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The District Ledger 1914-06-13

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The Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
Political*Giiity i* Victory
,c\»x
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\?xo^%. IfVVpl. VII
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. 0, JUNE 13 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
Wd^ks^tm^y J^ Four
M6fdhs-^Bpt7t No Pay
Labor Used in Cruel," Brazen-Paced
Manner—All Charged Medical Fees,
} Yet. One Dies Without Doctor In
Sight—Laborers Also Pay for Mail
.   Which Often Never Reaches Them.
[
Ottawa, June 5.—Tho evening Citizen says: "There seems to be a great
deal of complaint about the way nomo
of the contractors on the Hundson Bay
railway from Le Pas to Fort Nelson
hUve been treating men. employed on
construction work. Several men who
have been working, up there returned
to the city yesterday with distressing
tales of thelp experiences la ' the
north. One of them ts well known ln
looal labor circles and In telling 'his
story to a Otlzen reporter, .asked that
* hip name be withheld for the present.
He gave the names pt others now ln
Ottawa, who can vouch for the truth of
what foe says. - '
- "The anen up there^are so badly
treated that I feel I should make public what I saw and was told in going
;over the line.   On February 23 a man
wae iblown'up, by a  iblast at camp 18.
-He was.taken to the hospital (but the
r .doctor was away and .'there was no
'one to care for/him except a veterinary, who was called In. The man lived
. ^four days and died before tiie doctor
■arrived. He wts burled without a-word
jof prayer. The remains were placed
vin a rough <box and $ut into the
rground,       - '
(Charged for Every Mall ^
t - "Who men are charged one dollar a
-/month for doctor's fees, and if they
;onty nyork one day, thejf have to -pay
;the dollar. There waB only, one doctor
: froni Le Pas to cam-p 30, a distance
of 300 mileB, or from Le.Paa to Kettle
Rapids,   and sometimes   there -were
over 1;000 men on the line." Th£ra>re
, no phones and the mail service In the
winter was -most unsatisfactory.    The
men have a- certain amount taken out
of their wages each montlj for the mail
. service, and yet all the service they
got *wa& mail sent -by cache teams. The
mail rwpdld.remain!liL<a cache;* weeT-t
. or a -month before 'being 8ent-on;i,Some
times it took*4nontl» to reaclttBe m6n
at the end of construction and often
it did not Teach-.them'-at'all:' Men'
were hired In Winn^eg^and they went
„   up   there   to work without ' having
> clothes for such cold -weather.    They
—."uwe to "be paid-Js©~or-j5w"ffrxsontir
and that elwayw meant, a lower price.
It <w&s a frequent thing to see men
frozen in going from the steel tb the
camp,  I have seen men leave the end
of steel to camp in SO below   zero
Weather with only.one pair of socks,
ordinary  clothes and a  hat such as
would be worn* her$ In'the fall, I saw
"„* -n*ran*~lyingvta  camp" ior. over  two
■weeks -with both feet frozen and no
: doctor to look alter him.' There were
• other similar cases.
'Have to Pay Anyway
"Tbe men wero charged 75 cents -per
day for taking their baggage in on tbe
cache teams. Even if It' was only a
small bag of clothes, or no baggage at
all. be -was charged th* samo.
"The small aub-oontraetora were
treated very badly. They were given
to understand that tbey would have a
contract'per yardage for excavation 12
feet doeip, whioh would mean four feet
GLADSTONE LOCAL
A meeting of diggers will be held at
6:30 on Sunday next, to receive nominations for checkweighman.
Immediately after • the diggers'
meeting,, a meeting of the Local will
be held to -' receive nominations for
District President and Local officers.
of frozen earth-to take oiit and then
eig-ht feet of §pft earth. When they
got on the job they found It was only
aibout six feet deep, so that they had
four feet of-frozen ground and only
tiwo feet of soft earth to take out."
"One man told me that he had worked Tour -months, had lost no time and
yet the charges against him amounted
to more-than his wages. They would
be charged 15 cents for a iplug of
tobacco, 50 cents for a 5 cent bag of
salt, 18 cents a pound for sugar, 45
cents a pound for bacon, $10 a bag for*
flour, ,60 cc-\ts per pound for "iblue
nose" jbutteU and "two bits" a tin for
corn, beans, wc.      "  *
. Will Not Furnish Meals
"The Citizen's informant showed a
typewritten,copy of an order to a-
cache keeper .telling him that A.
Howdka could- not get his meals until
he had a credit coming to him of. $30
or more. Then followed this extract
from Uie general order:
"No /man feeing south is to *6e supplied, with anything, not even his
meals, until he has a credit-coming to
him of at least $30.' If this letter is disregarded, the "cache keeper furnishing
same will be held responsible.
'YFhls man went, in, thinking he was
to "get $30 a month and after toe got
to the work found he was only to get
$20. *v He started home and could not
get taiyr' meals".... He started to iwalk
ibac&to-end of'.fteel, but the caches
alongfthe line would not give him any-
tWng ^o eat,-and he had to return to
the .one where be,was'iworklng."
"THE LUDiidV/~MASSACRE"
- A .presentation will be made to Mr.
and 'Mrs. Walton on Friday evening,
June 12th, in the basement of the"
church, to which all members of the
parish,.and friends, are invited. There
will be a short program and refreshments will be served.
SOCIALIST PARTY OF CANADA
A special,, business meeting of the
ahove„ will, be held in the Socialist
Hail on Sunday at 2:30 p. m„ prompr,
for tbe^purpose of discussing the advisability of employing a. permanent
organizer in the Pass. The question
of a iparty picnic will also be dealt
with.
Anyone having books in their pss-
sassion belonging to the party are requested to turn in same to the librarian. In the future the library will bo
open from 8 p. m. to 10 p, m. every
Sunday for the issuing of books.
The District Officers, Vice President Graham, Secretary-Treasurer
A. J. Carter-^.nd International Board
/Member D. Rees" are away in the
Brazeau country, this Week engaged iu
negotiating an agreement .with the
mine operators there.
Don't forget the big wrestling bout
that, takes place in the Fernie Athletic Club hall (Ingrams). Clajiman
and Uvanni are in fine shape, "and
all events pulled off at this hall are
conducted with due regard for sport
and sportsmen. This will ibe a livo
event.
r^
•Walter -*H. Fink, publicity agent in
the Colorado strike, has . written a
•book, .'The Ludlow Massacre."
It contains -fcweflty-one full ipage illustrations, some of them actual photographs of the horrors of the strike, a
20,000 word, 100 page 'book, depicting
in a narrative form the Bufferings of
Colorado coal miners,, the slaughter
and cremation of men. women and
children* ^       N
"' fThe -book'Is* highly interesting reading and contains* ln addition to the
Ludlow maccare a story of the fight
madeliby Colorado miners since 1884.
Mr. Fink is a /trained newspaper anan
nf   wtrto   AVnprlft-n/»A   anil jin*a_jhfla.n_jn:
active, touch .with the'.situation since
■the strike begun. There is none better able to write'a story of the struggle. - As a matter of /act, Mr. Fink
has been "at work for "the past eight
months on a history of the Oolorado
war since '1876, which Is to be published by the United <Mine .Workers when
the strike ia won und-oveiv   '
"Thvirtidlow Massacre" Is 'being
sold at 25 cents a copy, a little more
than cost, that eVery coal miner in
tbe country may be fully acquainted
with the horrors or the Colorado
strike.        f
It would be an excellent thing to
have copies of "The Ludlow 'Massacre"
on file In every looal union and would
assist in the circulation of this hook
among the members of the organization and do much to Increase the Interest in tbe Colorado strike and toward a final victory.
Mineworker Secures Substantial Damages
(t •	
* LOUIS FANNA RECOVERS $4,000 DAMAGES
This action against the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, was commenced by Fauna for injury received in the Coal Company's mines at Michel on the 23rd of March, 1914. The accident
occurred by Fauna's slipping aud falling into the gears of a motor which was not protected,
and his arm had to be amputated. The Compau y admitted liability and tendered Fauna, before
the action, the sum of $2,000, which he, on, adv ise of counsel, refused to accept. They afterwards increased this amount and paid into Court the sum of $2,700, which was still refused,
.and the action came on for hearing before Mr. Justice Clement today. Mr. Justice Clement
found that the Company had been guilty of a breach of a statutory duty and awarded the
plaintiff $4,000 and the costs of action.
it
' SHUSKA VS. HOSMER MINES, LIMITED
Thiscase came on for hearing before Mr. Justice Clement on June 8th and 9th, and on the
ground that the chute in which the deceased was killed, was not built by the Company for
traveling, he dismissed the action at Common Law, but awarded full' Compensation to the
widow, allowing no costs of either action. '
CARDEMONE VS. CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO., LTD.
s
This action, about which we gave some partic ulars last week, occupied all last Wednesday,
and after hearing evidence for the defense, Mr. Justice Clement took the ground that the slide
of January, 1912, was not a sufficient warning to the Company of the cog being unsafe, inasmuch as he believed the evidence of John Shanks, that the cog or cribbage work, had effectively dissipated the effects of the snowslide of January, 1912, and that, consequently, the Com-
/pany were not obliged to take any further precautions. He, however, allowed full Compensation to the plaintiff under the Workmen's Compensation Act.
Ex-Pres. Smith
Explains His Case
SHUSKA VS. C. P. R.
Reasons for Judgment
Following is text of'judge^^asons^^^r^^^^.
ttt
COAL CRBIK NOTES
itlie mlnea were ldio from S p. m.
Thursday until 3 p. m. Friday, and
from S p. to. Saturday until 3 p. m.
<Brneet Nledlg, tipple boss, -returned
to work from Lethbridge, where ho
bad boen attending hia father's fu*
neral.
Tho football camo. Frank vs. Fer
nlo, ivu well attended by Coal* Crook
enthusiasts on Saturday.
Jack Myori wm admitted to hospital
aftor tto football nun* at Fomlo, to
undergo treatment tor bli knee. We
bono to see you around toon, Jack.
Ofioa Florence BUMborough eater-
tain*) a few of her friends «t tte
onalTorsaryi of bor naUl day, on Saturday. The smiling fecea of alt to-
•poke n pleasant tta*.
Tb« arrival of J. Bonos, from Rot*
herham, Yorkshire, England, wm celebrated on Saturday night nt homo.
117 Coyote street feverybody enjoyed
thomoolvot.
Tbo tun* paid another vistt to
French oamp oa Sunday, leaving • flao
ma to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. KayVMother
Md baby doing woH.
Tbo buildings oa Victoria park aro
vndorgolnt a renovating proeoos, un-
dor tho band* of Mr. Chetton of Pernio.
Will all local Moom tako notice that
lodio nlgbu aro bold now fortnightly;
neat lodge night beta* June tind., A
good aitMdaaM la desired, m 1m-
nortant boslnoo*  la bolng conducted
.Our looal baaoball elab la tery
huy neaetklng these days. Anyone
dealimie of beeomia* affiliated with
same, kindly five thoir namoa to Fred
Inland, seersUo-y*. who will also   be
Coal Creek schoolboys and Dougall's
team of Fernlo on Thursday last resulted In a draw, 6 to 5, on time being
called. Extra tlmo was called and
McDonald's team won out, tho result
being 6 to 6.
Word has boon received In camp
f roar-Robert Spruston, wbo Is down ln
Quebec, that b$ has identified the
body of his alitor. Ruth, Mra. Lowther
Morton. We understand the body is
to be brought to Fernie for burial.
The fishing excursion of thro* of
our Lancashire lads twill bo long remembered by one of them.. Did you
jump in to book the flab on Sammy?
iMuoh hotter to tako a iun and ahoot
them. ■■■■-■
Tbo following Is tbo Coal. Creok
line-up against Hoemer Football Club
oo Thursday* evening, to bt olayod in
ftonles kickoff at fit. m.: Laxmore,
MoLetohle, A. «MeFofan: Yates, Manning, Parnell; Wilson, .Martin, Walk-
er, Armstrong, Johnstone. Reserve,
J. Harper.  Referee, Sands,
Tho Board of Management are running a aorloa of gamo tournament*,
when rateable prises will bt giron for
pool, bllliarda, «even-up. cribbage, dorn*
inoos, draughts, quolta Md snaps. En-
trios close at 0 a. m., Jane Wrd.
Mn. Duncan and family hare loft
camp to tako up thoir residence at
Will the wires or oweethearta of
all local members of tho Moose, wbo
aro iBttnattd in tha formation of a
Ladle*' Social Circle, glvo their names
ta R. Nllaboroofb?
THt F1NNII CO-OMRATIVI
Tho quarterly meettag of tbo above
society wm bald on Sunday evening
la Victoria Hall, whoa a fair nomber
ot shareholders «oro present Tho
balance ebtet for tha pwvtoua quarter
was presented and dlseusaed, and Mi
tor~3uagffieat"inTHls case:
Supreme Court of D. C„ Fernie,
June 5,1911, before the Honorable Mr,
Justice Clement.
In this case I think if Shuska's
action in going down, the chute had
heen ip the ordinary course he "would
properly be held to .have chosen that
was at his own risk. The tunnel, consisting of a*, manway and * a chute, is
built deliberately) in two sections, one
Intended to be and actually named a
manway, and the other, intended to
bring down material, whether coal or
other material taken out in course of
driving the tunnel.
However, that is not this case. This
ts what may be called an emergency
user of the chute by the deceased,
and it seams to me ln view of what
really happened here, namely an unexpected blow-out or run of fine coal,
and, consequent thereon, an emergency user of the chute as the likely
road to safety, the whole situation
constituted an event not reasonably
to be anticipated or guarded against
by the company; and the company
was not. In my opinion negligent In
not providing a Imootb-bore tunnel as
a coal-chute, That, it seems to me,Ms
really this whole case.
mie real cause of tbe accident here
was a most extraordinary one,  There
apparently had been a piece of rook
over thia tringor, and it seemed   at
though K might fall, and the workman
PMe removed it.  Tbey $1 scout the
notion of tboro being any negligence
In not covering up that bole; tbe rook
abovo was bard, no danger of anything
dropping. As I said, that as a piece of
negligence io negatived by the evidence of all tho witnesses; yot in the
end that vory bola was tho causa ot
this man's, dtath.   When tbo run of
ooal came ht was In a position (I
accept the evidence of Hancock   on
that point) whoro ho could not reach
the manway; be did what waa very
natural, wont down the chute, apparently carried down on tho descending
coal, and whoa ho reached tho point
whero this hole wm over thit stringer,
bis leg hi aomo way want over the top
of tho stringer, practically booked onto the stringer and tht ooal from
abovo smothered hire and killed him.
Mow it seems to mt if what t havo
Mid aa to tht ooal chute it correct,
It applies a fortiori to tbo holt whioh
wm tho real cause.   In tho ordinary
working of tha mine, ovon supposing
men wort coming down that chute,
tbat holo wm absolutely "no risk   at
all; It wm oaly by reason of tht ua*
txpeeted happening, a happening that
eould not bo expected or anticipated
or guarded against reasonably, that
thia bolt came te play any part whatever. Tbat It did m wat owing to exceptional and abnormal circumstances
against which   I think  tho oompany
oould not bo expceted to mako provision.
I -can find none that have any application whatever to the circumstances
of this case, .1 find no rules that lay
-down provisions as to the construction
B.=tii.iU6i=~a3=a=
NOTICE
coal chute. I. think you have to regard
that tunnel as two distinct things, a
manway and a chute, and as far as the
chute part is concerning the company
were not under any obligation as between them and, their workmen" to
make it safe. I put. it as strongly as
that because Joy -.Judgment is really
founded upon " 'that view, I do not
think, therefore, having regard to the
real cause of the accident her6, tbat
the death of the 'plaintiff'a husband
was caused iby any negligence on the
part of the defendant company. The
result ls that the action must be dismissed.
Mr. Johnsou. (Paragraph 8 of statement of claim.) We sued both at common law and under the Employer's Liability, I am prepared to argue now
the question of Employer's liability
through defect ot tho works, ways and
machinery, unless .your lorship thinks
your judgment has covered that,
The Court—I think so,
A special meeting of the Frank Cooperative Co., Ltd., will 'be held in the
TaHnwrB^HHtlrPiwilcoTr^Wura^^iiW
13th, 7:30 p. m„ to discuss dissolving
this company.
All shareholders are requested to attend. 214
GREAT 8TRIKE BEGINS
To the Menibershlifof District IS, U.
ttl. W. of A. Greeting:
, Tho following explanation as to why
I have resigned the Presidency of District 18, has become necessary in order
that the membership at largo may understand fully what the trouble was
that promoted my action, and in order
that the matter shall be perfectly
clear, it will be necessary to inform
bur -members that on the evening of
(Monday, April 20th, Hellevue Local
Union decided not to return to work
until certain grievances had been settled to their satisfaction, in other
Avrrt's they went ou strike.
On Thurs'lay, the 23rd, in response
to a -message from 'Secretary Huvke ot
Bellevue Local, I left for that camp in
company with District Secretary Carter, and after discussing the said
grievances with the local officers, went
to'the mine office and interviewed
•Manager AVilliains, and though by the
written terms of the agreement, he
was not 'bound to discuss the trouble
■with us while the -men were idle, nevertheless, he did so, and gave us the
assurance that he'was willing1 to discuss the points at issue with the local
committee, just so soon as the men
returned to work.
We attended a meeting of the Local
Union that afternoon, and in the
remarks I advised the men to return
to work, because the interview J had
had with the manager left no doubt in
my mind that the grievances would-
be adjusted to 'the men's satisfaction.
The men, however, refused to return
to work, and a few of them gave expression to remarks not very flattering
to myself. I am pleased to say, however, that I had the support of some
of the 'best thinking men in Bellevue
Local in the stand which I took, and
which is the only position I, or any
other individual who whd" happens to
be president, could take, if we are to
be governed toy, our constitution and
agreement.
On Sunday, 'May 10th, Secretary
Carter and myself attended a meeting
of Hillcrest Local Union on business
in connection with that Local, and in
the course of a short address I gave,
touched upon the Bellevue situation.
On Wednesday, May 13th, a request
to Bellevue on the following Sunday
In order to straighten the matter out,
and had actually written a letter to
Secretary 'Burke informing him of
my intentions, wheu the letter arrived
threatening me with recall. This,-to-
ge^her with the fact that they were
anxious to advertise -the mutter in tho
Ledger, before the question had beeu
taken up in a constitutional manner,
caused me- to tear up the letter t had
just written, and I replied to Secretary
Burke Informing him I would not be
at their meeting, and advising Hellevue Local to put their threat Into effect by putting the machinery of recall
into motion. I knew that if this was
done, Bellevue 'Local would have to
state their charges (which up to the
present they have not done), and I
would have the privilege of replying to
the sa.me; but. at their next meeting,
held on Sunday, May 24th. instead of
carrying .out their threat of recall,
they passed a motion asking the District Executive Board to date my resignation on tho grounds that J had refused to attend their meeting.
I called a board riieeting for the
earliest possible date, Monday.June 1st,
when the question was fully gone into,,
Secretary Burke of Bellevue being
present on behalf of his local, and
the decision of the board was to tbe
effect, that after hearing both sides,
they did not think they would be justified in dating my resignation, and advising me to proceed to Bellevue at
the earliest opportunity, to reply to
the statement I was charged with
having made. While I was satisfied
with any finding the board might arrive at, I 'still claini that I was justified in refusing to go to Bellevue after
the threat that had been made.
I immediately tendered my resignation, to take effect at once, which waa
accepted, (because no other cours© was
open to them, this I made very plain.
My reason for taking this course was
not because I was dissatisfied witli ihe
action of the board, but because I hate
repeatedly stated ln the various Local
Union meetings, that as soon as any
local asked for my resignation, just so
soon would they have an election on
their hands, and no one ever knew me
to retract a statement once made.
I might point out that during Sec-
ARMY HOLD MEMORIAL SERVICE
Pittsburg, Pa., June 8.—-Hemmed In
on every side by pickets, the great
plant of the Westinghouse Electric &
Manufacturing company was closed
■tight today. Thoso of the work'ng
forces 'Who bad not joined tbe Allegheny Congenial Industrial Union in
its fight for better working conditiona
did ao thia morning and only an. occasional workman could be seen.
A On Sunday evening the Salvation
Army held a memorial service over
the victims of the ill-fated Empress of
Ireland. The little army hall was full
of members and friends, with others
who were ln sympathy. Seldom In
history has a shipping or railway disaster wiped out so many adherent of
a religious faith.
There on that princely ship in the
evening twilight stood a group of men
and women animated and enthusiastic
witb the same Ideal, eagerly anticipating 'participation in a monster religious festival, to be held in the metropolis of tbe British Empire.
Alas! a tew hours before dawn they
are plunged beneath the tidal waters
of tbe St. Lawrence, with but a few
remaining to tell the awful tale. The
Imagination reels before the terrible
tragedy.
Our clvilzatlon, with Ita boasted
mastery of the forces of nature, still
pays the penalty with human lives ftfr
Its imperfection, misunderstanding and
egoilum.
Captain McLean, Lieutenant Murray, Bandmaster W. Ratcllffe and
Sandman Pete Ratcllffe were appointed to attend the funeral of their
comrpdes at Lethbridge.
C. N. P. FOOTS ALL LI AGUE
Results of last Saturday's matches;
Fernlo vs. Frank, 0—2.
Hoemer vt, Coleman, 1—8.
Hlllcrest vs. Coal Creek, a—1.
Conbln va. Michel, 1—1.
•Played on ground* of first-named.
■Matches for. this week-end.
Pernie va. Coal Crook, Referee, J.
Wilton.
•Michel vs. Corbin.   Referee Shands.
Frank va, -Hlllcrest.
«osmer vs. Bellevue. Roforoo Caw.
fltNt	
ORANO THIATRI
■efhi.TJ -lO-ix't-uiKin-cr otticb_jt(—r~enne
for mu lo attend a meeting of Btlle-
uve Local and explain why I had n.j.Je
some statements at Hlllcrest or. thn
Sunday parlous, and to whicn ^unobjected, I was not Lold what th«
statement, really was, but, as the men
were now at work in Bellevue, I wroto
stating tbat I could not see that nny
good purpose woilld be served by my
going to Bellevue, espoca'ly as no one
seemed to be very definite aa to what
tbe statement made really was. I acknowledged having sail lots of tilings
at Hlllcrest, .probably being .--. little indiscreet in this "respect, but was willing to take full reapoiuibPIty for anything they might chnrge me with.
On Tuesday, .iMay 19th, I received a
further letter from Secretary Burke.
Informing me that Bellevuve Local
were not satisfied with my explanation, and asking me to attend their
next meeting, falling to do thle, the
recall would be put In motion. Nor
was this all. It so happens ihat two
of three months ago Bellevue Loeui
decided that it was not to their best
interest to have their Union notes appear in the Ledger, but just so soon as
tbey have a little grievance (of absolutely no Importance) with a District
officer, they immediately* decide that
It would *e to their advantage to
have their Union notes .published ln
the -paper.
Now I had decided that I would go
i-n.mT'lJiinirjrnjuiirKrTD "tne. JSXeCU-"
Uve Board, he stated that be understood tho   statement   complained of,
and which was supposed to have beeu
uttered at Hillcrest. was "that I, had
failed to get a meeting   In   Bellevue,
otherwise the men would have been at
work."   I Just want to say that If thiB
ls the statement complained of, that no
such Btntement was cvct made by -rtte
at Hlllcrest, nor was any other statement that conld   convey   the   samo
■meaning; as a matter of fact, there
Was a meeting of Bellevue Local tho
very day I was at Hlllcrest, and which
I could have attended had  I so desired.
Whilst I have tendered my resignation as per promises made, I still claim
that Bellevue Local cannot show any
valid reason for having asked for It.
In conclusion, let' me say I regret
very much what haB happened, as tbo
experience gained during my term of
office was just beginning to prove
useful to myself and the organization
In general.
I take this opportunity of thanking
my brother officers, the District Bxec-
utlve Board, both past and present,
and the membership generally for^he
kindly co-operation and support I have
at all times received.
With best wishes for the success of
»h« organisation, f am.
Fraternally yours,
JOHN' R. SMITH.
-»
ptaMM to roeolrt awbtcripUoaa.        wm ebown tbafln art-toof tbe doll    Thoro aro tome dltputtd questions oti
tleowMt. waa In earnw Mondav. visit* Mttofaetory ttrai, and aaatM««iWM|i«f«*«(i#d **«♦ a fio-H** **** ftv*b 10'"""
Tht managewnent of this thoatro
haa secured tho ^engagement of
Ursus the strong man, Md 4am Clap*
man, tht original English llghMieavy
weight champion wroattor for noxt
Saturday. Thee* two groat attractions
gave exhibitions in tht thoatro on
Wednesday night, and tha management was so ploasod that they felt
joatifled In contracting for a further
engagement. Ursut Is not a fake, bat
tho strongest man tn the world at hit
weight. He performt genuine feats of
streoglh, and tbo andiene* Is Invited to Investigate aod test the per-
apUanella be uses* San Clapham Is
oat of tbo moot edontlflc wrestlers
STRIKE SITUATION ON
VANCOUVER ISLAND
The men are persistently facing every emergency with an unwavering
determination Md realises that the
battle for the recognition of tho U, M.
W. of A. must and shall be event*
ually won. A few of our white com
rades have made shipwreck of their
principles, and have gone to scab a*
gainst the Interests of their fellow
worker, and that of thoir own. Also
tho companies have brought In others
from all parte of the globe, to assist
the white renegades Md the coat batons, to make the fight harder if pos-
ible for tho man remaining loyal. We
havo ovor a thousand of the best men
In Nanaimo alone, wbo are prepared
to go all tho way In the fight, until vie
tory Is assured
The other eatnpc aro as solid as the
day they came out on strike, having
not more than ono or two who have
left their ranks, Thoro have been qulto
a number of men comedown from tlw
Cumberland camp to scab at Nanaimo,
also quite a few out of tb* Crow'*
Nest -Pass. However amid all we are
quite certain (hat we have a good
chanco to win. as much difficulty is
being etperienced by the companies
In getting the operation to count ou
tho right tide of tho snoot. Too may
aeraae tx*t* ■***>•■ •« *tii* **Wr«,-  ■  -
SATTLESHIP NO LONGER OF USE
IN WORLD'S NAVAL WARFARE
London, June 6.—"Many people have
written and are still writing on the
question of whether wo should build
email battleships or large ones, My
opinion Is that wo should not bt build*
Ing either," declares Vice Admiral Sir
Percy Scott, ln a remarkable communication In today's Times, which will
arouse world-wide controversy.
"Submarines and aeroplanes have
entirely revolutionised naval warfare,
Sir Percy Scott says, dreadnaugbta
have gone out ot date, there will bo
occasion for discussion as to bow elsn
the domtonlns can glvo their aid.
THE SCHOOL QUESTION
FERNIE
IN
As there seems to be an impretklon
that we were biased In our report laat
wuek in not uubUsbltiK muuuu paiktd
at meeting of Council previous to last
one, may say that It was not our In-
SSff 2rS». «J..?1 Kffi' »»««i *• l«"*lon lh* «W* <* *•
«2rin^ht   Zm    ™L *2lJE£\w*ry«"«« *»" *• n,*d« t0 «*»»••*•
mannea,   he    sees    naval   warfare I. „ ««„„«„„,« #„,. i.kin* hi** 2s tntn
altogether obanged,
"In war time scouting aeroplanes
will always be high above on the lookout; and submarine* In aa constant
readiness aa aro engines at a flro
station, If the enemy is sighted, the
gong sounds and the loath of the flotilla of submarines will be slipped.
Will any battleship expose herself lo
such a dead certainty of destruction?
No,"
Sir Fwty Scott further says that
battletbiiM oan bo destroyed even in
a closed harbor.   He said:
"With a flotilla of auhmarlnet,
commanded by dashing young offlcors,
of whom wo hsve plenty, I would undertake to gtrt through any boom In
any harbor and sink or materially
damage all tho ships thoro.
"If * ■hattlmtttt* ta    ■»«■» aiti* Mtt-mi-
arrangements for taking block 2* lato
city limits, and that as soon as poo-
Bible the city wilt put by-law up to
tho eloctor*. While everyone roall»M
that tbe school question ii cn# of vital
Interest, nevertheless, the Council may
he ex-momi it they an' loathe to wra-p
the present building In the Annas.
Tbls building ha* a concrete fo«a<l»-
tion, and moit b* worth h-*******
four and five thousand dollars, but
owing to ito else and i»o«ltton thero
mre tt* pm»f>\* wbo eunA «l«#->r*» to
purchase mm* U (* questionable
whether t:M.(Hi mold be M*urvd for
the bollding as it stand*. Hoaover,
thf> matter will be put np to the rate
payers to decide, Md It will be for
them to say whether H Is mor* wo.
nomlcal to delay tbt* «t|wndMurt» of
$30,000, or far* the ovpendltura thia
tag thttW Oroea Utofc
Oar Jvaioft UotttM Club wftorod
defeat at tbt banda of Vtanria Jwlors
m Sondnr, 10 to S. Drat bt doara-
haartadnMFt.
•Mutuary Yenag Ittteaaap oa Sat.
tititot, on torn* im ommtoon, ■ oomo
tbrnmeedn kUe*ee tar taws that.
<Moer wt giro tbo aseathly flvtaroe
et tbt Ooal Croak acbool btjnF laeroaw
leagat ttabat
Saturday, Jut lift,.Ooal Crook ro.
Dodlere team, et rsrnie.
Saturday, Jant St. Ooal Croak m
McBeea'a tense, at Coal Creok.
Saturday, Jnw tt, Ooal Croak n.
MritRfWe t*ntn, at T*nA*
fThe taast m fatawday. vetwa* Dad-
ky% team, win iwsiiii at 7 p. m.
en Saturday troatag.
Or, WortrtNia baa pnrcbaoed tat
Shetland poay r*o*rtlryetm by
Vmoa hi tbt draw which took ftoee
la Hoamer. Tto daeufe boast to
baalagiwl atcbtfy by UU iuvaudo sec-
tin of the eamp,
Tba taorotaa mateb played between
iraasterrtag the atw little mm of MW
trom thoir aot profit oa thia tana to
tht Raeervo FMd. - * Vb* atom to*
Stall eteadily gMklng toadway lap tht
paat Jwraivt asqatha,_d«riaf which
period 0, aot profit of UA*
_mmnb^  *an>a   iy^k jy^g^ * AriMttttMLltttiA^*iA
■Bitdaod tt tit abawboldtro aad wr-
rfed to tht RJboorro f tad, thus patting
tilt atoro oa a much atroogar flMaotal
baaia.   Mr. WflHam DWtanaon. proat*
a, urgod upon tbt sharoboldoro to
• atro aetivelateroet la Itt pro-
eeodtaga, aai reminded thorn that aaxt
yoar tht agrooowat with tha V, M, W.
of A. aad tht tttat owaoro taplrad.
Tberetttr* tt htdtmvoll tb*m to «**
that thatr atoro wm fmt ea tueh a
haste that tt might ovoroome aay
erMawWch at that OaMW-rfght happen
tt trio*.    A rota of tftaaka to tbt
ar aad etait wm baarUty •aa*
■SW»" w^^^tt      etJF       adS^9     ^.^^BIP*t^^.^™PW*^^*^roafc
foiiowiag pMtitawa watt awaits tt
tht oompMy ta rogatd te tho condition
of tbo ehatt, that-.-.tlm pretence of
tbt striate? there wm an obstruction
to travel; I make ao finding of fiat
thero, booMw tba tvidtnet for tht do-
fetM ia Mt to. f havo tbe wrtdrme*
ot- tt .asaa-wae <wrota tht notico, aad
tht tvtdtiwt ot Iht man who *wm with
htm some daya beforo the catastrophe,
that H wm  written,    Evidence baa
-ti-^-i.:- i* *******, bat aot completed, thanfm I make no finding
tf tnd tm that print; bat It aay judg-
meat la oorroet that point la Immaterial, it notice had been given to tbe
company of tht pretence of tbat
Wringer across that chute, Uu.U-.iiu.
