho I'. M. W.
of A. has one more battle   to n-cord.
and one more 'victory' of tlw usual'
type.   As the general who flrd from'
the field  reported, there In nothing i
loft but honor, nnd damned little of; -^lyming' organisation U controlled
that, The miners have Awakened from j by cmttsollc*. or thst J. P. Whlto wai
iheir dreams of victory to find them-i ,„c,„,, ta oW|CB ^y tj„, infliionce of
selves more at the merry of   their | ,he cathojif church on a promlio tbst
six months at Nelson, snd sn addition
al |50 to be paid to McDonald's victim
on account of loss of time resulting
compliance with the Instruction* re-
celved from ths government head-
quarters.   Tbls   Information   Is   re
frain tho Injuries be hsd received, and nulred because of the .tat* of »«r wt
a $>S hospital bill to be psld by bim. Mm between   flrest   Britain.   (Jer
In tho ovont or this $75 not being
paid, tho sli months at Nolson were
to bo served, but If paid tbo term of
Imprisonment would be nuspeodwd.
Tbo disposition of civil rsseo took
up tbo remainder of tbo timo.
Tho work of organising tbo Volunteer Infantry Regiment has now com-
mancod, aad  Captains  Moffatt  and I wsMioUob of
many and Austria.
Canada Is a British ponw»»lon, and
therefore It Is alio at wsr witb th*
countries men Honed otiot*. Ito not
bo In the least alarmed wh'n called
upon to sin the doeamont *btcb will
be banded to you by tbe poller officer.
taskmasters than ever. Victory wss
In sight up to the last; but this vie!
tory was only visible to the gods,,
*'uo livid the vmion ever before their
worshippers, 'the wbrsnk and ph>le.'"
Tin n, aft«»r a fltrot Urade against
the "practical" men. "the something
new brigade," ihe wrltir Indulges In
a Utile autobiography which Is very
Instructive, ss it give* ut an Insight
If elected he would call off the (llaco
(lay itrlke. but I am a dreamer."
Vo mv Iriab vbt'l f-'o'i/f. M-jinn
you by your aentlmcnti. you are not a
dreamer. You are a wlde-swske, on-
ocrupulous hyiwrlte, si your next
paragraph will show: "And now, you
gods and would-be*. I bave atood aafda
tad allonrd >ou to flimflam snd hoodwink th« Ifttand   mlnetf   with   your
Stalker win bo at tbo rink on Friday, J*»«* "» *• *°ra 'n «*• «*«nuie» unlto l*tb. at I p. «.. to attend to tbo *or «»»«! of el.her tbo Emperor of
enrollment and arrange for the drill Germany or the hmperar of Amiria.
of tbelr companies daring the fall     An Idootlttestien card will be for-
and winter saoiitha. aisbod to you wbleb yoa should toko
||M t m ||IU]|     ,„..,,.    * r   ..  f o^*n^f|(Mntil»«     f***t»ft    t*     **i*f*wl*     %n>»'
Into Hie compoilllon of the wrllor who ^hb^,! bunk snd bourgeois ecu
apparently bss been s verliable Vicar! nMltn tot the Ism two >*sr*; I hava
et Rray. !ul auij hmnted   without   proU'tt to
"Ot tbe laat flvo yesra of my Uf*.' ,„1|r ^airiwas of lh# Mreanwr*' who
tht** bate h*+n »fH»nt In Mrnggles for B„v„r ^t0rr4 ym, ,.,„,„. nn*i  a-wlil'
»M>g«lt!on of tbo V. M, W. «i A   ,-BWi *,„, rendered   you   their   aid,
one year in Nova Smtla and t«o years I AM „ u mw |hat yott h%vfl t)vw
as It la only done for tbe ptinwa* »f!tn tfc* praaar.' tlrtk*    Ir. Ss*y,h Iktut  up lk9 fBot, ^ wjM»Bf this strike
tV pfovM'4 m' *l»H.f|,t| | ifttar.it te *j»vmI f*ft*ln hn*
* ', pertaining 'o trades unionism ia ge»-
P. of C. provided me wl'h tb»m«it»! !(,ra| an(| rht. ,- M w ,n partlcoi,r
The Qlsoe Bar, N  II, strike of IW^ fam , hiTe kepl nfttd thil
1*l#, found me an frlah wbel and a vmif Qf-fM-bud-faia- aHight ta> «l»«a an
Cttbolie ^ly eaemleo wen tkt I^f-SB^wtB^tv to ••tahlfrti   ttwtt, twit
** *  ••' r. •-.,;-., * A m9~t..*.i• ■"«-ifmtmmtnl1*d.  It ta my intention to
hand If e*11M nye* bt wn t*m**r «fI*W*i«wr* tit* n! Ml *M1-f!r*l! -'•*   -
III
aliens wbo bap-1 m,*m th* r M
tbe physical lubricant, while the
KNOX CMOHCM, SSPT WTH
tl a. m., "Wbat All Moa Afo Strive tbe law. If yon fondnef yoofaatvea tn jeiwiomle eondftlen. I had no fault to
Ing After"; 7:M p. m„ "Oooporailoo: (accordance with tbo laws of thl. I find witb tbo ptooont system. Rat the
Ito Origin aad J»or»oeo"i Sandsy coaotty, yoa wtll bsve nothing wkat'i strlko loft a dtoeenteatad, tkemot*
school, 18: IS P- m.; prayer mooting, j ovor to foar and will b* protected Juat oefoos ws*a slave, with another ene.
•Wrdnandew. I'.**  o   n     frwrtfxlr ♦b* «w *• » mutt.**    .--.Mre*    *-.. -**„ ■...*..  **i.f »,*..».r: .; .^ ^
welcome, w. J. SfacOusrrie. minister.
•Csnsdlsn eMlios.
1   There la oo espense arched to this
anywise   affect
systeaa, of abtcb ertaae aoat aro mor*
guilty thaa those in easris of tbe
trades onions (which rbargt I will en-
Mr. and Mrs. Mae<|wnte rotamsd wort, ^ **. ,Mn
on Wednesday from a cooplo of woota'f f09f ntnmtne aa a werfcwm or rm*- d**** to show in tbe proper pl*r»t
holiday on tbo prairie, sootboast ofufflt # m$ co8nto Would suggest!*" ^^ ,fe*"* ******* ,fc* **<»** ««
Moosejaw.    Mr.   Madjoarrt*   afoat(tbst yoa wf-foln from srfomwts wJatrtlW! wss tbe tem* ttt, "Waertwl
jaIkwU five yews m mlaUeir at Tel-. gm-diag tbo ptmtnt atrmni* *a lio-j «****»," * ,hSli** tfc*t '» *H'*r •*tt**'
Jodto Thompson ioli tio rsgular low Orass. oa tho too Uao, aad oafey*!**,, x**nm* tbla misv i«-»d   W««*»d where ibe r WW*'-*
t wiue • oetMw of i*u*rs to xk* tiiartoa
on this poruealar subject: ' Why the
1*5***1 ttrflu Waa Laat"-
Wo will f#*em further commsat
•stil v* loan tb* |»ttaai**e4 t*«*M«
Years traty,
J0HS LOrattRAtf.
Reaver Mines, Alta.
i* if
September ttvXxxt, uf Um «w**ut» court
horo oo   Taooday   and   Wodaooday.
Thotw ooio ooly two criounsl twwto wn
tbo dectret,   teem Omt  of  Xaui.
K^^-*-^^^^H     M4(,fek    AtMM      ,&K^^u^^j|     9....M*—...
vasiava wiui iiiww, m\p\nmiet. uerorv
bis honor aai sloetoi lor trial   by
COMMUNtCATtO
Michel, tt. C. *e»i. t, IMt.
Tn tk* Tit"r,r r>r *b-* -OVr-Vl: tMwr.
tkm Wr; »wni yoa kindly prtat the
following ;r-itr.-'  fu  ti«:  tu'.a-x..^*. U
■^ -,.-»> mmtib xkm »«■*•*»> oi old aviate WWiWo, whl<h nu bt- i.udfle1 jr e-stsWtahcd  nfih r^Goroltitm." h.-mr ptpet:,
qusiatancta.   Ia tbat district thrnsh-j^ «m attend to your bntlntm tni   Now. acrordtag to the skor* sat©-!   Th*»» bat* been   n report   tvmd
lot «*s tbe order of tbo dsy,   and j ^ pfg^t mny. »btograiAy, tn* tent* ago. H. IV. wnatnrotmd Mt*k*l tbst tbe \1t*k*1 Nod
white tltghtly Hghtsr than hut ysar.j „   ..   _ ..... jaa Irish rtkcl   Dat mont of no are 1 refec+4 to tarn oat and piny ea   tbt
tbs cropa weft, OR tbo whole, veryl   Jodgo Thompson   .»   no*   boltlne I awsr* that t***t*>i* to the* pmttkt J*«r««rfi«& td \b* St Am-tax* nt Terui*
itood aad tb* tnrmntt mtn all smUMcauaty court. faa sn frisb r*t>*s a«<t fir**tb\*tk*tr*,tt
»» '.!' "VS -■Vi'''-rr'r-^--■-"■ ^^^V"«<iSIZ*««M«a;,'^^.■n~.T£7y^*^A*tmW,i«Ti ii^rtSiwrnmimiwimtiiii n r'hoin
^jiiwaa^SSftpSiaaii
■^WjT
PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
^^^^^^fr^rpf*^ ^^1*^??^
The European Explosion
By Frank Bohn
The ease with which the ruling
classes of Germany have placed the
whole national life of tihe German
people as a pawn in the game of war,
cannot but astonish the world. How
many times have not the Socialists
■been called "dangerous to civilization." They would overthrow "culture" and what not. Judging from
the most reliable reports, the whole
German nation, with the sole exception of the Socialists, is now willing
that Germany shall be made a sham-
ble.s, that its wealth and its art
treasures, the homes of its people audi
the thousand places made sacred by
the thoughts and deeds of Germans,
shall be overwhelmed and utterly
ruined. Industrial society today cannot endure such havoc. The economics of its daily life Is a too' closely
wrought texture to be slashed by> the
sword. Germany, attacked from every side will, if the war continues
through the winter, lose five from
starvation to every one killed by the
bullets of the enemy. The conditions
of the Thirty Years' War will be repeated. And on what scale! The
schools closed. Industry paralyzed.
Cities in ashes. Railroads blown up
by dynamite. A thousand roadway®
clogged with fleeing, starving women
and children. All this was brought
upon the Fatherland by its arrogant
Junkers and greedy capitalists, who
were never tired of telling the world
that Socialism was "a danger to the
civilization of Germany."
There are today two unholy alliances in Europe. Each of them has
•been for a generation an insult to the
intelligence of humanity and a danger
to the peace of the world. IThe more
wicked and more dangerous of these
is the alliance between the German
militarist aristocracy, -with the Emperor at its head, and the German
middle classes, from the capitalists
to the intellectuals. Hardly less disgusting is the counter alliance between barbaric Russia on the one
hand and "enlightened" France and
Great Britain on the other. The two
alliances are fundamentally alike. In
each case it is the assignation of
those who are essentially political
democrats with the brutal passion of
soldier imperialists.
Why are these nations at war? In
answer  we must say that the first
- \HTr -VH5-HCT) -
„ayv9*****.*~ vv
est' Mie surface, is that of militarism.
For half a century the governments
of Europe have strained every effort
to prepare for war. They have burdened their peoples with huge taxes.
They have enforced the slavish service ot soldiering upon their workers.
They have developed a huge army
and navy officialdom, whose Insolence
ln Germany has more, in France as
much, and in England almost as much,
influence upon the destiny of the nation as the greed of the capitalists.
Throughout Europe the most respected business is the business of
murder. The alx great nations which
have made up the "Concert of Bn.
rope "have, during times of psice, a
hundred and seventy-five thousand
army officers, proud idlers strutting
about from barracks to banquet haJl
and ball room. Fat from much Idleness during eleven months of the
year, sneering at and spitting upon
folk of every claaa but tlieir own, this
professional soldier class makes any
lasting peace of Europe Impossible.
More fundamental, of course, Is that
group of national and economic problems which .during the nineteenth
century superseded dynastic quarrels
In the history of Europe. The great
International feuds are three In num
ber. They are the Baklan problem,
the mutual hatred of the ruling
classes of France and Germany, and
finally the rivarly of the German and
British capitalists in the international
market.
Servla
The vast majority of tlie population
of the .Balkans are Slavs. The spokesman of the Slavic interests is naturally the Czar. The Russian Empire has
everything to gain by the victories of
the small Balkan States over Turkey,
Russian policy looks forward to the
time when all of these, shall ba gath-
eied in the fold of the Russian Empire. Se?via. backed by Russia,
stands with bold front in the path
of German jiolicy, which alms at political an'I economic expansion
through the Balkans into Asia Minor.
More than that, she covecs the million and three-quarters of Slavs in
Bosnia and Herzegovina, as France
covets her re-union with Alsace-Lorraine. The hatered of the Slavs of
the Balkans for Austria is popular,
profound and enduring. The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, heir
to the Austria throne, undoubtedly
met with .sincere approbation on the
part of all the Slavs south of Austria
and of many millions of Slavs within
the Austrian Empire. This act on
June 18th last was not. a very fine or
a very modern way of settling a political question. But the Slavs do not
claim to >be, according to the standard of western Europe or the United
States, a very fine or a very modern
people.
Austria-Hungary
The German "pressure toward, the
east," its effort to expand commercially through the Balkans and then secure an all-land route to Asia, is accomplished politically by means of
Austria. The Austria-Hungarian dual
monarchy is a political monstrosity,
the like of which the world does not
possess elsewhere. Its population is
made up of-Germans (12,000,000), Hun-
garians (10,000,000), and Slavs (24,-
000,000). Besides these there are
Italians, Jews, Gypsies and Rumanians to the number of about 5,000,000.
In the corrupt and withering structure of the dual monarchy, f-euds
between these various populations
smoulder and break out like fires in
a dung-hill. The Emperor Franz
Josef is the most nearly perfect remaining representative of the Ger-
■nsfiny^Oi-vue^esgwteeiitii^venxury^ He*
is now eighty-three years of age, and
has forgotten nothing and learned
nothing since he harried every liberal-
minded person out of the land after
tbe revolution of 1848.
The twenty-four millions ot Austrian Slavs are politically subservient
to the twelve million Germans. The
Hungarians bave a separate government at Budapest, -with Franz Josef
as their King. The present war will
probably mean the rending of this political "crazy quilt" of Europe. Since
the defeat of Austria by Prussia in
1S06, her policy has been entirely
dominated by the German government. Industrially as well as politically the dual monarchy Is subsidiary. It furnishes Germany with
food products and the raw materials
of manufacture and conducts Its over-
«ea commerce largely through German ports.
The gross swindle called "Pan-tier-
maoism" la transparent to tlie most
superficial observer. To Increase
German power hy the subjugation of
the of the southern Slavs, to beat
back Russia, Germanize Europe to the
Black sea and the lloaphorus and
placo German sales agents In Asia on
an equal footing with those of Great
Britain—that la the dreiuu of empire
DAVIDSON'S
Heat Market
which  sweetens the sleep of Kaiser
and capitalist alike.
Russia
Russia is not an industrial, but an
agricultural country. The policy of
her Imperial government is directed
not to secure', markets but to conquer
territory, as did the emperors of
Rome and the European Kings of the
middle ages. Its hundred millions of
peasants are peaceful enough—'the
mau with the hoe never wants the
man with the^sabre to ride through
his turnips. But they are as undeveloped and illiterate as the Mexican
peons. There has been something
almost cosmic, something terrifying
to the civilizations of western Europe
in the relentless progress of Russian
power. Russia advanced to the far
away Pacific, and surrendered Alaska
to the United States only because she
did not have the naval power to protect it from possible seizure by Great
Britain. As the great Turkish Empire weakens and collapses, Russia
waits like a vulture to devour the
parts which fall away. Yet in the
case of the south Slavic population In
the Balkans we must admit that Russia has at least tihe argument to advance that she is fighting for the defense of a kindred people. Increase
of the territory of Russia and of the
prestige and power of the Czar's government within her own borders—
those are really the great dangers of
the present crisis. Nor did the Czar
take up arms with an aching heart
When Austria declared war on Servia,
Russian Industries were paralyzed by
great sympathetic strikes. In Russia'
any industrial upheaval is bound td
have political consequences. War,
even If not sought by the Czar, was a
most opportune occasion for. making
an end to the 'strike.
Germany
Germany has over 65,000,000 of
people living upon 208,000 square
miles of land. These, even under the
most highly developed form of capitalism which obtains in Germany,
could not live, were lt. not for a
constantly increasing exportation of
manufactures to foreign markets.
Germany is now one of the first manufacturing nations of the world. Her
exports amounted in 1913 to $2,478,-
150,000, and- her imports to 12,673,-
750,000. The overseas portion of this
total was more than $3,000,000,000,
and was carried in 4,850German ships.
'Whiie_6eTraany"^nnot~tMrsaid~tcr1W
actually driving Great Britain out of
the markets of the world, sho has
been gathering to herself the Increase. Even In Great Britain Bhe
sold, during the year 1912, over $290,-
000,000 worth. Germany and Austria-
Hungary comprise together a colossal industrial entity. Next to the
United States, this is now by far the
greatest factor In the economics of
tho world. Yet Germany has succeeded leos because of her situation and
natural resources than because of the
character of her industrial population,
and the application of the science and
method of Industry and commerce.
The structure of Gorman society today furnishes the greatest paradox !n
the history of the world. Tha evolution of German political life has not
been logical, and hence not safe. The
Get mans, whom the outer world has
known to be so methodical, careful,
plillospohtcal and scientlt'c, havo
been building tbelr "govreoment and
laws, and hence their industrial and
educational life, their whole coraplox
civilisation, upon quicksands.
European clvilxatlon devlops. as
evory informed Socialist knsw*.
through a aeries of class struggle-*.
Ono ruling claaa succeeds anothor.
The historical period in wblch one
possessing and governing group gives
way to another la known as* a revolu
tion. Tho process In overy **atitrn
European   nation   haa   boon aa fol
its n^ck the -mill-stone of Prussia. In
Prussia, serfdom, or the actual slavery, of the eountry worker, lasted until
1803. Economically it is still in force,
for while the serf was granted his
"freedom," the aristocracy kept the
lands. On the hacks of these toiling
peasants there remains today an
a-bomijiable class of parasites—the
land-owning gentry of central and
eastern Prussia.
The historical paradox furnished by
this political rulership of th-? most advanced industrial and intellectual civilization of Europe -by a brutal squirearchy headed by the kaiser, is not as
difficult to explain as It might seem.
Let us again consider 1848.  iThe revolutionary  class  at  that time,  especially in western Germany, was very
large.   When the Austrian and Prussian governments   beat   them   down,
they emigated to America—two and a
half million strong during ten years.
They left Germany stripped of    the
revolutionary class which would have
given her a political democracy and'
an orderly evolution of her whole social and cultural   life.     The whole
force of such German revolutionary
thought as has remained among   the
middle classes flowed into the channels of the Socialist movement.   Before that could gain power as an opposition,   the   task   of uniting Germany had been accomplished, not by
the will of the people, but by the military, power of the aristocrats.     To
unite Germany was as great and necessary a social work as to free Germany.    The same may   be   said of
America and of Italy In the oild-cen-
tury.   Since the close of the middle
ages it had been a fond hope of the
German mind.   By 1860 It had become
an absolute    necessity    to   German
economic     progress.      Mere     tariff
leagues among the German states had
been tried and   proven    inadequate.
Vainly .did the political democrats and
nascent Socialists unite their voices
ln favor of a liberal   union   in   the
sixties of the    last   century.     The
brutal   statesmanship   of   (Bismarck
and the cavalry of Von Roon   broke |
down all opposition.   The ruling aristocrats    even    won    over the 'business class to their ridiculous notion
that a modern industrial state can he
successfully reared and permanently
established by   the  old  methods  of
military, conquest. Germany was united'
'by-means of a great -series of political
lies, diplomatic swindles and bloodthirsty raids by  Prussia upon ' her
neighbors.   After the imperial crowning of the pliant tool of Bismarck ln
theTullerles, in 1871, there followed
a period of blue reaction' in the whole
political life   of   Germany.     Middle
class  liberalism,   fearful  of  the  So-
clallsts and  Impressed    bv    victory,
bowed before the black eagle.   They
were rewarded, by the development of
a forceful and successful commercial
policy in foreign affairs.  The unholy,,
alliance was perfected and grew   tn
solidity with the growth of the Socialist vote on one hand, and the increase
of foreign exports on the other.   So
It continued—this abortion, this mon-
atrocity, this German night in    the
midst of  universal   day.    Bismarck,
whom the elder Llebnecht described'
as being totally   Ignorant   of all the
truly vital facta   and   forces of   our
time, the German bourgeois almost
worshipped as the greatest man of tho
nineteenth   century.     What   Indeed
must have been the soliloquy ot the
troubled ghost of this mon aa it looked upon tbe heaps of German dead before the forts of Leige. and what will
It murmur when It sees French dragoons and Russian   Cossacks   riding
the strets of Berlin?
To that group of Germans who still
harbor tn tbo recesses of thoir mtnda
tbe traditions of tttt, tho leaden
clouds or war have a sliver lining.
Socialism may not Immediately result, but political democracy—that at
least li assured.
Oerman Versus Slav
No Oarmau lu the Uintod States hi
moro capable of speaking for tbo Germany of eighteenth century absolut
Ism than la Professor Hugo Oiuenater-
hong, of Harvard University. Writing
We make all our own Sausages
They are the BEST
HIP,  PORK,  VKAL,   MUTTON,   FISH,
POULTRY,  BUTTCH ANO EGGS
lows:    (l»   A nomadle stage,   with in tho New York Times of August ftb,
a. primitive tribal roveflim'friJt and a h*rofes*or Mttenoterherg tlttlAttt:
pastoral   economy;   (2)   Feudalism.
with a settled population, an agricultural economy and hence small political units;   III  A growing handl-
rnftamaimhlp   and   commerce,   with
the result In politico of a monarehlal
absolutism;   (t) The dominance   of
manufactures    and    commerce*. ' expressed   in   political   life   throngh
constitutionalism,  republicanism and
j Internationalism: tit The growth   of
ih# labor ami   HoriaHsi   movement.
; with an Intellectual class aa spokes-
• m«% remitting In stato capitalism.
I   Normal!!  tbe nations of wootera
"If thts war means such an Inevitable conflict of tbo Slavic and Ger-
msnle world, at least It ought to bo
clear to everyone who can think historically tbat It belongs to tbo type
of wnr for which tho world aa yet
knowa no aubatltute, tbe one type of
war which, ia spit* of tbe terrible
losaes la ultimately moral. Surety ao
oomment on tbla fight of the nations
»•• more absurd than tbo frivolous ery
that tbls le *aa Immoral war.'"
Jtpesklag geaorally, tbla paragraph
etosstrte* tbo mind ef Prof. Sftteflster-
bora aad of all other supporters of
Kurop# *>*■«. with fiigbt Olvergeaclwi * **»*   hopes   ot   tutorial    Germany.
!<!«# to varying pbjaiogiwpky aad aa-1 Wasbiagtoa, Jofforsoa   aad   Tboanw
'tlonai economy, from period to period j'*»Ine had <*aat off ibis remnant, of
| without much sidestepping. faJIIng «b* mentality of savagery a rantary
jihtwik nt J.uiii*Diii.«   Tlw Bailia^aveuib-[ :<<"4 * q/uairwr tm*. IX Pre*!, ttiiaantav*-
llac peoples tarnish, ol -roars*,   ttt*(bent aad tb* German ttmorror -nr*
, elaaatc essmff* of logical do-rotop.««wn**f, Ibea tbo none ami tb* aootb
!**«»-.. - -t'o* mutt** at a-sauta immo**i ■*> «»i»*o twnat t* a* ot eata otbor'a
m trlA.1 Orffar Will COnVlftO^ yOll tliat Olir    Imtntm <* «*«wi*ay we* evolve* eon*threat* forthwith.  Tbe United State*
m trims wswws w 9   , 1,„„,„„,l,kMI„   tinmm, Atw0M %m i»-|*»*wiiJI auaie war npmttmtdA-Aeem
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prices 0. meats ar* th* BBOV
PROMPT DELIVERY
Mie< tuai t*ad«rsk(f» of tie world, ba* »«, forcibly loach ISagilah to Ita pop-
bhiutXtTfl ii..*i:i.Xt*o.ly nod r»i**ta*0 tm- IsdaUoa* and tcremt f*t$#w*bie* fa ik*
langtwt wnn tbo fast »b* etwatd t doaamwat nt pJMtooapky at ItlfVtrf
tite bo-rant** m laprtdte la Ilia fierce th* native* who aahaeit first, Wat
eronomie l***Mopia»nt was adeqaat* j Maewstefbett perhaps doe* aot real-
to tbat end Tbo Itbentsh prepare*.it* that bis t* tb* theory of tb* aa-
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M.K.
Davidson
:-:       Phone 89
foaadly iaflaeaced. #srtag tlw Xapo-|of lb* middle at** II* ebows aot the
fe'iuk txi. Uy the sWClat ,uu! im-iUkal * '.'tUttU-rt xv-ui-t -id »*d*i',x Ut*tf».*v*tf>**-
fw«ai*s of th* fromtb r*vo!«tto*. Mt | allaaa, afcteb to ***** aaoa latefao-
u.• ii*,,.t,j****** <t* it.tiit****, *»u4 *b-u*tkii*»tt*k '*i»'ri» anni *«wi> rt*«tts
■...-....■..■ii,   i   n mi .iin i      Vv ;  I   j, I »v»a aaw la interest tons! cottar* tmt
Mmm  _tet    Al IP    -dm frMtatti't*,
3KmLtwmLf%mLtM mgmjnmt t .u nmttn tbt* sptetfie mm. rmt.
SHBTzSK~ l?aJT*y I wwnstotbem ataad>o!ails moat a*
!T^?f4^ff»TniTr■,-*-^•-ti^ *****»•**■   tletmms aad Aaswta nn-
pear aa the aggressors, first annexing
terrrltory entirely Slav In population,
and then, whon tho action results Iq
unlawful opiwaltlon, crushing out tlie
Hfo of an Independent Slavic atate.
But the imperllastle theory necessarily Implies the-forcible expansion of
ono nation or raco at the oxpeoao
of another, with all the bitter tyrannies and conflicts which remit
The Immediate Occasion of Wor
Tbat tho purpose ot Austria wag to
utterly crash Servla, permits of ao
dispute. Austria made ten demands
upon Servla and gave her forty-eUfci
hours in which to reply. This InsoH-
Ingly short timo limit Is a Prasataa
military method, the ptirpott of whhrtt
Is to attack a weak enemy beforo bo
ean bo ready. The Servian govor
ment waa forced to choose betwooo
peace or war wlthoat ovon consulting
It* legislature or taking time *o thia*
calmly. Hi* fifth demand made upoa
Servia was as follows:
"To accept tiie collaboralloa It
Servla ef tapreaeatatlve* of the An-
atro4lungarl»n government In tbe
suppression of tb* sObvarsiv* movement directed against tbo territorial
Integrity of tbo nmaarrby."
