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The District Ledger Apr 18, 1914

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Array (
!Provinci*> Ubr
'nry.
Jun 3o.
Industrial Unity is Strength
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The-Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
Political Unity is Victory
No. 34, Vol. VII.
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
,-t
1st of May Celebration
Tho let of May -promises to ibe an
historic day In tbe records of this
•town, The committee of Gladstone
Local haa. been busy during the past
week coil-acting sbscriptlons and arranging program, and it is estimated
ibal about fifiteen hundred1 dollars
■will bo distributed in' the shape of
prises. Michel and Hosmer, are cooperating, and' we "may reasonably expect something like two or three
thousand visitors -to help us -celebrate.
Footballers, lacrosse players, horse-
•men*,, runners, junipero, and: motor cyclists have all been! catered for, and
•events wtth substantial prizes will be
programmed.
It Is also thought that a boxing bout
(between Sailor Jones, of Medicine
-Hat,-awl Uvanni, of Cranbrook, twill
be staged, wfctte the dancing element
-wil! 4>s catered ifor Iby the Socialist
Party, who are hoi-ding a dance in the.
evening.
The following is an outline, of sports
program:
' 100 yards (open), prizes totalling
about |70uM, with an entrance' fee of
60 oents. •
440 yards (open), prizes totalling
! about 9-50.00* with an entrance fee of
50 "cents.
1 untts .(open), prises totalling about
$50,00, entrance fee 50 centa
Footi-baSH match (tu-ti, team) confined
to teams da tbe - Crow's Nest Pass
League; prise flOO.00; entrance fee
f 5s00.
- tFodttMfl taaifech for Juniors, prize
$53.00; estrones fee $3.00,
Lacrosse, $100:00, with $5.00 en-
trance fee each team.
■IawiwasB tfuatorh $33.00; $3.00 en-
-tiajwe fee.
Horse racing; $125.00 in -prizes.
Hfetor carate; substantial prizes to
be announced *ater,
mere wia also be .prizes for high
Jump tad long jump, and several oth*
er wrenta, ot .which full particulars
will be announce^ next week.
A full list of ail subscribers -will be
published in *he Ledger next week.
Any person desirous of contributing
may forward his donation to T. Uphill, secretary,. Gladstone1' Local, Fernie, B. C.
The speakers will be Parker Williams, iM. P. P., Ladysmith, and John
Loughran, secretary Beaver Mines Local.
ALLEN PLAYERS
At the Grand Next Week
"The Woman" is unquestionably a
drama which deals with the big things
of life. Its leading malo characters
are big men, for even though some of
them are unblushing grafters, they
are grafters, nevertheless, who play
with millions ifor their stakes and who
toy with the commercial affairs of a
whole nation as one would pull the
strings of a puppet-show, men to
whom the imposition of the rankest of
corporation dominance upou an. entire
republic is but an everyday affair of
•legislative business, and who would
brush aside,, or else- -utterly crush,
anyone who stood' In their way, and
that without the slightest suggestion
of a qualm of conscience.
In this play of strong characters,
however, the central figure of all, the
one which stands out the clearest and
most forcefully, is not the unscrupulous party chieftain, "Blake," nor the
brilliant but selfish insurgent leader.
"Standish." but the 'little telephone operator, "Wanda Kelly*" who hides,
beneath a pert and slangy exterior,
the stuff of which heroes are made,
and whose small but determined hand
played checkmate to tbe best -laid
schemes of the clever group of politicians, and at the same time lays the
foundations of her own life's happiness, "v
John Loughran
on Home Rule
Id a tetter addressed to the Pincher
Creek Echo, John Loughran, secretary
of Beaver Creek -Looal, has some -very
Iposnwa~oo»Bi»iwiff"W"Tb»KeT-upohrthe-
Home Rule controversy. The use of
religious bigotry and racial batred by
those to control of affairs is not by
any .means new, and the only wonder
to the intelligent worker is that the
ruling classes have boon able to continue- to use eutoh" means of deluding
the -.watbKWf.. IJSWfcwt osritty SQpd K
twill do tbs tuloni man ln Ulster tp Ub
a bdy-o-neC Into tbe. vltalaCof a mail
from Dublin, or tor tbe Dublin man to
•blow off the head of the Ulster man,
we cannot (or the life of us see. 'Socialists and labor men are accused of
aU sorts of crime, but If any of them
penult themselves to be dragged Into
this squabble we fear the .English, dictionary does not ©obtain enough, adjectives to describe what kind of a fool
they'sre* We ourselves remesnber
when it was confidently predicted' ty
antiiHome Rulers that it Ireland .were
granted looal Autonomy Dublin would
be used toy the French as a base for
tbe invasion ot England. Recent do-
vetopmenta in South Africa should
eon-Tines the worker tlmt nothing can
be gained by espousing either of the
oMipaitles. However, read iwhat John
has to aay, for he has bad first hand
experience and he understands the
economic tide of the Issue;
".., Home Rule Is a debatable subject, and our opinions on tbe matter
sre ipt to be Influenced according to
our environments, but If ths readers
ot the Echo wars, even silly enough to
fly at each others throats, and (Iks tbe
Kilkenny cats, 'sat each other up,' It
would not alter the destiny ot Home
Rule one lot* either way. That rt*
llgleue bigotry la carried to greater
excesses In Ireland than In most coun-
tries, few will deny, and that for generations religion bas been played for
all Its worth to order to prevent Catb-
same time the laborere will be housed
in comfortable cottages. This is .what
is •curdling the blue Wood in the veins
-9   .. •••"-.-i '•-      t1- -     *f, . —*•—    —*r* -—91.*— I t-.lr.^     «*.*   9%.a .rlllr.l^j—1...  ,—   *.* -   - ..