■war would be, "Wo aro aot building
tbat ehatt m a amaway. tf tba men
ebooM to go dowa there ihey have to
take tt with Ita faulte." That would
bt w ia what I anight call tha ordinary
ceamt tf mmtn, a fortiori It amllee
to ft user ToHowlag upon m abnormal
.9.9 ».*'.,- 49~.i i,.t,m a-,*..., **•«* ».'** *••«■'1-1,. i. tu- mm i# «.. ..iii mmA k,i. „.ion tho hlah seas or in o harbor, -whatI***'"  .lwt' ,***,**«r *• oonm let it «•
ltoMhMaM<rffha'**tfMM'1iaM« **dl*» »■ "tfaae_lf sro>n_ ^r*ss.**"^««t9_ m^ ^ «^ J^\rfTTd^iS ™. JTia***^?* ■ ^i-ir-rTn**rT*rt M*:i1 '!u   ;;1,:, "   '■'  'li
reqdlre Is an enormous fWt of sub
vaawtot oa tat mumUUH**, *AU«w*.Un4 uu»»tk>ipo4«4 run ol eeat awh as
tt   dfkmAMMM -tntoA Hi JKHtawaMMt jaf H^^aMiIja  aMkdl a la^MMi^Mh-*^! fe^^^
KffnlWbwIRti^ the aut„t0ry rule.
methods of o resiling. Thoro will bo
five roeis of moving pictures, aad tbt
prfee wtll bo IB and Id centa. Matt-
noo prices & aad 11 etata,
OEATH «>r WELL-KNOWN PtRNIC
MAN
A wlro was rooolvod la town last
alght (Friday! stating that & C.
Lyons had died at Victoria, V. I.
The deceased wm mo of tbo best-
known aad moet-reapoctod of Vbrolo
citixens. and bad for aomo ysaro eon.
ducted an insurance and real estate
business In this to* n. Seropohwaly
honest aud upright In dl Un tlmlUxgn,
ho wnn retpetfed aod liked bj all wbo
mat him.
The interateat will take place at,
Victoria on Saturday, Juno ISth. Our
sympa',hk>s aro with too widow In her
bepssvwnent.
lir, HMnnwM, I* i>. ti„ |». t». M„ I Km-
tist; Bank of ffamfltaa l(Mg» opposite
Trttea-Wood Co.  Vancouver Prices.
a... i*9ii miii ilk xke iintiuim tight being
lag put up.
PRB8B COMMITTKK
BOWHART VS. LUND
This action was tried before Justlco Celemeats tn Fernie this wtek
«4 wm brought by R. if. Howhart of
ardoer, agalast Peter Und, lum-
beruM «f uit same place, for 137,000
far tbt caacellatlon of tho license of
tht Wartfner Hotel Tha action arose
ovtr a tatter that the defendanf wm*
marines, warshipa and aeroplanes, and
a few fast cruisers, wovldlag wt om
nnd a place to koop thorn in safety
during war time.
"that tbe importaaco of subtnarinee
bM been roily recognised, neither do
I think it has hewn realised how their
advMt hae revolutionised naval war-
faro. Ia my opinion, as tho mot nr
vehicle has driven the bona from the
fhlldron must n«t be Intal*! with to
serve the selfish motives of municipal i^!ltlMftr,#
THE MOOSE
A welt-attended meeting of w***-
Wra of the I.. O. O. M. wm heM M
Monday intt, and a strong commltteo
formed to arrange tho annual trteate.
which It waa decided should tako
place on the first Monday In August,
to Klko. Tbe member* ara dotermfa-
*d to maki' this afl historic event, aad
roada, so bad submarines driven tbe
fcifrteehrp from the tea."*
the Attorney GNmoral of tbe Province,!   Tbta expression of opinion by Sir every effort will bo made to secant a
Md which WMlted In the Itoimse b*-) Perey Scott has Riven Mao rn a di»-1 rermnittd holiday tor that dav     A
cneatoo n* 10 th« advlMblllty of a labial train wtll b* eee-orod, aid ar
complete rovisloa of tho Mval prtlKcy raagementa mado with the Ktho pae-
of the oasplro, Th* opinion la grow- pie to totertaia tho F-evnMtea. ttot
\ne horo that, in vlow of the differ- this *uu- p«*tf*4 la year km, and looa
mw of opinion between the admit* a dollar a week, t where yen will Rati
ally and tho self-go venting domln-iit on the third I, aad thus secure aaf-
leas tho time is rapidly coming when, limnx fends to have a real holiday—
tk*f* titmbt b* nnotki-r fmpertat can llf only tw mv Ity. Darin* Ui: »utii
ferenco to discos* bow beat the oat** Imet aaoatha «h*> lodge will moot evety
lying aoetloaa of the empire ■nm do f two wnekt, nt the nttia! time and
their dflty to the motherland.   If, a* pla«»?    .V«-st meeting, June 2|nd
(UK (MUooUinI, lkef#nd«nl pieadmi thai
ho acted ia tht iaterest of the pabiie,
and tht Jtdfe upheld him, hot mv«
jodameat for -15,00 damatea for tho
publtcatfea of a copy of th* l*tt*r la
ftestlob to a minister at Wardner.
Ho ordtrtd fdalatlff 10 pay tb# majotr
pertlen of the eonta of tk* trial tt*r-
ehmar and Manio of Pernie appeared
for tht plaintiff, Md A, A. McDoaaM
of Cranbrook for the drfefldant.
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ill
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y
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awtnup
mrnimnomin iii-^MiLVf*-**
*m
-**$*-
^•j^^-f^S^I
."'"■SPSS
lis   ^*« w»
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»^,,'-5.V
r-**i.Tts.*
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- ' .    U,*^"-"    f    >-.■.*"   '*-    •■*--   **i  I t,**,*" «**-*, ^JJ   *'*   1     *-     J*
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PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LBDGE^FERSIE; B. 0., JUNE -y 19J4.%
.-.^fc,
j.'.-o"" ■*•■/,:.
SWX- .
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock In K. P.
Hall.
■Noble Grand, H. E. Barnes.
Secretary, J. B. MoUdejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Alello's Hall second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in their own HaU, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, A. Bunch.
K. of S„ D. J. Black.
M. of F., Jas. Madison.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meets every other Monday
at 8 p. m„ in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, F. II. Newnham.
Secretary, G. Moses.
139 McPherson Avenue.
LOYAL TRUE BLUE ASSOCIATION
Lady Terrace Lodge, No.
224, meets in the K. P. HaJl
second and fourth Friday of
each month at 8 p. m.
MRS. J. BROOKS, W. 61.
W. ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet'
at the K, P. Hall   first and
third Friday evening ot each
I   mQn.tlu.__ ,   ,.,,., Kir . j.,u..ni.*..
.': -AwfiKKurrONJnr. '.tiL. -L'
•   t
I By John A. Cahan
\kkkkkk*k*kkkkkkAkkkk*******W**i*l*i*iW
The Cause Sc the Remedy ;| ^reTs UnW
for the
The false idea so prevalent among
workers that the great Marxian theory ot a centuries' long antagonism
existing ibetween two factions of the
human race, was only the vagary of
an excited mind, (prompts me to this
little lesson of the theory.
ls it not a little strange tbat a working class of this "enlightened age"
should be so blind as to fail to see,
and see clearly, this class strife, which
may appear dormant at times, tout
whose grim form is definitely outlined
in the frequent strikes and periodical
industrial crises which punctuate our
prosperous age?
This whole business ot life and
death, of work and wages, of sorrowing and rejoicing, of Capital vs. Labor, is so clear, so luminous, that I
sometimes 'marvel at workers opposing Socialism—their political movement.
The Socialist party, through its agitators, its platform and press, Is endeavoring to make the workers con-
selous of their class and the class
struggle that has -existed for thousands of years, the Tragedy ot Ages.
In this class strife the workers of
slave class have furnished all the
servitude, humility, blood, tears, mangled 'bodies and despair, and yet even
now the habit of being meek is dominant In them as a cIsbs, even tliough
their meek attitude may mean 'hardship for their loved ones. """"
Socialists do not believe -that slavery and Its necessary poverty Is the
will ot God, and they also (hold that
"When the workers are thoroughly
convinced that there is but one way
to gain industrial freedom, >they will
take that course.
■Few of the working class are so
deaf as to fail to hear tbe cries of
misery, the sobs of injustice, the piteous iwail of children for bread (in a
nation that iboaets its wealth) but the
great (majority Tefused by their inaction to aid themselves and their unfortunate brothers and sisters in
chains. Instead they forge the chains
still -faster tby voting for a continuation of capitalistic rule.
'Now, between the slave classes of
KING'S  HOTEL
why does he share sorrows and joys,
tears and laughter, work and-strikes
with his class, and when the time1
arrives when.he can really aid thom
(election day), why does he vote for
the natural enemy of his class; Jihe
capitalist .party?
This capitalist party has three divisions, each of the three 'being rlabeled
with very inappropriate and misleading names, but workers should
not 'be deceived into believing that the
so-called Democratic, Republican and
Progressive parties (which each one
is decidedly not), are opposed to one
another. Capital owns them all and
■merely uses thean to divide you, the
workers, so that in fighting one another you will forget, or rather, not
recognize, that the capitalists are the
real enemies you should oppose. The
antagonistic attitude of these several
parties toward one another has <been
best -illustrated in thoir recent fusions
at Milwaukee and Schnectady, where
they had to come under one tent to
(beat the Socialists. Just why this
very deslraible object was striven for
is obvious.
There are some workers, multitudes
ot them, who believe that their and
capital's interests are Identical. In
fact, an organization hasv appeared
which, to me seems to be just what
this 'brand ot brainless, spineless
.workers want.' It is the Civic Fed-
eration, whose ibeing is dedicated to
the lofty ideal that the interests of
the masters and the slaves must be
the same. Now, it would 'be nice and
peaceful to believe this grand palavering If the workers got their share of
tbe 'product of this sanctified partner-,
ship, (but for every dollar a worker
■produces he receives as bis part about
one-fifth of It. "    "
larger iportlon,
-penses, and contribue the 'brains, and
constitute the "senior" branch of this
lovely, harmonious, convivial onion
of lambs—and wolves.
• Your faith 4n your masters Is pathetic, to aay the least. The capitalists
Ue and say they are with you to build
up society and glorify the   Stars and
*    v---
1
and fearing sucking balies from their
mothers' breasts.
And- now, before I. say too much
and get toto trouble,-, I will illustrate
as clearly as I can the opposite aims
ot capital, and tlieir greed and labor,
the chained slave, and the remedy for
the latter.
•Closing the hand' and then raising
the thumb as far as .possible, remembering that the th-mmib represents the
cost of living; an~d then bending the
little finger as low as possible, the little Singer representing swages, you
have the alnTand amtoition of capital
Now, of course, tbe wide gulf noted
in the first Illustration is not con
duclve to a better life ior the workers. They want to, eat plentifully,
sleep sufficiently, and educate their
young, so they strive (by uniting in
trade unions to get what illustration
No. 2 depicts, and that is endeavor-
ing to make the thumb, cost of living,
and the little finger, wages, meet. As
your wives say, "making the ends
meet." The do not join, bu: In sucb
degrees as labor lessens that gulf, capital loses. Prices lower and wages
raise.   Hence the class struggle.
.This clash ot classes ls the natural
result of en unnatural, unsocial, inhuman system of society. It must
cease. The progress of true civilization ls retarded by it!
In view of the above apparent facts,
and knowing that tho cold steel ot
the Pennsylvania Cossacks is not a bit
less fatal than the Hot lead ot the
'Massachusetts militia; and realising,
too, tbat the cry for bread of strikers'
children ls often drowned'by the thunder ot -machine guns In the hands ot
militiamen,    who'    are    intrenched
snuggly 'behind capital and tradition,
n^ k«o.«» +oira i*,,! forming a citldel of military despot-
The bosses take tiie ,Bm afld undformed .scabblsm, we So-
smce   tnej    pay ex- cjan8tB propose to advance our views
and theories to result ln the ultimate
inevitable elimination of the capitalist -party and capitalism, (blending the
names Republican,   Democratic, and happenings ot the .past will not he re-
Progressive into one grand, working peated,
Bar supplied with the best Wines,
Liquors and Cigars
DINING ROOM  IN CONNECTION
ijthercawVTrad the wage slave ctosstlfjitrtoM- -Glance *ack?»pl ,.«^ y«ac~or
©Modayr thOTfflOBt salient feature ol
difference Ib this: The slaves of ancient timeo and tbe serfs of medieval
days iwere (powerless to free -themselves, since the former class of chattels had no suffrage and the latter
class ot serfs had little or none.
"Divinely appointed" kings did.pretty
nearly all the voting that was to bo
done; -but with the wage slave class
of today however , America, the
mighty machine and power of political democracy has -been won and you
refuse to use It to liberate your class.
Remember that airy party thai rep-
W. MILLS,
Ptijj
(Mshsstfns is sas
f a, •£***£
0a0^o    -^..^W-W    owtt - na^PS^^
yon Is ooU water
ml a lal braid.
AlsbasdM  waOs
Bisks tke homo
lighter, asore
cheerful and
, beautiful (twill
not soften oathe
f wall like Isabo-
mine. Because
It is a cement It
willhardrawfahi
ags, become
part of the well
*t<tMlf,andlasL
for many
years.
.In January of the present-yw. -of
grace, 1&14, Tyhen -the sun was "said
to *have seton. Labor's Day'and plutocracy had announced' its supremacy,
there arose a. new light"and certain
handwritings on the national"wall,are
clearly discernible, writes & Hunter,
in the iMoartland. Worker, "at Wellington, New Zealand, Just at the,close
of the national industrial conflict the
men of the rural district throughout
New Zealand deemed the -time more
■than ripe to form a union. So the
Wellington Rural_Workersr Industrial
Union matrialized, along witb others
on the sister islands The shearers,
who are a significant {branch of-the
agricultral and pastoral - iriduafcry,-
assisted to lay the (basis of the now
unions, and M. Laracy was subsequently appointed secertary pro tem,
ot the Wellington one. ,
An attempt was made to register
the brand new union uhder the Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act, 'but registration was delayed; the
Labor Department- wished the name
to be the Walrrarapa Farm and Station Hands, and the,members of the
union were desirous of obtaining tbe
title of Wellington Industrial Distriot
tor obvlouB reasons.
This was the question when I waa
appointed orgaalzing-seoretary.
The deadlock was rather interesting, for havo not the -Huntley and
Wellington and other. "Unions been
registered ln remarkably short time?
Atter several Interviews with the department and' correspondence and
guaranteeing to march fifteen life-sized
men into the department's aMlce, the
final registration .was effected, and
now the rural workers are Incorporated in the -Wellington Farm and Station Hands Industrial Union ot Workers, other than Shearers, and aTe organizing by Act ot Parliament.
The Labor Department no doubt is
nOw anxious to rise above the die-
credit that the registration ot (bogus
unions brought upon it, and from our
Ixperience, I should Bay that a neiw
leaf -has (been turned over   and   tho
rural,cocoan^t,"'4a .that;.the-"apeclals"
have ibeentaugw; soihotblng^of reworking' .class comradeship. '-. So -fellow
-workers, J -bid^you look up^-forj Ibe?
■hold 1 the sun, t^ ihlnihg'o-R bw'causfe.*
■There .are "sev-OTaT-'dleUn-ct'l types „of
the.proletariat I.hav&*met in -the (prosperous wilderness,:: ^e'ro^e iwho ihais
been tbinking'«nd" waiting- for years
for a union -to,t-oome^""H6 'joinl'-'witli
zest and determination, that resolute,
ness (born of' olass consciousness-,
brought about through the -pipcess of
living the class-struggle, growing to
note the psychological* results-of evolution and gather an .understanding of
sociology,and blolo-^y.^ Hoia.'a,dlng-
dong;going concern.   ".* ..A.*'-'y*\
.Another .type-'fethe* ibl-pke w*h<r*H».y$
ihe 'Vwill wait and see'liow the-union
gets on; then' I'll jodn if it's aTauc-
cess."' He is the *post-.path©tt« (product
of our age. •     '--'-"A ?.   'A'
Withal, I am convinced that .the
Wellington JFTarm and. Station .Hands'
Industrial Union- of -Workers jwjir-eee
interesting times, and' will accomplish
great things aad take an„ accredited
■place"4n the .advanced line of working
class activity lor our historic mission
to free ourselves, traditions notwithstanding.
Here's to our day and destiny, Comrades.
4.Q8EP-H;
3ii c K 8-
^ '^'.vj^rjriateif; antf?$iU'*$lt6r.
HACLBOQ^, ^%; Bo* 7. >'•. AKBERTA.,
yisi'te; BeBeyuey^nr-.th^lith;1 of' JBa^fi-
*'   ■"  '--:-.'.'■•'•-*-WOTXtil,'   ,~,-i_,_   --     f ,.:
>-•• - i
-
A. &x
JOSEPH'   HICKS
- ■ .. Advbkat
v .•'„," £ ' Verejny Notar
MACLEOD', ' Box 7
ALBERTA:
NaoUyujeBellevne na 14*kaMy meaac
:*£
JOHN. BARBER,  DENTIST
Office: .Above Bleasdell's Drug Store'
-..";-;<  \ Phone 121 .^   >•'■- .v;
„ Residence:. 21 Victoria Avenue '-,
FERNIE
B. C-
•The workers get a living-wage. With
the aid of machinery, they produce
-much more than a living wage will allow them to consume. The master
class consume much and-yet there
is a surplus which piles up unsold.
This unsold surplus causes, mills to
shut down, (workers to be thrown out
of work, and hard times generally. Aa
machinery becomes more automatic,
the greater ia the unsold surplus.
There ls.no remedy under the present
system.- 7       ..    ,       •
ALEXANDER MACNEIL
Ban-liter, 8o!lcitor, Notary, etc
-Offices:. Eckstein Building^
1 Fernie, B.C.    °
'*
P.
c*
•* *   '        '   tl'
Laws                Alex. 1.
Fisher
LAWE * FISHER
ATTORNEYS
.  Fernie, B. Cv
resents tihe interests of capital la opposed to a /worker's interests, which
are chiefly, higher wages, fewer hours,
good sanitary shops, decent food,
clothing and shelter at reasonable
prices. Therefore to vote for tho old
parties ts to Indorse the system that
robs you ot the greater portion of
your product, thus keeping your loved
ones ln degradation, want and Ignorance,
Why does a worker arise In tho
early morning with the working class;
respond to the factory whistle -witta
the working class; eat with the working class; meet with the .workin*
class; laugh with the working class;
marry into the working class; roar a
family of the working class; in short.
two aad witness some of this upbuilding of society. In Lawrence,
'Mass., men, women and children were
cluttbed, shot and bayonetted by the
State militia; those hired assassins
awaiting the master's summons to
come aad kill. These strikers "got
theirs" -for "rioting." Imagine the
awful industrial conditions that force
a body of workers to riot. The Lawrence textile strikers made woolen
garments all year around and yet
■many of the child laborers were found
to bojwdtbout underclothing in the
Tdond-or_wint0r. Iu FSuh™oSs*jji*a"S8av*h'
the same atrocities wero inflicted-upon
the car strikers. In West Virginia,
the Siberia of America, the coal
miners, after bolng evicted trom their
hovel homes, lived through the cold
winter in tents, suffering indescribable hardships in ordor to win their
strike, mho Identity ot Interests between capital and labor once more
made Itself most beautifully manifest
when tbe "senior -partner*" of tbe
firm of "Coal Barons ond Coal Minora"
called upon their trusties, the State
militia, who responded with alacrity,
thus showing their loyalty to their
mastero-end their, treachery to their
class movement, the Socialist iparty
of the world.
Ours Is a republican party because
in government vi&tprofess republicanism; ours is .democratic party, because we are Social Democrats and
there can be no other kind; and our
Is a progressive party because .we are
with and not against ihe forces of
evolution, which is the onward tide
of civilisation.
If you will kindly look carefully at
the third Illustration you wlH see bow
simply the class struggle can be eliminated, thus freeing mankind.
We have seen capital slain.. We
havo viewed tbe vain attempts of -labor to "make the ends meet," while
UV        iuiwvtv »iu||€»« -t-wvSwns-
closed so now, by removing these
three obstacles, representing profit,
rent ond Interest, the other two easHy
join, creating plenty, harmony and
Joy.
Since capital ahd labor cannot remain together in peace, justlco or
hope, ono must go, and certainly labor must remain. Honco exit capital,
8tate mllltla, -poverty, ignorance, war
and oppression, and lifting onr tirde
eyes and toll stained hands toward the
sunlight, breath of hope, sweeping Its
exhilarating seiphyrs from the heights
of Justice, and as a proletariat, united,
Joyous,  liberated,  triumphant, enter
Just here, I mould -mention, knowing
the industrial mind of "God's 6wn,"
that there are a large number of rep-
re^ntatlves^&'worklag. dau^ugbU;
wtolwM.deride out^topoaoW&^Wi \
stance, the militant Red Fed. -may say '
that essaying to organise the country
wealth producers with tho Arbitration
Act in one band agd industrial unionism In the other is like going to tbo
new land to lay the 'basis ot ■Christian
brotherhood with ' the-Bible tn ono
band and a gun ln the other. I hope to
meet those particular pluggers, ond I
trust that all such will make themselves knowfa to me, iox various reasons, in the various district. It have
a message for ouch whioh I am heart-
»y mnrinn* It* riAHvor.
■* *,T.t-»*;',>a*li -tiYl'.-t*-''
"\\-^m^4^:\
WITH A BOX OF
.*-;■    " I-      .^OUR CIGARS,
la your grip'the longest railway.
trip'. wil. lose its ~ tediousneea
Tor-there' is a soothing quality
about .our cigars that banishes ■■
care and makes life pleasant
even on, a long railroad trip.
They are'Just ao comforting at
borne. Try a,tew snd then come
tor'tho wt, -which we know you
will want- thereafter. -  -
W, A. INGRAM, Fernie, B.C.
OUR COFFEE 18 GOOD
SAV-.,
^Br^^^l**********-...
r<s4„ a,-.f
Vs.*!!
BUILDER St CONTRACTOR
olass. They tore down tents In the]your Co-operative Commonwealth,
velvety blackness of midnight, best- your world for -workers, tno 8oetallst
Ing  the   -men, striking  the children republic—Ttie American Flint
Mi4^iHi¥¥¥¥¥»¥MVM¥¥0¥¥¥¥»»¥M¥»»M
TKE RIGHT TO LABOR
By Horace Orseley ,,
lon*n*n*k*nirk*n**********irkn+*nn+*>t++4+'i
Wtamm
An Alabattine wall cm   *.
be re-coated without rsmov-
ini the eld coat,    Alabattine
wsUttrathor^Nttanluty, They ,
art hygenk-No inMct er dl**** |
A ttm «»«v Ih * l a «n AUbtf-tu* w»U.
.bbattlne one room, and yooll
want li.am all AUbwdntd.
Church's Cold Water
1W(« toil let estlww yea t»e«'
i its! samples of Abhatthio wort
J       FREE STENCILS
(Mk iPj^   MM   mam|  ^^u^* *^b  i^^ft ^mMUUIm^b
t^bt^^wi^*^K^oe^w SP^wwwwgw ^w^^di^e^N^^oy  eoo^eN
l  WMiaiMiyoooaaoe*
n*e oieabam
"In the beginning Ood
heaven and the earth."
air, the waters, the sunshine, with
their natural products, were divinely
Intendod ami appointed for the use
and sustenanre of man ((Jen I, 2-$-?s>>
—not for a part only, tout for the
whole human family
created the (claimed   and exercised   tbe right of
The earth.(divesting, not themselves merely, but
the majority of all futuro generations,
of their original and Inherent rights
to possess nnd cultivate any unimproved portion of tho soil of our
State, for their sustenance and bene-
this assumption   of
 , ,. fit.    To render
Civilised soolety. as It exists tn our \vow-n »»U<1 to JkgfMiM iMitti
day, has diverted the larger portion [»*<*j» *«» ?2K!fc5* i*!?^
of mankind of the unlropended, nn-\xMJ^ " ^"KfJ^^S^K
purchased enjoyment of their natural «ood of the whole wat promoted by
rights. That the larger portion may be *wn eierciso.
j perishing with fold, yet ha** no l«--.    "Is    ibis    rationally    dtmonstoblc       _
I sally recognised right  to   a stick of! now?  Can tbo widow whose children j our public provision
soil of the Union has become the
.property of a minor part of the people of the Union,
"The past cannot be recalled. What
has been rightfully (howovor mistakenly) done by the authorised agents
of the State or Nation oan only bo
retracted upon tho argent public necessity, and upon duo satisfaction to
all whose private rights aro thereby
Invaded. Out those who have boen
dlvosted of an Important, a rltal natural right, aro also entitled to compensation, lite right to labor, secured to tbem in tho creation of the
earth, taken away In tbe granting of
the soil to a minor portion of thorn,
must be restored. Ubor, essential
to alt. Is the Inexorable condition of
the honest. Independent subsistence
ot tho poor. It must bo fully guaranteed to all, so that oach may know
thst ho can never starve or be forced
to b«sg while ablo aud willing lo work.
for   pauperism
;M«H*<«> HlH    tlKl       4U       ill*       HM**    liU.it.'    -J:.**,   it'.***   •,-".'--1-J
; Wilt-mi morass, or may b« famt»ii- ablo garret, on
■Squatocracy.no doubt wtll hail the
union with no small .degree of pleasure and satisfaction, since they iwere
remarkably able advocates of arbitra-.
tion unions during tho recent national
strike.
Tbe squatters' agitation snd propaganda has been to a largo degree responsible and successful in producing
the rural workers' union.
Ono of tho slogans of tho employers is to call for "sane unionism." Ono
of our objects Is: To offoct a proper
understanding botwoon employer and
employe. And with such surely oar
unionism should commend Itself to
the most exacting.
Tho present situation of rural (workers Is certainly serious. Tho farmers
havo long since organised themselves
Into ono Industrial union, and are a
power In the land today.
With the nrtde swoon of Maoriland's
hills and plains and the huge acreage
of farms and stations the workors aro
scattered in their strength. Untold
wealth Is produced by ths tollers.
Farming produce finds a ready market, prices ran up, prosperity flourishes like the green bay tree tho quiet
waters by, and the wealth producers'
lot becomes the moro intensified and
the squatters' motors multiply.
Thoso who robbed *4nay read;  the
workers are scattered and the squat-!
tors ore organised, j
The organised farmers are conserving their own Interests, while the
workers nre absolutely unprotected,
Isolated and threatened with overgrowing crave dangers.
The recent expoiures of the despotic H
importation of bor labor bv Rod)
Mcltae. who met tot boys, talked to \
them, and published the truth In tho j
Maoriland Workers lo the Issue of:
February 7. and tho unfolding of "tho.
arbrmti" cautwl great eommotlon'
throughout  both  Islands.  It   Is do-5
r»'iri»ft tn V « --tnt-i-tln -movo nt) bi»bs.tf'
GIDDINGS
Plans aad Specification* Furnished For
All Kindt of Work
Phone 123
Fernie, B. C.