Th* haaritlattoa of florvls In sob-
i mining to all bat tbt* demand, wbleb
•oatd bat* heme tantamount to otter
surrender of ber sovereignty. was
abje-ri lo Ihe point of complete nullification.
Tlm nUitttunuiti ite ■Utvwmiy tn-
! pacta* attack by Ratal*, tbat "tb* **
swan wa* (ore** lato bar h*a*7" l*(
umm** a nety vmpm i*e. 'fm aovova--,
m*M of 0*rsa*ay is faapaaalMe fOvj
SU* AUMWtaii pcAki td ttme*«*t 'ie tbe.
itattaiM. History win not fail to lay1
nt tb* dtmr ot ib* Orwit *»*»»►  as'
mBMaddl   a^^s   jmA   tl^^^m -■ tkt^^^^^^m^^^^m     *^M^a--^M^^a   O^a^^h  k
■»" a* *• »*w ivmpviui, waoa* rasa- (
teat baaslltbw t*»y bav* ao loag tal-'
•rated, entire twvpoasfbllfty for start-1
tag tbe war. j
The ttaat ae-sam-d rip*. Tb* Frwnrii;
army wa* kaowa aot ta b* at ft* bom. j
EtliMfftcUaU (m.S.* /.i.l U»*-*a ttA-t-j lion
tm ■alateaaa«*. tio gtetaltet at-!
-,**!** tap** ik* n-t-H- year ac-fvtt* la* -
wontumtd   ttt  aural*.    Oroat i
Imperial Bank of Canada
MtAO OPFICI, TORONTO
Capital Paid Up. .17,000,000      Roaom mad ... .$7,000,000
O. *, WILKIt, PrettflSM        HON. HOST JAfFRAY, Vlss-Pr**,
MANGHM-IM 4RIT1SH COLUMBIA
Arrowhead,, Cranbrook. ftritlc, Ooldsn, Kamloopa, Mlchol, Neleoo,..
Itsvslstoks, Vancsuvsr and Vlotorh,
•AVINOt OIPARTMINT
Interact allowed on depeclta at oerraat rate from date of deposit.
FWUfll BEAKOH A. M. O WIN Maagfor
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HAS INSTALLED
i >'•
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES.
LOOGtYOUR
Wllk, Tfck D*«b, MoitgigM, Intoftoot Pofidtt
.t^m^mtH mtt^m^imtkd^^m ttMI^BlaMfe dh HkldMlfe   m em   9^^^^^^ ^-^--9 i^t^ _^_^m_m   ■fc*MUM|a^^^||
^^^^^ ^^^m^^^^^m    w -*^MWMwm^a*^l^^w **mvB ^bFatemm wdtmi   *mtAAI^K^^feie Mt^^t^memtAtm
•"
-99*9-
m, ir P«wi*r; Mnn«£*r        Pternte'Branch
CaamWfMriStiMianMiiiitf^
tbt etitfo et Mm*, Ttof mwmu
nt Haaala la proverb-
I farttsl* ln**d s *l«H **r,   Owe ****,
bttort the  atrowa    army  eceaptoJ
1/«embimT»  and  *ai*rad   Belgium^
j Kntdak tempo h*l m*d lurk blood ia
tat     fnr tlta W**'-'**'**    tn    ttttt    t-mtV*
afttr tbe aaa* atactica, aright tore*
bim to tattoo witb a Socialist majority ii tbo tolebstag.   lib) amy   Nd
*m*e^>    *VWW**y     pTWHIf     MlfR|IMVHIV<
Tbo -SloprKgiMUoa botwam bla aavy
<kfc4 tbat td 3rf*at Hnmim **u*M be
tttntf m Hi^wii agaNHH Mm vathur
iaa* aaftaeaa. Mt* w*qm» Ilia, twen-
trdtto years W wMcb bad beta opeat
in iicioomat far tbe oktmrne seat
dMiaalii that ho wetk at bl* Moody
trado, WlbtO l tm to* tela lo dla-
ttagamt MO tetm^S teat* af
Tht tktmm Am/
Tbo myth r#»ardlaf tba arowoaa at
-Oofaaaa ana* ts ***r btdot *t*dtkl*d
Tb* almost antversa! aevopuaca 0
this belief rwnsh* trom a mWatarpva-
tatkm ot a few laciAtata • bfch
Should bav* misled nobody. Tba laat
dtstiacatsbed tmpttdtn of tb* a*t»
aaaas at war toteofttot tbo ' vary
%im\ acislfctm «l ib*. *tt*rmaa-WltB*!fV
caa* la oar elvtl wart ttm s*it-*im»l
meeer to* romaaaoO at ^nOttkm tbe
Great a baadred aai fifty >*ar* aga.
Ia Um* otHwlNM mwm et Wkurelfom*'
aeiiast Hnpetttm, tba f'tntmnon w*ra
salted with lb*   whole   ot
ttwmttmttee mt mttr* THt**l
■*«*■ ■* •
t$l
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, 3. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
PAGE THREE
British and American
By William English Walling
The confused state of mind of many
American Socialists is exhibited (by an
editorial remark in the New York
Call:    -
"As for ourselves, we declare our
neutrality. What we are looking for,
the one thing •we are thinking about,
is how for this war will advance the
-. cause ot Socialism and social revolution. iTo us it Is of minor consequence who comes out on top."
Undoubtedly the, Socialist war
against capitalism must continue,
even in the midst of wars. But it is
a matter of indlffernce to us whether
the Russian or German governments
are defeated? Do we not prefer the
governments of England and iPrance?
And If war leads to a general over-
. throw of governments, by peoples,
may it not be worth the price?
Yet tbe Socialist Parties of England and America, 'While predicting
that revolutions would occur in Germany and Russia, opposed the war.
The American Party declared:
"The Socialist Party of the United
-* States, ln conformity with the declaration of the international Socialist
movement, hereby reiterates its opposition to this and allo'ther wars
waged upon any pretext whatsoever."
Even a revolutionary war is here
condemned. The declaration continues;
"The Socialist Party of the United
States hereby calls upon-all forelgn-
foorn workingmen residing in this
country, particularly those whose
home governments are engaged in
the present strife, to hold joint mass
mee+ings for the purpose of emphasizing the fraternity and solidarity ot all
working people, irrespective of color,
creed, race, or nationality." ,
As four out of five of the members
of the national executive committee
of the Socialist Party, favor Asiatic
exclusion, this declaration is obviously insincere—at least, as applied to
several colors and.races.
Similarly the British Socialists,
with the exception of Wells and Shaw,
—denoiracBd-Ti^f^unin~niF^erhwfi-il~
vasion of Belgium, when they divided.
Tbey denounced all war, hut especially this one—In view of the alliance between England and Russia. The big
demonstration in Trafalgar Square on
August 2nd, presided over hy Keir
HaVdle, Hyndraan and Lansbury, protested against any stop being taken
to support Russia.
At the same tlfte tbe organ of the
British Labor movement, the Dally
Citlten, predicted that tbe war would
lead to revolutions both In Germany
and Russia:
"The moment Russia moves io
ward war, the Russian peoplo move toward revolution. And not the Rut
alan people only, but also nationalities
llko Finland and Poland, upon whom
Russia has trampled with clumsy and
heavy foot.
"Nor la the position of the Kaiser
much happier than that of the Czar.
Kalaerdom la on Its last legs In Ger
many, oven a* Caardom is in Russia;
the steady advance of democracy will
put an cud to both. The German
workers ntn peace-loving and do not
want war; least of all do tbey desire
to be dragged at the tail of the Haps-
burgs."
Aro the Dally Cltlaen and Kler
Hardie and tbo rest opposed to democratic revolutions In ttnsaia and Germany? No, But tbey are not International enough to want to help pay
the price. Tba Rusaian workera favor
anything that promises revolution,
and so do tb* majority of tke thr*
man workera. Bnt tbe British do
not want to be dragged Into continental affairs. Tbey prefer their relative-
by petty reforms at borne.
go strongly do tboy feel this tbat
Ihelr John Bona resigns from tbe
Cabinet, and tbelr J. R. MacDonald
wemmsmsmmmseemaeesmm
from the leadership of the Labor
Party—even after the invasion of
Belgium—rather than shaTe the great
responsibility.
The British Socialist intellectuals,
however—unreliable as they often are
—have not -failed in this great crisis.
Both Wells and Shaw refused to participate in the Socialist peace demonstrations in London—and gave their
reasons, which were almost identical.
And they certainly cannot be suspected of collaboration.
Like all Socialists, Well* would tolerate no attack on the German • people or on the interglty of the German nation.
"It will be a sin to disine-mber Germany or to allow any German-speaking and German-feeling territory to
fall under a foreign yoke.
"Let us English make sure of ourselves in that matter. There may he
restoration of alien territory to the
French, the Polish, the Danish and
the Italian; but we have seen enough
of racial subjugation now to be sure
that we will tolerate no more of it.
From the Rhine to east Prussia, and
from the Baltic to the southern limits
of German-speaking Austria, the
Germans are one people. Let us begin
with a resolution to permit no new 'bitterness of conquered territories to
come into existence to disturb the future peace of Europe.
"Let us*, see to it that, at the ultimate settlement, Germans, however
great this overthrow may be, are'all
left free men.
"A bloody and embittered Germany,
continuously stung by the outcries of
her subject kindred, will sit down
grimly to grow a new generation of
soldiers and prepare for her revenge."
Here are Wells* main reasons, aa
given in the- New York Times and
World:
"The defeat of Germany may open
the way to disarmament and peace
throughout the world. To those who
love peace there can be no other hope
In the present conflict than her defeat, the utter discrediting of the Ger-
mau legend—ending it for good and
nti-*=Sf Diooa anff"~lron, CEe'^euper-
stitiott of Krupp, flag-wagging, Teu-
the War
"To us and to- western civilization
the worst calamity] that can occur is
a war 'between France' and Germany
or between either of them and England. All our diplomacy and all our
power should be directed to its per-
vention. And to tbat end there is
only one thing that our diplomacy
can clo, and that is to represent that
in such a war England must take her
part, and is ready to take her part,
with the object of making a speedy
end of it at the expense of the aggressor.
"With that responsibility on us,
those of us who have nothing more
helpful to do that sing Christmas carols had better V"*1-1   our tongues.
"The alliance between the revolutionary government of France and the
reactionary government of Russia is
a monstrous and unnatural product of
cosmopolitan finance. One of its
threatened consequences at present
Is the forcing by circumstance of England into the ranks of Russian despotism in defense of a Servian assassination. "
Shaw, like Wells, desires that Germany should not he -beaten too badly,
though there is no great danger of
that:
"Germany is eo Important a factor
ln the work of civilization that .even
when 'we are at war with her, we must
aim finally at the/conservation of
her power, to defend her Russian
frontier.
"This need not discourage us in the
field. On the contrary, ive shall
punch Prussia's head all the more
gloriously if we do it for honor and
not for malice. Then, when we have
knocked all the militarism out of her
and taught her to respect us, we can
let her up again.
"As to non-intervention, it Is merely an insular superstition. The lead-
ers of the modern labor, movement
know that labor .politics is international and that, if militarism is to he
struck down, a mortal'blow must be
aimed at Potsdam.
"Consider for a moment the mls-
chief done bv this. Deaca._rp*tran<-h.
est in its efforts to maintain peace.
This remark, which—like his advocacy of the gerenal strike—made. a
sensation, was also empty of all
meaning. Fdr healso -complained that
the French government had tied
itself to Russia. It could as truthfully
be said that the Kaiser desired peace,
but he had tied himself to Austria. '
The 'Wells-Shaw view is ably supported in this country by Allan L.
Benson of "The Truth About Socialism" and other writings which have
been circulated by the million by the
American Socialist Party, more in
fact than those of any other writer.
Benson published in the New York
Call an article, "Let the War Go On,"
from which we take the following
powerful paragraphs:
"I am sorry to hear that the Socialists of New York intend to hold an
anti-war meeting in Union Square
Saturday afternoon. I am sorry to
hear it because I always like to feel
that the Socialists are maintaining
and increasing their reputation 'for
common sense. I hate war, but I do
-not hate it so much as I hate some
kinds of peace. I regretted to see this
war come on, but now that it has
come, I want to see it go on until its
cause shall have heen wiped out of
existence.
"What is its cause? Comrades may
say that capitalism was its cause.
Quite so. But that is not sufficiently
definite. It is no more nearly definite than it would he to say that the
atmosphere is the cause of the aeroplane. Without the atmosphere the
aeroplane "would not have existed.
Without capitalism the present European war would not have existed. The
present European war is the result pf
capitalism, plus the predatory and
military spirit of Germany as typified
by its Emperor.
"Germany won an easy victory
from .France forty-four years ago.
From that day to this she has been
drunk with confidence and ambition.
"Why not atop the war then? We
may omit consideration of the fact
that It would be precisely as nearly
possible to try to stop an eruption of
a volcano after it had begun to
spout. We should not try to stop the
war because the spirit that has
caused this war is a menace to civilization. Civilization will not be safe.
until that spirit ls crushed, II tt were
not to be crushed now, it would
cause another war. Until that war
came th|LW-^d_wfi]UdJlfi*i^uiiOfillB*d~lo.
tonic Kiplingl8m, and all that criminal
sham efficiency that centers in Berlin.
"But he It remembered that Europe's quarrel la with Germany as a
state, not with the German people,
with the system, not with the race.
The older tradition cf Germany ls
a pacific, civilizing tradition. The
tewierament of the mass of the German people la klndlv. sane, amiable.
Disaster to the German army, If lt ln
unaccompanied by such a memorable
wrong as dismemberment or in tolerable indignity, will means the restoration of the greatest people of Europe
to the fellowship of the western nations.
"France, Italy, England, and all tbe
smaller powers of Europe are
now pacific countries. Ruasla, after
a huge war, will bo too exhausted for
further adventure. (Tbls remark
should be much stronger, The Russian government will he bankrupt
certainly, and Ctarism will probably
he overthrown.) Shattered Germany
will be revolutionary. Germany will
be sick of the uniforms and imperial*
let idea as France was ln 1811, as disillusioned about predominance aa
Bulgaria ls today.
"That la why f, witb my declared
horror of war, did not sign any these
'stop the war* appeale.
"Declarations tbst havo appeared In
tbe last few days are tbat ovory sword
f* drawn, tgatntt flermatiy, N'o'ir !# *h?
sword drawn for peace."
Bernard 8baw. In a letter to the
•Dally Cltlsen, written jost beforo tbe
war, take* tbo aame stand aa Wells,
thoogb h* folly admits that Ratals In
even won* tbsa Germany, ithongb
weaker aad not so danaaroua:
menmmmBmsBaemsmmesmaeamemt
streaking their hope for war in unmistakable letters across a reddening
sky.
The declaration of this congress,
November 24-25, 1912, which stayed
this war for nearly two years, was as
follows:
'VThe Socialist Parties of Austria-
■Hungary, Croatia, Slavonia and
■Herzegovina, must continue with all
their strength their hitherto success-,
lul efforts to prevent any attack of
the Austrian monarchy upon Servia.
They must continue to oppose in the
future as they have done up to the
present any attempt to take by violence from Servia the fruits of war
and to transform that country into
an Austrian province and to embroil
the peoples of Austria-Hungary and
other nations of Europe ln conflict
in the interests of the ruling dynasty.
The Socialists of Austria-Hungary will
have lo struggle in the future in favor of securing a complete autonomous democratic governoment for
the whole of the southern Slavs, now
governed by the Hapsburg dynasty
within the frontiers of Austria-Hungary."
out of tliis struggle with bis autocratic power intact, and firmly intrenched in his leadership of all the Siavic
peoples, the dividing line of the new
"balance of power" is quite evident.
It will be western Europe against the
Slav. For so long as autocracy continues, Russia will not disarm. Her
next move will be to seize Constantinople and Asiatic Turkey. .The news
of the recon&iitution of Poland, with
a view to including Austrian and
Prussian Poland, has already led to
misgivings in London.
The Austro-Hungarian Empire will
undoubtedly be broken up by the
withdrawal of Hungary from connection with the House of Hapsburg.
The German nation will remain intact.
If a republic succeeds the German
Empire, German Austria wiil" undoubtedly be Included. The Italian
population of Austria, east of the Adriatic, would surely have been united
with Italy had that nation joined the
forces of the triple entente. As it is.
Italy will quite likely claim it as a
reward for remaining neutral, One
of the very greatest territorial benefits of the war will be the conquest of
Victor Berger also sees an advance the German fortress and colony   of
mient reform superstition. Why was
it that Asquith and Grey did' not dare
tell the Commons we had entered Into
a fighting alliance witb France
against Germany?
"Solely. because they were afraid
if they told the whole, truth }>oth the
labor members and the non-Interventionists, as well as the anti-armament
Liberals, would have revolted and
abandoned the Premier and his Cabinet to the thercy of Ulster.
"The mischief of all this was that it
encouraged tbe continental conviction
that we would not fight. This conviction, true enough, might have restrained France from declaring war, If
France had wanted war, hut thia ia
Juat what France did not want.
"On the other hand. Its effect on
Germany must nave been disastrous.
Germany was the country that needed restraining, and the official prevarication by which the Liberal party
was duped, encouraged Germany to
believe we would back out in the end,
and thereby precipitated Germany's
desperate rush at Franco.
"Had our government possessed a
ml modem foreign policy, Asquith
might have said furiously to Prussian
militarism:
** 'If you attempt to smash France,
of Socialism as a result of the war.
He is quoted in an interview as saying:
"The outcome will decide whether
or not there will be a United States
of Europe.
"One-half of the Germany army is
made up of Socialists. When the
time comes they, will act."
If the war is to create a United
States of Europe—or even if it,is to
result in several democratic and federal republics, then Socialists must
say with Benson and. Wells and Shaw:
"Let the war go on!" But if the war
does more than this, if it leads to real
social revolutions, to the complete
overthrow of the ruling aristocracies
and plutocracies of Europe—even
though it does not carry any country
as far as Socialism—within a few
years it will have amply repaid its
cost in blood and treasure, no matter how staggering this cost may be.
'■-iThe New Review..
European Explosion
arm against it. No nation would be
safe over night The suddenness with
which Germany precipitated the present war shows the dangerous character of such a spirit.
Comrades may recall the fact that
in this great wjjir. as in all others,
workingmen are doing the fighting
and the dying. Comrades may even
argue that German workingmen are
fighting and dying because of their
Ignorance. Comrades may explain
that if the German workingmen knew
wherein their Interests really lay
they would not fight, and that therefore ft ia Inhuman to kill them off.
Comrades may therefore blame capitalism, as lt Is expressed In Germany,
for the ignorance of the German
workingmen. All of which I contend
is not to the point. The stern fact ia
that Oerman workingmen are shooting
down the worklnsroen of other nations, The stern fact Is that the
workingmen of, other nations did not
seek this war. The stern fact ls that
German workingmen have pnt. bay-
onets to the throats of all the workingmen of Europe except the working-
men of Austrtadiungary and Italy—
and Austria-Hungary la spared only
•because It ts Germany's ally In murder,
"I don't care who put a bayonet to
wo two will smash you, If   we   can.;
We have had enough of the Oermany; my throat, whether he Is a capitalist,
of Bismarck, which all the world j« workingman or even a Socialist
loathes, and we will see whether wo ] workingman—If I can gat at him first
cannot revive the Germany Goethe and i will kill him. The fact thst he is
Beethoven, which haa not an enemy; misguided will not save him. Thn
un nntik,'" i fact tbat he Is Ignorant will not save
"A stronger reason for not wanting bim. Not even the fact tbat bf Is
Germany to be beaten loo badly Is. working against his own Interests will
that this might lead to desperation; save bim If I can put a ballet Into his
and a revival of nationalism, wbereae | skull before be pats a bayonet Into
a leaser bio* might fall chiefly on tbe j my throat And, If I havo any moans
head of the Kaiser aad help the peo- by which 1 can take the fighting
pie to form a peaceful republic       {spirit oot of tbat man so that be will
Oa the other hand, most Socialist* | let me live In peace In the future—I'll
do not desire to seo tbe Cxar or Kal-i ua* tbem."
ear gat too easily away.  It Is not m|   ^nwn |, by no means alone.  The
If Russia and Germany were on th*;oHlcU, mm omtt$ lh0 American ««.
verge of a revolution, a* some So.,cW,it( ilt0 considers Aoatrla tito ag-
delists and even eome nondtelalistsj ^mor.   We road:
bar* 9wppa**d   Th* war wa* aot dt*'
(Cuulliiued from Paire Two)
against fhe Fallen Mighty, after the
disasters of the Russian campaign.
lUie three wars which resulted from
the unconscionable schemes of iBis-
"maFEk"Tn™Ehe -movement for German
unity, did' not give Prussia1 a single
foe worthy of the effeorts of first-
class troops. In the SchleswIgiHol-
stein affair, the combined armies of
Austrla~and Prussia marched into the
dutchies, captured a fort, and the
Danes wisely submitted. Austrian
arms, of course, bave never won a
battle which the world remembers,
Ti'toen the Prussians were upon them
at Sadowa and Konlggratz, they collapsed In a fortnight. Finally, the
victories of 1870 against that blunder-
ing charlatan. Napoleon III., were
nothing to the credit of either generals or troops, ( The German army of
Von Moltke was ready, perfect In
organization. In that lay Its strength,
The truth Is that the German army,
with all Its wonderful machinery of
war, retains the psychology of the
armies of Frederick the Great. Is it
possible that there ia a s«b-lieutenant
In the army of China or Abyssinia
who does not know that troops must
not be exposed In masses, not to
mwnk of hurling them in such form
against fortifications? Armies wblch
are really modern emphasize at overly
point, especially upon the skirmish
lines, tbe imperative need of individual brains and Initiative on the part
of the rank and file. The bane of
Imperialism In arms la that It de
ponds, not upon the free Intelligence
of tho whole population, but upon that
of a general staff and rigid discipline
for all beneath. Fortunately, In hold-)
lot hark tb,* imnucttl devflwmtat of!
Germany and Russia, kingly rule has]
stultified their mllltnry development
a* well.
The foreign policy of the Emperor
on the eve of lb* invent conflict was
everywhere subordinated to ibe immediate and superficial demands of
his military requirements. Strategic-
ally he needed Belgium to pl«rc« tbe
French lino and tak*> tht*' short and
easy route to Paris, do hf made bit-
ter. flahilna enemies of **wn millions
of Belgians and thereby dr»w into tbe
eontlirt the   mighty   British   navy.
Kiau Chau, in China, with its sphere
of influence, by Japan. The driving
of Russian and German drill-sergeants out of the Orient is one of the
essentials to civilized progress in that
quarter. *.
Social Transformations
From the point of view of tho
working class throughout the world,
the declaration of war on July 29th
will prove to" be the greatest event
In the history of the Socialist and
labor movement. Even a political republic in Germany was impossible without war. The power of the Kaiser
must needs be broken 'by force either
from within or from without. No one
doubts that it would have been; better for the working class to have had
force applied directly from within.
"Those who would free themselves
must strike the, blow." Yet the German Social Democracy was wise in
biding its time. No political party in
the world knew so well that it could
not control the primary forces of
history. As in the Paris 1871, the
hour for the working class to strike
comes when nationalist patriotism has
spent itself. For the Socialist to revolt when the war-crazed mobs of
Berlin surged through every street
was simply impossible. In any ca3e,
the die is ca^t.  There Will be, sooner
THE BLOOD IS THE
STREAM OF LIFE
Pure Blood Io Absolutely
Necessary To Health
"FRUIT-MVES" PURIFIES
Theae    Wonderful    Tablets,
Made of Fruit Juices*, Are The
Best   Of All   Tonics To
Purify And Enrich
The Blood.
Pure, rich blood can flow only in a
clean body. Now, a clean body is one
in which the waste matter is regularly
and naturally eliminated from the
system. The blood cannot be pure
when the skin action is weak, when
the stomach does not digest the food
properly, when the bowels do not move
regularly, wheu the kidneys are
strained or overworked.
Pure blood is the result of perfect
health and harmony of stomach, liver,
bowels, kidneys and skin.
"Fruit-a-tives", by their wonderful
action on all these organs, keeps the
whole system as clean as Nature intended our bodies to be clean.
"Fruit-a-tives" tones up, invigorates, strengthens, purifies, cleans and
gives pure, rich, clean blood that is, in
truth, the stream of life.
"Fruit-a-tives" is sold by all dealers
at 50c. a box, 6 for $2.50 trial size 25c.
or sent postpaid on receipt of price by
Fruit-a-tives Limited, Ottawa.
Our comprades are quite likely prepared to show cause. In England
the vast meetings of the workers in
protest against war were noted even
by the capitalist papers of this country.
Meanwhile all of ns await with firm,
faith and mighty hope the hour of redemption in Germany.—New Review.
or laten that uprising of the hosts of
German labor for which every revol-i-
tionary Socialist has so long hoped
with all his heart. Incidentally we
may observe that the events which
have already transpired have completely destroyed and swept away tht
historically untrue, politically un-
«ound, and altogether ridiculous set
of notions which the compromisb;;
and cowardly leaders of "peace at any
price Socialism" have foisted from
the top upon the international movement. Revolutionary Socialists have
been for so long jeered at and misrepresented by a few politicians and
misunderstood by bo many, that it
seemed doubtful whether the atmosphere would ever be cleared. The
stupendous forces now unloosened
upon the world make further argument unnecessary.
A Final Word
It remains for us In America, firs'.
0* oil, to havo confidence In onr com-
radee in Europe. They will, In every
Innd, do their duty. !«et us remember
tlmt revolutionary perlo'ls detuairJ
practicality. In Italy, t. country until
now united with the agaressor, It was
happily possible for the Socialist
movement to help avert war. If in
Fronco and Belgium our movement
lm-- been swept along by the soiienl
opposition to the agisrawion of Germany, let ua withhold our crlti^snw
We Are Ready to Scratch
oft you- bill any item of lumber aot
found Just as wo represented.   There
Is no hocus pocus lo
This Lumber Business
When you w«ut spruce wo do not
send you hemlock, When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip ia a
lot of culls. Thus* wbo buy once from
us always come again. Those wbo
bave not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances tbey wouldn't encounter It tbey bought tbelr lumber
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Oealere In ■—
Lumber,   Lath,  Shingles,  Sash  and
Doors.    SPBCIALTIES-Mouldlnga,
Turnings, Brackets, and Ostall Work
OFFICE ANO YARD-McPhsrson ave.
Opposite 0. N. Depot.  P.O. Bex ti,
Phone 23.
