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BC Historical Newspapers

The District Ledger 1919-04-04

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 Y
ISSWS
v$£'
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tlfJl       'M^tr!
OWNED, CONTROLLED, PUBLISHED BY DISTRICT 18, U.M.W. of A.
 i_ ..___      .„ _ _    _j. ..& ... ^      ...
*c-
PERNIE, B. C, A&tlL 4,1919
Printed by Union Labor
Loggers   Organizer Driven
Out of Cranbrook Gets a
Hearing in Fernie
A. McKenzie, organizer for the B. C,
Loggers' Union ,was driven out of
Cranbrook on* Friday last by a mob
wblch first made him hand over the
money which had been paid into him
as dues by lumberjacks who wished to
become members of the organization.
Ue had previously been ordered off the
property of the Ros&Saskatoon Lumber
Company at Waldo and given to understand that organization among the mill
workers and loggers in "this neck of
the woods" would not be tolerated.
(The iB. C. Loggers' Union has al.
ready accomplished much on the coast
in the way of improved camp conditions, hours, payments, etc., and the
lumber operators of the coast have "no
use" for such an organization. McKenzie is a lumberjack of many years
experience and has had' many trying
experiences since undertaking to or.
ganize his fellow workers. He is a
strong opponent of those who advocate
violence or sabotage and prefers to appeal to the reasons of men. On his
return from Cranbrook he was interviewed by The District Ledger and the
following letter (which has brought
no reply) was sent to the secretary of
the G. W. V. A.: ,
Fernie, B. C, .March 31, 1919.
Mr. L. Richardson, Secty. G. W. V. A.,
Cranbrook, 15. C.
Dear Sir:
The District Ledger has had an in.
tervlew with A. .McKenzie, organizer
for the B. C. Loggers' Union, in which
h'e tells us that he was driven out of
Cranbrook by returned soldiers and
tbat they forced him to give up money
which had been paid him by loggers
who wished to.become members of his
organization.
Wo are aware that /there are two
sides to every story and it is the desire of The District Ledger to see that
fair play is given in-every instance.
Wo wonld. thfirefore. appreciate it
jvery much if you would give U3   for
publication this" weelTa. statemenT  or j Cranbrook receipts if they would
the returned soldiers' sido  of the case
ceedings saying he wished to ask a
question. 1 courteously asked him
to wait until all tlie boys were through
signing up but he refused to do so and
there was nothing else for mo to do
but accede to his request. He asked
if I had been a delegate to the Western labor conference at Calgary and
1 told him I had been. He then asked
ir it was not true that at that confer,
euce resolutions were passed endorsing the Soviet government of Russia
and the Spartacan movement in Germany and I assured him it was true.
He then asked if I endorsed those re.
solutions myself and I told him that I
did./
"Continuing the questioner told me
they could not call my speech seditious aB they had paid particular attention to it but as I had been a dele,
gate to the conference at Calgary and
endorsed its views I was a Bolsheviki
and the people would not stand for
anarchy but for democracy. He denounced me and the organization as
being "detrimental to labor and thc
well being of the community." They
then took charge of the meeting and
passed resolutions condemning the actions of the labor mien at Calgary and
cleared the hall.
"I went to the Cranbrook hotel,
where I was staying, and had not been
in my room more than two minutes
before someone rapped at the door de.
manding admission. I opened the door
and quite a mob entered. Their spokesman demanded that I give up my
receipt book along with the money I
had collected for initiation fees and
dues from the loggers and that I im.
mediately beat it out of town. When
I showed a little hesitation one of the
gentlemen took out his watch and
curtly informed me that I would have
two minutes in which to comply.
"I told them that my book contained other receipts besides those of
Cranbrook but [would tear out ^Jthe
wblch will be published as you write
it and without any comment.
Yours vory truly,
I1. F. Lawson,
Editor-Manager,
Organizer MoKenzle's statement is
ns follows and w»s are still willing to
publish "th-e other side" if it will be
'glvtn to us:
"I urrlvcd in Cranbrook on Friday.
iMareh 28, and Look a look around to
assure nie that the boys would get
their money back and that the receipts
would bo forwarded to the B. C. Log.
gers' Union, 01 Cordova St. W, V»n-
i couver, B. VS. 1 tried to get. them to
allow me to pay the money back per-
J sonally' but they would not do it. They
i promised that the money would    be
! paid back through the secretary of the
!<!. W. V, A. and from him I got a re. I should be dono
i'ceipt for twenty-five dollars, [labor and capita
OTTAWA HAS
A SOLUTION
FOR LABOR'S
GRIEVANCES
OTTAWA, April 2.—Hon. Gideon
Robertson, minister of labor, in the
senate today announced that the government is to appoint a commission of
five men consisting of labor men and
capitalists to study various conditions
with the object of arriving at a decision on the feasibility of joint control
in industry.
Better Cooperation
The government was working along
the lines of greater cooperation and
understanding and felt confident that
by this'means, by a better understand,
ing between employers and employees,
a more hopeful order could be secured. There were those who urged
upon the government the need for
strong action, for drastic regulations,
if Bolshevism was not to prevail and
life and property endangered, but, for
his own part, he was-of the opinion
that force was-not the remedy. On
the contrary he felt that tf the country
wanted Bolshevism the way to get it
was by force.
"One week ago," continued Senator
Robertson, "it was decided to hold a
conference with captains of industry.
They came to Ottawa—all of them
who could—and we discussed matters
all day last Friday, I laid before them
for consideration a certain course of
action and asked for their views as
to its wisdom and they gave it their
endorsation.   And as a result of that
Int. Bd. Member Livett In
Fight Against One
Big Union
President Christophers and
His Position Regarding
One Big Union
(Lethbridge Herald)
CALGARY, April 1—The first
conference, instead of parliament or
the government saying to labor and
capital, 'do this or do that,' we propose appointing a small commission
of five men who will absolutely com.
mand tho confidence of the public asking them to proceed to all centres of
industry, to s
get" all the facts
their   recommen
| Should Retain Identity
j "My idea of industrial unionism,"
de-;Said Mr. Livett, is "that each organ.
cisive step to get out and smash the | jZation retains its indentity and have
One Big Union was taken in Calgary jan affiliated understanding with the
Tuedsay morning, when Robert L.lv-' other workers with the purpose of
ett stated to a representative of the j attaining the one end. There are
Herald in the course of.ran interview; many th^gs that enter int0 the rea-
th'at he was resigning his position as | sons for thjs. After the referendum
international board member of the | vote was taken, from what I can judge
United .Mine Workers of America, in.1 at the moment, the'central committee'
order that he could not be charged,,wm. automatically cease to -exist;
m his efforts in fightln^the new pro- therefore, who is going to control this
1 'so-called One Big Union?   This is a
I point that is as nebulous as the whole
IMr, LIvett's action, it is regarded j scheme."
in various   labor   circles, will   have Agrees With Ross
very considerable effect on the ever-! Mr. Livett stated that he agreed
growing feeling among craft unions j wjth the statement of Alex Ross,
and   others   against   the   resolution! ai.L.A., at the meeting of the Calgary
posed organization, thaPhe was mere,
ly doing so to keep Ms job.
which the Red element carried at the
recent Inter-provincial conference in
Calgary, and Its reflex will certainly
be found when the Calgary Trades
and Labor Council again meet to dis.
cuss Uie matter.
"The interests of the men are more
to me than individual self or my position," was the way Mr. Livett put
it when declaring his intention to resign as an international board member
at the end of the month. It might
be stated that he was elected to his
position by the members of District
No. 18 of the United Mine Workers
of America and is not a nominee of
the international itself, although he
is also a member of the policy com.
mitteee for this district.
In declaring that he is going out
to do his utmost to kill the new organisation, Mr. Livett stated that
whilst they all believed in industrial
unionism in order to attain that end,
there should bo no secessionist movement. "The One Big Union," he said,
"openly avowed its intention to with,
draw from its international affllaUons,
,X.~~.tfnm.i.     tt   ...rt..1A    ,*rtfr,*i*   thn   fr^nl   ffl-p
X*X*U1 >U»
Trades and Labor Council Friday
night, that the One Big Union was an
I.WAV. movement. ,(We fought the
I.W.W.'s at our convention at Fernie
in 1918 ,and a number of them are the
leading spirits in the present move,
ment. They have been against any
form of labor organization for several
years past, and have only 'switched
over during the past twelve months
or so. They have always contended
that the labor movement was never of
any advantage to the workers, and if
disrupted a better form of organization would spring up, but they never
considered the suffering that might be
entailed in the meantime."
No Good Purpose
Continuing, the International board
member said that no good purpose
could ever be achieved by disruption.
By working on the inside there was always a better chance of getting a clos.
er' understanding with their fellow
man. By, working on "the inside" he
meant retaining thrir affiliations with
titter nrnfl  fti-ganizritions:  meeting in
While I was in Indianapolis with the
other delegates from District IS, attending the policy convention, the
Western Labor Conference was held,
a new babe was born, which was
named "The One Big Union," On our
return we Jind that a referendum of
the labor organizations is to be taken
first to see if they are in favor of severing their present International aliil.
iations, and secondly, if tjiey an; in
favor of a six-hour work day.
Anyone who has studied tti-5 labor
movement, will, 1 believe, agre-3 with
me, that Industrial Unionism, is or
should be, the logical outcome of tho
Trades Union movement, and having
agreed that far, our only diitevence ot
opinion is as to how it ihould be
brought about, as this will I believe,
largely determine its eventual success.
Presonally, I believe that some torni
of organization should hive been out.
lined, and this should in my opinion
have been placed before the membership, for their acceptance or rejec.
tion, before they were asked as to
their desire to sever themselves from
their present form of organization, lt
would, in my opinion, have been far
better had the workers in each in.
dustry known as to how far each industry was to have its own autonomy,
and when any question was of sufficient importance to engage the atten..
tion of the organization as a whole.
Since I returned from the east on
Saturday last, I have spoken to a number of men who were at the Western
Conference, and who are^in full sympathy with the idea of the formation
of the O.B.U. and, these men in most
cases, have expressed themselves as
beileving that we shall at least for a
short time, suffer a setback in the la.| izations comes into the O.B.U. nt may
bor movement, should we adopt the I still be made a success. In any event
new form of organization. Jt therefore j and in whatever form ii. may,come.
seems to me that had wc gone ahead there is. every reason to believe, that
and perfected some plan of organiza-1 to be successful, District 18 must pre-
tion -before we severed our connec-i servo its identitiy. However should
tion with th? present one. we should vour membership through the refer-
have   nassed  through  the   transition j end um, decide to accept tfle new form
competing with this district in the
sama markets, are working from eight
to ten hours per day? It is at present
a matter of competition in the markets
ahd no one, no matter how desirous
of bringing about a six-hour day, can
gainsay the fact. In talking the mat.
ter over a few days ago with a member
of the central committee o fthe O.B.U.,
he stated that he doubted if the time
was opportune, tq engage in a strike
to bring this about.
These are matters which I believe
should be brought to the attention of
the membership, so that should they
decide to adopt the O.B.U. in whatever form it may eventually be
brought into existence and should a
setback occur and things not go as
they thought, they, should at least
know some the reasons aud be prepared to assume some of the responsibility.'
Again, numbers of men, who are
mine workers, seem to believe that
when we get an industrial form of or.
ganization we shall forthwith do away
with the contract system in the coal
mines, lt must be apparent to the
most casual observer, that coal mined
under tho contract system is produced
and placed on the market cheaper,
than coal mined under the day wage
system, here again is where the competitive system under which wo at
present work will, more nearly than
any other thing, be the determining
factor.
Should it be at this time possible
to get the transport workers as a
whole to get into the industrial movement I believe it might be a success,
but I do not think that they are as yet
educated to that point, ir, however,
Division Four of the Railroad Organ.
which It was striving, Furthermore,
in the counting of the votes ih the
referendum, the object of separating
the east from the west was palpable,
and would simply mean that In addition to severing tho aflllation with tlie
Internationals there would bo a breach
conventions, and if the policies were
not, suitable, changing them along progressive and sane lines.
"Unless such a course is adopted
at the present juncture," said .Mr. Livett, "trades unions, as was itqinte.ii out.
stage, from one form to the other,"with
kaa chaos and disorganization' than
we shall do. should our -membership
decide to adopt the O.B.U. at present.
If carefully handled, however, this
stage might be passed over -sU'Cccssful-
"y
urvc-y the situation, to .     ...    . . ... ,,   bv a: speaker at the recent Trades and!'•' ,,        ,,,.., ...
cts and to let us have < cause« wit>» the east, and this would     - ,*.,,„..,*,   ...   ,i.-,wrv   ...m   ■,,,,!■   Regarding the six-hour proposition;
endations   as   to   "tat   reM,u ln ,tve fo,,r ™«9™ Province*.; Lnbf   Council .at   Ulgar>     ,J    bo | „, ,    f f   faj    ,     :).
Mn^the interests of both 'if thG8e votcs ™™' of having inc-riv m««»>c«1 between the upper and ntslior, manv of „s roitUy b(,lkn,(, ,h,(t }.  ,3
n.i  ii.'inK, \to ir.  .,;„i! 1>* a local organisation. millstones, . ! poRsible to bring this about in this
before May 15, and j
upon these recom-, .„.. "... .,....; 7.. „'.'.:_;■.■;..■ ...' .          . . *     ■         .' '
mendations, •yt'e propose basing a gov. ] •     <■•               -,       -   -.B* r,i          l   r*   1 •      l T\   i
eminent poik, for the•promotion ofiIndiana Coal miners SimA Behind Debsi
greater harmony In the industrial and j
lnbor world.
Basis of Control
"The odds against-   mo were    too j upon  that report
seo how the cbawt's were of organlz-| strong to think of resistance but    1
lag the lovRei-B wlio happened to be in | could not iK'lp asking them if thev re-
town,     Alter having a talk with   a j presented the "elite" of Cranbrook,   1
few of the boys around the hotels   it; -waH ■Immediately told to chut up and
was decided to try an;! procure n hull jwn8 hustled out of the room, giveni _   ,     . „        . .     ,,
and hold an organization meeting   ho1 an opportunity to pay my hotel bill and' Bam or Control i    AKRON,  Ohio, March Sl.—iCugw
that, nil thoKe who wished to Join j hire a rig lo im to* Fort, Steele as l! «xhat inquiry will go so far as 'o ' V' lJobs> socialist lead-r. toi'nv
would have a chango ««> *«»ow *"i1,iltJ, J00 «»«<* bamraife to think ot;flnd out what are the baB,„ of ,K)i;t j thr.-aton^l to cull » Bcner,.| iril- «f
about the union. On Saturd, j aftei-, ,v«lking. 'iou cau consn or yourself i ,.olltroj lllul operation of certain Indus-! »Hk party throughout the i-.i'iiM'.-.- tui-
n«m, March ..», a hall in the.Iiuppruil, lucky gettlngolT so «:wy.' declared one j (ri(,g l)V ,ftl)or H;ul mvunl, It mac not! '< " h« Ib Krnu;H a r h*«iirl t; in >i:r
Dotal was proem;..'it lor the purpose .«f the mon. 1 wan warned not to go; \H, feasiblo to certain industriei—may! <'"'<" «-« ch-iw.H upon wh'di 'h«
una a iiiCLlmg called for « p.m. ; ruvtlu-r wi>st as nl! the <!. W. V. A. (noj \i(, as fm^ihlo in some Industries!
■Beforo th;- mecilng started 1 was ] brandies had been notitlcd by wire.    !a8Io some othors, but I am coiivtncrd i
district   while   the,   oliut  coal  lielda
ot organization, tt oen"-jrpr^s^miGraiia~
all to do our best to niai;c it a kuccoss,
and  should  we  suffer a  setback,  It
"should be only a still greater induce.
. ment to work still harder to atiain
! the Ideal we seek.       '
Moping the foregoing w il! be of some
; interei.t. to your readers in reenrd to
! the one great (piestion nt pr-uuenl. en-
■; gaging their attention, 1 remain,
S     Yours for Beal Industrial Unity,
I !\ M, t'hristophers
il
condition is
will be out
A'U.H |
"A spitttt-r was on my trail wheu I
came back to Fernie on Sunday uIkIh
visited by the pollco and warned that
noi wilittons language would be per.
mltted and that Cranbrook would not.     . ,.„„,„,.„„  .,  , , ..
allow Buch prating*'a* had taken!" il0'" "n«t/^T I; '^1 T^l?
place ut the Western inlior ronfprcnrp I M^!,,,,UB.!)n"' *A"«!'».«»« that    must
InGalgary     1 repJtot that thew would j "wl   |ll'd''*'' uay '';;J,i'   on h1a ,,";;'!'•..
Im> no sedition* language, that It was j 	
lo bo h uuiun uKx'thig auJ v/;n inform*! Tlirri v,;i.*. i.tithir." v^\ulen?!vf> in
*}.l hy thu jikUw thM they would li«j jn-Ko-wtc't; recital of h\n miirv, Ho
Ibere lo ll«Un and I assured iH'irx they ' was not surprlwd at ih*» iroalmcm lu-»
would bo welcome. irwelUMl lor he fully realized thin in.
"Wlwn th« ttmt* camo for the meeting ill *   -        .   -.
rRilway
tn ttil
ho my
tiirmi
of hand
and
not „	
vote.     I thi-n enmtneneed to sign up
th» bay a and ilurlnst thU stmm two
^yv. tn «rJfiinn r-ime in oncb «,,<irryinK(
n Union .lack and placed ono on each
•iiie of th« tabW.    Having bt'en rear.
tHl tn tkulliii..! th. Vnioii Ja-f'-t wm nm >
a atmngo sight to mn and I had    «o were for ^^ mim m ,h4, n4ttw
•ibJ»ctlona.      After cight«ei\ of    tho pian m cranbrook tint ottwr* counail.
lo«*»>r* hull Ihwii »»gn«d up a member j«,j mthl«ratlon ami exprt'M'«•»! an opln-
of ibo tt. W. V. A. Interrupted the pro-' |„„ ifc^y had betu-t mi lo M< U«i«k>\
'.,*•. a rt *rult of coiivtiritalion with in-',
dustrtal leaders* lhat comploie dem. t
ocracy In our Industrial life is Ju.t;
a» feasible and Just its neciMsjiry as !
cotnplett**! democracy lu our political;
lifo." i
I'oaiitmh.g, s?enator-Ik-bowon s"*id :
that another mison why in Itor i«»li, a,
Hluiuid bn RiVt'li w *tiW-,i, iu tlu; iu:. ;
inil of industry, n;-,:, bctn.u-'vi of th--,
charge ngalnst It of Inefllcleiiey,   Km- i
lonvlctod under the -e.spioni;:*.' aie!       \
licit.-}   van   eimlined   lo   bed   wiih   n |
bad attucli of lumbago .at tho Immei
of Mrs. Margaret  1'rcvey here whui I
notified   that   the   t'uiieit   niaies   sn-j
preiue court had  refused hhn a re.; .   ,    f
hourlng.   He deelineti to w>c hcwkjiu-i'.lu-,'  '",
per  mull,  but   ti.rou.'slt   Mrn.   I'tev.,*> ■ •'" ,''1
i-'KUed the followjii't utatemeiit to the
I>re;.-«:
In HartdB ol  Attorney
''The, tn-.r.ti v 1-,
atornej,   Hoymosu
n ihe hr'niU of tnv
Ste.'liiiau   of   ("bi
lo hia *»ff*j»«-tiv-i»ii<»tij». Tht* delegate wao
nccompanicd McKenit*; on the tra'n io
IVniic frnmpfll'itPly got In »oin*h with
itoftt-o of thc» returiH'rt men in re uit,i
tt»«^rc waa a rather lnt»»r«?*'i|trf ilKciift-
i.lfti as ta vb' 1   bt\t\t hi* tW.it*. -fidin*
liglit to the end."
Mrs. Trevey said Debsi
not >:i>rious and thnt he
within a few days,
Wlu-n .shiiivn (he report of tho dei
ciHtm of ihesupri'.-mc court Debs,
said: i
Stnrt General Strike May 1 I
"TI.-.U i;>.".;i!s b., May l, the day ouj
which 1 begin my sentence, a general:
strike will be started. It nni-st not boj
forgotien that ttf.t day is llm labor]
tho world. I had been us.
nl tf th" --ttpremo court htvV
inn ruled by that time moro than I
"ii»i"t 'lai'ior meet hue; would bo lif-til
v-V'iv.r f"'- va;*  r- ,f.\---f.
"'Iin' ntliierK «>(' lay own «tat«>.   Indiana,   will  'i'tur*   the   Mrlke.    Thea*
men cain" lo m--.1 at ixsy l-.orne In Terra
beforo  J   marled   on  my  la.st
g tt>w and it;ld nie thut from
y   I   vent   to UK'  jienltciitiarv
unl'l lm no more caul mined In
until th» day I wan rvl'iwtl,
ni!ivnjit»»nt   will   U5>'!otibte'!lj
t iir.ee,"
Fernie Sporting
Notes
There will h" a meet ing Of thu foot.
ball beys at the K. A. :\. ('. umight and
Fernie will be ab.v to bou-st of a football \':liy.Mt: in the near future, tin tills
mentlii}'* i*'' h'-iv.u called ior ihi.' pi.riiv'-e
of forming a city leat-'iie,
Tile larroKse praeiiee
was a very good start.
hi« pels all <sut mid,put them iliMtigli
a vi-ry hard practice,     'J'oin expecta
to li:t*.e *•**'*, ti Itelii-J  .il-
tlic |.;i'oiiuds tlilt-* Stiudii.'.
In,: S-utulay
Hig Turn bad
•Hlf.llH
Tli*' Vt-]i Kdilor r-'-elvcd a telerrnm
on Tueiiiiay saying thai .Manager Matn
will arri'.e in Kernie on Saturday with
his hasi-hiitl yjuad and expeein m
i Kturt hia sipring nvlniHf,-: on Sunday;
', morning at KU't* at flie «etvx»l Kn»uad.f.,
. Thii linikii like big i-,-!i«lle bit ll for Fer-
' nie tli Ih year.     All ball play-ers    tire'
| l MJiit'tCil t.0 lie 'Ut tite Job /it) I line.
lh.
.3,2/.
The !', A, A. (.', ii*. pm:
Into Fertilu, Their big umfettl iliinre
b'-l'l <'ii \V« dH.'i-.day was a kwcII affair
aad will liniier Sunt*: lu ih" memories
■ .'.' tie- .* aui,-! r ;>«(ij>!i* nf P> rut'', The
halt wa« iiieely derttrated and all tho
i»«k «s thoroughly MtJo>H lhe datti*.
Intt rest   to   l::tr---'v'  pr<Hl«teH<m   th«
causo would he different.
"I aay that tbla wilt rem* abnu.
sonic day," nalit Senator Hnb,*ri*u>n,
"and in iry !:iimW*» J'tdit'M"vi tt («> ih'»
only way by whtch Canada « tn be
k»pt imm lnduntrlBl conflict."
I R^-Snl f2S?FT3 f4^3 P^.*?=t3 f^Snl PF^f3 pF^a TP^a rZ=Z$p) [Syitt f^r-K^ (3=
ifenb l^ti frti fefln fcti fe^b fFti ^rti IBn ^nD top I
li LIU Lb Li J ih LJJ Qj'lJJ Uj'UU lb UU lb LJU fe UL J lb UU is UU ih l. *jl.j ib t
J tb L JLJ  lb LJU ih L.JLJ D UJUJ
Two Rousing Meetings
are • wm* P t*0
Ferme Endorse The
0. B.  U.
In
meeting      Tbey did no and, a* not*
In *noth<*r c*)lui»«, thfro %nn no tii*   :MStujn
lurbmite. and ulthouKh wnnB of lh*nu * ir*rlp"r
dlffflrwl frnni McKenii*"* vi^wn ih»«y j [rXjCJ
| muted bun wilh (ourtesy aful tolrr.; ^{T]
| *nc« bt<timinn in-cn who hii»*e fought} i-Kfc/rZ
t tor frpftlnin. ' l^i">^£j
■T~
$1,000 Victory Bond
FOR THE ONE BIG UNION
XJ'J
thnn onta tw» wwin« uMtttino* nt Umw« l«   U>« rftwdud 'hnaiTf'   ^j"«
II* worker* it f^mf* Ult *wh. beth t bonttn not «o«l« »ll* Ife* ONB MO
mi,mat  mmm  m*m*i*.  *wn-P-mto    * ■*■*••■.■**•** d,        •**-*    #*.-i***^y .
000 *lfW ib* ap****** war*   n*mtr*' innted •oMIwn trnn/t t» rmmmlMr «ni
■tmiwr. otwnnitmr lot tbo H. V, Wot*
MM Labor Wiity; Am. bonmt, ot
WM JL tUMoottm, ot tbo tb C LflCgvfV
VPlttQ.    Ibnpionooeo ot tito lotlot
WWW   xWW  ftfWm.  TUT  mWfr  WS'WII   fn   WW
UMi tm tliu umi xtsi. Mx* ii.stu.s   w.
It)« 'rx** that ri»rl'lK»». who holiti *
emerrtm*!!! iKmltli.tt t»n The Hobll«r*'
Civil R««atablitihm-t>nt Hoard, wa* du-
appnmKNt a* fh* rwiih end ftl«* ol lh«»
amldien prf*»Tvlna law and order.