C. E. LYONS
Insurance, Real Estate
* a
and Loans
Money to Loan on first class Business and Residential property
svii..   fc'.C'.k. *»itif    :_ i,us a Iwltlbj; A-Lil  'Klttvhld S'iUU ,   , „ ., _     _    ^ _,      .„„
the 15 or go cents, tuto for this.    Society oierdses no!*' "", »l««atiers. The gsme of getting
-     - "■ boys" quietly Ingrafted   Into
t'nir, yet have no legal right to pbK'ti which is all she eon *arn by unriv patornai guardianship 'over the poor j}1"™       -       .      .      -     ....,„
-■■"-   '*"" »an umil he toss sur«.nd»r»Ml »o>«-t!»»   W   rates   snd. thus qltlmatolf
and eat the bitterest acron in   theimiomt loll, bo «ad» m i«*iUti Uui
depths of the remotest wilderoe***. she and her babies are benefited by-
!Tb«- defeasance cr confiscation of or In conse-qiienee of the granting to
J man's natural Hght H It** nny por- a part an exclusive right to uao the
tion ol the earth's surface not actually;earth and enjoy Its fruits?   C«n tho
» tw by another   i*   in   imiHinan'.!i»oor man who, day after day, pai-os
Asxri to k* k«»p« In view ln tm eon-ithe etreols of a city in search of any
; sMkratlon of the duty of th* affluent employment nt any Price (as woo-
send romfortable to the j»oor and tin-;sands **» nt»w doing here) be made
iornuiattr i<ir> realise It on his ttart*   Are (hers
{ "H in not e»f«<iitlal In this plare' not thosssnd. on thoitfinds-natlm
Uo itoiomltic that the divestment of of onr ««e, sho n.»v«r wlirolly vto-
Al,* Ur**r nnmh*r ot any reeoantn-d ■ Isted her taw ■—who er* today far
irlrhl to   the   soil and   Its produetn. i worso off th»« tto«-> would hnvo boon
spair. lis may spend a wholo yeor f«"»*Jhc r>fe"*5 ^w Hi? "L1^
iod hia llttlo allto. vainly seeking <»tod. snd will be stisngkjl now h^
employment, and   all   this time so-1'?" »>>• workers are strangled.  Then
clety doo| nothing, etros nothing for
him; but when his last dollar Is ex-
hausad snd hts capaolties very probably prostrated by tho Intoslesting
difoughia to which ho Is drive* to
•scape the horrors of reflection, then
ho heroines s subject of public char*
ehanal
lend and tbe whole outfll of tho ma-
of (housoiids. when s "tow "doT-!**»"»*» of the law will bo behind up.
bare by the putrhased permission td jlf nntoiws role of alio*lag no mn toll,re' worth of foresight tad   IM    Jj» **""  !« SSLJrtid\h*hiJE2
uillm  *«» or  »** »ol  |»'.Uk  *ad;*J^r(>f»*Ht»  '«  t*-™»\t e»f  more et^ mi^t h»v* i*rt*e*r»rt klm trom\v0™** *t*r ,t0 tB^»tP,V°**M?><l!B'
Ity and  Is often  maintained ts Idle- • *^ *«*} ..w«r*»™' l?.«*?» *»
ness for th* re«* of   his daya st s
<>ost
the aceomtnodstlen I havo seen Is • i
reritablo disgrwe to civlMsatfoh of \
nny brand sad certainly unworthy off
homsn habttatioa. and tht tucker that]
Is left for ths falthfsl toller after I
sending tho best away to Bill Wasssy's <
foreign land* demands attention,  tint
T. W. DAVIES
Funeral  Director
and    Imbalmer
Headstones Supplied and 8et up
00LEMAN    ttemtmt^^mm    ALMRTA
r*r*ntnrf
Ml who refteet mntt rei^ithe earth than he ran csUlvste nod!
log M •
iialnly *«ituJ« l^at »»») of tlw «a»U;improve  b^ k**n ?^!P**4jg.Z:' t»*«en%
lot land bybmdre&tjt square ratifojsycterf Kyt*"**rlmJ«*r* W^S! 1 *'!? Mm.
hi* fato snd   ta   s
ws**fotB'«e
to Ibi* o7tharTavorUe* of"the newer's'dmlt td bm one answer.    And ooe     •9Tmt t*|,e rtiii„ t0 tsbor—that ta, to.tlllBfc.Bf, nvnr■-„,,__.     ,
^■SStSA-^Si^^jS^^
J, D. QUAIL
pmHIwi of itdst   Tbo gsyohoiogy tt tho strlko Is ta-
for   hts   whole' torssUng.   ! would   tike   to add that
(sono of tho "specials" who wero wdw
I led to Woiltagtes have ateeo boss
havo beon
whonof I
itos« to •» oWkwnx * inmet «i«^lKkmitaW^*.rt Ui "*
ihttlt't* *he future ee««iMnts and eol- MCMse or tne wssiw «nm*r m ««.(hl ^,P ^w enmom.    t. tor •ao-.IJX Jl^oJil^ttSSmA^mM
^r^VViUM nnlmtttm ******* f***^   ™„JZ!Z J^>to wv>w man, wonwn and em m*tfb?&£J2t JSL'^ig A
the granting power. Unfile* it  hero, ,«rwit iwista ta »wtas ss ettootitn sow j Mm,,,^! tn4 a >sst fMgMPMM(|f& ** *■*• *m eanm ton oo§ wm
M.rri.sn.   Points  aad  HMMiftawvr. »»*< 0« $mtlMti JJw ■•■^«,*L!L ?**..?■ JTSL Ss »* '■g-Sltor   sn   ttm to ttm*  « J,*5»I   | «.* thM tho
Cleaning UtentUt wwpte^hy   the  myr*m  nmm.tr.tbet bo tbmtm. whita «J»Jw«J** not. ss th« wo«M mm****** jSSSSx^Ssttsr is la msnj
1      ".    ,.,t.., ,•».„ ni,nit,  tn   -a   TKtrrrr td   itw   tawoMMM   ****   me*e   SHS'wwrt v  ,„r *)„, fn ^ aatm w«* ftJ*.""•r^,  «'*,,,"l»'   •» •*   t,,"*,
rB 11^ taw  of  nstwo. oteif  femm\teotemt^eemmMt^tMdt .Wwfct ^^j fa + oemtMne ftnfc^taSS--,-*^^^w^
,pf lie atate of Htm ten* had toad ^«£2^JS^iJm? JS7 *»!  Aartl^a ^ ««««WSW    ?* f^m*'
onco. WNfelh   -wr.hm oar  atate,  of (k# (^  «|   «« MM   llaa MMi
taitta   mm  •!  aalawFaved   iaad^ ^HStaaa   wZtSTlbm *
wbttb thiawaars were o»ta. to tas- STSy >Sl    r£?%&*
ptwto nd dtoaaso of, oa aisMet emfi [nj^jin ^ nteottb, Oni wet
aawtieex to mental nnrtkm. fa la thai NA tho xmmamorn of tltlo deeds ostat itonaa .*>»»?,. *r<'^!L"!J1!^. ** *"*t, weoh to wos* aaieM
"*m ** ^*m™^e*Z*i« where onfrTTthe pafrtMSM fMa-iaai M***** fm'torn » Ig. fcw.g *|!* aaata«rii»
bat  to ah.|#Blfi ta/t
FRESH FRUIT
Should form a large part of every perton*t diet
now that the hot weather hat armed. Don't
forget that we ai usual are always here with
fresh Fruits and Vegetable* as soon as they are
■SS99HHHWH
if we f«wit>aro the eoeaoartc
sttkwi of th* stave and tho
worker «be thinks he Is Rot a
wt do not find mat* *«€*•»*•,
mh.   V.v >.Ui*- •«*-* * detf<*n*«B« md'tltfniot
"ihom ta
o-!(sktaM forfeited by ertsset a »orf««i
right to bo here, aad  to Ms
„,i share of   the   soil, tho
mmi*.   ttm
srsd and loyaltr to tho!
t,tvr*'t*r t.t *rt>l*4\'
'£££: n?2SiSZ!-am^im^-^«iims*»!S'SS.iSVSU
. wt*,!^ tbo way, has
jsfaod «ho waihonr mataal peatoettaa
sal wsirsrs rsaho~ths aalaa '"taM
^^*9 Md^^A %__m ___^_a -k^^h ta^h^M^^ mtm^t -^i^a Aito^uta
ww.wen ww raw wvt *mt^v mm odf nw
pntaaittas throogh tbo w/ltn, nwM|a
1^4 of tb* ottte mom at Ms f«*t
'tuiif mid itt ot^tnitt toot .itaWar aftat
iwap^^w»*    S.^B PS all
uu
I*
«     t
*«*«M(M»**
A. I. BLAIS, Quality Grocer
Frank, Alt*.: tSSJ. Bellevue, Alt*. |
mmm
•sh  to****  enett temeeem* m\-ytmmtt   ta aa aaa 4aaMai la jjtrr
ta oafi aff* TwJtaSwSTdSS3XfwWNUiHrtgM WSee* m n riastalsorhed M*ewg!,«-'L^.-.^iiMiaflaft ta
^T._     t_            ..-^.-.l,     -mi^99.9t.999.    »99    9*.   ,   .. t^ttlJ      '1 M    1 %M    llla**'*'!*. 5 taWttSW1     »•      «1^ ■■»»      «*      W»WT»      IV*
iHkiVj
afMT he sets eaaach *********
immI u» ;Lt Latjti-isu a" nit ttwsww
fhostare tiiei at tho tawes* potato!
,et«*|X
m--taa-9*watk
Wl"ia0*'im
Kadtaar
, .. J^y/Femood eat wM#»itatf&arawMg. ataa ta aar taat aad*
. this aamaatt bt »•  ontfnat P«v 1*0*0*1 ***** «w_»*^«. ,^»
aver; today but^^«f workers ^i^J^J"*'^ » *S . Ji fi^i
at tht attasJ aata* ef s-tarmttaa   Jtaw wed laa etemxmm mo nom. nm m
mmFbm** mmmm mettbo erne. J*Jm£.t?*9m
et tw i*«tthy, t*Lp**£»Q* imeiwo
tag. to   4a   s%    IWJIIMM ^^ hta Nad to ItaM
■'•ilk.   80 tbo "aaeclair
foaai la aesaatatSaa,'
V-
i&Mt
.'.aiwtt
tut?   tmte,
ttokm el tt* g»s*t !••«• mu«it \ne\i*
*** **,"^*JST -MaluHs^r"^* —
^j^flpwsrssTsH^ .a. ifinifiiiif^i1
SMMC
aaghtr etmeotttd oa arrtvlag la W*
to ftad that ha had to tafca a
have gwaa
ta tor** tbe m««ra that Hal aai aria
M fti,-m '.l rk.) fftnprnj fJtfr,   Sfow.
paay *f thee* 'naotale" who -wool
bTQkm wpmi    tb* nbmt lfc€/ fl.n.t
talimi ftHiini a 11^   f
W  swewpii   *»wwif If attWOOHOlm
Wm erafiaattaa taaitai aMklatta
Stephen T. Humble
Furniture, Hardware, Chin*,
Stationery, etc.
OLD COUKTRT FOtIODICAI.9
BBLLBVUB
^HyHtMsrui
$,$*$ .s*^
■ v*. •
mm?£»AAJf
"&Z
.•i^rSHK
SW5
-*****        .**      " '-'    L     .'•      '       " '   .       '"'. ■*"*■■   Z'-**     *     ,
uH-Mgags
,\ '""m*^-" "*.-.
■■&S&-
■-&
:THB DISTRIC^:|JBDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JUNE V1914.
PAG& THREE
tiuft^ l8,U;MwW. A
*   .s*>"ax i\i&m  ..-' -r x   *. *'. ---.    ■    - "       ..V * - v ,ni ,* .*.       ■*'     *     ^
%
1 \"V*»
Ll1      -*'
*, GLADSTONE LOCAL '
•~L r-..-: '.'.r -- - $0' 2?1*' j' ;\ *. %/■
v .;^eeVsttrat;;andvfhlrd Fridays,
;;^Ml"nQr-s',HaUi'*Periilei seqond ancl
-": foj/rth^Erijiays*! £CIubvH*Ui- -Coal'
"- pi*«efc'-SIclcBeii'ef*|t attached—T,
•) 'VpfilU.^^PerntV.-BJC.-;; ■ 'A-
''  --•   ■■~t ■■■::   '   "--• -:- "-''-•-'■ •<•   "
*    .   •• t "—r——i".' _ ■ ^—-—-l' :.,.••— r~
hosmerIlocai^   ->'-.
-   ,   ;.. „.-* No. 2497 ;. :\   -"'■
,-.;-'-M:eet every Sunday-at 2,30 InK,
;.p.'sHan,,Maln' Stwet.-;-Siok Bene,,
.."fit Society attaptied.-^tW. Balder-.1
". "s'ton'j.'lSec.; Bp.K'63, Hosmer.'-B. C,"
'-,"'■*'"'    MICHEL,L-QCAlL ''''■ ^
'/,   y ■ '- V; No. 2334
, Meet every'-Sunday; afternoon
at- 2 o'clock in Crahaa's Hall.
gick' Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer, Sec.      -   -
V?      PARK LOCAL
--      ;." \.     No. 1387
Meet every Sunday. Sick arid
Accident Benefit Society attached.-—Michael Warren, Sec, Can-
more, Alta. -   <
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058 .#
' . Meet second and fourth Sunday
in month. Sick and Benefit Society attached.—J. Gorton, Sec '
CARBONDALE LOCAL
.      ..        No.'2227^ .
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 • p.m. in the' Opera' .House,
Coleman,—J, Mitchell, Sec, Box
106, Coleman.       '*,
BANKHEAD LOCAL -.
No. 29 * -
^Meet every.Tuesday evening at
7 o'olock tn the Bankhead Hall,
Sick and Accident Benefit,Fund
attached,—Frank Wheatley, Ftn.
-Sec,, Bankhead, Alta.
-   COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet every Friday evening at
7.30 ln Miners' Hall. Sick, and
Accident' Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barringham, Sec, Box
112. CoalhursfP. O.
I
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
/  - No. 481--^
• Meet every first and'thlrd Sun.
tit^y"at X>yrio Ball, t p.m.—John
.--Loughran, See,'':
COLEMAN LOCAL     '
ft        7x   'No. 2633. . y,,
Meet every alternate Sunday at-
2.30 Vm^'ln' the %Opera" House,.
Cdleman.-
Johnstone,- Sec
."■..-   PASSBURG LOCAL ,. .;
-." •?•*-}: No, 2352 \<" -~'~A' ' "
'-Meet' every-second'and fourth-'.--
Sunday, ot: each'moijth at 2 p.m.
liX Slovak Hall.' Sick Benefit So-* ,'
clety attached.—Thoa. G.. Harries,,
Sec, Passburg, Altai .i '      ■  c   X.
t *'       •  - i  ..     .
BURMIS-LOCAL-,--:" .
X'--- Noi* 949 "'
J4eet every second and'fourth
Sunday of each month at 10 aim..
in-School Hou"se,?Burmis. No Sick
Society.—Thos. \at"-Parries, gec..:
Passburg, Alta.'-      -Sy    »
MAPLE LEAF-LOCAL
-. No., 2829.- • ,
Meet'everyfirst and third Sunday of .-each month at 10 a,m. in
Union HMi; Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg.vAlta.
.'.LETHBRIDGE LOCAL  '
No. 574
v M«et every Wednesday Evening
at 7.30 in Miners' HaU, 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec-Treas.
BELLEVUE,LOCAL
No; 431'i^/       •
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
ln the Socialist Hall. — James
Burke, Sec, Box 36, Bellovue,
Alta. * ■.-',-
CORBIN LOCAL
.   '    "'      No. 2877 V
Meet eyery second Sunday at 2
o'clock In the Club HaU. Sick
Benefit' Society attached,—Geo.
Kims, Sec, C-jrbin. B. C.
\ GEORGETOWN LOCAL
. ,"   ',-;.        NoiT 3026
.   Meet every-Sunday .afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding "House.    Sick
and  Accident  Fund attached.—
,Max Hutter,* Sec. jy<..
FRANK LOCAL  *
:    .-. *,  N0.-1283
.   Meet Sundays, atter each pay
day; at 'Mtyerp. Hall.   Sick and
(Benefit: Society   attached.—E
. Morgan, Sectetwx* ?-■'*
¥¥■«¥¥ W yi(ll>v»l(»Y»»»¥VH»»il»>IY*l'
TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTttTTTTTJ
BY PAUL LAFARGUE *
Translated by Richard Perrin   II. +
- it
irktjk-wikkkkkkkkkkk'knkkkkk'kk'k kirktikAickkkA'kkkk-kickicickltkkick
I^SIL^E^OEAL
o     .     ' >* '
IS WHAT TEE "OOEAN" GIVES ITS POLIOYHOLDEEfl
, J:* Bere are-a few olainu we have pald*of lato
$35.70 $31.40    $10.00    $14.26    $21.42    $50.00 $17.99
10.00 57.15      20.00   ' 10.00      12.84    115,00 04.60
17.60 '37.10      18.50      42.84      37.71    450.00, 26.97
54.30 18.55      17.00       6.00      20.00      19.20 50.60
JTho "WmAS** ii the burnt ACCIDENT Company in the
Tbt "OCEAN" PAYS DAILY over $15,000 for ACCIDENTS
to POLICYHOLDERS
8cita Accldttt&StiiriDtM Corp. LM. of London Eng,
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist Agent
Miners* Union Hall Block      -      Fernie, B.C.
. The sophistic criticism "of. the ..false'
aad variable impressions of the senses
has not 'heen refuted aad cannot ibe
refuted; every day it is connrmed Oy
countless striking proofs of the unreliability of our senses. It Is approved
in the popular saylngT "There is no
disputing about tastes and colors."
Hardly-two yeara^ago, Blondot, tne
famous physicist of Nancy, discovered
the .-N-rays, the -pretsence of which
could be ascertained <bya bright spot
upon.a phosphorescent screen; numbers of , European and - American
scientists, as expert experimenters as
himself, also saw this bright spot; .and
yet they finally had to admit- that
these ^rays iwere an optical illusion of
ithe observer. Every man sees the sun
shining in brilliant light; tbose skilled
in optics maintain that if an aeronaut
could pass (beyond the earth's atmosphere, the sua would appear -black to
him. In order to show that the same
•object produces different impressions
upon different Individuals, a iproreseor
of psychology had a clown enter the
lecture-room suddenly, turn three or
four somersaults and as suddenly
withdraw. The professor asked his
audience to state what-they had just
seen, without conf erring without each
other; no two statements agreed ia
respect to the movements and the
clothing of the down. The legal testimony of eye and ear witnesses is contradictory unless it has 'been; previously agreed upon; thus dn the Stela-
hell trial ten -witnesses, among them
six pbllc-emen, accustomed to making
investigations at the scenes of crimes,
gave varying testimony in regard to
the position of Steinhall's body;
his servant and a neighbor saw it
stretched out upon the (floor; four 'policemen found him kneeling and leaning against the door, the fifth -saw him
•with his back turned toward fhe wall
near the 'washstand, etc. - When a
historian has but a single ipiece of evidence, he will make .positive..statements in rfegard'to an event? tout if
several documents are -in existence be
■will be uncertain as to details and
often ae to the whole. Where is tihe
historian who could untangle the
Dreyfus case, which is obscured by so
manyvdifferent kinds of statements?
History Is -not an exact science.
fThe,.conception8 *of Pure'Reason,
which to Plato appeared incontro-
vertibly true, are necessarily v^rro-
neotts, since they are senae-perceptions
transmitted through the (brain, -when
•ili-ts BBUseBtrauBmii tiSij*imjlemKst im-
pressidiw" and attained, to similar
knowledge] -Hence, for example, it is
■more: than probable that the animals
have, mastered the first principles of
mathoipaUcs;'a donkey, says Diogenes,
kiiows aswell as a mathematician that
a straight line i^ the shortest patn
to the -manger or the water trough;
pigeons 'do noi begin to set until '.he
fenialeJiaSi-inid- two eggs, as thoign
tliey knew, that twice one are two; the
sheep ' know the time of day -without
having learned the conception thereof
from -Pure Reason, they know as weii
as, tlHTEltepherd does when the time
has cowe to return to' the etab'e;
chickens have a certain- idea of space
and prove it by their reluctance to
mount to a roost higher than that to
which they are. accustomed. This idea
of f.pace is not inborn with the animals, that is, it is not instinctive; we
may, for instance, observe how puppies acquire it. Hence we must admit that it^aplte of the diversity of
the impressions produced among men
and animals toy the same things, more
or less similar ideas are formed by
both, since both are made of the same
substance. Hence If it is impossible
to deny to men and animals a certain
minimum of. knowledge,; we must,
.with Freycinert, acknowledge "the peculiar approximation (adequation) of
the outer world and the intelligence,"
which Parmenides defined when he
said: "The p'osslble alone can 'be conceived, and the consequence of that is
that our art of computation and its
various combinations, in otner words
the langguage of mathematics, as the
human intellect created it, is wonder-6
fully adapted' to express the processes
of nature. .-- . . Formulas that had
been Invented for theoretical speculations proved- subsequently to be In exact conformity with natural phenomena, indeed, they often express
them best." Who could have thought
that the proposition, "spherclal surfaces are in direct ratio to the square
of their radii," would evef serve as
well for the, decrease in gravity and
In radiating forces; that the series of
odd numbers -would represent the distances "covered by a freely falling body
during the separate and successive
momenta of its -fall; that the curves
produced when 'we cut a sphere
through planes which 'have different
inclinations to. its axis (a discovery
made Iby Appolonlus of Perga more
than 2000 years ago) would serve
Keppler as the")>asls of his astronomi-
ca^-systesi?—1£a4kis«-Freys!net-ad<is*-
staaaae
To Sports Committees
The Fernie Coal Creek Exceliior Band ia now
open for engagement*. Satisfaction guaranteed
Por Term* Etc Apply
THOS. BIGQt, toorrtary,  Fornlo, B.O.
>«
CASH MEAT MARKET
Saturday Specials
•••f Milt
Stark -j^MddMdtkMSdbM •*
wf wm*w wPm wUfatHm^*l^^*^tm^m*'
FfMhOookMl TH|*
AtbtrUt Oroatwry Muttf
10© Ib.
ISO lli.
lOiolb.
TOO ft lba.
preeslone to the tetter. Pure Reason,
to -which Kant ascribed all certainty,
appears so uncertain thai we must examine tto conclusion* In the light of
experience, which, in tho Judgment of
POincare, the .math-amaAlclaa, ia tue
only source of truth. Common sense
corrects the judgment of Pure Reason.
Tho senses deceive the mind, which in
He turn deceives tbe senses. Therefore, Charron wrote triumphantly:
"See, haw marveloutly far man oan
go with his insight aad certainty
wfcen tho inner and outer world ate
equally flllod with errors and defeota,
when reaeon and the aentea, tho ©Met
tool* of oolence, are mutually misleading."
Public opinion and oommon eense,
which Socmtea end Pyrrho tn ancient
tlmo*, Tbomaa Hold and Roger Col-
lard In modem timet, took at their
Wide, are unreliable alio. Both oon-
»lst primarily of preooptiono, -which
amy tw deceptive; thai because our
viaion deceive* ut ai to tho olio and
tho path of tho oca, public opinion
aad common aoneo dedored that tho
wa moire* About tho earth, that tho
earth It the center of tho wilvort*.
rrho Hophltt* maintained that different linpmokms on received by
oach Individual, heooo tro can create
no objective adeooe. And ia raalltr
a arieaoo founded only oa ooaoe ta*
prooateaa would have a limited vaHd-
Ry. tt wouM nooeoaarliy ho purely oub-
Joettra, aad would vary aot wrty arlth
indWduala, but alio -with tha chaatM
wttekaaooffoetala-lhoaoBMa.
Bat alao*, aa La Daatae aaya, wo
aro otm HHaf aad oar tptrtto has aot
boeooio oitlnot. the lailor matt have
pooteoetd a mot* ot t-m peife<te4 nvA
eortaia aleimum of koowlodf* la order to adaot ttaatf ta tba aataial aai
oootot oaadKtoaa to wWA 4twaaaa»»
awathavt gaaoral vatMlty, alaa* Um
bt tfc* aMMt vaHoa* raoo* asl
ttwemlHoe oa^Miahed otaia »** tnmtkt
***W^^^Wt^i^, W*WtU    WWWFOfWw^w   W^WfO   WOeW    -IP^^WWPWj^
laatltailoaa, fanaa af mmm
mmUmt aai arhloh
•vohrtid from  one aaotber.  Aa the
▼kol optntoo alwayt eoatata tta
tadKfom  aholla,
ia aaaaatlalU*' tta
■' Oot tearaof that each
ft allHiflljF bi aodal aai oeoaoMte
oTotatloa eeali oecar aatnag- all  th*
w w wWHW*wnai   vVOia   ^^<^f ^to    -ntr-^mratr-m^f   •-■••       omtw
K tlm bt the earth, thff malami af
tM/Jb4^Jb_t_J_, i__M_9*_U__ ^_^_%^m__, b_^__^h_^___^_^_b M_m §La
wiooao bwiw nre moroaoew eo mo
oaEoat to  whldi aaua bcoaioaoi Ma
aatwrfaoeaa.
ttUn ahattuHy alao ailaaia ta tha
enweaaoea'1** torxtm tWiearrmUer ttifnt*
-thoro to
"It is difficult to see merely a remarkable coincidence ln theee facts and
to ascribe to accident alone so many
concurrences.' I eee therein proof that
the human mind^and nature obey a
definite plan,, which ln, a marvelous
fashion enables .the mind to understand nature." *, Freyclnet's plan
•which preeuppoaed a Ood as Creator,
can be' nothing other than the universal composition of matter in the
universe, which is everywhere the
same; hence animate and inanimate
substances are composed ot the same
element!, and; therefore, man can understand tho world. Berkeley aaya
with Justice: "The mind, aa an Immaterial being, cannot precelve material
things," but matter endowed -with intelligence can precelve them.
Thl* knowledge, oven though a
minimum, which we cannot deny to
man, la not yet acience, but merely a
preliminary atop toward acleoce; if, in
order to know the outer world, man
had availed timteif of hi* aenae* only,
thl* knowledge would hardly hav* advanced further than that of tbe animal*, whose sent** are far more perfect, with the exception of tho -tense
of touch, wblch ha* boon extraordinarily developed by th* uao of the
land.
Thu*, for Jnttance, geometry would
aot have com* Into being If man had
not Invented tho rod to m**rare tha
Ungtb aud breadth of fields, Instead
of oattBMtlng them with tho eye. Tbo
rod u*ed by primitive people* to measure aiabl* land, wblch *%*ry yoar wa*
partitioned anew amoag the famlHe*
of tba gen* or of tba village, .wa* of
•uch groat utility to than that It a*>
tnmed a mnttetl character: tb*
peaaaat* of th* ftutttaa Mir (village
commonlty) called It tlii* "Holy Rod"
aai kept It lo th* church; tbo Hgyp-
tlaaa oho** tho oil, tba onH of m**>
ar* lor th* dlvlaloo of arable land,
aa th* hieroglyphic aynbol of troth
•ad MrUc*; everything mearared by tt
waajaataadtnta,
4 plae* of wood, a rod, tak** tb*
Plata af oa* of tb* **a***; from that
tlm* oa th* length and breadth of a
fleM w«» ao lo»g*r a mar* poreoptloa
of tha aye, uncttnin and variable ae-
cordtog to tb* tadlvldoal; tbat which
U aMaaafM i* tra* aai J**t, aai tber*
I* ao farther oeetalon for dltputea
a* at tbo tIaM wkta It waa oatiawtai
by th* eye.
W« kaow tba propertle* of thlag*
by tb* ImprtmlOB* wbltfk May mak*
oo ua; It It through aaa** tmpret-tloot
ihat we flrtt com* In oonfact with the
oater world.
of inanimate bodies in order to learn
the .properties of things, a column of
quicksilver, for instance, to measure
the temperature, litinus paper to ascertain whether a liquid is acid or
basic, and so on. Hence Kant and
the Xeo-Kantians are guilty of a grave
error when they assert that we know,
and can know, the properties of
things only through the impression of
our senses.
Therefore, it is up longer the uncertain and variable agrceptlons of men
which form the basis of our knowledge, but the certain and Invariable
influence upon animate bodies; although formerly.it wa$ impossible to
know the temperature of the air with
exactness, as long as we were limited
to the uncertain and variable impressions upon human senses, we have
been able to ascertain it exactly since
the sensitiveness of quicksilver Indicated it to us. Two astronomers who
observe the same star will make different'drawings of it, while the photographic plate, the "retina of scientists" aa Jansen calls it, presents an
exact (picture. .Since photography has
the advantage over the eye of eliminating all subjectivity and of preserving faithfully the Imprints of the
im-presslons acting upon it, it is re-'
placing to an ever increasing extent
observations t>y the naked eye. Ma-
enivrler's little apparatus, which ls
based on the fact that electrical resistance is proportional to the aqueous contents of a mixture, reveals to
us far better than the tongue of the
most experienced , gourmand whether
a wine is diluted or not. Analysis by
freezing enables us to determine .exactly, by the amount of ice formed
bow much water haa 'been added to
milk, and to diagnose the state of
health of an unseen milch cow, which
would he impossible - to the most
.skilled veterinary. Man has only
learned the tone , of his own voice
since the Invention of the phonograph, and even ' then he does not
recognize it, for he hears it as others
hear it, /without the resonance of his
head.
The exact knowledge , universally
valid because always,the same, which
we gained by the substitution of Inanimate nature for our senses, enables the physician to diagnose disease by Its aid, the psychologist to
employ It in the study of the phychl-
cal properties of the ego. Socrates
said: "Know thyself!^ and modern
'mSff"afldsrT*Winrthe Sia onnanlmaTe
matter."
However, the knowledge of things
•will always be jpconiplete, on account
of the Hack of perfection of our senses
and of the instruments which replace
them, and on account of the. methods
whici we must employ in our investigations.
No object is entirely independent
of the outer world, it is determined
by the coincidence of an infinite number Trf conditions and accompanying
circumstances; it never remains' the
same; influenced in an infinite variety
of ways by its environment, it is in
a state of constant change; in order
to study it, we mutt regard it as entirely independent of its environment,
as invariable, and must test its' properties one after another. The abstract
sciences have all struck out along, tiie
same road; it was possible to obtain
the objects of their studies, the point,
the line, the surface, numbers, only
by separating them from their environment and depriving them of their
physical properties, In order to transform them into imaginary entities,
devoid of objective reality and only
existent in the mind of his who conceives them.* For this reason the
theoretical deductions of mathematics,
wblch do not depei'd upon the senses,
are not subject to the errors of the
senses, and since they are logically
constructed they have universal validity, because they correspond to tbe
universal laws of human reason;
hence the geometries of Euclid. Lo-
batschefsky aad Riemann, although
tliey are mutually contradictory, arc
accepted' as tme by mathematicians,
for their propositions form strictly
logical systems.
The natural sciences, which substitute instruments for the senses, are .-is
universally valid as the abstract
sciences, since the scientist does not
analyze his Impressions; he studies the
actions of things, not upon liis senses,
but upon other things; he records
them and classifies them in order to
deduce from them theoretical conlu-
slons and possibilities of practical
utilization; he exa/mines the influences
of things, not' upon his senses, but
upon other things. Knowledge -was
subjective as long as It was based
upon the results of the perceptible of
our senses, It became objective so
soon as It was based on the facts furnished us by the objects. The incisive
and Incontrovertible criticism of the
Greek philosophers, who undermined
the foundations of subjective knowledge, cannot affect objective knowledge.
The Sophists, the -pltllesfe destroyers
of subjective knowledge, with an
Incomprehensible Inconsistency took
men, whose knowledge they denied,
as the measure of all things, and
abandoned tbe old objective natural
philosophy, lh order to found the |
subjective philosophy of the bour-1
geoise.    Tbe  men   of   science   who
Sixty Years fhe Standard
•DR:
BAKING
nam
A Cream of Tartar Powder
Made from Grapes
NO ALUM
-• rf.Vftji
,~..-.*y
PROTECTING THE PEOPLE
The .Mellon National Bank of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, has an advertisement in one of the journals of that
city that will appeal very forcibly to
the majority of the laboring class. The
headline of the advertisement reads:
"Don't I'se Unclean Money," and
then follows:-
"The tellers of the Mellon Bank
have neiw notes of convenient denomination put up In packages of $10, $25,
$50, $75, $100, ready to cash customers checks.
"When you present your check for
one of these amounts you get your
money at once in clean, new bills.
"The service saves your time and
protects your health, Paper money ia
a favorite breeding place for disease
germs. The use of new. clean currency Is the only sure 'protection. And
that is the only kind of money customers of this bank receive from our'
tellers.    •
"Your account is invited."
The above "ad" from a banking institution will be appreciated by that
vast majority of the working class
who carry great wads of paper currency continually. It Is certainly considerate of one of our financial Institutions to take Into consideration ,the
health of that element in society
whose wages are so corpulent that
they are forced as a matter of necessity to come in contact with huge rolls
of that germ-breeding currency, which
might put many of them in the hospital and ultimately into premature
graves.
It was Indeed thoughtful on the part
of the officials of this national bonk
to place a sanitary "ad" in a paper of
Pittsburg, warning the people against
the use of unclean money.
created   the objective   knowledge"^ 1_wl.'jtoy M^_ a warni"g'- l/a*   ot
TialOTer^"uFTeWnitroo"the"pbTI^
Phy of the   ancients   "which was de-,of Pi«sbur» m'8ht **v» become af--
^^v*|u.^^^l|Kttu      jJHj|)|^ab^Myw^^HjLsj^dK      ___J_w     ^^Kdbbmbi^^ebdimmb      fMh-ttkiM       IttbdNhJUa^lUM
tmm^wmm m        wK^t^KNtm m9pwm^0Wm     wfHi     wl|^WB^PiWBB.^fc^^      ^WMWw      w^HmwteNe^*
Witmt mtarfa aai »ha ftnawri— he g«tmi*
gill The Finest Ranch
-      Fed Cattle
flHHBHHnHBMIHaBHHaHMHHHHBaiBBIHHi
Eckstein Blk., Fernie
w^^^m^nwtrti^mt  t^^^met wa^w^a   wwa^a  ■^^jpWww
'^^P*^t^*tt      *ww     *-*t*^^^m^^m^^F
**j^  ^l^*y^l *#wtf i^^'il^A iKa^iy^^   *f
""I "^www mwmm ^^f   mum* ^wHm^et^mt^mf ot
eomet. that Ht popQod **• of am
Hertty ot tbntr •****.  Bat tta prop-
•ttlta of tilags «wtt aa latfaoac* aot
^-^^tjt*^  .^^^^^^     ^^9999    ^^j-y-|-^-|J^^, *   'Jkk^taJL     JbflK^^^    ^,^^^-y^
wwiv   *VI ^^w*   w*^W| wp* mmm*   »■¥•
Inanimate bodie*.   Tb* weight of a
l**w af lia *l**t *^tm^.^^+ tk«
aaaat ay**ta dibtmotilt hwm tte mm
j^a jM^w *^m ^d^^e^^^b   ^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^m^^^w
^^w ^^^.w ^^mw ^^m^m^^^mf ^m^^^^^m we^yF wP*^f^^l^^w
ftefttat not ywnnt tUm turn *
mtWJMP WtH09m, flWWwW     f0    ^Iff^flf     fl)  f, R#
ttat Hay toow itw   t« inw
tta —aaa at i*Wan, it tow
^m^^i    ^^^^^^a    VwMi^.*.<-(MwaW WW* tO
if^jb, j^mjLjm^.^ t__m_,_%    ____,        ■    -    .
a^^m   aw^t^*r*    lemnw taoy ore
of tta tmm '
tkeoemetm
ta, opfsr td  8tttt&Ia
baaiaj
Ha
tb* aaal* aa well *• la oar
tta   haidae**, lu
lamiaoaily,   *tc^
b*die* a* well *• oar aalaaUe bodio*,
htameo wo mot dnUott tto (Mmttottao
af a ttlag aa Ht til*wat pawar 'el
eMrtfng in.   tnttomto   'tpott aatm*t«
tb* etmaftfvtmme of Inttntmnt*
botlet }t *evea moto dentate thaa that
of aabMto aoit**j tta* tha wrawr
am tmnnt t« vflwato by tbt Hettem
•i«h of *(rttt*e t*t*ipmpbyr wbleb
w* cannot aollce at all; w* *ooM ba
atnwiata, aadimMbi* to dtattegat* tb* J#gr««* af
rtod nnmber of aiNRaitli wMeh art
ibe ttrl«ie!l   itwiatttrla* a»p«rattt»   in
Keept -turn.    Tb* tmm» tn  thtt w*
Um e«a avail oavoetve* of
Whenever possible science ie substituting inanimate things for the senses
of the scientists. In many sciences
this substitution has been completed,1
the chemist employs none of bla senses
to learn the properties ot the sulphuric acid or other, bodie* which he
analyzes or combines; we could endow bim with a new sense or deprive
him ot one ot the old ones without
altering bis scientific knowledge, for
thia is not based upon the proceptions
of tbe senses, .which aro tubject to
errors and variation*, but upon tbe
knowledge of matter through inanimate matter, which i* subject to no
errors and variations.