Steam H#sud Throughout
LkfUiM Lighted
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J, L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
Rates $2.50 per day
With Private Bath *J.C0
Fire Proof Sample
Rooms in Coontctioo
F"
elaiwd to bead ott r»vol«t Ion-even
ta Roasts—but tw pnrpoeee of conquest   This mistaken vlow Is   et-
pri*seed by the Ainwtesa Socialist,
the new official organ of oxtr Soclnllst
Party:
nf...    -* --      . ' '•'
.■. ....  , 4 . *  .      .^...r.ttr.'-*...    .4*   ,ttii99ttwili,9.9im
\tb* •paittftfit!' yititiTMrtipnxt I'.u.umu-U.i.
of wbolossle murder as Its only boj*
ef eboclritg. crashlag aad stamp-foe
OM tbo tottlttally growfag Mi In*
eraaabtgtr     formtdobte      rtfttltlflft
rt,   .
-...<•■■
If tide were trwa, tbo woftUon—
to the abayo et e general strlko—
otgti 10 eo oeemrM even oenre iae
Mtl ttfffee wat ndromttd br .litttr**
right •# te bio taoaaetetUtn at tbo
OOfbretei et tb* war "Ant It bit it no
-neal mwrnJuf, alnos be oggtaJnei a
few «sys beta* bis Aestb tbat   be
til teaweat to N. ioorem. Mho
j|_     ■n^^g^mmm^^^    A_L^    tm_____^___.     ^miM-a   imh      tkmm
IV  mmmrWWW   *mm   FrlWPHf   WIJfRPflt   fTir
<^^yyQ|tiA ■y-AaBgJ^fci|yy^fc JL^ m^^^^^^^ mmM
^^■^^^^^^^^■.^^^ w ^ww^^w^^emo^^^me • mm ^tmtetwmmtmtf   we*^i^^t
Trnnen.  ITU (surest U reform* «*•
jul   L^«|   Alhftf    k^^   j^^ufUA   t___t   mt^^^^^/^!
te death tbat be
"flenrla Is shaven of hop* in sooth
tm Bnropt, Tbo liberties wot by iu
people match Un emel oppression of
the dual monarchy of Auwro-llungary
ss tbe freedom achieved by tho United
mut* tbsllsogoa midmowend Kneels,
"Tlie Wmtk Wte-rm etatattt -i*t a atttttt
Ulsfie repabfic. TU* fforvtana We in
tats dream ead strive to make tbe
dream real, fltek eeemm weald mtaa
ibe «ratbag* of Europe's uoaeWitf
threats aad tbo scrapping of its ty-
itirt** fnums"
Tbe goeislfst organ thaws tbat tb*
whole lateraatletal asoreeseat tgfto*
it the lagfUtMey of tb* flervbu aspi-
isiioas:
Xeorty two ywew ago at tb* litre-
erdlaary fatefwatJonal BorisIM Paste
< oftgr-f-M «t«*0 at Manet, dwiuortand.
eertnt tbo Balkan war. the Moody
fiaf*r* of aail-btmatlty
These tacts sgein prove tbat tbe pro-
ires* of th* world I* laev)tab>. Out
worn systems entbraa* stiipldii,*.. And
%^tt^d*Kdlkadbatk,
■^awet^fc^a^s^M* *^*^**^w^>^'#^^>^wMV*,^v,V>^v,^^'*^%^^W>»^^^^^\^^^**
stupidity, *h«m vested with rt'Kponsl-,
biilty, leads to suicide. ,
Prebabie Iteaolta ef the 'War      (
Rverybodr prftehwries Tfw» tutor* '■
Is more itterentlna tbst tbo past. Ao'
on ebatt ansae no tit■*•*•. Tb* wor ■
•111 resalt in territorial alterations,)
ll « n-mitaiilmtiti ut the balaaco of j
powor. and in profound soolal trsns-i
forasatkmft.
Tbo territorial n-sdMstments win!
be mnde. of tomtt*, at ibo *tp*ea* td \
both Germany   and Austria.    Bosnia
and Hertegovina win  either  go  to
•orvta or b* erected iste a topertto
Hslkaa kfaf-dom.   A million or aaeto
R\itnatiUa* U T,•*..*.«.. »...* mVA    be
emtttd wttb tbetr tatloasi elate.    If
; TtiUtMl iaa mtxumiff **ift<-i into sn mm*
jtotttaoes state. Frmne* sod Etglaad
] wfB permit tbo ttwt»*S*s   of   «*Ikta j
tm tuwAtm.mtitttawtttmkm*'\mA meet** Pou»d. « t«*»a«» ai-
IS^ZrZZZZLrmZZrilT^tZ tte*iAmlaa will go to Prance.       f
tio *M Imtsar* of powor" witbf
Ul* utoto out****** «m «*•* »*** ***
tbe time todmu tm tbe other, ««t
now rotfoir*. it 1n4*-**l tke Inntttotion
etniWtes at aii a* moifmitmtwt ft*
eottanmtee wtn l«f«*d open tb* at-
tit«4» of ttrnets    IT th* <*sst
the WALDORF
Mrs. S. Jetminga, Prop.
L. A. Mitts, Manager
EsCCHCAi   Cii'.iU.i.       Amt»ic*U Mid
European Plan — Electric Light —
Hot le Cold Water-Sample Rooms
Phones- Special Rates by the month
Imp-Ms Hsi Imr torn
Vk.uillpnrm
AMMrtUB His Rstts
tSAQf-trftiy
l*WVW»--'»M»*-W**-»l*/S.*VS*--***-%i'S*>V»<VV%^
%m ~xs* xm^^^ ^---j*-*^^^™ mmetm hi *^k ^^^s^m
' '*S^3mSisnLjn>MiK'
Fornle, S. C
TNI
Bellevue Hotel
OOMMIROIAL   HOUSI
Ateommomtteo tn fke Pttttt—
UH^Oot* — Svory   CawveiNewet.il
tseeltent Celelo*.
SVlTAttt POH LAOI8S ANO OfMTltMIN
tl* A* OAULAM, Prop.
UlLIVUI, Alta. m
wemmsmmmmKmzmmmmmmmm
m
'':>.* %4-Wi-*-
US™
ll*   9IV.*•*, m' ..WWtf
■■■■■>-oF" *-■■
■op.. ijt-fi; i aw^sffyTT^wygs?^^
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE,
,B. 0.,. SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
is
I
II
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium, Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
THE PARADOX AND THE PARALLEL
On another page Avill be found a splendidly written article by Frank Bohu, captioned "The European Explosion."
Tiie reader should read and digest tliis article
thoroughly, after which he 'may, should he feel so
disposed, venture to read this screed.
ln his article Mr. Bohu points out that the structure of German society today furnishes the greatest paradox in the history of the world. (A "paradox," briefly described, may be called an absurd
fact; a '•parallel," anything equal or resembling
another in aJl essential particulars.) European civilization, it is claimed, has developed along contain set
lines—through a series of class struggles. German civilization, or development, has not adopted
such method of procedure, hence the paradox.
The author gives his reasons, ample and logical,
for this statement, but we are not so much concerned on this continent with the development of Germany as Ave are witli our affairs. And when he say
"our own affairs," we eannot afford to take cognizance of imaginary international lines, for the
welfare and trade of Canada and the States are
so intermingled that depression or prosperity in
one couutry immediately affects the other. We
have no need to go farther than our own town to
prove this. If. however, Germany has provided t'he
"paradox," there is not the slightest doubt that
America has provided the "parallel."
Commenting upou the revolution in 18-18, the
author says: ""When the Austrian and Prussian
governments beat them down, they emigrated to
America—two aud half million strong during the
ten years. They left Germany stripped of the revolutionary class which would have given her a political democracy and an orderly evolution of her
whole social and cultured life."
In place of "an orderly evolution of her whole
able. Her people were intoxicated with the spirit
of militarism aiid this was the result of a "paradox-
ieal development of society"—an unreal development, call it' what you like. If the war at present
raging was unavoidable, how long does America
hope ta stave off the Armageddon that threatens
her from the hordes of unemployed?
Half a million unemployed in Xew York, and the
winter not there; necessities climbing higher and
higher, but the crops greater than ever; immigrants
arriving at the rate of tens of thousands per
month, in spite of the war (and what will it be
after?). How long shall we be free this side from
the roar' of strife? If the development of Germany
has been unnatural, in the name of sanity Avhat
has the' development of American society been?
Germany may provide a "paradox." but America
has provided more than a "parallel."' How long,
Mr. Reader, before this neutral loving continent
will be engaged in killing off her surplus workers
or ihe workers killing off tlie exploiters?
THE "PHYSICAL LUBRICANT"
social aud cultured life," the Prussian government
offered an evolution by means of a military despotism.
The student of history, especially labor history,
on this continent, does uot need a magnifying glass
to observe the parallel. On this continent every
■labor struggle has been marked with such tactics,
but instead of a military despotism, it hns been a
' * capitalist despotism,'' or a " trust rule."
From'Virginia to Washington, slowly but surely,
capital has ousted the native English-speaking laborer on the American side of the line; from Nova
Scotia to Vancouver Island the same thing has happened this side, In place of these native sons we
see employed the worker from southern Europe
and the Orient,  But that is not the finish.
The very men brought from Europe to oust the
English-speaking worker, today finds himself in
exactly the same position that the native and English-speaking worker found himself in sonic ten or
fifteen yenrs ago. And it is possible thnt his po-
sition may be worse.
One of len hours thn apologist exclaim what excellent citizens the Slav or the Swede makes. And
Ihey will iimke. so long us capital has any use for
them, but then thoy start to kick, wlicn thoy find
conditions such that they ennnot endure; then
they, too, will have, to follow the native son. As
witnww the Colorado strike, where many of Hte men
who arc today fighting for nit existence were
brought in some t*»» or fifteen years ago to replace
the English-speaking miners.
In fterniHny the world Iiiih been Iron Iim) to civilization by means of n military despotism, on this
continent wo linv»> been treated to eiviliyntion l»y
means of tiipitalism and triitification.
Although the German method mny have liivn par-
ndoxieal. no tint- who takes the trouble to Htudy tli*
fuel* wiil (i licit imi thn method*. In building up hsr
iiitiiy and navy, -Ueriiuiiiy found room for her surplus labor, while the method and discipline of militarism subdued every effort at rebellion, -Knelt,
however, haa not been the ease this side. Driven
from Stat* l*» Stale, (lie native mm has at last been
compelled to join the rnnki of those ndgntlory
workers nnd job deckers wlio infest the wliftle xx't'nl-
ern coast.
■flemiflii inslitnristii (-rented a tritfiintb' fighting
army; Aiiieru'wi ritpitnli.Mii bus created n tfignuti**
vnn-mpluyi-d unity.
Tlu     .,««..ill,*l    v,*m*i:**l     ,, *.i *•/.    bnvr. \ft.,*t   .%*',,•    **•-,
« * \\i>   "y.-y.fV .'■''* tlr    -'A,
Wliat itiht'V hihtmiui-: hnv* ue in hkiury -of * uu-
!j.»5I   "'.TJjfv'rtSlJg   TWlti'tV*  ■}■-■*•   fight   its  Wl)  Jh'iiijt-lr *
Kveii the chaUnl *lav« period dae* not |irovide a
i,.,ii<,ll, l   f ,9   .ih.li   ft*liit'itf»*ln*..>,*i-   > *t      *tni>li    *'i    ,•"*■*>
ilition in iu«t jmwtible wnlrr tx military i|i-»|Mi!i*tii.
it in only under a tfenerous and benevolent capital,
tut nyirtetii that it in poaaiMe. Such n policy t<. the
(■Jrrinmi iintM.ii would have bet-ri siiit-idati herr it
Several correspondents have taken up to task for
not replying to a correspondent writing in the
Western Clai'ion under the initials of "R. "W." In
defense we would say that there are criticisms that
do not require answering, the critic invariably sup-
plys, unconsciously, the reason why. True, there
are occasions when a critic may have a real grievance, but a poor grasp of composition may prevent
him explaining his case fluently. One invariably
recognizes the ruggedness and candor of such an
individual and his very weakness becomes his
strength. Such, however, cannot be said of "R.
AV.." We do not intend to make any more more a
cursory review of the letter.. and after that the
reader can judge for himself. Like all new-born
critics he cannot avoid the autobiographical portion ; he is never content until he has told us what
tremendous sacrifices he has made, although in this
instance it might hnve been better had he cut this
little egotism out.
Says "R. W.": "Of the last five years of iny
life, three have been spent in struggles for recognition of the U. M. W. of A.; one year in Nova
Scotia and two years in the present strike. In both
cases the T\ M. W. of A. provided m'e with the
physical lubricant, while the S. P. of C. provided
me with the mental." If we read correctly, during
the last five years the writer has for three years
been receiving support from the TJ. M. W. of A.; to
he brutally candid, he has been existing off the
funds of the International Union for three years
out of the five that he mentions. During this
periodlieHminieen_suppl!e"d~ wi t¥~mTn£aTlub~rTca7
tion by the S. P. C. Now, the Island strike is ended,
and about five weeks before the end the International Union was compelled to withdraw its support. This is rather significant and the reader
'might stop and do a little thinking. How much of
the "mental lubrication" would "R. W." have
absorbed had the "physical lubricant" not been
forthcoming? How much had he absorbed heretofore ? No sensible individual cares what his religious beliefs may be, whether he be an Orangeman.
ii Catholic or a Jew. "R. W.'s" religion does not
seem to have helped Jtim in catching anything easy,
but, strange, in the case of J. P. White it (so he
claims) has been most ef feet ive. To say the least,
there must be ur'nluuates. even among Catholics.
But the introduction of religion .may be regarded
as an effort on tbe part of "R. W." to prove the
sincerity of his conversion, nothing more.
The remarks bf the writer about the salaries of
the International Officers may be regarded as
weightily ns his remarks about .T. V, White's religion; no one ever thought it necessary to explain
why the fox said "the grapes are sour."
The laat paragraph of "11. W.'s" correspondence is the most significant; "And now, you gods
and would-bcs, I have stood aside and allowed you
to fliin-flnm and hoodwink the Island miners with
your sentimental bunk and bourgeois© economics
for thc last two years; I have mit and listened
to your cynicisms of the 'dreamers' who never offered your cause any assistance, but rendered you
their aid. And it is now that you have given up the
ghost of winning thia strike that I intend to reveal
certain facts pertaining to trade unionism in general and the I*. M. W. of A. in particular. These
facts I have kept sacred that your organisation
might he given an opportunity to establish itself,
but you have failed!". In the first part of hia
letter the writer makes the statement that he haa
had experience in two strikes, Nova Scotia and
Vancouver Island, and he states further on "in
both cases the men were sold."
It is hard to reconcile the fact Hint a "elans eon-
scions" slave can "stand aside" nnd permit hia fellow worker* to be "sold" again and lever protein.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ ♦
♦ BELLEVUE NOTES ♦
,        (CouUmied from Paste Five)
Jack Barwick and Harry Fisher
have gone out to the Xorth Fork for
a short vacation.
Found—At Crow's Nest, ou Labor
Day, a pair of eye-glasses. Anyone
proving ownership can have same by
applying to Air. Jos. Stevenson of
Bellevue.
Lost, Strayed or Stolen—A ceven-
pound bull trout, from the South
Fork, belonging to Charlie Burrows.
Anyone holding some after this date
will be prosecuted.   Look out, Bob.
The stork was seen hovering
around James street on Friday last,
and upon investigation was found to
have left a bouncing baby at the
home of Mike Padell.
;Mr. Thos. Stevenson, last years'
mining class teacher, wishes to inform the public of Bellevue and vicinity that he will in the near 'uture
be opening his classes for students.
Watch this column for particulars.
A. Mr. Reed will occupy the pulpit
of the Methodist church next Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. \V. Scott will entertain
che members of the Methodist choir
Wednesday evening.
iMr Tom Hynaston sptnt the weekend  at Burmis.
■Mr. T. M. Barnett and Mrs. J. Naylor
were Blairmore visitors on -Monday
evening.
One of the Alberta mine rescue
cars is stationed in Bellevue, where
training operations are in full swing.
■We are reliably informed that this
town will be lighted by electricity toy
the time winter proper arrives, which
will be an inestimable blessing to the
inhabitants.
Owing to loss of orders for the
time being, work will be somewhat
slack. It is anticipated that one
shift wil be laid off entirely. A number of places were stopped this morning.   Ledger readers take notice.
Born to the wife of Mr. Barlass, C.
P. R. assayer, a five-pound daughter.
COALHURST NOTES
■The time -worked was two days, 'die
four days last week, with about the
same prospects this week. Quite a
number of men on company work are
getting in full time, preparing for the
able to abuse and ridicule tbem in a
foreign language for the benefit of
the foreign-speaking members. That
is the real reason why this band -was
started; the fact that we are citizens
of a British colony and should have
eijual rights with foreign-speaking
people, is another reason why we
intend to fight this matter to a finish.
The city will not have a foreign-
speaking police force; the fire chief
will not have a foreign-speaking member on his staff (in spite of the fact
that he has been very eloquent
in championing the Italian band);
but the council does want a-foreign-
speaking band, and does not want an
English-speaking band.
One is tempted to inquire whether
the music of this town, like its vice,
ls not regarded by a certain individual as his own particular perquisite,
and at the next city council election
we may possibly 'be favored again
with the presence of an individual
on the platform who has done more
to demoralize this city than any dozen
men put together. It is certainly a
most humiliating sight for English-
speaking citizens to know that their
recreation as well as their morals are
practically ln the hand a and at the
mercy of a foreign-speaking Individual.
To return to the question of the
band grant. McBean, an employe of
Rlzzutto, was the mover of the motion that the Italian nnnd be given
$500 and $100 to the English-speaking
band, McBean aad lis employer
were antagonistic to the latter band
when they first made application to
the council for a grant. Sam Graham
and the mayor, who have an almost
pathetic regard for Ruzzltto, shuffled
and objected to the grant being divided. Poor, old Roblchaud, who
would naturally go with the majority,
wobbled at first, but finally he took
his lead for Gates and Graham and
became a "whole-hogger" for the
Italian band. Thus a majority was secured, first, by economic pressure, and
secondly by Ignorance, for it !s
doubtful if one of the councillors
can read enough to understand a
mciicn if it was put in front of him,
Two councillors tried to do the
right thing—that is, give both bands a
square deal. They repeatedly stated
their opinions and endeavored to
show that the presence of two bands
was not detrimental to the town, but
rather a blessing. 'Such broad-mindedness was intolerable to the clique.
The petition presented to the coun
'For good, dry firewood*, phone 190,
or write Evans, Cedar Valley.        24*
Dr. Simmons, L. D. S., D. D. S., dentist, Bank of Hamilton Building, opposite Trites-Wood Co. Vancouver
prices.
The Ladies' Aid of the 'Baptist
church will hold a sale of -plain sewing
and home cooking in the church on
Saturday, September 19th, from"™2
p. m. 242
1
pany are going to close down the mine
and work the rock dump instead.
iMr. Norman Pitcher, general manager of the company is in Coalhurst
this week.
John Byron started to work here
agalu on Monday. He has lately heen
employed at St. Alberts as shotlighter.
v Sam Jones, district mine Inspector,
was In Coalhurst on business two
days of last week.
^Us-not--trae-Uiat-th<^«©m4-eii-^TO^
CORRESPONDENCE
(Continued from Vko* One)
and district when passing through the
depot, unless they received $15. I
beg t'o state that there Is absolutely
no truth in this rumor, whatever, as
the band was perfectly willing to turn
out and play and would have done so
had It not been that the majority of
the bandmen were -working. I remain
yours, respectfully,
T. UORROOKS,
Secretary Michel  Band.
"NO
ENGLISH-SPEAKING PERSON
NEED APPLY"
To the Bditor of the District Udger:
Dear Sir:—It has often been declared by detractors of Canada that
the policy throughout tlie west towards English-speaking people was
one of "So English-speaking person
need apply." While there are many
loath to accept tbls, there can scarce
be any doubt, after thn aeMon of our
great and noble council, that tbere
la a certain amount of truth In thtt
oft-repeated statement. The city
council wnn called upon to deal out
justice to two bands: one was a band
composed of English-speaking people,
who wished to he under the guidance
of an English instructor, whose directions they could understand; the
other was composed of Italian-speaking people, eome Hrltlih cltlxens,
many not. Let Is be distinctly understood that we are not out to abuse
the Italian band, and so far as the
members of that bend are concerned,
Sold" in Vi.v* Hrnti* nn.l ••milil" nn Vaneouver *P h*v* *b,0,B,«,y no V*ml »»•
ft>KI   in Mivn *.«tiit nn<i   «n«i   nn vniieoim r lh(i^ Md tf ^ d|y ^ fl| ^ ^
tliciti a grant we do not object, all
lulnml. The first wile ,xm not "Iwwnn" ennnttli,
tail )n< Niotiii tinith for 4wo vciir* nntl w>iIi4mh1 tin
Mtme pr-tivvtM tit a acvomil muir! "The tuttf-in* ww
th
'mnl   tbr
•nWei /..>l
i\XA tlv-
art' iVr-feMf.l
we ask for li the same consideration
for Kft*H*h-»p*-i-*lr-,n people. Our
■fMwtl-nn f« th*» ftnllmi t**i*il l* th*
I bandmaster, and |n«t as the British j lleh-speakln* band.
dred ratepayers and people who can
claim a vote, but lt was disregarded
by a certain-legal gentleman. This
individual told the council that a petition was so much bunk, that they
need pay not attention to same, and
that it was their duty to support the
Italian band.   Why?
The majority of the council did
what they were told, but they also
did what they Intended to do when
the .matter was first mentioned
In the council meeting. Impartiality and falrnees Is the veriest nonsense to these Individuals and they
were at no pains to conceal their Intentions when discussing the matter.
The "gag" about the Italian hand performing certain services for nothing
was deliberately engineeded between
certain officials of the Athletic Association and the city council, The
English-speaking band refused to he a
party to such methods of securing the
grant. The Athletic Association wero
not admitting people to the ground*
tree and had no right to expect free
services from the bands. There is
not the slightest doubt In the mind*
of the leading tradesmen and citizens
of this town that the treatment
handed to the Fernle-Coal Creek Excelsior band is nothing more ihan the
result of mean, despicable tactics bn
the part of certain members ot the
council, who .from the very first,
showed a bia* and narrow-mindedness
that  was  positively disgusting,
The KnglUh-sp#alttng band has accepted the flOO from the council and
passed It on to the hospital. They
have no desire to be Insulted, although greatly ln need of funds, and
will rely upon the generosity of a public that has shown more consideration
and fairness than certain merahors of.
the council, to assist them at the benefit match on Saturday nest, September 18th.
There will be an election shortly
and the people of this town will have
an opportunity to voice a protest
against the action of the council. Until tben, we can afford to wait, but
to fxptct fairness and conalderatlon
from the majority who voted for the
one-sided motion in like expecting d
terrier with tallow leg* to catch an
wal»e*tQt vm In bade*.
Yours tnilv, on bebnlt ot tb* Wn*-
tr»» ftimply * ijn«tti«n |»u*liinir tin- nntiw mm fur-
thet Mii.l for!Imt »t-»l; foivinjf liiiu lo find « io«w   wilh *'|>h.v»i*r«l liiliriiiii.l," but tt'llMi ll»«» r*'******™
r.-tftfjtvijj f't* ,i>t\,-} ,if(v!  f.-ti.-A't. I*.  ji.i,%v**,<f-vf!  ||>ifrf •■■!{'
tin) fr«* r*m4y to«itwt him*. Aim! In* went l'nmi Stuff
it* Stalf, ner****** j»r*j*»ir!«- -*<-*<) .!<>*».-rl; n<»v»-r Iwinjr
bIIowc*! to rtwtsin in onr |»lfi'*f fur any hn^th of
ttm*. Imt permed by bi« r^l^ntlftt ^tpM**»r    He
tr,l*i   mr<.-V.*   fn  th*  Pjn-'fi,-   nntl frvtm   fV  f*,l."fri>'
ptisbMl berk. He lwvi*l«l to Ui<» i«.ln»iiiiil t-mrfh.
Itnf km\ tlrivMi li««*lc fr»»i» thi»n-.
Tnwl-tjr CterwMHijr I* rwr*ft-»l in Itlotnlit-ti wnr of
modern firo«» ind w# an* told tlmi it ore* una void-
% 1im» Ve v.'nM- mil'A th<-- *,\r<' t\t'1t'i\1t't\   :\]\i\
,.        ,       .,      ...      . ,     "      .   ,.      ,. j nation today Is registering a vlwfowt
tlku tlio w«l* of \m mhUiim ui<liK»«iJoi< ' ^ ,„rot«,t agalwt the Ki|lserian nwtltodi
jiiunv-iI f-.»jih; h-t" bmvnwH Ihr attmtr of ass o-ryt.wi- wj u^ German Emperor, and l» deter-
juition whom? miHti'iimm- In- hun coiumnittl for tliiv*! mined to free Europe from his rule, ao
mn   ,,f tii-,. i-,-*9,e*t tint  In. ti*>.' hn^rt in tli.' mtmitrv '*(**> i* *b*   Kne!l«h.»twnVlTir tmtid  of
il. W..M M* m»ny niiotli«-r aulrtlrtonrnplii*!. ,.„„|pp™'« ^K'rmlncd that 'Pkoevar dl-
,   .,   ,   „    «,   .,       ..    „„,:     .I    •   ,       rwts them, It shall be an Bngltsh-
*t,M.nlythefaulli«fothor^ w,tJj   whow   ,ongu0
to t!i<» imwHyof nw own inaction.   H«\ '»«•   «l»>t>! thej are familiar and who will not be
f-onacio'iiN alavf," 1ln» "-wap-Ml ratholi**," in con-[«----■-•*-*—-•*■-***! -u _i,j_.lj ...j. sxi
t.nt to lw ffoo.l no lonir tm hia atomaclt i» »tippli.-,| j     WHY WFiK LUNGS ^
RATBPAYBR AND 11ANIWMAX.
GlassifltdAds.- G«nf a Word!
TOR WBXT—Two furnished rooms!
Apply Box 324, or lit McPherson
avenue. 246
M
1l-.fl.h-r. v..i, mil „..t,t 1hftt it u tt.it tnAA , v i- J ^ iU,„ t,M ^^ rvrry ,ttty m lh-
K Uu* Ktrikii haa gone, ami
']t*Hy«i<'ji! l«l»ri«*ant," lliat the ''Saviour" apj-HMtr*;)
TOR BENT*~-Two room (unfurnished).
Apply. W. Minton. 8? Mason avenue.
Fffrnfu Annus 2t0
The toll ot tnbtrmbmU It dalmht*  WRNWHIW RCKlM«-To tal* wim-
hope of winning th<» »lrik« haa gone, ami with il thej £"""! ^^S* Uwreeimtheir prim
1 'wmlition until tlwrcritM |»rio>l arrtvt*.
ihtTuwk, worry, wntknrm after wick'
it h not until yoxtnr* hoet thai ke h ,Um,.\nrtl™*^*£^^
lo «H«^li»v<*> th* t*»rfMy m yonr nrganiyatton nnd it*' ifKft** wnmmptim.
nffiifr*    Vnnlv n fnrvfv ••<tffrfnrrr"' !    To ,ctwrit aenln*! ennw-mptlftn, llnnt.