VHrUin* openly dtdamd that b*
"pitit**d In lb*- tptinlt td tb* Cranbronk
mem," and he advocated tho namo dla.
tftm*pii lit tow mid orilwr In Kuril lt»,
Thia la to tlf him not»cf», on behalf'
OP*    **-***    mp.m*M* tt .#-   .u*«    « -i.t *,*..'.,   .,«.*>- *       4.      ■ ■"       '■
wetmlmm* fwrttwHiwi, thai tnm «<M
order Mmt Im ptomtrob la thta tow* t
prepared to nnteow to iheaa tniimnl *tip-\-—j, .. ruau*. -^r»t.*m >•• *>t>>>ma<a
Z   ...     9-.^  .9 ^~M    .k., ..*m.    m^m^     I   **.*t9       **       %#*^»iW||*W       ^WtW^tm       IM       -Ml** Mpi*
Pl KM *ik#4UI7 n iron ura Mian | th« >***M*-^r* at«tt will Om takaa lw
onto wtttmnot awanii mm utoo
jflp m topi tototoot wMlww oot NH
tottooy mm to fottttn to vlotala Um
tttt tawtt hi ta4 tow bono U Cru.
Mmk.    to tMa tboti poto hmmoomo-
a-wwoi^^^tn wn&   waemwam  a^^^ep    ^^^mmw   **^..*.^wr^i^^wr
TW PUf H-PWpWHfW oof&wW wlff WBh^JF iWHL
mmm il ***m mmm kwftkte fc* *****
fMty tftli Of •fftH ff tt>
otttm
■» tbo
« UM mmtnmte.   tw**.
HxyW-tOXbt H TVHM -UM flCtaV^ i i*^a -^^^^^.^^ *aA*i^ -tfltl ^i t-AkMs tan I
! aad fra* * fwHwtto* Hat til* rat are-1 JTr SSSLT '
1 *4 metltat fa a wotbmt aad bla oeoblem]       wfwm»ww.
"To Tlw ntottlrt IWfrr:
At * Mo-Mint ef MoyM MM* *
UOtta..' L*al«. No tl, Md oa Marr*
Slat, Ita*. tto foltowlnf raaotatloa
waa potmd. aad I bit* hwaa laatr«et*d
to aani aaaw to roa for riMtaatloa:
WHKRCAS. thia orfaattaUea tea
henrA witb nmnt*m*nt thai *mm» of
tto cHtaaa* «f Ctaatow^ a«»fay aa a
fatwi, fMtnia pp a fMRaffsfai aMattmi nt
Upper* tmPeO tot tbo petpemm of imi-
M^Mi    wWM    ^M^^t^P»^W»y 0       WwaWI j Wwo
ileal aMqw who tova wnaaaal asaa ta
grtai aai wto at* advocataa ef via-
laaa* aai af II* itatartaaea ef tli*
•AM* atoald to Itoowa oat of tto ael.
dlati* MsaaUhtlM tt ttot ofiaaltatloa
It te acblav* tot Ha HtHtovahla  tha
Oa Wadaoadar attht itov* waa an-
Tmm amrnkmt* a tun Akt. Suanar nnd
Fraaaflaat OulauelMra. af IMatffot IS
w w^^^*^^^at^ma^ wwma^mf^-^pw^ppw™*t   ^^w   w&nera*t w*^*    w^t*t
Tto aahjm wiTtto OXR BW DXTOX
IBIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE that .mr tbotiMmi rcml.-r* M lm-
tILmatmS. Ootifi.l  ifitiKtr f-mrtt  *»*n*. m «iu*i*Mf •» »"*i« «i  >«•*!.   »«  tut
rtmmp victory of th* i».SH hit* l>M«>.\.
Tb* Dolkur to to bt Stat to th#   followinir a<Mri^a:   V.   R.
MIIKil.KY. Ubor Temple, Vait«»itmf H. (\ ami th* ttmlpt
*»»...«../,* *t-""l lm  t*..bnt*wtt*dt*rA lb*rtrttrb Th* Ittatrtr*   Ijmtt***r m
irrott|M ef on* fctm<tr«] to anno expem* ot letter writing ami
lotage.
I
«
GJDQ
. tte lelariatlaaal aarhfM at imotaatm I *m. *** SsH5ErJ*i!y i?^**.   .
^Wt    ttttWf-    t-W-m*Wb    ^"^Mr      "W    .^^^P     ^W
vKhttovlawa toM ty tt* tptnbm
to input tp tbo alalia I* Raaal* totliaii to
tttk-m^m^m   Ab^ftia   m^^.   ^-H^^^^H^Mdl   P^  9t^^^^p^^t^^p   *n*nn^^^*.   t tntp^^^^^^^^
XOtm wna im arwrnwr rn ippii ii i trrtmr [wtittttttr -— — . — —  -.   -- ,
tr ad ■#*•** aaa tia faUUoaahl* to-|aata of eiQtoftim twt^ito-mam.]
rl
8, W.
h^^***^ ^^j^^*^^^ ^jb ttt^^^^^^   ^^^^*
Hi Wnmi vl flfWif   mmm
V, A- wtt watf« ttom fHomllf
wot "wMtod tte oteaty per e««t. of
HuilM**.#  *^m-PM- +^b   aig^u   9p& tt%m   tettMaLl WWWt W-tpWo-otmm  M  WWIWfWPli  W   DlflllH ,
wlwwr-**?..w'!.y*^gL" '? r^^f fHfr pFr atitf ftmiem, tbht twptnftnlPmI
O. B. U.
*H_I^^M| ^^i^|a^ Jpp^^^^^^^l^^^^^
aa Hront tor (to mm  of Indntria)
mmm wwt. pmn wwwp wpp iimms
umi ar.apn ot esppnao, ia aeavaaa
twfa« la Na* with hi* letter la thtt
I !*»« of Tto HH-trVI liRiffff.
.   .... •HtoWW   ^^S^wPPa    ■W-'HI    ••■" *w    -aJBat*
wn ifiTVwmwfww w*   wmww   mw im *
amm^^^f*^    ab^WLdaiAdMiAi^kltt*-*^ -tt'
Pw O. fl. OaMaa. Sec.
Moytt. Marti 11. if if.
f
tr
I
1
w
o
I
f
V. H. «W*U>. b*xty. i'aauat I'fc-m-
wlMm t,*bt*e T*i»ti»li» Va-timerr*
It  V
IVIfrtw   WftTttW
Kncteaei Hnd a dollar to help (a t>ro-
p***itd* nutk ** TiltS ONK l*l».
t'SIOS Ttm need net tend via an Individual r**»l»l hurt ea« a«*now!edift
. '.   .        .*..   . .. .* 9*\ *.l      .  »**       .        * l»
toivtW with tto ottor* of th* touch
who am eeatrtlatlat te tto •!«-*» Vie-
tety no«d for tto OWR WU VSI OS
Tea needn't barm aaf worry In regard to puiag tto Intereat oa ny
atora ef tto toad. Wa all aspect to
cetoct ttot ta ton *ea«aa fron "tto
tAto* iV.lUr*,''
Tear* for TIIE OVE BIO tIKION,
%nott!	
A44r*M
• *•»»■*#«
rl** J
,<umi<JH*WteJl,. ^..JtiUm THE DISTRICT   LEDGER,  FERNIE, B. C, APRIL 4,1919
yheJX^ttj^dqc-a\
THE DISTRICT LEDGER WILL
■9. BE SMALLER FOR TWO WEEKS
•For two weeks The District Ledger
will have to appear in four page size.
This is due to the fact that we have
undertaken to print iu book form the
Appeal Case in the matter of Rees and
Williams vs. Wayne Local union
which is to be taken to the Supreme
Court of Canada this month. The
evidence and judgments in the case
total about- five hundred typewritten
pages and The District Ledger is Iim.
ited in the possession of only ona lino-
type. Our contracted space-will compel us to boil down or hold back much
interesting matter but we hope to
make'up, wben we get-back to our
normal size.
THE DISTRICT LEDGER AND
THE ONE BIG UNION
The District Ledger is sometimes
oalled an "olllcial organ" of .vistrict
18. At the very outset of the pre.
sent editor's connection with this
journal he announced that so long as
the management remained in his hands
it would life "the miners' paper," rather
thantlio expression of officials. Without any instructions from officials The
District Ledger has stepped with both
feet right into the light for the ONE
BIG UNION. Wo are convinced that
in so doing we are taking a stand that
will be approved of by the rank and
file of District 18 and no murmur of
complaint has come to us from auy official except indirectly from Interna,
tional Board Member Livett who has
now resigned from the Board.
The District Ledger has a high regard for Mr, Livett as a man, much as
we disagree with his opinion in regard
to the ONE BIG UNION. It takes
courage to step out practically alone
and fight against ■ a movement which
Is meeting with such universal approval among the rank and file of
District 18 as*the ONE BIG UNION.
The only regrettable feature of the
matter is the associations which Mr.
Livett must make in the fight. He
will have the sympathy
should ask for it, which he will not)
the financial support of the operators,
thc government and the corrupt In.
dianapolis outfit in the light he proposes to put up against industrial
unionism and in his plea to the miners to be careful, to not sever their
connection, with the "international"
machine. ,        -
In his address at District 18 con.
vention a few weeks ago Mr. Livett
outlined his stand and he is holding
to his position. He said there that
"the first step on the part of the workers towards, reconstructing society
musi be political."    Holding to that
days and bugful nights of the camps
by indulging in pleasures that often
are unwise.   Cranbrook does not hold
a very high opinion of the genus lumberjack and, if the truth be told, thinks
that a miner is in the same category.
Such    opinions    are    unfortunate.
There are people in Cranbrook who do
not look down on those men who have
the hardest, most dangerous and most
unpleasant work to do for the community.     Even    among the    railway
men there is a big majority whose sympathy is with those on the lower rungs
of the ladder.     Here and there .n-ay
be found a conductor who feels a iu.
pefiority.     He has a job in whicn he
has prospered; has been able to buy
a car and to talk "high finance."     He
has been able to dodge the spotters
I of the C. P. R. and really feels he is
generous to that corporation in splitting "fifty-fifty' * on the receipts    of
fares paid in the .train and then    to
supplement this graft he has what   a
miner or a lumberjack would consider
a mighty good wage.
Now, it will be seen by our story on
page one, that one of the conductors
of the C. P. R. was very anxious to
"butt in" to affairs of which he has
no knowledge and to forbid Organizer
McKenzie from exercising the privi.
lege of free speech on board that train.
Conductor Jackson is a good fellow
and we would not like to see him come
to any harm. He would be missed by
a great many with whom his relations
have been mutually agreeable. We
would ask him, however, to pass the
word to other conductors who might
think their "graft" places them in a
position in which they can look with
contempt upon lumber jacks and miners, that these miners and lumber
jacks are very loyal to each other and
to their class. They despise spotters
but the exigencies of the occasion
might conquer for a brief period their
feelings and they might "buU in"- to
the affairs of the conductor's. iWe hope
we have made the hint plain enough.
♦ ♦
*P
♦
♦ ♦
PPP*P*p*p**p*p<^<pp*<p*pp*
MOUNTAIN PARK        ♦
SECRET SERVICE MEN TRY TO
PERPETUATE THEIR JOBS
Canada has more secret service men
at work today than she had during
the time of war. Surely there is no
idea that the country is now overrun
with enemy spies who are anxious to
destroy property, wreck troop trains
and furnish military information to our
foes!
Under our present system it is but
(and if he Natural that each pne of us should into hold on to and perpetuate his present job. Secret service men are
like the rest of us. They are, doing
tbeir level best to keep alive the spec,
ter of "Bolshevism" so that they can
be kept employed in suppressing it.
Last Sunday evening the editor of
this paper addressed a meeting at
Blairmore and had the pleasure of
seeing in the audience a man from the
secret service who was, there ready to
report any seditious utterance and to
keep his department informed regarding the growth of the real labor
movement. It was a pleasure to have
the man there and that pleasure was
The annual meeting of the Mountain Park *Co.operative Society took
place in the Picture Hall Wednesday,
■March 26th, 1919. The shareholders
showed their usual interest and were
well in attendance.
The president opened the meeting
and ordered the business report read.
The business transactions showed
very good results, which is the more
remarkable as the Society works with
a comparatively small capital and had
to recover from the year 1917 a loss
of $4,iiS9.65: at the end of 1918 the nett
piofit amounted to $5,237.93, thus giv-
,ing a total profit of J10.097.5S for 1918,
Some of the shareholders insisted
that this profit was too high and.only
accomplished.by selling at too high a
price, but they consider that this profit
was produced by turning over $115,
000.00 worth of goods, showing about
10 per cent nett profit, they must consider the profiit a legitimate and not
extremely high one. The Society is
now able to pay all the back interest
ou the share capital invested and it
is with the newly elected trustees to
decide if a dividend on the goods pur.
chased by the shareholders shall be
declared or not.
We consider it our duty to mention
here that these good results were not
obtained by high prices and overcharging the public but to a great
deal by the great interest the employees have shown in their respective
work.
We lik-e to mention here a few In.
cideuts: If the driver was sick the
head clerk was not afraid to drive the
delivery wagon and on the other hand
the driver was ailways willing to do
jobs not concerning him at all. Extra
teams to haul the goods from the
station were an established custom
under the old management: this haa
been eliminated and saved many dollars.
iBut we must not forget those of-our
customers which were always willing
to gtve their whole business to their
store even if some outsiders tried to
tempt them with cheaper prices.
They know that their dividend at the
end will more than equalize these ap-
pearlngly splendid .offers: They,were
true to the fundamental principle cf
co.operation.
Tbe officers and trustees were elected as follows: President, Mr.-, Jas.
Derbyshire; Sec-treas., Mr. J. S. Mie.
helln; Trustees, Mr. C. Taylor, J. P.
Derbyshire, Geo. Pike, II. King, P.
Barruzzini, John Berglund and John
Henderek.
iWe wish the newly elected officers
and trustees good success to the many-
tasks before them so that the Societies business at the end of another
year may prove that what we all
think it must be: an institution "for
the benefit of the people of Mountain
Park.
A  Co.operator.
FERNIE   LODGE,   KNIGHTS  OF.
PYTHIAS,  NO.  31
Will meet regularly
every Tuesday even'
Ing at 8 o'clock.
Visiting members
cordially welcome.
W. Pennington., Alfred Baker,
<--. C. K. R. S.
STAY AWAY FROM BRULE
Salaries      431.00
BIIJjS PAYABLE
Im. Bk of Can... 5,000.00
Brunner, J. & ac. 0;*
Crued int. . 1,051.90
TO THE SHiAiRBHOLDERS
Capital Stock ,.. 10,390.00
Reserve
for bad debts .     200.00
Profit & loss Ace.   5,237.93
1S.965.60
6,051.90
15,827.93
•10.845.43
Men should stay away from
Brule owing to lack of sleeping
accommodation, hotel and bunk
houses being over-crowded. Notice will be given when things get
righted.
A. McFegan,
Secretary Local Union No. 1054
DOCTOR WANTED
The  camp of  Pocahontas    requires the services    of a doctor.
For further particulars write,
MEDICAL COMMITTEE,
Local Union No. 3170, U. M. W.
of A.
POCAHONTAS, ALTA.
High-Grade
American Dentistry
Bridge Work
3 PANNING the gap occasioned
NOTICE
baiip/ be spj^n-iM^^i^a^t^^
BIG UNION what he considers a danger. Tbe ONK Biti UNION does not
propose to play politics or flirt with
tht politicians, if we understand arighx
the expression we have heard of those
who speaks for the mdvement and
the Tigorous approval any body of
workers always give to such a sentl.
ment*
In a letter in this Issue President
Christophers states his position. He
Is an Industrial unionist who han no
use for tha politicians. He is not altogether satisfied with tho modo of
procedure which has been adopted and
has, we think, no great need for tho
fear be expresses tbat a mistake has
bc<sn made In not perfecting "some
plan of organisation before wo severed
our connection with the pre-sent one "
Wo believe that President Christophers
run trust to tho good sense of tno
rank and tile wh';ii the proper time
arrives to shapo up the correct orrj-in-
(ration and wo are further of thn op.
luion :bat a new constitution ;tnd a,
flxed Jirogramme at this uimn* of tlw
Kiime would not be In the beat Interests
of tha movement. This is, of oourH»,
merely au opinion and upon honiwt dl!-1
frrenws of opinion nnd n thorough tils. |
niHulon amongst tbe rank And tito do- i
pcndu the success or failure of OKB
1MO UNIONISM, Thn now unionism \
cannot !«.» mad* to er»»w nor can it be i
held back by leaders nnd the measure '
tit ils -succors df ponds apon the Intel, j
Upone-i of tbe muss. I
Wo bave no authority to spoak d<>-1
finitely for th* other officials of 1Mb. j
trict IB.   President Christophers tells i
uh that Secretary lirowtw Ih hs«art and ;
sou! for the ONK UN! VNIOV.   Tint
iIwh not como as a surprise in any-1
one.   Wo aro Informed   that   Itoard j
Member Frank Wht-atloy in against lhe !
OKK MO UNION".   Neither in that n I
furpiisn.     Mr. VY'lmaMoy i* pr<*i»*nl«'tit ■
of lhe Alberta Fed-oratlon   of Labor.
iif  -9*i*m i»iiu«<i in liml poMlmii .mrX'*. j
ly through lh«" work of A lev. Hii<<nnr,
inboard  memHer, and    who  !«  now
louring the camps boosting for iho
ONK UIO  UNION.     Kwmnr thought'
lhat Whoallpy would br* one of tho
..imtfif-l*.-!   mfipdr'-T',   I**.   ONK   Ht'] :
UNIONISM   but   *fn.r«  the   opponlte !
h;iH been shown Hnsnrir I* on hit* v.»y
io  Wheeii-ay's  how-ir rump nt   Hunk.,
bt nd whoff ho will Mt th« wern'ier
ship   -^lutt   hf»  think*   of   Wheal lev's
Jilwr*. nil   tl;e  MMtU;l' ttlj.l ttliou   WIlO.it-
ley Ij* explain lit* poMHon.
Th.' IVM   '■■"   «-,   e|!«V wm bo of X'tUil
t'.'rr- -l 'iu ■* '. ■ .; •-'..- JH**!ii« *, T)d*r<
mill Ih? H'.tnb d*<t.,sM*iit»; |her« rIiouM
tit* fifi nn'irfntH* Tli. ?•<> I* rtmni tor
tinut-nx ti,tii*r-*-'tit-***. «t ntyintoti «n sneh*
.i i.;r .,*uJtJ. t'. ., sli..: '.,.,,... .;;.«*u*.•«!
■nnd fStnt't* tbt* its*, Mt; l'\0'»\' hu*'■
%k* rirthiMHin trulh uiviii i'* ri't.* we
UU:d liut U'lit (t.r llu-  l.iut ini'*- .,,'„'      i
on ONUS "■BIG UNION. Practically
every hand in the big hall went up
and the secret service man caught the
infection and his went up too. We
don't doubt his sincerity for he is a
working plug like the rest of us and
he must be really hard up for a way
lo earn a livelihood or ho would not
bo In his present position.
LETTER
THE  MOUNTAIN   PARK CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, LIMITED
Mountain Park, March 29.—Today
we have a'real spring day in iMouhtain
Park, so far a» the temperature is con.
cerned. The ground is still under a
heavy cover of snow and will be tor
some time. But the weather has had
a good effect on the different sports cf
the town and under the able leadership
of Cecil Rod way the Mountain Park
Athletic Club was organized. The
following officers and committee were
elected: "
President, Cecil Rodway; secretary,
Tom Eccleston; tennis commitoe, li.
Rhodes, R. M. John; baseball committee, Fred Steppy, iH. iLetcher; foot,
ball committee, Norman Watson, Jas.
Price.
The meeting was well attended and
great Interest shown In the proceedings.
The matter'of financing is* always
a problem but the meeting was jus.i-
fled in deciding to appeal to the public
for a subscription.
>We believe the newly established
club will find generous support and
hope that all well meaning citUens and
friends of a good and sound sport will
willingly dig into their pockats and
give liberally.
We understand this meeting to be a
preliminary one to lead the way to one
of the biggest .M. P. has ever seen,
which will be called in tbe near future.
All good sports are therefore asked
to watch for the announcement and
everybody Is cordially invited to at.
tend.
X. Purcell, better known as Xett,
among the miners, met his fate at
last. A cave, coming down without
warning, finished his life. Mr. Purcell was working hard all his life and
known a"s a very experienced miner
We all regret to have lost him so sud
tlenly.
M. P. Observer.
Miners are hereby notified to
stay away from Greenhill Mine,
Blairmore, Alta., until further
notice.
Many miners on the sjiare link.
rod, Mcdonald,
'Secretary 2163,
Blairmore, Alta.
NOTICE
We beg to advise all men to
stay away from Nordegg, Alberta,
as the mines are overcrowded.
JAS. BEWSHER,      .
Secretary Nordegg   Local Union,
25-9i    No. 1087, U.M, W. of A.
H. OSTLUND    -
Solicitor for District 18, U. M.
W. of A.
MacDonald Block
Lethbridge, Alta,
L. H. PUTNAM
Barrister, Etc.
BLAIRMORE. ALBERTA
To Tho District Ledger:
Will you spare mo a little, space in
your valuable paper re It. S. Oosden,
better known In JUlcrest as Bob
Brown. In his letter published In last
week's issuo, March 28, ho states that
the ofOciala of Hillcrest liocal Union
were tha cause of him being arrested (Jpn' Store Dept,
and telling the company to stop his JM«at Market ..
union dues ami also the causo of htm
being hounded out of the camp. And
also tolling lilm that If he wanted to
got on digging coa! that ho had better
stop talking Industrial unionism. I
want to toll Oosdon that 1 didn't take
any part In ony auch activities nor I
ua.-i not jealous of him going io the
conference, but I did say that an
agitator didn't get along the bfist.
Balance Sheet as at December 31st, I
1918, as per the local auditor,
Mr. E. M. Anderson
ASSETS
Cash on hand ..$    213.40
"     in bank ...      4*35,«9
643.09
.INVENTORY OP MERCHANDISE
General Store   .. 24,138.80
Meat Market ....   2,683.75
HUNGARY WOULD RECOGNIZE
TREATY MADE LAST YEAR
FATAL COAL MINE
EXPLOSION   IN   COLORADO
Thirteen Miners Lose Their Lives In
-MiiSv^jn'-TrinlBio	
by the loss of one or more
teeth a properly constructed, well
fitting bridge is " a thing of beauty
and joy forever." Such is the
bridge we can make for you, wid
we guarantee that it will fit you,
improve your appearance, and give
long years of comfort and good
service. The construction ot a
dental bridge calls for a degree ot
skill not surpassed by that of Mie
engineer who plans and builds ihe
bridge of commerce. Our early training in America's foremost
dental colleges places us in this respect in a most enviable position    ■'.'■■
THIS MONTH 20 PER CENT OFF OUR REGULAR MODERATE CHARGES
DENTISTRY AS WE PRACTICE IT IS A GENTLE ART
DRS. BRUNER, RICHARDS & NELSON
Lethbridge Office: The Ott Block
Calgary Office: 115a 8th Avenue East
Edmonton Office: 3 Cristall Block
Tony Derico
Communicate At Once With
NORTH AMERICAN COLLIERIES, LTD.,
908 McLeod Building, Edmonton, Alta.
®:
E.   PICK
Sole Agent for the Pass for |
Lethbridge Brewery Products®
I'roBldont of
P. DUJAV
HtllcrcBt Local Union.
26,222.35
EQUIPMENT 1,661.92
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
(Full provision mado for all bad or
doubtful debts).
8,448.62
3.238.08
Mt Park Coal Co.
Deposit with GTP.
2.'.00
FHtR INSUIIAXCR
Paid In advance
8USP13X813 ACCOUNT
Ho mi-counts recelv'ble
12,011.20
220.62
50.00
40.845.13'
PARIS, April 2.—-Budapest advices
to tho French foreign office state that
Dela Kun, Hungarian foreign minister,
is willing to recognize the armistice of
November. Although the allied missions wore temporarily deprived of
their liberty in Hungary and finally
expelled, the new Hungarian government apparently does not consider it
has broken relations with the allies
and desires to maintain them.
In conference circles It Is felt that
the understanding by the Hungarians
of the neutral zone created between
Hungary and Rumania led to the orig.
Inal action.
MONUMENTS
Kootenay Granite and Monumental Co.,
Ud.
P. O. Bex 865
Nelson, B. C.
UAHIMTIBd
ACCOUNTS PAYAIIU;
Wholesale Acct   »lS,53t.CO
The only Monumental Works In the
Kootenays
TRINIDAD. Colc.March 31.~At 9
o clock tonight six bodies had been
brought to the surface and the bodies
of Ave other dead had been located
■-iu-.the Empire-mine of the' Empire
Coal company, near Agutlar, where
an explosion occurred early todr»y.
Two men still are unaccounted for,
but members of the rescue crew believe it Is certain they were killed
making the total death list 13.
Except for the body of John Lund,
quiet* none of the dead had been identified.
Rescue crews from Hastings and
Delagua succeeded in penetrating the
workings this afternoon, but wore
delayed several hours in reaching the
bodies by light gas and debris, which
blocked the slope 2500 feet from tho
mouth.
Of 36 men who were in tho mine
when tho explosion occurred 23 made
their way out to safety.
The explosion, as Indicated by conditions encountered by the rescue
gangs, was confined to a small area.
Air conditions are good and the ven.
tilating fan Is working.
Twonty-flvo yenrs aso today a similar explosion occurred tn the Empire
mine, killing two men and injuring
two others.
UNIFORMED U.S. SOLDIERS
APPLAUD BOLSHEVIKI ORATOR
Hest Wholesale Prices to lhe Trade
=GE2UOyR~PRIOES-OK--ALL—TEMPERANCE
Top-Notch Prices Paid for Bottles
E. PICK, ''The Bottle King"
-TMIYMXRlB.