Industrial production, which at one
time was in advance of science, must
now follow limping aftor; a* long at
its control waa dependent -upon human semes lt was unreliable; In splto
of the most thorough training there
was often no plausible explanation at
all of false or poor manufacture. Ile-
llabillty wat not attained until we bad
recourse to every possible kind of recording apparatus from tbo simplest
(thermometer, manometer, etc.) to
tbe most complicated (voltameter,
ampermeter. pyrometer, calorimeter,
etc).
The ftubstltu'.lon ef th* seotltlvenest
of matter for human Impressions,
which enable* ns to learn temperature
by th* degree* upon tbo column ol
iiulektllvcr, tone by tho number of
acoustic vibrations per second, etc.,
ttaaforms that -which Is quality for
men Into quality with r**pect to
mnitor. Th* transformation enables
aa to repine* phenomena by nunwrt-
««t proportions, and titers the nature
of our knowledge. Th* qualitative
kaowledta af a thing la knowledge of
It In reaped to nan; ta* quantltlv*
kaowfedg* of It la knowledge with ro-
•p-tct ta other thing*. Th* prladpl*
of *«b)*«tivity, tb* starting point ef
tha snbJecUv* philosophy of the
bourg*ot*c i* replaced by tho prtn*
dp)e of objectivity
Uvea when Omit do aot mislead aa,
tha t«nte* only furnish as with
aa ottroaMly limited kaawtodta af
thing*, -revealing to a* only som* of
their proparUa*: fer laataaco, tto oya
doa* aot pensolv* aaataatt of tho
solar tp»etnt*: iu rtceptiv* pow«r te
tbr below ihat ef laaahmte mattor:
where the ty* of tho a*ttoaom*r ts
aaablo to penetrate tta (fallen*** ta
tli* empty space wbleb Hertchel do*
tcHbed a* a "coal ***k,'.' tta photo*
trophic plain mveal* naw ooo-ttell*
daHag rblMbood [ tleo* aai aeattotwd eotaUc aotter; tb*
—- —         "-,*» .nm,*,.).        9*i.99m*449.'l. -*r--*«*-W-4«M%i**0'tift'MM-   t^tt*-**-* I
th*wtib**tm*. tfaei mw t»rtt*rid***\ fl*n*f>«'
aatronoait* aajawfodgo bowwia,' bnowt- j
oa go of wim taa mon wctw aaaias]
of tb* koatoaa. j
Tb*llartU af the *w*U1v«mm af
matter ara aakaow* to us; that  of j
tj^^a^mjLMkuOm ^^^m^jj^^^t^ jy.   tn^*nMWtob^^_ JtaM^k
w^**w*w*^^ntw*^^r *mpi*aii.^aitw ^ww w^^w^nea^t'W^^-^enf ^mm&
yat It beaaaaM fiaor from day ta lay.
xaa laOTaMHasai, wap*a aaam aaiaiy
MMauNNw law wagrw**, left aa la tgaor-
aaoa Aa mmri ta ab**omeo* wbleb
Jm9 vofonwwr p» UNIQV fH»m to vm»
'_\m_____   mtwgaieftm______i______      tt__tl_iM^i^   *^^k   SiAiaU^I   ^^^^^^^
Wli niWuTwNMNHMi-fF. wBHwB  mw ^W-I^-WI m^^^m
t&* tUwtrkal *ji»l*Usu;*t of ai*uL via-
jy>H ja-ftyb '&mf*m^^^^ m& ^____,% m^_M '^_o^____e^
fWe*   vtw^F  mm^n^^^ummme w^e   m^-emi^  mt^^^e   ^w^&woi^m
*nn fti«j«tc the mm loath gun at a
dt-g-tw*,   shoo of  vs  ttat  tbo neiot
Haatfiii Is aaHi antra estoaalvo than
^*ir^   *  ^mew  ^^* awwwon^e  ^nwn**e ** ^**iw-w^w * ar  ew^a^a^
tkskiotjtkMi hnewleim
Vfnw"!! a^twi   at*-^^*a* -^ ew^moty**
PI fN^P^MfflOII to VH0
p*rfectloa af oar maaae, bat la en*
pottlaaaa tha ambod* forotfitsiat
Uu» amwMtawnnm *** hammyamke aamx-tei *
^■^^^WWPP mK^mwr (pWWfWM  WBW  mm WPP W(F" I
paratwt of rw»forrt) »m\ rmtnA be-]
mmmmmn ttMMMi __________Wmm9 MWtA  mm|||W aagMi, 1
ttwo.
splsed by the bourgeoiw philosophers.!fl,cted wlth the   $ems   from "n,thy
are today working toward a new
grandoise natural philosophy.
and
•Savages do not distinguish between object and number; they consider number to be a property of the
object, just as civilized men consider
heat, electricity and light; later on
number becomes separated from object*, so that it become* an abstract,
imaginary being, which is treated like
an object. Point, Une and surfaco aro
In the tamo manner separated from the
body of which they are properties; the
point Ib deprived of three dimensions,
the line of two. and the surface of one.
Tbe system of capitalism Is to blame
for tbe misery wo endure. We ore told
tbat tho individual capitalists are not
to blame. Who supports tho capitalist system? Who profits by its continuance T The capitalists. We cannot
oppose the system without opposing
the capitalists who benefit therefrom.
lucre," and It might have been that a
national epidemic would ensue from
the masses of the people handling the
germ-infected currency of "Uncle
Sam."—Miners Magazine.
DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED
bj-  Incut  application!), as
ippli	
reach the dfaeascd portion oi
There In only one way to euro deat-
iii-bh, anil that la by constitutional r«m-
«>(ll««. OeafnpHH la cauaed by tin Inflamed condition of the mucout llninir
of tito HuMtarhlan Tube, When this
tub* la Inflamed you lmvo a rumbllntr
Round or Imperfect hearing, and When
It 1* entirely cloderJ. Dearneis ia the
r-rmilt. and unleM thn Inflammation
ran bo tnken out and thit tuba restored
to Ita normal condition, hearing will
be <lp*troyi>d forover; nine catea out of
ten are cauiod by Cat«rrh. which It
nuthliiK but an Inflamed condition of
the mucouM «urfac«>e.
We will sJve One Hundred Dollar*
fjr any mat, of Deafness  (canned by
catarrh) that cannot be cured by IUH't
Catarrh Cure.   Hend for circular*, free.
V.3. 6HRNKV « CO., Toledo. Ohio.
Hold by DruajrUl*. 76c.
Take Hall'e Vemlly I*IU» for eonttl*
nation.
||   THE     |^ A   S8S&1864
HomeBank«Canada
i*
Thera ara many hundbraaU of aubttantiat aawiaga accounu
with tha Homa Bank that ware ataitad yaara ago with a
deport of ona dollar.    Your dollar ia alwajra welcome.
Full compound Interest paid.
<l. P. MACDONALD, M«n«g#r
VtOTOMIA AVI*        4-        4- mtftw ■.o.
Imperial Bank of Canada
TkO mf*r*m 'mam
t |WWW|1WT
• •to* tea
MtADOFFlCt, TORONTO
CaattaiAtrth*Ht*i.. %\bmm      CapitalP*iaUp.
ttnonrmfoni     tmm     TatalAaaata
o. ** wiLmn, Ptnmenm.      mm. «OiT jamhav,
■aANCHgt  IM  aaiTltM COUUMilA
Artombnm, Crombtook. fottdb, A*M*a, Kwalaaaa, Mkbel.
»#v*ltt*M, V*n«««vsr nnd VHtnrin.
•AVINOa DIMAaTMINT
later**! aUawai no dapaai-t* at tt*rr*et rsts from aala af i*aaa*l.
FtItNIt MANOH A. M. OWgN, Maaaa*
THECANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
^m^ *wmm ^-me*^   ^m^w  omn ~ anm ▼ ttemmmwmw wwm wee ^mow^ -ma^^^
HAiWrTALLtO
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES.
lOftf-lt vat?*
WQlt. Title Deeds. Mortctsc*. Iniafmce PoUdtt
w w -weeeee^f     m -(p^h^^if     •ontw^^m^em^j    .^ww^f-p ^^j^m^^i.**-^^    mtmm^twifon ^aaw^     >• ^Fmp^p^^^^
orothtrTihnblff Inoneof theteboxat
KNt rVKTNUl WFOaJtAnON APTtT TO
Ba P. Fowl«r, Manager
Mmlt Branoh
<■ -p. mwyftfym*' VWW**. wqftpMMwji*^ ■..
■ '■t-i.xFX'"
.i*y **.**-
'-■cv
.,   -.' ,i-'xM«STS'*y>     ■*,-'''.-*vpfV.;.4- ;VW **.;■??-£ ..■l-T<l,jf$-il-IJ^4ii^' 4J[ty-4J**** *-      ,*>.**.;-*™.^.*-2r-*,=-^^ii£*f^.r'-A''-T^ ■ >-<*...*fV3?,,,^ i     -     - ' T*     **.
• - "v-:^ "■ *..■..»■;> -*; ■■* ■■»:'--.,-«■"»-    "-*:. *;--'K-"> •*-  •    -..'-■"■.  .t<-v^-*^-****5-**-*?"''      •iJ*t**A:??"-'. ^»".'-v^-?". *■-',-";•   .-■■", v-- --,--'.'.   -
-'' - ■ -  ".'";,'*.'-i   "■-- ,.~:"-*J''-~ \ ■"";.- -   -••:/■   ' .**S"~sX"* **.'^'""^i'"**'\     "A-** '■■'<*Xh*-."   T" '   .v;;":-^.",.- ,•"-'>  ■,'.   .■"'«'■■
/
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JUNE 13 1914.
13
If
I
u
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Peliatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1,00
per year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
solor work.   Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
* Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
There are plenty of gop'd, capable men in this
District, and they are not always found among
the most ostentatious, but they possess those sterr
ling qualities that have created history in every
country and eS'ery eraT They are fearless of their
own personality, and are the material from which
the real leader and emancipator originates.
♦"♦♦♦ <f «►♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦
♦ •'".-■ ♦
♦ HILLCREST'NOTES ♦
THE SHUFFLE OF CYCLOPES (?)
Last week we -mentioned that something would
be done to assist the Colorado strikers, and we are
pleased to infoiin otir ivnders that this something
will he tho proceeds of a dance, to he held on Monday. June 22nd. Tickets have Iipcii printed, and
will be sold at 50 cents each. Hoth ladies and gentlemen will be expected to pay. and the committer
expe.-t to realize at l-'aist jjtfOO.OO. You know tho
fight and sacrifice lhat lias been made by the men.
women and children in Colorado; you know their
struggle is your struggle, and you know that it i.s
only by adopting the principles of unionism and
helping those brothers and sisters in distress tliat
you can ever look for reciprocity. Tickets will_bo
sold by a committee and you will be approached to
buy one; there is no obligation to attend the. dance,
bud there is an obligation to "spend four bits and
assist the Colorado strikers in their fight against
tlie" greatest and most cruel corporation that the
Christian or anv other era has known.
THE INTEREST OF THE WORKER
The object of this paper is understood by all to
be for education, and by education wc presume is
meant a more and perfect grasp of the position of
the worker and tlie master class today. The former
has to study his p\ynvinterest, for the very simple
reason that the latter is so intent "oa studying his
own. and the worker need look for no sympathy or
assistance from that direction. We know, an.l the
lesson has been taught often enough, that only
from our own class can we expect and get emancipation, and that to strengthen the hands of our
masters is to strengthen the bonds that enslave us.
True, the master class may tickle us with their re-
-forms, ancl appease those, lick-spittles who are con
According to the Voluminous and Cyclopean
monster •(?) who peddles the piffle for a contemporary, we are "a human shrimp." Tt is remarkable,
however, that soy small a piscatorial specimen
should create siieh an impression on this Goliath;
whose weight must equal 130 pounds, unwashed—
pardon, undressed. Pathetic! well, we should say
so. Can you imagine his angish, and how, when
with every .energy paralized, he has just enough
sense of commercialism left to reach out and pilfer
the energies of others. We do fpel flattered, and
can possibly be excused, when we realize that this
great organ condescends to clip our news, but ifj^
we had had any idea of the extent of his prostration,
we would certainly not have been so wicked as to
have called attention to the fact. True, we have always thought that anything in the shape' of work
or shock would have a disastrous effect upon such
a delicate and sensitive temperament.
Possibly, the whole may be explained by the
fact, that the editor of the contemporary is absent
and has to leave his columns to the tender mercies
of this individual.
The new eity machinery by-law 'has evidently
faiied to please -a few disgruntles. The steam roller
seems to have crushed all hope out of some individuals, while the stone crusher has shattered their
sweetest dream. Too bad! too bad! But what
might have beeii had the "Dads" realized what a
.mighty intellectual genius they were rejecting?
Let us .console ourselves, however, with the hope
that "what seems a loss may often prove to be our
greatest gain, etc."  R. I. P-
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
The league fixture was fulfilled
here Saturday last, Poal Creek 'being
llie visitors. ,The home team won the
toss and decided tb play with the wind.
Immediately at the start the visiting
team was away with a rusn, and after
a short play secured a goal. The
home team retaliated after some fine
foot 'V.'wlx by ■ the inside and outside
right, and placing a fiqe center for
Rochester," the .center half, he- planted
same intc -the iiet, thus equalising.
Corner Sicks wor*" very frequent during this game, owing Lo very high
winds, anct from one of these corners
the out-side right -secured i goal without the assistance of any of the other
players, which.speaks well of the
weather -man, and so ended the first
half, with the visitors playing a good
gams.; But they all went to pieces
during the second half. The home goai
during this half waa never in any real
danger, whereas the visitors' goal was
frequently assaulted, but did not again
fall, owing to'the home teams shooting being all shot to h—. When the
whlnlle blew for time the score was
-1. iu favor of Hillcrest. fc
The sale In the Hillcrest Co-opera-
tlvo store is, we understand, to continue for this week.
The smoker which was held In honor
of the visiting footballers was a huge
success. _,
The -miners here were idle from 1
o'clock Monday noon until 7 a. m.
Tuesday. v
- In spite of the sinking of the Empress of Ireland, several parties intend to visit the old land from this
camp in the near future.
An -oil company opened an office
here last .week, and to all appearances
this week it is closed. It is to be hoped
none of the .boys were stung.
.The local union here has decided to
leave the. offer from the Educational
Department over until their next meeting. Also take note that the nomination and election of local officers
takes place next Sunday week; all
members are requested to attend.
D. Hyslop of Coleman was here last
Saturday, doing business for tbe District Ledger, and we understand he
had a large number of subscriptions.
On Saturday last Brother F. Loates
left the hospital aqd Is now at homo
with his family, where he Is progressing as well as can be expected.
rpecting to tiear from., "Willie about
Thursday to know": the-effect bt- his
arguments- with - Commissioner- Mc-..
Nell.*. What,'"will happen If the decision is detrimental to the workers?
/The -future will -answer.S.l '■',', * -
Next order of business "was in reference to article that appealed "in the
Lethbridge Herald, suppose* to have
been -sent In -by. our •secretar.?,': It wns
explained'that the secretary had sent
in a statement, -but' that the editor
had seen fit *o alter the reading of It
a little, to (better serve his capitalistic
teachings, and \we, further find that
the, secretary, os soon as the orror on
the,,-part-of,the Herald was noticed,
•phoned that -party, and asked them -to
make it read as it was sent, which
they promised " to do, but -we have
failed to see it. Maybe it escaped'our
notice; • ...
generally, and are not willing -sacrifice" •anything,, at all—eo the men are
taking what, they '-consider the only
way to settle Buoh'a fpolieh state ot
affairs, after trying -all-other .ways to
get ' the dispute. setUed^fchey. are
doing -what the. ^Englishman calls
"cNdwt." Maybe there will something
•town up presently, whereby '.-such ar-.
rangemente can be matfe. Let us live
In hopes that the day Is not far off, *J
am, ■ "',-     ,. r A,
; "Yours teuly, .-• ...
FRANK BARRINGHAM
Sec, Local J189.1T. iM. .W of A.'- ■.'
COMMUNICATED
A
Regal White
;- bprSaS (241 egg) Strain .^
-A few early-hatched cock-.
ereis for sale inthe fall
•    18"      .-"  Write'   "       ."•■",-
Wm.ANTROBUS
Coleman.,-  - * Alberta
reaBIEiEIlij^^
The, Best Ventilated. Theatre in Town      :.;
THE SITUATION IN COALHURST
WILL STEIKE A BLOW FOR JUSTICE
tent to use the. labor organization for their political
„ and selfish ends, with a soft job, but for lasting
and permanent reform, they are not only useless,
hut a menace tp tlie labor movement all the world
over.
It is ouf intention to write plain English, and
not make use of the usual generalities to apologize
for same.. The workers of this District should
know those who will- serve their interest best;
they should know without hesitation that only the
man who is working for the workers,and not the poli
tician, is the man who can and will study their
interests. There never was and never, will be any
owasion for a labor union to indulge iu the Macchi-
valian intrigues that have happened in our midst.
Without obsequiousness on our part we shall be
able to enforce our demands, for the politician will
eome to us instead of we going to him, wheu he
realizes our strength. Por the last two or three
yeart the labor movement in this country has been
influenced by a number of men whose only object
has been to secure some comfortable government
grnft as a reward for the prostitution'of organized
labor.
From coast tq coast thin haa been practised and
in every instance the interests of the worker have
been sacrificed and so long as they permit these
political sh.VKtci'N to control their organization, so
long must they be content to suffer the rcsulta of
their machinations,     <■*    t
Next year this District will be called upon tn ef.
fci't another Hirrconieiit with the Operator's Asuoci.
iitiou, and they will need men who will serve their
interests; not ncccsHnrily uith, smooth-tongue,poli:
tician*; not necessarily the most brilliant of
repartee artists, bul men who possess i>ommon sense
mnl »n absolute disregard for those under-strep-
pei** job that the master i-l.*** in always ivml.v H
dole out to itk hirelings.
see
The State of Oolorado has received a great deal
of advertising during the past several months.
Nearly every publication throughout the United
States has given recognition to a State where the
constitution has been murdered and where law is
laughed at by those i mighty giants of industry,
whose millions make them more potent than the
powers of government at Washington.
 T-hA-pAnpl*fl_ftf_.fl_niitinn l»>ve__wit,nessed the apec-
taele of the Chief Magistrate of this country assuming the cringing attitude of a beggar and supplicating John D. Rockefeller to settle the strike in Colo-
rado. The people of the United StateVhave heard
the ultimatum of the haughty billionaire refusing
to' consider for a moment, any proposition for an
honorable arbitration of differences. The people
have likewise seen the federal troops dispatched
lo Colorado to protect the interests of a monstrous
combination of mercenary despots, who demand
that their employes shall be mute and submissive
slaves, accepting in silence the terms dictated by
organized greed.
Por the benefit of Rockefeller & Co. the LegUria-
ture of a State was called into special session, and
"the servants of the people" in a law-making body
voted a bond issue nf *1,000.000 to.aid John D,
Rockefeller & Co. to suppress the striking coal
miners and drive them into peonage. Furthermore,
the legislators clothed a corporate tool in the guher
natorial chair with authority to close saloons and
to prohibit the selling of firearms or ammunition to
uiviii* who iiiitfht think it advisable and judicious
t,. irproporiate to himself hia constitutional right
to bear arms as a matter of self'defense.
The conditions that have been created in Colora-
do are causing thousands of men to do som© serious thinUing, and while these thousands of men
•lesir© paaoe if possible, yet tliey want no patot
that is bought at the expense of manhood and
honor.
The braipi and bone of « State have reverence
for law and have the most #incere respect for the
constitution of a State and Nation, but if IWk**
feller is to tower above the constitution and corporate anarchy is to bo indorsed and supported by
the prostituted officials of a State, then the day
iM not far distant when the callous hand will strike
i. blow for Justin*.—:Miners' SlsinuliM'.
COALHURST  NOTES
GOVERNMENT TO AID
BIO STORM SUFFERERS
Odath Toll Orows In Nfw IrwngwleH
Horror •• Fre»h Report* Come In,
PjtMrt antf tons Oo te Doth To-
Ukitr
Ottawa, ont., June l«.--llmi mart*
il,.o Hm» liv*» »«>f* lou: is* Jh».' storm
off -WialWi my   «n   ittr uarihvnijtoM.
l4nm»n<*. on th# met tide of Mltt-coo
in.-I S'.ii)|,lt;;jJi una Uuuwiue IUUIiik
Notts ner* wrecked nt M*lby. Thirty-
fh-p *rhooncri» wire tfrtfpti wrtt«r«* on
''William Graham was In Coalhurst
on a business trip last week, connected with the Miners' Union and the
company. 'We hear be made quite a
host of friends, -without Introductions.
Alex Boyd, the -boxcar loader man,
left -Coalhurst on Saturday for" his
home in Cape Breton. Alex enys
things are too dead out- here.
—ifceoBard RWgway—ana^ac1r"Ciayr
ton left camp to look for a' better 'pasture around the Hat this week. Good
luck, boys.
•Mrs. Harry .Thomas underwent an
operation for appendicitis on Monday
at Diamond City hospital. We are
pleased to learn she ls doing nicely. -
•Mrs. J. H. Watson and ibaby are
talcing • a little vacation during , the
slack times.
Mr. Tuff has found something ln
the vicinity of his farm, Just west
of Coalhurst, which he believes Is
"mic'a." and the Lethbridge Herald
gives him .further encouragement to
investigate the matter. It it pare
stuff all right, and he should be a
rich 'man soon, and very toon at thst.
If they had advised him to start a
poultry) farm and use this splinty
looking dope for the grit with, the result that he might get golden eggs
some day for the dry tanning eon
gress, <we should not have bean surprised, Nevertheless we hope Mr.
Tuff has found something that he will
-benefit by, and the fanners in this
part of the country sure need to find
something to cheer them up s little.
Picnics are In order every Sunday
at Wattnough's ranch. Bring ths
gramaphone along and everybody two-
step.
The concert at tke M«thodfst
church last ■week waa a pretty good
affair. Quits a number of nickels and
dimes .panned out in ths count, considering ths hard times. We bslisve a
concert would go food Ot about two
weeks, ths proceeds to be used to pay
back rants, owing to ths company.  ,
Some one asks wh6 it was doing a
ten mile trot -every morning around
his section of land. 8ald fsrty, we
believe, is doing other stunts, suoh as
skipping, bag punching, shadow boxing and talking about ring craft and
hundred dollar bett. With sil this no*
tng on 4n Coalhurst, we wonder what
it will amount to if ths station matter
finds out.
Coalhurst Local Union Notts
Tht miners, st a largely attended
union meeting on Thursday, June 4th,
decided to resume worl snd give
our Wttrlct President a chancs to
handle our grlevsnco with ths Com-
, , , „ mlssloner, who had declined to take
pnid « ««nts a ton. pick miners ont „,, ,hll grfufan^ othnrwlie, because
dollars ton, and «wh miner «» to bs Jl0 aM wt! Jjad violated the agree-
provided with an electric safety «"»» ment. Acting Prtsldsat (irahsm was
wltl«>h he «;an w.ur on hts cap. (TM „, th„ mMttns and sdvtued the men
lamp* »w» »«iptiliwl with powerful j »ha, ,yt w|, ^ onjy wa}. <0 g,t «n
.Mown* battery which is charged «*• badlenct with his worship. 8o. after
ery day JwjfopMli* mlnw to-tglns work. UotiirideraMt discussion, ths men fall
T}»«   b*p   :?   prevt-kd   *«htv?nf,»» wjtj, |,u ld**«>, and ibe am
Tb the Editor District Ledger, Dear
. Sir;
I am instructed by'my Local Union
to give to the members of District 18,
U. -M. W. of A., some little idea as to
the cause of the trouble-now existing
'between the employers and employees
at the mines at Coalhurst First we
are working under an agreement made
after the agreement for the District
was' drawn up, and our's just reads
that prices aud conditions shall ibe governed by the 'mines ln the immediate
field, namely A. R. and I., Chinook and
Diamond City Collieries. In many
instances the Pit Committee and management have come to loggerheads
over these conditions referred to, as
the company at Coalhurst do not always feel like doing their work exactly as do the A. R. and I., or even
Chinook. Different iways of getting
out -pillars appeal to' the company
here, making orosseuts farther apart;
different dimensions in timbers appeal to them to be more suitable.
Safety lamps are always used here,
while in tihe A R. and I., which Is to be
our guide in conditions, etc., they use
the open light in most parts of their
workings, and a different explosive is
used here than at the A. R. and I. All
these different items ln conditions are
an open road to a certain amount of
argument between tbe men and management, because we are governed ,by
an agreement which ls based on conditions >which exist in another mine, and
do not and never did exist in the one
the agreement was made for.
Now we come to the troutole'at ipre^
sent occupying our attention: The
coal is supposed to pass over a screen
ot certain dimensions—said dimensions nobody seems to know. -But the
screen the company installed twas taken to be according to other mlnea.
•The scale committee examined everything with the officials of. the company
when contract (work was started early
in 1512, about Febraury or March, and
wa-s satisfied with what they had seen
aB toeing correct, "as they   had   no
means of '-gftntrftrttt-iHi-ig j>iw+Mng nny.
High Glass Photd Plays
TONIGHT-THURSDAY
-6   REELS—FEATURE .EXTRA^RDINARY—6   REEi.8 '
Germinal
Or ^The  Toll bf Labor   ^
The Greatest Mining Picture'Ever Filmed
" FRIDAY and SATURDAY""
Blograph Feature In Twp Reels v    .
i Cur
A Splendid Feature Full of Action     ,
Monday and Tuesday
SELIG 8PECIAL TWO PART FEATURE
Tragedy and Ambition
COMING      COMING      COMING
„.   Five Reol Lubin Mastsrpieca   -
or
lAule *8hliJi»l#an and wsn?    «f   tbem  - --
tmtfty danwufwr.   The crews reached |-Morsf* battery which .tst«wrgtd_«-
»hor» aafoly.
in  hi* Akwktoo *«U»   'ie Imnnn'iTbt*J^-*',-   Sf ••*«   "J"",*1"tUmji« with |il« id***, aind th* comj«»J
trsiels swad-ed. U\  no Mr** w*r*\yiM*M* mtenmrtl whfla •»"»« *»« *■•» nottfNl to thin *tt»et and wort
w»»lmd overboard worker the bfiicflt of a »WvJ7/™ rwwt rasumsd on Monday.   Wt aro ex-
Xew UriiMw'icii and Umiw cosat IwiJmid drowned while his ntkoomr wa« h* can dlrtct {* j*JSS&kxSi  *h*
off     land.   A   Shlpplssn mosi nc'dt'l     Amhorttwa   say   tne
way,", and the coal since then, up to
about two months,ago, has received
the amount,of screening that this method would allow. Now-the company
want to get the coal screened a little
tetter before being -weighed, and "have
put ln what may be called blades or
retainers, ibetween where the car of
coal is damped and the screens to
ateadjr. the speed of the coal going
over tht scream, thereby getting fljore
screenings through the screens' and
less In tbt weigh pan. *fl»* miners
crumble about thtlr weight not being
as good as Jt was and tht' Fit Commute take tht matter up uith tbt
management and try to get tbsss .blades or retardtrs taken out again, but
fail,in their efforts to make their argument stick. Tbt company says tht
coal still -pants orer tbt standard
screen and thtir Is notbin* in tbo
agreement to say they cannot doiwhat
tbty bave dont. Tht mtn, bowtrtr,
take it tbat it is a new oondKkm, and
not existing in tbt otbtr mints «loss
by. Tbo awn agrtt to stand by tht
existing conditions, and* ask tii* Company to ust tht method as used in
tbt A. R. snd I. Htr* wt art told
tbt dssign of our Opplt Is not Mkt tht
otbsr tlpplts around hsrt, snd the m*
tbod ustd st tht Lttttbrtdft Oak
Mints cannot bt ustd htrt, so what
art wt to dor Tht Local Unifen takt
It ttost tht mttbod ustd htr* wat sat*
isfsctory to both sides for ovtr two
ytsrs. -why should it not bt satisfactory until tho txplrttfon of th* agrs*>
ment ntkt March, wbtn both sldts will
bs considered, and a nroptr working
agreement may be mad* to salt tb*
dtsica of tlppit and othtr conditions.
Tbt mtn notified tht company thst
tbsy wtrt ssttsflsd to continue working on a day <wag* seal* until tbls nsw
condition was prlotd and stttlsd,
wbleb Is In tht sgrsamsnt (pan 7)
under th* htadina of "Ntw Worli,"
thereby showing Uiey af* ssilsfltd io
do what is in th* sgrtMMnt. Th*
company, howsvsr, say thst Is no good
to th«n. thtrsby showing thty stw not
satisfied to do what th* sgrasmtnt
doss contain, but srt wilUng to do any
thing st all which la aot tn th* agreement, and at tht huh* ttm* using tht
argument thst tht agreement contains
nothing to stop thtm from doing it. Bo
whar* do w* stand and what Is to Im
dona with each s Matt of affairs txlst-
ing? The mino here hss worked ettry
Utile so tnt Uils ysar and w* btlltvt
ths Company are np sgatn*t it warding s market for thslr ronl At the
sam* Um* th* mtn ar* np agslntt it
nn regkrds a HfUis asd dont want to
lose amtklcs which Ibty bt'Atir u
rtghtfolty tktdrt throttfh hsHshlps.
poor markets and ad terse conditions
The Sunken Village
■„ *    ■      '* - - •   . -"a'1 -■    ^ -.
Matinee Saturday at 2.30~5eatad 10c
GET  THE   OEPHEUM  HABI.T
IFilFfflWinilJBHIWIIMHIIIIIIlil
The Surprise of the Season
, wmsmmmmeneeoememaemaeBmamameBBmeaeemeeemeetmmomm
JOE  UVANNI
N       OF PERNIE
VS.
* *» i
SAiM  CXmJLWLJLUL
LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION WRESTLER
OP ENGLAND
On Thursday, June 11th, at 9 p.m.
IN PtkNIB ATHLETIC CLUB, (INGHAM'S HALL)
Good Looal Pwliminwiei Gon. Adminion $1.00
I'Vidav nud tUat sia) ditaitt^r '*tt* the;80    miles   mi      wh«,    *»    •-"■■i'i"."" i;•--,-;  ---„: ,i,. -m.. mmmmhU
wow in the his»iry ol m** UaMtm in-U-b^iwr. wauu.nl b>  fanulu towi* Ia»lis    ''''P^AVS
«hi™y "f svw   iiniiis*t<-K   whk   Hi.»ltlnel^ ItentollliT nnd fill son and an. awwshnstidjr |250,0«»;--BschanR«.     ,_■
mtrmm mn4* In Ottawa ifels mom.|mbm tmmem* bnj«*« gi%« ^|MUAH HUt^^ WILL TMR«Ll| ^      ,
Mr. Has** **M thai sppsFMitly iiotfth* two i«ts#ls rspoitmi   muore on,    ^   ^ y,,.^*^''^^^*^*,^^
win*   »«r* umii)   uwu»ik«5» u«s^n»».<* wt i i'*.-try*■*.**■• •>*. n*,****.*■•**-•" r-'' -A. '■•   ^^   #„_.-,.„  ..i«_ **,*■, iim nntrori  itram.liM. t
it &££* ^yrasl; ** ^^ n^^iwa^ wH5r&!