Wr iio not intern! to oemtpy *p*** Hy ^printing
"U. W.V |(.f!i»r. hnl h* hit* promim-il to (?«• tn-.r-c
ili«rlo*iiitr through lb*- Weat-prit tlarion. For our
part, tho find let tor in oiiotifh.
fortabii! hom<»; «v*ry modern con-
ventenee.   Phone No.  %%-,  or eall
bow** Wi ii*»tt'}jiitd avenoe.      Ut
mtelnt*lfmtf^exek*,ittnit'*Ktrm1tPim nfter
tmah tmtntta* Its rich mwllcinal ptmtikb*
«t'.-n'. »lr«n;«tl»en* the t»injt», p«ts vluor In
Ui.- M«»l.uiul ii;>buiM* •trmiitb torrtdtt
tml-trunbtd*. NtHtol-Imulkioti 1*1^11*^^
»>r <!KiU-tA;:!'l*.T.   Rt-(ut« *m4Mtitalct.
M>BT-«Beiw«'n   P%n»ie   depot  and
Klug-* llw i■:, ou Monday erimluf, a
pattern), and gold chain; case
cbaaed. Finder will be rewarded If
tie returns <«» lo this office or to
Kinf't Hotel, F*mtl#. 241
notice:
Bank of Montreal
HOSMER,   -   B.C.
The Bank of Montreal, Hosmer, announce
that they will be closing their branch at that
point on October 1st, 1914.
August 24th.        N. F. Kendall, Mgr.
Fire Sale!
Goes merrily on and will be continued until goods are all sold.
Take advantage of the big reductions.
A   SPLENDID   DISPLAY
FOR   PAY-DAY
Note: The sale and discounts apply only
to goods in stock at time of/ire and not to
new goods bought since
A. W. BLEASDELL'S
DRUG STORE FERNIE
—Gran(i=U4tionHotel—
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater to the workingman's trade
G. A. CLAIR :-: Proprietor
33123.
HERE IS A SQUARE DEAL
and peaceful security aa .well.
With a polloy In our oM Une
company, you can go off on your
vacation or visit tbe «nd« of Van
eer-Ui and you know you're secure.  The best ln
FIRE IN8URINCE
la always cheapest, awl especially ao when lt -doeea't coat
higher. Don't detay about that
renewal or about that extra insurance you want but come right
In tut once aud have it attended
to..'
M# Aa KASTNER
SOLE AQINT FOR FERNIE
ALBX BECK BLOCK, It FERNIE, B. C.
'
THE FRAQRANCE
OF FINE TOBACCO
Is present In every one of our
cigars. And for flavor and
smoothness they have no superior at any price Try a box
both for your own enjoyment
and for that of your friends.
Every cigar In the box will be
a real Joy smoke.
W.A. Ingram, Fernie
OUR COFFEE  II OOOD
ISIS THEATRE
Fernie's Leading Picture Theatre
tmmmmtmmwmwmmttmtmmtmmtttmitmtmmtmmm
Ev«ry Friday
LUCILLE LOVE,
tub arm. t»r mtstbrt
Friday  September,   18th Series  No.  Five
Saturday Matinee and Evening
Featuring the famwff t. Warren Kerrigan, ooppertm by ne all-star
in
The Bolted Door
A 3 Reel Drama
Watch for the big Feature next Wedneiday and
Thunday.   "ISIS" ALWAYS BEST ™ Ji-S" %XX "A XX- 'fATf^frti :AX^:A»x^^W(\. -'•-
'«■;, yifi^,i f**s
/«
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
PAGE FIVE
News   of The  District
COAL CREEK NOTES
During the process of dismantling
one of the boxcar loaders up here on
Saturday last, John Valne received injuries 'which necessitated his removal
uable prizes being given for billiards,
pool, seven-up, dominoes, quoits and
snaps, etc.
Don't forget   the    Rugby   football
Preparation for combating the "cold
king" are being made at the schools
up here. Heaters of tbe "Blazes"
type are being installed in each room.
IThe action of the Femie-Coal Creek
Excelsior band re tbe $100 donated
by the city council, was the subject
of conversation during the week-end
up here. The action of the committee
was approved by a large majority of
the residents.
The tickets for the benefit concert
in aid of Mrs. Harris, which will be
Tield on Wednesday next in the Club
Hall are now on sale. A capital program has been arranged.
The -Coal Creek members of the
"Vets" journeyed to Fernie to join
their comrades in the church parade
on Sunday evening last.
Dr. Dan Oliver desires Uo thank tbe
many friends for the expressions of
sympathy extended to him during his
recent sad bereavement.
to Fernie hospital, where, we learn, he game on Saturday  (pay-day),  which
is progressing favorably. - will 'be held on    the    old    football
iTony Brotti was .removed to Fernie hospital on Tuesday afternoon,
suffering from a badly lacerated
hand, sustained -while lifting a mine
car on the track in No. 1 Bast mine.
Johnny Miller, company man employed in No. 2 Bast mine, on Tuesday evening received injuries to bis
ribs, which necessitated removal to
his home on Riverside avenue.
Sir. and Mrs. Adam Watston desire
to (hank the residents and friends for
the many expressions of -sympathy extended to them during their recent sad
bereavement, also General (Manager
Wilson for train placed at their disposal. We regret the omission of the
foregoing in tbe notes of last week,
through an oversight..
The board of management of the
Goal Creek Club are running a series
of tournaments for the members, val-
K The, Miners' Union Were  Dissolved
How Would The Individual
Miner Stand?
THINK ABOUT IT!
There is a CO-OPERATIVE STOKE
AT COLEMAN operated for the benefit of the working miner.   Also think
-Abeiit-^hat^ind^siipportTt^s^oTrtTr
yonr Union.
grounds at Fernie; kick-off at 5
'clock. iTeams meet at King's Hotel
at 4:15. Secure your tickets in advance.
A large tree becoming dislodged
from the hillside above No. 1 East,
rolled down and struck the air line
for No. 1 East mine, putting it out of
commission. Fortunately it happened
on an idle morning, and the damage
was remedied before the afternoon
shift.
One of our local gun artists, while
out on slaughter bent, was proceeding
down the government road and saw
what he thought to be tracks of some
ferocious animal infesting these
parts and thinking discretion the
better part of valor, beat a haaty retreat back to civilization and. reported
his fears to the boys. On investigation, the animal in question proved to
be a stray dog.
We would advice all local Moose
to put in an appearance ait the next
meeting, at K. P. Hall, on Monday
next, 8 p. m. Important business will
be transacted.
Coal Creek Methodist Church
Sunday, September 20th: 2:30 p. m.,
Sunday school and Bible class; 7:30
p. m., the choir will give a song service, solos, etc.; Friday at 7 o'clock
sharp, choir practice.
Owing to some misunderstanding,
our representatives in the advertised
inter-provinoial football game which
was held in Coleman Saturday last, returned home by the next train.
The .gold medals won by the Coal
Creek Beavers, for prowess on the
lacrosse field, are now on view at
the store of Liphardt, the jeweler.
The Coal Creek Club was closed
Wednesday and Thursday, to undergo
renovation.
serious offense. The preliminary
trial was held on Tuesday and he was
committed for trial    in    Lethbridge.
A. return match between ■ the Canada West and the Firemen resulted in
another win for tlw miters, by one
to nil.
The hard times seem to be affecting
the booze trade, as George Redel, who
has been dispensing drinks at tbe
Taber Hotel for tbe last eighteen
mtonths has been laid off until business pick up.
Everybody is eating chicken these
days, as with wheat at 2 ceats per
pound, it is cheaper, to eat chicken
than to let them eat wheat.
LETHBRIDGE NOTES
IT WILL HELP SOME
Western Can. Co-Operative
TflADINO OO. LIMITED >      OlKSH
COLEMAN ALBERTA
MICHEL NOTES
INVICTUS
The Bett Good Shot
If you want tho latest stylos
and tho most serviceable foot*
wear—buy
THE INVICTUS
We sell the famous
Penetang Shoepacks
Came in and Nt tha
FROST KINO COAT
It Is made 1mm M ounoe All wool Mackinaw, epeeiaily fsitsd for
tht parpen,
The eaat measures full Sf Inches long, and all tha IIHia tomtom have feat n atudlad In ovary datalt.
Comfortable collar, aaay trmbeltt, large, rtnnxy atoms and In
addition, haa a fanulna amartnaaa tliat will |lvt pftatnre ta tha
waarar. Tha colors ara: frown and Sleek j Orajr and Hack; Qraln
and mack.   Pries 110.00 tttb.
&ADIVS COATS
Up-to-the-minute atytat In Fall Ooati far Ladles, Mlaaaa and Children*.
Ganta and aaa thtm; you'll ha d*M|htad with tha ahawinf.
mh UlVfc AWAY A ORIIHIt A STAND ON
CtGTQ&St-H, Sttt f *f#
The vary next dollnr tm aaand her* may ha tha Iwaky one.  Try it
W. L. OUIMETTE-
Coleman        -        Alberta
■8
—G-sorgeHNaylorran-olu^me-^Mtcirei-
Ite, is back here among his friends.
The men who worked up tbe Elk
Valley for the Grain Belt prospect
outfit, are down ln Michel, having
been fetched in owing to the war
troubles and the tightness of money.
Bill and James Yates dropped Into
Michel last week-end to join brother
Tom on a hunting trip.
Mrs. Norman Henderson and family
aro leaving Michel to join Mr, Henderson at Red Deed, Edmonton.
The Saaandra Lodge of Rebekahs
are giving a social dance ou (Monday
next In Cretan's Hall, at 9 p. m,
Mr. Tom Williams, mine inspector,
was down here no Thursday, making
hia usual Inspection ot tbe mlnea .
Two accidents occurred In No. 3
East mine on Thursday last, I. Ootto,
Italian, working on the afternoon shift,
met with an accident by coal falling
from the face and breaking his leg,
below the knee. Frank Dickie wad
Injured by a car running over a
block and crushing bla foot and ankle.
Both tnen are progressing aa favorably
as possible.
Mr. T. Graham, chief inspector ot
mlnea, and Mr. Tom Williams, inspec-
tor, were here on Tuesday on business
at tba mines.
Thofuneral of lgnus Hunger took
place on Tueaday. the burial aervlcea
were conducted by the Rev. F. Mala-
sentr and the remalna Interred In tbe
Michtl cemtttry.
About twtnty mtn have put in thelf
names at the coal company office for
Joining the regiment the government
is asking for and are being put
through various drills. Michel prairie
la tht training ground.
Tht mlnea have only worked ont
day since tht note* ware sent in last
week, and not ctrtaJn of Parting
again this week.
Mr. and Mra. Oeorgo Hudeon board-
td the passenger -Saturday nwrnlng,
enroute for England, for a trip to
their native home.
Mr. William Touhey baa taken up
the position of nlfhtwatehman va-
vated by (Jeorge Hudson.
A sad accident occurred to Intue
Hunger on Bewick's ranch. JOk Valley. He wan engaged In loading up
some hay on a wagon, when a portion
af lit* loud sMwuiJv causing Hitngav
to fall on tbe point of his fork, which
ftMeumtatf the audontn. Ho aoo-
tuitouvu to ki* ini*»vtm uu *u«vi*>
last.
Tht KwlglM* ** Pyihlm gat* *
danco and wpper to numbers and
wive*. Music waa rendered hy -Malt
Miller, t. Hommntt and Uan Wad-
dlngton. Avery enjoyable evening
waa epent.
Tbe clerk of the weather seems to
hold fast to the one rule, as year after
year, about the middle of September
he sends along all kinds of moisture
and finishes up with a snow storm,
which we are having today (Tuesday)
If only the farmers of Alberta could
get a delegation to Interview him and
explain to him the fallacy of bis
policy, they might induce him to alter
things a little, by giving us September
weather in June, when it is more needed, and assure them bumper crops,
thus keeping them from depending
on the charity of their more fortunate
neighbors. It may be that a great
many people will blame them for remaining on the land, but what can tbe
poor beggars do? They know there is
no chance of a job either in town or
city ,and if they happen to wander Into a town they are taken up for
vagrancy. Truly, the way of the
transgressor is hard, and as one
who has tried farming for several
years said, the man who takes up a
homestead must have a grudge
against himself and all belonging to
him, especially if he is inexperience
to begin with.
A great number of the citizens on
the north side are wondering if the
committee of the ratepayers association have left, or do they never have
any business on the south side. When
stertirir^he^ub'wayrorviaauct.TrrwaT
said It would be finished within two
months. Now it is going on four
month and the one-half is not finished,
and not likely to be this winter. Why
not get after tbe commissioners to
force the contractor to put on men
and get it finished.
Tom Henton, who has been company weighman at No. 6 mine, has
been transferred to No. 3 mine, and
Wm. Hurst has taken his place at
No, 6. ' '- -.t
Mrs. M. Brennan of Coleman left tor
home on Monday's local, after spending a week with ber sister, Mra. T.
Whltelaw.
iMrs. J. Graham, who underwent an
operation and was sent home, bas
had a relapse aud Is not expected to
recover.
Today (Tuesday) Wm. Huddllngton,
a grlpper In No. 0 mine, was severely
crushed .between some cars and timber. His Injuries are internal. After
being treated at the rescue station
the doctor ordered bis removal to
tbe hospital.
son taking the kick made no mistake.
Prom this stage on, Alberta had most
of the game, and iMarsh taking a pot
shot at the 08. C. goal, left the goalkeeper .wondering. A good game resulted 'in a win for Alberta by a score
of 2 goals to 1.
Owing to the lack of arrangements
at headquarters, the B. C. team was
not as chosen, aiid the patronage bestowed on the game was not what it
should have been, in consideration of
the cause for which the game was
played.. I understand that a return
game is to be played at Fernie shortly
for the same noble cause. Let us hope
a larger crowd will be present on
this occasion.
Vice President Graham of District
18, was present at the regular meeting
of Local 2033 on Sunday, the 13th.
The vice president gave a short
resume of the doings in this District,
especially the Hillcrest affairs.
On Saturday morning, about 10 a.
ni., Joe Pouleskie, a timber packer
at the McGillivray mine, had the misfortune to get his right foot rather
severely bruised. A large timber falling caught him on the ankle, causing
painful injuries. Joe was assisted
home and is now progressing nicely.
•Mr. Fred and Tom Cox were passengers on Sunday night's train for
Spokane. They are doing the fair
for a week.
Out of about thirty applicants,
Chief of Police Ford retains office,
which he has held for about four
years, to the satisfaction of the ratepayers.
Mrs. ,Millward of Ste. Sault Marie,
is visiting her brother, -Mr. Joseph
Stephenson, for an indefinite time,
In Coleman. 'Mr. MUlward is serving
his country in France 'at the present
time.
Mr. Russell Ferguson Is appointed
to take the names of any ex-army
men for Immediate service at the
front.
Mrs.  William Graham,  from  .Mac-
klnson Landing, Arrow Lake, is visiting friends in Coleman.
Vice  President Graham   who   was
the Act will he aware of the bard-
ships it entails on those it was supposed it would benefit. The executive was instructed to co-operate with
the Federation officers.
Reports of Committees
The pit committee reported having
done considerable business with the
superintendent" chief of which was
the necessity of an agreement being
reached to govern the price for crosscuts tbat were being driven above the
maximum distance, owing to the
change that bad been wrought in the
method of work.
The question of the scarcity of
lockers in the washhouse brought out
the fact that there was one hundred
ordered and that they were on the
way. The question of dirt allowed to
collect in the cubicles was brought
to the superintendent's attention, and
<he promise given that he would remedy the trouble.
The comiMWee reported having followed out the Local's instructions and
ascertained that there were men per
forming carpenters' work for laborers' pay. After some discussion as
to what constituted carpenter work,
the superintendent stated that as
there was no rush of work, it was not
likely that such a condition of affairs could prevail.
The pit committee reported having
been to -Blairmore to interview the
general manager with regard to discontinuing yardage sheets, previous to
the issuing of statements. The discontinuance is to be regretted, as we
found this method very convenient.
The secretary was given a copy and
could tell at a glance just what was
short on anybody's statement who
happened to consult him. The Ren-
eral manager informed the committee
that all the data would be wrltteA on
the statement in the future.
The report being adopted, the
committee was Instructed to interview
the superintendent and ask his co-operation in getting the statements oi't
at least three days before pay-day.
That ever-green question of he'ter
provision for tools was also touched
will go into effect on October lst.
Some discussion relative - to the
union label was indulged in, and one
good brother informed those present
that Mr. James Naylor had a good
supply of overalls bearing the label.
■But the executive reported that
both Naylor and Burnett were prepared to stock union made goods, it
the union men of this camp were prepared to buy them, but that while we
persist in buying goods irrespective
of the conditions under which they
were made, or with the idea of saviug
a nickel, they have ho alternative but
to sell them. The next move is ours,
boys.
A notice of motion was given that
at our next regular meeting, to be
held on Soundly, September 27th, the
remuneration of one of our officers
will be discussed. Members kindly
note.
(Continued ou Pave Four)
appointed delegate to the Trades and
Labor jgongress jg__be  held   in  NawIiJl^^MiUaJlullB^-ithla-theJho!
of possibility that
Brunswick, left on Monday night's
passenger for the east. Mrs. Graham
is accompanying bim on his journey,
for a holiday.
Mr. Robert Home has returned   to
Coleman from Mountain Park.
NORDEOQ NOTES
an   improvement
will be made in the near future.
The committee handling the bonding of officers recommended thai the
offlco of treasurer be abolished,
with which the Local concurred. This
Toeo*, -GUARANTEED
KlPOAmerican Silk
I lUU     HOSIERY
WE WANT YOU TO KNOW
THESE HOSE
They stood the test when all
others failed. They give real
foot comfort. They have no
seams to rip. They never become loose and baggy, as the
shape is knit in, not pressed in.
They are GUARANTEED for
fineness, for style, for superiority of materia! and workmanship, absolutely stainless, and to
wear six months without holes
dr replaced by new pairs free.
OUR FREE OFFER
To every one sending us 50c
to cover shipping charges, we
will send, subject to duty, absolutely free: ,
Three pairs of our famous
men's AMERICAN SI LK
HOSE, with 'written guarantee,
any color, or
Three pairs of our Ladies'-
Hose in Black, Tan or White
colors, with  written  guarantee.
DON'T DELAY—Offer expires
wheu dealer in your locality is
—selected;—■Sffv-e—eoioi—and"
desired.
"Brae"
The Internationa] Hosiery Co.
21 Bittner Street
Dayton, Ohio, U. 8. A.
COLEMAN NOTES
I wish to Inform the readers of the
Ledger and members of the U. M. W,
of A. that the Brazeau collleles nre
full up, and no one should come In unless they have assurance of employment. The company will take on a few
men from time to time, but It Is rUity
to come as a stranger and broke.
There seems to havo been an exaggeration , regarding the sulphur In
Drcueau. It haa been reported that
some sixty men went blind from the
effects of the sulphur. It Is true that
occasionally a man loses a shift or two
on account of sore eyes, but this will
be less frequent after the new fans
get, properly going.
We are to have school accommodation* in the near future. At present
we have forty-six children of school
act. and when the company gets the
other eighteen houses finished and
haa them occupied by family men we
Should have a full house.
The Labor Day celebration could
hardly he called a success, on account
of the bad weather—and too much
beer Wh*n -uiV ■»•<• xwlilt. tlut bot»e
is the root of all evil and the ruination
of families and thp fllllna ot our J»il«
and Insane asylum*, and a cause of
poverty.
We had a death by shooting, of
which I ran gi*e no pirtleulars at
present.
Stephen T. Humble
Furniture, Hardware, China,
Stationery, etc.
OLD COUNTRY PERIODICALS
BELLEVUE
Alberta
■ELLtVUI  NOTES
mem
tmm
Ou Wednesday uigbt, tbe tftb, Mrs.
M. H. Somerville gave a lecture In
Coleman Opera Houso on the White
Slave Traffic. Mrs. Somerville ia like
the bad bay in school, she ia giving
to copying. No use trying theae
stunts nowadays. 'Most ot the lecture
was from a book by K. A. Dell.
On (Friday night, the 11th, a very
pleasant dance took place In the
Opera House, under the auspices or
the i. O. O. F. About sixty couples
tripped the light fantastic until the
woe am*' hours o' the morning, Lunch
was provided during the night by .Mrs.
K. Bacotl. All wbo were prosont expressed ihenwelvoa as highly delight-
J ed with the night's enter,alnment.
Oo Saturday, thc Ififc, football
teams representing O. C. and Albert*
me! on lb« ground of tk* t'olenkte.
P. V in a benefit match tor the widow* and orphans to tbe recent Hill-
crest explosion.
The M.
p. m., bpforo n very  fair   crowd  off
spectator*. In tho Initial etago* of; ^ th«» terms «' ***tt*mmt **+*>
.««, «,..«.*> A,,*. ,...^.»* .4mm ««**-«• •»-«■». * arri-r*d et, and **t* In otmnttno*n*-* \
u* Hi. .,' s-x. Ax *H r. AA! •■.")'■.., ja^H^ng k» ,,n ertt-tnlsed labor »oj
and bai-k *w equal u> Ib* <?«-*<* jnnai-M-tally asaist thnn Alter noiPfj
paMiatr ot Parker aad company* As j ^.Wit^i.H ^ M4 *!..<,..*.«( tkmt n* **.*»•» j
tha gamo praewidad the a C, team m^i^ Qttteer* wm* ^ a hatter po-
mitt!<Mt down and som* really ««-vwJgJII<MJ ,„ kMW ,h# „...„, **mMtl*^« ■
***** erttb the report of International Hoard
Member tit** »«A elk*-* to r»'l*
i hem, wc respectful! > recommend
that lt will be a hotter ;t-Mkod of pro-
tedute fer   the   ItMr:*-'   »o   ao»*5«t
H. 6. GOODEVE CO. Ltd.
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnish your house from cellar to garret and at bottom prlcea.  Call, write, phone or wire.   All orders gheu
prompt attention.
If you are »st(tfl«d, ttll others.   If net aattafiad. tail on.
Coleman
Alberta
Th«" r»*(nilor meeting of Loral l"l
j was held on Sunday last, with tb*
jpr#Hiid»«r)t fn th-" '•hslr, and *n ■♦•-.or
j moo* <rond In ai!-f»daac«,
!    -Torrespon.ltitte *a» ret«lvi'il nam
C. team kicked off about 5 jW-trtct n, informing ua how well iu.«
o-pemtav* lu tt*mt CUU1 mm titim *>.■
TAM*  NOTES
aides nere playing good football.
Cup tie fever was very conaplcnona
by H* absence Iloth goal keeperi
%t*r* vltlted repeatedly, hot were
very safe, and on tho will of half
lh. m.   a* waa remark- •' It <tee« not
T. W. DAVIES
Funoral Dlreotor
and    Imbalmtr
HMUfstonM Supplied and Setup
COLIMAN     Ammmmn^engmioe     ALBKRTA
rim* n*ltb*r «M* «>»M rlttlte *np*rt-t v/.wv'ib* mm*- U*n„ «',.,
oriti    on Ute reenatiitton of plar. j km mm*.
v r*,*   jMm  ma Hii *tr*rmtnT*  ■f.-f-r-T*  F->       ^   (nr-,^r  (.-u-mm-   tin"»
Two days jh-t wtob nei'mt -lo bn Ik* J *-<irr.   i'i*)'  *'•»*  ^-J' <*«'-f»l "Md j miofi was rer-aired frowt
limit for t!» mine* this eeasun  aodhv*Skfr lot Ooal t*wfc P. f » «eor«t > rresswrer rwi«.       '   <
F. M. THOMPSON GO.
"Tha Qusality Stor«"
Phone 25 Blairmore, Alta.
Just to hand 200 casts oj
PRESERVING FRUIT
uf E*ir* €hote« Quality
ImIijih IYmt«»* jwr U*% *l I<i. IYwIic* prr l**» $1.10
fVftix pt»r Ims $2.30, ('•Mikinu A|if»li** \*>r Imx *1,*dl
rt.i.it... v.
mt
1      1
**,-• kMf*   • »|»|t»*v..
I^\ k ->>»».% *1»»..»*,»
11*  ■%   •■*•*•■■'
9*trtin*f- i
**     V.V?1»
T#5*r ntwme te Imi to hnraony with j fm n c. with a well lodgwl nttrn.
iwv*»*t othor estape tn thta twopmd. \ »nn-h mm Piston no ttbnn**-.  tin the
CoM «*Mtk*r ssar hrtgitw tbtwtm mph^.tdt km-n* tw* dm-miiM v,
a HuleJww**r#f tbo m»mip*m*nt «f? .»!'«'"''• *•"'♦ ">■* "^r™1 r»r*r;r*'>
the fanada West any Xliet they will U en- "*» dmnmtwno, more Mporttlr
kit* m W0re men before the ftrsi of j r.»rk«-r. And fr«>m m* ut th<- 4«>t«*Tmiij
.S««ei»h»r« \*-1 rmktm td tk* ktmnn foroards. tsu !***,»! mhki-i,
k wrtl-imown worhlngnnm m town JMrrang trlpixnd l^rker, with th* r«»stiii  proctstlnn td th*A
has keen arrowed, chargo with e rery j ?*•«»< * P*n»lty wa* gtren. *Kd Jsck- * at «n famffit*
I
FVdcraMoB nf IaIm^, liif^rmitia it* «.f
iNr intantion to »t>»k t*> »mtoi mh
prewent Cottps-nMiwa A«e 4«s,»a •**,
u*».kW ammimm »ti   xe<f  St'-fti*  •<•«»*»*•'
tore, ahwsa the Uti** ot tte* tte* wh**Hh J
bn* reemttix  !«■'•'.*■   <,*   ''■• *>"t;r-'i
:*.  *f«ji.jf»*»   :■',*  i-f
ffflTf'*, *#  ttnyt-t,*
t**,4,   m*t*ni*>fa  t*t'-
DRY GOODS
lls*fs»rf» Irtuini! a .S»i»«l«»r t mt mt* tmr rwitif** of
Mt*ii'«, Ltiiit.^' itiisl tiiiMivn »it|) wim.I Mntiwn-h Knit.
f*fl«V* tit *nit «i?l niff-v/.i
.(imt to linnil n -.hifuiii'tit nf Stniiri«*M« jmn*
\V*«»1 VmU'tii'mrki *hiti* .iw»l «imw«'ti« »tt«l miiiifi
yttit**. .Wm a full r*tii|»'f of I ji»Ii#"« arwl t MMit n"*
V tni\*t*rw-*itT.
We pay 5 p.c. discount in cash on aH purchases
Th* Store That 8AVI8 You Money 7       'X-A   " ',s * i* ; ''.  *j4'*•'■-' :'7'.A • ?<   \- "       " \ '•    '.i
'»,ii*
19-A       *•".', ■> ^ '..i
I
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT. LEDGER, PEENIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
Local Union Directory, Dist. 18,0.M.W.A
IS
GLADSTONE LOCAL
No. 2314
Meet lirst und third Fridays,
Miners' Hall, Pernie; second and
fourth Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
Cieek. Sick Benefit attached.—-T.
Uphill, Sec, Fernie, B. C&
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334
Meet   every  Sunday   afternoon
at   2 -o'clock   in   Crahan's   Hall.