Tlie Alberta Hotel
a
1
Blairmore, Albertu
ssaaftHSBS ■saasg^i^afttgsasgan^^
®
GRAND THEATRE, Fernie
Saturday, April 5th
Bud Schaft'er Presents
Ikey-and-Abey
A i\G UL r
■&',,tiii*W*'
\l„'l""
f *
IM
Ua pan* "ti" I* I'M sti<* ft, r> mi lh-
rpet.Bt h»i»f«-tJiii(f in Ok* .•*• !,-M* Tint
riiy ;j* I'rjjil-r »»lf      li .-. < *-■  r. '.V.I,
•W-vW.*    ..-*»    ...v*..-**-.    (J»»- .*.-.*»•«.» *     *llt        Mf-      *,. ,
nit* of  th*   p*oj>t«»  o<  that  Irrart    tu
mtsUl*  'Sr.tiih Ji'-iir*. Sir.:;.'. fr<<
dom an«l pM»»rn> Uvr »«<l (rd» r.
H In tro* thet 'h*" *<ttton fak.n v.nt,
not takto hi th* who!<» et t!<e tlll*,:a*
but It I* n\*m tne tha.'. th*- .piri', nt
tbn ronmnftlfi »"** In -sympathy »(»h
ifio*i*> mhti iiNis in* in* mu, tfti-tr n*n
hantfe nd forr#rt mt ot thnt Mtj- *#
„..;.. *lii. I «» ..'A*'—»••' ■<*-   •'* * "il •■-'-
t,-jkMi tut tb* work hi hat tlow in thu,
lnpmt«nt«i>t of ike conditions t« lhe '
ImratHt tamp* ;
Crautonnk jw»<h.I« *** many tu*lwr-
tntbn, 9f«eH tpttrtit hts bttn mt'te;
to CwwiVrw* h» m^lttp rosi %*>t ftbtr,
m,wmimmOnt**a tn lh#»* wt** wt*t* tmmm'
tm tmm tbt mo*, with n mti-fr bjoh^t ;
bt thttt poobttm wot to tlNrfr b*on. m I
tlttlr* tn mob* «n for tba lr>i)»oin«
tH
-.f-^r
fa
■i 4 \
t*    %
**
...        9
or
■fT-
ISIS@I3*!ll3*!8]3flKS^^ =n.
If You Want the BEST in Meats Phone or Call on
The Meat Man
BENSON
Dealer in
Fresh and Cured Meats, Fish,  Poultry,  Butter,  Eggs,  Eto.
Delivery Prompt Prices Same to All
Phone 163 Comer of 7th Ave, and Victoria St.
Blairmore, Alberta
I
■fi
I
r
m
Soldltra, Sailors and Marinas Protee.
tlve Auoelatlon Chetr Saattlt
Orsanlstr
(Hpokeiiman Ite view)
NKW YOUK. March 31.—Nearly 8<W
uniformed inen—dlncharji'ed Amt-rlcan
soldiers and sailors—cheered the bol-
shevlat movement nt a mooting called
DAIRY RANCH FOR SALE
Three hundred and twenty acres
within one and a hnlf mllos of thu
Station of Lwndhreelt; r]J fenced and
Improved «ith a toney md comfortable house and one of the finest barns
in the district; an Ideal barn for dairy
purposes, the first st»ry bolng all
Htono and cement; the second story all
flntHhPd In grain litns nnd mows; an
abundance of water, In springs and
running bireaitu.
There are hen house*, -two garages
and other buildings. The implements
on this place are worth nea'ly as much
SYNOPSIS OF
LAMP ACT AMENDMENT
rrc-empiton now eonflnsd to surrsfsd
Viiin.v .n.i)'.
Kw:i/«'ii» mill l)« arantsd eovtrlnv only
Und KuitobtM for ngHoultuml mirposso
*i,n which I* non-tlmbor Isnd.
|-.<rtiRr*hl|i i)r*-Bit,i>tltina sbolldisd.
nut lMiriitN tit not mar* than four may
irrant;.? for uftlucent i>ra-tmi,llonn, witb
Joint r.-..i.li.n<T. but muh making nc«M<
'M.rt>t*m«*ji|» on rt«p*ctlTO e-tetms.
ii(i|iior<t. muit owuuy elalms for
iu.- uttrn and m»k« tmprovMnonts  to
jLa**^m&mtvAi
HAVE YOO SEEN POTASH AHD PBRtUTTER? T*w» w* Hti.l H*hntt*T\ Mrny Mmint!
Ver*•*. \xl,nh>nl* l>»-i%U*r% in tlift%)**, l*nugh*. Ilappiiirm, .Joyfitlw** nml JbJ, $oy, Jiggling
Jug of Jo/, hhlitiif tb* Uhh Mfmln of IIHnris?, 22 Mlnirnl gwpri.tt», .\ tlmf fhnl'n Vfrnr
n% ItaMM-fiit' bdUom priee*.   Thin it not a mtkYtnf pietnre.
."*i»'l»f»v-* 'the. l\r*\ *y, *,*-h.-ti,] t-bWiiren tlf»t sti-rxl In Ihf t'liTrt-fl amPiT-hy mum ^iurluy,
A»«rii*t f»tfc,«f th* Ifcf-y awl Al»?y i<nrzl<> Vtrtti\**iif. «**ill tPtlh trtfht- «w tn-f t'wkrt.
PRICB*-^100, 7Be, 50c.   ditto™ 28e. Bstl Ssls U VUUonn Drag Stora
OOUOUH, MONDAY, APKIL 7. BLAIMIOW, TO1SDA Y, APRIL S
If
tonight by the soldiers, sailors and j „ we am asking for the Hatich. «*vcn
marliifa* protwtlve association for th<'| thousand dollar on «nar t»rm* Thl"
Siif emnlS'mSnt.      ^" lj»*ZltmnlV tT^ ™* lht* !"   *"
The ebeera wore" in rasponsa to a i J^m^,0^'?,'!?/ IZfn""T ^°
«)uuih l>>  a mui! iu uavai uniiorm,<
who wi* h!» namo as l»0l-pr Marnier, „  „ A- **• "BNSMOHK
and declared he was ona of tbo or- »2"l Lundbreck. Alberta.
1 intitltfprs of ihet "soldiers, sailors and  ________ 1
| v.cirktii-cn's council" In -Hr-atllw daring  ^"S1'*'*. b«ss.„  y....xy <. . ;.;, •,,«»
\ tbt: rt-t-mt strlko ttwre. ! n rt gTOOK AMI\ »AV HAMtm
;    i know every soldier nnd sailor p' w' «»*ww* *"*> «»* KAHOM
ih<»r« Is willing to hav# this ber-mta* j
in   soMI«rs,   sailor*   »tnl   workmon's]
! rinmrll, ttt'ii'I  I?    Aren't  w*, »Kiy<?"
• th« speaker -rrtecl , Th» <fh««»r« lol-i
' lowed. ,
i    M mntb*r tmint h«» *»v 'if'.jio-l          '
"I want to sound thl* warotnt! to] 1700 ■<.■*».,,**
lho»« lx-rponn who sre ai>t»rorrtHiingl •,
;».**,*.-1,---   H,   %'i-ft-.*;  ».»  Ia     *■   •■• ■  -»■-"' '' mln'-'A
• lioliht-vlM     1 find  *n<»re
, arn'm-s; raldl^r* trim rrancs'- ttw-ii I <;o
"'. m thf tfti*\ able" '
'-    'Msfmn»r  Wtl"rt)-   ai'sr-lt*"!  (»'>«'»••(
■who "nt,* »"t'fluff jiortifTc itf;i;i<r-* n;iiJ;
) m*r>nli#>,v nowpetn"  whll*1 **#»»*s**i»»-*t  wh*> i
, vt.iktHt Uwtic H-.if* l» wttk til*- * ar ' *i* \
1 living on eottee and Honshmift'
tn«> bf h-jih-wI pr»v:dmt npjilirsnt mi
I    .*,m^..»4,.(.i*ii*»
For Mt
OWn I
with uJjoiit 200
if.,'. ■■ l  ,,'      t,t    ,,-■
  .. ■■   * ■**■ *. *.* ■». *      .».wt), 1
lM>lNl*rv»|rl? Wltt neren *^pf" ialty adapted tn!
iMiot* orni*nen. *>;m\y pi-fa red* \
nml i«mi tw ipritw'p.l,' ni»v«»r.
r,il)u;jr <--rft''\i. ug.t nui.lj hn.'*'
«!»tk on Inrg-c hiJ'c; kimjiTJ
iMiiWiin*; railroad *i<|i-tr.vk {
* ..   , ...   , ,  ,'.*.», 1     *-,.   mtiatmi ,
■*, *       1., . . *
•t.i--.',,: ,4 |iu |i«r utie, inciu4ing elsarjng
mnl (Htltlvailnn of st l*s«t I aenm, be*
t-r.* .reviving' Ctttwn Orsnt,
XVh*r* iire-«ni|>tor In o«eupsllon not
'■-,-*. tiuu) a ><ni», sutl hss nwds nropor*
• unfa*. ff»i«ruv**«in*Mit», ho may, mobuso
«f i,>i.iu«un or ojhor eait**, ba grantoa
iintmeiiinte certiiicato of Impravomsnt
**   ! ::, i .Ur UU i.Utm.
li »*•» r.1* without iH-rmnnotil rostdttiea
" " - *   -   ,#1,^,
»« aaiaitt -ttilie* fo
(•.in itr.rt r«><M>ra>i ssin* esch ytar. FMl«
t.r ii mnk* tmprovemtiits or rogurl
•..nc wlii di*«it«« ** 1nrt*\twa. Tills
.f,i;,.,, •„- oiitsined on thoso elalnw la
h-** thm f. y*srs, with ImiwwvosMats of
Sid pr jt.n-. tnoiudlng I sores oloarof
*n'l (-.titiv»*c4, and rooMoaca   of   at
li-fi.i •* '-.••■tr--,
rr-*.*;n|.<or twMIng CrewB Orsnt mar
-.-..rl 11 ..othor iir^'-iniruon. tt lia re*
•:.-.■(■<«» ini-.| in -c<>».|iineUon with his
l*r .,. wM!«ut Sfiusl oorupolhw. pr*.
;*.'■• i ;*,bti*uiry Im^mvt.monls msdo sng
ft-* '*-, •,,( mslntatnoS un Cream grants*
f*..tt m
Vi *srfvi y*t] ww, not »trs#dlna" tt
*. > '•--, wiv i,r \i*i-»td    n*   tmatmttmi
,-• i; <■• t.-f «.wi4i»!v«i nftw ftttftlttfiar ronl*
*-•  "U\ ,i< <1 iintirm'timci'it ruidltlnna
f*  ■  %*.*:/'-V  *"4  !f*.<!ii««rtal imlMMSS.
!' ..   *; .*...«* «*- «t» *„itf* mny ba losio-a
.*•:*    * * t«-'•■'•>•*. „r eetr.tmtxy, ,
■■.*'■* 'y-*iyv tn$t* annum nor.
i ,* .»...„r» Af mt* A«t t* *»is»ts4 ta
•:■.'■ I .-.r.ti.g Mf*<*t tarvtag
9 ■ : %u,.*Tt>,. iv.,.,,, TM itmo
"*t -1 1 n 1 ". titf ii.--.-nt <*■ dtwUmme mt n
'...,....« ,*f(..t.(«i.i.'f tm*r am*r tmt
•l-* ,*,.t ',*•■ t-x»eiMl«>d f»ota
' . ' t '.in ih- .i.-sHi •'( vtifb mri-Mn,
*»* * >..i.i:>-, «K*t»l *,,-* xmr atltt Iho
ci * »..* .*•* ,.( iii" in. i*i>i,( miv, thtn
ut-.*:- ut- f **t*n rniA*- tvtrnacliva.
^-   ■..,..■■ -iwf-   **-**■ ^mt-mmt,   t * t I9*9t,*.t ,9,
■::;    '."". }:,<':,-■ .*,:,',•;,%,-*■
RtOAtOIHfi ItUSSIA'
!.   NKW TORK.~-t%« pooplo". VfinUl
, ':..-* %,'t-U .'ith tiUt-tii. .a an ufgsHita-,
! Hon reftinlly formed for paldlshlng \
\ nnd dl-tT-r-tninMlng ar*pnrnlc» infonnn.  ■
Xr-vivt*. imsvigi-t],
sell, f'wunliwtiolc,.
V. X Uu*-1
l«. A   2M»!
I
I
! r-rtHnnf-a as to whkk lb. pumti la tnln-; v**. Omm-. rijm i
latermed    Tbn Irst imNM  p«n ! ***'' A    LT^ - -
i ont is #*nt!lt«d "Rtisslaii! IB*»l«»ts."   In! W A Y H B I
fannnanring its neuivaiun tptir* tolMoreM*n than Jobf.   Will notify3
rent, por topyh tbn Ptopten W«|tlirooglt %slMsllll*l%*r W&tBf
1 tt*
"Tbo «r«a of tht watM nt* opm\*^*^J$*»&>,
Pewit, for wuh th* futur-? <n' Ru^fa,'**b- 9T, t9!9.   Jo&ti KibX, fec'y*
tyhe lotom et tha wBrti ts ******* i   .  | ,...|m
'ttnwad.   1%» 1ws1tio»s f* *isttlt»t r«r. •     """* "*        "**""' "    "* * -'*
■ wit   tnfomstliMI   atMMI   IP*   It«*f*la« ■ iimwmmnwimtamaamnaaatimmmataanmanmM- '   n
>8ofi«t« to Ui« roat of tk« worM laf
•wiwi   vtiii  net   ftwiM^lat*.   Alfcrtrt*
Ififirs   WtiiiAaw.  for  ftrt««R  awotlm
I war  rottttpoptHot  to   ttamU.  bmi
1 written o denttipHam nt tbo workiac-. —1,„ ^   ««._ *w-   , __ . , •
Intan-M mvetnmm to to* tern et ol™™T> W«!»^y._ Co«al»l|>»Mll.]
yrnntt tmvhM caffed **tv!ii:.tatt &*.».
Ik-x,*"    Vama-w man.* •«•»» a*4 tbIU
' tn tho TTnffad ittttf sbooM be tsmn.,
<*<• «tlh th« conwnu of title littleI
JAMJtt WHITMOUil
Tmiefttp of
PwoostidOrfSB
Tntrt^osftlvitt. Catuiiu-aititiu.,
tt I*--*. -fa.lL.». ,9,m ate**-™ ■ " 	
tirmcftniiton
ACT. •
.... ***-i»  •«.  n.,»'».i im *m nmm
f ■!.■•   ti.-'rt'i j*>   ■N*.i,..ii,M-!!*t*a^ Agrt
*,,.. tm *f, tt,rrea** trine thw (!)
•,*.-*■ pn »»*.*»'*;...« ».f ttit* h*."<t.  Uf 1
*.  ,t*n (w»»itrm*    arftaJtAf
iti***** «c tmt*i*»rtttn\Je tho mit prioo .
ih* *»fi.,v imtfat   T*i(* <»r mors porotuss
',.ixi>,.4  '■*'■-*' .*#*.•«-«**■•**»    tmmr   mrirne
..*..*  ..    -*».-.....     . II.   ±   ui
i.-.l 1**   »l>>*m<*l':l
*■;*■* 4<-rt-t »*ltt*«l
-, *t. ■: ,1 .in atpomitm tm a pntpot.
,...*. mr »t\i4t„i*i.i, n-n sHotmont ml pm
■-4 *f,,.t \*iD* Mt«e«*4 frem srsUaMo
ft m* ii la'1 Js l» Iho looaUiif may he
'■i***   T*n?*s sSkrtwwits sre eoMRieaai
,\9n |»jm*nt t,t ail la*** dur tho
1 ■**«•*» or to say mOnPtpObtr. Tit
r.*e»>««   of   t ******* to m-ptm* im pa*.
. l***»   £|!V¥..   *.la« C»*»*-f»  :,***  «s»«««0  to
tali are al»« mmse-tae. TM netttPm at
the MlKlMtor of 1mm* "    '          ""
xsMXta
*n rmtpm fN* IM
• UlUlUtU ilUul
X* n-nal.   TM V.m* tnr'itotMip SJttHI-9*-
twns.fuset n^tmn^Oano yi»_ am M
(BW-^BWW^Pwt     fWWWtt •fPW^B'PWWf HWBiy  MP
WLgfTgfg wWtlWn,, tt^_ ^
*tik£$mrft   *
fio#wty f
SSs
THE   DISTRICT LEDGES,   FEENIE, B. C, APRIL 4,1919
•M
f.^j
PAGE THREE
i
*.;-i.*k!j?M!*ali
u
fife
RETURN
=»gp
bsssb
TARZAN
By
EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
Copyright. 1913. by W. G. Chapman
"I wn hours tlfli'l' i!.r. OiiiK :\ ni n ur
ele of blnel; \vitri.-'>i-i -iirniiHiili-d llie
village. Al interval* ,,uv wns {.i-relied
high iu the bruiu'lii's nt n live which
eouid overlook the i-niK-iile Presently
ti Miinyuetiiit within Hie village fell,
pietveri by tt single .arrow, n silent mes-
seiiuerjif. death from out of the silent
r.tr<-st. ;
T-I'e Arabs'■and their followers were
ituown into a due riig« at thia unprecedented occurrence. Tbey ran for the
gates te wreak dire vengeance upon
the foolhardy perpetrator of the outrage, bet tbey suddenly realized that
tbey tiki not know which way to turn
to Sad the foe. Aa they stood debating, with stany angry shouts and much
geettealatfag, one of the Arabs sank
attest)? to the ground In tbelr very
midst—a thin arrow protruding from
bis heart
Taraoa hed placed tlie finest marksmen ef the' tribe In the surrounding
trees, with directions never to reveal
themselves while the enemy was faced
In their direction. Ab a black released
his messenger of death he would slink
bach behled the sheltering stem of the
tree he hud selected, nor would be again
aim until a watchful eye told him that
none was looking toward bis tree.
Three times the Arabs started across
tlie clearing In the direction from which
they thosgtit the arrows came, but
each time another arrow would come
from belli ad to take its toll from among
their aiimher. Then they would turn
and ^harge in ii new direction. Finally they set out upou a determined
search of the forest, but the blacks
melted before tbem so tlmt tbey saw
no sign of an enemy,
But above them lurked a grim figure
in the deaye foliage of tbe migbty trees
—it was Tarzan of the Apes, borerlng
orer them as if he tind been the shad-
tbe enemies' loss convinced the blacks
lhat no fewer than twenty had fallen
hefore their arrows. They were wild
win elation nnd were for finishing the
day lit one glorious rush iipon tbe "Village, during which they would slaughter the last of their foemen.
"You'are crazy!" Tarzan cried. "I
have shown yon the only way to flgbt
these people. You will fight just as I
tell you. to tight or I shall ieave you
and itt* back to my own country."
Tliey were frightened when he
threatened this and promised to obey
Dim Ri-rupuiotisly If he would but
pi'omi.'e'tiot to desert tliem.
"Very well." lie said, "We shall re-
him to ..the,'elephant' Doma for the
'nlirht. I have a plan* to give the Arabs
a little taste oi what they may expect
if tbey remain iu mir country, but I
shall need no neip."
So tbey man-bed nui-k lo their camp
of tbe previous uigiit aud, lighting
great tires, ate aud recounted tbe adventures ot the day until long after
dark. Tarzan slept until midnight,
then he arose and crept iuto tbe Cimmerian blackness of the forest. An
hour later he came to the edge of the
clearing before the village. There was
a camp lire burning within the palisade. The ape-man crept across tbe
clearing until be stood before tbe barred gates. Through the Interstices be
saw a lone sentry sitting before tbe
Are.
Quietly Tarzan went to the tree at
the end of the village street He
climbed softly to his place and fitted
ao arrow to his how. For several
minutes be tried to sight fairly upon
the sentry, but tbe waving branches
and flickering firelight convinced him
that the danger of a miss was too
great He must touch the heart full
in the center to bring tbe quiet and
Budden death bis plan required.
He bad brought beside his bow, arrows and rope the gun be bad taken
tbe previous day from the otber sentry
he bad killed. Caching all these In a
convenient crotch of the tree, he dropped Hgbtly to the ground within the
palisade, armed only with bis long
knife. The sentry's back was toward
him. Like a cat Tarzan crept upon
the dozing man.
Tarzan crouched for a spring, for
tbat is ever tbe quickest and surest attack of the jungle beast, when the
man. warned by some subtle sense,
sprang to bis feet aud faced tbe ape-
man.
CHAPTER XIX.
Victory For tho Waziri.
WHEN the eyes of the black
Manyuema savage fell upon
tke strange apparition that
confronted him with menacing knife they went wide In horror.
He forgot tbe gun within bis bands.
He even forgot to cry out. His one
thought was to escape tbls fearsome
x*v
New and Than at Varying Interval! a
Man Would Plungs Forward Dead.
ow af ieatb. Presently a Mnnyuema
forged abend of his companions; there
waa neae ta ate from what direction
death eaae. and so It came quickly,
and a moment later those behind atom*
bled over tbe dead body of tbelr corn*
rade-the la*vita ble arrow piercing tbt
atill heart
ft to*, aot take n great doe! of thtt
manner ef warfare tu get upon tbe
nerves of white men. and ao It Is little
te tta wondered at tlmt tbe Manyuema
were saon panic stricken. Did one
• forge ahead an arrow found bis heart;
did oae lag behind ha never again was
seen atlves did one stumble to one side
•tea far n bare moment from the sight
of Us fellows be did not return, and
alwaya when they mme upon tbe bodies of their dead tbey found Ihose terrible straws driven with tha accuracy
of superhuman power wrolght through
the t Mini's bfstt Hut «urw than all
else was the hideous fact tbat not once
during tbe morning bad tliey seen or
btort tba slightest stga ot an enemy,
ether thaa the (XlHrsa arrows.
When laally tbey retained to Um
village it wna no belter. Ktery now
and thee at varying Intervals tbat were
maddening In the terrible tumpense thoy
camped, a win wonU pinnge forward
W.w*W-        . «**-.   *»*■'*-. <*-*   -"      •  ■-9-—I'   •»•***--..     .•"••*,»..
v^ftotfir* te let**** 1*X* 1*rylt*l* <pt«eo. Iwt
tho AitlM fearad to take up the march
threat* Ibo grits and hostile forest bo
tot by litis new nod tmiWt tototf
wMHt laden wiib tbe gnat "tore of
l«ary tltey had found within tbe fll-
tenet wit, mmtarn >ru tiNty lustoik W>
ttnm tkt Ivery behind.
finally tbe entire eipedftlea took
itfng*   wttkla   the   tkatriwd   kata.
Hem, at tenet ttoy waa* to five
ffrow tto arrows.   Tanan. trom tto
jtiat ntovt tto vfltoge. tod marked tto
hnl late wttkb ilk* ilvtot A»»h» taut
\pmo, not. tohwrtwr Nhnaatf apaa ••
.wvtti'ltiuuUuit UiuU. hu diuvu hU heavy
■pear witb att tfct totrn tt Ms giant
•osHeo throng* tto tkatetwtf roof. A
Isswt nr patn toto Mat ttot N tod
faaad n nu»»k. Ttoa Tanaa rvttmwd
te tto for**. tmimirO Um warvtaf*
and «»Wr»w n adie tw tto aowtk tn
fNI WWI Wit*
Mw ■P^pPrO'WB wn wm fflffffp miwmwm
pot a «tmtf# *raiwiir,»--n«tt mrmn n ml-
WMHP  -iWWnB wRmmtww ow
upon him, and tben the sentry thought
to scream for aid. but It was too late.
A great band was upou his windpipe,
and be was being borne to tbe earth.
He battled furiously, but futllely.
With tbe grim tenacity of a bulldog
tbose awful fingers were clinging to
bla throat Swiftly and surely life was
being cboked from bim, His eyes
bulged, bis tongue protruded, bis face
turned to a ghastly, purplish hue
There was a convulsive tremor of tbe
stiffening muscles, and tbe Manyuems
sentry lay quite still.
Tbe ape-man threw tbe body across
one of bis broad abouldera and, gathering up tbe fellow's gun, trotted silent
ly up tbo sleeping village street toward tbe tree tbat gave bim sucb easy
Ingress to tbe palisaded village. Ba
boro tbe dead sentry Into tbe midst ot
tbe leafy mate above.
First be stripped tbe body of car
tridge belt and aucb ornaments aa he
craved, wedging It Into a convenient
crotch while bla nimble fingers ran
over It In search of lhe loot be could
not plainly sea In the dark. Wben ba
bad finished be took tba gun tbat bad
belonged to the man nnd walked far
out upon a limb, from tbe end of wblch
be could obtain a better view of tbe
hot* Drawing a careful bead on tba
beehive structure in wbleb be knew
tbe Arabs to bi be pulled tbe trigger.
Almost Instantly tbere waa an answering groan-Tartan smiled; ba bad made
another lucky bit
Following tbe abut there was a mo*
ment's silence In tbe cnmp. and tben
Mauyueutu aud Arab came pouring
from tbe huts like a swarm of angry
hornets; but, If the truth were known,
tbey were even mora frightened than
tbey were angry,
Wben tbey discovered thst thoir sentry bad disappeared tbelr fears wero
r'j-stiiMi madly amiss the clearing toward the jungle.