-w -•vu@TW»TS©Iiwi"w'»,£j *0*BM*oj»^n*u*in/u-pryv«m-w»'-T»»»»-T-»iioinr—oj u—u-snfjyHimBUY
iThe Loyal Qrangemen of .Fernie are
holdSng a -ball on Wednesday, May
20th. in the Victoria Hall.
Don't forget the footballers' dance
next Monday evening. Prizes for
tango and hesitation experts.
William Cooper received a caWe-
giram this morning.from Wigan. England, informing him of -his father's
demise.
G. P. Stalker, of Wilmer, B. C„ Is
the new Government agent for this
district. J. S. JT. Alexander will return to Victoria and resume his position on the Water Commissioners'
Board.
S. iB. Bytes, ihe new Provincial
Chief of Police, arrived' on Saturday
from Tet'e Jean Cache, and has taken
up his duties;
Chief .Mlnty was presented with a-
handsome gold watch by the constables of Bast Kootenay, on Wednesday
night. He will leave fer New Hazel-
ton at the end of the <wek.
A pretty wedding took place on the
7th -in the City Hall, Calgary, when
Wr. Wm. J. Long, of Calgary, and Miss
Florence Blakemore, eldest daughter
of -Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Blakemore, of
Fernie, were united in marriage, the
Rev. A. D. McDonald officiating.
Herteet E. Barnes, provincial consul, Modern Woodmen of, America,'
leaves in a,.few .days for Vernon,
where the ehcampment ia being held
this year. Before returning he wlH
pay an official visit to Vancouver,
Spokane and Nelson. Oro. Barnes is
chief officer for B. C. -
THE LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Every member and officer is invited
to attend the lodge next Monday evening at 7.30, when officers wiM Ibe Installed for 1914. VlsHing brothers
are also invdted, and as a social; with
refreshments, has been arranged to
take place immediately after the business meeting, this will be an excellent
oipportunity for all .brothers to get acquainted.
On Sunday at 12 o'clock (noon), officers and officers-elect are requested
to gather in the lodge room for team
practice.
THE 1818 THEATRE
A story chock full of thrills and ad-
venture, terminating in the annihila-
merry 'humbugs, **hd?*oo£ -Major Seeley
was node ftjmpegoet He allowed
him-s^B 1» out*luffed, but it must
be -remengKJred. .that the ex-minister
of war Is' one. of the laigeet land and
■oollleijyi -owners In the midlands ot
Bngten<t,'~snd that^what he'did was
but an honest attempt^on his part to
•aye, even at the expense of tihe Empire, the.class to which* he belongs.
The truth ls that unless the present
government is overthrown the landed
aristocracy ot Great Britain is doomed. The British Socialist party in
parliament and in the country has
forced the government to Introduce
measures for the benefit of the working classes, but that will drive the 'upper ten' out of business. The latter
class know this, and believed that by
offering a strenuous opposition to
Home Rule, and byi appealing to religious bigotry, prejudice, and racial
hatred, they could oust the government from power on the Home Rule
Suestion. As a class 'they can see
estmictloD staring tbem tn the face,
and Just like any other big -game In
the face of approaching death, tbey
are concentrating aH their latent energies on making one desperate kick
before giving up the ghost. As to arguments used against Home Rule, was
not aH these and more forcible arguments used previous to 1867 against
(tome Rule fer Canada? Moss of the
statesmen and others who were opposed to conferring the constitution
on the Dominion ot Canada lit that
time pledged tbelr regulations that if
Home Rule was granted ln less than
twelve months civil war between tbe
Catholic French and the British Protestants would so wreck the Dominion
that nothing could save Canada from
coming   under  ths   American  flag.
MEETING OF CROW'S
NEST.PASS LEAGUE
The above league will meet
in Coleman on Saturday,
April 18th, and all representatives and officials are asked
to attend.
A. J. CARTER, Sec.
SOCIALIST PARTY OF CANADA
A propaganda meeting of the above
party will be held! In the new Socialist
Hall, on Sunday next, April 18th, when
Comrade Harry Martin .will deliver an
address on "Woman and Socialism."