^C'lkt a total W.* at MsIt.ayjS.irt j shown thirrtgw J«^«»»^r  *•»{
lb*. !»od»#« »f th* rrew. Captain Pros- }*«»n*ita» «f «k«.*JEIL - •£!' J^
%lr* Albert, his two sons. MarUa ant formed liy *• "•*»?£;••l*_.m*1" I
John llsptltte. an«l Oliver I'solin, men whos* bous* ah* ****** ft .in *
emt upon tk* abort*. I ov*ri>ow«rlag 1» K* ntmip*>  nml nn
Km far frnm whsr* ths It. J. W. mst *«««*d JpwtW":
i.. Jt ism
PANTORIUM
ASK FOR
FHE ROSES,
mtrtm
,*-.      t t*
lion." Htt i«iii tlt*t »* won *• th*
KoTi-nim-vr.i had *«ffi<-lent fnforma-
i'lon. *tcn* Wrtdlti tic taltcn to assist
fHiffcrwri
retmSm.lSo T^mntnntXi^mZtZ:^!* ths it. i. w. mm \ ^*^^_* ££< 1*0$,
,,,,„....      ,.     .,-x,v*iti*,   tt* ik* fmr'Ttteo'ihll*'    iv.wra*.    »w   ot  H**to*i™*™*,^n™™~.?"T^
{.,,      •    » t, 9.9 i^r-n-Hl rentet-'* l»«P** «?** i'aran»«. »"«• i-infn'^t nn-KWl bed bm*>* stiuw^iua nt ,..'.* ,u.a ,
d»blU $m* "down    «   lem tmrl L ehore,   ol   Uul. mtmnne,   Uiooot,   K~»^»t "g»«n*-». *» ^|
, ,»# wm M* m Une ma w#H nn m mn. <b«ir * r,w# re-mked timt* naieh meat i in «Me* HJM ZrTmTXtkTmtmrf
H* kmeata i* ,o*,ne td coaaUWtls* | sf th* v««.i, nr* dsmsa-i. \wVt^&^"™<*^-1
' indf i®od *W tntr mad- «MB * stwsit'
i1"" ~'"m"\veiM~dV~PlTritMW-nhf*** *nt*te !««» h»r llf* »nd kIm* -nedr)
9 ..^ ,, ■ i ——*-». i*>*r tenn wt«« -Mwitaht   t*+r   mm twi
HmWrwMMkyOii {*** tonMttd today t» mtnr of th*. a*--.   ,t» m**
nltm*™*A-*~- *w.!i*a«* ntMfs r^stnis* to w*ri under I   Comrsd* T. ». Oshoras,   it* ?illsd
in tontm td coastHMIktaiof tv v^t-w.x am *»s»»S'-
■met* d*wtollah*d und IS troetk n«*yi Xmm"m9'A._7»«
t,t »bwB xkrn* lean is «l»»t*r, Wtftj4XX MIWEHf *MM.TOm
*, <tifu*»«...       U»»«.*.     Bl.vlkU.lU lit. .stiSkQt:.':
1   Tailors
Clothes and Shoe Cleaners
®
Suits Made to Order
from $18.00
Hats, Caps and Belts made ts match ff»Hs
Mzssz±.:
.-mj
lUlhsr.'. X. B^ iim* 1ft—1*« PH
fe jktb
ftltar* tte) nm i
Ground Floor    144, Main St.
IN SUDDAOY'S OLD ftTORE.   PHONE TtP
jtnle wtmebt  ham  botb tit\nZntin0 that Is «o be ia torro tor \oetWMttwtft^mrnin towa »®d r#«ls. l»,^iii'i»iM.^i»»iiii<<
~WjS?
riw>i,yt»fori,i»«^jiii^^
A
4fl
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, PB&NIE, B. C, JUNE 13 1914
PAGE FIVE
ft*33||
•If'
-,♦♦;
♦    -    BELLEVUE NOTES .♦
.  ♦        j.' By "Vexatiis-V 1 ♦
♦ --   • *-d -. .,     ■..,-.      '     ^
... ■     . ^. ,-■'    V
,      -   x    ■,-     ■ *. Ir ^ >
,.G.W,Oousens met,'With e slight ac-
■   ^cldent on., Tuesday; receiving   some
"\'--.nasty.wounds on the h-spd.   After be-
. .; Ing fixed- up byi the doctor, he -was
. able to;go.-home.
V   'Mr. -Harry Boulton left this week
Ior Ws home in Lancshire, England.
,„ ...   A large company of children, under
'    ,~.Mr, A.,.'KelIey, the principal of   the
. school, climbed Turtle Mountain   on
,   ^-Saturday.,
The miners at Bellevue were all
idle on Monday.
The Bohemian people of the camp
lield a dance in the Workers Hall on
.(Monday night.
;•        The athletic exhibition and wrestling match ln the lyric Theater on
'Monday night drew a large crowd.
' "Ursus" certainly gave a  wonderful
' exhibition, >wh(le  the wrestling    be-
tween Clapham and Fred Scale . was
"- also good.   Clapham, failed to' throw
liis man in 15 minutes and at the end
made the statement that the local boy
'    was the strongest man he had -met for
<;      four months.   He also made tbe'state-
.   ment that he would throw any three
/ local men. ,
Mr. Comfort and daughter were up
from the North Fork on Saturday. He
reports great .preparations for drilling
for oil- in that neighborhood.
iPercy Andrews, the C. P. R. scale
Inspector, is* spending the week ln
this vioinlty.
A boio coyote stole a turkey off the
' nest, 'belonging to Andrew Goodwin,
on Sunday night A very valuable setting of eggs was destroyed as a result,
.The Rev. Fred T. Cook will preach
Ills opening sermon in the Methodist
church on Sunday evening, June 21st.
. Bellevue Local Union Notes.
Our meeting convened as usual with
the -President in the chair supported
by a good crowd..
~y     /   " 4t,.  Correspondence
" "We. fiat© -received from the District
office the nomination call and wore
ty, ■        also asked to decide as to whether
.ws desired to use.the preferential -ballot or-to revert to our   old   ihailicd.
Now, seeing that we, Local 431, were
responsible for the resolution. introduced at convention, whereby we de-
■' sired that before .eny member could
iold ac office he must have a majority
of all votes cast.   And, whereas die
preferential ballot was.called lnto.be-
*.     ;,ing to till that need, we cannot very
well Ignore or -discarcf'it now. Surely
we are not going to parade our lack
of intelligence concerning- tbe above-
named ballot, and.drop-it. like a hot
cake before we ' have-givqn. it a fair
trial? As was poitned out, tbe coming
election will be less complicated than
the last, ao we advise you to stay with
it.- 'We were also in receipt of another circular.'informing us.'why President Smith had'resigned.NNow, at
the first intimation of such a step, we
were a surprised bunch. In the first
'Place, as.-was pointed out in previous
correspondence - (that was withheld)
we only desired- him to attend our
meetings. President Smith, however,
puts it as tbe culminating point"
which led to his, resignation, as there
was some dissatisfaction at some ot
the settlements effected .by him. Now,
if President Smith Is referring to
some •findings that have been handed
down during the life of our present
agreement, there is much cause -for
dissatisfaction, but surely no one is
blaming President Smith for that, as
we should all know by this time the
functions of such boards.
x
Reports of Committees
The examining committee reported as follows: We, the undersigned, being appointed a committee to examine the whole of Bellevue
mine, do hereby beg to report that on
the lst and 2nd day of June 1914, we
examined the lower section from the
■main entry, through all the working
places, airways and .traveling places
leading thereto, and from 133 to 76,
and all the old workings accessible
and -from 68 to 45, and ail 61 district
traveling roads and airways leading
thereto, including return airway, and
found all ln good working order, with
the exception of the inside district,
where the ventilation is rather slack.
Continuing on the two1 following days
to examine thq, upper section,'We examined all working places, airways
and traveling roads, and found same
to be in good working order and ventilation good, with' tho following exceptions: Slackneap of air.in -main
gangway and inside rooms, also in
No.3 angle north, off 67 and the angles
south of same. We also find traveling
roads leading to splits 36, 37, 39 in
an ynsafe condition and would recommend tbat they be remedied at once.
>   Submitted by, '.
•'      -        • ROBT. LIVETT,
; JOHN HARWICH..,
After a tew questions had' been
asked-and -answered, the report was
accepted as satisfactory. The report
of the .delegate to the special board
meeting was then; received, and as
there is an idea abroad that Bellevue
Local began to publish its Local Union
1/
Don't Forget Sale of Men's
And Boy's Clothing
ON SATURDAY JUNE 6th
AU Mens 3 piece suits reg. $25.00 Sat. $20.00
AU Mens 3 piece suits reg. $23.50 Sat $18.00
AU Metis 3 piece suits reg: $21.00 Sat. $16.00
AU Boys 2 piece suits reg. $6.50 Sat. $5.00
AU Boys 2 piece suits reg.   $7.00 Sat.   $5.75
AU other suits at cut prices Also good range
of Boys Knickers and Bloomer pants at cut
prices Also some good lines of Mens pants
greatly reduced.
Reductions in Groceries, Dry Good and all
Mens Shirts
Fresh Fruits Sat. Reasonable Rates
HILLCREST CO-OPERATIVE
Society Limited
HILLCRE8T , :•:   ALBERTA
•U
notes for the express purpose of getting after President Smith, the time is
opportune to just state why we reconsidered our former position: Dur-
ing our recent three weeks' stoppage
•we thought we would' utilize OUR paper for the" purpose Of making the
■membership of District 18 conversant
with our troubles. But as that avenue
was closed ft> us, we were compelled to use some other me-
diunv and at the time we affected a
settlement ,we were on the point of
making our troubles public by having
them . published in pamphlet form.
Now, realizing that he had nothing to
lose toy publicity then, and that if we
had not discontinued our Local Union
notes, the membership of our District
would have been in possession of sufficient data, previous to our stoppage,
to have readily understood our position and to sympathise with us;
that, Mr. Editor, and Ledger readers
Is the true reason of our present position. Our meeting* concluded at
its usual late hour, with matters of a
routine nature. Will all members endeavor to be present next Sunday;
when we will receive nominations for
the office of District President, also
nominations for local officers?
By a typographical error it was
stated in these notes that a day's
wages was $3.00, instead of $3.30. This
is understood toy most of our readers,
but In case of any question arising, we
make this correction.—Ed.
COLEMAN   NOTES
A most successful whist drive was
brought to a close on Tuesday night,
June 2nd, in the hall adjoining the
Anglican church. The following
ladies and gentlemen are the prizewinners: 'Mr. Leitch, first; Mr. L. G.
Brennen, second, and'.Mr.'iM. Bell,
third. Among the ladies, Mrs. Martin (Bowman secured the first prize;s
■Mrs. J. Loneebury, second, Miss W.
Gower, third.
Work on the foundation of the
Catholic school is progre9sing"~rapidly
and it Is hoped will be ready for pupils
about the end of ..the summer months.
About thirty men were laid off rin
the International Coal . Company's
mine in.. Coleman last week. Conditions as to work are not very prosperous in Coloman at present.
At the regular meeting of the Coleman Loca] it was moved and seconded that we revert back to the old
method of votlng.-
. 'William Graham was appointed delegate to the Trades and Labor Congress to be held in St. Johns, New
Srunsw&kr
On 'Friday night, the 5th of June,
the Odd jFellows assembled ln tbe
Eagles Hall, Coleman, to do honor to
ono of their order who has left for a
well-earned holiday - in_ Drayton, Ontario.. After tea and refreshments had
been partaken of/ an address -was
read by .Mr. Thomas Haynes, and <Miss
'Martha iMofflt presented Mr. John
Swan with a Past*Noble Grand collar
and Jewel. Mr. Swan feelingly reviled to the address. -Speeches wore
made iby 'Mr. Charles Duniop and others, and dancing was indulged in until the wes etna" hours of ths morning.
On Saturday -night, -the 6tb, the
drawing for tbe high grade bicycle
given by Mr. Ouimette of Coleman
took place and was won by Miss
Glady Crawford.
Coleman Football Club Journeyed to
Hosmer on Saturday, June 6th and
beat ths team of that ilk iby ths
•core of 2 goals to 1. Conbln 1* due
at Coleman on Saturday next, when
a good exhibition of tbs of the soecar
tame is expected of both teams.
Born—<Po IMr, and Mra. J. M. Murdock
(of Flagstone, R C), In Coleman, a
son. (Mother and son are both well
•Mr. Crawford, who hat been study-
ins medicine for tbe past three y«an,
Is asilitlng Or. R. T, Rom Ib Cole*
man. Mr. Crawford was a -former resident of Coleman.
'Mrs. Grant Downing underwent an
operation for appendicitis and Is -pro-
graulng very well tn Dr. Ron* private hospital.
8. H. 'McDonald of Coleman -would
liks to try conclusions with any miner
tu the Paw at about 133 pounds. Now
horn ii a chance for soma one to pick
up a couple of hundred dollars easily,
(Reply through the columns ot the
District Ledger.)
The football game between Corbin
and JMichel look place on Corbin's
new grounds. The teama turned out
as follows: Corbin—Walker, goal;
Clark * and Harlin, -backs; Strang,
■White, Jackson, half backs; Stobbart,
Bell,-Overton, Stobbart, Hayden, for-
wards. -Michel—Moores, goal; Hampton - nhd 'Holmes, backs; Weaver,
Travis, .Guest, half backs; Sudworth,
Grundy, Kirk. H. Brown, F.-Koberts,
forwards. Sands, referee. The game
was very evenly contested, both teams
scoring *, once. Michel lost several
good chances and should have obtained the lead, however, ihey are
pretty well satisfied with sharing the
points In both 'matches. Corbin played a good and skillful game and deserve all tiie praise that is given them.
We are informed the Coal Company
Intends painting the houses this summer. -Let us hope it Is true; a little
renovation will be appreciated
greatly.
Mr. Joe Wagner visited Mr. Pete
Sandorgraff at his home in Spokane.
LETHBRIDGE  NOTES
The mines are running two days a
week, as usual.
The death occurred on Sunday of
.\gnes, the Infant daughter of Mr. and
IMrs. John Larsen, ag;ed three months.
The sympathy of thii' many friends of
the family is extended to them in their
sad bereavement..
The funeral of the late Mrs. Brigadier Hunter, who was a victim of tbe
disaster to the Empress of Ireland,
was held this afternoon from Hetter-
ley's undertaking parlors. The members of tbe Salvation Army Band met
at the parlors and marched, from there
to the Citadel. Adjutant Kemp of
Calgary conducted the services. The
interment iwas made in ihe public cemetery.
Fire -broke out at 995 John street,
Staffordvllle, on Sunday afternoon,
completely.destroylng Frank Brandle's
barn. Three months ago Mr, (Brandle's home, was burned'to the ground.
The equipment from both No. 1 and
No.. 2 fire-stations responded 'to tbe
call, 'but high winds had aided the fire
to spread so there waa no opportunity
to save tbe building.
Mr. Jim Peacock, who underwent an
operation for appendicitis, is home
and is progressing favorably."*
.Building operations on the separate
school on the north side have commenced. It is to be one of the finest
buildings in the west when completed.
Dr, Miller, Provincial Superintendent   of   Technical   Education,    met.
their opponents, Coleman -wanted
to move off in the orthodox fashion,
but the Hosmer half backs would not
let them, and consequently for the
closing part of the first portion of the
gaone most of the play was at Coleman's end, Ramsbaw on one occasion, after good work by Pow, missed
an absolutely open goal, much to Coleman's joy, Crossing over, matters
still continntd even, both sides attacking in turn. Coleman, however, were
the more dangerous in front of goal
and gave Hosmer's defensive many anxious moments. Ultimately a weak
clearance by Pruett left Jackson unmarked in possession, about 35 yards
outv und he scored with a long shot
that Hosmer's goalkeeper ought to
have saved. Ramshaw, for Hosmer,
■missed a glorious chance of equalizing
immediately after, and the game closed with Coleman winning 2—1.
Coleman's forward line was superior to Hosmer's, but there their excellence-ended. .Banks and Killock
were the best of the line, and Beddlngton was also useful/ "Ruffy" was
the best of the halves, and was well
supported by Jackson and Hunter.
McCauley and Emmerson kicked well
and Holmes, in goal, gave, nothing
away. Richards was Hosmer's stalwart and he received splendid support
from Balderstone and Burlinson. It
was this' trio that kept Coltman wondering about the result. Hosmer's
goelkeeper was at fault t.n one or two
evasions, but kepi a good goal, and
had two sturdy defenders In Wardrop
(who played one of his best games),
ar.d Pruett. Pow was the star of the
front rank.
A special meeting of Hosmer Local
was held Sunday last, and was well attended, the hall being filled. The action of the District Executive in declaring the election of delegate to tbe
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada
null and void, was thoroughly discussed, but the members failed to set any
reason for such a step, especially as
W. Graham got such a large majority
and also having regard to the action
they took in the Rocky -Mountain
delegation. We also went on record
as being iu favor of abolishing the preferential system of balloting, lt being
Uie-general opinion that considering
-the large number of different nationalities tbat comprise the membership,
the slmplist method of voting is the
one which Would give the most satisfaction. Tbe correspondence relative
to the resignation of Jr E. Smith as
District -President, caused surprise, tbs
membership not seeing much reason
for any such action. However, we
suppose ex-President Smkhvhas a perfect right to resign if he so wishes,
even tf the reason is not quite clear,
On Sat. June 6th at 0 p. m.
The Tieket That Wine
The Bicyele or Dinner
Set Will be Drawn
Jf or mry doUtr y<m iptnd with ui yon bro ono
cbtuoo of wtimiBff out of tlw start mantionaJ
talssfcttprim
tho tltfien drUter* wn mend the wtrtr* rhnairea worn
hvn of wtoaiaf. Too got bit quality and lowmt
prion han, io bro on poor waaU mpplted it thit
ttort Md bo ta Hm to got that boonttfal Mt of
diab« or tho MgtHtsdt W«y«lt.
Be on hand Saturday evening,
June 6th, at 9 o'clock sharp
W. L OUIMETTE
Coleman        -        Alberta
♦♦■
MICHEL NOTES
Nominations for local officers will
take place on Sunday at 2 p, m A
contract miners' meeting will be held
after the local union -business Is over.
Tho principal object of ths contract
meeting will be to receive nominations for checkweighman. Ws bop* to
see both meetings well represented.
John Price has heen laid up for
more than a week with la grippe, bat
we are pleaim! to say he la Impror
tog.
A dance took plate In (Iraham's
Hall on Friday last, one remarkable
fraiitr* nbout it belrnr tbt* amint number of ladiea present. Pour gsntlc
m«-ii to oti-H 1mlv. "hi, st too bait
We are pleat**.! to annonne* lir.
James Stewart baa been promoted
and now holds the bosltion td tnmne-
ner tor ths Trites-Wood store.
Bvnrybotlj' Is wondering when llw
new store will be
the school-boards, lastevening. The
night classes -for miners.will be commenced this winter, as soon-'as the
necessary arrangements can be made.
.Mr. and "Mrs. Robert Clark and
baby .of No. 6, Hardlevllle, left on
Saturday for a two months' visit to
the land of the thistle and the
heather..
The official plan of the Thirteenth
street subway was signed and sealed
by the Mayor and City Clerk, and
work on the construction Is in full
swing.
The dallies and Taber met on
Thursday in a District game of football. The score being 2 to 1 In favor
of the Callles. The winners appeared
to be a more seasoned bunch of players, and were In a trifle better condition.
The North Lethbridge residents
have obtained tbe cluster lights on
the principal streeti, making a vast
improvement to ths north side.
The members of the Roumania
church, are building a churcb on Eight
street nortfe.
♦ HOSMER NOTI8 ♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦+.
Th? merchants of Hosmer called together an emergency meeting on
Thursday last to hear a complaint
that groceries were being sold after
7 p. m. by certain Individuals who had
been a party to the agreement tbat
•xlsta. After all the evidence bad
been produced, a verdict of "not
guilty'1 waa announced.
It seems If any one In the vicinity
of Hosmer shuffles off this planet
while tha White, B. C. season Is on
and tlio nnrt* Itnt'MMhle. i'«» own-
ment absolutely refutes to be responsible for any expense Incurred In
clearing the road lor funerals, Ai
least that is the nature of their reply
to a Hosmer widow who had to hire
teams to break ths roada before her
buaband'a burial could bo proceeded
with. Even In Russia one would
hardly meet with these highhanded
methods.
Mr. and Mra. W. Salt, popular rml-
denta of Homner, have left for Beak-
head, where they will reside In future,
Chief Cornett and President Kendall, of the fir** department, were
busy gathering funds during the past
week and report merlin* wiih arstlfv-,
ton ewcra*. A full ll«t of donations
will be given next woek.
The merchants of Hoamer are now
■Jwolrnloff lo f*1*! the gool of (Icting
their places of bualnea* kt T o'rltwk
each -evening,
To s-ppew the «e|fl#h tt'*', ho**
eve*, the nnaiatnntn nreto he rfenrl-mf
of their weekly Wednesdny afternoon
orr. but It Is to be hoped tbat the general public will djMhelr eiepifiiftK •>*•
radt- Osborne pointed out how before
the present machine era came in the
problem was to produce food for the
people, and now tbe question was the
consumption of the vastly increased
product of the worker aided by modern mahcinery. The problem of con-"
sumption arose over the fact tbat the
worker only received about one-fifth
of his product in the shape of wages.
A special meeting of Local 102 was
held on Sunday to nominate a candidate for District President. This local
deckled tc nominate one of Us own
members for the office, and the choice
wsx.% Aiex. McRobei'M.
The Local also decided lhat Ilia vote
lie taken eccordiny to the uot: const!
tuilou, by preferential ballot.
The football club visited Lethbridge
on Thursday and were defeated by the
Callles by a score of two to one; in
what was claimed to be the fastest
game flayed In Lethbridge this season. , The boys go again to play the
S. O. E.'s on the eighteenth.
A game was played on Saturday
with Grassy Lake at the latter place,
the boys going by motor. Taber won
by two goals'to nil. A return match
will be placed on Saturday.
The mines have worked one day this
month so far, and no work is expected
this week.
The Store
of Quality
and Service
We are now hookinsr or-
tiers for Creston .Strawberries for preserving,
price & quality guaranteed
HOSMER INDUSTRIAL
Association Ltd.
HOSMER    -    B. C.
(Opposite C. P. Ft. Depot.)
Realty Co.
INSURANCE  AGENTS
-    - - - w,wdk nominated for   the vacancy, but
we are since in receipt of a telegram
from him declining- the nomination.
It is rumored that a movement is on
foot to nominate an ex-president, if
such ls the case, it is certainly a good
stunt to leave the field to as small a
number as possible. We have already toad some, and It hurt—we mean
tbe Lib-Lab. stuff.    '
The nomination for Local officers
also took place, with the result that
the .personnel remains practically the
same, with a little change in committees. The election of Qas Committee brought forth some strong comments from the membership, It being
the general impression that these committees are only A farce. It Is an
established Impreslson that the company's treat the aame aa such. After
a long discussion It waa moved and
seconded that we decline to nominate
any gas committees, ud also that
every member refuse either to ect on
or pay any money whatever towards
the upkeep of same. ..Motion carried
unanimously.
Tbe pit committee were also Initruc
<ed to take up a few grievances with
the management, and report to the
next meeting. The Local alao intend
staging a concert and dance for the
benefit of Brother A. Torek, who bad
hia spine injured in the mine last August, and physically Is practically helpless, and appointed Ttrothers Balderstone, Mihalcik and tBureskl a corn*
mlttee to take charge of arrange*
ments.
The reault of the case 8huaka vs.
C. P, R, was practically as follows:
The Judge gave Judgment for the com*
pany in tbe common law action, but
ordered $1,500 dollars to be paid Into
court; $1,000 for the widow, and |3S0
for each child. Bach side to pay its
own costs. The gist of the judge's
decision was that flhuaka was in the
chute at hf* nwn rink, and therefore
the company were not liable or responsible for anything that occurred.
Tommy McKelvle had a narrow escape from being transformed Into »n
antel while reparlng a bull wheel on
"Caliper's" central. Tommy rot badly brul*ed snd shaken up, nnd will be
confined to the bouie for a few daya.
The occupants of the Victoria llacli
would be much obliged If the in-r»oi>
or person who borrowed or *tol« the
gasoline can* off the verandah would
kindly return the nnnxe. otlnsr*i«e thej
majenty of tbe law will be calM Into
operation, r j
Su jo)fu! did acime of thn i»m«-iii!ei»i
of the company feel about tbe dectnlon
In ttif» «hti*!ta enne lhat thnv <mu>i•■wl- i
ed <o load! ttt* nit and sundry with ariM
f'.flal Jo;, prodni*'"■ lln»***ef, »h*-*> <
enitnoi net away from tbe fact that-
iwbat is technically right ts not an
ways morally no, The miners of
Hosmer know ttmi with sn ex pend i-r
Hire nf a few dollnrn Rhtlika would'
probably be alive tml ay. and knowing,
Now is  the time
for  protection
You cannot afford
to lose when we
protect   you
can
Agents fer Oliver Typewriter
Co. Machines at 17 cants per
day.
HILLCREST
Opera House
Bright, interesting, educational subjects. Projection
clear and sharp. No flicker;
no eyestrain. Music by Hillcrest Orchestra.
Doors open 8 o'clock; start 8.30
Admission - 25c & 10c
HILLCREST
ORCHESTRA
Open or Engagements
for
Dances
Concerts
Etc.
UP-TO-DATE MUSIC
C.V. EDWARDS, SECRBTARY
HILLCREST ALBIRTA
Phone 74, ring 2
H. C. GOODEVE CO. Ltd.
■"™■^""'"■■^™"™»i.^********"l««"«M«BpiB»™M<MI«l«^^
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnlah your houae from cellar to garret and at bot-
torn prices,   rail, writ*, phone or wire.    Alt order* given
prompt attention.
If yeu art satisfied, tell others.   If net aatlsflsd. tsll ua,
Coleman
Alberta
w ffl!*?!'.   „ J r°» ' <*><** ««» We*Mtdaw/io that, ,„,» «.„ r,« .„
Thursday nnill II p. m. Mrtav '   "' l*"^"a^Z"*^'-^iatmii'^•W^T^'**1 "° *"**«*»»*»>' mirthful,
^n,*^^ «■■«»«•« in tto. o mtaeii.Hr.ctp«l how* I* town **• now clo*.
on tlm 3rd UiHeul to John (Jermsn. j ins nt I o'clock, namelg, J. Ilurns *
The awldent was eansrt by two entnim   im   ii ii,»m7; it"  !***
n «*• rt*» n  «** m* M
that were being lowered down on tbo
Incline Jumping th* track. Assistance
wns promptly    on    tbe    tuante. hot
intw uiUhAoj   ktWUMMM* A tHtUHTf i«kl
■seated certain. Md whits W, White-
houte. pit boss, nnd M. D. McLean
held timbers to avoid tbls, tbe
stpeeted ba^kpened, and another fall
of rock oeenrrrd, wblch would have
burled bim up  again,  but for   tbe
'the!
.«(!.     .«,>-* JldM.lUM,    ti.     i„    t»krfU(|    *****    **'
Aym arc talijflg » Jaunt nul vom^wny
tor n vacation.
il. I*, iiueketl wit* * c.u»ai*M v.»i-
tor ta Homier lust week.
Rational rrodw-** Co„ l,*d   sn4
Hosmer Indnitrial keen- Ltd.
M-nwr anA t'tttXarmrt onr* rm* ot
tn* mat (n«i>i i*» aeee st Homier for
*om«» tiro*. In la*t B*t'ird«j"« ienm*
match. Coleman gate ibe r,?**t !■*'*■
Ulifd «!U[il.ty, hut the ihrumfii! method* of llotmcr ramcd ib« cn»hold*ni
many antlous moments, and lbs for-
... _   ,     v     -  ..     -   —.    —- .twate of the game were In doubt ua-
r timbers plseed ow btm.  Tbey matt-Ull it bad almost rug Its conn*. *b#n, _	
^KC'^ra_wwjm_WimL Alvovily »firr*.ir.l -Totaniin, having scored two ol    tb*^! ihf town 'ute b«!«jj
TABER NOTES
Chief Paw-Ida, of iht f»r« d*furtni«nt, j
Is getting np n program of tport* for i
tkiminkm Ikty.     tk* fcwiinr-rj i*t*ttt*t*>
a mai
"i :v,A
'i!^Vtortte?U£Ld£!!i ESilTi J'" ;i''''V,,*':"f'ffJ"'*w! MtJ" atj'^iia «Sjt«St •»'«id '..nii-t „i ■<>!•
SiLWhJ brt& t£2u£5F •**•;'»•»«"•   »'**"*«•■'tno ttm drtw camp, Is In town thi* week vltltlng
fSMt r22L«      ",Hto,,,*',*fr..**" a rn .mp   ■Pi-t^ronttntind In <!!»* Amz\kMn fanning tbt.taet couplo *,t *.<;«*«,
Sr     MclniAiA     fAM...i.    -,     .  \'»abl<*n  o^l  < ol*m»n   from  »  com-(but tb* wnV tbo cr*p« »•#■ imktnt xbia
T^*tsl   * V.*!-TrIS■*.,ik^ *   rt*llt«Mwr..*«iaH**i*rha»tog eo rhwK-* ao tacit diarins ****!
|.'i   • I'ju   ',i   >jii. ,iu>l*Ll   Aw     \Um   Ukltr
koteU nmeodinM Ut, Tom Winter*.
A ent* ot attempting to ihoot   M-%
[wtte   and    o busing    thfl    coastsble
wblM nccutlug M. imy, m»m_7o
J. VM  Burton aM   Natinkfty.     Tb* |th«»n tbt* btnd ^syed.  Tbts pnlst gto
HcH>mcr ths touch   of vim tbat told
againif   the   scientific   methods   of
to twentf-one montbs In go«l.
«!S :
•THR    fl*
r-^ji«ns
111<> «,..'     kl,.«».»». ua.i«i.>«rr, ttft.*    >•■» •     ittm  tt*tntti*    tit*    f~
i*o twar.* b**tt.f, yet, nud enconraged) tri<t to the north rmoiry
Uv •'■.- «ii*»-< t iiur*, »ttckrd UfVly. I'o*,. «•-■• <UtW>t>*» i,t,\l\ \,,-l
••♦.I'tiull) irUklog two ow»<«<*ftU and,    J   U, Qttottn* tr***'  i\.*-   >!>■(.'«••»■»
m*,i*rt   -afik e $nod-tram tdt&i.   jy,i«,i k*t\nr* io ib# ji-„.-*   iftii cm
K»*d«r uteht.     Only t v-n,!i *«-liefsrf.
IStVcd gM, tWt  tkb*e a-bo did
my plnnAntl with tlu ill.cu
wev*|
Cm-1
F. M. THOMPSON GO.
"The Quality Store"
Phone 25
Blairmore, Alta,
GROCERIES, DRYG00DS,CR0CKERY
and Everything in Shoes
Our Grocery stock is complete with only the
chfM-rfKtf hrnnHf      ^ full -linn r*f Fr???! FfUftS
and Vegetables always on hand.