For a time no one turned back toward tbe thing that had frightened
them, but Tarzun fciipw that they
would in a' moiiii'iit. and when they
discovered that it was but the dead
body of their sentry, while tbey would
doubtless be still further■ terrltied. lie
had a rather definite idea as tu what
they would do. So he faded silently
away toward tliu south, hiking the
moonlit upper terrace back toward the
camp.of the Waziri:     -,
Presently one of, ibe Arabs turned
and saw tbat the thing that bad leaped
from the tree upon them lay still and
quiet where it had fallen in the center
of tbe village street. Cautiously be
crept back toward it until he saw. that
it was but a man, A moment later he
was beside tbe figure and in another
bad recognized it as the corpse of tbe
Manyuema wbo tind stood on guard at
the village gate. ,
His companions rapidly gathered
around at bis call, und after a moment's excited conversation tbey did
precisely wbat Tarzan bad reasoned
they wonld. Raising tbeir guns to
their shoulders, tbey  poured  volley
I Under Tarzan's guidance the black
I Waziri warriors stationed themselves
j along the trail on either side in tbe
j densest underbrush.'* They stood at far
intervals, and us the column passed a
single arrow or a heavy spear, well
aimed, would pierce a Manyuema or
an Arab. Then the Waziri would melt
into the distance and run ahead to
take his stand farther'on. They did
not strike unless success were sure and
the danger of detection almost nothing,
j and so the arrows and tbe spears were
few and far between, but so persistent
and inevitable that the slow moving
column of heavy laden raiders was in
a constant state of panic—panic at the
pierFed body of the comrade who had
just fallen, panic at the uncertainty of
who the next would be to fall and
when. *
It was with the greatest difficulty
tbat tb<i Arabs prevented tbeir men a
dozen'times from throwing away their
burdens aud fleeing like frightened
rabbits up the trail .toward the north.'
And so tbe day wore on—a frightful
nightmare of a day for the raiders—a
day of weary but well repaid work for
the Waziri. At nlgbt tbe Arabs constructed a rude boma in a little clear-
after volley into the tree from which J *nS by a river and went Into camp,
tbe corpse bad been thrown. Had i At Intervals during the night a rifle
Tarzan remained there be would bave i would bark close above tbelr heads,
been riddled by a hundred bullets. j and one of tbe dozen sentries which'
■"" When tbe Arabs and Manyuema dis- j they now bad posted would tumble to
covered that the only marks of vio- j the ground. Such a condition was in-
lence upon tbe body of their dead com- l supportable, for tbey saw that by,
rade were giant linger prints upon bis j means of these hideous tactics they,
swollen throat tbey were again thrown would be completely wiped out. one by
Into deeper apprehension and despair, j one- without inflicting a single death
That they were not even safe within uP°n thfeir enemy. But yet. with tbe
a palisaded village at nlgbt came as a ', persistent avariciousness of the white
distinct shock to tbem. That an ene- ! man' tte Arabs clung to their jpot and
my could enter the midst of tbelr camp   when morning came forced the demor-
and kill tbeir sentry with bare hands
seemed outside the bonds of reason,
and so tbe superstitious Manyuema
commenced to attribute their ill luck
to supernatural causes, nor were the
alized Manyuema to take up their burdens of death and stagger on into tha
Jungle.
For three days the,withering column
kept up its frightful march.    Bach
whites able to offer any better expia- hour^was marked by its deadly arrow
nation.                                               5 or cruel spear.  The nights were made
With at least fifty of their number Mrfteww by the barking of the invisible
flying through the black Jungle, and Sun that mnde fentry duty equivalent
without  the Slightest  knowledge of to a death sentence,
when their uncanny foemen might re- 0n the n><»n»tog of the fourth day
sume the cold blooded slaughter they **** Arabs were compelled to shoot two
had commenced, it was a desperate ot thelr b,acks before they could com-
band of cutthroate that waited sleep- Pel tte balance to take up the hated
lessly for the dawn. Only on the prom- lvory- and as tfaey did so a voice rang
Ise of the Arabs that they would leave "out clear and stronS from the jungle:
the village at daybreak, and hasten on- "Today you die, oh. Manyuema, un-
ward toward their own land, would less you lay'down the ivory. Fall upon
the remaining Manyuema consent to- your cruel masters and kill them! You
stay at the village a moment longer. have S^1*8- why do you not use them?
Not even fear of their cruel masters Km the^Arabs, and we will not harm
was sufficient to overcome this new yQU-   We will take you back to our vil-
terror.                             " lage and feed you and lead you out of
And so it was that when Tarzan and our country In safety and in peace,
his warriors returned to the attack the ^ d°wn the ivory nnd fall upon your
next morning they found the raiders masters.   We wlllhelp you.   Else you
prepared to march out of the village.
The Manyuema were laden with stolen ivory. As Tarzan saw it be grinned, for he knew tliat tbey would not
die!"
As the voice died down the raiders
stood as though turned to stone. The
Arabs eyed their Manyuema slaves.
The slaves looked first at one of their
carry it far.   Then be saw.something 	
iQILldl^-wMe_sa.ra*p^i!^^
man upon whose massive rolling mus-     -  -    -
cles and migbty chest the flickering
firelight played.
Btot before be could turn Tarzan was
xney
of tbe Manyuema were lighting torch- were but waiting for some one to take
es in tbe remnant of tbe camp fire, the inltltaJve.  Tbere were some thirty
Tbey were about to fire the village. Arabs left and about 160 blacks.   All
Tarzan was perched In a tall tree were armed—even those who were act-
some hundred yards from tbe palisade. Ing as porters had their rifles slung
Making a trumpet of nls bands, he across their backs,
called loudly in the Arab tongue: "Do The Arabs drew together. Tbe sheik
not flro tbe huts or we aball kill you ordered tbe Manyuema to take up tbe
all! Do not fire the buts, or we shall march, and as he spoke he cocked his
kill you all!" rifle and raised It.   But at tbe same
A dozen times be repeated It   Tbe instant ono of tbe blacks threw down
Manyuema hesitated; tben one of them bla load, and. snatching bis rifle from
flung bis torch into tbe camp fire. Tbe bis back, fired point blank at tbe group
others were about to do tbe aame wben of whites.    In nn Instant tbe camp
an Arab sprang upon them with a
stick, beating tbem toward tbe huts.
Tarzan could see tbat be waa commanding tbem to Ore tbe little thatched dwellings. Tben be stood erect upon
tbe swaying branch a hundred feet
above tbe ground, and, raising one of
tbe Arab guns to bla shoulder, took
careful aim and fired. With tbe report
tbe Arab who wu urging on bla men
to burn tbe vlllago fell In hia tracka.
and tbe Manyuema threw away tbeir
torches nnd fled from tba Tillage, The
last Tarzan saw of tbem tbey wero
racing toward tbe Jungle, while their
former masters knelt upon tbe ground
and fired at tbem,
But however angry the Arabs might
nave been at tbe Insubordination of
their alavoa, thoy were at least convinced tbat it would be tbe better part
of wisdom to forego the pleasure of
firing tbe village tbnt had given tbem
two aucb nasty receptions. In their
hearts, however, they swore to return
again witb aucb a force as would enable tbem to aweep tbe entire country
for miles around until no vestige of
human life remained.
Tbey had lookwl In vain for the owner of tbe voice which had frightened
off tba men wbo bad been detailed to
put the torvh to (be but*, but nul even
tto keenest eye among tbem bad been
ablt to locate him. Tbey bad seen ibe
puff of smoke from the tree following
tto anot that brought down tlie Arab.
waa a cursing, bowling mass of de-
"Who are you that speaks the tongue
of our Arab masters?" cried the Manyuema spokesman. "Let us see you
and then we shall give you our answer."
Tarzan stepped out of the jungle a
dozen paces from tbem.
"Look!" he said. When they saw
that he was white they were filled with
awe, for never had they seen a white
savage before, and at his great mus-
des and giant frame they were struck
Iwith wonder and admiration.
| "You may trust me," said Tarzan.
iMSo long as you do as i tell you and
harm none of my people, we shall do
you no hurt Will you take np our
ivory and return In peace to onr village or shall we follow along your trail
toward the north as we have followed
for the past three days?'
The recollection of the horrid days
that bad just passed was tbe thing tbat
finally decided the .Manyuema. and so.
lifter a short conference, ihey took up
their burdens and set off to retrace
their steps toward tbe village of the
Waziri.
At the end of the third day tbey
marched into the village gate and were
greeted by the survivors of the recent
massacre, to whom Tarzan had sent a
messenger In their temporary camp to
the south on tbe day that tbe raiders
had quitted the village, telling them
that they might return in safety-
It took al) the mastery and persuasion fhat Tarzan possessed to prevent
the Waziri falling on tbe Manyuema
tooth and nail nnd tearing them to
pieces, but when he had explained tbat
he had given bis word tbat tbey would
not be molested if they carried the
Ivory back to the spot from which tbey
had stolen it and hud further impressed upon his people that they owed
their entire victory to bim they Anally
acceded to his demands and allowed
the cannibals to rest ln peace within
tbelr palisade.
! That night tbe village warriors held
a big palaver to celebrate their victories and to choose a new chief. Since
old Wazirl's death Tarzan had been
directing the warriors In battle, and
the temporary command had been
tacitly conceded to him. Tbere had
been no time to choose a new chief
from among their own number, and In
fact so remarkably successful had tbey"
lieen under tbe ape-man's generalship
that they had bad no wish to delegate
the supreme authority to another for
fear that wbat they already bad gained might be lost. They had so recently seen the results of running counter
to this savage white man's advice in
the disastrous charge ordered by Waziri, in which he Himself had died, that
It bad not been diilietilt tor tbem. to
accept Tarzan's authority as final.
The principal warriors sat In a circle
about a small lire to discuss the relative merits of whomever might be stig-
Rpsted as Old Wazirl's successor.* it
was Busiill who spoke -faati-—
In no way allayed, ami aa though to j baU though a volley bad immediately
bolster their courage by warlike ac-	
tions they began to lire rapidly at tbe
barred gates of the village, although
•'Since Waziri is dead, leaving no
son, there Is but one,, among us whom
we know from experience Is tilted to
make us a good king. There is only
nne who has proved that he can'Successfully lead us against the guns of
the white man and brlug «s ensy victory without the loss ot a single life.
There Is only one. nnd that is the
white mau who has led us for the past
few days." And Itnsuii ■siuuikj to his
leet nnd. with uplifted spear und half
bent, crouching binly. commenced'to
dance slowly nbout Tarzan. eliuntlng
slowly in time to bis steps: "Waziri.
king of the Wiizlrl! Waziri. killer of
Arabs!   Waziri. king of the Waziri!"
One by one the other warriors Hlgnl-
HikI their ncceptanceof Tarzan hk tbelr
king by Joining in the solemn dunce.
The women came and squatted about
the rim of the circle, heating upon
|niiitom.i, clapping tlieir tin mi-*, in time
lu the steps of the dancer** and Joining
In the chant of the warriors. In the
< enter of the circle sat Tar/.an of the
.ypes-WnxIrl, klim of llie Wasdrl; for,
like Ills predecessor. lii» wim lo take
lhe name of hi* tribe as liN own, Pact-
'it and fantcr grew the pace of the
iliincci'H. louder nud louder (heir wild
nml mirage hljont.- Tlie women row
nnd fell In uiiir-'iu. tduMiinsi n<>w nt
the topH of tbelr vol<e« The K|««arn
Here liranillslilitK fiercely, ainl u» the
iliiiicerx Miint|ifi| down anil beat their
MiltliN upon the hurd tramped earth nf
lhe Aillime mieel ibe whole kIbIii wio»
iis terribly primeval nml wiviiue nn
llmiiuli It were i„'U\ii j.tMt/eil In tin- .llm
■ibiwti ot tiumaiiity. cnniitlev* sun", tn
the pant.
U      (!;,.     <-\-   'I,     |   .*|j!       I*,';;*.
iiiin «|-ram; tn Mt (•'•■! it
i.i       .. ■   ■',        •     I .1.111,,I .        in.
llie "In le of L'lillcl'lli'.-   Iiii.
||'!I|.«n|  iltli)   f<.Ui<l  IMr'   -I'..
k|.«»nr iii  (lie nai'i.. i,i
Wlllll'-ltllll   III*   ll-.-I..IV   -
0. B. U. Bulletin Mo. 3
TENTATIVE OUTLINE OF
INDUSTRIAL   ORGANIZATION
The Press is not abusing the Western
Labor Conference ano villifying the
ONE   BIG   UNION   because   it   has
Nothing else to do.    It is Speaking
on  Behalf of its  Masters, the  Em.
ploying   Class.   . It  is   Pursuing   its
Logical   Program  of  Belittling  any
Honest   Effort  of  the   Workers   to
"Cease Chasing Rainbows," and Organize  on  a Basis that alone will
Ensure to Them a Chance of Meet,
ing  the   Masters on the  Industrial
Field.  .It is Now  Praising "Craft"
Organizations (which in times past
it abused and conaemned because It
Realizes that Craft Unionism cannot Disturb its Masters.
Many questions   no  doubt  present
themselves to the minds of the aver,
age members of organized labor who
are  honestly  desirous   of  Improving
their form of organization, chief of
which we imagine will be: —
"How shall we go about the formation of the ONE BIG UNION?"
And many think that before they
jpan ;vote' even upon the question that
they must sever their connections
with their present International Union,   that Is not so.
(Let us bring to your attention re.
commendation No.'s 5 & 6, of the Policy Committee of the Western Confer-,
ence (see press for resolution cr re.
port—In Bulletin, of course, those will
be given in full.   WAP) I
No. 5, you will see, shows that in
promoting the new form of organiza-j
tion, we shall work through existing
bodies, and that no DEFINITE steps
can be taken until we are assured by
the VOTE OP THE RANK AND PILE
that they desire Industrial Organization.
No. 6, you will further observe, de.
mands a further conference of representatives of ail Trades Councils
and District boards, who shall perfect
plans of organization and develope a
definite line of action.
Tho Central Executive Committee is
but a temporary body, elected to prepare propaganda and issue and re.
cieve ballots en the referendum. We
cannot therefore take on work to
which we have not been committed
and concerning which we have not
been instructed.
However,'it appears that many opponents who KNOW BETTER, and
other workers, who are honest but do
not know, think that T>y Industrial
Organization we shall throw the workers together promiscuously without
reg&r for the industry, bottle washers.-
boiler makers and musicians, for in.
stance. Such a contention is ridiculous on the faco of it.   Craft organiza-
ttftw   tm —*->.#*■ ysirlI»>■   br*.   i-tm*ntP     t a* nalntAR-
-»,-3W""—iB—HVVWrwiuj—«r-vrwr>-|—-aa^^Wf—f-t^aawwmwf-
plumber, sheet metal worker, etc., IN.
DUSTIUAL ORGANIZATION MUST
BE ACCORDING TO INDUSTRY, I.E.,
SHIPBUILDING, BUILDING TRADES,
MINING, TRANSPORTATION, PUBLIC SERVICE (civil employees).
These will be sub-divided according to
trades, necessarily, but will discuss
together all common questions, aud
vote and act on them together.
Do you see the difference?
Instead of one TRADE acting, or
coming out on strike, by itself, it will
and can only act, together Vith OTH.
ER TRADES .of 'the'SAME INDUSTRY.
When we do write a constitution for
the new industrial Organization, it
MUST be drafted UPON THE UNBS
OF INDUSTRY AS THEY AT PRESENT EXIST, and to that extent work.
ers will be organized to their ASSOCIATIONS IN THE PRODUCT OF
THEIR JOINT LABOR, and not by
the "craft" they follow. The "craft"
(the work of the "skilled" workman)
is being wiped out by the machine.
Industrial Organization is an advance upon the old and now obsolete
"craft" form, because it places the
workers in a position whereby they
can function effectively In defence and
for such concessions that market con.
ditions will allow.
One Big Union of the workers would
be impracticable unless cast in the
SAME MOULD AS TUB INDUSTRIAL
SYSTEM in which we Uve and work.
If we are prepared, as members of
the working class , to recognize each
other as comrades of ope big body, OF
ONE CLASS, then the next logical
step is to so organize as to place our
forces in the same relation to employers as they are to us.
Later we hope, if finances permit,
to publish a leaflet showing the reduced overhead expenses ot Indus,
trial Organization, as against the
present "craft" form., i.e., that Industrial Organization is cheaper and more
efficient for Its members. This will
be our next Bulletin. -'Look but for ft!
Central Executive Comlmtteo
' 210 Labor Temple,
Vancouver, B.C.
CENTRAL EXECUTIVE
W. A. Pritchard, Vancouver, B.C.;
R J. Johns, Winnipeg, Man.; J. It.
Knight, Edmonton, Alta.; Jos. Naylor.
Cumberland, B.C.; V. R. Mldgley,
Secretary, Labor Temple, Vancouver,
B.C. .*   '   ',
Saskatchewan Executive
F. Cropper, Moose Jaw; Jas. Mc
Murty, Saskatoon; Wm. Munroe
Moose Jaw; J. Sambrook. Regina; U.
Hazeltlnc, Secretary, 3223 Riverside
ave., Regina.
Alberta Executive
Mrs. George Corse, Calgary; Wm.
Rolling, Brule Mines; Jas. Marshall,
Calgary: Donald McNabb, Lethbridge,
C. E. Berg, Secretary, P.O. Box 639,
Edmonto'iti. "
Manitoba Executive
F. J. Baker, Brandon, Man.; W. H.
Lovatt, Winnipeg, Man.; H.'H. Roberts
St. Vllnlr Mnn :  A   Seohlc..Wtnninee.
Man.; R.B. Russell, Secretary, 14 La.
bor Temple, Winnipeg, Maul,
British Columbia Executive
"W.'*'H. Cottrell, Vancouver, J. Ka-
variagh, Vancouver; P. McDonnlel,
Vancouver; J. Taylor, Victoria; A. S.
Wells, Secretary, 405 Dunsmuir 8t,
Vancouver.
Policy Committee of
District 18 To Meet
Operators
ft   V
On Wednesday, April 9, at Calgary
the policy committee of District IS
will meet the representatives of the
Western Coal Operators' Association
for tho purpose of extending tho llfs of
the prescni agreement until puaco Ls
signed and the agreements nlso expire
in the United State*. The recom.
moKdatloiis outlined by the international policy of the U.*.M. W. of A. will
be adhered to and it ia not anticipated
thut there will ho much trouble in coming to nn amicable asrei incut in the
-HrcuiivitaiH-tn. The rocommendiilioim
uitiiuimouHly hrrlvcd at in Ititliaimpull*
are an follows
To tins Mi'inbers of the Policy Com.,
niittoo: -
(iemkirnu;
We. yr.tir i-nlM.-uiniiiUteu seli-ctuil to
bring Ih   rcc-onimmiitatloiia  for adop-
:l|*f
i in
•n  ef
.)'
I'll
't:i:.v*
ttbr
ri !»;.rt. an . rct'omni'-m!;!.
1. s. I.. ,:-.
.* I I,*. I*
.i. .1- I, ll
'*-      I ' '
bees loosed Into Its foliage, tbere bad
| been no Indication (Imt It bad been ef-
no enemy was In sight Tartan took
advantage of the deafening tear of
litis fusillade to lire into the mob beneath him.
No one heerd hit shot above the din
ttt MttJiuf uiutfceiry la tbe street, but
some, who wmre standing chwe. new
one of tbeir number crumple suddenly
to tbe <srth When they Irs mil over
him he ws* «l«irt. They wrre pnttir
Mtl, ken, ami ll took all the bnitel authority uf tbe Amt* to kvep Ibe Man
vn*i»nw from rn«Mwe bt>1it*r *tt*1t*r let*
Ibe Jungle-anywttetw lo escape from
HO»  IrUliHM  »IU.H-IW,
After a  Umm tbey cmtaeucvd  to
niilH dutwo, emi *« em tnnth** my*-*
leriott* deelhk occurred among them
they took benrt «t*ln.   Hut It wn* n
ft,.,9*  *n*;.J1  9 t.t*,.    *,,9  1*.   ♦   .,  .  «*,,.,.  *.:■*
concluded tbat ttwy wmld not bv dl«-
inrtuml again Termm ear* v<«k« lo a
weird m«mn, and a* the raiders looked
np In ih* rtt-r-wtlon from whUtt th*
sound «e*cmed io mia«, the si<e man.
who ntnwl •winslnf Ihe deed tmriy nf
ib* ariitrr nmtir tn ami fm «*Mifetrfr
»h •!  i Imp *rnf|*M« fer oat Nlmre IMr
bi-i,l«
Wrth  bttwht  et  eftim*  llw thtwie
ItttAe iti ell dlr*rtJ.<«« tolMWipe this
lo lw Kprlnninii xtt*,n IIm*u». Tu tbeir
f*«ir itt*fnrt«>d imael.-j-fflft-'flw the lundy ttt
tlm, m-utry, f*fi*3 nhh irMr tpmw'-tit
■i*-»>i-*' -fmf ti*tr*. ft»*nnii,tf fhv rffr.<ni"'-»
«( a gVf-wt towxf wt f*»f. IK IMr at*t*
My lo i«**w»rtt«e many of the 1ih*k*
**f»W*t ttt* |«»IW***-» whit? ttHtat* |.*r
«!»«» tl* hsini ttmtm tb* **ln» end
The Camp Wee a Curtlitf, Howllef
Mass ef Otmens.
mens, flgbllug with gnu* and hnlvet
*nd pistols. Tbe Ami* stood fogetb*
er ami defended their liven valiantly,
fee tlve.
!   Tartan  waa loo InWIIgent to tw
j caught In tiny auch trap, nnd so the to- ..  .  „ „
pott of his shot lind wmvetydieda way m with the ralu «f lead that poured
■»^#-_ .*^ > 9^.    - opon tJiMn ffan JfceJr own slaves and
th* siitiwtr ef tiTUTf* mA *pr&rn mbkk
now t*tip.*d frem the wmMindlrig lop-
pi* aimed -euieiy at litem. tb**re waa
little question from ibe flrat wbat Ibe
outcome would be. lu ten wioutsa
from tbe time tbe first porter bad
ini.ii.iiit i
■i- It.-l. I
lli.- I-.. I,-
llti-le • I I'
I1 --',-','.I .•
ttt',1 I.:,.. 1.
\ ., '.
htm   il..*i.
*• le
*,!   J*
Hi it
1,1«!
fi.r
i   1.
the foHinviii
!. Hec'iii-M )<■•• th.'tt iiiiciiipliivmetil
in (i t'uiiit't'ii tliri'iii unii a i!i"ii;i''o li
Uie .iiuit , H,i.|*,ni*i ... ,iii>i |iiu.,|,ii,*
ty of the uiitver**! of t'.i*' I'tilleil State*-*
Which U!l,l'lll|ilu: lii'li! iii »rente.) ll)
i the c»v« r <ltw |n|t!i ini of the min ins." in
! dustry.   \V<« roiieur in the r, * iiinniea,
' ililtllill iif  .'!'< ':■<!,!. ).:   iliHi",,".ul ili'cl-'ire
! for a nj;-!ii,ur uork ila>, 'Si\t* dayn per
: weeK,  nud   ri-t'iiiiitiieiiil
po*i-r    Hlli!     i!i!1li<!WO    i
■*,';*ei|
■tii.l
before tbt ape-min was on tlie ground
and racing for another tr** • bmdtmd
yards away. Horn he again found a
suitable perch tmn wbkb be could
watch ibe pnvantloits of tbe raiders.
It occurred lo him tlmt he might havo
considerable mors fun witb tliem, ao
again ho culled in ilium through bin  thrown iJktvn. IM* load the tost ef
99l.9,,9,   .ml*,   tttntf,
lb* Ir^r?*    TVfiil tn
Impravlsed trumiwt,
..-I. **nv.     m-m*a
■ti lin-i* i:fi in* fur
tvoryr #
•en* of tbo Minynema started to
I lay down tbelr loud*. Imt tbla waa altogether too much for tbe avarirtotn
' Al*l«.    Willi MmnI nhtmta end mi****
I to*y a»iw*«i tbelr pom fall opm tut
i bserev*. tbreatenlnt Instant deatb to
any wbo might lay down bis load
! T1>ey wold five np firing Ibe v11laff*fc
' tmt the rtwRgbt of atamd-milnf tbfa
; enormous furt»M in Ivory waa itultt
I beyend their eencvpilon.   Oetter deatk
im» mu
I   Aot m tbot iMrrMI mt ot ttm ttt- f   ..*
- lave ef Uu* Ptoitx. »«» ov tne skoal*
. torn nt t*etr alana waa tkt ivory too*
«N» «f a morn et hint*   Ttmnrt llw
^^^9*pn*p9 -a^&b  *<^b^<b*-*^*'^^L*Mja    h**^*ykJlv  ek^bWMMdi^itttf Jh-fe*-*^-*-!^
> aajfwps stttteawat
Itatvttae
Arabs lay dead.
pnro ine flttng bad ctaam Tsraaa
W'iif .V4'.v.U ;.*<■ ,-).•*■ MtXtiijtM-iimo,
"Tsk^ up our Irory and mum tt to
tmt filiate ftwm ohtttfo too ttnlo Ik
Wt •kail sec bnrm im"
eHArrtft xx,
Ott a nwuwtn tbt ManywaM
bmtltatMi. They bad Bt stomach to reu 4ce Uut diOittlt
tbree days' iraU.   Tbty talk*
, *d togntlwr la low wbitpatB. and eat
I tamed toward tkt Juagte. calling aload
;ti» tho mtfe tbnt, hit fpofcim to th*ft»
ttom out of tke towage,
tttm An w* ir-nitr thet wit*n yen
I fcsvn oi in your viKsiie yoo WU1 aid
kin « atir ke asked.