Immediately after the propaganda
meeting, a business meeting will* be
held, -and all members are requested
to turn out in full force.
The usual economic class will meet
in the afternoon at 3.30, to which all
are invited:
*• Tbe party also announce that they
will hold a social and dance on the
lst of May, Further particulars will
be announced later.
A DENIAL
A persistent' rumor has gained currency in town, during the past few
days .with reference to James Stewart, late of Fernie. In order that thlB
tnoy be allayed I wish to state tbat
there is absolutely no.foundation to
the story, jptewart being ln the .best
of health on- Sunday test
DAVE REES.
MEN'S DEMANDS ALL MET
.    EXCEPT RECOGNITION
Eight-Hour Day Ood Minimum Wage
Won—Miners Obstaln Better
Working* Conditions
'ered explosive, is "Red Powder," a
three-reel feature tbat the management of the above theatre ls screen
Ing on' Saturday. .This is supposed to
be the most realistic and hair-raising
piece of photography ever attempted,
and some of the scenes include the
complete demolition of a stone' build'
Ing, blasting scenes, motor boat pursuits!, tbe annihilation''of a sailing
boat by explosives, ending with the
run of fire apparatus, and a situation
depleting the arch plotter and his in
nocent wife and child, suspending
from a derrick with a frantic mob beneath clamoring fer their lives. A
whirlwind of sensationalism, which
makes you rise in your teat with excitement.
Friday's feature, "On Land and
Sea," is a two-reel projection of an
English bouse, featuring Cricks and
'Martin. ■■-..„*■
For next .week, a splendid program
has been arranged, Monday, "A
Stolen Identity." two reels; Tuesday,
"Over the Cliffs," three-reel Eclair;
Wednesday, "Miracle Mary," throe,
reel Victor. For Friday there Is an
extra special feature, tbat everlasting
success, "Arizona," In five reels; America's greatest play by Augustus Thomas, produced under personal direction
of the author with a mighty cast of
(Metropolitan Favorites and original
"Arizona" players, Including Cyril
Scott, tbe original lead, together with
a vast army of cowboys, cavalrymen
and unique Western typos.
HANCOCK, Mich., April 13.—The
cower mine .workers who have 'been
on strike since July 23 last, voted yesterday to call off tbe strike, -according
to- announcement today by Charles
E. -Hietela, district secretary of the
Western -Federation of Miners. The
figures will not be given out until after a meeting ot the district board
this afternoon.
It is unofficially reported that the
majority in favor of calling off the
strike was 1012* The unofficial vote
from four ot the five locals in the district resulted'as follows:
Ahmeek, 600 for returning to work;
~tr e^sasid;—; '	
Calumet, 291 "for; 382 against.
Hancock, 491 for; against, 18.
South Range, 485 for; 90 against.
Recognition Waived
Recognition of the union, denied by
tbe mining companies, is waived by
the strikers in voting to return to
work. They claim that practically all
of their other 4eJn«m<l8 have been
complied1 with si-ace tne strike began.
These demands .include better -working conditions, an eight-hour day and
a minimum dally wage of $3.
Several thousand men bave been
Imported to fill the strikers' places
and the companies will be hard pressed to find work for the returning
strikers.
ULSTER  SCENE   OF  OUTRAGES
Member of Cabinet Expresses Views
—Labor Party Seeks Independence
LONDON, April 14.—Msh despatches received today tell ot outrages that
have been committed upon Protestants. Two Protestant farmers. Joseph
McCartney and Andrew Agnew, of the
Ulster volunteer -forces, were set upon
near Ballyguwely on Sunday night and
severely beaten by a crowd returning
from a Gaelic football match. Agnew
was thrown Into a ditch and two men
held (McCartney .while two others beat
bim unconscious.
--* car conveying a number of Cooks-
town girls to a range dance at Cough,
County Tyrone, on Monday night, was
attacked by a party of men. Two
girls were struck, one named Johnston
ba/ving her skull fractured. Three
others are In the infirmary of County
Clare as a result of wounds received
from revolver shots.
Limit of Concessions Reached
LONDON, April 14.—There are no
further developments in,the Irish situation, both sides apparently marking
time in parliament, no matter what
they may be doing In Ulster.
Labor Party Would Be  Independent
The Independent Labor party In
■session at Bradford' passed a resolution Instructing the Laibor members to
act independently ot the Liberals in
parliament
RAILROAD ARBITER8
MAKE FINAL RULINGS
After lengthy -consideration of the
complaint of trainmen and conductors
that the Eastern railroads were evading tbe terms of Its award of November 10 lest, the Board of Arbitration
yesterday finally made public its rulings as to the meaning and application of that award; A copy was filed
in the United States District Court
in accordance with the provisions of
the Newlands Act
•The points raised- were nearly all
technical. The board decided in the
affirmative In a' point raised as to
whether a crew could' be used ln extra work in case It did not run a
sufficient number of days to be covered by its guarantee of wages per
month.