Sick Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet  every  Sunday.   Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Michael  Warren,  Sec,  Can-
more, Alta.
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
'Meet second and fourth Sunday
in month. Sick and Benefit Society attached.—Thos. Thompson.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30   p.m.   in   the   Opera   House,
Coleman.—J.  Mitchell,  Sec,  Box
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock ln the Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189 .
Meet every Friday evening at
7.30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec
^»^»ev^a*^4V»yi^[«Wi".-^^**
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2633
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec.
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. ,2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month "at 2 p.m.
in Slovak HaU. Sick Benefit Society attached.—Thos. G. Harries,
Sec, Passburg, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at X0 a.m.
in School House, Burmis, No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hall. Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society,—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' Hall, 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec.-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at'2.30 p.m.
in    the   Socialist   Hall. — James
Burke.   Sec,   Box   36,   Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet* every second Sunday at 2
o'clock in the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Ceo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin, B, C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter, Sec;
.«	
FRANK LOCAL
No. 1263
Meet Sundays, after each pay.
day, at Miners Hall.   Sick and
Benefit    Society    attached.—B
Morgan, Secretary.
EJEIBIBIEISISJEJeM^
ff>! p—i
£ashJfteat^MarketJ
ALWAYS THE BEST QUALITY AT THE LOWEST PRICES
We breed and feed our own cattle. Now Is the time to get
aome nice young veal.
Pork sausages, bologna, weiners, pork sausages, liver sausages, creamery butter, fresh eggs, fresh fish, tripe, hams, bacon,
always on hand.   A RIAL SOLICITED.
Opposite the Post Office
Phone 52, H. Northwood
Mgr.
A few weeks1 rest from Business at
Glacier Park or the Coast
will give you a new bate ot life, or to those whose time is llm*
Hed, take quickest route east or west, vl* tho Great Northern
Railway Co.
23 Hours Fernie to Seattle
26 Hours to Victoria
29 Hours to Vancouver
Direct connections at Rexford for East & West
Yon will enjoy all the comfort of moat modern railroad equipment Courteous and efficient employes will make roar trip
pleasant
■•fere purchasing steamship tickets, let us talk It over.
Per furtber Information apply te
J. a. MANN, AGENT
p. o. u, wi    nwtiE, i. c.   nn. tu.,*.
0*2.
il*"
ras
Miner's Oil Lamps vs.
Miner's Electric Lamps
KING'S HOTEL
0*r Mijtplitd with tb* t**t Win**, |
Liquor* and Ogars
[the worker*, which tbey have taken..
Socialism I* not against the home, j
It will took* it so every family may!
own a home, rather than renting it -at I
at present i
Hc<iall«m is a water si ring welling;
[from   bumsn   hesrts.     Ktery   new!
i fountain opened means mere fertility,;
wtnm room in co!WEenoN| mM<. g^ fof th# ww,4 i
Socialism is • light burning is
W. MILLS,
the
human brain. Bvery new light kindled
nerxttr nnriatuM
ItttmiUMI   WIM   UOI    HMiMt    mil
e-vsal, bwt it win prevent tb* mile
tmt with tin &lg nnd trom !M3»g It
ever Oreatheart, tha toller.
tto-ri-ttiUai 4-m* net apfc**! to tb*
idle   The platen arw all against It
S«etaltna deasands 'hat tht worker
shall cent* dl tiding up with thn
shirker.
•ottaHsm la lib* the tew—ti gtvee
flgbt wil It will give life and eaarfert
to *V,
■adatfsm te aet popalar with an-
armi**ti Ml ettpportere td tbe eap**»
taHst syataaa feat* If.
AwtttHUm I* mui a fwe-teart ot Ifwt-
ant*. II tt were, how the old partus
•wild Rock to tt!
Swrtetwae ta aad aeaiaat reticle*. It:
wxli wmm «   me  trek
ftt$Iby it diMipatea some or tbe darkness
iiaasal-and- tame of till* obi world.
j Socialist* are not oabeHevwa Thev
, nav* tae great faith that povertr aad
Mu* *■*« xmy On kmmited trom th* eartUs
aai arw working t* asshe it real.
BmMUm U net lm Inter ot ds*W-
Ing op. It la against dividing np with
| the ansa *•!** *tmpkny* rem or the ted-
rom watch cwrrtta   yww  goads   to
ttctatfam bas a place In America,
from the fart that capitalism has   a
pla<* her*.   It ts a tmctllas that   da»|
stray* th* germs of robtery, p*vettyj
j.s.& uUtttry. i
Socialism aaa ao placo far leasers." \
i***k urn men i* amppemtO to lw   • «*i
helper    Tlw greater 'tt* helper tbef
•   H1L-   _*—.    *—*   *.-    *«-    *
Socialism wants ta know what right
tht miasms hat* hi ti* ftwpwnt af
tr**'*i I* ike ma*; ?«t h* ts at* •
"Itaier"
Socialism offers th* old parties ail
tint ih* *td pants* do aai met*.   It
_m_t___m*^   tmk^m  am,   ^m^m^A   w^u«ub     ^—^^^jk   ^^^^m     _
emtmwm ttttm m wwPi vmrntmr* mtmmt tmwnp n
sta-h**r day aai psatarthm asataat*
robbery by rent and profit talinc.—
C. I. f%tf!ar, ta Th* Oftaftr Jar.
(From a paper read at the Mining
Class of the Cambuslang School (Scotland) July 4, 1914, by B. A. Hail-waad,
M. I. M. B., managing director of
Ackroyd and Beat, Ltd., -Morley, hear
Leeds.)
During the last few years the question of the advisability of installing
electric lamps in the coal mines of
this Kingdom: has been a very live
one.
In the case of the most comparatively recent disasters it has been custom,
ary to blame the miner's lamp. Prom
observations and tests made by the
tvriter, he cannot help but think that
one reason for this/is that a lamp was
looked upon as a very convenient article upon which to place the blame.
The limited knowledge formerly (and
even now to some extent) possessed
by the average miner, manager, inspector, coroner, and jurors on the
behavior of safety lamps in the
"midst of gas" gave to all concerned
an easyi and plausible thing upon
which to place the blame in the event
of there being nothing else convenient; or no doubt it was by some
thought lhat by blaming the "lamp"
it to some extent involved- the men as
being connected with the cause.
Many of the experiments and tests
of miners' safety lamps which are
referred to by experts or in books on
mining have been conducted, on an old
Davy lamp or unbonnetted safety
lamp, and under conditions which are
quite unlikely to happen in a pit.
Had bonnetted lamps been used the
writer is -convinced that the results
obtainedWould have been entirely different, and much of the unnecessary
excitement and nervousness been
avoided.
In some tests carried out a few
mojiths ago by the writer in Pittsburg, U. S. A., he placed unbonnetted
single gauze safety 'lamps in an explosive mixture ot natural gas and air
and smashed the gauze of the lamp by
blows from a large mallet, and in no
single case was there an outside ignition. In other tests the glass bf the
lamp was shattered by blows from a
long chisel, and yet there was no external ignition. In all these tests the
lamp was surrounded by an explosive
mixture and gas flame was blazing in
"the^g-aiioC;—iii"-=eavh*~Coee=tue=o.uocrirOL"
the blow or the movement of tlie mix
ture caused by the oncoming blow put
out the flame in the lamp.
I may say that we have tested the
Combustion Tube lamp ln varying percentages of coal gas from 6% per cent
downward, nnd have never yet got an
Ignition from the broken glass. The
lamp is Invariably completely extln.
guished when the percentage of gas
reaches 6l4 per cent, so that obviously an explosion cannot be got
from a mixture above 6V4 per cent.
We bave carried out experiments on
our ordinary miners' lamp, viz., those
not fitted with combustion tube, and
although In tbls lamp we can keep gas
flame burning in the gauze at 7 per
cent, we have not been able to get
an external explosion. The shock of
striking a lamp even with a pick-like
point of the spring pistol extinguishes
the lamp.
To show that an explosion can be
easily produced by the ordinary portable electric miners' lamp as now offered fur una lu Uie niliwn of this
country, I will take samples of well-
known makes of electric lamps, and
using tbe same apparatus and aame
percentages of coal gaa and coal dust
and the same spring pistol arrangement, will easily create explosions by
the smashing of tbe electric bulbs in
the mixture. I may say we have got
an explosion In thia type of test by
tbe smashing of tha bulbs of portable
two-volt lamps In the midst of a mix*
turn of a* tow n.s 1 per rextt. ma.? rat.
air and coal dust. I think you will
agree that thls> ts a sotnewhst startling discovery. The ordinary open
lamp may be moved about with Immunity la a mixture of 3 per rent of
gaa and atr, In Uie tests on the
safety lamp la was shown that 3 per
cent of gas. air and coal duet has not
heen Ignttel, ao far as the writer hss
been able to make up to uow tbe possible explanation for the different behavior between the miner*' electric
ami tk* miners' oil lamp la that tbe
former Is btirnlng tn a vacuum, and
oa tha bars^ag of th* bulb there is
each a commotion tn tbe air as ti
aomawbat ratembie a hlow.out shot
llred into coal duat It to wall known
that n blown-oat shot will create an
tsptoaUw wliea tHvni lato coal dlast
eM *t* (w't -vtv Wtti-iwt en-e ma
whatever
Imtntotatelr on tho bvrsttn* of the
anlh of an elarttfe laasp In tba tasting
chaaeher ta* naa panlcfaa of coal dast
floating la ta* air mixed with a small
■n*re*nt»r* td faa attttttd *i*rm tn rnttt
tato the vacaum at tn mraortm.rily
rapid mo, aai iwaafMy tha asotorotea
gat jsmsMi tacetber ta form a maeh
more po**rfnl exploaUe thaa would
he the can* at erttnary atmospheric
prsaaai* tm Ignttlea at tbe filament
•siigftt atait a miniature but compars- j
lively fttrct ttstoatms, whtefc wtmMI
a Ml *xp-o*xo» mo motion
thrtwgb th* sarroaailag mtimr*.; aad
wvtiHit etptortttn, mbitb nptor-
tmttf dom aat o«*r I* iwmoettM
with th* asiaem* ott lamp wbmm all
th* aofitoita ara at oritaary normal at-
lamp. It is well known tbat one of
the' advantages claimed for the electriq
lamp, is that the makers state it may
•be thrown about and treated roughly
and the lamp not extinguished, and, although it will be found in practice
that to roughly treat an electric lamp
will involve the owners In a great expense 1n upkeep of bulbs yet the fact
remains that the lamp can be placed
in various positions without being extinguished. .This will no doubt lead
to lamps being badly treated, and owing to the ignorance of the user of
the possible presence of gas, the lamp
may get damaged and the bulb broken
and explosion created, wliich would
not happen with the oil lamp, as users
of, oil lamps naturally exercise care in
the handling of these lamps. This
care in itself is a good thing for the
mine, 11 helps discipline.
In tho event of a fall of roof, an electric lamp would retain its light up to
the moment of the bulb being smash-,
ed, and as sho.wn in the tests this is
sufficiently long' to enable the gas
to reach the red-hot filament and become ignited. Not so with the flame
lamp, the very movement of the air
and gas in front of the fall seems to
extinguish the lamp before it is smashed, and so an 'outside ignition is
avoided.
There have already been cases of
the celluloid cases of electric lamps
having burst from the accumulation of
acid fumes; gas may be ignited by
sparking: from the terminals of the accumulators of portable lamps, especially 4-volt batteries. It cannot, therefore,
be said that the electric lamp is free
from the possibility; of causing an ex*
plosion ln a mine.
It was thought that electric lamps
would do away with the Inconvenience
and danger of having a light extln
guished in a mine, but experience is
showing tbat there is considerable
trouble In this direction with electric
lamps. The Hghtvof an electric lamp
may bo extinguished from several
causes, sucb as a sudden jerk in tbe
mine breaking the filament; from tho
filament burning out; or the vacuum
of the lamp being destroyed when the
filament immediately collapses; from
the battery running down, or from bad
contacts.
Whereas In the case of the nil lamn
^™ asHw'dr -tm asotftia  lamps tt
■era Ufcety to pf smashed In a men
te a ike* et e attar* aalhtf
it is a very rare occurrence -for a
lamp to burn out ln tbe mine, a careful man reaps tbe benefit of his car-3
by scarcely ever losing bis light bv
jerks. This type of man does not
complain at occasional Iobb of light ow
ing to accidental stumbling. On thc
other hand tbe careless man is justly
punished for his carelessness by hav
Ing more frequent extinguishments
Tbe other cause of loss of light ls by
"gas," and no reasonable man wtll
complain about bis light being put out
by this means, seeing it compels him
to get out of tbe danger sone. With
modern safety appliances, extin
guished oil lamps can now be easily
and safely relit, With these appll.
ances It Is impossible to extract from
the machine a lit dangerous lamp in
the pretence of explosive gas, the gas
wblch unters the machine at the
time the lamp is placed In, is ex
ploded Inside the machine at the moment ot Ignition of tbe lamp and tbe
explosion would be confined to the
inwide of the apparatus nnd automatically extinguish tbe lamp, so that
there is no need to reject oil lamps on
the score of "loss of light"
The property contained In the ordinary flame safety lamp of easy and
quick dstectlon of not only methane
but of carbon dioxide and black-damp
Is auch as to alone make one hesitate
at scrapping such sn article. Many
attempli have been mad* to supplant
this divke for testing for gas, but
ao far there la not a single device on
the market which can approach tbe
miners'oil lamp for tas-doteetlng properties.
Sweral attempts have been made to
aupplant the minora' lamp hy devices
employing platinum black or sponge,
or the like, .This will only detect one
kind of gaa, ouch as methane: It would
be unelesa for black-damp. The platinum speedily gets out of order, and
generally apaaatag it la necessary to
employ a battery which win often get
out of order, and possibly fail at an
unexpofttd moment. In other it*
vices tbt well-known principle of the
differenea in rate of diffasion of tHf.
fertnt gases bat beta eayrfojed.
Theae, however, lose their Indicating
properties after being In tha gaaas Htr
a, tow iu.luut.es, as the itffsraaee tn
raailag oa tha aeate prodaeei by comparing viti tht standard afr ta aaiekly
to* tt m iftstrumem ta kept ta tht
gaaaa for nsany mlnataa, ami th* as*r
would icarcwty bsow wbaa It wm tn
working order, especially If ba failed
to U*n ihe ta*tnaa*MH wader e*ts«taat
observation
Dealing with tkt sa»>e*Ha<hiwit<»e,
I will refer to tba nratafmas of which
so much baa bean ntari dnrlaf tba
laat few years. Aaf peraoa e/bo bat
beta troubled with acbtnc area aai
*«.»int In art, mlW aympaUHS* *tta   t*
jriM^gjHLdyHL jfcUr.jnmi*-*-M-tja*jM. .9- w^^^^^ akt^e*^ ^^^tfa^j/fadm __j___Mb__
miner mnavtag rrom was netaiwi mow
nest, etpartatty arfeea daring eertata
sttgts of tta iatafatpmaat tba mtaar
eenvtvtt to wttfc 5a Imt, ataffSr mark*
tags, not ottnm la trampai p*t»i!e**s^
each swing al tb* Mak tibcatea thraafh
tb* tbtattlat fee**, inta the maa Pstts
era^y; thea* ar* ib* tnm wbas , an
nTwtnPfwjr ntat*i, a matt marmi *■•
done th« thing ba ought ta bav* laat,
aai Jetfarttoa lii *wa aafsty aai
the safety of his fellow men. <To alleviate tbe pain caused such men should
surely be a desirable thing, if in doing
this expenses can also be avoided, arid
-cleaner coal obtained, it should be
worth the while of all concerned to
install in a pit a lamp which will do
it.
Several eminent doctors bave stated
that an illumination of one candte
power will prevent nystagmus, Por
some time at has been known that
the ordinary miners' flame safety
lamp does not give such an illumination. ' When, therefore, the electric
lamp was introduced and statements
made that it would give 1% to 2 candle pqwer, people naturally thought
that nystagmusi would disappear, but,
unfortunately, it was overlooked) that
one candle power with an electric
lamp Is not so useful to the eye as one
candle power from a flame. The
rays from an electric lamp are cold,
hard, and piercing, and reflect back
light from the facets of the coal, and
these are uncomfortable to the eye. I
think time will show that one candle
power with an electric lamp will not
prevent nystagmus.
From the reports we ourselves have
received in our movements in all tlie
coal fields of Great Britain, and dn
coal fields abroad, the writer has not
the slightest hesitation in saying tbat
the electric lamp for miners' ordinary
use will go out of employment In tbe
next few years, as this type of lamp
seems to have inherent defects which
cajpot be overcome, and neither managers nor miners will put up with this
inconvenience, and the enormous cost
entailed, now that a miners' flame
lamp has been constructed which gives
a superior light to the electric lamp
and at a less coqt than tbe electric
lamp, and is quite reliable in its action, and a first-class gas detector.
A manager of a Yorkshire pit told
the writer that with his experience of
three of the latest makes of electric
lamps, and also with the Combustion
Tube lamp, there was not the slightest
doubt about this lamp displacing the
electric lamp within the next few-
years, as no manager would undertake the trouble and worry Incidental
to the handling of the electric lamp
now tbat he was able to get a flame
limp with &• candle power bigger than
the electric lamp. Continuing, be
said that the satisfaction be experienced in having lost so much money
on the electric lamp -was that he con-
slderied it (the electric lamp) had been
the means of forcing the flame safety
lamp makers to renewed energies, and
he felt that to that extent be had done
something in the forcing of the invention of the Combustion Tube lamp.
dn conclusion, I might add tbat on
iMarch 29, 1914, Dr. Llewellyn, after
testing one of the forms of the Combustion Tube lamp (since which date
we bave still further improved the
lamp) states that the lamp gave a
candle power of 1-5, and after burning
six hours in the pit the candle power
was 1-3, and the light given by tho
lamp on the "floor so excellent that it
gave a better light than most of the
e'ectric lamps at present on Hie market, and he agreed that a soft light is
bet-cer for the eyes of tho miner.
Ir. the official government tests o.x
ibis lamp, the human 2 office official.)
reported thit lt gave a cmdle power
cf 1-9 after being lit half an hour, and
at tbe end of ten consecutive hours'
burning that the canc'i power was
l"o     •
The writer submits that tho miner
can now be provided with a flame
lamp which beats the electric <l.&mp for
candle power, convenience, safety, reliability, cheapness and what ds more
important to the miner, possesses true
and acturate detecting properties.
The only drawback the writer knows
of is that the lamp gets rather warmer
than the ordinary lamp, but as shown
in today's tests this does not affect'
the safety of the lamp at all, and
where there is a movement ln the
air, such as on tbe roadways, or
even at the coal face, this is not a
serious discomfort, and in any case
the writer submits that the many advantages, especially the increase in
candle power, altogether outweigh
any slight •discomfort which might
come from a warmer lamp, as It is a
well-known thing in this world's af.
fairs that it an extraordinarily rare
occurrence to get a new invention with
new advantages without some disadvantages.
A Substitute For Goal
For centuries It ban been remarked
and returning travelers today relate,
that a strange growth of thick weeds
^Bd^6dgBHneartne"Bumce"or the wa-
ters of the Xile, above Khartoum, is
responsible Tor the impassability of
the river at that point. To anyone
who has visited the Soudan, the bare
ly navigable Xile about that region ls
a source of great disappointment. Ex
President Roosevelt particularly com
mented upon it.
Baedocker carriers may now save
their tears. These vain regrets are
literally wasted on tbe desert air, for
two Oerman pundits, Herr Dr. Von
Rath and Prof. Von Horlng, together
with air English military savant, after
a painstaking Investigation of this
fibrelike moss, ♦have constructed a
startling theory that this was the sort
of stuff tbat, under proper geological
conditions, became wbat we recognize
as coal, Then they set about to prove
their hypothesis aa facts.
Tbe periodic flooding of Egypt hy
the Nile may or may not have some-
thing to do with the rapid accumulation of tbla sedge, called sudd, ft
possibly has nothing whatever to do
with Its formation; but that is
neither here nor there, na far at coal
Is concerned, llie essential fact is that
It gathers so quickly in the waters of
the Blue and White Xile that the application of sucb a refuse and waste
to fuel uses will produce a cheap and
easily accessible material. Because coal
la almoit completely absent, and practically prohibited for fuel uses, at the
necessarily high pries In tha Boudan,
Induitrlsl development of tht country
ba* be*n twrtwty rttarded.
Just think of tha possibilities, when
lt la roallxed that there are IS,WK»
square miles of tbla Xile sudd. It Is
about three feet beneath tha surface of
tba river, and grows te aboot twenty
feet in height from tbt surface of tht
rivtr. and growa to about twenty feat
tn height from tba Nile's bad. Com-
posed ef roots, stems, flowers, grasses,
pspyrui and tht likt, It reappeam,
even If absolutely removed at any spot,
la leas than three week*
Now, tht flrat step taken by Captain
flennell Tamper and his Teutonic col.
lesgoei wat to arrange tm tht transportation of tbt aadi to Kaartoam.
Tb* nitirta, every tbt** wteka, eat
the mans down, th* it In haadiet, make
rafter of It, and float thtm -down to
Khartoum. Thia waa ta*ea to Captata
J** ••»-*> »*       It-*-**.'-        I*   »i. 9*-tlit        -I,-.--* »*.
4 -   *-*   '     '      -     *  *     ' '  '    |
*%*-H»«r mk, trvntdrmsntd. tet* \\* Air'
compact bricks tbat bl bat nstntd mt*
dlt».
At tta factory, which waa rtetatl7
tbtawn open la tba pretaata of tba
T-hnXtx*    *■»•»  rtr„t..x*  itn.».«-»   «Tp
•*...-,      ,.        .„....*,.     .. •■.),. * .*   .■*:',»
tlMlpaitatiarite af tb* taattra worti,
qnaatltlct of Nile sadd war* evaporat-
-   *      JA_____A a^^AMAAAaJ -mtm-M ^k^^m^m^mijt
Treated witn a salt known at araeaat
only to oor salutary •ettaUat. It It
again dried aai piaeei tela
The bricks thaa made at* tb*
menial tnddlte feel, avalUM* far
tsrfemt vahiaWa jrarpotea.
A Mg attamtr was ra* w» tba -Milt
gttUMNtt milta. oa a* *sttaN iajr,
with Amaricaa wal Another toy tm*
•i'ttJT Iil# It* WMfv -JMttl wWI MNNlf mmmm)
a tblrd tnw onpr tb* asm amtsrfai tmt-
Alt wat nasi. Thfa ussslmsaf irai
earrfed imt tmforw Captain mmptr df*-
■ggfaiai bta atar aslt aMItta*.    lat.
It took the steamer seven hours and
seven minutes with either coal, and
■fixa-Hly BftVtB-bours-witb-tbe-artiilylaf
coal.
Xow, when it is recalled that coal
of either sort. costs iu tlie Soudan
$20.50 a ton, and suddlte, If transported an equal distance with the cosi,
costs only,$5.75 a ton—even though
actually It requires two tons of sud.
dlte to "each ton of coal—well, aa the
sure-thing gambler says: "There Is
nothing to It."—Coal and Coke Opera
tor of Fuel Alagasine.
FAKING  WAR  NEW8
When war news is given out   exclusively by rival war offices the only
reliable thing about it is that it is alt
false. Newspapers have two alternatives in their treatment of this news.
They may either, .print what comes,
without change and let readers do the
guessing, or they, may do as some Mil
waukee papers are doing, write the dispatches in their own editorial offiec&
to suit the circultaion. department.
It is noticeable that whichever
method 'is followed, the Socialists get
the worst of it. The war offices are
most assiduously striking out all.reference to the Socialist campaign
against war and the American capitalists press, and particularly t&at of
Milwaukee, is evidently inventing a
few "cables."   , •     •
There was one -thing on which all
these "cables" agreed and that was
that the Socialists of Europe had nil
become nationalist jingoes. This being
the only, thing upon.which the liars at
both ends of the cable agreed, it
should have been self-evident that lt
was pre-eminently false.
As the European Socialist papers
arrive • they confirm this impression.
They show that at the time that the
French Socialists were reported to
■have been voting for war supplies,
they Avere absent from the chamber
holding anti.war demonstrations, tbat
when the Germania-Herald faked the
dispatch stating that a Social-Democratic member of the Reichstag whom
it called "Hasse" bad shaken the
Emperor's bad and congratulated him
on his war policy, the only member
with a name resembling this (Haase)
was selected by the German Social-
Democrats to represent them in an
international council against war, and
signaled his presence there with a
scathing denunciation of the German
war policy.
Almost every cable mentioning Vivian!, the French premier, adds that be
Is a Socialist, and the local falsifiers
generally add a "prominent" or "lead- ■
ing" Socialist The truth is that he is"'
a renegade Socialist and, like all renegades, is the most bitter enemy of his
former associates.
There ds plenty ot room upon the
cables for long discussions by H. G.
Wells and Bernard Shaw on the attitude of Socialists toward war, although
no Socialist would take the opinion of
either of them seriously on tactics,
and they have never even participated
in Socialist councils. Whatever may
be their merits as novelists and play-
rights, and Socialists freely concede
these,-tbey are not authorities on So-
clallst tactics. '7	
""Taut "not one word has been permit-'
ted to pass the censor from Kler Har.
die, Victor Adler, or any of the So-,
clallst members of the various Parliaments of Europe.
. ThU united lying at' borne and
abroad against the Socialists is a tribute to tbe fear in which they are held.
by the war fanatics on both sides of
tbe ocean. It indicates that however
great the hatred between the censors
on the opposite sides of military conflict, tbey are all united by a greater
fear and hatred of the millions of
workingmen bn the other aide of the
dast oShflict.—Milwaukee Leader.     ,
DO you ever consider
the importance of
oo the use of stationery
that is in harmony with
the nature of your business? In many cases
your letterhead is considered as an index of
your business character,
hence the necessity of a
good printer.
00
If you want really high
class printing-the kind
wc always produce try
us with your next order
I** District Ledger
-QUAUTir PRINTERS
Phone 48a   :•:    Fernie, B. C.
*r*—**omr**"t*>**m
g^m»j|^|
Sir     S-   *,T~        "'    "**W
g|g|»gmj|jj|^
^ytt@& The
and
Only
Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
Minard s
Liniment
Fentie-Fort Steele
Brewing Co., Ltd.
Beer ^
and
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
THE DISTRICT LEDGES, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
 —____
The Unmaking
of a Mother
By Ethel Carnle
Passburg
Hotel
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
i
Ross Brothers FiK
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Full supply of following
fer an appetising meal to
choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge taut*
ages for tomorrow's hrtsk-
fast.
C/H.L OR PHONI
Calgary Cattle Co.
Phone M Weed Street
\        PIRNII, i. C.
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
V,
A. McDqugall, Mgi
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and
Shots) (tents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT HOSMER,  B.C.
"Carlbel!   Clarlbel!"
Above the "poshing" of the clothes,
■-the frenzied screaming of James,
named after his grandfather who had
just died in the workhouse hospital,
and the rattling of pots knocked down
by tbe cat in its endeavor to smvive
in its struggle for existence, airs.