~T#s Art mt Um*," ttpttet Tama.
motb*t thnn tbnt we have ptemtntd ott
jto bara you if you will rtiurn oaf
Ivaey to at.   Bat thtn yea de kaow.
F
■tlwam ******* ml maamitn , ti^t ll tmu* *i-vUU» ***» ******* lu kUl
"Tetat a wwew flan wist J yea on tf yaa tto out rriara aa wa tt*
. ^m*.*** ■* 8U!f1'* 6,•*" M .       i •**»lkn* *r» *• •« »^e likely to do
t^miXPmrrr.TVm-^ U tf m nom on tbno W ye. do aa
1 waa****
IImt well die*!.^! <{iiltt totitut ti,nn
txlttme well bm! tint* nud lirepn»*nli
nble  tiimiiier*  ti.iii  po nithjiteil   her
l,t.!«    ■■■    f.   •;   ft' t'.    f   .;.,!,..    **..,.      ,\«4
.Intic i»nfi(«r; W«nt!it *(... h-ii-,< i**)!'
m tii Hu-. Mmifci .*...! I i.m . iiii'M.lln
li|«i Inti OiiKe.) mi.i.iiii In* li H.i^i. miv
*i,'.e -Uiijerl-i1: Ami llAtli'M'. I'ould
I'.^riiol tin l'i' believeit ttiit tluw mi*
llli* *.'ime lll.U. In- li.nl IMI' -ill . il ill'.'
Ililll   ii   down  of  ll|.»  Il.oi-l  *« let l  club*
.    .    ..,*   .      ..'(•'I,*..,    .*.*..#   ..   ,,,*■   ,     ...   VI   , **
(*.,Jl,t.-<l li, j!.!*. ,*t.*,|,  lv- .;!*(.}   n*!«ti 111**.
lull t>(trl<    ll«*lli|ittr>it«   l»lnl   til*   in, l;il   or
|i.«W»."l«l»   .tli.I   fcnio.      ilielr.   *liijl    Infill*,
l» .tolm « lit(|uii, l.iinl lJi|.)*|i Kr"
\l,»l   -il    I'jft.l.i    .1   l'l»    A!»*» I   -l|ir.-   I|.(...
rt     ♦«•!»»     *»Mljt^li«e    HM*-I»ll«     Hl«-M - t*i**W if
hut »urel> mn* h* tnll*«wins ttwe*iilu
How «I  III* nie i -turn. |»>r tiitl tie iw»t
ntsrted ttt llw i«ty Iwiitout;
•       ■»••»••
"ITie reo night lhat Tar*Ht» ul ih#
Ape* became <lilef of the tVtttin ittr
VMiinnii lie lovi-o   ,/iim- I'oriet, m> <ly
In* in a Ilny I.mi •.im tniiiin «e»i ,*t
ii>tli i.t»»i 111*- Al.ii n>      vil llie »>» l»f
torn in ibe hont in nttp'p atte pad tm*
nptd tram the Ijmly Alice, t.nty ibeca
tunlr-f*!    'they   wew  Jmw
CUtteit ami tbitma. ,
^To l*f i»otif!tiii**»il^
Unltea States;
4. we recommend that the throe
resident International Ofllclals ho em-
powored to draft or to havo drafted
for prosentntion to the Hpuci il Intn'.
nationfil Conveiitloh when co"venal a
tentative draft of bill to bo presented
to CongresH and providing for nat-
iuttullf.iuion i,f nil ecu] ininm;
fi. We recommend that the ht^r-
li'iiioriil tlthtiaU be authorized to
wage tm extensive and iutenslvo cam.
piilgn of nrgttuiviation in the anthracite dlstrlctM tui,l in thi? *.parisely or-
KfuilKi.d   and   non-union   bituminous
«llftr|et«;
6. 4W« recommend that It be the
liuclartu pulley ut the li.urnailonal
I nloti that the Htipplemcntnl Agree-
until in the utuhrucl'.e region which
rumen the Ini-roiiHo In wages secured
in Vnv-eiiilii'-r 'V)'< k'hiII r»-oi'iln In full
force nnd "fleet until tho e»ii!r;itlon
,,! .i,„ i,    ',, ..,,11,.. ,,.!i„ ■t-.f*.,■ evtit and
tint the full jiuw»r und Intiiiitico of
iho tutted Mine Worker* of America
,S,.,u\ ht i }„,,'„>,i.l Ui ih..t t..;.!,
7. We rerommciid thut the Intor-
jilitioiiiil fH5l»:i;ilM bi« lii;itru? tel Sn call
•i f|H'-fi:i! Irtfrnnttnsi'tl I'njivnntion al
ii miltntite time previous to tho ter.
inlltntuii) of eV;-'l.iiC tiK.rei-tiH-)iU tor
the P'lrpoi-.e of «li'llig eoiis-M.-r-'itlfin to
the   re;'Mir nilaliotiK   of   thin   Policy
.<ut he de*
<t will ens-oie
uiiiii? agree-
•1 th.it the
ht* fli*Miirbe<i
!CI»iI  rROM     iKtV ANO Atf.Y
. *■>
Sy;M* '3
„!ri;.j THE DISTRICT   LEDGER, PERNIE, B. C, APRIL 4,1919
THE DISTRICT LEDGER WILL
*, BE SMALLER FOR TWO WEEKS
For two weeks The District Ledger
will have to app&ar in four page siae.
This is due to the fact that we have
undertaken to print in book form the
Appeal Case in the matter of Rees and
Williams vs. Wayne Local union
which is to be taken to the Supreme
Court of Canada this month. The
evidence and judgments in the case
total about five hundred typewritten
pages and The District Ledger is Iim.
ited in the possession of only one lino-
type,. Our contracted space, will compel us to boil down or hold back much
Interesting matter but we hope to
make up when we get'back to our
normal size.
THE DISTRICT LEDGER AND
THE ONE BIG UNION
The District Ledger is sometimes
oalled an "offleial organ" of District
18. At the very outset of the pre.
sent editor's connection with this
journal he announced that so long as
the management remained in his hands
it would be "the miners' paper," rather
than the expression of officials. With-
out any instructions from officials The
District Ledger has stepped with both
feet right into the light for the ONE
JUG UNION. We are Convinced that
in so doing we are taking a stand that
will be approved of by the rank and
file of District 18 and no murmur of
complaint has come to us from any official except indirectly from Interna,
tional Board Member Livett who has
now resigned from the Board.
The District Ledger has a high regard for Mr. Livett as a man, much as
we disagree with his opinion in regard
to the ONiB BIG UNION. It takes
courage to step out practically alone
and fight against a movement which
is meeting with such universal approval among the rank and file of
District 18 as the ONE BIG UNION.
Tiio owly regrettable feature * of the
matter is the associations which Mr.
Livett must make in the light. He
will have the sympathy (and if he
should ask for it, which he will not)
the financial support of the operators,
the government and the corrupt In.
dianapolis ^outfit in the fight he proposes to put up against industrial
unionism and in his plea to the miners to bo tjareful, to not sever their
connaction with the "international"
machine.
In his address at District 18 con.
vention a few weoks ago Mr. Livett
outlined his stand aud he is holding
to his position. He said there that
"the first step on the part of the workers towards* reconstructing society
must be political." Holding to that
belief' he sees in the program of ONE
"Bits UiNiyN wnat ne considers a dan-
ger.   The ONK BIG UNION does not
days and bugful nights of tho camps
by indulging in pleasures that often
are unwise,   Cranbrook does not hold
a very high opinion of the genus lumberjack and, if the truth be told, thinks
that a miner is in the same category.
j    Such    opinions    are    unfortunate.
There are people in Cranbrook who do
not look down on those men who have
the hardest, most dangerous and most
unpleasant work to do for the  community.     Even    among the    railway
men there is a big majority whose sympathy is with those on the. lower rungs
of the ladder.     Here and there .imy
be found a conductor who feels a -iu.
pcriority.     He has a job in tvhicn he
has prospered; has been able to buy
a car and to talk "high finance."     He
has been able to dodge the spotters
of the C. P. *R. and really feels he is
generous to that corporation in splitting "fifty-fifty' " on the receipts    of
fares paid in the train and then    to
supplement this graft he has what   a
miner or a lumberjack would consider
a mighty good wage.
Now, it will be seen by our story on
page ohe, that one of the conductors
of the C. P. R. was very anxious to
"butt in" to affairs of which he has
no knowledge and to forbid Organizer
McKenzie from exercising the privi.
lege of free speech on board that train.
Conductor Jackson is a good fellow
and we would not like to see him come
to any harm. He would bo missed by
a great many with whom his relations
have been mutually agreeable     Wo
♦ ♦<*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-*»♦ ♦♦
♦ ♦
♦ MOUNTAIN PARK        ♦
♦ ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦<>■ P"PG-<P-PP^<P*P
The annual meeting of the Mountain Park Cooperative Society took
place in the Picture Hall Wednesday,
■March 26th, 191'J.   The shareholders!
showed their usual interest and were!
well in attendance.
The presideut opened the meeting
and ordered the business report read.
The business transactions showed
very good results, which is the more
remarkable as the Society works with
a comparatively small capital and had
to recover from the year 1917 a loss
of $4,589.03: at the end of 1918 the nett
profit amounted to $5,237.93, thus giving a total profit of $10,097.58 for 1918.
Some of the shareholders insisted
that this profit was too high and only | BILLS PAYABLE
accomplished by selling at too high a! Im- Bk of Can..,
FERNIE   LODGE,   KNIGHTS  OF
PYTHIAS,  NO.  31
Will meet regularly
every Tuesday ev-en<
tng at 8 o'clock.
Visiting members
cordially welcome.
Pennington, Alfred Baker,
0. C Iv. R. S.
Salaries     431.00
We
price, but they consider that this profit
was produced by turning over $115,
000.00 worth of goods, showing about
10 per cent nett profit, they must consider the profiit a legitimate and not
extremely high one. The Society is
now able to pay all the back interest
on the share capital invested and it
is with the newly elected trustees to
decide if a dividend on the goods pur.
chased hy the shareholders shall be
declared or not,
We consider it our duty to mention
here that theso good results were not
Brunner, J. & ac.
crued int	
5,000.00
1,051.90'
would ask him, however, to pass the obtained  by  hlgh  prl(jes  and   over.
word to other conductors who might ciiarglng the public but t0 a great
.Li., i. .i.~i- n.Mifi" noAoi .til-am  In    a    ...      .*. .  .   , ... °.
think their "graft" places them in a
position in which they can look with
contempt upon lumber jacks arid miners, that these miners and lumber
jacks are very loyal to each other and
to their class. They despise spotters
but the exigencies of the occasion
might conquer for a brief period their
feelings and they might "butt In", to
the affairs of the conductors. iWe hope
we have made the hint plain enough.
SECRET SERVICE MEN TRY TO
PERPETUATE THEIR JOBS
TO THE SHiAiRBHOLDERS
Capital Stock ... 10,390.00
Reserve
for bad debts ,'     200.00
Profit & loss Ace.   5,237.93
18,965.60
6,051.90
15,827.93
STAY AWAY FROM BRULE
Men should stay away from
Brule owing to lack of sleeping
accommodation, hotel and bunk
houses being over-crowded. Notice will be given when things get
righted.
A. McFegan,
Secretary Local Union No. 1051
DOCTOR WANTED
The  camp  of Pocahontas    requires the services   of a doctor.
For further particulars write,
MEDICAL COMMITTEE,
Local Union No. 3170, U. M. W.
of A.
POCAHONTAS, ALTA.
NOTICE
Canada has more secret service men
at work today than she had during
the time of war. Surely there is no
idi>a that the country is now overrun
with enemy spies who are anxious to
destroy property, wreck troop trains
and furnish military information to our
foes!
Under our present system'it is but
natural that each pne of us should trv
to hold on to and perpetuate his present job. Secret service men are
like the rest of us. They are doing
their level best to keep alive the spec.
ter of "Bolshevism" so that they can
be kept employed in suppressing it.
Last Sunday evening the editor of
this paper addressed a meeting at
Blairmore and had the pleasure of
seeing in the audience a man from the
secret service who was there ready to
report any seditious utterance and to
keep his department informed regarding the growth of the real labor
movement. It was a pleasure to have
the man there and that pleasure was
accentuated* whan th-a vnt&„iun.g-t^tenj-t;
deal by the great Interest the employees have shown in their respective
work.
We like to mention here a few in.
cidents: If the driver was sick the
head clerk was not afraid to drive the
delivery wagon and on the other hand
the driver was always willing to do
jobs not concerning him at all. Extra
teams to haul the goods from the
station were an established custom
under the old management: this haa
been eliminated and saved many dollars.
iBut we must not forget those of-our
customers which were always willing
to give their whole business to their
store even If some outsiders tried to
tempt them with cheaper prices.
They know that their dividend at the
er.d will more than equalize these ap-
pearingly splendid offers: They were
true to the fundamental principle of
co.operation.
The officers and trustees were elected as follows: President, Mv., Jas.
Derbyshire; Sec-treas., Mr. J, S. Mie.
helin; Trustees, Mr. C. Taylor, J. P.
Derbyshire, Geo. Pike, -H. King, P.
Barruzzini, John Berglund and John
Henderek.
iWe wish the newly elected officers
and trustees good success to the many
tasks before them so that the Societies business at the end of another
year may prove that what we all
think it must be: an institution for
the benefit of the people of Mountain
Park.
A  Co.operator.
f
propose to play politics or flirt with
the politicians, if we understand aright
the expression we have heard of those
who speaks for the movoment and
the vigorous approval any body of
workers always give to such a scnti.
ment.
In a letter In this issue President
Christophers states his position. He
is an industrial unionist who has no
use for tha politicians. He is not altogether satisfied with tho mode of
procedure which has been adopted and
has, we thlnkv no great need for the
fear he expresses that a mistake has
beon mada Jn not perfecting "some
plan of organization beforo we severed
our connection with tho present one "
Wo believe that President Christophers
can trust to tho good aenso of tne
rank and tile whon th« proper tlmo
arrives to shape up the corr<»ist. organization and we aro further of thu op.
inloti that a new constitution and u
(Ixud programme at this stage of the
game would not be In tho heat liiterosts
of tbr* movement. This ls, of course,
merely ap opinion and upon honest difi
ftmncea of opinion and a thorough dis.
cukhIoii umonsat the rank and Uio depends Iho success or failure of OXI5
BIG UNIONISM. The new unionism
cannot ho made to grow nor cnn it bo
held back hy loaders and tho mctuuro
of its success depends upon tho Intel,
llgenco of tho mass.
Wo have no authority to (-speak definitely for tho othor official* of Din. jf
trict 18. President Christophers tells
tie, ttmt Socrotnry Browne In ln-url. and ,
houI for tho ONK 1110 UNION. That j
docs not como un a surprise to any- j
one. Wo arc Informed that Itonnl j
Member Frank Wheatley in Against the
ONK IU(J UNION. Neither Ih that a!
ktirprlsii ,Mr, Whon tley is |»r«>*»»<l«nt *
of tho Alhorla Federation   of Labor. \
1\r,    wim   pt'l-f-i'' t    In    Mnt    t.VI-*"..!!    I'll-;'-1,
ly through th" work of Al<"w Husnar,'
•Dihoard  memher, and    who  Im  now .
tmirliiK 'hi* tJiJi.p;'. huostiug lm' th«,
ONK W<1   UNION,     Hutmttv thiiUKht;
tliat Wheatley would 1h» one of iho '■
Ktatitn'tw^t   fOipportiT*   of   ONK   HI'S
..UNIONISM   hut   slnco   the   opposite:
h«H hfiMi shown Sttxtinr h tm hi* wny
tn Whitley's homo ramp nt   Itatilt-
limit whore ho will tell the jmiiih<r
Klilii  what   hn  thinks  of   Whonllov's
hlciiH mi tin- tm»t!<r and allow \Vhe»t-
5t»y to <-,\|il,i,u hts position.
The ti. ' t U*->. v,-nltK will ha of »*rct«t
liiiPH'*! »hr"*n"»'*<"<t '*!•" nMl**!e* There-
will ina mui h di'b.iti'ijr: thero should
ht* no t|Uf«rrni|iu'    Thr-re l« room for
hm,..   *   ,»;*, r**;, f   ,  ( ;.,;„*.,   ;,.,   ,„u,h»
A hip »t|hJ«'"M n« tbnt -Wri" rH<«en*wr!
unci ;!«:'".' t'i" OVS-: V.'y'. V.\<i\ Ui*,,
tbt- -ov^rl'i-Htsg truth up--!: i'». y-Av we
iitfit no* fi-i'ir fnr flic liml !:•!'•■-i ■!(■
WHY   SHOULD CONDUCTORS
DESPISE THE LUMBFfriACK*  Ml
On figt •*•;*•. ;.*, :*.;tj .5;-.. ..:,.;> i,: ihv
recimt hsppenlm? In fh« iKtehMriti!»
■rlty of Onmhre-nlt.    It I* n t*»t«rv vbtt-b
,*)*•,,•*, >   ,-,,*   r, .'■    ■ *   t ' ■ •  •< ■' l
sire of tht' people of that lown to
manfain ttritlxti JtiRtlre Hritt*!i free-
dom nnd prnntrv* law t*wl <.nl<-r.
It Is true thet the arum tak.n w«*
not tafcen by Ihe whole of flm Htixnn*
hut It is »li»o true thr. the cplrl; of
(he eomwiinUy wes in sympathy with
fftOM Who t*VXk th" fit"'  ff ' tb-'it ','■■ U
bands nnd tortod out ot their city a^
tiinn wbi, t-,1 a ari1i"<dld r-rtinl nn )'»«•
i-m*1 for lb* 'work h* hen dw in Ih*-
Improvement of the eotrftMon* in  the j
Inmlwr cnmp*
rnmhrmik people *** many Itimbwr. <
lath*.    Much profit ha*  been * ma I*
in Cranhrw»k Im mrlllnK mm «n4 «th*»r I
eommodltlf* to these men who torn**
*m*X .t***m lib* t-u*!.!* mkltt* m UUU wii>u«.., ,
Pn tfcetr poeheta end la tlieir h^snt aj
desire to make up for tbe loltiomo
on ONE Bla UNION, Practically
every hand in the big hall went up
and the secret service man caught the
Infection and hia went up tbo. We
don't doubt his sincerity for he is a
working plug like tho rest of us and
he must be really hard up for a way
to earn a livelihood or he would not
bo in his present position.
THE MOUNTAIN  PARK CO-OPERA-
TIVE SOCIETY, LIMITED
40.845.43
Mountain Park, March 29.—Today
we have a'real spring day in (Mountain
Park, so far as the temperature is con.
cerned. The ground is still under a
heavy cover of snow and will be for
some Unie. But the weather has had
a good effect on the different sports cf
the town and under the able leadership
of Cecil Itodway the Mountain Park
Athletic Club was organized. The
following officers and committee were
elected:
President, *Cocil Rodway; secretary,
Tom Eccleston; tennis commitoa, B.
Rhodes, R. II. John; baseball committee, Fred Steppy, tH. iLetcher; foot,
ball committee, Norman Watson, Jas.
Price.
The meeting was well attended and
great Interest shown in the proceedings.
The matter of financing is always
a problem but the meeting was Jua.'i-
fied in deciding to appeal to the public
for a suhscription.
We believe the newly established
club will find genferous support and
hope that all well meaning citizens and
friends of a good and sound sport will
willingly dig into their pockets and
give liberally.
We understand this meeting to be a
preliminary one to lead the way to one
of the biggest .M. P. has ever seen,
which will he called in the near future.
All good sports are therefore asked
to watch for the .announcement and
everybody is cordially invited to at.
tend.
N. Purcell, better known as Nett,
among the miners, met his fato , at
last. A cave, coming down without
warning, finished his life. Mr. Purcell was Working hard all his life and
known £s a very experienced miner.
We all regret to have lost him so suddenly.
;M. P. Observer.
Miners are hereby notified to
stay away from Qreenhill Mine,
Blairmore, Alta., until further
notice.i:
Many miners on the spare link.
rod, Mcdonald,
'Secretary 2163,
Blairmore, Alta.
NOTICE
We beg to advise all men to
stay away from Nordegg, Alberta,
as the mines are overcrowded.
JAS. BEWSHER,
Secretary Nordegg  Local Union,
25-91    No. 1087, U. M. W. of A.
HigK-Grade
American Dentistry
Bridge Work
3 PANNING the gap occasioned
by the loss of one or more
teeth a properly construcjed, well
fitting bridge is "a thing of beauty
and joy forever." Such is the
bridge we can make for yon, aad
we guarantee that it will fit you,
improve your appearance, and give
long years of comfort and good
service. The construction of a
dental bridge calls for a degree of
skill not surpassed by that of Mie
engineer who plans and builds the
bridge of commerce. Our early training in America's foremost
dental colleges places us in this respect in a most enviable position
THIS MONTH 20 PER GENT OFF OUR REGULAR MODERATE CHARGES
DENTISTRY AS WE PEACTIOE IT IS A GENTLE ART
DRS. BRUNER, RICHARDS & NELSON
Lethbridge Office: The Ott Block
Calgary Office: 115a 8th Avenue East
'  Edmonton Office: 3 Cristall Block
m:
H. OSTLUND      tf
Solicitor for District 18, U° M.
W.ofA.
MacDonald Block
Lethbridge, Alta.
LETTER
To Tho District Ledger:
Will you spare me a little, space in
your valuable paper re It. S. Gosden,
better known in Hilcrest as Bob
Brown, In his letter published in last
week's issue, March 28, ho states that
tho officials of Hillcrest I^ocal Union
were the cause of him being arrested
and telling tho company to stop his
union dues and also the cause of him
being hounded out of the camp. And
also telling him that if he wanted to
get on digging coal that ho had better
stop talking industrial unionism. 1
want to toil Gosden that I didn't lake
any part In nny such activities nor I
was not jealous of him going to tho
conference, but I did say that an
agitator didn't get along the bent.
P. DUJAV
I'reHldont of Hillcrest Local Union.
Balance Sheet as at December 31st,
1918, as per the local auditor,
Mr. E. M. Anderson
■     , ASSETS
Cash on band ..$    213.40
"     In bank ...      435.-S9
L.H. PUTNAM
Barrister. Etc.
BLAIRMORE. ALBERTA
FATAL COAL MINE
EXPLOSION IN COLORADO
■M
Tony Derico
Communicate At Once With
NORTH AMERICAN COLLIERIES, LTD.,
908 McLeod Building, Edmonton, Alta.
®:
:®
HUNGARY WOULD RECOGNIZE
TREATY MADE LAST YEAR
Thirteen Miners Lose Their Lives In
Empire MlniUn-TyJ-niw^., •.*_•
649.09
INVENTORY OF .MERCHANDISE
General Store  ..24,138.80
Meat Market    2,083.75
20,222.n5
EQUIPMENT 1,661.92
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
(Full provision mndo fqr all bad or
doubtful debts).
Gen. Store Dept.   8,448.62
'.Meat Market ...   3,238.08
Mt Park Coal Co,     289.50
Deposit with GTP,      25.00
TRINIDAD, Co!o.,March 31.—At 9
o'clock tOnlght six bodies had been
brought* to the surface and the bodies
of five other dead bad been located
PARIS, April 2.-^Budapest advices j?"*be Empire mine of tho Empire
to the French foreign office state that „"al„vc»),milany' uoar Aguilar. where
BelaKun. Hungarian foreign minister, 2?. plosion occurred early today,
is willing to recognize the armistice of
November. Although the allied, missions were temporarily deprived of
their libprty in Hungary and finally
expelled, the new Hungarian government apparently does not consider It
has broken relations with the allies
and desired to maintain them.
In conference circles It is felt that
the understanding by the Hungarians
of tho neutral zone created between
Hungary and Humanift led to the orlg.
Inal action.
£*•   PIC ISL
Sole Agent for the Pass for
Lethbridge Brewery Products
Best Wholesale Prices to ihe Trade
flF,T   QtTR   PB.TnV.S   ON—AT.T.—TEMEeRANQE^nPJlglEg-
■Top-Notch Prices Pnid for Bottles
E. PICK, "The Bottle King"
The Alberta Hotel        - Blairmore, Alberta
12,041.25
FIRE INSURANCE
l'ald in advance
220.62
SUSPENSE ACCOUNT
Ite accounts receiv'hle
50.00
MONUMENT8
Kootenay Granite and Monumental Co.,
Ltd.
LIAHIL1TI1CS
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
Wholesale Acct   $18,531.00
<0,84S.43
P. O. Box 865
Nelton, B. C.
The only Monumental Worke in the
Kootenay*
GRAND THEATRE, Fernie
Saturday, April 5th
Bud Schaffer Presents
Ikey-and-Abey
/9r I,.*.'»*IM   _*.
.Vtntii'W"*
*■—%1,ttl">' bin
fl
Two men still are unaccounted for,
but members of tha rescue crow believe it is certain thoy were killed
making the total death list 13.
Except for the body of John Lund,
quist none of the dead had been idem
tided.
Rescue crews from Hastings and
Delagua succeeded in penetrating the
workings this afternoon, but woro
delayed several hours in reaching tho
bodies by light gas and debris, which
blocked th© slope 2500 foot from the
mouth.
Of 36 men who were in the mine
when the explosion occurred 23 mado
their way out to safety.
The explosion, as indicated by conditions encountered by tho rescue
gangs, was confined to a small area.
Air conditions aro good and the ven.
tilating fan ia working.
Twenty-flve years ago today a similar explosion occurred in the Empire
mine, killing two men and Injuring
two others.
UNIFORMED U.8. SOLDIERS
APPLAUD BOLSHEVIKI ORATOR
If You Want the BEST in Meats Phono or Call on
The Meat Man
BENSON
Dealer in
Fresh and Cured Meats, Fish,   Poultry,  Butter,  Eggs,   Ete.