One of the answers of the board to
points raised was tbat in combining
short freight trips the railroads were
limited to an aggregate ot 100 miles.
Many examples were given as to the
operation of the overtime rates i_n_
^^TaiMioirorthennfe^"6r"a>e"ar«l^
trators in making their award.
'Four ot the six members of the
board agreed in tbe ruling ln some
of the <points and Lucius E. Sheppard
and Daniel L. Cease, the representatives of the men, dissented, but under
the Newlands act a majority ot the
board can render a decision.
Tbe ruling which affects about 85,-
000 trainmen ond conductors raises
their wages $6,000,000 per annum.—
New York Call.
Our Strike in Colorado
■DENVER, Colo., April 16. —Tbe
United Mine Workers, after three attempts, bave finally .been successful
in having a writ of habeas corpus issued by the state supreme court for
the production in court of 'IMother"
J-tjpee, 82-year-old angel of the coal
camps.
"Mother" Jones was held In the
military bull pen at Trinidad by Czar
Chase for nine weeks. She was allowed to see no one, and given nothing to read. During that time two efforts -were made to make the notorious militia show cause why she should
not be allowed her constitutional
rights -as an American citizen, but
both were unsuccessful.
The supreme oourt this week took
original Jurisdiction in the matter after ''Mother" Jones has again been
made a military prisoner and confined
in a damp vermin-ridden cell in the
Walsenburg Jail. The same cell was
so unsanitary as to kill a healthy
young Greek The militia have been
ordered to produce the aged labor
leader ln court within ten days.
On the eve of the second request
tor a writ, tbe mlHtia released 'IMother" Jones and deported her to Denver. By that act they admitted that
they were holding military prisoners
Illegally. It is expected that tbe scab-
herders may do tbe same thing this
time, thus preventing the habeas corpus question ibeing decided and Indefinitely, depriving American citizens
in Colorado ot their constitutional
rights.
The reign of terror whioh has prevailed in the strike district since the
wholesale Importation by the ooal
operators of hired gunmen, and the
added tyrannical rule of the militia resulted this week In the preliminary
organization of a law and order league
among the members of organized labor in Colorado.
Trade unionists throughout the
state will band themselves together
and take the necessary steps to obtain
justice in the civil courts and the
rights guaranteed them by the constitutions of the United> States and
Colorado.
That the good citizenship of Colorado Is thoroughly disgusted' with the
high-feanded anarchistic methods of
the governor, the militia and the operators was shown at the elections this
week, when the United Mine Workers'
tickets won out In every district ex-
rant Wslaenlhurg. .the notorious king"
Attorney General Farrar has also
told the corporation-owned executives
that they had no right to tear down
tbe miners' tents at Forbes. To show
him they were obeying the orders of
the coal operators and not following
his advice, Ammons and Chase had
the (miners' homes destroyed again.
Officials of the United Mine Workers have announced that "when they
again erect these homes they hope to
be in a poeition to protect their property rights against all trespassers."
After robbing Colorado taxpayers
ot $750,000 to use the militia to terrorize and intimidate the strikers,
Governor Ammons has announced
that he .will withdraw aU uniformed
scab herders.
This statement has been made before and resulted in nothing. About
the time the militia are to be withdrawn the hired assassins of the operators will start another reign of
terror, blaone It on the strikers, and
the lickspittle governor -will have another excuse to keep the militia in
the strike zone.
ode. and Protect. W uniting .»2EE*'S.-K^»&*£
against tli* common enemy, landlord*
lam, which baa already been ths curse
of Ireland, most people will admit.
That Home Rule, coupled with Uoyd
George's mw Land Bill, at present
before parliament wlH. if paassd
sound tbs death knell ot landlordism,
not only in Ireland, but throughout
Oreat Britain, will be admitted by all
students of British politics. Thsrsfora,
Mr. Bditor, when you say "It Is ths
spirit of true loyalty to lbs British
Bapire that prompt* Sir Edward
Canon and tbs men of Ulster In thtlr
fight acalnot taparaUon," we contld-
or auch statements too ftrony to bn
treated seriously. The actions of Mr.
dunes aad Us eoUaagaaa during tba
rit week prove conclusively tbat It
net loyalty*, nor reHgtoo* nor racial
question of whsthw the decaying
aristocracy, or tbs will of tbs people.
shall prevail That army officers have
been  canvassed  and  Influenced  by
false prophesy, and although tbe con
cessions granted to tbe anti-Home
Rulers will detey the time, wh«n Ire
kind will he united under a-tovern-
meat la Dublin, yet the time will soon
coins, (tut whether It will be for weal
or woo ot tbs distressed country, time
alone will telL
"JOHN LOUGHRAN,
"Dearer Mlnea."