Jones' voice, shrill and yet muted, as
if coming through a heavy burden,
rose on the air. (
There was no answer to her tired
appeal.
The "posher" stopped—the cat darted
under the dresser with guilty haste,
licking its whiskers, the baby in the
cradle let out once more bis haunting "a—la—la!" as If. he found It
impossible to reach the "te," and Mrs.
Jones, wiping tbe opaline bubbles
from her arms on her rough apron,
realized that Clarlbel really had left
off rocking, and bad run away!
James, red In the face, expostulant,
and pathetic, had been deserted.
In the corner sat Rebecca, dressing
a doll In unique fashion.
"Rock that cradle till I find Clarlbel!" said her mother furiously.
Rebecca complied, but in anguish
of spirit.
James was a noisy baby to pretend
to have for one's own—at 4!
.Mrs. Jones 'went to the front door
and looked along the sunny street
where children were playing, school
being just over for the day.
She knew that she could bave
quieted James while she was finding
Clarlbel, but Clarlbel bad got to know
her plain duty and not run away
from it.
No. She couldn't see Clary anywhere.
But on the flags, pasting colored
strips of paper on bis top, was Johnny
Sands.
"Have you seen Clary any*
where?" she asked.
Johnny studied .Mrs. Jones, taking
in the menace of her tone. Then he
shook his head. Johnny's teacher alwaya thought of him as a rather
stupid little boy.
"Won't I give it to her when -I get
hold of her. An' James crying
enough"1 to rupture hissel' so's he can't
work 'When be grows up. Nothin' to
do but just go to school. I was 'working in a print shop at her age—
earnln' my   own   . porridge^.-ClarsL
Clary!   My word, lady
John watched her go near the street
corner.
He had stopped putting the blue paper and white dots on his pot.
■But when Mrs. Jones turned back
and went Into her house he wandered
"Now—I hope you're ashamed o'
yourself," said her mother. "Go an'
nurse your little bretber. You ought
to be glad to have one. You'd be
sorry If 'e-was dead."
Even this appeal to sentiment did
not crush Clarlbel. There was something about her that her mother
could not make out. Clarry was
unsually a good nurse. Rebecca had
bold of the cradle-string, and -was
pulling it with such vigor It threatened to topple .over, and as slie swung
she was mumbling about "IPig porridge hot, Pig porridge cold, Pig porridge in a dish, nine days old.-'
"Clarry, look after James," said her
mother, and put tbe string in the slack
little hand. She took it mechanically.
Rebecca realized some tragedy about
her sister, and placed her doll on
Clarry's lap.
"Don't want it," said Clarry, let-
ting. It tumble off, at which Becky
began to cry.
"Walt till you father comes home,
lady," warned /Mrs. Jones, and went
back to the washing.
Mr. Jones was a six-loom weaver,
witb a cough. When he came in be
dropped into the first chair and
mopped his brow.
"Ninety in the shade today," he
said. "God, I wish the summer was
over. It's hell Hello! What's to:
do wi' Clarlbel?" I
Becky ran and told how Clarlbel had
thrown her doll on the floor.
(Mrs. Jones talked of James' screaming and how be might have ruptured
himself, and now 'Becky might have
played with the fire and been burnt to
death.
"You should be good girl,
Clarry," said her father. "You
should help your mother. You're a
big girl now. Quite a little woman.
I went to work when I was your
age."
Clarry never spoke.
She satjnilling the string mechanically, listening to what they said.
"She takes after thy side," said
Mrs. Jones.   "Ours never sulks."
There were cockles and mussels to
tea. Clarry ran for them to the shop,
where the old man always asked her
what her name was—and forgot it
afterwards.
"A quart," he asked, looking at
her. "What's your name?" She told
him, gravely, without telling bim tbat
«he—had-Hold^hha-befor©;—He-wag
very old and very slow—and some
times when be was serving people his
daughter came, twitched the bag from
bis hand and served them hsrself.
.Clarry had noticed All this. In a dim
way she lelt tbat there was a similarity between their fates.   He had not
-    n; ucmnn uieir iinea.    tie naa not
8lowly round the corner Mm. JoneB the right to be old; she had not the
had  nnt   tui-noH
Civilisation haa made marked advancement. Thty formerly killed with
the stone ax; la tht tarty daya of
America thty ustd the bow and arrow; now they slaughter with ma-
cblnt guns and high explosives.
iiTHE ft       a ga^1854
HomedanK'Canada
***** 0ff!?IL*?»ll« mwtattA m vomrto
■RANOHIS ANO CONNlCTIONt THROUGHOUT CANADA
Ayaaag mon wfll stwistissss btssiaw beftrt ttmtag tt tbe Beak whh
a dtpMitaf out delta te open aaattaaat.  Yet a Bank cm hare ae
a. r. MAODONALD, Manager
VICTORIA AVE* •»- f PIRNI!   B. 0.
List of Locals District 18
*•» Mama ttt. ami P. 0. Attrsst
_   2? White Ash Mint........ Wm, U-mb, Taber, AU*.
tl Bankfctad..... ....J'. Wheatley. Btakhead, Alte.
tet, mmt-et vive* .....t. mmebme, Oovret Oat*, tia Piaehtr. Alia.
i*.i iiiA-ietm.,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,damm* Uttiim, t*tn &, mmntnm. Alia.
Ilt3 BJaJnaom W. c, Ckriatofhara. Maimer* Alta.
Wt Bormtt T, o*. tltrrtta, Paastarg, AHa.
tttt Carboadalt.............J. MKefcelt, Cartmndale. Coleman. Alt*.
18*7 Oantnore,  Michael Warren. GatuaoM, AHa
d.wm tut^mtmmt*..............,9*. ewuntetm. -woteasaa. Aluu
lli. Oorbia... ,.,«.... Ota. men, C-orMa. B. c,
im Cfela** Mtaaa,. 3m. ttome, Chi***, tu Vtmeem air Alia.
!5-!Sr *"*»*** ita* Ai*.
mt IHlkrast................ Thoa. TboasiMoa, Hlllerost. Alta.
IH Utbhridgt...,. I* Slow* jm tnm mteem. H.imAbnemm
mi tamrtme Cmeitm... .TtuTk Uiiimbnm. coaihwtt AtoT^
tm Maple Lea/. T. 0. Heniea, PtmAmTmn.
Si:t itif^cj It. Simei, Mlabot. ti. a
ttm Pamfcorg  m ff ffsnrtna Tailwu. AHa.
tbt Tkbor. a. Pttmmm, Ttber, AN*.
tm Omtetewe, Compete...Wat Hxttr. Otargatawa, Onaatort. Atta.
ten Brsteta Miatt..........Harry VeKtuaa. Nordt«, rla Battel
■m neeeoTSbem.
had not turned.
In the street Johnny entered, quiet,
sunuy, with grass growing between
the paving atones, seven little girls
had hold of hands and -were swinging
backwards and forwards singing a
sort of chant,
"AH In a row;
Gathering snow-
Some said Yes,
An' some said No!"
In the middle was Clarlbel Jones,
a rapt look on her small-featured
fact, with the blue veins at the temples. Htr hair flew backwards and
forwards like a yellow cloud-—htr
blue eyes were aglow. She was somewhere on a fairly hill gathering snow
with the wet folk tinder a fairy moon.
Johnny atole up behind htr, say*
ing In a whisper, "Carlbel Jones—
you're wanted." Even so a sympathetic detective might warn his prisoner.
8he tame back with a start, drop,
ping out of tht row.
"Was tbt mad?" queried Claribtl,
In a fagged volet. Johnny nodded
dramatically.
"Happen If you go now yoa won't
catch lt so bad," be suggested. Clari-
bet'e {fiance went iun uri tha grout*
of whispering girls.
"Com* on, Clarry," they shouted,
"We'rt going to pit)1 at 'My hair Js
long."
Tlarry! Clarry! Walt till I
catch-"
Clarry started nervously as tbt
volet rang from the corner of tht
strtet. But htr mother had turned
back again.
"Aren't you golagf* asked wist
Johnny.
For answtr  tbt   ran   aad Joined
hands with the (Iris, and *ooa  tbey
wtrt singing:
"My hair Is long;
My drtss It short;
My boots ar* lined with silver;
A red. red rasa ajton my bres§t—
Aa' a gakata gold ring oa my finger."
HI laat aht* lt**i tttt, **■*.,.   ,.*■»■,      *
,   * .... .
towards ber tut* '
Oa tht doorstep h#r mother wis J
•tending. She cant to aseet tht ran-
atr away from doty.
Tba transgressor crashed down an
f-mrmlw to ni* om nt tttt,  .,-;*j.    (i;'
came along with heed slightly ■bantJ
aad trailing foa-tatep*.
Mra. Jones' hand shot oat tad
cauiibt Clarry's. giviag It Httl* afcafces
aa they irant along, ind Jerkin* out
saeh pfanuksa aa 'Working at year
ag»»" Uay, littli goodtor-ttoUila?'
and "What weald yoar tandair *f%mi
teacher say?" sad "l*#*vl«jf poor JltUe
Jimmy to teraaas hitter Mm*
Ike ««l*atnatiag  paaiahtaant   «as *
•awed aattl tht culprit waa asldway
la    tbt  lobby—wb*n kar   ana arat
tmsthtd. aot tratally. kai ftratir
right to be young.
There was no one in the shop tonight
"Here you are, Little 'Uu," he said,
looking down with his blue, gentle
eyea.
She gave him the money—lingering.
Tben ht precelved that the was not
smiling today.
"Have you got caned today?" ho
guessol.
Then It call came out. In a jumble
of wild words ahe told ?h$u of James
and her enforced motherhood.
"Somebody's got tn rock babies,"
he told ber gently "Smiebody had
to rock you.'Wbo rocked you?"
"Mother!" said Clarry, "Not Decky
—because she's newer. I rocked
Becky. Now I rock James. An* he
cries so.  1 want to play.*'
"Art you goin' to bt all neet serving a quart of mussels? (Mrs, Jones
'II want 'em for v tea. Run home,
Clarlbel Jones, an* ttll your mother
It weren't my fault you dawltd."
Ha opened tht door for htr,
"Somebody's got to rock babies,"
ht aald. "All right, Lisa, I'm comin'
I'm comin."
Aftor tea Mrs. Jones had to Ir>n.
Whilst she Ironed she grumbled at
the number of pinnies Htcky aid
Clarry dirtied. Jamta waa cross, and
Clarry had to rock him again. Mr.
Jonts took Becky to ttt the htnptn.
"I'll wsnt Clarry to rock Jamea.
An' there are a few errands," said
Mrs. Jones.
At bedtime fsther told Clarry s
story. It was about a good little arffi
wbo did all her mother told ber.
CUro saw tbe moral at one* snd
htr nutation wandtrad.
Mt*. Jones mt   (ar   laiem-tni that
when she took her upstairs she told
her she might take her doll to bed.
"Don't want it," said Clarlbel, sleepily.   "Don't want it any more."
She took ber mother's kiss coldly.
It almost seemed as if she objected
to the incongruity of being at once
as responsible as a grown-up, and as
easily cajoled as a child. There was
a little, old-womanish look as she
turned her face to the wall, away
from the candle light.
"She said she didn't want ber doll,"
said Mrs. Jones to Mr. Jones. "I always said our Clarry was a queer
little thing. But she'll want it tomorrow. I'll keep her home half a day tomorrow. James happen ha' that
tooth through soon. God knows what
I'll do wben t'other comes."
But Clarry did not have her doll on
the morrow.
Nor the day after.
Nor the day after that.
She gave it to Becky—as if she had
suddenly outgrown maternal feeling.
There were a few pangs of jealousy
during that first day or two when she
saw Becky nursing it.  Then it passed.
She did not grumble wben told to
rock James.
She took it as the inevitable—a
thing without joy, without meaning,
that somebody had to do, and that
she bad to do-because she had no
choice and because she was told.
When the new baby came she
showed no pleased delight.
It was another to hush—another to
rock, another to carry around.
"She's jealous," said her mother.
"I'm glad James has got off walkln,'
but he'll be a good bit of bother yet."
"They'll o* get out o't way. at't
once," said a neighbor. "An* Clarry's
gettln' a fine help to yo.' An'-.-Backy'll
be a wasber-up, soon. Lasses is handy.
'But they wear more leet stuff than
lads, so happen it's as weel as that's
a lad."
Johnny Sands had made himself as
dusty as a miller and as tired as a
dog In order to carry paving stones
to make tbe shape of a house for
Clarlbel Jones. There was the little
doorway—a plan of a doorway,
rather, and a paving stone left out
on the right to suggest a window,
for in these kind of things much
must be left to the imagination.
"Now isn't that grand?" he asked.
Clarry beamed admiration.
Becky was rocking on this afternoon when they bad holiday from
school, and Cissy Sharpe, Johnny
and she were going to play baby-
bouse.
Johnny was to be father, Clarlbel
was to be   mother   and Cissy   was
sAAAX^yXAAXXsy
?^wPpH
,,,;,-;;;. sax, :fgg?S
';;'pAiB%E^;';v'
*iw
ROYAL
HOTEL
fernie:
Bar Unexcelled
AH White Help
Everything
Up-to-date
Call in and
see us once
JOHN PODBJELANCIK. Prop.
WOMEN   OF NORWAY
Equality of Sexes Has Improved the
Condition of All
[ Directory of Fraternal
Societies
ai
"going-to lie auntr ana come over on
a visit
"What'll we do for baby?" asked
Cissy.   "Oh, Clarry, fetch your doll?"
"I haven't one," confessed Clarry.
Cissy got a bright Idea.
"Let's bave your cat," she suggested.
Clarry stood with downcast eyes.
She hesitated at what ahe was going
to say, wondering what Its result
would be.
"Suppose," she said at last, "suppose we have a baby bouse without
baby."
Cissy Sharpe was aghast at this
revolution 1n babyhoust land.
"An' how can I ask If I can take
ber to my house?" asked she. "I
won't play at babyhouse without a
baby. An' I fetched all my tea
things, Clarlbel Jones. An' how can
Johnny be father If there's no baby?"
"Well, I shan't play If I'm t^ nurse
a • baby," said Clarry, sullenly,
"There's no fun In It."
At Isst it was all settled.
John and Cissy set lea ready In
the house. j
Clarlbel went off to another pile of j
stones.
By-and-by* there waa a tapping
at tht door and aa If they eould not
set tht queer figure with its torn veil
and battered hat. tbey pretended to
open tht door, the door that was not
there.
"How do you do, Mist Jones," said
j Johnny.   "Yea tht baby's vary  welt,
but Jutf.  <?iitf.!tiK a,  tooth     Will   you
have sausages or celery, Miss Jones?
What a nice little doa you've tot."
And there on a string, following
Clarry when ht wat pulled, was Peter,
the cat.
"Wouldn't you like to be mother,
and let mt be aunt a bit?" sug-
gented Cissy once.
"N'o, I'd rather ht anni." iald Clarlbel "I ihal! alwaya be auia now.
Clasy. It's nlee to hflir about bsby'e
tooth. I'm glad you're In fall work.
Mr. Sands, it take* t let to bring
np rhlMrwi. Thank, you. yes. I i»k#>
sugar In my tea."~»N, y. Call.
Nobody can visit Norway today
without being struck by the position
held by Norwegian women. They are
neither submissive, timid nor loud.
They dress with modesty, and they
dress fittingly. But the great fact is
their social position. Here they really
seam to move among men as equals,
and that position seems to be now accepted without any real damage to the
womanhood or manhood of tbe country. On the contrary, both are better
for lt.
The achievement of tbe voting
power by Norwelgian women is only a
part of tbls vast movement, which is
represented by a claim to equality in
society as a whole. The 'women in
Norway have worked for tbat greater
aim simultaneously with the suffrage
agitation ever since 1885, and they
have achieved their aims together.
Practically all the professions are now
open to women ln Norway, except tbe
priesthood and the army.
Men and women are educated together at school and college. They
form clubs and societies together, bothi.
for sports, pleasure and serious *ob-
INDEPENDENT OEDEB
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets   every    Wednesday
ening at 8 o'clock In K. P.
fall-
Noble Grand, J. T. Puckey.
Secretary, J. B. Mciklejohn.
ESTHER REBEEAH
LODGE NO. 20
meets first and third
Thursdays in month, at 8 p.
m., in K. P. Hall.
A. MINTON, N. G.
S. TOWiXSEND, R. Sec
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello'e Hull second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernte, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, T. Ratcllffe.
K. of S„ D. J. Black.
M. of F., Jas. Madison.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
iMeets every other Monday
at 8 p. m., in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, F. H. Newnham.
Secretary, G. Moses.    v
140 Howland Ave.
9tm9t99^**tm999*99t^t^.^*m9*^*^t^^*^*^.^,^.^S9
LOYAL TRUE BLUE ASSOCIATION
Lady Terrace Lodge, No.
224. meets in the K. P. Hall
second and fourth Friday of
each month at 8 p. m.
AIRS. J. BROOKS. W, fif.
W. ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet
at the K. P. Hall first and
third Friday evening of each
month at 7:30. Visiting brethren cordially invited.
R. CRIOHTON. W. *M.
J, SKILL1NG, Rec. Sec.
A. Macnell
8. Banwell
MACNEIL 4 BANWELL
Barrister!,   Solicitor*,  Notaries,   Etc.
-Officei:~Or6uh(TFitor, Bank of    ~
Hamilton   Building Fernie, B. C.
P. C. Lawe Alex. I. Ptshe*
LAWE A FISHER
ATTORNEV8
Pernie, B. C.
SHOOTING SEASON
BEGINSJEPT. 1st
Call and see us before
setting out for your
fall hunting trip
jects.    Tbe young men, indeed, are
now said to refuse to have separate -societies, and the too sexes are more
and more working   together in    all
spheres of life.   Women sit oa jurlns,
and there ls now one woman judge.
And yet. (Norway does not sink into
tbe sea.  On tbe contrary, she has, by
general consent, never been so prosperous.
The vote ls the banner and the em.
blem of tbls movement, the crown of
woman's claim in Norway.   The story
of tbe  way  In which the women of
Norway secured the vote will be deeply Interesting to nil people at the present moment.   The victory c-ame In the
end quite peaceably and by the consent of all parties.
The Norwelgn women got the vote
ln the normal political way, by help-
ing and supporting tbelr friends In all
parties, and the detail of the story ls
a curious one.  The first victory of tht
suffragists, In Norway as In England,
was to secure the local vote,   That
tote ha* been very extensively used.
It is now universal, and It has re-
lulled here in Christiana In tbe socialists being tbe most powerful psrty
ln tht  municipal council.   The next
victory was the gain of tht limited
vote—th* "counclllatlon bill" vott»-for
Slate purposes. That wae given to the
women of Norway by tbe Conservative*, but with tho aid of Liberal mem-
beta of tht Storthing. j
Thai limited   vote   continued   forj
wtM time, but in V,12, tSit* liimul* ■
ware returned to power in spite of It. *
In   1913— lam  y#Br, the Liberal* and
Socialist* combined, and not opposed,
by  the (V>n*ervaiivea,  <«iteiided  the j
■rate to all wom-t-n. and now the *«!♦!
I trait in Norway ttands a* th« same {
' for both mf n nnd women   s universal j
vote for all adults over 22 years, both !
for State and local (Mirposea.
Wouiom utt* allotted lo alt In I'ariin-,
mem. but not to foworae members of
the gov-frnment    One wnmeit «at !•> *
Parliament for a short time a« sub-
's'ftute for » man »he V»irw*itf.i«*«
; happy people, have * *tib*tlttite **■*■
•>m which tikri tln-m from b>*t**»
: firm*.   Hut *br bat ke*n dttmtwl, and ;
, no woman no* »lu lu lite Son.rial*t,
I Parllsmtnt,
Now for   the   results   on polltle*. I
W#*>*Men'« n-n-Mliw* <iw> «*<•««»••«..■   .   ■ ■ i "I
imor* *t*t*trrd to    There «H» t* \'«f
i max a «oa»*n"e   eonnrtl which re^re *
«eata   all   tba   higher   Inter**!* of!
Auairi,      I*i*t tod) i* re-tnlnri) eon- f
salted by tht government en al! wo- <,
teaO1* *l*"0.tlifti*   Vrt VonrM»l',Ti tt.-*'       I
.*t»nt Itias $*t been' tleeteit on tbe *»»»• | ■
i^trsal nnttmt*. hat the nomen'* vote t
has plsyed a i«irt which «iv#* «uffi tt«m*« this
deal mlieme fer ife* Himre.   I* ha«     We ofr<4f 0m l(tt%4tH mitn R#,
} last gained s maternity benefit   fnr ward for aay eat* td Catarrh that aaa-
Mint   lu.  —-..,»   *--   •«-«..      —
W« bave the largest Assortment of Rifles, Shot-
CUD *, Ammunition -ft C*mp*
fntt «fi*#e» tm tt*** »£»•■
J. D. QUAIL
Phons 37
FKRNIP    .    W  C.
Norwegian women
t'«    «!>k    wiMi    relorau
hoase*. p«.r-«l<*>ri« *»d eh'.lifren'* mre
line women'*  vip* |.  »»j  f,,f ji*n»|,lng'tT»;.H,','iV;;,,V
|egl»latli»».   Above *SI. it |. pawarfMlrin? w *** '*M**»^*mU * tp bM
t* t-m§«ems«~f,   Tha*   N*r*tj, em <   N-tt*n«.». tuxii «jr oigaencg,
her iwwerfwl b*-»| opthm. hn, 1* «.» ' ' "'*
* ting » l«*d to Ihe world    An* tn >*>.
loot he* ear**! bv Hair* -fntnrrb *f*ttr*.
**o#m.t    We. ttm t»K«er»i*«*ne4, »»«t# fceawn P.
S   t*ertt*x for tl,*'  1*   'i <-«,(»   a *. 4  ttf'lttr*
,9,nr in »-.• tmatm****
Uimti-fiMil*,*... »W*   |w
i
i
s
'fl
iht wtawsa knro pl*y**i * rre,t mtf il
t—to* itennamt Worttr
, ,    11t*tl"t Cttemn c%tr* tm imp*** tnferwil.      ,*
' !*r. nt-titin dir*«'i>>- iin«* ttt* ntmmt emes*.
.* *m*-w*«e"f>*  .■atta'-t*   til  il,f .st*!***-,.    ttaW
,.\\t.**9999.\9t.9    -**..    9.~-.~ I—   -
/'A
i> -.*■
IIHMWiUt* M-nf tta*,
f   Tab*.
tl«(l'a
Pr»r# "ii'Znt^"
Vmtmtt I*hi* t* PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT, LEDGER, FEBMIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
Local Union Directory, Dist. 18,U.M.W.A
GLADSTONE LOCAL
No. 2314
Meet first and third Fridays,
Miners' HaU, Fernie?• second arid
fourth Fridays, Club HaU, Coal
Creek. Sick Benefit attached.—T.
Uphill, Sec, Fernie, 3. C.£
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334
Meet  every  Sunday  afternoon
at   2   o'clock   in   Cvahan's   HaU.
Sick Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet every Sunday, Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Michael Warren, Sec, Can-
more, Alta.
HILLCREST LOCAL
No, 1058
■* Meet second and fourth Sunday
in month.   Sick and Benefit Society attached.—Thos. Thompson.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30   p.m.   ln   the   Opera   House,
Coleman.—J.  Mitchell,  Sec,  Box
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock In the Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Banklieud*. Alta.
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2633
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. 2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak HaU. Sick Benefit Society attached.—Thos, G. Harries,
Sec, Passburg, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
Meet every second and, fourth
Sunday of each month at XO a.m.
In School House, Burmis, No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries,'- Sec,
Passburg-, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189 .,
Meet every Friday evening at
7,30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank BarrlnghaVn, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481 ■   " '
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec.
MAPLE LEAP LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hall. Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 in Miners' HaU, 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec.-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2,30 p.m.
ln   the   Socialist   HaU. — James
Burke,   Sec,   Box   36,   Bellevue,
AHa.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock in the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin, B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
arid Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter, Sec.
 ':   ' * '•'
FRANK LOCAL
No. 1263
•Meet Sundays, after each pay.
day, at -Miners Hall.   Sick and
■Benefit    Society   attached.—B
Morgan, Secretary.
HBBISISEIc!^^
Cash Meat Market
ALWAYS THE BEST QUALITY AT THE LOWEST PRICES
We breed and feed our own cattle. Now is the time to get
some nice young veal.
Pork sausage*, bologna, welners, pork sausages, liver sausages, creamery butter, fresh eggs, fresh fish, tripe, hams, bacon,
always on hand.  A RIAL SOLICITED.
I
Opposite the Post Office
Phone 52, H. Northwood Mgr.
A few weeks' rest from Business at
Glacier Park or the Coast
will give you a new Isase of Ufa*, or to those whose time ls limited, take quickest route out or west, via tho Great Northern
Railway Co.
23 Hours Fernie to Seattle
26 Hours to Victoria
29 Hours to Vancouver
Direct connections at Rexford for East & West
tsrsirr    - = j
You will enjoy all the comfort of moat modern railroad equip*
ment Courteous and efficient employes will make your trip
pleasant.
Before purchasing steams hip tickets, 1st us talk It over.
Per further Information apply to
J. A. MANN, AGENT
r.tlaill     FERNIE, B.C.     FW. N.. Kl
s«»5
m
«
VS0
Miner's Oil Lamps vs.
Miner's Electric Lamps
(Prom a paper read at the Mining lamp!   it is well known that one of
Class of the Cambuslang School (Scotland) July 4, 1914, by E. A. Hailwaad,
SI. I. rM. B., managing director of
Ackroyd and Best, Ltd., Morley, hear
Leeds.)
During the last few years the question of the advisability of installing
electric lamps in tbe coal mines of
this Kingdom has been a very live
one.
In the case of the most comparatively recent disasters it has been custom,
ary to blame the miner's lamp. From
observations and tests made by the
writer, he cannot help but think tbat
one reason for thisis tbat a lamp was
looked upon as a very convenient article upon which to place the blame.
The limited knowledge formerly (and
even now to some extent) possessed
by the average miner, manager, inspector, coroner, and ji-rors on the
behavior of safety lamps in the
"midst of gas" gave to all concerned
an easyi and plausible thing upon
which'to place the blame in the event
of there being nothing else convenient; or no doubt it was by some
thought that by blaming the "lamp"
it to some extent involved* the men as
being connected with the cause.
.Many of the experiments and tests
of miners' safety lamps which1 are
referred to by experts or in books on
mining have been conducted' on an old
Davy lamp or unbonnetted safety
lamp, and under conditions which are
quite unlikely to happen in a pit.
Had bonnetted lamps beeu used the
writer ia oonvinced that the results
obtained iwould have been entirely different, and much of the unnecessary
excitement and nervousness been
avoided.