Delivery Prompt Prices Same to All
Phono 163 Corner of 7th Ave. and Victoria St
Blairmore, Alborta
%
*=,*
I
1
J
r.
+~w>
fS*
Js
Y>
' w '^Jga-%,*..*
*oLtt&\\  Tt^i   H
-1 mwf\l'" JLS   /-Ir
}r*w*"\ s **^     I'M1*-
■m*-Pnm**>'9 -*%;Vi
HAVE YOU SEEN POTASH AND PEBLUTTER? Then »re liml HcliiiflVr'* Merry Miihi-jiI
Far"<*. WhoIi'Milo Dealers in Qiftgltm, LaitRH*, lln|>|>iii<>tf, Joyfulnm and Joy, Joy, Jiggling
Jug of Joy, hiii ing ill.- hiah apot* of HUitrUy, 22 Musical Surprises. A tioof (Jar.J.ri sh..M
Ht Ham'mh'IiI liut torn i*tiwn.   This is not a moving picture.
XOTItH,   Tl.», im»i *,-, **,t„„,\ t-hiltireii ihat wmi hi the wirrwt aiiKwer by noon SalunLiy,
AinriiM »lh,of Iho !k<y mud Ahey pimh (V>ni|i«ny. will <»sch ri»ci»fve tme tree ticket.
PRICES- $1.00, 7Bc, 50c.   Chlldrtr. 25c ftMl 8t!e at McLeta's Drug Store
COLEMAN, MONDAY, APRIL 7 BLAIBMOBE, TUESDAY, APRIL g
Soldiers, Sailors and Marinas Protee.
tlve Association Chesr Seattle
Organizer
(Spokesman Review)
XBW YORK. March 31.—Nearly S(M
unlformoil mou—discharged American
soldiers and sailors—chocred the bol-
shovlst movement nt a meeting called
tonight hy tho soldiers, sailors and
marines' protective association for the
ptirpoMf of rtf«r'H*<»ln!» timaim  nf oh
| talnlng employment.
]   Tho cheers were In response to a
ppoc-ch hy n man in naval uniform,
who gav«« hi* namo a« I'eter Manner,
and dnclar«4 he was one of the or-
I ganlzers of Uio "soldlcrti, sailors and
j workman's* ruuncll" In Soattio during
j the'recent strlfee there.
j    "I know «»ver.v soldier and  sailor
j hero la willing to have this hecom«
I a   soldiers,   stiilorx   and   workmen's
■ -f'ounril, don't  I?    Aren't  we, hoysf
j th» speaker erled , The cheer*  loi-
! lowed.
I    At Auoilmr ihiIiU Ii>» «n I.imi*"!
j    "1 want tu miihiiI Hilt m,lining lo
' ihme penions who are •iiMicwrleiing
'  ISKItlHV    «f     Alll'lttV    f(l    III ""Mil'   .'.I    !h«'
j bolsheviki
< rtlHOfllJ
I on the
- <Marmer bitterly attaekwl person«'
> wh<» "sre *e«HiiK ptHtdie «ll:*n*-r*# end ',
j monk-ey supears" while stoi'Hm* whoj
i I'l^Iu'il ilii'li; I)ifwh i.u win tUe wu' ".in*;
\ ilvlng on eoffeo and doulimits.' ;
( f e***\*9 t-r-t-  t.'Vf***** r"»ir>*»i
RFOAROINO  RUSSIA
i    N«W YORK—The people's Print,!
- **<* v,V-«ii y+th ?*".m-r*i, ix m ft-JiKam5«-
| Hon rewnlly fortn#'l for puhllnhln*;
I and dl«»emlnttHim aeeuroie Informn. '
1h*.ri   -!T^m   t'.*,.Tt ,'tin-!  ii*  «.nn-i** ..*t*-.ti-    :■ ■
i tftntnfn nn tn whlfh the pnbllc in ml*-;
1 informed.   The lirst document  put!
out is emitted "Russian Soviets."   In!
DAIRY RANCH FOR SALE
Three hundred and twenty acres
within one and a half miles of tho
Station of Lundbreck; all fenced nnd
Improved with a co»oy and comfortable house and one of tho finest barns
In tho district; an ideal barn for dairy
purposes, the Brst story being all
Ntono and cement; the second story all
finished in grain bins and mows; nn
abundance of water, In springs and
running streams.
There uro hen houses, two garesos
and other buildings. The Implement*
on this place are worth neatly es much
.ik we ui*» asking for the Itanch, .<e\en
thousand dollars on easy t»rm». This
la u x*iul dairy ranch and this in nn
exceptional opportunity for a nm*i who
understands the dairy biwmev*.
8YNOP8I8 OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENT
, 1're-emptton now eonflnsd to survsys*
faiirtii wily,
)u>i:ui'd« ivlll be grsnUd cvvsrtng onlf
W.< >1 «ul(iib)« for avrteultursl puntMss
mui aiMch In nun-timber Isnd.
I'l.rtmrthiit   pre-onipllonii   abollshsd.
wui i>»rti«s of not mors than four msy
«rrsni;« for udjacsnt I'lo-tmutlonn, wile
joint r.'.idi'urc, but ssch ntnking nesss*
«rrsni;« for udjacsnt l»ro.*m|jtlon«, will
joint r.'.idi'urc, but ssch ntnking nesss
*.•»! U'lurovsiiMiiis on r<Miii««tiv* olatms.
I'ru-i'itiptors must oecuuy elslms for
"' """ smsnu  ta
*g slssrlng
und euitivstton of st iiiaai'6 scrast, t»s>
A. M. DELVSMOHi:
"4-3I Lundbreck, Alberta.
B. 0. STOCK AND HAY RANCH
For Sale
flv.i .nur* snd msko Imurovsn    „
■...■■ii, ,,t tio pur ucrti. luvluiling «l««rlng
ml eultivstlon of st I«ast I	
fi.r<- rt-eclvlug Crown Grant.
Whore iire-<>m|itar (n o«eUpstlan net
>-*i tiKin li ><'i*n'n. tuid hk* muds Drapor-
t «>i.|,it- (i»iiiniv.'inf-iit«, bn mny, eacntt*.
of hi.iii-tiith or nthsr enune, bn granted
.i.i.'iinfinite crrtidi-'ut© of (mpravsmsnt
i   i ii,.i. f.-r hU Unlm.
K i-nl- without iii-rinsnent rssldsnos
nm) in- t'liitnX prnv.doit spiillesnt nifkM
...... .'*-■> i. tix:*„i u( taxi im »e-
en-*, rfi.it n-oiNlK »niu« each yssr. Full*
,.•• i; tn.,u* imi>r<n'«m«iits or rseord
K.in» w(i> oiwrste s« fnrfnltursu IHtls
r..i,i>«, 'ri- otitAiit«(t on ihMM oUUms (9
•if tt.ati S yesnt. with Improvsuisnts of
tl'' I'T mre, including I acres slssrsd
ati'l i n'ti\ntr<l. nnd resldsniM et St
ii- i-t 'i * * -ir i
i Tf -.Mii-'i-r imiilmg Crown (Irsnt may
...,,fj iv.i.ih'.r |»iV'«niptlol», If h. fm*
,;■ r,.*. l.-.i.l in roi.tiimitlon With his
In'  i   wiCi.'il ft.Misl fwcunstlon. pM»-
.- i «i.ii,i.<ry imHiovi-msnts msds snd
n- '■   -..- imtlniained -vn Crewn gimnttd
t <i
fi
I<IH) luros, with titiout 200 neusj
Hiitimil iiii-iil'.w    A'.at
svikl,    I  find  mor©  botshrvikl i UHtft nor*n t»*i\*t*i-uilW nilnpt^i'   t"'
t mldiiir* from Frnnm then i do; UltlH. m*UhM,^    ],m\v ,.|,.nrtf4|..
nntl cnn !»*•   irritritti,!; in*v»»r;
l'i«ilii(t» rpi'i'k mnl rmirli !ii*r .
ilers cm Inrp' *lal*e; MiijillJ
fMiililiiifrH; railroaif sidetrack
*. *
■ ■\.,i<i ,ir*n«. not »f«##dln|iF If
. miv lie |f"n*wl nn hin««»lt*«;
ti. if (,!i««it,ni nfirr futmllng rMl>
ii : .'.I n-iiir'ivfrtifiit ifiridltlnns
»i if s o<1 "rt'tlrtsi mmmsl
. •. .i ^ * in.-.. i «■* m»y ** maaed
■,'■■*   nr ci-in|»nj\ ,
■y n -tpr rntt ohant* ott.
,i -i..,« ttt iiiih .\<-i i* •nburi-wl ts
• i ■-.■rg aoi't wrrvlr^i
V . ■• '    V !.«.»,   Tha lima
, *• 1.1., Mn* it. r* or dttrimtm at a
. irM-iiii.il r   mar   swrir f«r
l i     ii1.   ,-,\!.'ni|,-.|  fr«|0
■ p iiii ifi   .i-iiit ,,f nii»h (mrwin,
■ -r >    .nul •!• •• j-snr attar th*
•   i-t  Hi-  pi i wiil   war.    Tills
.».«..  «.-i miil# rttrssctim.
i* ''ii
y>lt»frn
1*,,
*1fl r\r\
torm« nrrn»i<»<.'(!,
sell, ("ratihroo
Ml,    V. X \hu* I
Kee? Away From
WAYNE
f»ni**t*f**r*.*  ft * ***9.*r.*,m
A&1. *
, * ..... i«. ,',* iiW siwt le
r*"~ *,,-,•* hnW'i f «<iw.ir.»i1«-ti«ir A«r**-
»... .t.9 ««» f*,i-*-tin*im lrw« im Cmm of
•arii tm.i0.fli*-f: nt tit* !»;»(,. If dmMMli.
#.» ,),« ,.«i>i..t*ni» *».r#..*«iy mmt** w*jt
eitrtm t*> ,tttiti"rnt,t* tn thn **!» (irltta et-
thr mh-fi't imrtml. T«.i »r mora psraont
lulilli.-il  »ui'i» .\$it-t-i;t.>,-ti    tony   mrmen
mt-Ht* ar.**m*mi tnlritty.' if "VI*"nil
«.»■»■ Ot.Tf.% i4«!mMi «« ttmta »• faimt
*.** «* ..i Mr nn •;:f4kttit»n tmt » prntM*.
tsointr «il<4fh^,i. sn •ltotm*nl of laml
I snnovnring its publication (priee to i More Men tban Job«.  Will notify!
scent* pot eopyl, the People's ifim through Tfct Diitrict UHpr when j
I * *Tfce syes »f the werM tre open Ef^^^^fS*11^**.   i       -   .
Iftwssht, ter with lh* tntnr* ef ftrrnnln  rob. Wt, 1M9.   Jollil Km%, S«C y
; tbn mint* cf ibe world is «l«i*iy j *■,     * - *   * •        *
*; btmod.   Tbo tmttm. ef wttlmr ret.,  "*""        ~*"-~—^—!—' ^^
■ r*'*x   itni»nn-*u..ii  hIhiiii   line  Httftstan *. 25SS5S3BS25H5S5BS5B5SS5S^
m<Mt   vita!  end  immHlsto    AlVrt JAMES WUlTEUOTTSf
RIji*   WflliuMs,  for Wtwa   month* j , Teieher ot
[wtr   mimmed**!   tn   Ratsbi,   ha*-. Pinno nttA Oroott
\wmim n deiCTftitioB of ib* working-U,,^,-,,   iiu!!!!^  rS,«#.*««i»i
■ email pompblel rolled -Pnaafan ff t f      Tntmjxrmimri, CjmpOIttiotl,
'lel*m   Vaem man. »om«ii Md ehiWi Orrhratrition
> tn tke tliNiMl Pinte. nhmld bn tamll.
i»"» wiih fh<» rwnt«nts of this little
tmmtm*
•t **;u»i veins sst«ct«4 frwe sv»UsU«
'"mm tititl* in th« l.w/iXiy in*jr lis
«* ''■»- Tli4*s attmtrmil* sr* *f*m4ltKmsl
•I'" pSJrnwM Of SR intt** dur lh«
ttfttrt* at te nny mo-.k-ipshiy. Ths
rights at parmmg te whim ifce w.
I i nr from ii\j Cru'iiii tw** ...nvtwi to
**U ap* akm m*A**i*4i Tea deetPma ml
lh* Mftristtr of iMfim In r**pmt it* the
*Ai<,.*-tr,**tt*.r ', r,r *.,.:rf|iiii.ifii iiUutUWUt
w nmti.   t%* H*rm t**r mallrt -totptXtta*
f»* ms#« nti,*a <%t*i ttata mm bat On
WWWttA-^MtWtX^     TlMHUft   ttBAtlfelMHltt*ft   *gk*K*ykK  s^*
town ma ami taeiPtTm CtnP^nM
MJP-hwt aveitm,
^Hsflt Uuastiiit><*   amta^^but   tn^.   ssi
WWp 1WOHIMW Ipfv TO WWW
bttn.uamp nr f ttttoMt )(y
THE   DISTRICT LEDGER,   PERNIE, B. C, APRIL 4,1919
r\$\     thJi
PAGE THREE
ft
1
y*.*\.
She
sr
TARZAN
By
EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
Copyright. 1913. fay W. G. Chapman
i i
rH
"1 wo linurs nfliTii.o iiiiil ;i in n • ..'■
•cle of hinds wiinnits >iii!i.iMiil«-il tin-
villain*. At IniirviiK nm- wns | i-rchwl
Mali lu the liruin-lii's <ii ii tree which
iiitlld overlook tile |iMi|<inle Presontly
n Mtuiyuenia within (lie \illiig»> fell.
(ilerci'd hy it single arrow, n wlleut mes-,
sontrct'.jif death from out of the silent
fnn-st. , "
Tl'** Arnlis and their followers were
iiirnuii tnto a Une rage Ht this unprecedented occurrence. Tbey ran for tiie
gates to wreak dire vengeance upon
the foolhardy perpetrator of the out-
•rage, but they suddenly realized that
they did not know which way to turn
to tad the foe. As they stood debating, with Many angry shouts and much
gesttenlatiag, one of the Arabs sank
attest!? ts the ground In their very
mMst-a thin arrow protruding (rem
his heart
Tanas bed placed the finest marksmen sf the tribe In the surrounding
trees, with directions never to reveal
themselves while the enemy was faced
ta their direction. As a black released
his messenger of death be would slink
bach beblad tbe sheltering stem of the
tree he bed selected, nor would be again
aim until a watchful eye told him that
none was looking toward bis tree.
Three times the Arabs started across
tbe clearing In tbe direction from which
tb*ey theaght the arrows came, but
each time another arrow would come
from behind to take its toll from among
their lumber. Then they would turn
and charge in a new dlrectfon. Finally they set out upon a determined
search of the forest, but the blacks
melted before tbem so that tbey saw
no sign of an enemy.
But above tbem lurked a grim figure
in the dense foliage of the migbty trees
—lt wos Tarzan of tlie Apes, hovering
over tbem as if he bntl been the shad-
tbe enemies' loss convinced the blacks
lhat'no fewer thnn twenty had fallen
before their arrows. They were wild
witb elation and were for finishing the
dny 1n one glorious rush upon tbe vil-
lage. during which they would slaughter the last of their foemen,
"Yon are crazy:" Tarzan cried. "1
have shown you tbe only way to fight
thciH people. Yon will fight just as I
tell yon to fight or .1* shrill leave you
:md git hack to my own couutry."
They were frightened when he
threatened this and promised to obey
tit*ii Ri-ruimioHsly if he would but
liruiiii.sc not to desert them.
"\ ery well." lit* said. "We shall return to the ..elephant hoimi for the
nlirlit. I have n plnn to jrlve the Arabs
a little taste oi whnt tbey may expect
If they remain iu mir i-omitry, but I
shall need no ncip.''
So tbey man-tied bark to their camp
uf the previous nigtit aud, lighting
great tires, ate and recounted the adventures ot the day until long after
dark. Tarzan slept uutil midnight,
then, he arose and crept Into tbe Clm-
merlau blackness of the forest. An
hour later he came to the edge of the
clearing before the village. There was
a camp lire burning within tbe palls-;
ade. Tbe ape-man crept across the
clearing until he stood before the barred gates. Through the interstices he
saw a lone sentry sitting before the
fire. .-'« .,
Quietly Tancan went to the tree at
the end of tbe village street He
climbed softly to bis place and fitted
an arrow to bis bow. For several
minutes be tried to sight fairly upon
the sentry, but tbe waving branches
and flickering firelight convinced him
that the danger of a miss was too
great He must touch the heart full
in the center to bring the quiet and
sudden death bis plan required.
He bad brought beside his bow, arrows and rope the gun be bad taken
the previous day from the other sentry
be bad killed. Caching all these in a
convenient crotch of tbe tree, be dropped ligbtly to tbe ground within tbe
palisade, armed only with his long
knife. The sentry's back was toward
him. Like a cat Taraan crept upon
the dozing man.
Tarzan crouched for a spring, for
tbat is ever tbe quickest and surest attack of the Jungle beast when the
man. warned b? some subtle sense,
sprang to bis feet and faced the ape-
man.
i"'sln-i1  madly m-iiiss  III.-' clearing toward the j unfile.
For a timj* no one turned hack toward the thing that had frightened
them, but Tarzan ftiifw ttmt they
vvould in a* moment, ami when tiiei"
discovered that it was but the (lead
body of their sentry, while tiie.v would
doubtless be still further terrified, lie
had a rather definite idea■'ii-s"to what
they would do. So he faded ■ silently
away toward the south, taking the
moonlit upper terrace biiVk* toward the
ca m p of the Waziri.     •,
Presently oue of. ibe Arabs turned
and saw that tbe thing tbat had leaped
from the tree upon theni lay still and
quiet where it had fallen iu the center
of the village street. Cautiously he
crept back toward it until,be saw. tbat
it was but a man, A moment later he
was beside the figure aud in another
had recognized it as the corpse of the
Manyuema who bad stood on 'guard"at
the village gate;
His companions rapidly gathered
around at his call, und after-a moment's excited conversation tbey did
precisely what Tarzan had reasoned
tbey would. Raising their guns to
tbeir shoulders,  they  poured  volley
Under Tarzan's guidance the black
Waziri warriors stationed themselves
along the trail ou either side in the
densest underbrush. Tliey stood at far
intervals, aud as the column passed a
single arrow or a heavy spear, well
aimed, would pierce a Manyuema or
an Arab. Then the Waziri would melt
into the distance and run ahead to
take his stand farther ou. They did
not strike unless success were sure and
the danger of detection almost nothing,
and so the arrows aud tbe spears were
few and far between, but so persistent
and inevitable that the slow moving
column of heavy laden raiders was in
a constant state of panic—panic at the
pierc*ed. body of the comrade who had
just fallen, panic nt the uncertainty of
who the next would be to fall and
when.
It was with the greatest difficulty
that tbe Arabs prevented their men a
j dozen'times from throwing away their
burdens aud fleeing like frightened
rabbits up the trail toward tbe north.
And so tbe day wore on-a frightful
nightmare of n day for the raiders—a
day of weary but well repaid work for
tbe Waziri. At night the Arabs coo*
structed a rude boma ln a little clear-
after volley Into the "tree from which ] ,DS by a river and went Into camp.
CHAPTER XIX.
Victory For the W«lri.
HEN the eyes of the black
Manyuema savage fell upon
tbe Strange apparition that
confronted bim witb menacing knife they went wide in horror.
He forgot the gun within his hands.
He even forgot to cry out. His one
thought was to escape this fearsome
W
LLlook
New and Then at Varying Intervale • j
Man Would Plunge Forward Otad.    j
ow ef death. Presently a Manyuema ;
forged abend of his compaulous; there )
wae nana te aee from wbat direction
dentb cane, and so it came quickly,
aad a noaaeot later those behind atom*
bled ever tbe dead body of tbelr com-
rade-tbe heritable arrow piercing tlw
•till heart.
H tmm nnt Ink* n grinit dent nt thit
manner ef warfare to get upon tbe
serf es of white men. and so It Is little
te tw wondered at tbat tbe Manyuema
were soon panic stricken. DM one
• fow ahead an arrow found bla heart;
did one lag behind be never again waa
eeen aMve; did one stumble to one aide
even for a bare moment from the sight
of Ma fellows he did not return, and
always when Ihey came upon ibe bod
te. ef their dead they found thote t**r-
ribl* arrows driven with lhe accuracy
ef anperhnman power Mrnlght ihnittgb
tbe vkllifl's beau. Hut wwrae ibait ait
etae waa tbe hideous fart lhat not onco
daring tbe mm nine hsd th**? nmm ee
btnrt tbe eilfbteat sign of an enemy,
ether tbaa tbe pitiftaa arrows,
Wben tnaliy ttay ntarned to tko
village It was nn holier. Kvery now
and lb** at varying intervals tbat were
maddening In the lerrlhlii suspense thoy
canted, a win wonld plunge forward
t*n*Hi**f« le 'lenat* »W» i«»wlHl»» -plni***. Yep
tlw Atnta feared tm take np tb* mareti
throng* tbe grim and boattl* forett boost by tbla new nod ittifWe rertny
while laden witb tbe groat store of
Irory tbey bad found wlihln tbo »U-
tan: mmt, w-mwa ya%, ku«? tamUPk to
leave tbo Itoty behind.
finally tbo entire etp-fdltton toot
refuge   within   tbo   tbatrtad
Bom, at leant, tbey wonM I
\trom tbo arrow*.   Tanwn. from tbt
'tree abovo tbe vlllago, had ataria-d tbt
man upon whose massive rolling muscles and mighty chest tbe flickering
firelight played.
But before be could turn Tarzan waai
upon him. and tben the sentry thought
fo scream for aid. but It was too late.
A great band was upon bis windpipe,
and be was being borne to the earth.
He battled furiously, but futlleiy.
Witb the grim tenacity of a bulldog
those awful fingers were clinging to
bis throat 8wif Uy and surely lire waa
being choked from bim. His eyes
bulged, bla tongue protruded, bla face
turned to a gbastly, purplish hue.
There wns a convulsive tremor of tbe
stiffening muscles, and tbe Manyuema
sentry lay quite atill.
Tbe ape-man threw tbe body acrosa
one of bla brood shoulders and, gathering up tbe fellow's gun. trotted silently up tbe Bleeping village street to*
ward tbe tree tbat gave bim aucb easy
Ingresa to tbe palisaded Tillage. Ho
bore tbe dead sentry into tbe midst ot
the leafy maie above.
Flrat bo stripped tbe body of cartridge belt aud such ornaments at be
craved, wedging It Into a convenient
crotch while bla nimble fingers ran
orer it in aeaivb of tbe loot be could
not plainly seo In tbe dartt. When bo
bad finished be took tbo gun tbat bad
belonged to tbe man and walked far
ont apon a limb, from tbe end of wbleb
be eould obtain a better view of tbe
buta, Drawing a careful bead on tbo
beehive otrueture In wbleb be knew
tno Arabe to be. be pulled tbe trigger.
Almost Instantly there was an answering grosn-Tsrian smiled; bo bad made
another lucky hit
Following tbo shot there waa « mo-
the corpse bad been thrown. Had
Tarzan remained there be would have
been riddled by a hundred bullets.
When the Arabs and Manyuema discovered that tbe only marks of violence upon tbe body of tbeir dead comrade were giant finger prints upon his
swollen throat tbey. were again thrown
into deeper apprehension and despair.
That they were not even safe within
a palisaded village at night came aa a
distinct shock to them. Tbat an enemy could enter the midst of their camp
and kill their sentry with bare hands
seemed outside the bonds of reason,
and so tbe superstitious Manyuema
Commenced to attribute their ill. luck
to supernatural causes, nor were tbe
whites able to offer any better explanation.
With at least fifty of tbelr number
flying through the black Jungle, and
without the Slightest knowledge of
when their uncanny foemen might resume tbe cold blooded slaughter tbey
had commenced, it was a desperate
band of cutthroats that waited sleep-
lessly for the dawn. Only on the promise of tbe Arabs tbat they would leave
the village at daybreak, and hasten onward toward their own land, would
tbe remaining Manyuema consent to
stay at the village a moment longer.
Not even fear of tbelr cruel masters
was sufficient to overcome this new
terror.
And so it was that when Tarzan and
his warriors returned to the attack tho
next morning tbey found the raiders
prepared to march out of the village.
The Manyuema were laden with stolen ivory. As Tarzan saw it be grinned, for be knew tliat they would not
carry it far.  Then he saw something
At intervals during the night a rifle
would bark close above their heads,
and one of tbo dozen sentries which:
they now bad posted would tumble to
tbe ground. Sucb a condition was insupportable, for tbey saw tbat by,
means of these hideous tactics they,
would be completely wiped out, one by
one. without inflicting a single daatb
upon thfclr enemy. But yet, with tbo
persistent avariciousness of the white
man, tbe Arabs 'clung to their Jpot and
wben morning came forced the demoralized Manyuema to take up their burdens of death and stagger on into tbo
Jungle
For three days the withering column
kept up its frightful march. Each
hour was marked by its deadly arrow
or cruel spear. The nights were mado
hideous by the barking of tbe invisible
gun tbat made Sentry duty equivalent
to a death sentence-
On the morning of tbe fourth day
the Arabs were compelled to shoot two
of tbelr blacks before they could compel tbe balance to take up the hated
ivory, and as they did so a voice rang
out clear and strong from the jungle:
"Today you die, oh, Manyuema, unless you lay down the ivory. Fall upon
your cruel masters and kill them! Tou
bave guns, why do you not use them?