Fresh Strawberries and Pineapples For
Saturday
Sole agents for "INVICTUS," "REGAL"
"K"mako FINE SHOES and "LECKIE"
MINKS SHOES
K«-i»|» ymir tick*!* from «tir *mU rr«Mer, Tliey
nr*> wofili r» )\*v ii'iil «'ii!*i» s\1»t!M'Vtr j>ri'M»nt«Hl,
rommcneinir Mny l*t.
Tho Storo That 8AVES You Monoy ^m&matWQ*
am**
li|l|j<ll'iWlii,ii',wnwfV*W^'.'«
-«•-.
!^J*^vrW^'
SBS&iiiggSiWMiBiK^^
r
c
if
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JUNE
The Corporation of the City of
Fernie
BY-LAW. No. 149
(MS#
£**f
A iBy-law to assess, levy end collect
the cost of the construction, as a work
of Local Improvements of permanent
sidewalks under 'By-law Number 146
and to raise upon loan the necessary
monies to pay the cost thereof.
WHBRBAS the .Municipal Council
of the Corporation of the City of Fernie did by By-law Number 14G authorize the construction as a Local Im-
'provement, of permanent sidewalks,
upon portions of the following streets
in the said City of Fernie. namely:—
Mackenzifi, Victoria, Pellatt, Howland, McPherson, Dalton, Beihune,
Lindsay, Mason, Chipmau, Nicholls,
Morrlce Avenues, and Walmsley, Geni-
ralll, Wood, Cox, Hanson, McEvoy,
Thompson, Rogers, Drinnan and Davies Streets',
AND WHEREAS the Council deferred making assessment until ull suoh
work had been carried out and ihe
actual coat ascertained;
AND WHEREAS the cost of the
■work or improvement as shown by the
Joint Report of the City Engineer and
Assessor is Four thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and
eighty cents ($4538.80), nnd such
amount is required to be assessed
against the owners of the real property benefited by such improvement;
■AND WHEREAS the report of .the
said City Engineer and Assessor has
been adopted by the said Council;
AND WHEREAS the said Council
has raised from the Home Bank of
Canada on a temporary loan the whole
o! such costs, namely:—Four thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and eighty cents ($4538.80) and
it is intended to repay same out of
the proceeds of the loan to be Taised
hereunder;
AND WHEREAS as Uie said Council has decided to distribute the (payment of the cost of such works .proposed to tbe assessed hereunder over
a period of four (4) years and to 'borrow the monies necessary to defray
such cost upon the special rates levied hereunder upon the lands and improvements benefited upon the guarantee of the Corporation at laige;
AND WHEREAS the total frontage
upon tho said work of local Improvement of the real property nnd portions
of the real .property immediately benefited ls Eight thousand, five 'hundred
and ninety-nine and one-half feet
(8599.5 ft) and the cost chargeable to
the property benefited is as aforesaid
tho sum of Four thousand, five hundred and -thirty-eight dollars and
eighty cents ($4538.80);
AND WHEREAS the Corporation ot
the City of Fernie desires lo pass a
By-law for the purpose aforesaid;
iTJiERfcFORE the Municipal Council of the Corporation of the City of
Fernie, enacts as follows:—
1. That tho real property immC'
diately benefited by the said work of
local improvement shall be that which
is ■particularly mentioned, set forth
and described In the schedule follow
ing:-—.
SCHEDULE ^
Showing the real property immediately (benefited and tbe proportion in'which
the Assessment is made on per foot -frontage
Col. 1
Lot
12
13
14
3
2-3 of 4
1-3 of 4
Name of Owner
Dr. D. Corsan	
Mrs. C. M. Corsan ...
J. F. Rudalckl 	
Gladstone Local Union
Dobson & Wlllingham
J. W. Dobson 	
Mrs. Ellz. Todd 	
Chas. P. Hill          5
A. J. Farquharson     Pt. 6
Elten Turner     Pt.6
Wm. Hawthorne     Pt.6
City O'f Fernie          7
Francis White          8
District Ledger          9
District Ledger Pt.10
C. N. P. Coal Co., Ltd. .. Pt. 10
Wm. Hawthorne
A. T. Hamilton ..
C. A. Wilkes ....
Methodist Church
Methodist Church
Methodist Church
C. E. Lyons 	
2
3
4
5
6
7
S% 8
"Tfrnn-»".-E,n*cj—;-.—..... ttt~n -fir^s—
Sam Graham          9
Mrs. Leila Ross         10
Alex. Macnell        11
A. C. Liphardt    12
AV. F. .Muirhead       13
J. D. Quail        14
J. D. Quail         15
G. F. Johnson    "  16
Alex. Beck       17
S. F. Wallace       18
S. F. Wallace \       19
S. F. Wallace        20
City of Fernie       12
Mrs. Geo. Bella         2
Kootenay Telephone Lines       3
John Hunter Estate         4
Emma Kirkpatrick E% 5
Mary McFarquhar  W-Vi 5
Block
1
1
1
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
J6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
4       r>
Rate
per
Feet    foot
front front
6
(Total
60
60
60
13.5
13.5
9
4.5
80
1
a
i
4
4
4
2
■2
13.5
13.5
13.5
80
150
77.5
8.75
—a~«.
.50c $30.00
.50     30.00
An-
nual Total
Pay-   Payment ment
$9.00 $36.00
9.00   36.00
,50
,55
,55
.55
.55
.55
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.55*
.55
.55
.55
.60
laaaaaattat
ttHHti
p • • • • » i
Mrs. Marie Hoelzel
Ellz. Campbell ....
. W. F. Vance
Isabelle Wrigleswortb
Mrs. W. J. Blundell
Angele Chardon ..
Angele Chardon .,
J. B. Turney	
J. iB, Turney	
Geo. W. Hadley ...
Archie (Maclean ...
Al. Rlzzuto  ;
At. Rlzzuto 	
Knights of Pythias
L. E. IMeDonald
Al. Rlzzuto ...
Al. Rlzzuto ...
8. F. Wallace .
Jos. Alello ....
Sherwood 'Herohmer
Sherwood Herchmer
Francla White	
Catherine Roblcbaud
Catherine Roblcbaud
W. A. Ingram
Sophia-Bean	
Catherine Morrison
George Grandln ..
Frank Bean 	
W. j. J. .Morrison
Hugb Carill*
Wm. JUndley
Government .
John Be*n ...
Jobn Bean
John Bean
If. A. B*rig*n
George Barton
Oaorg* Barton
1.10. Covert	
Thomson ft Morrison
Nell McLean 	
Percy -Been 	
Philip Caratella ....
lebool Board 	
C. J. Digby	
C J. tMgby	
P. Carosella ........
P. Carosella 	
P. Carosella 	
Bmma Alder 	
Emma Alder 	
P. V. James Rstate .
•*»••»
••••#••
•   •«*«•••••!
UMIMMIUM
l»«»»«f*ff
• ttttttltl
6
1
S
9
JO
lt
12
13
11
15
10
17
IS
19
20
,
9
3
4
5
6
T
8
»
10
11
PL 13
Pt.18
Pt.1?
PL 13
14
Vt*
All
1
2
PL 3
-PL 3
4
5
6
7
I
8
10
1
s
3
4
&
1
2
3
7
7
9
-9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
14
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
21
21
21
21
21
21
11
21
21
21
22
22
21
23
S3
22
22
23
23
23
23
22
23
23
32
33
23
17.5
4      .75
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1,00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
60   1.10
13.5 .55
13.5 .55
13.5 .55
40,25 .55
40.25 .55
84     .60
17.5 .76
17.5 .76
17.-5 .76
4   1.50
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.6 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
fi.5 .70
3.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
68
30.00
7.42
7.42
4.95
'2.47
44.00
.75
1.50
.75
3.00
3.00
3.00
1.50
1.50
7.42
7.42
7.42
44.00
80.0«
53% 40.42
.59% 5.21
—t.a\u—e_qi_
TUO**]*i -**3T4di.-
9.00
2.23
2.23
1.48T
.74
13.20
.23
.45
.23
.90
.90
.90
.45
.45
2.23
2.23
2.23
13.20
24.00
12.12
1.56
36.00
8.90
8.90
5.93
2.97
52.80.
.90
1.80
.90
3.60
3.60
3.60
1.80
1.80
8.91
8.91
8.91
52.80
96.00
48;50
6.25
.59% 10.42
3.00
_1_EC B—OK.
—J.-VUW —*I . 44V
3.12   12.50
Col.-1
A'ame of Owner    . Lot
Oscar Erickson .."  4
Gee Han  5
P.  Bombirio' '  6'
R. Migale   7
R. Oaravetta  ?
Sam Lee \..,  9
Sam Lee  10
William Barton  11
William Barton   12
John Reid   13   (
■Mike Guzzi   14
Tony Caravetta   15
George Loxton    1
George Loxton .„. Nv 2
James Easton  %3
J. P, Bushell   %3.
Thos. Robertson  %4
Wm. Eschwlg    %4
J. 11. Wetherili   5
A. F. Haddad  6
Santa Pascuzzi   7
Percy H. Lewis  %8
Valentine Oppl   %S
Dorothy Hamilton   9
Joe Taverna   10
Sam Parks  '  Pt.l
P. Burns & Co,, Ltd  2
John J. George   3
P. R. Lundie   4
\vesteru   Canada  Wholesale Co  5
Patsy Audla   6
Marlon 1. Ward  7
Miss Jessie L, Dobson ... S
Wm. Newing   9
•0, Ulfstelii ........  10
Sam Lee   6
Valentine Oppl    7
Fred Miller  8
Mrs. S. Orr  9
Margaret Kerr  10
Jules Andre   1
Jules Andre   2
Wm. McDermid   3
Wm. Kummer   4
John Johnston   -      5
Miss A. tM. Andrews  6
Chlng Wing Kee   7
W. G. Barclay   8
Sidney Gillett    9
Thos. Griffiths     10
Kennedy & 'Mangan  1
Kennedy & Mangan  2
Joihn T. Mangan  3
Mrs. Mary Palmer   4
Mrs. N. P. Wrlgglesworth 5
Haxry Wlllingham   I1
A. T. Hamilton   2
Hattie E. Whelan  3
N. E. Suddaiby  4
C."N. P. Coal Co., Ltd. .. 5
McGladirey Bros  6
M-cGladrey Bros *-.. ■   ,7
H. Snow   •■ 8
Lily Kenny  9
John Phillips  10
«. iW. McGuire  11
W. J,_Adams   12
Jane Bullock   13
W*m. Currie W% 14 & 15
L. G. Snow E% 14 & 15
  6
  7
8
  9
.:  io
,  ii
  12
13
W% 14 & -15
, E% 14 & 15
-.&::
6
20
20
20
20
31 ft
34
34
34
34
48
63
25A1080
85
35
3ft
85
35
35
X
tt
36
15
*5
3tA
30
SO
30
20
20
33
78
78
34
34
78
78
10
10
10
10
10
1181
6
ft
5
5
5
88.5
.54
.54
.54
.54
.54
.54
.54
.80
.88
.03
.88
.88
.84
.88
.76
.70
.76
.76
.75
.70
.83
.83
.83
.83
.83
.80
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
60.50
7.42
7.42
7.42
22.14
22.14
50.00
13.42
13.42
13.42
6.00
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.76
1.75
1.76
1.75
1.75
1.76
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.76
1.75
1.76
36.83
18.41
18.43
18.41
18.42
86.«3
36 .A3
86.60
48.48
48.48
34.46
34.47
40.88
43.83
7.60
7.60
7.60
7.60
7.60
.90
.36
.36
,36
.36
,36
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
18.50
2.23
2.23
2.23
6.64
6.64
15.00
4.03
4.03
4.03
1.80
.52
.62
.52
.52
.52
.62
.52
.62
.52
.52
.52
.52
.53
.52
.52
.52
.63
.52
.63
.63
11.06
6.58
6.58
6.63
6.58
11.06
11.05
Emma Letcher
Emma Letcher
J. M. Clowers .
Angus Smalek .
Jozef Stelliga* ..
Jozef, Stelliga ..
'Mike Kubiness
'Mike Kubiness
John Garbutt  .
Henry 'Elliott .,
Block
32
-' isa ■
33.,
- '33 ».
.32
.32 .
32
32
32
,32.,
'32
•32
•33
'33
33
33
33
33
33
34,
34
34
~ 34
34
34
36
30
36
36
' 36
36
36
36
30
36
38
38
38
38
«8
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
46
46
46
46
46
47
47
47
4*7-
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47-
47
47
48
43
48
48
48
48
'48
48
48-
48
Rate-'. •■*.
5W." 7-
Feet   toot;* -X\
front fropt:'*5,otal
41.5,.60-' -25.00
"  |1,5\60
"41.5*;60
-41.5'".60
41.5 .60
.   41.5 .60
116.5 .60
161.2 .55
r 95.7 .58
7       8
Annual Total
Pay-  Pay-1
meat- ment
7.50   30.00
95.7N.5S'
95.7 .58-
81,2
10
10
5
5
5
5
10
5
5
2.5
9.5
O
5
41.5
71.5
41.5
41.5
.60
.75
.75
••76
,75
.75
.75
.75
.90
.90
.90
.90
.90
.90^
'25.00
' 25^00
„25:.00
25; 00
25,00'
68.13
88:68
65-93
55.93
S5.93
.48,68
7.50
-■  ,7.50
3,75
3.75
• 3.75
3.75
7.50
"4.50
4.50
2.25
2.25
"   4.50
4,50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
' 7.50
20.44
30,00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
81.74
26.60 106.41
16.78   67.12
.32.6 13.55
.20     15.71
60
.60
41.5
41.5
41."5
41.5
41.5
41.5
68
68
68
68
68
•114
39
39
39
39
39
39
'39
39
34
61.4
61.4
61.4
61.4 .51
61.4 .51
4
24.80
24.80
24. SO
24.80
24.80
24.80
24.80
24.80
57% 39.15
.57% 39.15
.57% 39.15
.57% 39.15
.57% 39.15
.51     (58.42
.60
.60
.60
,60
.60
,60
.55
.53
.55
.55
.55
.551
.55-
.55
.54
.58
.51
.51
4
4
4
4
34
39
39
39
39
39
39
39 '
114
39
36.5
36.5
.76
.75
.75
.75
.75
.88
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
18.42
35.70
30.70
30.70
30.70
30.70
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
,3.00
20.04
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
.22.74
22.74
22.74
16.78
16.78
14.60
. 2.25
2,25
1.13
1.13
1.14
1.14
2.25 '
1.35
1.35
.68
.68
1.35.
1.35
4.07
4.71'
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
11.74
11,74
11.74
11.74
11.74
17.52
6.28
6,28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
5.52
10.71
9.21
9.21
• 9.21
9.21
.    .90
.90
.90
.90
.90
6.01
6.82
6.82
67.12
67.12
58.41
9.00
9.00
4.50
4,50
4.50
4.50
'   9.00
' 5.40
5.40
2.70
2.70
5.40
5.40
16.26
18.85
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
46:98
46.98
46.98
'46.98
46.98
70.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
(25.10
25.10
25.10
22.10
42.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
3.60
"3.60
3.60
3.60
3.60
24.05
27.29
27.29
ajjd cqime hito force^m the! First d«[y
of July,;A. D. 1*14." r, -■;■■''; X
.14.' "l*n^'-^daT/«b^l:te\^**^.igi^
feno\ra.\£or"aU purj^see astherap-a-
ci-sii 1910: Local.* improvement" By-law
No. 2/ 1914,'V'•-,:v^(.-:-^;^- .'';. v^t" '
. Dime' and..passe*d. ini Council aBsem-
bled,tbi8'14to;^yt(to/M^f.A;--l}.-fi9^,
•."-' .v,".' '•' "NOTICE -Jr ;"■' ,J.-:;"
.TAKE' NOTICE 'tin,? ihe':above Is a
true.copy of -iho. By-law.. upoaiwWdh
■the (Count of'Revision will,*sit4n-'--the
Council Ofiamber,«<City Hallt City of
Fernlsi B;, C.,:*o»\.*yir*ediie6de.V,* June
24th, 1914, at,g>i.m:;v5jlountalni'Time.
.If any owner or owners desfre.to ob-
jeot^-to the assessment -made-byvibls
By-law the, requisite. (petition should
■ho filed witty-the undersigned ten clear
days.(before the" first sitting of the
Court of Revision.    - :  ,   '
'....   ARTHUR J. MOFFATiT*, X".'
''.''        -" '   ■    .„ City Clerk,
City .Hall, Fernie, B. O., -  :,   -   '
•May 15th, 1914.   ;    . '       .-*
THE PRESS/AND THE: WRECKS
.The Empires of ,Ireland-wasn,iqi.car*.
rying millionaires. •■ There i'were'-.tiut
few -people 'qyeicjwu.known; vJHyere
were. huadr§ds> of'icopunon- -voo^leA^
andltbey iw:ettt dowfl,.: -.'-" "-:■ ^XA-KAy-
v CBut* no.othesr- 4ews{ev$ht "of-Idie^iiy
cornered., even ,•; measura;bly^id?ifift,
portanoe with.. thte':torTiihliefi trajgedy of"
■the sea. -/However, Hga*p»t's Journal
used-red ink'st'tfce-'tap'of ifeMpiages!
to' telL, of., the „ Gla&tSiV victory, ,*,;-After
that ■cam&-tho;;itory,?of:-the- ■los's^'bfi
these1 'hundreds,     ••*■"'-A'A-   j,s;-.y*
" And a large portion' of tfeeT<japital*lsE
press; views ithe. matter; :in the same'
light,. Already. tt.-*4f*pears' thatv the'
Empress o^Jreland;yJllihet/-f9rgotteafe
sonn toy the .great;; pwb*$clt;jf : organs;.
■What'of -a-fow Uuhd^icdmiiaoa people?" > "■ '..>.- XXZ- '■.:. XS
And iwMt .more bandy idee, -to 'lay
hand to than^'to 'Wame" the crow ■ of
the, sunken; ship?- In' this -case, foHolw-.
dug thej,rule, the -capitaHstr- (press, for
the anost part, is displaying a descpic-
a-We, policy and one that tbe "working
class should mark well.—N : Y. Call.
liiiiii
1s»inrn»
^%£Tliey Djdr|l8;More
7A:a^thwM
W^lw^'
¥¥*V¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥Wvyy»¥»v¥-V¥*»M
^kick'kk.kri-kkkkkltt
A Royal Visitation
(As it ought to be)
By. R, R. Suthers
»¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥**¥¥¥»¥¥¥¥»*
HHMMMW
4
.88
.8?.
.88
.88
.88,
.55% 63.24
.88     22.74
.50% 20.30
.50% 20.30
>36.5 .50% '20.30
36.5 .50% 20.30
36.5 .50% 20.3'0
36.15 .50% 20.30
36.5 .50% 20.30
36.15 .50%'20.30
36.5 .50% 20.30
6.82   27.29
6.82   27.29
36.5
6.82
.6.82
"6.82
18.97.
6.32
6.09
6.09
6.09.
6.09
6.09\
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09
-.6.09
3.60
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
72.60
8.91
8.91
8.91
26.57
26.57
60.00
16.10
16.10
16.10
7.20
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
TV"ArRIcK-esT.T.... 77. *. EW«"'
Dan Willis WJ& €
Robert Smith         7
Jos, Johnson     % 8
Harry Haigh    % 8
Stephen N. Moore ;    % 9
Alex. Bunch     % 9
Cowper Stephenson .,",..       10
J.   A. Broley  A.:    % 1
Cecilia Lukas   ,...   % 1
John Rauter ......,,,,-..'..        2
George W. Goole ....;     % 3
Jos. Hamer	
Wm. Dickinson
Wm. Dickinson
John T. Mangan
Wm, (Bateman 	
Howard iMarshalf ..
Jas. A. Broley 	
Chris. Dlngsdale ...
Mary Podblelanclk .
Mrs. Clara Morris .
William Jackson ...
Miss A. 'M. Andrews
Robert Speirs 	
i t a • * • »
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
"49~
49
49
49
49
49
49
49
51
51
51
51
Cl
51
51
52
52
52
52
52
63
63
53
63
63
_34T
34
68
8 .61
8 .61
2.5 .75
2,5 .75
5 .75
101.5 .51
87.5' .51
79 .52
39.5 .52
39.5 .52
59 .52
69 .52
50% -20.30
7W%T9720 a.b.Vtf
.56%'19.20 ,   5.76
.56% 38.40
4.89
' 4.89
1.87
1.87
3.75
51.37
19.38.
40.75
66
5
5
5
5
5
.56
.66
.56
.56
.56
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
8599.5
20.37
40.75
35.75
36.96
36.96
36.96
36.96
36.96
'3.76
3.75
3.76
3.76
3.75
14538.80
11.52
' 1.47
1.47
-. .56
.56
1.12
15.41
5.S2
J2.22
'6.11
6.11
12.22
10.72
11.09
11.09
11.09
11.09
11.09
1.13
1.13
1.13
1.13
1.13
27.29
27.29
27.29
75.89
27.29
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24,36
24.36
24,36
.24.36
24.36
24.36
"Z57U4"
23.04
46,08
5.87
5.S7
2.25
2.25
4.50"
61.64
23.26
45.90
24.45
24.45
48.90
42.90
44.35
44.35
44.35
44.35
44.35
4.50
4.50
4.60
4.50
4.60
party consisting of the Mayor,
Medical Officer of Health, and a Lady
Health Visitor- was mado up, and
leaving the town hall toy a side door,
their majesties were conducted into
one of tho (poorer districts in the
Borough of Finsburyi
(Most of the (people here dwell in
tenements, the entrances to iwhich
were crowded -with a miscellaneous
assortment of children' of all ages and
a number of men and women. Making
their way slowly through the'- dense
throng which followed them, ihelr
majesties entered a-building,and visited a number of the homes.
(The first room was occupied toy a
small iboy and twin baibles less than a
fortnight old. The father and mother
■were tooth out looking for work. The
room was almost bare of furniture
and exceeding dirty. On the floor was
a dilapidated mattress -without clothes,
on wliich the whole family slept.
The next tenement was occupied toy
a woman who 'has ibeen suffering from'
phthisis for 'the last three' years. Her
husband is a casual porter earning
12 or 14 shillings a week. They have
five children, the eldest 13 years and
youngest 11 months. They have two
two rooms, each about ten- feet toy nine,
and both were in a filthy and verminous condition. .Although their majesties did not remain more than a minute, the King's light gray suit toore
many evidence of  his  visit (when he
His Majesty, the King" of England, oal Offler of Health ffmore'could not
having expressed a wish to visit some he done for these people's (children,
of thk people in their homes, a small The Medical Officer, .-^f Health- said
9. the; fhat.more creches werje urgently need
ed, (but,' of course, they i.were only
.palllatives. "The problem at 'bed rock
■bottom," ho saM, ."is a ■ problem- of
poverty. It Is an economic' problerii:*'
His majesty asked. what the infantile mortality rate was and the -Medical Officer told him that-for 1912- It
was 112 per 1,000, as.-compareii Tvtth
90 for the whole of London. There'
are'tjwo lady.health visitors who visit
all the births in the slums, and there
are -weighing centers where the mothers are igiven" advice as to the' reaiS
ing of the children, tout much remains
to toe done.
At the next tenement visited there
was a woman who had just lost a baby
which had been prematurely, (born.
When the Queen expressed her sympathy tho (woman said: "Sorry to lose
4t?v Not -me, I was jolly "glad." "Noticing jher majesty" BhOcked expression,
the woman said: "So would you.be,
toeggin' your pardon, it yon*8 five
mouths to fill already,"
. Remarking on the callous feeling
.disiplayesa, the King was told by the
Medical Officer of Health that during
the lest eix yeara (premature birth accounted tor more deaths of infants
than any other cause. There had been
381 such cases and the Medical Officer said there was no doubt-that the
hulk of these premature -births"iwere
deliberately torought on. "Some,of
the anothers concerned have admitted
this," he. said.   They frankly confess
.     MH.H/li WILLIAMS     '
Pawuhrston, Ont., jim**? 20,tli. loi* %'
•'I really believe,that.I owe iny life"
to "Fruit-a-tives".   Ever since' childhood, I have been under the care of-.
physicians and have been payingdoctors*' .
bills.   I was so sick and worn outthati-
people on the street often asked nie if I **.
thought I could get along without help. ''.
The same old stomach   trouble'and
distressing headaches nearly drove me-:
wild.   Some time ago. I got a box of '
VFruit-a-tivesVand thc first box did ;■■:
me good.   My husband waB delighted
and advised a continuation of their use- ,--•
"Frult-^-tl^es"-- completely cured me..'
Today, I am feeling fine.'and a^hy- ;-
sician meeting me on the street, noticed *,
my improved appearance and asked me-' <
the reason., I replied, "I Bin taking .
Fruit-a-tives;\     He said, ."^ell,  if
"Fruit-a-tives" are making you look sc> •
well, (jo ahead aud take them.. Tbey- v
are doing more'for you than lean". -
■A   ■.   Mrs; H. S./WILLIAMS,
, *'Fnitt--a-tive«" are sOjd by all dealers "
at 50c. a box, 6 for $2.50, trial size 25c...
or sent onreeeipt of price by Fruit-a-tives ••■
Limited, "Ottawa.
moved out
-~rThe"ii*B5i—wteni-e-Bc—on~-Sw—fiuot' jtnst -theiy cannot-afroW
above also consisted of two rooms. The
(father -said he had''been suffering from
phthisis for eight years and could not
work,
itrhesiTKm
rew'ipore. chlld^n—their '""istiiltened
re«>ur««s, thdlr poverty, thetr "struggles (for a livelihood will not allow It.
The another ,wa» also very 111 JThey cannot endure the double load of
flaccid, overworked "mothers, ' devoid -
bf tone, and with littlfe or.no energy*.,
-and reserve power. ; If these mothers*,
.before -(tonfinement, were'toetter fed*,-,
and leas^worked-, the «batoies" wtoea"
born would,start life »ith "more -grit,"
more etamlua,.more staying   power/'
more highly developed and competent
glaade, -organs', - muscles/ and body.'
juices.  The prevention of these deaths.^
is almost entirely a question of relief.,
As I said before, the root' -problem is-'
the prObelm of poveity."   ...   Y.
As the time allotted to the exipedl-
tion was   nqw expired ' a move mbs
made to the "Casual WardA in Little -
Gray's Inn.   Under the   Cleansing ot'
'Persons Act   of 1907,  - the Borough
Council made aiTarrangement ''with/'"/
2.10
2.10
3.10
3.10
44.30
33.10
33.10
33.10
23.10
44.80
44.20
Exempt
14.54   58.17
33
33
41.5 ,<0
41.6 .00
14.64
7.34
7.34
14.00
13.15
8.36
8.36
3.15
8.15
3.85
837.44 848.83 888.03
4.18     1.34     4.96
4.18     1.34
4.18     1.84
4.18     1.34
4.13     1.24
38.18     8.34
25.00    7.50
38.00    7.60
"FRUIT «£li
SALT"   t
2. "That the said shares end proportions of the said sum of Fbur thousand
five hundred and thirty-eight dollars
and eighty cents (14538.80) shall be
-assessed on tbe vnrlous portions of
the real (property benefited in the
manner and to the amount set forth in
the -Seventh and Eighth columns ot
o'i0 the Schedule tn tbe next preceding
2 jo) section of this By-lawi and the Mid
2 io -property and (portions ot th* reel property set forth and described In tbe
•chedule 4a flection 1 ot this -By-law
contained, aro hereby assessed accord*
lug ly with tbo papsont ot the amounts
set forth In the Seventh and Eighth
columns of the said schedule opposite
each MM portion of real property.
3. The amount of tbe epecial rates
assessed as aforesaid against each lot
or part of * lot respectively shall be
divided Into four equal parte on by
the Seventh column of the Schedule
in 8eeUen 1 hereof and one of such
part wlU be aesesMd, levied Md collected to Ut* first year and eaoh tub*
sequent yoer tor three ymn atter Uie
first fMMlnf ot this By-law during the
fVrar (4) rem which tbe de-bosun*
hereinafter mentioned have to run.
4. That H *bsll be lawful for the
Oorporatloo of the City of Feral* to
borrow upon th* security of tbe epe-
clil mtes hereby Imposed Mdwui
credit ud gusntnt** of tb* GoiMffr
Hon *t large by way of tb* d*b*«nm
hereinafter mentioned, from any per-
•on or persons, body or bodtw cor-
borate who may be wilHw lo adnnee
tb* sam* a sum not to sussd In tbe
whole turn of Four thonMnd. five hundred and tfclrt*elfht doUers aod
eighty cents <$<5II,W).
5. That it shall b* lawful for the
Mayor of tb* Corporation of tbe CHy
of Fernlo to oause any number of debentures to be onn* "Local Improv*-
wn<n> T^r,♦^^»^♦■l■l1.»•^l•, tt* ha *matla tne a*t*b
48.17
88.38
83.88
60.61
58.58
8.00
8.00
3.00
3.00
e.oo
4.00
4.W
4.N
4.84
HM
30.00
30.00
fixed, printed, stamped, oi lithographed facsimile..
7. (All the said debentures shall
hear Interest at the rate of Six (6) per
cent 'Per annum from the date thereof
which interept shall be paid and Included iik each annual Instalment eo
payable at the branch of the Horn*
Bank of Canada aforesaid.   ,
8. It shall be lawful (or th* (Mayor
and Council of tb* said Corporation to
dispose ot tbe aald debentaree at par
and to authorise the Treasurer to i»y
out of the sum so raUriM by tbo Mie
of the Mid debentaree all expenses
connected with tbe preparation and
•printing 0f th* debenturee and coupon*.
8.  Th* amount so *ss*M*d and
levied against suoh lot* or part* ot
lot* a* aforesaid for each year aball
b* (paid as to th* first year payment
on or b*for* tb* last day of December
1814. aod as to such subsequent w
ment* on or b-sfor* the laat day of D*>
o-tmfeer ln tb* year* 1818. lil« and
1817. and in default tb*Nof shaH boar
interest from and after oocb dat*
teepecUvely at Ui* rate ot 8 per o*nt
per anamn until paid, aad aay be
recovered together with all ooata ia
tbat behalf by distress and sal* of tba
gooda and chattel* of tbe person liable
for such d*bt and by sal* ot tb* wfcol*
of th* ml proporty or any vart th-er*-
of and l*n days' notlc* thereof pab*
I «bed In on* newspaper olrealatlnf la
tbe Mid Municipality shall b* given.
10. If tb* owner of aay portion of
tb* mm property hereby assessed
shall desire to conmvta tb* *p*elal
assessment Imposed by tbls Bf4aw b*
or ah* can do so by paying to th*
Treasurer of the Oorpomtfoa oa or
before tbe 15 th day of November, 1*14,
th* -amount set oppo-sM* tb* r**l pvo>
party mentioned in tb* tin* eolnmn
!«■• * i-?"!! 'S^SUL ~Z*\%&TSfflCfl" *mm l m
ing ta«,»-*» ot ibot ikonmod. din
bundtedjaad tbIrty-eUht dollar* and
eighty ceots (14888.80). sad each of
'  debentaree being of tbe
11.  Tbat the Corporation of tb*
City ol Fernl* do jjwwtw tb*
■mm   wem   wiiumn.   *m*w   v.   «•  IShSS*^*! i^I^LStTSTtb^ ttS!
amount of aot Mm than On* hundrediff^JMff AJ.t2ii?2^U!? Sa
doiurs (3100.00). except In the case of | ** •<* J» S^SSS^S
tot a Umm amoant If dceaned raqals-
Ite by tbe said Mayor aad all web debenture* Shall b* aealed with the seal
of tbe Corporation ot tb* Ctty of fernl* sad signed by tb* Msyor and City
Clark thereof.