In some tests carried out > a few
months ago by the writer in Pittsburg, U. S. A., he placed unbonnetted
single gauze safety'lamps in an explosive mixture ot natural gas and air
and smashed the gauze of the lamp by
blows from a large mallet, and. in no
single case was there an outside ignition. In other tests the glass bf the
lamp was shattered by blows from a
long chisel, and yet there was no external] Ignition. In all these tests the
lamp was surrounded by an explosive
mixture and gas flame waB blazing in
-ths-gauge Jn*^acbucase~th*e-sbock~ot
KING'S HOTEL
from
ftar *u*i»plWI wilh the tmt Win**,
liquor* and Cigars
itm&u'to opened tuam,* mot* intuit),
mmm room in no>mKcnnN! mwe gotN, fof the mom
Socialism |* a Hgbt burning In the
human brain, Kvery new light kindled
by It dissipate* some of the darkness
nnd terror of this old world,
Socialists are not unbelievers. They
j««»« to* great i-aiin tiiat poverty and
the blow or the movement of the mix
ture caused by the oncoming blow put
out the flame in the lamp,
I may say that we have tested the
Combustion Tube lamp In varying percentages of coal gas from 6% per cent
downward, and have never yet got an
ignition from the broken glass. The
lamp Is Invariably completely ex tin.
guished when the percentage of gas
reaches 6% per cent, so that obviously an explosion cannot be got
from a mixture above 6% per ceni.
We bave carried out experiments on
our ordinary miners' lamp, viz., those
not fitted with combustion tube, and
although In this lamp we can keep gas
flame burning in tbe gauze at 7 per
cent, we have not been able to set
an external explosion. The shock of
striking a lamp even with a pick-like
point of tbe spring pistol extinguishes
the lamp.
To show that an explosion can be
easily produced by tbe ordinary portable electric miners' lamp as now offered for uro In the mines of this
country, J will tako samples of well-
known makes of electric lamps, and
using the same apparatus and same
percentage* of coal gas and coal dust
and the same spring pistol arrange-
incut, will easily create explosions by
the smashing of the electric bulbs In
the mixture. I may say we have got
an explosion In this type of test by
the smashing of the bulbs of portable
two-volt lamp* In the midst ot a mixture of as low ns 8 per rent ronl gas,
air and coal dust. I think you will
agree that this' Is a somewhat start*-
ling discovery. The ordinary open
lamp may be moved about with Immunity Ib a mixture of 3 per rent of
ni and air. in the teats on the
safety lamp Is was shown that 3 per
the worker*, which tbey have taken, cent of gas. air and roal duet has not
Socialism Is not against the home, j been Ignttol, ao far as the writer has
It will make It so eviiry family may I been able to mnke up to now the po*.
own a home, rather than renting it .as I slhle eiplanatioii for tha different bo-
at present, | ha Wor between the miners' electric
«ui»aliem is a w*t«?r siring welling j and tha miner*' oil lamp Is that   the
human   hearts,     Bvery   new)fornor Is burning In a vacuum, and
on Uie bursting of tha bulb there  Is
fhe' advantages claimed for the electrk;
lamp, is that the makers state it may
be thrown about and treated roughly
and the lamp not extinguished, and although it will be found in practice
that to roughly treat an electric lamp
will involve the owners 1n a great expense 1n upkeep of bulbs yet the fact
remains that the lamp can be placed
in various positions without being extinguished., This will no doubt lead
to lamps being badly treated, and owing to the ignorance of the user of
the possible presence of gas, the lamp
may get damaged and the bulb broken
and explosion created, which would
not happen with the oil lamp, as users
of oil lamps naturally exercise care in
the handling of these lamps. This
rare in itself is a good thing for the
mine, lt helps discipline.
In the event of a fall of roof, an electric lamp would retain its light up to
the moment of the bulb being smash-,,
ed, and as shown in the tests this is
sufficiently long to enable the gas
to reach the red-hot filament and become ignited. Xot so with the flame
lamp, the very movement of -the air
and gas ln front of tbe fall seems to
extinguish the lamp before lt is smashed, and so an 'outside ignition is
avoided.
There have already been cases of
tbe celluloid cases of electric lamps
having burst from the accumulation of
acid fumes; gas may be Ignited by
sparking from the terminals of the accumulators of portable lamps, especially 4-volt batteries. It cannot, therefore,
be said that the electric lamp is free
from the possibility of causing an explosion In a mine..
It was thought that electric lamps
would do away with the inconvenience
and danger of having a light extinguished in a mine, but experience is
Showing that there is considerable
trouble to this direction with electric
lamps. The llghtsof an electric lamp
may be extinguished from several
'causes, such as a sudden jerk in tbe
mine breaking the filament; from thc
filament burning out; or tbe vacuum
of the lamp being destroyed when the
filament immediately collapses: from
the battery running down, or from bad
contacts.
 Whereas in the case of the oil -amp
the safety of his fellow men. To alleviate the pain caused such men should
surely be a desirable thing, if in doing
this expenses can also be avoided, and
cleaner coal obtained, it should be
worth the while of all concerned to
install in a pit a lamp which will do
it.
Several eminent doctors bave stated
that an illumination of one candie
power will prevent nystagmus. For
some time it has been known that
the ordinary miners' flame safety
lamp does not give such an illumination. ' When, therefore, the electric
lamp was introduced and statements
made that it would1 give 1% to 2 candle power, people naturally thought
that nystagmus* would disappear, but,
unfortunately, it was overlooked, that
one candle power -with an electric
lamp is not so useful to the eye as one
candle power from a flame. The
rays from an electric lamp are cold,
hard, and piercing, and reflect back"
light from the facets of tbe coal, and
these are uncomfortable to the eye. I
think time will show that one candle
power with an electric lamp will not
prevent nystagmus.
From the reports we ourselves have
received in our movements in all the
coal fields of Great Britain, and in
coal fields abroad, the writer has not
the slightest besitaticn in saying that
the electric lamp for miners' ordinary
use will go out of employment in the
next faw years, as this type of lamp
seems to have inherent defects which
cajyiot be overcome, and neither managers nor miners will put up with this
inconvenience, and the enormous cost
entailled, now that a miners' flame
lamp bas been constructed which gives
a superior .light to the electric lamp
and at a less cost than tbe electric
lamp, and is quite reliable in its action, and a first-class gas detector.
A manager of a Yorkshire pit told
tho Writer that with his experience of
three of the latest makes of electric
lamps, and also with the Combustion
Tube lamp, there was not the slightest
doubt about this lamp displacing the
electric lamp within the next few
years, as no manager would undertake the trouble and worry Incidental
to the handling of the electric lamp
now tbat he was able to get a flame
W. MILLS,
tnt
ASOUT  SOCIALISM
OtUvuUUMt    **ti   Hit*/*.    IM-***    tin     i-UKu
equal, but it miii prevent ibe little
so-at with tbt Mg w»d from tordtog M
orer Ortatheart, the toller.
Socialism does not appeal to the
Mie.  'tm pinum are ait aaotnM it.
Socialism demands *hat the worker
aball cease dividing up with the
•Writer.
leetollsm ia like the *un—Ii gives
light, and It vlll give lite aad contort
to aU.
Socialism la mot popular with an-
*.>'-vU*>»U.    AU ».i»»i*HU*i* at vU t4k»»l-
tallst tyvte«K hate it.
ftorialltm ts oot a protest of feoer--
aae*. R It vers, bow the old parties
would flock to ft!
Aotinlitm la »et agalast rtltekm. It
«*>U iMtke ix.   m*   tttmi   nt'.**.**.   *nd
wivwWa.i.^^™ji   bttmj   -t^w  ytmmmmr^mtm
ffo-cfallMR rents to know what right
tkt etnnttn mm te th* wmotif et
somewhat resemble • blow.out shot
fired Into «o<il dust. It Is well known
thst a blown-oat abet will create an
exploaUm when fired lato coal dust
and air only., vis., minus sny n»
whatever.
■I-*, ...,.j „v. „.»,.,*,,*u hum xkm **rvO| taamttaiittety oo tke our it ing ol the
nud nrt nothing to make it ml. j bulb of an electric lamp in tba testing
flmrtallem I* net In favor of dlvtd-; thumbt-r tho lino particles of coal dast
wieh a com motion tn tho air a«
it is a very rare ■ occurrence -for a
lamp to burn out in the mine, a careful man reaps the benefit of his caro
by scarcely ever losing his light bv
JerkB. This type of man does not
complain at occasional loss of light owing to accidental stumbling. On. thc
other hand the careless man is justly
punished for his carelessness by having more frequent extinguishments.
The other cause of loss of light is by
"gas," and no reasonable man wtll
complain about his light being put out
by this means, seeing It compels him
to get out of the danger zone. With
modern safety appliances, extinguished oil lamps can now be easily
and safely relit. With these appll.
ances it is impossible to extract from
the machine a lit dangerous lamp In
the presence of explosive gas, the gas
which enters the machine at the
time the lamp ls placed In, Is exploded inside the machine at the moment of Ignition of tbe lamp and the
explosion would be confined to the
inside of the apparatus and automatically extinguish tbe lamp, so that
there Is no need to reject oil lamps on
the score of "loss of light,"
The property contained In the ordinary flame safety lamp of easy and
quick detection of not only methane
but of carbon dioxide and black-damp
Is such aa to alone make one hesitate
at scrapping auch an article. Many
attempts have been made to supplant
this device for testing for gas, but
so far there ta not a atngle device on
tbe market which can approach the
miners' oil lamp for gas-detecting properties.
Several attempts have heen made to
supplant tbe miners' lamp by devices
employing platinum black or spongo,
or the like, This will only delect one
kind of gaa, ouch as methane; It would
bo useless for black-damp. The platinum speedily gets out of order, and
generally apoaMng it Is necessary, lo
employ a battery which win often ttt
out of order, aud possibly fsll at an
unegpoctgd moment, tn other de*
A.m-* tho ottt-knofto principle of Ihe
t0, difference In rate of diffusion of -tit.
lamp with a candle power bigger than
the electric lamp. Continuing, be
said that the satisfaction be expe.
rienced in having lost ao much money
on the electric lamp was that he considered it (the electric lamp) bad been
the means of forcing the flame safety
lamp makers to renewed energies, and
be felt that to that extent he had done
something in the forcing of the invention of the Combustion Tube lamp.
In conclusion, I might add tbat on
March 29, 1914, Dr. Llewellyn, after
testing one of the forms of tbe -Combustion Tube lamp (since which date
we have still further improved tbe
lamp) states that the lamp gave a
candle power of 1-5, and after burning
six hours in the pit tho candle power
was 1-3, and the light given by thn
lamp on theNfloor so excellent that 11
gave a better light than most of the
e'ectric lamps at present on the market, and he agreed that .i sor; light is
beUer for the eyes of tho miner.
Ir. the official government tests on
iLis lamp, the human* offico official.!
rororted thit it gave a "indie power
cf 1-9 after being lit half an hour, and
at the end of ten consecutive hours'
bi-rning that the   cane'.!   power   was
The writer submits that the miner
can now be provided with a flame
lamp which beats the electric lamp for
candle power, convenience, safety, reliability, cheapness and what ds more
important to the miner, possesses true
and acturate detecting properties.
The only drawback the writer knows
of Is that the lamp gets rather warmer
than the ordinary lamp, but as shown
in today's tests this does not affect'
tbe safety of the lamp at all, and
where there is a movement in the
air, such as on the roadways, or
even at the coal face, this is not a
serious discomfort, and in any case
the writer submits that tbe many advantages, especially the increase in
candle power, altogether outweigh
any slight discomfort which might
come from a warmer lamp, as it is a
well-known thing in this world's af.
fairs tbat it an extraordinarily rare
occurrence to get a new invention with
new advantages without some disadvantages.
A Substitute For Goal
For centuries it has been remarked lit took the steamer seven hours aud
and returning travelers today relate, seven. minutes with either coal, and
that a strange growth of. thick weeds) „..  . ••-
iln/L-aaitix.^
Hue^ourface~.of"ttae"wa7
ing op.  It is agalnat dividing op with
the man wbo raptor* ymi or the rail-
towO-mnmn tmrrmo
market
•octollem haa a plaeo in America,
floating In tht air mixed with a small
iMrire»t*gc nt §n» would t#em to mak
to | into the vaewam at an extraordinarily
rapid nt*. net poottbly tho taotocnl**
from the fart that copttoltwn ha*   a]more powoifnt wploalv* than would
place here.   It Is a bacillus lhat   dost roys tho germs or robbery, poverty
m if mfwry.
pi jsmmod together to form a much
bo the eoao ot ordinary atmospheric
pressors   Tko Ignition at tho filament
ttithx start a mtoUt-M* Ul romiwr*-
Soetallem haa oo ptneeter leader*.-{tfvely tlmt eiplooloo.   wbkb wooWt
Dai m-tiy umu u »u».k*>»«l u» b» »,*«.t * tall esplo*M>*» into motion
helper. Tho greater tho helper tbejtbrowh tho swrotmllMi mixture: and
greater U the man; yet he la not n so «r» get aa etptoeteo, wlttcft *pj«r-
"loader." [natty does aot occur   tn   connection
Socialism offcw tho old patties all iwlth the miners' oil tamp wherein all
iihet tbe old partleo do ond mote.   It ] tho ponJooa oro ot ortioary normal at-
Uim-i*. Um m **m4 1mmm* «<mmI iewd, o, mo*nO*tte preaaoro.
rtiboor da; aai protection against j   Tho ho* of Hi electric  lamps to
robbery hy rent and profit taking—j mora likely to got smaetied in a mlna
{tint to • tfem At e edmmf notetf
C I. Pilfer, It The Glag*r Jar.
m-flX-    XIA**-**
>D*?ircai
ters of the Xile, above Khartoum, is
responsible for tbe impas-sability of
the river at that point. To anyone
who has visited the Soudan, the bare
ly navigable Nile about that region ls
a source of great disappointment. Ex-
President Roosevelt particularly com'
mented upon it.
Baedecker carriers may now save
their tears. These vain regrets are
literally wasted on the desert air, for
two German pundits, Herr Dr. Von
Rath and Prof. Von Horlng, together
with an English military savant, after
a painstaking investigation of this
fibrelike moss, .have constmcted a
startling theory that this was the sort
of stuff tbat, under proper geological
conditions, became what we recognize
ns coal. Then they set about to prove
their hypothesis as facts.
The periodic flooding of Egypt hy
the Nile may or may not have some*
thing to do with the rapid accumulation of this sedge, called sudd, ft
possibly bas nothing whatever to do
with Its formation; but that is
neither here nor there, as far as coal
Is concerned. Tlie essential fact is tbat
lt gathers so quickly in the water* of
tbe Blue and White Nile that the application of such a refuse and waste
to fuel uses will produce a cheap and
easily accessible material. Because coal
la almost completely absent, and practically prohibited for fuel uses, at the
necessarily high price In tha Soudan,
Industrial development of the country
hss be*»n sprloiiily retarded.
Just think of the possibilities, when
It is realized that there are SR.000
aquare miles of this Nile sudd, (t Is
about threo feet beneath tbe surface of
tha river, and grows to about twenty
feot In height from the surfaco of tho
river, and grows to ahout twenty feot
la height from tho Nile's hod. Com-
posed of roots, stems, flowers, grasses,
papyrus and tbn like. It reappears,
even if absolutely removed at any spot,
In less than threo weeka.
Now, tho flrat atop taken by Captain
l)ennott Hamper and his Teutonic col.
leagues waa to arrange tor tho trans-
portatlon ot tha sudd to Khartoum.
Tho natives, every throo weeka, cot
the mass down, tie tt la bundle*, mak*
nftor of it, asd float thom down to
Khartoum. Thl* w*» taken to Oipuia
Wnewe-H tVce-i-HM-** if-iaiuM****! a*t*e* ie'
panog wim to* ataiHtard air to qoteWf | «,».««* *nd iranaforntod Into the tn, I
tW*4 U .Ua t*.*it-»(m*i in. tout in ik* \ WBp(let brfeka that he haa named aud-
dlt*.
At tho factory, which wno roeenU7
thrown open la tho protoaot of tho
jrh-erttv* At* W*t**n*tlt wm**t* **P
plsnlpolentUrUs of tke eastsra world,
qoaatltle* of Nllo sudd wero ovapetof-
•4, dried, compressed aad chopped.
Treated with a salt kaowa ot araont
only to oor military -fnttst. tt la
again dried aai placed toto aoaUa,
The bricks thaa mado are tht ccm
mercisi swMtt* fuel, ataltaMo for
various vtlaaMe pttmrnntA,
A Ms steamer wat no tp tht Nllo
ality-flve mil**, ot a ontubt mt.
with Amerlcsa eoal Anothor day tn-
eetty like It, Wolah cool wt* owd. tkoo
e third day only tho aew iMtorfai rod-
Sttowaavnft TM* experiment wtt
^^m^^mtir^j* ^^-m* L^ik|^^ jon^m4*M^e__* ttibntmimiemtii dfth*
tmtrmm otn nniuio wnptwni winipwr mn*
eovored hit now salt ad4Ul*«.    Tot.
t^mmtt *jmie eeme -mmww et^mt
i exactly seven hours with thn »rtjf!'.??.!
ferent gases   has   heen   employed.
Theae, however, lose their Indicating
properties after being In tho gam for
u few minutes, as tho dlff»rsncs   h[
reading oa th* ecal* produced hy corn-
coal.
Xow, when it is recalled that coal
of either sort, costs in the Soudan
$20.50 a ton, and suddite, if transported an equal distance with the coal,
costs only ,$5.75 a ton—even though
actually it requires two tons of sud.
dite to'each ton of coal—well, as the
sure-thing gambler says: "Thero is
nothing to it."—Coal and Coke Opera
tor of Fuel tMagazlne.
PAKINO  WAR  NEW8
When war news is given out   exclusively by rival war offices tbe only
reliable thing about it is that-it is al!
false. Newspapers have two alternatives in their treatment of this ngws.
They may either print what comes
without cjiange and let readers do tha
guessing, or they may do as some Mil
waukee papers are doing, write the dispatches in their own editorial offices
to suit the circultaion department.
It Is noticeable that whichever
method is followed, the Socialists get
the worst of it. The war offices are
most assiduously striking out all reference to the Socialist campaign
against war and the American capitalists press, and particularly tbat of
Milwaukee, is evidently inventing a
few "cables."   . \
There was one thing on which all
these "cables" agreed and that was
that the Socialists of Europe had all
become nationalist jingoes. This being
the only thing upon.which the liars Rt
both ends of the cable agreed, it
should have.been self-evident that It
was pre-eminently false.
As the European Socialist papers
arrive they confirm this impression.
They show that at the time that the
French Socialists were reported to
have been voting for war supplies,
they were absent from the chamber
holding antLwar demonstrations, that
when tbe Germanla-Herald faked the
diBpatch stating that a Social-Democratic member of the Reichstag whom
it called "Hasse" had shaken the
Emperor's had and congratulated him
on his war policy, the only member
with a name resembling this (Haase)
was selected by the German Social-
Democrats to represent them in an
international council against war, and
signaled: his presence there witb a
scathing; denunciation of the German
war policy.
Almost every cable mentioning Vivian!, the Frpnch premier, adds that he
is a Socialist, and the local falsifiers
generally add a "prominent" or "lead- -
ing" Socialist The truth is that he isv
a renegade -Socialist and, like all renegades, is the most bitter enemy of bis
former associates.
There ds plenty ot room upon the
cables for long discussions by H. G.
Wells and Bernard Shaw on the attitude of Socialists toward war, although
no Socialist would take the opinion of ■
either of them seriously ou tactics,
and they have never even participated
in Socialist councils. Whatever may
be their merits as novelists and play-
rights, and -Socialists freely concede
these, they are not authorities on Socialist tactics.
Cut not one word has been permitted to pass tbe censor from Kier Har.
die, Victor Adler, or any of the Socialist members of the various Parliaments of Europe.
, This united lying at' home and
abroad against the Socialists is a tribute to the fear in wblch tbey are held
by the war fanatics on both sides of
the ocean. It Indicates that however
great the hatred between the censors
oni the opposite sides of military conflict, tbey are all united by a greater
fear and hatred of the millions of
workingmen on the other sido of tbo
class conflict.—Milwaukee Leader,
DO you ever consider
the importance of
oo the use of stationery
that is in harmony with
the nature of your business? In many cases
your letterhead is considered as an index of
your business character,
hence the necessity of a
good printer*
00
1
gas** for many mloat**, and tho asor
J would tttonnty- kwo* whft It was In
worhlng order, especially U be failed
to keep the Instrument under constant
oosorvattM.
Dealing with tho subject of h«*<t*ch*.
I wj|| r*f*r to tho nystagmus of which
so orach haa horo hoard daring the
last few yearn Any pcrooo who haa
heen troubled with aching *jrtt aai
txiAAvt I'^-l will symootfcbo -alta a
mfaor tmftoriag from thl* potato! *kk-
, u«*>. «»!>-*:tal*,* mktm doting certain
1 stag** of Ita development tht mlatr
conKisoee to wortt la hot, atoffir «o»*»
ing*. and ofun ta cramped position*,
each swing of tha pith vibrato* through
tho throMtog head, oalll tho mee teeto
Ktmop. Umoo wr* tho tins** who* , oo
prwvtaosty atotod, a mm teuton 'ttm
done th* thing ho ought to havo dono,
•a* tooparto* hia
If you want really high
class printing-the kind
we always produce-try
us with your next order
TM District Ledger
"QUALITY* PRINTERS
Phone48a   ;•;    Fernie, BC.
flamW    ■» The
Original
and
Only
Genuine
TgEDIgTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
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Brewing Co., Ltd.
Beer x
and
Porter
BoiM Goods a Specialty
Passburg
Hotel
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross Brothers PpoPs»
COLEMAN
Liquor Co,
Wholesale De«alers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Full supply of following
fer an appetizing meal to
choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge 8aus>
agea for tomorrow'* brsak.
fast.
CALL OR PHONE
Calgary Cattle Co.
Phon* 66 Wood Street
v PIRNII, B. C.
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDougall, Hgi
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
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Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and
. Shoes, Goats' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT HOSMER, B.C.
Civilization bas mado marked advancement. Tbey former])' killed with
tbe stone ax; In tbe early daya or
America they used the bow and arrow; now they slaughter with machine guns and high explosives.
II    ™E      ft it    Smk1864
Homedank'Canada
HEAD OmctS ANO HP* MUNCHIS IH TORONTO
JAMS MASON. OmmkI Mwuner
BRANOHM AND CONNECTIONS THROUGHOUT OANADA
A young men will sometimes lmiut* before coming to the Beak with
*(l*p*shof one dollar to opm an account Y*t « Bank cm hsv* a*
better *se*t dun • Uig* aossb*? of mmII mcomms with ambWoui snd
thrifty foung inn. •«
J. P. MACDONALD, Manager
VIOTORIA AVI,, -»- h- riRNII   B. 0.
*T3
No.
37
tl
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im
sn
»I7
IW
i%t* 4 •%
nt*
1114
isa
lost
utk
tttk
•TTI
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List of Locals District 18
Nami Ssc ond P. 0. Address
Wtilte Atih Mine.,,,,,, .Wm. Marsh, Taber, Alta*
Btnktiead..... ,...JP. Wlwiler, Baaktead, Alta.   !
;*.«-* t9tv**...........*, taotitntne, motor croek, via Ftnohsr, Alio, j
T't^I'-'tji Jniui.il IkiiU*, iMtA lit, ikttiotm, Ail*.
Blalraor* W, C C^iMophors, OlalraMr*. Alt*.
Bunola.................T. 0. H*rrt**, Paosborg, Aha.
GarboBd*!*..,... ,1. MMeboR, Oanbondal*, Coloman, Alta,
Oatmjor*. Mlehool Warren, Connor*, AIU.
The
of a Mother
By Ethel Carnie
"Carlbel!   Claribel!"
Above the "poshing" of the clothes,
*he frenzied screaming of James,
named after his grandfather who had
just died iu the workhouse hospital,
and the rattling of pots knocked down
by the cat in its endeavor to suivive
in its struggle for existence, airs.
Jones' voice, shrill and yet muted, as
if coming through a heavy burden,
rose on the air.
There was no answer to her tired
appeal.
The ".posher" stopped—the cat darted
under the dresser with guilty haste,
licking its whiskers, the baby in the
cradle let out once more his haunting "a—la—la!" as If he found It
impossible to reach the "te," and Mrs.
Jones, wiping the opaline bubbles
from ber arms on her rough apron,
realized that Claribel really had left
off rocking, and had run away!
James, red In the face, expostulant,
and pathetic, had been deserted.
In the corner sat Rebecca, dressing
a doll In unique fashion.
"Rock that «radle till I find Claribel!" said her mother furiously.
Rebecca complied, but in anguish
of spirit.
James was a noisy baby to pretend
to have for one's own—at 4!
Mrs. Jones 'went to the front door
and looked along the sunny street
where children were playing, school
being just over for the day.
-She knew that she could have
quieted James while she was finding
Clarlbel, but Clarlbel bad got to know
her plain duty and not run away
from lt.
No. She couldn't see Clary anywhere.
But on the flags, pasting colored
strips of paper on his top, was Johnny
Sands.
"Have you seen Clary any*
where?" she asked.
Johnny studied Mrs. Jones, taking
in the menace of her tone. Then he
shook his head. Johnny's teacher always thought of him as a rather
stupid little boy.
"Won't I give lt to her when I get
hold of her. An' James crying
enough" to rupture hissel' so's he can't
work -when he grows up. Nothin' to
do but just go to school. I was working in a print shop at her age—
earnln' my own porridge. C_I_ary!_
Clary!   My word, lady—"
John.watched her go near the street
corner.
He had stopped putting the blue paper and white dots on his pot.
•But when MrB. Jones turned back
and went into her house he wandered
slowly round the corner Mrs. Jones
had not turned.
In tbe street Johnny entered, quiet,
sunny, with grass growing between
tbe paving stones, seven little girls
had hold of hands and were swinging
backwards and forwards singing a
sort of chant,
"All in a row;
Gathering snow-
Some said Yes,
An' some said No!"     '
In the middle was Clarlbel Jones,
n rapt look on ber small-featured
face, with the blue veins at the temples. Her balr flew backwards and
forwards like a yellow cloud—her
blue eyes were aglow. She was somewhere on a fairly bill gathering snow
with tbe wee folk under a fairy moon.
Johnny Mole up behind her, saying in a whisper, "Carlbel Jones—
you're wanted." Even so a sympathetic detective might warn his prisoner.
She camo back with a etart, dropping out of tbe row.
"Was ibe mad?" queried Claribel.
In a fagged voice. Johnny nodded
dramatically.
"Happen If you go now you won't
catch tt so bad," ho suggested. Clari-
beV* glance went toward the group
of whispering girl*.
"Come on. Clarry." Ihey shouted.
"We'r* going to play at 'My hnlr is
long."
"Clarry! Clarry! Walt till I
■fetch—"
Clarry started nervously si the
voice rang from the corner of th*
street. Out her mother had turned
back again.
"Aren't you going?" asked wise
Johnny.
For answer   sho   ran   and joined
hands with the girls, and soon thoy
wet* singing:
•"My hair Is long;
My dress la short;
My boots are lined with stiver;
A red, red rose upon my bresst—
Aa' a guinea gold ring on toy finger."