Kill the^Arabs, and we will not barm
you. We will take you back to our village and feed you and lead you out of
our country In safety and ln peace.
Lay down tbe ivory and fall upon your
masters. We will help you. Else you
die!"
As the voice died down the raiders
stood as though turned to stone. The
Arabs eyed their Manyuema slaves.
The slaves looked first at one of their
-sa«ager^!8-^iaa.M>.*lH&^T^h}^^
of the Manyuema were lighting torches ln the remnant of tbe camp fire.
They were about to fire the village.
Tarzan,was perched in a tall tree
some hundred yards from tbe palisade.
Making a trumpet of (is bands, be
called loudly in tbe Arab tongue: "Do
not fire tbe huts or we shall kill you
all I Do not fire tbe huts, or we shall
Ull you alll"
A dozen times be repeated It Tbe
Manyuema hesitated; tben one of tbem
flung bis torch into tbe camp fire. Tbe
others were about to do tbe name wben
an Arab sprang upon tbem with a
stick, beating tbem toward the buta.
Tarsau could aee tbat be waa commanding tbem to lire tbe little thatch-
ed dwellings. Tben ho stood erect upon
tbe swaying branch a hundred feet
above tbe ground, and, raising one of
tbe Arab guns to bit shoulder, took
careful tlm and fired. Witb tbe report
tbe Arab wbo waa urging on bit men
to burn tbe village fell in hit traeka,
and tbe Manyuema threw away tbelr
torches and fled from tbe Ullage. Tbe
Ittt Tartan taw of tbem tbey were
racing toward tbe jungle, while tbelr
former matters knelt opon tbe ground
and fired at tbem.
But however angry tbe Arabe might
bave been at tbe Insubordination ot
tbelr slaves, tbey were at least convinced tbat It would be tbe better part
ot wisdom to forego tbe pleasure ot
firing the village tbnt had given tbem
I two tuch natty receptions. In their
hearts, however, tbey swore to return
again witb aucb* a force aa would enable tbem to aweep tbe entire country
for mtlea around until no vestige of
human lift remained.
TBey
were but waiting for some one to take
the inltitaive. There were some thirty
Arabs left and about 150 blacks. All
were armed-even those who were act-
log as porters had their rifles slung
across their backs.
Tbe Arabs drew together. Tbe sheik
ordered the Manyuema to take up the
march, and as be spoke be cocked bis
rifle and raised it But at tbe same
instant one of the blacks threw down
hia load, and, snatching bis rifle from
bit back, fired point blank at tbe group
of whites. In an Instant tbe camp
was a cursing, bowling mast of de-
"Who are you that speaks tbe tongue
of our Arab masters?" cried tbe Manyuema spokesman. "Let us see you
and then we shall give you our answer."
Tarzan stepped out of the jungle a
dozen paces from them.
"Look!" he said. When they saw
that he was white they were filled witb
awe, for never had they seen a white
savage before, and at his great muscles and giant frame tbey were struck
Iwith wonder and admiration. -
j "You may trust me," said Tarzan.
("go long as you do as I tell you and
iharm none of my people, we shall do
you no hurt Will you take up our
ivory and return in peace to our village or shall we follow along your trail
toward the north as \ve have followed
for the past three days?"
The recollection of the horrid days
that had just passed was the thing tbat
finally decided the Manyuema. and so.
after u short conference, they took up
their burdens aud set off to retrace
tlieir steps toward the village of tbe
Waziri.
At tbe end of the third day tbey
marched Into the village gate and were
greeted by the survivors of tbe recent
massacre, to whom Tarzan had sent a
messenger in their temporary camp to
the south on the day that tbo raiders
had quitted the village, telling them
that they might return In safety.
It took all the mastery and persuasion tbat Tarzan possessed to prevent
the Waziri falling on the Manyuema
tooth and nail and tearing them to
pieces, but when he bud explained that
he bad given bis word that tbey would
not be molested if they carried the
ivory back to tbe spot from which tbey
bad stolen It and had further Impressed upon his people tbat tbey owed
tbelr entire victory to him they finally
acceded to bis demands and allowed
tbe cannibals to rest In peace within
tbelr palisade.
1 Tbat night the village warriors held
a big palaver to celebrate tbelr victories and to choose a new chief. Since
old Waziri's death Tarzan bad been
directing tbe warriors In battle, and
tbe temporary command bad been
tacitly conceded to him. Tbere had
been no time to choose a new chief
from among tbeir own number, and In
fact so remarkably successful bad they
been under the ape-man's generalship
tbnt tbey hnd bad no wish to delegate
tbe supreme authority.to another for
fear that wbat they already had gained might be lost. They bad so recently seen the results of running counter
to this savage white man's advice hi
the disastrous charge ordered by Waziri. in which he himself had died, that
It bad ui'it been ditlicii|t for tliem to
accept Tarzan's authority as final.
The principal warriors sat in a circle
about ix small fire to discuss the relative merits of whomever might be suggested ns old  Waziri's successor.    It 110U
j wm Bu5uli.wlu*>^p4tk#-first4—— ——rtfoi
0. B. U. Bulletin Mo. 3
TENTATIVE OUTLINE OF
INDUSTRIAL  ORGANIZATION
The Press is not abusing the Western
Labor Conference anO villifying the
ONE  BIG   UNION   because   it   has
Nothing else to do.    It is Speaking
on  Behalf of its Masters, the Em.
ploying   Class.   .It  is   Pursuing   its
Logical   Program  of  Belittling  any
Honest   Effort  of  the   Workers  to
"Cease Chasing Rainbows," and Organize  on  a  Basis that alone will
Ensure to Them a Chance of Meet,
ing  the  Masters on the  Industrial
Field.  .It  is Now  Praising "Craft"
Organizations (which in times past
it abused and conaemned because it
Realizes that Craft Unionism cannot Disturb its Masters.
Many questions   no  doubt  present
themselves to the minds of the aver,
age members of organized labor wlio
are  honestly  desirous  of  improving
their form of organization, chief of
which we imagine will be: —
"How shall we go about the formation of the O.VE BIG UNION?"
A.n<i many think that before thoy
can vote even upon the question that
they must sever their connections
with their present International Union.   That is not so.
■Let us bring to your attention recommendation No.'s 5 & 6, of tho Policy Committee of the Western Confer-']
ence (see press for resolution cr re.
port—in .Bulletin, of course, theae will
be given in full.   WAP)
No. 5, you will see, shows that In
promoting the new form of organization, we shall work through existing
bodies, and that no DEFINITE steps
can be taken until we are assured by
the VOTE OF THE RANK AND FILE
that they desire Industrial Organization.
No. 6, you will further observe, de.
mands a further conference of representatives of all Trades Councils
and District boards, who shall perfect
plans of organization and deyelope a
definite line of action.
The Central Executive Committee is
but a temporary body, elected to prepare propaganda and issue and re.
cieve ballots on the referendum. We
cannot therefore take on work to
which we have not been committed
aiid concerning which we have not
been instructed.
However, it appears that many opponents who KNOW BETTER, and
other workers, who are honest but do
not know, think -that by. Industrial
Organization we shall throw the workers together promiscuously without
regar for the industry; bottle washers,
boiler makers and musicians, for in.
stance. Such a contention is ridiculous on the face of it   Craft organiza-
roent'e alienee Ip ibe eamp. and tben i   Tb#y hnd imbed m vtfn ter the own-
Manyuema and Arab came pouring
from tbe buta like a twarm of angry
hornets; but, If Ibe truth were known.
tbey were even mora frightened tbaa
tbey were angry.
Wben tbey discovered tbat tbelr sentry bad disappeared their fears were
in no way allayed, and as though to
bolster tbelr courage by warlike ae-
thine tbey began lo fire rapidly at tbe
barred gate* of ibe Tiling*, although
eo onviny waa In sight Tartan took
advantage of the dmifenlug roar of
this fusillade to Iin* Into tbe utob beneath bim.
No one beard bis shot shore tbe din
ol netting «i««i*try la lite etntet, bnt
•Ota*. wt«o wer* Kleutllne vktrn, mw
one of tbelr number crumple suddenly
to the tertb Whvn lfc»y Imnwt orer
him h* wfl« deed, ttt*y went pnnlc
mbken. *itd If took all the hnital an-
tbortty of tbe Arat« to kfvp tbe Man-
vtwm* tmm rw«Mt»» i*t*lit** atrattm* *<*tt*
the fanffle-anywlM-fw to enrape from
u*i* uuuimi -.luug-e.
After • tin* they coammi-cfd to
nj[RtJ#l twiwifc, Mtti§ *i* ttm* fwtttitt* miyw
tttwtttn -oeetbs eemrrrd among tbem
they Imp h-pnrt eesln.   Hirt It wes a
.*...,, **,-, a .. ., i.    * .- i    ,       .*.*■*
!>ttt late wU*H* tb* rfcWI A«»bs
J gone. and. bntnie'tng Mmaelf etwa mi
.owkUUiuiiiuit UimU. tw Oiuvu UU Iwntiy
inptnr witb at. tbm form mt bit gtaat
tWtWMtWtm  %WmWWw*W  f-W  IMRVl  VWWW*    tm
bowl of pain t«M ntm tlmt tt ind
feewft • mark.  Tb*« Tartan rvtwnwtf
tn iw* vtrnwiwo 0Mmfv%wtm w0 wtmrnttm
and wtttNttew • mil* to tbe ao*tb ro
w»t nwt ami.
no atmptt^Eioo to ton toiro ^totmtrtp
tmt it *in0* enmnitr- mt **** n ml-
tmotb tatUmntme **t
nrtw Imt-wl tbst • l«7 W'tWkt 0*4 hm dtft-
Mrt*«t aetlm Tanun mi* t*Ato 1** n
weltd ntmn. and a* ifn» raiders looked
np in fht» dtrvrthm from wbfrb tbe
tmitut Mt-mcd Ut mm*, llw apt-man.
wbo **««1 «wlnfft»t the dron l«dy «f
the -ttftftr renttr ft* unit trn. iftififr-nff
**li(.l the rnfpwo tar mot ntmte ttwtr
hn»t»!*
With  Imml* ml nlnrm  tb* tlm»,8
tmb* lm nit 0-mtbma to^MNWp* ,hl*
sw-w and t-tevt-Mr rrtwtoiw wiw oetomat
' u» w ■n**s!u*sf.«ui m**-** ttwm,   T* thiMf
; ff*ar *fl*tofl«| tm^fffimitont llie iwwty of
. the fftii-y. luSiiwi WiiO whit apra» Ml
\ ■;""i '     'luf   Vt'.f ,   :•■     lllll, i?   ffW    !('. I'!,,'    '
af « ormai Urn** «t f**y.   In (Mr net
Uty   tn  **<HHti*   uitiiiy   of Hi*   tit-M'tca
, wtltp tlm* t**il****i*9  wltiir tttiwr* ttw**
tint* a ih*" bar* from tn* nmitm aod
| er or tbe voice whleb bad frightened
, off tbe men wbo bad been detailed to
I put tbe torch to tbe buta, bnt not oven
j tbt keenest eye among tbem bad been
able to locate bim. Tbey bad e*en tbe
, puff of smoke ttom tbe tree following
: tbe abet tbat brought down tbe Arab,
i but, though a volley bad Immediately
! twet loused Into Its foliage, tbere bad
* btta no Indication tbat It bad been effective.
i   Tartan waa too IntetHgeat to be
. caught in any tuch trap, and ao tbe report of his shot bad scarcely died away
| before tbe ape-man waa on tbe groend
•nd ie*l»c tet «*«Mlh*r tm a k«**tw4
yanta away.   Here be again fonnrt a
suitable iwnh from wbkb bo conld
wateb tbe pnn*r»ti««» of ibe raider*,
tt occurred to bim that bo might have
. cemtidereMe more ton witb tbem, to
' again U. cnlM to tlntm thmauitt* bin
: imprevtaed trnmpot.
M«<fn«iiMi.   me tt***..   "M«atw
IVr I'-nr;-*    flt.ii-j i: . <,- Wm ,w ,\. n, .W
v tvery!"*' #
San&s of tbe Jsamwema started to
t lay down tbelr mada, hot mn tnm at*
I togvtbtf to* awneb fee tbe avarfctowa
A '-Mfe^-iA tWitAmt^    a^m-am^O   jb-^^A-^^S*^    ^^^Pt    ^gj^^^-h^y^g.
tbwWotW,       wtt Tf~    ttWtPf   VTrvwyTw   Wttt?   I ill mpn-o
they atm-Mt tbelr ttm* tott ttpnft tie
; beam* tbtvetwniMt twtfaat dratb fa
any wbo might lay *»«« bt« loedL
; They «mM gtv* tp Print tbe vttttge.
* bat tbt tfcmtbt "t »h*o*mlng tbtt
.onttnmaa tertwi* in leery wet f-nttt
■'< WrWjnWBWI t-WWW tZWaWt^PfHpotW*      PfltfT (PBiWi
tban thstr
-   but on mot totmbmb on ot tbo ap.
tap* ot tbm Watiri. aad eo tbe *Im«I*>
*, -itm tf tbatr atatea waa ti« Itery nnt*
' «ma •* a memo mt tamo* Tvmnrt tbe
; eortb tbty aatrrbtd. back toward ttutl*
"Since Waziri Is dead, leaving no
sou. there Is but one ;tnu>ng ns whom
we know from experience is lltted to
make us n good king. Tbere Is only
otic who has proved* that he can successfully lead us ngalnst the guns.ot.
the white man and brltiK ns easy victory without the loss nt h single life.
There Is only one, nnd that Is the
white mnu who him led ns for the past
few dnys." And Itiisiiil Mprung to his
li'i't and. with uplifted spctu nnd tut It
bent, crouohiug body, com men < <il lo
dance slowly about Tansnii, cbaiitlng
slowly In time to his steps: "Waziri.
king of tbe Waziri: Wnzlrl. killer of
Anilw:   Wnzirl. king of the Wusslrl!"
One by one llie other warriors signified their aireptnnceof Tnnuiu us tlieir
king by Joining in the xolemn dum-e.
The women came mid squatted iilmut
Hit* llm of the circle, beutlng ii|iun
liiinloiim, clapping tlieir ImiikI* in time
in the steps of the dinners nml Jntnltig
in the -rbiint of lhe warriors, iu lhe
• inter of the clrile sat Tur/iiii of Ha*
.\|M-K-Wiixlrl. king of llie Wiixlrl; for.
llli" Ill* prediicw^iir. lie wns to tukc
the mime of hl« tribe 111 liN own. Fttnt-
er mnl famer gr»iw ilie pine o| the
nl.iui-i-i-ri. Iiiinh-r a nd louder their wild
.(inI KiiiiiKe 1.I1011U The wuiiieii roue
mid f»'ll In uiiiMMi. ..ini.-kiim m.w nt
Uu* tn|iK nf their voln'«    Tin
on~Ts~accoT'dlTig to craTx, i.e., painter
plumber, sheet metal worker, etc., IX'.
nUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION -SnJST
BE ACCORDING TO INDUSTRY, IJiJ.,
SHIPBUILDING. BUILDING TRADES,
■MINING. TRANSPORTATIO>f, PUBLIC SERVICE (civil employees).
These will be sub-divided according to
trades, necessarily, but will discuss
together all common ii'Jestions, aud
vote and act on tbem together.
Do you see the difference?
**-Instead., of one TRADE acting, or
coining out on strike, by itself, it will
and can only act, together with OTH.
ER T-RA'DES of the SAME INDUSTRY.
When'we do write a constitution for
the new Industrial Organization, it
MUST be drafted UPON THE LINES
OF INDUSTRY AS THEY AT PRESENT EXIST, and to that extent work.
ers will be organized to their ASSOCIATIONS IN THE PRODUCT OP
THEIR JOINT LABOR, and uot by
the "craft" they follow. Th© "craft"
(the work of the "skilled" workman)
is being wiped cut by the machine.
Industrial Organization is an advance itpon the old and now obsolete
"craft" form, because it places the
workers in a position whereby they
can function effectively In defence and
for such concessions that market con.
dltlons will allow.
One Big Union of the workers would
be impracticable unless cast in the
SAME MOULD AS TUB INDUSTRIAL
SYSTEM In which we Uve ahd work.
If we are prepared, as members ot
the working class , to recognize each
other as comrades of one big body, OF
ONE CLASS, then tba next logical
step is to so organize as to place our
forces In the same relation to employers as thoy are to us.
Later we hope, If finances permit,
to publish a leaflet showing tho reduced overhead expenses of Indus,
trial Organization, as against the
present "craft" form., I.e., that Industrial Organization Js cheaper and more
efficient for its members. This will
be our next Bulletin. *I.<ook out for it!
Central Executive Comlmttee
'•.«'■ 210 Labor Temple,
Vancouver, B.C.
CENTRAL EXECUTIVE
W. A. Pritchard, Vancouver, B.C.;
R J. Johns, Winnipeg, Man.; J. R.,
Knight, Edmonton, Alta.; Jos. Naylor,
Cumberland, B.C.; V. K. Mldgley.
Secretary, Labor Temple, Vancouver,
B.C.
Saskatchewan Executive
P,'Cropper, Moose Jaw; Jas. Mc
Murty, Saskatoon; Wm- Munroe
Moose Jaw; J; Sambrook. Rogina; R.
Hazeltino, Secretary, 3223 Riverside
ave., Regina.
Alberta Executive
Mrs. George Corse, Calgary; Wm.
Rolling, Brule Mines; Jas. Marshall,
Calgary; Donald McNabb, Lothbrldgo,
C. E. Berg, Secretary. P.O. Box 639,
Edmonton. o
Manitoba Executive
F. J. Baker. Brandon, Man.; W. II.
I Lovatt, Winnipeg, Mau.; II. II. .Roberts
-S-J!^    Vital,     *ViftSi.;    *..i—-.JV^^rS-i—«.-i mn p*8*fsr=
Man.; R. B. Russell; Secretary, 14 La.
bor Temple, Winnipeg, Mau.
British Columbia Executive
\V. H. Cottroll, Vancouver. J. Ka-
vanagh, Vancouver; P. .McDonnlel,
Vancouver; J. Taylor. Victoria; A. S.
Wells, Secretary, 405 Dunsmuir fit,
Vancouver.
Policy Committee of
District 18 To Meet
Operators
United States;
I    4.   we recommend that the three
; resident International Oilii lals ho em»
On Wednesday, April !*. at Calgary
tho policy committee of District IS
will meet the representatives of   the (
Weatern Coal Operators' Association} Powered to draft or to ham drafted
for the purpose of extending the lif» nf I for presentation to the 8p«i x\ Inte*.
the proxeiit agreement until pence i» i nailou,.! Coiaeiitioh when *%)>*en*fi a
signed and the agreements also expire l tentative draft or bill to ba presented
In the United 8taU'«. The niom U« Congress and providing for nat-
mcndiitlons outllnuil hy thu Interim-j louallsailou ol all wal mines;
tioiml policy "t the V. M. W. of A, will i •'»• uv rec-ummtiiiU Unit Uio* l-ilir*
Ue adhered to ami it i« not anticipated • «::';i"»"! ^hiaU »«' ftuihorUed to
Flimr, | lhat there illl he much trouble In mm* ■■ *'W "» Mleimlve mA Intensive cam.
uiiie Iiiii ml IhIiHiu ticiii'iv. timl u* Uie
i|<iin-f*lN ■»tim|ied down it ltd lieut (heir
►lili-lili iifrfin the liiinl tr!iiiii«il writ, <>t
llu* vUIiiuh Ktrii-I lhe whole ulctit ven**
.;- Mril»!,V t'fl!l»*V;t! ;i|ni »;Mi»Ki' tie
Hi.mvli It wi-iv l.cii'u fifoyi'ft In t!ii' dim
O.iHii ut liiumtiiliy, •■niiiiilv***- am* in
llli- I'lll-t
,x» i;,<- *>\, lt«.>i'i-i»i   wi.»«-»i t
It;,sit   •[ tTtltii. ,|n  III*   fi'»*l   t4i.il   t"
lug tu mi iiiuKubl.) aurevmiuit in tlm ■: rwten «»' organUntion in lhe nnthra-
clruim taiiifs. Tho recommmiilatlmm iiu' M**!*'"** »n4 in the spamely or-
unanlmciiiRly hrrlvN at In IniilanapolU !»«•••««'   Mhi   nonunion   hilumlnoua
Tbt Camp Wm a Curainf, Howilnf
Matt ef Oament.
IIM-    *l ll
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it   « illlliillil ,
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To tlie Mt-mhers of the Policy Com.
niittco--
■ Ci-iilh m-> ll.
W'*'. >.nr ; iih< <H)iinilt:-i' k«-|i r t»>«l to
. Urir.r   lu   ri^ntiiiiii-in'aii'iiin  f->r ;n|op-
i. :i fi  .lii-  i .i'i.i ,   .-•iiiniili. (• s-iij'ii.i
H;- !«>.!i,,-,i.-; :   ; .rt ;i'„ . ri "niim> :..! i.
1. I!i • 'I'M !. • i'i.<i Un «;..(»;.i> mi i !
iu, :i i .hi fi't i'i. 1.1 iiiii u M"h.i'<- (•
ihf n-iiirt . U.i| ii'ii'- .«"«<t pm |M-t.<
ly nl tin- iii'ju-r- ii' i.i- I mu-1 St.«i* -
whlih in i iii|i!n'f. r. '.* it',,', '. I'.
1 «•;,.. ■>•. r .'. j. *,•-, • ' • r ,i,, , ■ •, -•• ■ ,,
, du*»'r>. '*'•*• »'i:u'ii i'i 'If ». f.ii'm >
tliiMrii t.r . n  .'■ I  • ■  I!. '
lighting with iun* and knlvet
and pistols, Tb« Anils utood togstb-
er and d*t*od*d thHr ilvtw vallantlf,
bnt witb tite rain of lead tbat poured
upon then tmm tbelr own slaves and
lit* elM-Nof'wI arrow* and aprars wfttek
new kfafx-d tnm the nurroutnllng )a»>
tie aimed aolely at tb»m. there vat
liltio ^eeatlon from the flrtt what tbe
-o-titiee-NM would Ue. In ttm mlmtm
front tbe time tbe ftrat porter bat
thnwu «W-wim Ivl* kxtd tl« tost of tbo
Arabe lav dead.
Worn the flftut hsd eaaaed TartM
n*M-l* 44itu* w .A* MitnyiMUW*.
"Tak* «p em Uery nod mmm it li
tPPOtt   PtttfJAonP      -AtMUMK   a|tk«fei^   mrnj^aa   ^t^Apk,   tttp
O^pw    wPPWfH-JPRi   IIotWWP   rmM^PbWOtl'  JHPW   WPW  Wpt
We ikan wt tam jm"
CMAPTIH XX.
'. hH„ .•).. i.    ■ <■;■«  .i ■*'   >
• lh*   woll  dr**">**d   n*it*-i   ywine  im»
I mIhmw ««ifl Ufwl t»**t* wi»d lrcvpr«»i»«'h'
| utih*1  ln;iiirn'rii tnnt  ttt* , .13 HvjiNil  h»»r
; *.*.*    *l     'it., ifl     .ttt'ti     tt-:»i,tH9    .'.1*1.1;        ,\tt*t
}4 h'.tl"    V- t\-*;      \V „.I,I    *,{.,     J,..;,     »Ui'
i >m**t   nil*   «M»rHg.».   *«rilin*" < liU-1'ialn
j l-*u*i|ng iwk*«l MWMHia lil- »)'(i.«tl. »*r-
S .t^tt   -,ui,imt9.     At.*i|   11 \t,,• .1'     t •mtlil
j liAciMit  lul*-  l«»ls*-««'il  iU.,1  lli,«   wa-
;' UiUi   I* 1 hi*, iim,  i,«   iuul tt.tr*'4*i* *..', iii,u>
i Halt  :*  iknu-ii  nl   (-ti»* »».i**|  *.-*!.**. f ,-lt*t«.
, ! «  I ■■*),*,    *Pia1 •airit:*! in* i* tttfl* («•*» f 9
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<i.i' ii,'. - \# r
<.:..,, II inil
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ill'i-trict ii
6. ,\\"*i recommend that it be tbe
tlpclnroq p(»l|i) iii the InternallDnal
i 11 inn thut tin- ,"-.'jii.li-iiiviilal Axre«v
iiiiiit in iI.i- ai.ihr-i-1 i> r.*»;liiu which
•■iiirn-M tli«- in-rc.i'•• in wnges iftttrwi
,i. No.•..,:.. 1 ;:. ■. y...*'.', r-iiuiii in full
i-in   ii'nl    ",**\  if-r;i ih«   "ti>ir<itlon
-. .     ■ .. -     - . ....'...  .,„l ...... ...    MlMl«
ili-i  i.f full .i.nir .imi lni'ij.urn nt
• ts,* I iiiif.l Mm.- ttirtiri nf Amerlm
Hi..Ill   llf  I lH|l|H,ll'.l   In  tb.-t  till,
UV  n 1'Miimi-hil  th ti  tho  Inter-
'■;,"i.11 il (i,»!i«! |„ li    in 'r.t • •; I,- mil
-.!*. '  '  r ..,*.. :..' "    ;.<'!.' .)',, at
.1   :Ui .iii'i- «.!!«•  \,r , .ni.    in tin-  ti'r.
1   ,' .1 ■ .,1   1 ,   i*%.   1... ■   ;■> t* • i..   . '■     lor
th-
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'.,'. 111. . 1 -i. . Policy
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r 1*        ■ * •   .Ming aglet*
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1 a   rr-rs   nittftui*  an*-*nx  et**i  «'i»wiy
^»p>w wm m*at et a tmmtat
torn a •taaie mr. «»•
And an anhamlsa bmh.