derry, whose husband Is one of ths
wealthiest land and colliery owners ta
Rnalsnd. besides owning vast estates
is imom, te now
{md '.vt- till I'litti"'
army affirm sr* to the Influence of
titled ladles, thn resignation ot the
otfittts, bt eowrse, was Intendtd to
flwbairass the govsmtnsnt and fores
them to resins.    This would save
tht* ^rtatnrraer   fw t*  ffrrtp tf  lamat
J^A*^ A^h***^^ ^M^Aa.B m^9m0 9      Om^tta^^ a/W,^^^9^^^^^_\_99_t_9.
from tno streets or woyo usorgemn,
liis Land Bill Introduced by Uoyd
George wMl If passed, band over to
Um agricultural population of Groat
Britain millions ot acres of land tbat
la now tied op aad fenced lor ganw
preserves. It will also prevent lbs
fssdeid sristoOTsts from Imposts* on-
HALF  A   MILLION   INORIAII
WASHINGTON. April ll.-Due to
lbs efforts of tbs Metal Trades depart'
ment ot ths A. P. of h„ tbs Senats baa
adopted an amendment to the urgent
deficiency appropriation bill, which
will postpone for two yearn that portion ot tbe Panama Canal act which
povides tbat wages shall not eieeed
13 psr cent of tboss paid in government Institutions In continental Unit-
IMMIGRATION FIGURES
  -— .--*    .   ed States.   Tho act establishes per-
tttkd WIM, beaded by Lady London-' nutrient government tn tbe canal nunc,
and took effect April 1 of this year,
Officials ol tbs Metal Tirades depart'
ment called on Col, (lost-hals, en Ms
Inmuc. |»fw|»»f't», i recent rait to Win city, and *iio*eil|i*"   *.««»»'.-t.i*    io-whwi    mm-uumc*. , g
lir/,',*   T'H"frji^Vi'r'v'lu  *\,*tl>  if rtu, v-iij,'!' ;-.iij tH'jj iO  Uu* '^p"n wtn-Wnw ttr* tn-m-nw T<sr 1V«r'>u
sft was mtoretd now tt wnnld nt-Msn n
reduction of from 10 to 18 psr cent.
Tho u»!a*!*t* a*ked tbe amy oftte«r
If he would oppose an extension of
the old rats for two years, which
•n'fmtrt  fftft the t<nn»tn*f-tttiii  nt,9*n*t ttt
tbo canal. Tho workers were nnowet-
sd that if the Senate Appropriations
Committee would favor ths Mil, he
would offer no objections, ss he desired to maintain the present pleasant
relaUoas agisting between himself and
this canal sons wotttere. Several con-
fsrert*** wot* b*td, »Hrt the nrntter
just conditions upon their tenants,! was finally adjusted on tba acceptance
and leave tbt flslng of rents and I by  tbe  «<m«t# of tbe anwmdnwit.
tiiltui 4n'*uguiw.ui** iu (.lw luiuk uf it) -nUWl*   *.ii*-*At*  t*)i*>t.r-u*-)iH»tely   ih,*m
Gunmen  and  Scabs   Battle—Negroes
Shoot and Injure Marshal at Hastings    Last    Night —Later    Strike
Breakers Killed by the Militia.
TBINHXAJ), Colo., March 28,—As a
result ot a fight between negro
"scabs" and gunmen at the Hastings
mine last night, J. Robinson, marshal
and gunman at Hastings mine, was
shot through the abdomen.
John Johnson, negro "scab," who is
said to have done the shooting, was
killed by the militia at 11 o'clock this
morning.
'WllHam Young, another negro
"scab." 1s said to have been killed by
the militia shortly after 1.30 o'clock
this afternoon.
Details of national guardsmen are
scouring the hills throughout tbe dis-.
trict looking for other negro "Beans''
who .broke loose from the Hastings
property after the. riot. Last night's
shooting and today's search is an affair in which the gunmen and militia
are pitted against the Hastings strike
breakers.
The fact that all of the negro
"scabs" are carrying arms given them'
by the coal companies makes the situation all the more critical. The
struggle bas resolved itself into what
could be termed a race war, and h
feeling of apprehension has crept into
many_ofjfahe homes throiighftnt tht*
district "     " ^~.
Trouble started shortly after 10
o'clock. The negro "scabs" who were
imported here soverai weeks ago by
the Victor-American company to serve
as strike breakers had Just been paid.
There had been trouble brewing for
some time between the negroes and
the gunmen, on account of the tact
that the companies refused to let the
"scabs" leave the camp.
Last night the negroes got hold of
a quantity ot whisky. -Tbey began a
night of carousal and revelry, ending
in the "scabs" beginning to heap
abuse on the whites.
A quarrel started and Marshal Robinson started to quiet it
Johnson is said to have emptied his
revolver at the marshal, hitting htm
once In the abdomen. The,.Macks
broke loose and from that time en
they ran the camp to suit themselves.
After creating considerable more disturbance the bolder ones started out
with their guns.
Robinson was brought to Trinidad
last night and placed in Ban Rafael
hospital. He is in a serious condition
and little hopes are held for bis recovery.