8. All tb* MM debentures shell
bear dat* a* of tit* date after tbe final
passing of tbls ByJaw, aad aball b*
luade pay-ttbk lu Tour ujiul tutuual
eommeemi^wNeeofewe  e e or^ee  woow  we^oj   m^ee mjtaonettwatwm
menUon*d for this By-law to tak* ef.
feet, at tbe Branch oftfoe of tbe Home
flank of Canada in tbe City of Pernio
in tb* Prevfneo of British Colmntolit,
aa deetenated thereon and shall bave
attaebed lo tbem eonpons for lb* payment of each of aw-th annus) tosts!.
meats and tb* signatures of the Mayor
and Clerk of the Corporation respect
tvaly to Ui* «o*pons may be either af-
beratntder aad oo aa Ib no way 0* In*
terfera wMb or praNdlo* lb* memo*
ment sad ep*dal rat* hereby ttnpoeed
or tb* cbaif* b*r*by orsatod on. Um
lands snd portion* of tbe land will oat
of tb* cwrent yeart ranaa* pay to
aay person or corporatioa froai wwm
they borrow tbe monoy «p«a tho security of tbe debcatiu** Iberaby *«•
thorlsod or to the several raipeottve
bolder* o( the said debeaUr**, tb»
**v*ral raap-scuvo aanaal mtrnm* a*
tbey way from ttm* to Um* tbtt mm.
ll. Tli* money to b* ral**« by tb*
asi* ot d*bent«i«s hetntrn *ath*rts*d
shall forthwith aad aftor Um raestat
of the same be paid to lb* How* Bank
td tbmodo In Alaebnrn* ot sny cjMMjrs
r»ii«d or advanced under 8M*J5r-l»;
or authorised In eonaeetiea wttb 8MI
roet of the s*M works.  .
IS. This 9ydnw abaB tako «ffeet
and iwas spitting tolood. She has bad
weight children,. four of whom have
died of tuberculosis. Her . majesty
congratulated the jnother on the
-Qleanliness of her-rooms, which were
a great contrast to those just viBlted., -'
In the next home a mother was
found In toed with a baby' nine week*
old. To he? inajwty's question, **Are
you too ill. to get up?" the women answered tbat she was in toed because
toed iwas the beat place when there
iwas no fire, no coal, no coke, no wood,
and no food. She Mid her huebaad
did Odd Jobs and earned about seven
shillings a -weeks, 3s, 6d. of which'wa*
paid for her room. Her majesty naked
why she did not go Into an institution,
to iwhich the woman angrily replied
that "*he had not eome to that yet—
she wa* a respectable woman, she
was."
Leaving this building, their majesties were next conducted to a crooh*,
one of the four in th* borough where
working mothere em leave their
babte*. The Medical Officer of Health
informed the King that there waa accommodation altogether for 140 children, but it iwa* not lieariy sattlo*nt
The crecb* visited wa* run by a wo*
an iwho haa bad no nursing «SD*rl*
one*. Tbe room* were fairly cltaa
and th* bed* also. Tbers w*r* tblrt**h
children thar*, betw**n tb* af» of 8
snd 11. Three babtes were tyiac tn
perambulators. On* was timraab«d,
and sucking mHk aad water throogb
a long, nnelMn tub* from a m*dWn*
bottle, tt* clothing vas dirty and It
stank afeomlnaiMy.
AnotlMr of tb* babte* wa* thia aad
flabby, aad bad a cough. It also was
dirty aod sm*lt off*nsiv*ly. lu b*ad
waa caked wkh ecruf. Tb*nura*Mtd
It wa* f*d oa mllk aad bread and
wat*r. Tb* chUdran bad aot b**n
waah*d, tb* aura* said la r*ply to th*
Qosm, "m tboy were soppoMd to b*
bibugbt to th* eroob* oImo."
Their tnajevtiee «w*r* then taken to
**v«rat tenements "where Um mother*
wer* absent at work, and foanwd
aooMthint of th* mothods «mptoyed to
dispose of tb* children dariat wrlfr
Ine hour*.
Ia tb* tint on*' was a baby tear
month* oW, with its father «* explain-
«d (bat tb* mother want to iwork early
In tbe morning and tbe boy iwas locked
Inthe room alone. It ws* vMisd turn
ttm* to Hm* by tb* father, tn th* l*
forvsla cf looking for work.   Wb*a|
with the tandtadf.
lo the nest room was a v*ry dirty
baby la eharg* of a gW <*oot I fmte
oM.   0be said "Mavrsr washes lm
last thing at night"
Anottief bom* contate*d a baby te
smA»*« wk a, *Mt **i i, Ik** mtm km*
ait aoormoM brois* oa Um fotabaad
aad tb* mother saM she bad "tipped
'•r sbt of Um maU cart"
A swarm of children cath*i»d roaad
Um door ot tb* next tasauwaU AK
fo«atb«r there were *tfbt *I%ote
btdt been tUm," th* «td«st danghter
of tl mm, aa aa* tad • varr iMf Mlqr
ttot id o retry dirty bottl*.
Mother ws* at wort and father wa*
miming. ^
Tbeir mafsstlM wars maeb ss»cb*d
by wbat th*y saw sa* askai tbo M*H.
child-bearing and'of .supporting the
family, (necessitated by the tether**
uneioployment, or by the casual nature of the work. - , '. i
jHis majesty, who had a copy of the
Medical Offtcert last report In hia
hand, a*ked, "What is maraamue? l\
see Uiat also causes* large number cf
deaths." "    •'■■   *     • "   *
Yes," the'Medical Offloer replied.
'^Maraemus.ls one of the four chief
causes. It is a very loose term, and
means that the exaot cause of death
■was Ill-defined, but the baby wasted
tor eome time before tta end. That la,
tbe wasting .was a marked feature of
tbe child'* illness."
"I* tbat due to the lack of food?"
asked Ui* King.
Wot always," relied the -Medical
Officer.' 'rThe babies are generally
.puny from birth. However well tbey
are fed, however well they ar* clothed,
they do not thrive, and dowly, bat
surely, degenerate, Into tb* !w**t*N<
ffo oommon ln children's hospitals."
"To what do you attribute tb*
bablM' WMkaMSMf asked tin King.
•TThM* babies," replied th* Radical
Officer, "ar* tb* oBfiprfof  td weak. I
the Holborn;Board pt Guardians :,Ut,*-7A
■provide (for the .cleansing of cases7, in. A.
Blnsbury at i^oet of O.ahilling^wr^V'
iperson.   At the Mayor's Hwggestloa^   -
the. whole t**rty. aY-alled *$mnm9XS&s£-mf^-.
these faclliitiee, afterwards" -returning"-"
to the iTowa Hall In* a taxi; The'Klnr
and Queen expressed., thoir. pleasure ;
at^havlng towniatoie to see their people as*h*y«reaily*mre^ind'deiMirted-ior
Buckingham Patoce.
4* -■'
, * A . • . * I        ' f
-*■ * * . ,,       .   • *. ■    '«! " ,
•P. -S.—I need hardly Inform the in-'
triiigent reader tbat th* above narta.
tlve is an account ot a dream, induced by the perrusal ot tbe annual
report of th* Medical Officer of Health
of the Borough of Fln**ury., If any
reader wlahea^for a little light holiday
leading he. oan apply to the Town
Hall, Flnabury, for the rull report.r*-
From the English Clarion.
t*rdwt-
DR.DoVAJTSFRENCHPlLLS^
r^^z^i^t^^^J;
aadNMoaNeel»tof srles.  Tu*Sooiiu. Os-sO
Sfc
Ina**
of weak,! Far ul* at BlsaadalCa Drug ttsra
HERE IS A SQUARE OEAL
aad pMctfol Movtity as orsH.
Witb a pottcy la oar oBt Bn*
eomuny, you <*n m^mpm
vUM^Mll X^T Taw* m|w ^Ww W *m^W
naitti aaA yoa know yoaV* a*»
eura Ta*b**tia^^
nm iNiUHMiot
la alwaya ob**a**t aad
ally ao wb*e K  "
    Doa^datay al
bSI89
saraaeayoa waaibatoaanibM
la al oae* 'bad bava It aiasadod
tOv
M. A. KASTNER
•OLt AQINT. \fOn FtRNII
it'      fium.&e
jji.j-uj
ShihlfrGim
^m^»S'iaariiwS!l
will gtv* yo* * a*w Imoo af Mfo,or to tbpsajwhose Us** Is Ha*>
lied, tak* qakkwt reel* vet* or w«t, vu tb* Onwt Xenbert
ffoilway Oo.
23 Hoars Feral: to Seattle
26 Houn to Victoria
29 Hours to Vancotnrer
Dirtcl cowawtioiukt Itatfotd lor Baal A Wtrt
Yoa wtu tahy all Wm Biastett ol i
CoMt***s and «UM*at eaapMye* «4U mnbo rm l*\»
e_e_^l_\^_^_i ^k^L^kfa|a  Mitsi miaaeifctim  _&_________%,   Adfc nmm _ti____t Mk
•Www pWWSIW*V WMMVPIV^P PHHVHi ••• W9 wmm ■»
flpjM^ 4^^mM^ami baJkya|||MuuUtauii g^^99m^ ____
Vwe  cWfllWr Ifffvr^WIIVfff l^^f^ Up    , „*,
ft J. MALONEY» Atmit
f> _%. U_m aai -    ftMng, ft.C •   Wta^m Ik. 101
"»*f
*.i*^.Mi..*w»i^*j^.it#.M*w^ f. iitm.-tmt^iiiH'iwtm^i tm muttiaaaiaggttm
>,-V *e-^'-;^^^^:.^^ >: "'   ':"' ■■-"-'  :■"
Ik   ■*.     ,'■*■   ** • •" i'-** .j*--   > •.;  ~ -" "   ■"'.      '■ ,    '■"—«     --   - -■      . j-       . .
$m'm^m
ao'aesnute
waioaaatai i JmitwiiWlui
MM)
'^»iiiTnii^:psJi*M8peB>gjg
.';.-"*■
• ff,pr"
#
*        .*_ * "**l
*     rru^*K
' - -tf.^"
'<'£ *,',-""
V.   i
THE DISTRICT IffiDOB^^MUIIB, B. 0., JUNE \ 1014.
PAGE SEVER
Liniment.
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
.   Food arid every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
:jpaw^:i-.*j  _w)ii|»w&*i»ti^Aiia-'.a  ty,.*, •■■..'    >,\
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
P
iv
«■
Dry Goode, Groceries, Boots a»d
Shoes, Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT HOSMER, B.C.
Fernie-Fort Steele
%.-x: •*--
and
Bottled Goods a Specialty
Large,Airy Rooms &
Good Board
memmmmmmmm
Ross & Mackay ^ps.
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDoupdl, Mp
"■WV *i?r*v*
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
COLEMAN
. Liquor Co.
*~x.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors -
• -
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Send us y«up orders
Our Checker
.*.--' > '  '?'*.*■£■•.'■  ' i ■
Column
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES    .
.  vv?V^FOR MINERS IN ALBERTA
32
2t
31
27
26
25
24
23
20
19
10
«
1«
IS
12
11
17
14
29
21-
u
10
' (The^lnister of Education in ~&il-
beW*4s" •prodding for   the   needs ot
•Ptetriet Ledger Ottioe, Mky aotU^1914: ;m^la« te g6nf *? P°Ufy f?f^*al-
  -       -   '     J > "' -pal.education and plans to aid in the
organization •and maintenance of night
schools'and special classes In mining
centers" .of -the Province. Dr. James C.
Miller, Provincial Director of Technical Education, confers 'with lo:al
■school boards, mine officials and officers of the United Mine Workers of
America.and"cltizens regarding local
needs'and details of organization.)
Dr. James O. 'Mills, Provincial Director of Technical Education, is at pres.
ent paying'official visits to each of
the mining centres of Alberta, conferring with local school boards, mine officials, officers of the United- 'Mine
Workers of America and interested citizens regarding the development, organization and maintenance of special
classes for miners and those living in
tihe mining centres. Having visited
Bankhead, Burmis, Passbury, Bellevue,
Hlllcrest,1 Prank, Blairmore and Coleman, he goes to Taber and the mining
centres in the neighborhood of Leth-
hrldge, and later to Brazean.
In the conferences, Dr. Miller has
indicated <that.it is tbe intention of the
Minister of Education to aid the local
committees in the organization and
maintenance of such special classes
during the coming winter. The director has expressed his sincere gratification, on. finding the local school
boards, mine officials, offiers of tha
Union and citizens not only, sympathetic (but ready and willing to actively
cooperate in the development of this
movement Upon the report of the director to the mlnUter, after the present
trip of inspection is completed, the details regarding organization and maintenance wltt he determined. Early in
the autumn the director will again visit
the mining centres Jo address .public
meetings and -make final arrangements
for the opening of classes about the
middle of October or first of November.
<-ln so far as the minister's general
policy for the development ot technical
education is related to mining centres,
there is under consideration the organization of euch claeees as the following,
ae a 'beginning, from which further de-
yptanaent, jnay„*hfl.ipr*ayld«Unr as thn
. All matter'intended for publication
In -this, column -should foe addressed
'IThe Checker Editor," and should'
reach this office not later than first
-posit on' Tuesday of each week.
Correspondents will oblige hy quoting the position of the 'pieces at the
stage when- their play comes in.
0 Contributors -wiH oblige hy arranging their play in tabular form, four
columns to the sheet, tho first three
columns- being ot equal length. ...
Answers -to Correspondents
J." <F,'rT., Strathcona; Alta.—Thanks
for games, .which iwe shall uso at the
first opportunity.  We .wish you every
success in your chosen calling.
*E. iB. Sprlnghlll, -N. S.—Thanks for
cuttings, which are very good. Solution to prize . (problem arrived -. in
time, and moreover, came first out of
the hat. We congratulate you, and
If you will send word what literature
you deslreVw e iwlll he very glad to for-
ward same.
We wish to thank ill- those readers
who sent solutions* to our .prize problem, dnoet of which were correct. However only one could win, so iwe must
wish them better luck next time.
Problem Ne. 14
-By IMr. J. <R. Yeoman, Whitby. Con?
tributed hy Mr. G. Wood, Coal Creek,
B.C.
WHITE    -: !
iS-LiJIIfeiaaWPfaaal^Jaffi mm-
B i ■•■ -
mt**-#a,l.i
\m
m
PULLING OPP THI DIMUISt
Pull supply of following
fer nn appetising meal to
choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
. and Eggs
Try our Cambridge taue-
•get fer temerreWe breakfast.
CALL Oft PMONt
Ciliary Cattle Co.
Phone M Weed ttreet
PIRNIt, %. C.
/""V        BLACK
Black men on 2,18,22; king on 31.
•White men on 10,30; kings 4 and 12.
White to move and win.
iThe shove problem, although pdb-
-iisbed before tn the Northern Weekly
Gazette, ts Iby a "well-known problemist
end contains eome neat vlay.—(Ch.
Ed.) '
■Solution to Problem No. 13
iBlaok n#n on 5,6,9,11,12 and 15.
White men on 13, 17, 20, 21, 22 and
23.
iWhlte to move and draw.
.3—13 11—.0 ..—18 24-81
13-19 18—15 23—26 14—10
20—1«     (19—23     17—14       Drawn
iFrobtana Nos. 12 and 13 were ending hetween <Mr. Peter Marr and the
author, and It Is very creditable to
the tatter that he eould -pull off dratwt
with such a» expert at Jdr« (Marr.—
(Cb. Bd.)
Solution toNo. 11 (Prise Problem
Black men on 6, 2.10; 12,16 and 16.
White men on 13,10, 21, 24, 26 and
28. ■ x
White to move and draw.
26—23      15—24      23—18        10—12
16-20      14-8        27—23 1—17
21—17     27-42     10—15       Drawn
20-27      28—18      2.-U
17—14      32—27        6—1
The above was an ending hetween
Claude Brown, Oarabuslang, and the
author.—(Ch. fid.)
'Many of our readers sent In correct
soltlons to the shove problem. On
being put into the hat the first number to come out corresponded to the
number allotted to Mr. B, Uradley,
Sprlnghlll. N. 8., who Is, therefore declared the winner, according to the
conditions of the competition.
The following games wert played hy
heed-^arises. Tfce-general consensus of
opinion of all concerned is in favor of
not attempting.too ambitious ajpro-
gram in the beginning, but rather to
begin modestly and plan for permanent
and effective development
(1) Classes to.assist the non-English-speaking members ot the community to gain a knowledge of the -English language and of Canadian civics.
If Alberta ts to he an English-speaking
Province, and H those who do aot speak
^^sh-oaT^cs^g-to-^e^^eTine*^
are to become Canadians ln reality and
if the Bngllsh-speaklbg members of
the community are to understand and
appreciate all the various groups that
are being blended Into our -local end
national life, it becomes fundamentally
necessary that definite, positive, constructive efforts be mado to facilitate
and encourage the development of
these desired ends.
(2> Classes In English, practical
arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry aod tri
onometry, Mechanical Drawing and
mechanics for .those engaged tn or
looking forward to being engaged in
tbe skilled trades or crafts or In
mine operations.
(3) Classes in commercial arithmetic, bookkeeping, stenography and type*
•writing.
(4) Classes for miners wbo desire
to Increase their efficiency and -prepare
themselves tor the examinations -leading to fire-boss, pit-bow, and mine-man-
ager's certificate.      "v-
produce'the marked bullet, insisting
that he bad. caught it on a plate.
On cne occasion a visitor who was
an edmlrable,a*mateur conjurer offerf?
ed himself as in assistant. Ho took
the gun and 'ammunition, ^and duly
loaded. It was the custom of the professor to give the bullet a final ,tap
with his wand to see that it iwas rammed down properly, and this final tap
extracted the bullet. This the visitor
knew, and .when the professor offered
his assistance, he politely, declined.
Anderson did not insist, but coolly
walked to the end of the stage ana
called out:
"Now, sir take good aim Nat me and
fire."
The visitor hesitated, as he knew
the gun" was really loaded.
"Fire, sir, fire!"'cried the professor.
The holder of the gun lowered the
weapon, saying he could not-let it off,
returned it to the wizard, w&o immediately, under -pretense of seeing whether it had been -properly loaded, extracted the bullet, fhen he gave the
gun to some one else. But ere the
rifle was fired he addressed the audience.
"Ladies and gentlemen," he said,
"the person who has just resumed his
seat 'knew mV trick, and foiled It, If
he had fired this, probably would have
been my last appearance before you.
But he hadn't sufficient nerve to shoot
me."
When it dawned upon the house that
Anderson had risked bis life rather
than confess himself beaten,' the applause was deafening.
FATHERLY ADVICE
Amusing it is to read the views of
the New York World on the pooling of
forces on -the ipart of England's
miners, railway, workers and transport workers. The World recognizes
fully the power that this great alliance will wield and it understands
thoroughly what the British workers
can do with their strength so massed.
But tiie World adopts the customary
"detached onlooker" point of view
and discusses the matter of leadership ln a vein that, to workers, is most
amusing.   Says the World:
. "In a great trade union combination
eV4i360,000 mesabersf.epmiiirlBlwg. the
miners, railway—-fflen-end^-transport
workers, England will face a force,
political and industrial, that it will
have to reckon with. If the three op
sanitations, under the proposed agreement, were to work together in support of the. Labor Party in Parliament, -they would represent f. formidable alliance, with the possibility
some, day of seizing the balance ot
power' 'between the -Liberals and
Unionists!.   On the other, hand, as n
MEXICO AND PATRIOTISM
We Americans honestly believe that
we will benefit the .Mexicans by forcing our institutions upon them. We
do not realize that the Latin temperament is different from our own—and
that their Ideal of liberty is broader
than ours. We want to debauch the
Mexican 'people and turn them into little brown copies of American business
men and laborers, as we are doing to
the Cubans and the Filipinos. As yet
the revolutionists In the north have
trusted <the word of the President of
the United States that this is not a
war against the Mexican people-rand
the report of the State Department
today is that "no aggressive act has
yet 'been offered to Americans in constitutional territory." But at the first
breach of faith on our part, the Mexican nation will rise against us as one
man. The American soldiers will have
nothing perlpus to anticipate in, tlie
opposition of the Mexican army. It
is the peons and their women, fighting
in the streets aud at the doors of their
homes, that they will have to murder.
It Is tbe .patient, generous, ignorant
race that has struggled for liberty tor
400 years, unorganized ani\ inadequately armed, that tliey will have to shoot
down. The United States will bave
quenched the,hope and the genius of
the iMexican race forever.
And If we, having established a settled government in Mexico City, can
withdrawn from Mexico, It will be to
leave things worse than they were
before—the great estates securely reestablished, ithe foreign Interests
stronger than ever, because we supported them, and the Mexican revolution to be fought all over again in
the indefinite future.—John Reed, in
the June -Metropolitan.
THK TRICKSTER TRICKED
The political activity of the Socialist, aa I have underatood tt, doae not
consist directly of the class struggle
hetween capital aad labor; tt la not
the men of that struggle goo* for
itbemsetve* only Into polltlos. It ia
the wise men of the country pulling
off the disguise by which that gifOf
gle In and out of politics is so skillfully concealed from the victims by tto|eo^^^55^^"Mr.TM'.
beneficiaries of profit versus Ameri- iey, gprtnghlll, N. 8.. and Mr. John,
cans. Direct combat between any ] Hodge, New Westminster. B. C. who|
tiro thiugs cud* uit'ti iu tho dw&i-uo*  tu Jwai-uiy ike iihevker w-UU-oi of Uie i
Glasgow Observer.   We ere Indebted!
to our esteemed  correspondent,  Mr. I
Uradley, tor the games, i
"Creaa" |
Black—B.     Bradley,
Hodge.
One of tbe tricks performed by the
celebuu«d Professor Anderson waa
extremely clever. Tbe professor used
to give oue ->f tbe audience a rifle,
some powder sod a marked bullet The
marksman was then rbquested to load
and tirepare to fire. The professor used
to walk to the end of the stage and Invite the ilflpmnn lo shoot him. Then,
after the latter had fired, he uaed to
ROYAL
HOTEL
rSRNIV
Bar Unexcelled
All White Help
'I Gpow Hair, I Do"
Fac-simlles of Prof. A. Garlow.
'■■ZriJt
'-   'K
,   '- S*
Bald at 26.
Fine hair at 55.
A.'i-l
■r *,■£*.■
■••.■» I
I POSITIVELY Cure all hair and
scalp DISEASES. Prevent BALDNESS
and premature grayness. GROW ladies' and children's hair rapidly.
I TAKE NO DOUBTFUL cases and
positively cure all I do take. .Hair
can be fully restored on all heads
that still show fine hair or fuzz to
prove that the roots or CAPILLIARY
glands are not dead,
I HAVE A PERFECT system ot
HOME TREATMENT for out-of-the-
CITY people who cannot come to me
for personal treatment WRITE TODAY for Question Blank and PAR,
TICULARS. Enclose stamp and mention this paper.
MY PRICES aro reasonable Hy
cures are POSITIVE and PERMANENT.
PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW
The World's Most Scientific Hair and
Scalp Specialist
Room 1, Weldon  Block,  WINNIPEG.
MAN.
—Everything
Up-to-date
Call In and
see us once
J0HM P0DBIBLAI0U. Prop.
We Are Ready to Scratch
oft your bill any itearof lumber aei
found Just as we represented. There
ls no hocus pocus tn
This Lumber Business
When you want spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip Is a
lot of culls. Those who huy once from
us always come again. Those who
have not yet made our acquaintance
lreTaklng^hM^s^they"'wc®dh1t ev"
counter if they bought their lumber
here.
-'Ml
■jM •
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealers In —
Lumber,  Lath*  Shingles, Sash ani
Doers.    SPECIALTIES—Mouldings,
Turnings, Brackets, ami Detail Work
OFFICE AND YARD—McPherson ave.
Opposite 0. N. Depot. P.O. lex U,
Phone 23.
T^Wlonal trade Union organization, upholding In common the demands of
one section or all, this great body of
workers might in ordinary circumstances prove Irresistible.
"In the last few years England has
bad tta miners' strike, its railway
men's strike and Its dock workers'
strike. But In each case only ooe
class of workers -was on strike. Only
one part of tbe industrial body was
paralysed at a time.
"There is nothing ss yet to stow
that the new British trade union com.
blnation -proposes to exercise force
against tbe employers, hut tta mere
existence will be a threat not to be
Ignored. If It holds together and all
parte co-operate loyally and can stand
the physical strain put upon separate
industrial interests, U will be a tremendous moral force to confront In
time of social unrest. It cannot be
ignored and k will he beard.
"The danger of sucb a huge organisation lies In the abuse of Its powers,
la matters of legislation It will be entitled to respectful attention. Irrespective of Its partisan relations, if
merely because of its numerical
strength. Uut unless soberly led, It
will be apt to take on a form of
tyranny over industry ss a whole,
vhlch cannot live without fuel snd
transposition. It might starve England Into submission, hut its members | y****>**t*+**~i***~*~****t***^^
in thc end would certainly tm the chief i*
Steam Heated Throughout                                           Blectrir Lighted
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
Rates $2.50 per day                                                  Fire Proof Sample
With Private Bath fJ.00                                         Rooms in Connectioa
aufferers."-~X,
Call.
! tion "of either and always in the Pfo-
{ductton of something different from
both.
The class straggle Is an abnormal,
socially unnatural activity, and hoth
contestants are the vxxiins or tne
crime.
•Political Socialism Is not engaged
tn tbat atnttSlt, Socialism ls dlagnos-
lag it, doctoring tt, sometimes giving
It a chill aud sometime* giving It n
fever, with a view te some time eater*
mlnatlng It fiom the systom.—Peter
K. Burrow**, la "Revolutionary Be-
says."
For our Foreign Brothers
Til? WALDORF
KOMU NIET RADY, j
TOMU NIET POMOCI
The eity beautiful Is a fine Meat, hot
aa long aa the masters own the eity
aod the jobs therda, the slaves will
have a harsh, cheeriest life, whether
(fhe ctty be beautiful otjotherwise.
H-JS
ts—IS
a—it
17-ja
io~tt
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21—17
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tb—22
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White—J..
,    Ust'wio a da'vuo lilu'myu* a* nlo*.a';
29 j 71 * Kr**l«vwt*f» sstno <r *«!»» rosdeieM
13 sj| i pusstna  *  dorn    voidsoyeny   i«nl«'."
t$_~l7., Atc-bo tajml slovaml: "Skrnott*   |»<-
List of Local* Dlaliicl IS
Mack—<l,
fry.
n -is
»—1»
I fr-u
ItT—W
"Creaa"
Hodge.   Whlie-E. ©rad
ii II
IS-lii
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WWteAshMtae Wm. Marsh. Taber. AKa, N-
, jr. WluftUey. Bank-head. Alta.
r*fi**-..tttdr--l*OOmeOOttlOONOt k^tOOtk ttk rtSCtMT,
'••••••»><tJMMS BwiNfc <Bm abi ttemttebt Alts.
......... W. ft Ctmeimbm. Walnaore, Alta.
i,• »•••>«*•->«*••«• T. O. Huifaa^ Paaeverg, AMa.
OerbettfaM ...,...].
tjmmNmmWe ooee****oeo,b oo t
Ow#dNMK •...• i him. t.H*   <Mn!MnM\ fnEHwBHMI**  MlfM*
ObtemX'mm.Y.V.'.'.V. Skn.Somo.vSSk. ma Wamtmd Oity. ARa.
fr'erete ftm. UpMtt. Vmtdo. M. c
fftmak , .....gws-lliitia Wraafc, AHa.  ^
WWHMT-* ■*■»■*■** ft-ae-amie***   W-e   ^■B^^w^B-.-^WW|(   W-t^-^^^UI^m't   mBt   %•**
IfIliCfWftMf»t»*(«*»t***«MW.» {MM-Mii IflWnVMv -mIM*
I/MMvMm*a****,**>**** lib MQOffVb tttt StBtfe AtMflMt Ns f«4tfctftt0t
ttfltoMf* ffolifirlM    Tim! n<iilfiglMW Drtittml tin
JWBpVv It^BV « tm eo 0*e • n * o • •» W* IMIPM^ WMWW^I
SfWtijT , fT. Pawr^inetcl. ft. C.
IwWPt ♦ atanattaatataaeal   At    ^Mf-WvlF*)   TWwi   AnV*
Oeortntowu, Caamom...}tas Jfater. Georgetown. Canmore. AM.
Bteseea Wean Hatty &Ktnmn.J9wr4teg._r1o HaOy ******
m*,     tt,
10—11
l»-l»
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27—41
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l<u*kiUU iUiii lilMV) vote UtUUVM, t» ll} l
i«j co n>ojctita sa K.Mtul iirotv««b a !
btuho, prefo brat* ohlad nn j, «inol»o-!
«lv«h }l!aTitoov!, tinlmuS. i..«*.;H>" n-
Vllnf «« slebo iidkyna nwntiH *:•> hit,?
te by u«4ol do uradtt xv-ulo.i. ax(,nk\
kto urady berte lea pre honor. pre *
chvast otobny ttek—ten Jf* ttixemtt I
ftpolfcu I«i tm Ahodu « ked' by Hot
tnkf protl osohu ptatnAmu ijwjuitui
ia, neeknx' ko urmlntkovM' j»rp *«bx
»ejnfti«
K mtioliMi stran otijavla ta obtn* ■
poiioty. t* by Hlovarl v  mm   ktomm
,BM»t« mobii mat* prtmetaav, n» pr*.
,   Ac i. toto pemWk^.J*.ao » drobd j S?m *"*""' ^ ni* «« Wri^
jsta'vaja' tnlkti veci; itesvoramtou aii
' vi»lk** veei hjnn"."
j   Davoa a davno bl*s«#u   *a  siivd
j'Kralovitvo s.tfo   v   sub*:   r onU-Jou-i'!
pusttis   a   dttta    vosdvoJcs#    psda.
14—id
p—14
10--7
14—21
7—11,
g—12! Alebo Inyml siovaml: "Rkrte svora
is—la'cHH' Movti»v*/>i. vrtbn 9*ee\', wtset
Drawn ■ nosteu al* v«>lk* ved fiynu "
Mr*. S. Jennings, Prop.
L. A. Mills, Manager
Excellent Cuisine — American and
European Plan     Electric Light»
Hot & Cold Water—Sample Rooms
Phones-Special Rates by the month
European Plan Room Ratei
60t and Upwarit
Amertetn Plan Rale*
$2.00 per Day
I^WMWWW^<¥WW^MVW<WW<W-Vi*lWi*l^¥WW<W^W#i«W^WAM>
Mtifw,    ak«
ttUMtbAm
*   tnhi»|
MILITARY OALUTf•
l^\e*tm% oebtkoeh.  kntlaarh t' ■m»|S|» a AM.   %$%£&   .   , ,
l»-24 «*».»«*a.»to ^^^^.SrinMMUMaii   •   p«»«»tt»«m   be,   uk
li^tfilkev. aajma t Amerike. .ma   te teWw,^***.*.   a.** .* - XX-
i»-*4|««wa,#*« e» mm etmo **es*Mnr1 (^ vMf WttW, h,* '„* ^^
il   Hi       .j \t-.i' t'l'iti* i.fj"ti*t.. )-*•«*© Mefeajo***   n*i.r«>«   liftaaiy II
"^™     KeUfakrat" icrlUe aa, be tn, bed oM,mmaif osoh; wa, uma male by ea
*«—«"*** ? ••w,**,,,,'■•   aaiem   ft»l   tm   »jH*   efSieilsart"   4 vusi,■■■.•.,    >j* 1 tut-
\lJfotmttm~omo mem ? tal bteeol ee-1 redeem p«v#4oml.
r, wins'inaataactr—nern-^e    vrn  toho    btdt\   Jmh ?ktt*m*   v   mv.jfh'ii   vi»riach
• rtnr>»in rtn *n»*^»t      *\*o   if tr,    ■n+**r*at
\to pre wiohfeh rfpatet sa to atavs.