At 1**1 *b* t*ft tbe ttrnn-n **** tKUfi
towards her fate.
On the doorstop bor mother was
standing. Attn came to meet ths ran-
ntr away from doty.
Tho trsnsgrossor crashed down sn
"Now—I hope you're ashamed o'
yourself," said her mother. "Go an'
nurse your little brother. You ought
to be glad to have one. You'd be
sorry if 'e was dead."
Even this appeal to sentiment did
not crush Claribel. There was something about her that ber mother
could not make out. Clarry was
unsually a good nurse. Rebecca had
hold of the cradle-string, and *was
pulling it 'with such vigor it threatened to topple over, and as she swung
she was mumbling about "Pig porridge hot, Pig porridge cold, Pig porridge in a dish, nine days old."
"Clarry, look after James," said her
mother, and put the string in tbe slack
little hand. She took it mechanically.
Rebecca realized some tragedy about
her sister, and placed her doll on
Clarry's lap.
"Don<t want it," said Clarry, letting it tumble off, at which Becky
began to cry.
"Wait till you father comes home,
lady," warned Airs. Jones, and went
back to the washing.
Mr. Jones was a six-loom weaver,
with a cough. When he came in he
dropped into the first chair and
mopped his brow.
"Ninety in the shade today," he
said. "God, I wish the summer was
over. It's hell Hello! What's to
do wl' Claribel?"
■Becky ran and told how Clarlbel had
thrown her doll on the floor.
(Mrs. Jones talked of James' screaming and how he might have ruptured
himself, and now Becky might have
played with the fire and been burnt to
death.
"You should be good girl,
Clarry," said her father. "You
should help your mother. You're a
big girl now. Quite a little woman.
I went to work when I was your
age."
Clarry never spoke.
She sat pulling the string mechanically, listening to what they said.
"She takes after thy side," said
Mrs. Jones.   "Ours never sulks."
There were cockles and mussels to
tea. Clarry ran for them to the shop,
where the old man always asked her
what her name was—and forgot it
afterwards.
"A quart," he asked, looking at
her. "What's your name?" She told
him, gravely, without telling bim that
she had—told—him -before,—"He-was
very old and very slow—and sometimes when he was serving people his
daughter came, twitched the bag from
bis hand and served them herself,
£larfy had noticed all this. In a dim
way she felt that there was a similarity between their fates. He had not
the right to be old; she had not the
right to be young.
There was no one In the shop tonight
"Here you are, Little 'Un," he said,
when she took her upstairs she told
her she might take her doll to bed.
"Don't want, it," said Clarlbel, sleepily.   "Don't want it any more."
She took her mother's kiss coldly.
It almost seemed as if she objected
to the incongruity of being at once
as responsible as a grown-up, and as
easily cajoled as a child. There was
a little, old-womanish look as she
turned her face to the wall, away
from the candle light.
"She said she didn't want her doll,"
said Mrs. Jones to Mr. Jones. "I always said our Clarry was a queer
little thing. But she'll want it tomorrow. I'll keep her home half a day tomorrow. James happen ha' that
tooth through soon. God knows what
I'll do when t'other comes."
But Clarry did not have her doll on
the morrow.
Nor the day after.
Nor the day after that.
She gave it to Becky—as if she had
suddenly outgrown maternal feeling.
There wore a few pangs of jealousy
during that first day or two when she
saw Becky nursing It. ,Then it passed.
She did not grumble when told to
rock James.
She took It as the inevitable—a
thing without joy, without meaning,
that somebody had to do, and that
she had to do -because she bad no
choice and because she was told.
When the new baby came she
showed no pleased delight.
It was another to hush—another to
rock, another to carry around.
"She's jealous," said ber mother.
"I'm glad James has got off walkln,'
but he'll be a good bit of bother yet."
"They'll o' get out o't way, at't
once," said a neighbor. "An' Clarry's
gettin' a fine help to yo.' An' -Becky'll
be a washer-up, soon. Lasses is handy.
(But they wear more leet stuff than
lads, so happen it's as weel as that's
a lad."
Johnny Sands had made himself as
dusty as a miller and as tired as a
dog In order to carry paving stones
to make the shape of a house for
Clarlbel Jones. There was the Htr le
doorway—a plan of a doorway,
rather, and a paving stone left out
on the right to suggest a window,
for in these kind of things much
must be left to the Imagination.
"Now isn't that grand?" he asked.
Clarry beamed admiration.
Becky was rocking on this afternoon when they had holiday from
school, and Cissy Sharpe, Johnny
and she were going to play baby-
bouse.
Johnny was to be father, Clarlbel
was to be mother and Cissy was
going^0--^r~aTm«^Hn*S~com"e"Ov"er*W
a visit.
"What'll we do for baby?" asked
Cissy.   "Oh, Clarry, fetch your doll?"
PAGE SEVEN
ROYAL
HOTEL
[ Directory of Fraternal
Societies
l-r:m§
FERNIE
Bar Unexcelled
All White Help
Everything
Up-to-date
Call in and
see us once
JOHN PODBIELANCIK, Prop.
WOMEN    OF  NORWAY
Equality of Sexes Has Improved the
Condition of All
■ Nobody can visit Norway today
without being struck by the position
held by Norwegian women. They are
neither submissive, timid nor loud.
They dress with modesty, and they
dress fittingly. But the great fact is
their social position. Here they really
seam to move among men as equals,
and that position seems to be now accepted without any real damage to the
womanhood or manhood of the country.   On the contrary, bo»h are better
for it.
The achievement of the voting
power by Norweigian women is only a
part of this vast movement, which is
represented by a claim to ©quality in
society as a~whole. The women in
Norway have worked for that greater
aim simultaneously with the suffrage
agitation ever since 18Sf>, and they
have achieved their aims together.
Practically all the professions are now
open to women In Norway, except the
priesthood and the army.
Men and women are educated together at school and college. They
foim clubs and societies together, both
"I haven't one," confessed Clarry.
Cissy got a bright idea.
"Let's have your cat," she suggested.
Clarry stood with downcast eyes.
She hesitated at what she was going
to say, wondering whnt its result
would be.
'Sufipose," she  said at last, "sup-
looking down  with  his blue, gentle  pose we have a baby house without
gave him the money—linger-
eyes
She
Ing,
Then he precelved that she was not
smiling today.
"Havo you got caned today?" he
guessel.
Then It call came out In a jumble
of wild words she told !h:n ot James
and her enforced motherhood,
"Somebody's got to rook babies,"
ho told her gently "S tuiebody had
to rock you.' Who rockod you?"
"Mother!" said Clarry. "Not Uorky
—because she's newer. I rockod
Becky. Now 1 rock James. An' he
cries so.   I want to play."
"Are you goin' to be all neet serving a quart of mussols? 'Mrs. Jones
'11 wnnt 'em for f toa. Run home,
Clarlbel Jonea, an' tell yoar mothor
It weren't my fault you dawled,"
He opened the door for her.
'Somebody's got to rock babies,"
he aald. "All right, LUa, I'm comin'
I'm comin."
baby."
Cissy Sharpe was aghast at this
revolution In babyhouse land,
"An* how can I ask If I can take
her to my house?" asked she. "I
won't play at babyhouse without u
baby. An' I fetched all my tea
things, Clarlbel Jones. An' how can
Johnny be father if there's no baby?"
"Well, I shan't ploy If I'm to nurse
a . baby," Bald Clarry, sullenly,
"There's no fun In it."
At last It was all settled.
John aud C'Ihkj set tea ready in
the bouse,
Clarlbel went off to another pile of
stones.
Dy-and-bye there was a tapping
nt the door and aa If they could not
soe the queer figure with Its torn veil
and battered hat, they protended to
open the door, the door that win not
there.
"How do you do, Miss Jones." said
Johnny. "Yea the baby'a very well,
bui Jimt  otittfnp n  tooth     Will  yon
INDEPENDENT OEDEE
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
ayening at 8 o'clock In K. P.
Hall.
Noble Grand, J. T. Puckey.
Secretary, J. B. Mciklejohn.
ESTHER EEBEKAH
LODGE NO. 20
meets first and third
Thursdays in month, at 8 p.
m., in K. P. Hall.
A. MINTON, N. G.
S. TOW'NSEND, R. Sec.
ANCIENT OEDEE OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello's Hall second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet overy Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. In their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, T. Ratcllffe.
K. of S., D. J. Black.
M. of F„ Jas, Madison.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
(Meets every other Monday
at 8 p. m., in K. ot P. Hall.
Dictator, F. H. Newnham.
Secretary. G. Moses.
140 Howland Ave.
LOYAL TRUE BLUE ASSOCIATION
Lady Terrace Lodge, No.
224, meets in the K. P. Hall
second and fourth Friday of
each month at 8 p. m.
(.MRS. J. BROOKS, W. fil.
Vv. ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet
at the K. P. Hall first and
third Friday evening ot each,
month at 7:30. Visiting brethren cordially invited.
R. CRIOHTON, W. iM.
J. SKILLING, Rec. Sec.
A. Macnell 8. Banwe„
MACNEIL A BANWELL
Barrlstera,   Solicitor*,   Notarle*,   Etc.
-— Offices?—Ground" FIoorTBank of
Hamilton   Building Fernie, B. C.
e. 0. taw*
Alex. I. Fish**
LAWE A FISHER
ATTORNBY8
Fernie, B. C,
Aftor tea Mrs. Jones had to Inn. have sausages or celery, Miss Jones?
Whilst she Ironed  she grumbled st What a nice little doa you've aot."
thu number of pinnies Becky s-id
Clarry dirtied. James wss cross, and
Clarry had to rock him again. Mr.
Jones took Ilecky to see the hen pen.
"I'll want Clarry to rock James,
An' there are a few errands," said
Mrs. Jones.
At bedtime father (old Clarry n
story. It was about n good little ulrl
who   did nil   her mother told her.
Clarr.v aaw tbe moral at once and
her attention wanderod.
"At*. Jones »o   far   n»l*»i*t«rd thai
And there on a mrlng, following
Clarry when be wa* pullpd, was Peter,
the cat.
"Wouldn't  you  like to bo mothor.
sug-
nnd   let   me   be   aunt   a   bit
KCHteil ('Uny once.
"No, I'd rather be aunt," said Clarlbel. "I i>hnll nlwsyn be aunt now,
Cls*>'. It'* nlre lo hear about bxby'*
tooth, I'm alad you're In full work,
Mr. Sands. It takes a lot to bring
up ohlldron, Thank, yo«, yee, l tako
sugar iii my t**."—-.V V. Call.
SHOOTING SEASON
BEGINSSEPT. 1st
Call and see us before
setting out for your
fall hunting trip
6w^'..Vij...,".V/.,.y. Goo, film*. CorWn, B. (T
aK.^.\"\-:."ftffiaflsa re0"-4 ■* **■
****** ••Bran'Morgan, Frank, Alta.
Hfllertat,,, , tto* Thompson, Hlllcrest, Alta.
TvofbbrWt* fWlferfOff., .PVgiJk Barrtagbom, Coalhorat Alta,
Maplo Uot., ,„,...,T, 0. Homo*, Ptoatan-g, Aits.
MWtc' • "• Etawr, UUsbml, B. «,
Vnmdmrt....,.,,....... f. o. Harrt**, Pmtbei% Attn.
I****   .A. Potterooo. Tnbor, Attn.
Owrwtowo, Canmore... Mix Hotter, Ooorgotowa. Otoaer*, AH*.
Braseoo Ml***., ...Hany ♦WC-wtm, Nettem, tig Jto&jUeeeb
ete Hem**. JSbnnn.
impel** to mn wti nt tb* wi*.
cam* along witb bead slightly bent,
and trailing totddtep*.
Mrs. Jones' hand shot ont snd
caught Clarry's, giving It llttlo shake*
aa they wont along, and Jerking out
such ph-nto* a* 'Working at yonr
itneV Lasy, Utile good-for-ttol-Mfl',"
and "Wbst woold yoar ittwfay srbool
iMirber aayt" and "Leaving: poor little j
Jimmy to scream hi***!' bine."
Tbe rolmlsatitif p-oalaiiMeai was
saved until lb* eolprtt wnn midway
In tbe lobby-when ber ana wa*
tmaekod, oot bratally, tat Wrralr.
foT™spdftSTTfleasufe" aflSTserious objects. The young men, indeed, are
now said to refuse to have separate societies, and the too sexes are more
and more working together in all
spheres of life. Women sit on jurlos.
and there is now one woman Judge.
And yet .Norway does not sink Into
the sea. On the contrary, she has, by
general consent, never been so prosperous.
The vote is the banner and the em.
blem of this movement, the crown of
ivoman's claim in Norway. The story
of the way in which the women of
Norway secured the vote will be deep,
ly Interesting to all people at the pres-
ent moment. The victory c-ame In the
end quite peaceably and by tbe consent of all parties.
The Norwelgn women got the voto
In the normal political way, by helping and supporting their friend* In all
parties, and the detail of the story is
a curious one. The flrat victory of the
suffragists, in Norway as in England,
was to secure) the local vote. That
vote has bt-en very extensively used.
It Is now universal, and It has re-
Milted hero in Christiana In tho socialists being the most powerful party
In the municipal council. The next I
victory was tho gain of the limited
vote—the "couiiclllation bill" vote--for
Stato purposes. That was given to the
womon of Norway by the Conservatives, but with the aid of Liberal mem-
bers of the Storthing.
That limited voto continued for
nomo flmo, Imt In I'M;!, tht LHur.il*->
wero returned to power In nplio of It.
In 1.11.1—hint yonr, tho Lthoral* n<i<|
Socialist» combined, nnd not oppoxed
by the ConsorviiilvoN, oxtendt'd the
vou* to all womon, nnd now the suf.
fruKe In Norway gland* a« thn same
for both mon und women a universal
voto for all adults ovor ••' years, both
for fltnto and local purpoM-a.
Women un- ullouetl io nit In 1'urlln-
mom, Imii not to borom* members of
tlio Kovormnont. tine woman *s» '»•
Parliament ror a short timo a» sub.
stltute for n msn—th-tt Norwoslmitt.
happy people, bave a substitute «»*»*
;i*rn which nave* tbem from by*!«<;.
tinn*. liut tke has beon defeated, end
mi woman now kIu In tU«< \urwolalsn
Parliament,
j    Now for   »b*   results   on politic*. ■
i Womoti'x f»nlnlrm« irt* nt ft****,*!* *t*>,r.i
more deferred to.   Thoro *lt« tn Vw.
, kkhj H tiotnen »   rounrll whlrh tepr*- \
•ents   all   the   higher   Intereais of \
ttututu.     1ml IkmI) la regularly «on.|
suited by tho government on all '*<>- i
m*n'* o*t\*xlom. Vn V«riroot-,n i»e"
unent has yot been' electt«& on the unl !
H*r*«l suffrage, bat the women's voto'
has played a part which alvoil mttt* • imive Tfttft
cli.nl guldanc*. for the future.   It lw* j    Wc offt,f Qm unMtml Dollar* He*
imt «aliMNt a maternity  benefit   for; ward for any cane td Catarrh tbst «*»•
Norwegian womon |aot be cured by Hall's Cnterrb Pnrt*.
Uo    M    »»u„i    roforrn* .   »a«o».j    w^'tn'o ImtxArJimwtt VevV'kowiro'F.
homes, perelom nnd ohtldron1* rnro*   If, «"»»"*r '<"■ »-><• '*• '•<•»<* «>„t »»»^v*
t'Hit   ;■   :,'..,,, .i.i.-  mi HI!  IruslftolMI
Iho women*  voto |*  mi  tor ptxakinr, !»r»»i#«Mi-....i    mui   niutuvmii*   t,l„t-   i«
legislation.   Abovo .». it !• powerful ftm* 0M Mr •«'»«•»»«•• »»•* * «•*»
In ttmpetnM*.   Th«»    Sorn»y, nith]   *ATl"N.a hank of COM^r^r.
h«r poworful local opttrw taw, 1* *.*t i, tUU'a Ceinttk -Gmt* i* taken irn*ro*t-
llng a Wad to tl* »orld.   An* in ib*i l&mZ£*Z*ti™\\?V™ ^Tntn^r^.
1f"'llhl     AAI '•«»»■*•» ■*****,******.
Tfk*> 11*11 * T»«lly IMl* tm rtmatl.
patten.
We have the largest Assortment of Rifles, Shotgun „ Ammunition k Camp-
mo ixitlAl* In tt** **:.2ZZ
tl. D. QUAIL
Phone 37
FERNIE    .    R  C.
ill
the women bas* played a sroai tir
1 im»-Uarmetit Worfcor ■m^x^Aimi
Me eight
"v^fiivi-r^
■•^^r^f?^!lp!fv^i#^^
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 19, 1914
i -
r
il
P
i*
Have You Inspected The
Fall Coats for Women ?
If Not, Do so To-Day
Tlio gathering together oi' such a notable selection
of coats and wraps for early fall ami winter wear
reflects credit on this store. AVe are proud of our
showing, embracing the newest styles and features
as arc pronounced by fashion leaders. All the new
tendencies as shown by the new eastern houses are
represented on a smaller scale here, and Ave invite
the people of Fernie to come and make a selection
before the lines are broken.    Prices, $7.50 to $45.00
7-'i'<*V"^i'"i'\
" 'X' \fi\
>•*> r\
■<?Avi
\%7^m
-*■■) r?A,
■liTl^
*'L
Raincoats at $10.50 Each
lia prepared for the rain and be warm and comfortable in one of these heavy raincoats. Cut on the
newest lines.' Guaranteed perfect and thoroughly
water-proof.  All sizes at $10.50 each.
The Balance of These Dainty Lingerie Blouses at
$1.75 Each, Instead of $3.50 to $4.50
There is a big valuo represented in this selection
of lingerie blouses, the styles are good nnd the
values we emphasize ns "Nest Yet," worth -$4.50;
for $1.75 each.
Mine Women's Winter Goats—Extra Special at
$7.60 Each
Tht'eo-nuartor lengths winter coats, eoloi'K in grey,
brown and green eheeks. A warm, serviceable eout
for ordinary wear, and a good buying while Ute
nine conts nre here, Saturday, We urge early morning selection, at $7.50 each.
Pay-Day Specials From the Raady-to-Wear Section
Sweater eoatu for women, #2.50 to #10.50 eaeh.
Every wanted style and sine in good, serviceable
weights in the season's new coloring and sty lex.
Our range ia very complete in women'a, miaaca and
■children'a, and we invite your early selection.
Price* to suit, from $3 50 to $10.60 each.
Sox Specials
Men'* exlro heavy grey all-wool mxx, regular 3T»i\
apeeial, 4 pairs for 11.00
Mon'a heavy grey wool ribbed sou, rogular 25#,
apeeial. ft pair for  .$1.00
Men'* oxlro heavy all wend m\, in grey, blue
iuul brown, regular woodsman**» nnx\ special for
*jn«„M-*t» .*ntl M*n*«t«v     W<kw»!oo wW  flSe  ner
i'Hih, .ii-'i-\-h\ 2 j'.i'r for $1*W
Mon'« black cashmere aox» with grey heel and
toe.   Regular 35cj special flatoitlay, 4 pair. .$1,00
i 9   *■ * ', t 1    , .1
V>kU   MUM ■*»*■  *»wvS*  .»,*»*i  «..**  0> '
for your inapeetlon.
Attractions for the Ladies
Women's woolen hose, three pair for $1.00. Good Printed Cotton Velours—Extra Special at 25 per yd.
serviceable weight for fall and winter wear.   Wor- i              *             j *, • .                           ,
.  ,       ,-*   •     ,,   •       c.,      ,!!'.'. A range of new and dainty patterns to choose
sted quality m all sizes, 8V> to 10.   Special 3 pair    f    on •    i        • j      e *. U- •    *.      * * *. e    *■
e                                                        L          J from, 29 inches wide, of Sufficient weight for ki-
tor                                                                         $100 ■                                                    *o
 * monos, dressing gowns, bath robes or children's
Women's Winter Weight Vests—3 for $1.00 dresses, warm and fleecy.   Special, per yard .. .25c
Coming the time for a change to winter weight A gt        ghowi     of winter ^^
underwear.   These are perfect fitting cold weather ,,      ,   .    °,                , ,,    ,
weights in vests.   Pure white and natural. Special n°Ur ,St°ck °f he^y W°° blffke,ts * c0»f<f m
3 for                                                               jj.qq • all grades and weights.  Grey blankets m 6, 7,8 and
10 pound weigths.  White Saxony blankets at $5.00
New Eiderdown, 54 Inches Wide, $1.25 per Yard lo $S.50.  Hudson Bay blankets, 4 ft, in all colors.
Colors, grey, white, red,  navy and scarlet.   A Get >*our ^PP1*' bfrfore the selection is broken,
very heavy weight, soft and durable.    Special, Vyella Flannel, 65c per Yard
per yard  $1.25 The best known grade of pure wool flannel on
Velveteens for Dresses and Children's Wear ^ market  guaranteed pure wool and unslnink-
,_                            •                              . able splendid for children s underwear, wash waists,
Has a permanent glossy finish with a rich, heavy etc . 32 inehes wHe. 16 pfAtemfi t0 choose from>
nap and good, strong cotton back. 22 inches w"ide    Special, per yard   65c
and every color.   Special, per vard... -, 60c *  ->««•
„.,   ,       „ , ,    ,      '      „  White and Striped Flannelette. 8 Yards for $1.00
Eiderdown Robeland Fleece-Special 35c per Yard Put away your winter,g supply of eottou f,amiel.
A heavy fleece lined cotton velour, extra good for ette now—the selection was never better and at the
bath robes and heavy winter kimonos, good color- price it is a particularly strong value; 30 to 34 in.
ings and patterns.   Special, per yard 35c    wide, free from filling.   Eight yards for $1.00
■^s*iwy**s^-iiS3>^
wMfflwsmrniwsM&wififfli^^^
Specials in Men's Suits and
Sweaters for Pay-Day
Our new stock of men's and boys' sweaters are now
opon for your inspection. A great variety of new
lines are shown this season, and each have the distinctive style features that characterize the 1914
sweater garments.
Men's heavy hunting sweater coats, have very
deep collars and are knitted in heavy Jumbo.
Prices $4.00 to $10.60
Men's all wool heavy ribbed or fancy knit coats,
iu shawl collar, Norfolk und double breasted style.
Priced at $3.60 to $6.60
Coat *wi«»U«rw without eollara (for office men) in
fine ribbed weave; colors, grey, brown, navy and
green,   Priee* $0,00 Ud $1.80
Men'a cont wentem, medium weight, ivvcnrible
oollart; can be worn with or without collar; colon.
A'1'"1
I,   9-*m**li'ir94,   99tt*^,   ^,it..i..9   94.419    9,    ^tr-'lM.     *m9**l,*Jt       -V.
il I'hlf.r .•i.iiiVmsmfvn TMnd ntfRW,,$4fW,f!.TiO
Suit Special for Pay-Day-Office Greys and Office
Bluet
$23.00
These f-ofta are made from tht bett quality wor-
«eds; all silk lined and conaist of complete mit and
extra pair of pantaj in all site*, from U to 44.
,..•••)„ „..•*■» «
,*,***     ^■•494 4.1       .4...      44.
m&m mak
I     *>■} tjal-tW.
in,       *
999    .**i,4.    ..*4,99.9999f    «W-U    M)itt**M^
See  Our   Window  Display
Pay-Day Specials in
Footwear For Ladies
'- ,*** ,
Ladies' high laced and button boots. Some
fifty pairs to be sold at less than cost prices. Made
in black vici kid and patent leathers, in button and
lace styles.   Special pay-day values a,t $1.95 a pair,
Nothing satisfies a particular woman as will a perfect-
fitting shoe; with it goes a
feeling, of absolute content.
This illustrates one of our new
"Empress" styles. We have
many others in stock, which
we will be pleased to show.
Specials in Men's Footwear
Men's 10 inch brown high cut boot1?, in box kid
and crome calf leathers, all solid leather, with
straps and buckle. Every pair guaranteed. Regular values $6.00.   Special pay-day price, $4.90.
Men's 12 inch brown calf high cut boots; a good
^slioe for prospecting and  hunting,  with  heavy,
doble soles and wide heels.   Regular values, $8,50
d ifcfl OO    Spgoinl nfly.dAV-pEWi.SfiLflQ^pafr^	
Men's Pit Boots
All solid leather, every pair guaranteed, well
nailed soles made on wide, roomy lasts. Regular
values to $4.00.   Special $2.95.
Grocery Specials
For Pay-Day
Java Can Syrup, qts., per tin $ ,35
White Beans, 4 lbs 86
Dairy lltitter, in 5 lb. lots    .28
IJraid 's Big 4 Coffee, fresh ground, 2 lbs 78
New Laid Eggs. 2 don 86
Silver Label Extract, 4 ozs 15
fable Pigs, per lb 20
Fresh Apples, per lb    .05
Van Camps Hominy, 2 tins 86
Kootenay Jam, 6 lb. pail 80
Aylraer Jam, 5 lb. pail ,..   ,76
Chiver *a Ma lade, 5 lb. tins    .66
Dalloy 's Prepared Mustard, 16 oz ,,,   ,26
Vau Camp 'a Pork and Beans, small, 2 for    ,86
Slam Rice, 41b    &
Heln* Tomato Soup, small mc 10
Special Blend Bulk Tea, 2 lbs...,......,.,...   ,78
Large Washington Onions, 10 lbs    M
OoM Standard Malt Vfnegar. i\H ,   ,86
mmsBmmmmmmmMBmmaBsatmsssss
Stationary Specials
Military Seribblera, 7 for , $ M
Military Kxcrelse Books, 7 for ,.   JO
Writing Pada. rach ,, ,    4|
Knvelope«f per pkg ,,,.,., .06
R410WA1B mHMmmt
nAy-*r *9*ltk ta ftswu* aad laaoelwvt
Bogtrs, copper pit bottoms, reg. $3.00, apeeUl tt.78
Boiler*, copper pit bottoms, rag. $150, apeeial $8.10
Bread making pans, regular $178, apeoial.,,,
Tlu kniwdiug pan*, regular $1,75, apceial...,
Tin Impawn? mm rtmxU* At ttt tmeatml      ft ort
Tin kmtdfnt twna. ratular *1 «5 «fw#t«t..   fl <W
IwaaMied kneading pans, 81 qt., reg. W.», ajmetal
■i ......... ».....«,.,..,,.»»,,..,,,,..,, gKOO
Eoamaled koMdiog paM, If +, reg. #!.?§, npeml
Knnm*t**ddMimm reenter«ftbt -mtud*,)      mwn
Knameled dhh pana, wgtrlar $1,50, apecUl.. ,.|
EnaweleddWipaM, regular 11.25. apeeial....
Money Sav
ing Prices
D TRITES-WOOD COMPANY, Ltd.
The Store of
Quality
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL AND COAL CREEK
m*. •   um*t!**
wm
WM,HWw"
"""^
JL^.
IIIII lllll Illl
-^mmim^Mn^mAmmMm
Mttl^iMI^^
-—••'• '       1,

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