The march for the negroes started
at daybreak this morning. Victor-
American gunmen located Johnson
flji<l one or two of his wjujpaniocw
ttliortly aftiMr 10 o'clock a short dJs-
tanco front Hastings. The negroes
wero surrounded and a telephone call
was sent to Trinidad. About 100 militiamen responded and aided the gunmen.
Johnson was killod aft*r several
shots bad boen «t«han«ed. Ills body
is t»lng brought to Trinidad.
Another group ot negro "scabs"
were located about an hour later nnd
tho militia took up tho work of dislodging them. Young is said to have
been one of the victims, and threo
other negroes are said to he und«r arrest
The state militia Is still patrolllnsr
th* Heating* district, lowklUR for additional "scabs" who broke kxwe from
Hastings.
Mllltla thsots Up Tent Colony, Osa.
Chase Admits
Conduct of the Michigan Stato
militia daring the copper wtrike In
the Oohimet region bas not been od*
mindde, but still MMilgan mn ink*
a f«»w lessons from Colorado, It was
evident Ttiureday. when K becanw
known that Captain K  H   llailer, td
Ths Limit at Indurasee Reached    K&L^i,for * w2li*? tffi*
I1HNVBR,   Oslo.,   March   SK-TV J»« ««oral Chase a methods in Trim-
h«»l    l»-u*ii«4*   tut    jtft.lUi*^,'*,-   ._ ,     .   .      _.  ..   .
 _  ^railing w!nlonVfBK!wm*tim*a rolled t** mimi.  ™<^!,b?«£, "j!**  £ ™"*|*  "J*
doubt tha-. tbe atriks was proripiuisi «*« Harebell would not ao th* full, '«<• «»im** V^f sJ*wU*h, **,r If UlS» <Vtora£ mill ttaIm^a
wholly from an In snae feeling op ths *«».   ««*, however, bad lots of terrorism en »be striking roa! mtntn * «■^JJJ<ra™ »  ttsSKv teloni-el
pnrt of oach IwHvldUB   workman who\my m 9f „„, „„,„,,   B|tllo,IRll  hl.  when  they; kldnapM   "<>"»;' *>nre     ', ^mX„^r««JmTi^r ^^
wan   afTcetcd.   that   the   dmufffl  In hlM( uh<(B  rowid^aWo l»nWbi»*.t. UnO1^^^
wnn*tt and honr* of work wna not|8(.„„ ^^ lh«. ninst. Wows, hut m In the WalsMrtmrw Ja I. Rhe Is |r,B«!jbn w*S'-J5« ,Kf fKl ? f. tt^
justified bi'the management. Xoat-ui,, bJbui round Marshall pla«d a b*M *h*r* lneommualr;a.to a military JJT'J X^1' (^!i"' ^LtJ^
fwtnt had b*»n made by anvow* to or-!•-»*««•»•*? nn (*****»,**•• Mn a** *r+*w ^ItirlMwr. .B™ m  mmZ '"T ,"".. **"*<*>« **n%
gnmm o sinar. torn|ii^Misms ««»-,n!-*t blood _      |    .«,«*,   VJ*f*^a    ««»•'«".«■■?, "•"",„„» .tri*-. ™v nt ih,* ..-*»« tn at,*
 hat n f«tw ready '"in qnit."!a 1^^^.' WftVVf'rMi' nWht'!hnv" ^-W f«',,f,% w^r* •hr-wcHt"""1*-   V"""-- lT?*,T* *,hm W,m** °f
being no danger of eye strain where J umor, organism of th* American FW-, o&tobt doubt who would have got wnwwN   alley*,   have   «**«», ^J,"^ JK;rSMnf
sniloa  af Ulwj*t,stttd a «wtes,»jw, *«{**. Sw ta  »»** nitwit u» «5«*& a!<* -m**w*d wotn-K.  mA "»• ■     T""  WI""B   u *»l,Mr *"" %v,ln*
THI ORPHIUM
Manager Johnston Is determined
that his house shall in future be
guarded against a repetition of the
recent disastrous tlu whioh originated In bis operating room, and If human precaution and forethought can
accomplish anything, we venture to
say thst a fire, similar to the last, will
he absolutely impossiblo, and Uw uioax
nervous Individual will be able to visit
this house with tbs assurance that so
far aa tire danger la concerned, this
has been totally eliminated. The Or-
pbaum haa mora fire silts than any
other place of amusement In town,
and arrangements wtll be mads for
earns to open automatically from a
control station upon tbs alarm being
givsn. Automatic fire eitlngulshera
will lm Installed, and nothing will satisfy ths management but a concrete
operating room, with all electric wires
to and Irom asms In metal conduits,
and a metal switch board containing
all ewltehes and cutouts, Ths following la tbs specifIretlon of same:
Room to bave concrete walla, celling and floor; door of plate (ron with
automatic shutting devices. The Icnsc
porta are also fireproof and operated
antomatl-r-ally. A twenty-Inch Iron!
fine from crtllng of op««mtlnir room to
otitalde of building will remove all
fmroes md smoke In ibe evtuu of iim.