• ale prt-Ae bmII by sme tr-pet1 ea isle
I naroda walbo tskf ed, kterf vfvoje. or-
that lo »s.!**«»l*we   t*bo  t*  Mcavede  a
THI
Bellevue Hotel
COMMIROUL   HOU8E
Best Assenwietfatlefi
U^te-Oets — Every
PtH+llemt ■titdafa**
In the Psss.—
Ceevtnk«n«e^"
1                   ttirrawt inmi t nnwo
tun oe»tirtfwe«
4a Ska OALLAN, Prop.
MLLCVU8, Alta.
•**-** ■'* --"■■•*-* * -- -* * - "*"**■ *****    ■*
It haa been estimated ._.. .. *- , m . ,. . . , « .. . ., . ...
lutes, rcys! sad »»lwry eempUaaMta.\**<* i^J*,tol_t¥] J**1 *! k*Mf
MCbaato* ef coatinai haitq. eta-l**** ***t »br»,ta|* eeersaava
title ot ntbtomn. ******* nnd ntmdet ■ «ke*H»#. not** rfbmty to etiwrnm
tomellUe*. rtfJag e»4 seettag of thej»"f» "mS.!™** ** if4' *yi!i*
sea mtbtm dntty by ntttbttrtooen eorf******' ***«*®r by mm ttdo a»H«*i?
nm resects et wnr. tke <*j**h>g and x*rfl ♦»*• *>*mp • **»»«**   »«•**
M*««-.-.M
leet', aemyslsneet' • *«mtlr *i.*«bi*.       ,
I'rafejme 0 dobrej rad*- .. kfm t*
(ton, rapasMUkime ss' .
BuiSmaell Jako out r*duU* kuity on •
•ttej   lavifk*.    iretne    k   takfart**
veetaas nnwwkttmeiairf. * mi*) turnd- [
n*f kttfir*, atfttttnant« ,*■* ■ ■n*i   ' ".'\i\
sehyaette a vtaathote vMkrbo
«|w«Mv«* ns ff^t    hn"   •('.■nt" at
>rt< iiani w*ndia
 „ ef gats^ eae. the etriHtedt'T1 !*K^i1<<'^w^t ** bodtm\   stnUtn eprsvAen a*w»»v»«. mutt
wntbt le ewey pat «f tke gMw flwei«*'1* *t*nrt* ttkemmm ttrmnwrfmttfjtut nddn, pemtntc kntdtwm. W,bn-
ott dottr m.memtmt eummekou.{• w m ****?,**** mown m ttdeUao^ mynuot* om fw»*rtiwt *sd«w#*f
At • fraim 4|fJ0> per shot,   that ea*be a*e*e»thi** aave«s?    V«e  e |», w «,»  ttMw  |*^Mft|e  M^m.!   A Moet reel tlm ad^nU*d for
wmtt tmemd    te    mm  Awes *,wlir i»»a*», les u, ku*;* nuke MnMi* m.maMta te«4«Bsr * **»* JWb^
i$t*,nmi   per d*r,   we  mejmjm*   tfirmmn w«m»», n ***  1  ***ti [**hh oDra,f-ia tcAiiiLu*.. u.u j. j -.-i il'wffWr,t "••wr^n* k-Mti■ *** ^ww
(IWjWUm per year Mee* W telepeMt by m swl * ntebtd * if
nemo. TMs fs etifr wit Item,  th the onfm tpolkom spslft. ale le tea a tea < fsfco trsvu  «
Grand Union Hotel
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best 0/Accommodation
W§ eater lo Um workingman^ trade
G.A. CLAlh >; Proprietor
meaawbtla. tfce poor am tyim* wbhittm hiereas tpblke  Je
keaftl-r.—Vkter Hem. te toe Wear-[»«***•** ea ekava. ie kr
preti   xeme.
laMae.* (COeette. IV»k 1)
I i^N^Bt     polPMPnlBlfll     lit4u       K#vT
T*kto
■Hi!
Tb«  friati  home rale   I*   paaaai.
«♦•&.*«,*^r k-i't Cntmo n»4 bi* $*nm
_ w<*tn t**dn,* >■:* fit vn xtf*" ft tb**r
^T*^irr.-MB" Xra>*a< tttty mim k«4 a##«4 tot the jehJ**** ^*"^ **** '** •**»** >mi* feut-
m otm aeaee sibiwjuj^^ ti|||<1 tf9ntmi}fm, ^   mteiftfbo #ef*ft»H«t   ts   wttmn to   «•**
uprlmn-   Mra-. uiu   »» ttimjim #, ,„*„ „9t ^ wnr^ ^ ,,MJ. t h!vWl|r »*,„ m fm» M wmkm are
term eettmme htm**   U tt wen. tfasettk*  em**   to  f*t  kBt*t.    WlHHk ft.
its*tow nrlu *•* tke boot/Of nyottm »ktek tre-itome* to their «** airmaeea.   tkep
»tr% twtb mmetry* I are a km* klntt. fl"*- "1 -rt    ,   i'tf"
■-QZ
. 9*±*.^i   -1        V   t.'   -.-tt^.      .■..'-"'■fr-      9 •^*9. *     It
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PAGE EIGHT
-    .— \ ■..-S^.v,      > t-        "-
' -*•     •     1 **■.) .tr.    .        -      .
THE DISTRICT LEDGES, FEIfflLE, B. C, JUNE 13 1914;
■^ %>^:f«\sc^:y^ .'>■ ^sr;,|e^- - ■   A-   IA t,*Si A-7-i- f 'A\:'
v -  ■• ■ /■., v ".^i■?• -VvSr^-111     ■r'*^*'- ^^'^s, .ys-^X^-S'-r-y.^.'*- *y^-ft- ,Ar\ ■%. - . .   y     *■■'.,■■
-   .   .   ' *■       ■•»■—   -     -v     .-v—.' ..       ' -t --   ?"r..^*  -- ' . .      * . -> ■    ~V*^--. -"a*      'f-* y>      ,. vtf*.    ...*'1   r   *''.■■.'.'     -'    -,       *    . ., -.    - ,    ' - *• -
'   l    "'.' -*'    *■*       ,     ,-f"3*  *-***.        >.;*?,*. '- "S- ;      -, " "    ■"   ,      "■'"•  -   '•--tJ -J-*'    -,;-•*-*,    -y\.       •*   ,   .      r. v''    *" .-■■•*.        '       .      •"
-    -     v   -.' * ~ .    .. *i4t     ^^.'..^:   - VX •-■        - *. ,  •*-   -       ...       -* -^ -i  -,4... "   ,^i:      -a C - '-1- -*.*- ^-'       .*i;, -
i'i'"aft-i-it*'*''*•■-■ -v.-        ! A^AX-'X-*-"',-: -'"-' vv ", x ■:" ~CA .X7 \ 7  ;   ' -      7Ay.x     ,:   *.v*,. '    *_. -" -.*.„ -*,. ■"--.,/"' -\ , •
Dry Goods Department
EMBROIDERIES
Extra Special 2 yards for 25c        ' .   .
A clean up on a special line of embroidery, iu all
widths, fine qualities aud particularly good patterns, special 2 yards for  25c
PILLOW CASES
Pillow cases, sizes 40 and 42, special 40c per pair.
Ready hemmed, pillow cases of a splendid grade of
heavy cotton, a good wearer and washer. Special
per pair ... *-•- 40c
FANCY CUSHION TOPS
Hade of a good quality of heavy duck, in plain
and fancy, also stamped ready to work. Odd lines
worth as high as 75c, for 25c
WHIITE CAMBRIC
An extra fine quality of cambric suitable for
underwear and night dresses, 34 and 36 inches
wide, free from filling, special 2 yards for .. .25c
TRIMMED HATS
lingular $8.50. $10.00 and $12.50, for .$4.95.
Hut don't wait too long, as Ihey are being picked
up (juicklv. all this season's newest styles.
Regular $6.50 and $7.50, for $3.75.
An unusually good offer at this time of the year.
These hats embody all the style features of a higher
priced hat. regular $7.50, for $3.75
NEW CREPE WAISTS, BXTRA SPECIAL, $1.25
EACH
This is a new line, just fresh from the hands of
the makers, trimmed around collar and cuffs, aud
down the front with Polly Varden trimmings,
special, $1.25.
SUITS
Have you seen our special $15.00 serge Suit?
Comes in a good quality of shrunk serge, navy
blue only; best we could procure from any mantle
house in Canada, all sizes, 34 inch to 42 inch. See
it. The style is absolutely correct, and the quality
of material is made for service. Special,$15.00.
WASH SKIRTS from $2.00 to $7.50
Shown in all sizes and made in Ducks, piques
and repps, plain and fancy buttons, in a big. range
of stvles, for the seasons wear, from, $2.00 to $7.50
BOY'S WASH BLOUSES at 65c each
Every size and a complete range of new and very
serviceable cloths,made with or without the detachable collars ' ,- 65c
. Separate Skirts in Tweeds only, 25 per cent discount. ,
Tweed skirts in a, big range'of good colors; .We
can give you correct sizes, and the range is large.
72 inch sheetings, special 40c per yard/ A dandy
quality of cotton to give good wear, free front dress
ing and soft finish.    Special per yard .... .. .40c
Trunks, Bags
^Yojiave just unloaded a car of- new Trunks, a
Suit Cases, Club Bags and Telescopes.  • .    "- _
Our stock now includes trunks .and bag cf the; \
very latest type, combining strength, convenience',. „
and beautiful finish.  -We have the greatest variety'
every shown.iu Fernie.-- From the metal-covered
trunks at $2.50 each up to the gnuine fibre trunk '\
at $35.00, also mauy styles in wardrobe and dresser \
trunks at $20.00 to $75.00 each.    "      '.    ■    .
V
Suit-eases-in iinitation'orXreal leather,' all sizes,
in tan, russet> -.or black, fitted*"'with^'toilet ^Hicles
or with plain shirt'pocket and Straps. .Prices run
from $2.00 to .$25.00.-'; ■'- ,• y-;v^..■;'"AA:'\   , ,
Club bags in sea lion, pig skiit or'qowj-jide, 'in
black or russett.'-(leather lined) '(fitted' or plain);
sizes, 16'inch, 18 inch or 20 inqh/also ^it^jalgs'in'
18 inch or 20 inch, .priced from $5",50 to $35.00. -' "
See these lines displayed in our windows, '  • '„' '
,v-ss*-" 'TJ.■,-■>'-*
1 Announcement
We have installed a private telephone exchange in.our store and
patrons can now get direct connection with
Mr. A. B. TRITES ........ No. 1   CLOTHING DEPT No. 7
Mr. R. W. WOOD  No. 2   FURNITURE DEPT. ... No. 5
Mr. E. K. STEWART No. 3   L^55 r RBAJ^ T0     'w    r
GENERAL OFFICE, No. 4   HARDWARE bEPT.'::. No. 8
BOOT & SHOE DEPT. ... No. 7   GROCERY MANAGER,. No. 6
DRY GOODS DEPT. ..'... No. 7   GROCERY-DEPT No. 10
1 Customers will get prompt service by asking to be connected with
|       the Department desired, when calling •'Central."- , *        '
I PLEASE TEAR OUT. AND PASTE  IN YOUR TELEPHONE DIRECTORY*
JiiiaiMi^iJiPJ^^ ,
... *A-i 7**.y.    ■*'  •     ^^     ' ' \»;v*"'" ''-Tv-*!--Vvi    -       i
\i"A*x" Fd¥SatWvaaM
-  •' ■■      ..*     —- J.       v."    •„.-   a-   ,* -      . * f-l iV.-   "•':':
\_S' .■"XtX:-.^ ■•.
\*' '-■-•/:-*?
•.-^■"u-y^x -• "v .-.^s.
)*■?.
.-a."   ». v-
....        _ Xt*
*■ '" a"'  ''.'iV.8*
Raincoats
The weather this month makes raincoats a necessity. We are showing a big variety of styles for
Saturday selling. Prices, $12,50, $15.00, $18.00 and
up. These are coats of the best known make,
and are fully" guaranteed by us to give perfect satisfaction.
MEN'S AND BOYS'STRAW AND LINEN
HATS ■   ,.
• AVe invite you to inspect our big range of men's
arid boys'- straw and , linen   hats,  every' wanted
shape and quality is shown in our window display.
•We also wish to draw your attention to our $6.00
Panama, the best hat.in the country at the price.
Children's.hats run from 25c to $2.50; men's hats
from 50c to $15.00. -
SEE OUR STRAW, HATS BEFORE YOU BUY
Boot & Shoe Dept) j
Odd lines of Men's Fine Shoes and Oxfords;at;'
very low prices . v ' ^ *
^Men's Patent Colt, Gtmmetal and Tan.Calf Oxfords, serviceable-and easy fitting", regular prices
$4.50.and $5.50. special for Saturday... v;.. .$3.95
Broken lines of men's shoes in Invictus and Just
Wright makes, containing all the different leathers,
Patent., Vici, Gunmetal and Tan, Calf, regular $5.50, -
6.00 aiid'6.50, special Saturday "per pair .;.. .$3.95
Boys' and Misses shoes and slippers, odd^ines,
we will clear out at $1^|0 per pair. - See bargain-
table for-these values.  -*"'.- V "   A
Odd lines of liadi'es? high" lace and button boots,
containing patents, Vici Kid,- and Gunmetar leathers, regular values $3,75 to $5.00,"special Saturday-
per pair ......;......'....,..'  $2,95
Gold Standard Baking Powder'12 oz." /, .\i'.:;
Lima Beans,-4-lbs ";.. (vy.V."-*.<"...;;'.,:'. -
Mrs.. Stewart's Liquid -Blue," 2 for,. 77.
Slab,Fruit «ind Cherry Cake, per lb.......',", .'j;
Scrub Brushes regula,r; 20 and 25c ,$ach-.'."'..
.. Government Cre:araery: gutter,-3-lbs,' fo*r•»,-,',
■ Canada Firet'Evapora-ted Milk, 20 oz. 2 for -
' Family Sizev,'.-.' .".'•."•'.v., v,y.. .■...:...";;%.;:'. .-
Cowan's Assorted Chocolates per lb,'v.-: ***•'
*, Robertson's Fancy (fr'eam'Chbcolates.pet jb.,.
Golden.Dates 2 lbs for \ .<-....:...
-Lemonade Powder, large size .•.,' v *.\',-.-;..'..
Liquid Veneer, large size-, "..'.. ,-.-
Paragon Pickles, 40 oz .; ; ,.,
Heinz.Baked Beans, med, size 2 Corf....,,..
., Heinz Tomato Sauce, small A,.,,,;...v..,;.
Baby's Own' Toilet Soap, per box.	
Swifl's Witch Hazel Toilet So^p :...,.
Roger's Goldvn Syrup 2 lb', tins * .a'..
■ Maplo Syrup, quart'bottles each ..,.,	
Special Blend" Bulk Tea. 3 lbs V	
Standard Pr-ns per tin .;.: *.;..■: \)\ t.
Sweet Wrinkle, -2 ting for *. ,\.., ':7;\..;'. *"7
Cooked Ham, per lb. -.'.,'".'/..,.;...':,.....,
Roast Pork, per lb
1 • » • • '• <
.;'"-.15^
. v.25U
.=■ Wr-
;  ,30<;
.  .15:.
..1.00:<
; .25
,10/
.40 :
1 . 55
'-.    .25,r
.25
-'  .35
.■■';35?
,-   .25:-
-   :,10,
.   .25",
., .15 ••
' .15-.
,50
* lioo'■;
^ .10;.
;   .25 .
'.-  .40
 35f,
*.'¥'   ',
McOLARY'S BLUE. ENAMEL .CANADA- WARE
■ ^ spEOfAL;, "■;,■'.' '• '•""**
' Dish Pan .....,......'
';; Di-^h Pan',.;. .•>. :•;'...A,
;\ Dish Pan ...>...;.  ....
Dish Pan ' .\..-..;.
Milk and Rico, Boiler;
Milk ai*d Rice Boiled.;
MilU.;and?fiace*Bc>ile?. r. * v.-.Reg-.*- 3.50-for
' * "-,'" Grey Enamel Imperial' Wate
.„'.'.Reg.. $1.00ior , .75--
....Ileg/ l'.?5 for ,.9&- !
..-. Reg: 1,50 for 1.10
•w,Begj 2.00; for ,l,70r
.*,'.-.Heg. .90"for ^70
■I -f*,-. Reg.- 1.35- f or«-, ,....,90 •>,
rl.20
>,. Dinner.EaiU.
Dinner Pail
?■' 25 lb tin'if;
50 lb tin -\..
--100 lb-tin,
,Reg„ ;..8j5 fov ,66
..\...*yi —.,.'Reg:*,L00 for' .75
Japanned Flour, Tijis .-'"'- -/'      ; t*
s  "   V.      \   .. Jf'-****' "*i''?"***4i.»«"'B-fr«,«-,»*i*r"«^"u
;..■■."-: Heg. $1.50 for $1.05
 i";....'... .t.Reg.   1.75 for   1.25..
'     ' ■ '" '      .Reg.-  2.50tforr 1.85"
;v*>
r>
Several of the rate payers aro wearing anything 'but a smile, atter perusing their assessments.
Tbe city will place a hydrant at the
south ond of the town at the request
of the resident, to be used for watering the streets. The cost is not to exceed $55.00.
'Whether it may be taken as a sign
of prosperity or not, we do not care to
yenture, but the City Hotol Is certainly not doing the trade that it usually does at this period, only two
guests being at -present registered.
The accommodation provided by the
tnunicipal authorities evidently does
not appeal to many. This does not
mean, however, that our police force
Is not performing its duty, but rather
that their strict attention to duty has
wared the evil-doers away.
Colin Campbell of Victoria. Superintendent of Provincial Police, was In
town during the weea.
iMr. H. Elmer Is in town attending
the Supreme Court on behalf .of
Michel Local Union.	
Amateur horticuituralists have been
warned iby tho city that they must be
more sparing with the water, and in
tho event of them not exorcising due
care, will find themselves inflicted
with nn additional two dollar rate.
William Hawthorne Is decorating the
lower portion of the Beck block, and
tbo .store lately occupied by N. B.
Suddaby bas been divided, making
two business places. Mr. Cross of
tbe Pantorlum Tailors will take the
one to tbe south, while the other has
not yet found a tenant.
J, B. OSBORNE
Saturday, June 13
Owing to the biff mwentm of the Athletic show Isst Wwl-
nesdajr, the management have decided to re-engage—
Ursus, the Great
The strongiit man in the world at IfiO pound*. The
uisii who has bested umm of trti- Ntrongcat men h\ the world,
including the great Hmidow. The only man who performs
tU« urigtwal em'nl feat. Ursus perforata genuine featt of
strength and not fakca.
Sam Clapham
The original Engliih ligfii-h^ivjr weight ehampion wwat-
•wl.     tm, m**t atutt «««» «««««■ *■*•**«. «««•« * ***■*«   t***.***■*.**. i.uaf
.Wv »3l ah< Mi r.vXi'.tJiJiuj i.f inm-HiV (Vrrlcjimr'^   im<V'
tmtwl *fld will *lm> m«ei all comers,
Thk is jntar mily therm to em b «h>nnlne athletic dutt,
•ltd U»nM not be miseed.
t. *•.'.. rt'tto, f,f„ -mrii.t,. nt Writ****! \tnt-ina intdnttitiw
Big Domino Feature Entitled,
IHE THIEVES"
AUo K-tftUmm Cwmif mTIm Under SiMitfT
Adults 30 cents, Children 1S tents
Matin**, AMb 18c, QdWrwi St
Buy a Committor*! Ticket, Good for 10 Moving Picture Shows, Price $1.00
"The Philosophy of the Trade Union
Movement"
J. D. Osborne, known to all socialists as the blind orator, delivered an
address at the -Socialist Hall on Wednesday evening, taking as his subject,
"The Philosophy of the Trade Union
(Movement." This Is ibut a brief out-
lino of his remarks:
In speaking ot a movement or an
organisation In society, it is our aim
to understand the reasons of sucb a
phenomena, and therefore* I shall
treat the subject In a cold and analytical manner. It has been said tbat
the trade union movement Is tbe lineal descendant of the ancient Trade
Guilds, but this ls ndt tbe case. The
modern trade union movement Is the
direct product of capitalism, In this
universe there Is nothing stagnant,
but ail thing* are subject to ebange.
Capitalism Is undergoing • process of
change, the same can toe said of the
trade union movement, for -we eee
tbat more capitalism combines the
greater becomes tbe concentration tn
the tabor movement. The form of or
ganltotion dots not change before
but after tbe development of capital-
Ism. The labor movement bas served
tbe purpose of preventing the deter
loratlon of tha-.wortlng classes. True,
tt wilt not ist tor tte worker the
(ult product of hit toll, ss many a labor leader bid on* time imagined,
bnt tbe labor movement Is under
etood by most modern labor leaders to
function not ni an aggressive organisation, but as one of defense. How-
ever, capitalism hoe Itt Umttatl.111,
for It is based upon the wage sysMgs,
end wbllet tt lives tnd thrives ss such
It nevertheless, In the words of Karl
•Man, digs ttt own grave.
A Itm* tnd appreciative audience
listened to the speaker, tad winy
SntttloMi were ttked tt the cloee ot
lie address, 3. ft. Osborne left (hit
morning for Vancouver.
THI CITV LIAOUB
Tbt etty league polled off two fig*
terse this w«ek. Tuesday evening,
tke Teamster* met tod defeated tb*
Crew's Nett Trading Company, by •
•eortert-1. noth teams pltyed good
ball, twt the ieamtteft wort too strong
for tbe rterlti, tnd their welgtit soon
WM on the lighter teem. Wftbtn n
torn minutes of eUrtltg Ctas. Hon.
•at!** mmdo k greet mm and sbouW
bave scored, bot shot and Ut tte
FEERNIE FOOTBALL CLUB
A general meeting ot the above club
will be held on Sunday, at 4 p. m.
prompt. The dance,.. players and
working committees are especially
requested to attend, as well as all
others Interested.
TRAP SHOOTING
Several enthusiastic trap shooters
Journeyed to the traps at tbe north of
town on Wednesday afternoon, and
enjoyed a quiet afternoon's sport. The
scores were not heavy In tbe tint 25,
but later on some fair score* were
registered.
The business men are determined
to enjoy life at well as their assistants, and will make Wednesday
the logical day for the meeting.
"GERMINAL" AT THI ORPHEUM
William tyckefc had hir engine and;
crusher chewing up rock oit.Tuesday
~bur ever popular young citizen,* Vic
Allen, is in hospital, undergoing a
slight operation.' May he soon recover,
ls our sincere wish. .
FURNITURE POR 8ALE
The undersigned will bave eome
furniture to sell before leaving Fernie. Anyone desiring to (buy can view
the same any day after tbe 17th lntt.
The list for sale Includes oak dining
room set, library table, rocking chairs,
oak and Iran beds, oak dressing tablet,
washing machine, lawn mower, garden
(rubber) hose, ete. „ ,_
»16 W. ft. WAUIW
WMJ.
thrftwv. Vf«t i«*w; foibtAt wn* th*
brightest Mar tn tte whole eoneteltt*
tion of defease tnd eaved repeatedly,
wfet!* PftfVftft WM t Hv*. teaHHi<
fltyor. HtttMMe ot centre was as
B»od tt anr one on the fteM.
TltP   -if-pf^TMIW   WU*  tf|#   nf#t   Wlftwfl
Of tte Tttwsterf eleven, eHtoegft
JtamrllloKlebelM played a cool, sure
gMO«. elwtjrs tetog where tte leather
WM. **
Oo Wednesday afternoon the Butchers tte Tritso-wood tried cotelneleat.
Ui tte rsetlt wee t win for the 1st-
ter bf t—b. Tte netrters ere t
hetvy tsoa and thould have made
more wo of ttetr wetght, tet tl»0f
W«lu»l flaisb «uut uuu *m*uM iMMuiai^
ally aoo leer er Ave buuhen eloylne
em oootter to got tte tell, ite wet*
ntUn It thtt THtee-H'ood m not
scare more, and tbey bava only to
tteftk tte WMk ftwwsn! tine tm tMs.
'^aatar^mmmmmmimtmtj m nn wim tm. nm«*
Mit Ttesjue WTIllsms wss ttks« to
ilioeotttt, toUeilng ttwto n wivne tt«
teeCof •MMMUoo. We pro* piste*
to letrn ttet tbe is now eonvalesceat
Those who tttended the. Orpheum
on Wednesdty evening enjoyed one of
tbo finest products, both from a
photographic and histrionic point, of
vltw, In the filming of thit great liter-
try production, one gets an Illustrated
edition of the work which more accurately .portrays the masterly ability
of Smile Zola and the passjpns  and
Pthos of his characters, "Germinal"
a strong, passionate; picture play,
without the raaudilng, mushy romances that one tnvariaftly find* in
the modem ficUonlst work of today.
Charles Dickens It acknowledged by
all to bare been tho most versatile of
writers, but to jBolt must be given tho
Itnrtls tor tn Intimate knowledge of
bomtn ptttion, tnd tn tWllty to pro-
tray stmt that bas never been equalled. Heknewtheoeoole.and the-neo-
tl* knew him; ho lived their lift whon
o wrote about thom. hence the to*
curacy with which he oan portray
their every action. Tte test teese of
thit greet picture -play It characteristic or Soto, tnd gives on* a glimpse
of tht satirical humor of the author,
when the widow, after teeing ber
husband tnd chlldwn ttertfleod to
the greed of the mln»o*n*ra, 11 re-
warded hy tb* offer of a Job in No. ft
shaft tt a man's wages ot Ma cents
per otr of coal loaded. Tte work la
t masterpiece, and the tpleadtd,
brilliant photography bring* ont evory
detail tnd feature In t bttotlful omte
tone that Is both pleating and reetfUI
to th* eye. Too tboold ecrttinly *••
ttitm tnma* tilt*!***** ft <• at* t*ht*t*t Ima.
I son. H tt food fer refktetlon.    Doot
' wrgwt, at ite urvtowo* u»»40t i*i'a«t*»-
■kr Friday tad iatwday tte Mo>
graph twtvrt^ Yaeqel 0*r will te
shown, and Tragedy and Ambition, a
two-reel tpeclaL   le   tnnouncsd   (or
k*M\t»tiet *t*a  k*mmat,t..   *i* ttantantUt
mmd have mod* trr*tgem**U for *
ifioof frature* ttet wfllte • «nvH*»
tnd t plotter* tor patron* of thte
boose. Tlieee feetvree wtH arrive
rsrtkrlr in the near Attn* *MI foe*
Oriaft aw tt *tor* tet tbme who hav*
tbeOroteu teMt TM* teooo le
cool aad comfortable on the hottest
TENDER* WANTED
-Sealed tender* will be received by
the undersigned for supplying later
only In the construction   of t fence
around the Annex school ground*,
-Speciflclatlons may te had tn request
All tendere must toe tceomptnled
with a marked cfeequt for (29.00, tnd
be in tte haadt of th* Moratory not
later thtn 12 o'clock soon, June 18th,
J914.
3. 8. DIOKBN,
Secretary Feral* School «Bo*rd.
Ill
fO^^ALB-Oheap-t^ncaJJed for.'new
j,and eecond-hand'ladiea' and ■eent't
sv'lts, skirts, overcoats, paatsT vests?
'waists, hats  and >hoe»~*lt*nlwm
f Pantbrium Tailors, '► Oro&'nd ;J16or;
lbt Main street, In^uddaby's 'old
•tore. 317 ''
FOR SALE—-Viollncello U tixe,   ia
'^fine condition,'    Sola   instrument
(cheap).   Apply H. Hewitt, .House
-117, Coal Creek.        '   .       210 '■■
AU/TOMATIC RIPLB-Remlngton, 35
cal.;- eplendld condition; slung;
.peep rear sight and ivory tip' foresight  Apply Box 380, Fernie, B.C,
LOST—A email envelope containing
monoy, Finder <please return, to J.
W, Qninney, c. o. Trlte**Wood Co.,
•Ltd., tnd receive reward,
■m
Crow's Nest Business
College
And Academy of Laagaoges
J.W.Bsaattt, Principal
Classes arranged for any thne
daring dty or evening
• Witts Psr Pities ifi
Johnton-Ptkeotr Btook
FERNIE      x       EC.
Classified Ads.- Cent a Word
 , - 'j TTTT-
TO BBNT-—Two Onfurnlsshecl roomai
Apply 139 iMdWieirebn Ave.; Fernie*;
I B. c. ■ ■":   . 203 ;
FOR SALE—9-roMMd house on full
' site lot, steam Seated throughout,
•bath, and every modern oonvenlen-ce,.
', large oithouse, and lawn in 'front.
. The 'property is, surrounded by a.
well- built fence and make* a splendid modem up*to-date home.' Also
Lot 3, Block '48, for sale cheap.. For
. full .particulars apply to The Ledger
Office. ■ r ...     . m
FOR aALB—Horte, buggy aad barnett. Hon* sound, weight about
1050; harness witb collar and.
names and bregat collar. Now; tho
whole lot cheap, 1135,. Apply Box.
880, Fernie, B, O. . >"
FOR SALEr-Ctfebagec, oaulWower,
Brussels sprouts, toed cttototgo
fklanta', also flower and herb fttnt*.
a Dodd, >btck of Annex toh*ot, Fornle, a c. Ml
FOR SALE—100 laying bens, at HOC
each, including our Imported pen*   .
of 8. C. Black Minorca, 8, O. White  ,
Leghorn, Anoona, R. O, Brown Log*
born and 8. O. R. I. Red.   ttlko
Poultry Ttrdt,' Kko, & 0.     211
dtya, em R* roomy **tt*. hWh *•«•
tune nnd trend v*e»Hsttft»i tRtlW tt *
deetraWe jAnee td «nt*rt*ttm«*t,
•"Moeogli Fir* to fto»t***.orTte
Smto* Vinage," a flv»r««t UM* em
rial tmtwe to booted fer tW* ten*
very stevtly tad Sttt* wfll te   ew
i*^S<^^^      rf^        S^^9^^^ t^^ftA _M_W
fMVIWP S mWam     <^W     ^W
from London, Bnglaad.
ISIS THEATRE 1^,
Ml
SPBCIAIr SATURDAY — M»tin«« find Mwninm
THE ELEVENTH HOUR
A Two lleol Bf«on
Special Mondiiy
In Mititanoy tho right thing ?   Soo
THE MILITANT
A Three Heel Imp. Drama,     Arid Judge For Yourself
Torongti neglect ot ter tette.ii, Sir ArUer, Mtrgarei t* tm to join u* mUttanto.    Vbm
telldiagt aad railroads, tet wtea htr friends kidnap ter owm eWW, teotwo   Sir Arthur   1*
ttem. It It t olHswut otonf.
On* of tb* most r*s«*tle *treet rtot* ever flUMtl, tnd R It O* rttl thing.
detwoy
&XTRA 6P&CIAL ThbMrmeim,y J
iSUi
lie IntenutJotany ftmovt fWbf ite noted drtattltt C, If. i. MoOtollta, IntwvrtUd by th* dl*-
Ungulsbsd American acres*, CarlotU NHUon.
4Rtcli •  ZrEAH  KErBSCHMA - w WtmwU
Ueh Kleeenaa le eertat* to etir tte eivtHted world wttii H* ptat for tte crlmlntl wte te* n«v*r
tern shewn ite right way to live.
Cofnffitf Soon CdMitlfiv Soon       -     Coming
An ImmorUliird VUtulintipn of Dkk^nV Matterj.ieco .
DAVID  COPFBRFXBErD
S, tmStf, Ite fr**t**i***tteiM9i *» .tte wertt* ot IMtiiw,
eiiwuuw ee
THE tfttl KXCCLU IK KVCRYTKfKQt PtRTAINrNQ TO PtQTURCI
mmmam*tmmmiimammamatmmmamiimmmaamamaiiatiamtla*Wm^

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