►«  ■   HveitM  UW  MMVnMM j imt m».r«#ty «*,* t»«. tttihtmim: tttt *-%ul*t
tMattated.  Tbnt tad no a<oo> j ttim **i ni* mtm-v+im*, t*t if*d *»«• u»»«
t A     ■**• to rttwca  ttat MnH j utaricd ai iW t«y imi<»m>
tbrot daft' ma   Ttay laife-      .......
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j tantM totreefl tke Matte. eaMng alovd j Aptm fmmtmm rto*t «i in*. Wn**n it*.
i%*? ^J}"$j£l *WW4€* '** i**m i **-* I*' b»v*a. J««* *'-««. 1*1 4>
I UMI ont et tta ftHatm | te« M a tiny tm»i a*W wWm. m*e+t nt
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i Si* *a ci^r*'m mm ** 1 **» ••m *mi %*wwr* •** ^ «♦
,; Km W allF ta omtrn.^      ^ ^ ^ *■ ^p^i f^m, ii^ \^Hf i*.|,-#. *,«,jf lOtem
I   "T«n On nm booms" topboo rtraaav   mrtlrmd   jlrey  wwm Jam
i*w«tatttaaitaiwe&*ve|ftM»ia«lN«   ttonoootntltmtno
ito nana yno It pom mm tmtwm oot
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. klMt it ttt* mOOto mot ftmrr *• -MM •
tl        -Hu^^ri rfkflft        PP ^A^*^^ JAM, *^      ■    1*0 Mf^KJ|^MU*|hLM<tt J^^ J9u9^m
I yw on 11 yon Om mm* ivtatR oa we <
ret I, and aiw we wn more likely tm do
* ^m it ytmt ttttptw w. twain ir jmo tte m* :
'Tn.  !.*•   t"fi*\1"*i1\M*i\\
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.*'?,•?
ig^H PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT   LEDGER,  FERNIE, B. C, APRIL 4,1919
LOOK!
T
LISTEN!
NOW is the time to protect your property against fire.
BIG REDUCTION of Fire Insurance rates on Residential Property
in the City of Fernie.
Call and get rate of your property. JJI    A    KASTNER
General Insurance
FERNIE NEWS
For Sale—A four room cottage
with pantry, sink, pump and other
conveniences. A bargain if taken at
once at -J375.0O. Apply Albert Kawcett
West Fernie.—L'i.
Dr. W. H. Pickering-—Late of Grand
Forks, B.C., has opened a modern deii„
tal office in the- Bank of Hamilton
Bldg.
One Big „ Band—iHand musicians
come to the Uig.Get-Togethnr meeting and bring yonr instruments along,
Sunday evening at 7::!0 in the Fernie
Amateur Athletic Hall, Pellatt Ave.—
Don't -Forget!
Gone to Coast.—[Mrs. Khule, formerly of the Trites-Wood Co., left on .Monday for Vancouver, where she will take
a position with Spencers, Ltd. On
the eve of her departure the employees
ot Trites Wood presented her with
a piece of Elizabethan silverware.
Enquiry Will Soon Commence—A. I.
Fisher, M.P.P., has returned from'Vic.'
toria. He has informed the miners' representative that the enquiry into the
Coal Creek disaster will be commenced
forthwith. At the last meeting of
Gladstone local union William Rob.
son was unanimously chosen to represent the men at the coming enquiry.
United Church Services—Rev. C. E.
■Uatzold, pastor. Sunday March 6.—
11:00 a.m."The Beautiful Gate;" 7:30
p.m. "Christ's Testimony to Himself;"
2:30 p.m. Sabbbath School and Adult
Bible Clas. Easter Sunday will be observed iii the Sabbath School as "Go
To Sunday School Sunday." Parents
aiyl friends of the scholars are specially invited for April 20. <
Kavanagh to be Here.—President
Kavanagh of the B. C. Federation of
Labor is, to visit Fernie shortly in the
interests of the ONE BIG UNION. He
is considered one of tlve ablest speak-
*•«$>♦♦♦♦♦♦ <X*^P P-PPP P
p ^
O      GLADSTONE LOCAL NOTES P
P «>
PP-P&PPPP. *P~PP4P -P*PPPP,
The B.C. eight-hour law came into
effect April 1st, 1 thought there was no
loop-hole in it, but say, there was nev.
er an Act passed thnt you could not
rive a double.barrel id molly engine
through. I thought also tftat the eight
hour law included lunch time. Tho
coal company thought it did not, so
to be very kind to its employees and
so that they could catch the 3:45 train,
they allowed them to commence to
work about 15 minutes to seven, and
stop work at 3:15.
\Vo wired the (Minister of Mines for
an interpretation. He told us what we
already knew, and that was the eight-
hour law, meant one shift in every
twenty-four. We wire again "Does
the eight.hour include lunch time?"
Back came the reply, "In the chief inspector's mind it did not, in his opinion, when a man was eating his lunch
he was not working for his employer,"
A glorious interpretation. In our
opinion he was very much working
for his emiployer. We understand that
when a man is feeding his face, he is
feeding his energy which he will ap.
ply to his master's business just as
soon as he gets through. (But that Is
not the point; if they make that stick,
how will the man stand if through
some unforeseen circumstance he gets
injured while he is eating his lunch?
What about his compensation?
It came to the notice of Gladstone
Local Union, that the Editor of the
Fernie Free Press, had issued a writ
against che Editor of The District Ledger, and the following resolution was
passed without a dissenting voice:
"That on the day of the Trial, Gladstone Local Union, shall take a holiday
and accompany the Editor of The Dis.
trict Ledger to the Court."
Mr. Editor,,I had occasion recently
to write about the road that leads to
the cemetery. Of all the roads leading
to a place of rest," well that is the llm.
ti!    We had a funeral last Sunday,
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
SEALED TENDERS,    superscribed
"Tender for Elk River Bank Protec.
tion Work" will be received  by the
City Clerk of the Corporation of   the
City of Fernie up to Midday of Thursday, the tenth day of April, 1919, for
the   construction and   completion of
Protection    work   aloug tho
bank of the Elk    River, adjoining blocks 69 & 74 in the
Municipality   of the City of
Fernie,  <,
Plans, 'Specifications, Contract, and
Forms of Tender may be seen on and
after the second day of April, 1919, at
the oflice of the City Clerk, City'Hall,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C.
Tenders will not be considered un.
less made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of the
tenderer, and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted;
ARTHUR J. MOFFATT,
City Clerk.
City Hall,
Fernie; B. C, April 1, 1919.      34.lt
Saturday Matinee
at 2.30
ORPHEUM
THK HONE OF GOOD PICTURES
Saturday Nights
First Show at 7
Friday and Saturday, April 4 and 5
FRANK KEENAN in
"The Bells"
"Bells, Bells, Bells. The bells of the sleigh ring forever ip
my ears.
RUTH ROLAND in the 7th chapter of "Hands Up"
HAROLD LLOYD in "Sick 'Em Towscr"
Monday, April 7
FRANCIS FORD in
"Tlie Craving"-Five Part Bluebird
"Vengeance and The W©2*ia.n"-chapter 14
•     Comedy
i *a»-*9*a4B«S>3& tW-tiSP*9&mtPtBa*-9*fbt
Tuesday, April 8
ALICE JOYCE in
"Tlie Highest Bidder" Five Part Vitagraph
Comedy
Wednesday and Thursday, April 9 and 10
HAROLD LOCKWOOD in
"The Landlopers-Five Part Metre
Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle in
"A Country Hero"-two reels
i
i
COMING
Mary Miles Minter in "Rosemary Climbs The Heights
ers at the^ coast and his visit will be i how we. got. there, I do not know yet
One of these days there will be a spill
and some one. injured, then I suppose
there; will be all kinds of excuses made
to cover up someone's neglect. If the
road cannot bis kept in order why not
abandon the cemetery, and maKe one
where it is easifer to get to?   I am sure
anticipated with interest. News has
been received from Hossland that the
Miners' Union there has by a big voie
endorsed the OXH.,BIG UNION.
Back from Overseas--John McteWe.
1nhn.  formerly  \vith   the  Oo va  Ii_sl
Trading Company, arri/i;.,!" b:>c*^,.i'vomi those who are taken up there will not
overseas last ' waek. iu> Via^.ied i kick" about it. Will those who have
through Calgary 'Where he was recog- i charge of that work sit up and take
nized by Wiltom .-.M-.r.* t-l ihis c'ty.; notice?  *;..*■■■
Thero was only a v r.m- r. kt cliivt. j Brother Sterling, Alex Susnar, Tlieo
sation but it i.-. ..in■! ::t■>>:l ;.i ;r.u>r: Htttswall nnd .lohn Marsh, were visit-
getting hia ..dis :.'i ('.'.ja   ;:t   'He   (••■i*.<.,! prs t'o'Fernie ■ all full up to the top
Poultry
WHITE WYANDOTTES
Eggs for hatching^from matings of
pure white, large bone, finely shaped
birds at from $2.00 to $3.00 per sitting.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
C. GILLETT      Box 501, Fernie, B. C.
BARRED  PLYMOUTH   ROCKS
Saturday Specials
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Lipton's Yellow Label C.offec, lib. tin ..."...... .55
L.ipton \s Cocoa, 1-2 lb. tin ..'..' ..... .25
Cowan's Supreme Chocolates, 1-5 lb. cakes, 3 for........ .25
'Happyvale- Sliced Pineapple, 21-2 lb. tins.  .35
AYagstaffs Jam, 16 oz. bottle, Pear, Plum, R«d Currant... .20
Apex Jam, Pure Emit, 4 lb. tin.....  ".-■' .75
Aylmer Pork and Beans, 1.1b. tins, 2 for.  .25
Lennox Laurfdry Soap, 5 bars  .25
French Castile Soap, large bar ,   .30
English Glycerine Soap, bar.  .10
T. P. Sauce, per bottle.. ,....................... .20
Libby> Sauer Kraut, 21-2 lb. tin. .1.7. .25
Special Blend Bulk Tea, per lb.  .55
Pure Cider Vinegar, qt. bottles.......   .35
Washington Soluble Coffee, medium size.  .55
Tea Garden Cranberry Sauce, 16 oz. jar..; 35
Ontario Clover Honey, 5 lb. tin  ....... 2.15
Slab Fruit Cake, 1 lb. tin.  -40
Branches at Fernie, Michel, Natal and Coal Creek
remgteed, bred to lay...'First' and
second hen; first and second pullet;
•first* second and third cockerel; sec
ond'cock;' first aad special utility nen
Mr.   Mel
Fernie.
lejohii   v. iii   (.'iiii'*
i'-x'K   io
Women's Branches Federated Labor!
Party.—Ou   Sunday   evening' at   hnlf j
past  seven  o'clock   there   will  be  a;
meeting in  r.Jio  Miners" Hall pf the •
■ll.C. Federated labor party.   A special
invitation ia issued to al! women to
como to this -meeting for the purpose |
of organizing a woman's branch of the!
party.    It Ss hoped that there will he
a largo attendance  a a  thc  wives of,
the workers are tuking an increasing;
Intercut in the vital problems of the:
day. !
The Ukrainian Labor News■■ i'incc
their paper'wait bantu'd missu' mouths
ago, thf-'Ukrainian work-civ. him- b.t.<v,
without a Jojinifil to !><>-1> t'ma ;n,
formed in their own bj.Ttiagi-. No.v
there Ih ht'lni'. t<4su«-l hv th" Wini'i'iiei'
Trades and Labor Council. "T)i.< 1 I;-
ranian -Utlwr Xew ." Tin ni.it'e,- irs
printed it\ rmrnili-1 ci* i»
and U-kraluliUt. J*, will
paper for onr torcis™ hrnt'jc;
becoming ac'itiainted with
guage. .NV'cilli'-s to pay tl
Iun Worker Ih Mroiig for the
I'.NJON.
il
;iu'ii~ii
u t'ltid
*i in their
OH''     !!!»■
■•     1   kl'lll,
ONK I'.IG
toye Or-ganite for Sport.—Thet'. H.
. K. T. (ttS.tr j'ttiW Club w!';! h'M a
tnenting in th" !*".»t'Hi.'i*i of ( hrl'ti
church on \Ved«f>.d.iy, April '.*, sit ",'S.ti
p.m. Ui or-'tuilzo th *ir hpivri** for the
•ri mlnir *< {"s'tn At  :*    !'r*"l!!iiit!'!r1'
metitlng h»•!<! thl* week It was found
tfiii th(ir.' >•"■' """'I t'vit'•:!-•} .o'i'i'i"
lhe Hoy* for th'' furwHiloti of liftst-ball
f<Mitl»all and U<tu,*,m. team■•*-   The V,
s. i: t. *iif> :..;• *•- :*■ ■ > i •■»'•  -- '."•: ■•
or four track xw-ftf durtii); ih" year.
All the boy* are re t tc»tt tl to attend
IKtV ANO AOEY ARE TO
■E ATTRACTION AT GFUND
with the O.MD 1.1IO UNION, and all
bursting to speak. Well they will get
all tlio chance they waut before they
leave.
We Have recently spoken about tlie
amount of protitH that, were made dur.
ing the great war,* and also passed   ;
ro.-.olutionti asking for thn conlliication;
of these profits po that the dependants
and the perniuueiitly injured soldiers,;
.should receive the henclit. lielow you
will Jind a letter received by the min.
era' secretary, from Saul lJoitnell, M.l'.
HOI'S!-] OF COMMONS
Ottawa*. March 21th, l!i
1 htive a copy of a resolution passed
hy your locnl union at their regular
meeting, and 1 can assure you ot my
entire sympathy with it. 1 believe,
with you, lhal all e\ee»s proi'ltu made
«n>ritig tho war should be eon li seated
by the state.
1 am a member or the PeiiHlons.
Hoard i li in year and iun OHhtiiir you
thnt J am leaving no atone unturned
to Hi-cure iiii-reasi 4l ptMistons for the
men who gave cuth noble nervice dur-
itig the time ol war.
TruMiiiu, ih.(l e.i rythUig i- giiiiig
along smoothly.
With kind regard!<. I atn,
Truiy Y-osiM.
(signedi        S.  Hutiiull.
Alho Hue li'oiii the Velenuu A.i.soc-
Iniboi from Cal'-'ary.
I»r«ar s*ir: —
U»- lU'woluUoit aH pa«'d by your lo.
cui, (Oiisuiiied ia your letter uf March
ITth, these wcr« endowed by our n^-
MM-iittSosj at thv.-»r 5,»>it a.iciiug.
Thanking you for these hiiggCKHoiw
Yours Faithfully.
-S, <!. I'ctlev,
h«cr«*uiry-lrenHurer
at Fernie Poultry Show. Eggs, $2.<M.l
per sitting. Duck Kggs for sitting.
Fifteen pound Flemish Giant Buck for
stud.    .
F. STREET} Hand Avenue,
West Fernie, B. C.
ROSE COMB RHODE ISLAND REDS
Tomkins' strain.     At  Fernie show
won best male, second pullet, lirst pen
and  best display eggs.    Two dollars!
and five dollar,1! por fifteen.
ALEX. AITKEN, Box f.*2
West Fernfc, B. C.
Single comb Huff Leghohis and
Barred Hocks. $1.50 per setting.
Heavy winlc-r layers. Two Huff Leghorn cockoreln for Hale.—Joo Turner,
Hand  Ave,  West.  Fernie
CASH CLEARING OPT SALE
The Followiug Lines Will Be Cleared Out Regardless Of Cost As We Will Not
Carry Them Again
Service Trays, Wood; Chinawarer Consisting of
Plates, Tea Sets, Cups and Saucers, Chocolate
Sets, Nut Bowls, Bonbons and Vases. Carving
Sets, Dolls, Electric Fixtures and Table Lamps.
THIS SALE IS FOR CASH ONLY
FERNIE OPTICAL PARLORS
Headquarters for the Brunswick Phonograph
Store Opens At Noon
COAL MINE FOR SALE
■H'ood
bin.
A country coal mine in good locution; scam :} ft. 10 indies;
dry l;oof and dry mine; -newly developed; nlso storage
to hold sixty tons, and 'blacksmith shop with till necessary
equipment.   For particulars apply tn
,     GEO. WM. HALLIDAY
Eox 185 DELIA, ALEERTA
THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF FERNIE
IN    M ENIORI AM
In loving memory ot my dear father   nn;!   brother,   .lanoR   and * Pranl:
Sinit'h,  who were  killetl  in  the Coal
Creek explosion, April .'th, Ii»17.
A luvinK father, true und Idml
tlf proved t« lie in heart and mind',
A lovitic hrother. too, n:* well
When they tm earth with «« did
dwell,
—tioiu- Imt n*ot forgotten.
■Fnnn ilauKhter and son-in,ltiw, Ada
nnd Tom Thornton.
IN    MEMORIAM
lu   lot'lng   mtaiury   of   William
Ilrown. who io»l hl» life in tlio explosion at Cad Creek on April r»tti, J!H7
'llure in a link death eannot never
S.,vi    ,.-,.:. r ".\<-'.t-.\ rv.v, «  VA'tt. for*-'.  <•
from his brother, Frnnh Ilrown nil
by  hix  mother and  Hinter*  now   In
1.1IK1.H01
All Ratepayers' whose taxes
are still unpaid for theyear 191©
are hereby reminded that int•er,,,
est is bcisMft charged at the rate
of 8 per cent per annum,
A taac sale will be held on October 8,1919.
Abbey's Fruit Salts, large
Abbey's Vita Tablets    -
Palm Olive Soap, 2 for -
Gold Bar Peeled Apricots, ls.  -
Lemon Pie Filler - -   ■       -
Abbey's Asparagus, 2s.-
Stop On Shoe Polish, 3 for
Lennox Laundry Soap, 9 bars for
, Tomatoes,"2 l-2s., 5 tins for
Malkin's Best Tea, per lb.  '    .-
Sweet Juicy California Oranges , per doz.
Purity Flour, 98s. - - -
$ .75
.50
.25
.35
.40
.50
.25
.50
1.00
.70
.60
6.00
FERNIE GO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, LTD,
Incorporated 1907
Canada Food Board Licence Ho. 8-594
(3
SKSSWi
ind )«*i ever *Utp to ihSni lhal th'-re
wnn Mtt.uctir *orf«»' in thl* world
I have Mnt » real t'tuotn -cV,n*nr U
tkny and Si**-*. Mr, Und Xihaffer, 'Aho
tl** pltjwl 1 **■«■•■•* fnr *tm,f Um«- ihf
|M«t Hir<"-*e ;i*»t* fn r*n1\y tb<* h,*i
pttmm rhnnft <>f tv.vm »tl Mr. s*« half.
ter i* n1*n thi< mi but of ihf Iim K»1H-,
Uttt   *A    Sl*^     ttt.'.    S'.r    t      1.   \jt~\iV\t    7mt,
b* *h^« a  «M» *|.»!i*'!»ir f".f»!»«|r  tM«
mtmattxt,
Ur. AJ 1bMi\ who piny* AHi-\ i* tm*'
of tli<* fimnlewt 1t*w ti*ui*'d\^ii*i "I fh«*'
t(J»«l today    He in til-u ;i Kiiiiit itatn'i-r '*.
ft I* worth th* prle* t,t ttAmt.-u,-, to
M« lit o«n r..n»rpi««»ni ut "ikftkUU-
In* thtt r,rn**lS' a r»»» umn «mt dene*. <
Mr. i**» tnmtm, »*« pt*j*n t »c«vw* (
kv    ..I      •'■■,!.       '-'    >'1        '   '    '       "'     !•'",,"       '■•'"'
Until. '
Ur. 0«o. Clark, onr tomimnw )«v.|
talk baa n po^i it/it** atA *ilr<'*'wt> lit*,
part tn tlw too* t».bbm.
tttim Stdliln MeVtiwiwi wiw pttyi
%*9j     vtri.f    fttatti**,    »*j    *t*11    \-mt**m *
Qio^baut rtM<!» Oh* Mt t **•«*•
MtmAno Koptn pUyt tkt ptrt ot •«
Workers
ofthe
Ml« WMtMt plir» tbn part ot o
4l8<fn troot to tan* » ml tmi
t*ttg& nwt ttt fnr pm* atmrfmt •»*»
""        'dlWINIII
lli*t nttAbPt.
CAMACNAN* IN ttMIIIA
TO M MOUOHT HOMf
OTTAWA. Vnttb il^-tn tko aPtto
taaiOf. tb Pttty to o »iHln bf Mt.
Itt* potato. oiKixmwutA, Wntat'T dt
mypm ***bmrm oott tbm omanta*
tarnoU. boA bono mod. tot tfti morn
Ot Om Otbatlem axpootxbam. tbmUXJiln
tpotMoo.
obvtn oo
World
LOGGERS «nd CAMP WORKERS
Tins MK.\\H xov
MHS TIIE
B. G. LOGGERS UNION
01 CORDOVA ST. W., VANCOUVER, D. V,   0
no IT MOW
ONE BIO INDUSTRIAL UNION FOE AU OAMP W0BJOEB8
Loggfiv of tb* Interior Qtmttof Tnko Notte*
Tli" \snrir+r* *xt tl»> Cm*i DhlrUtn liave formed aa ©r-
raniutton kntmn aa the H. €. lAggm' Onion, indontnal In Itt
imp*, rompming all workera in tht lumber indattry, ud «©n-
MrtKlion rompn. afRHat«d with tht Vdnrouver Trade* tnd
Ijihor Coonell and the 11. C. Fedewition of labor.
Wt Invite all Lofffera in tht interior to join hand* wHk m
m a united efluri io hm<r uur c(mdiiit-iiH, whieh -vm oo^f \m
diwr In thi* mann^
Orffanizeri art now on the road ami will ftoyjam a vfcut
in tbe mor t-autre.
Hogetrtatlj!
For fartfctr Intmrrmtmi ctiwmmteoto with M. WWb\ too-
trtorf'itoomtot, t*\ VWiUwa 9a. W.
T AWtnmBR. B r. PIIOHB SWTWOWI tSW
Great Clearing Sale
Axes, Handles, Cant Hooks
Mauls, Wedges, Saws
PAINTS
$3.75 per gallon
HOUSE PAINT
VARNISH, OIL
WHITE LEAD
■
ALABASTINE
IT WILL PAY YOU TO CALL AND GET PRICES
The Duthie Company
|NORTHERN   HOTEL
!i JNVITBS VOUR PATRONAGE
| Alberta reader* of The District Ledger will find H to thoir
'i\ advantage when visiting Pernie to stop nt the Northern. Tlir?
| will find it ewy and home-Hkt.
|
8
HIGH  CLASS CAFE
ALWAYS OPEN
License No, 104770
High Olus Day and Ni^ht Caf t in Connection
European and American Rates
Phone 29
• !■
•AVt COAL WILL
COtT 114 NIXT YEAR
KIMNRUIV UmtMb AM
•TOONO POft ONI IIO UNION
TOnOSTO, AfrtH 8—H, A. Hatrtnf-
...                  I»      .*    ,■   .*. ,l..1,,t..t.9     ..nlt.l.
•..tt*,  •.•.***.•.*    .*-.*'» **."*.*-''■    *
ilut coal *IU eoat $14 b ton la Toroa.
ta atit wtattr, 4at te tacnaaed frHgfct
rata and Metier wages.
The preMmt prlet of coat here ia
it lie a tea.
 —- ■■—■p" *'*'■ ■	
CANAOA LOAN* WMWO^OO
TO ROUMANIAN OOVINNMINT
Central  Cafftmltteai-nan  Jae   Nayler
KtiWBKUBI, B. C-Joa Naylor, of
Um eeatral commliua ef the OMB WO
UNION, haa heM two neeUaca beea
aai ahMty-flra per eeat of tha work.
•rt bnae bntd up aoltdly tor Uie ne*
ontaataatloa. Tier era weary af tha
lU.Maan at tho pnnL The district
praaMeel aai aa Itattaa aciaalter hap-
peaei aleaf *hfle Nayler waa la eaa»
..LONDON. IfaiVh 31*-Th* BrttlA
tovtrviant haa ceaeteiei amas*
awata far tha oiaatac tt -erotitn ta aai a
tumaaia tot tb.vmrcbotn et Uomo- prorad rety laurtatlat aii Inatree.
Itate neeeeeRtw. eepeetaltr railway tlve.   PreeMeat Mettle let half   aa
'«tt*fi»t.   OoiapWd*  imiMiiBt fersikear. Uw« NayDw half ae hoar; thea
I *o otmy af %!*jm mw alae wm hefaaeh haAtftaaa Mlaatee la wtleh   te
mmt- j aaewar -eae-Mtowa aaa aaeiaar attaaa
lha Caaaitaa lateraawat le gyeaLi ttaataa ta wim* ta taWh tto. Aatow
Imt a loaa ol t}*MM,000 to namanlalot banda at the doae mauled the faet
far tia paiehaae of aartc^tatat ae-i that tea bote are ataety4ve par ent
ewwHlea. atnaet far tie ONK WO VSIOS.
GOAL MINERS, ATTENTION
*tmmtmmnomoittmm---mmaamammtamtoimitom
n.M per month providee yon egeintt any accident end
every eiektieee, end peya 140.00 a month from the dey you en
Ieid np.
Pertienlara from
thi b wnmwT nwnuufoi AoiHon*
BeakofHaniHoiBldf. rwnd%B.O.
Claims promptly adjuateJ from thia offlua
h k k
IT PAYS TO ADVERTI8E

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