The lantern equipment will consist of
.WASHINGTON, April H.—The comparatively small number of emigrant
aliens who left this country during
February is one of the features of the
last immigration bulletin issued by tbe
Department of Labor. The departures
for this month are 17.074 against an
average of 30,697 for the preceding
months of January, December and November. The small number ot skilled
workers coming to otir shore* maintains its average. A total of only 463
immigrants reported thoy .worked at
one of the following crafts: Bookbinding, -brewing, cabinetmaking. engineering, fur working, metal working, plastering, plumbing, saddlery and harness
making, stonecuttlng. tanning, tinning,
upholstering, and patternmaking. The
total number admitted during the
month was 46,873. Of this number
9.336 were classed as farm laborers
and 7,661 as laborer*, nut 748 profess,
ed a knowledge of farming. The number of gardeners admitted was 67;
servants, &.G20; tailors, 1X41; seamstresses, U2; shoemakers. 484; elerka
and accountant* 1.088. The number
ot mid** bavlUK do occuuaiiou, tu*;uth-
er with women and children, totallod
12,487.
A. f. Of L. AIDS UNSKIU.ID
OLY.MHA. Wash.. April H.-~Tbe
State Labor Commissioner, acting undor orders of (lovernor Lister, has forwarded bl* report to the state executive on ths strike of unskilled worker*
against tbs Tacoma Bmeltlng Company, which stnrtcd tbo first of tbe
wear. Wago reduoUons and increased
hours reused the striksi The condition* were not up to tbe average of
other smelters for the same class of
work, the report say*.   Tho commls-
BOXING IN PERNIE
About 200 fighting fans, Including
tome of the local "gentry" of Fernie,
were present at Ute Orpheum on Monday night to witness the bout between
Cyclone Scott, of Victoria, and Dick
Marshall, ot this town,
The first preliminary between McBride, of Macleod, and Ronny (MacDonald, of Fernie, was ono ot the liveliest mills ever seen In this town. It
Went four rounds, and every round
was full of excitement. (McBride had
the best of the weights, but .McDonald came back every time with a golden smile and a vicious punch.
The second round waa very exciting
and it was only by clinching tbat McDonald managed to stay.
The third round opened with both
lads boxing hard, and at one time It
looked as though the Fernie boy
would get the decision.
Tho fourth round was also slightly
In favor of tlie local tad, but as McBride had such a good lead on tbe
two opening rounds, the referee could
not do otherwise than call It a draw.
Bailor Jones, of Medicine Hat and
hi* sparring partner. .1. F, Davis, of
Spokane, gave a three-round exhibl
tion. Jonea I* very fast on his tost
and looks to be on* of the classiest
mon ever seen here. There Is a pos-
sNtlllty that, a mntvh will b* arrnmr-
ed tor lilm on May let.
The main bout was next staged, and
after a little discussion on the part
of the contestants as to who should
referee. It waa Anally decided that
Con Whetan should be the third man.
The bout wsnt the full limit of fifteen
round*, but neither of thn contestant*
could claim to have covered himself
with glory, or shown exceptional pugilistic ability. Scott did all of the
opening, but (Marshall was in splendid condition, snd managMl to avoid
ssventl vlokwa anaesthetic doses that
Scott tried to land Hugging and boring featured well, and the majority of
tb* spectators wore dlaappointiMl tor
dom of Jeff Fair
The Mipp- Workers' candidates
made a sweeping victory at Superior,
IxHilsville, Lafayette, Frederick, Oak
Creek, La Veta, and Aguilar. The victory ln the latter three towns, where
the mllltla has committed its robber--
les and other outrages, shows that
tbe people are all on the.side of the
striking coal miners.
Jeff <Farr, who waB exposed'before
the congressional committee, proved
Just as crooked as ever In his political
methods. It was a city election, but
that did not deter Fair from bringing
in 200 employees of the Walsen mine,
four miles outside the city limits, and
voting them. The union ticket lost
out by but 115 and a contest is anticipated. If the Illegal vote* of tbe.200
scabs are thrown out, it will give the
mino worker* a complete victory, and
mark the downfall of Farr and his
deputies who have tyrannised' and
murdered the miners in Huerfano
county for years.
DENVER. Colo., March 28.—Sitting
at the State House In supreme Umor.
ance ot the faot that the State Board
of Charities and Corrections had repeatedly condemned tho Walsenburg
Jail as unfit and unsanitary, Governor
Amnions refused to express regret
Thursday for the Incarceration of Mother Jones In the cellar of thnt building.
Ammons said Mother Jones could
save her liberty by leaving the State
If she thought she would get sick in
the damp and dark cell of the Huerfano county Jail.
A report by Judge William Thomas
of tho charities and corrections board
is on file at the State House, and this
report terms the Walsenburg Jail ■>«
"too small to keep clean and too
dark."
In a letter of recommendation to
the Huerfano county commissioners,
sent in He|M-wmiit;r, I !•<.(, -Jmitm
Thomas reconmtendu that th«* present
Jail be remodeled and particular at^
tentlon be paid to tho question of
light, ventilation and sanitation.
This work, according to Judge
Thomaa. baa not been attempted, and
Judge Thomas says that the Jail Is
no place to keep any prisoner, nnd
mtalnly I* too small and poorly ventilated to insure the health ot 4n
elghty-two-ysarold woman.
"I never hoard of It," said Amnion*,
when told of the report—Benv-w Bt-
. . -  .      .... .        appeared to be) at aselng both men   w
i4o»«rgiireU«efolto*I»g»W*llglitoa|0B  their  ttm after tbs  first  tew jC«k»m4«
how the strike started: "There I* oo round*, tb»
*!* Sttniplei H vt*d
Tb* theatre will bo redecorated In-
tertoriy and kslsomlned and painted
fhrrmrttwrt.
ktitl aimmlaalo-n. lha* doing away
witb tbo nrssent system of yearly tenancy, wbk-k ssist* la fSaa&and today.
In fact the object of ths bill Is to give
the stsfo foil control of ths aristoo-
taey and to so amaf* mrttet* b**-
twesn tbo farmers and tha land com-
WtlWlfOfHWril tfWlt IWItH Will tin tw1t*w"*wi
workmen, who will benefit to the ex
font Of 8250 ww> a year.   Hte passage
of the **»«ndm«-»t aluo mimi,* tke -ttm-
Unuance of former rates in tlw eWt-
«i! and other departments, who** mt*
tUnytwn h»<! no tm* if, fpt-uk fr<r thtm.
amon* th* m,n   Commenting on «* fan In thc art of revering, although dren bnt tbwnnnmftbtroeWeo or* j ™''™ ,]° ^iX*    *tU   itm
OB Saturday ovonlng tba Coal Creek»mmv,  "from the evldenoo sewed t    '        ™__—„_  friddw. hole. <-» -««•«* **, .,*.^.,.««.««, u*« « tw*
Amateur Dramatic Association have!there wat no indication tbat any vte-!,__..„»._.,_». .«.„„ *    I' wa* in
engaged tha bail, and are potting on Hence or -shooting had been Indulged ARBITRATION BOARD ■.«„*, Manltws
One of tbe bast vaudeville sbowa ever in by ttot? striker* nntll after Hberlff j RENDERS ITS REPORT j rontwcted
wen in Fern!*, including that rib-1 Jamieson's d*>i>utl«s wore stationed at i     m ——*. , and died.
tickling,  faee-dlstontnt, oxcwlstlna | tit* plant"   Th* deputies were armed I   OTTAWA. Aj»rti !*».-■ Th« Wbor d»--     Tlw mllltla know tbat it wa* thl*
fires, "A   Parody on Vmdn Tom's with rifl««* and revolvare and were ae- (pertinent today r*n*t*«d th* report of ret! which made Martin** 111 and eaus
raWi*," <wf»Mt  erne -riven wffb wtrb :mr*>l tht* naeotid «•«* aftur th* strike I'be arftltmHof)   fwurrt   m m-ntt*  tit*! *f bl* d-Mth.
autceas in xhn early pan of the yoar  *a***ll«d. Wlw-n the report was writ-jfour-j'caiHdd dispute between tho <J.;    l»r. Abiun-Nur li;ti advised thn uA . . __
at €5«al Creek, and i* being repeated! t***n th-w* w»*re *•« m*B em *trtk#, and\T, P. and It* we*f#rn *hm* *'?«r»!oy«**'*. *Htl* that th* *»» It nb*t*lul*ly iwfit * \\v«U'f**dnv, th* tvtii.*>m heler. t fare-
H , mt +t*um*h*t tw t*4>uv«i*rtMt IO »»»■» et  *-e*>
* thi* cold damp ct-ii that •;vVTn.M7'f I51*/1*;"ln tJ,f, *•**« !»*••
ion. a healthy youna Hr.*k,:tr,,! '::ft'A'* «'.;«'•"« »«»«*J by itor-
rhftutnatism of the bum «rnor Amrionn
VALKOICTORV
X hfttt*
tl,*, WkhUn-i on
,.,..v-.-   „~«   «,.   ..,,,,      ...   ..r. ,„.,    ,,,,    ,,...„,.,.,...'.       ,,.     .mn,      m^j      ■,*.*"*«    tut     tftun.t:u
but wbo will fireflt by th#> eeiltit* of I rib* or frecHtrert few*'r*atiWnt» trw-m
hiworfnirtred fra«f-»»s In infixing on
by half wbilat tb* waves of agrienlln^ tbo continuant* of present standard*
at labors will be doubled, and at tbe until tbo canal i* vomiileutil.
•Ht Hi utui *,****. '■****• it'.i'.kmia ii-tui >,»i»ij ,TU«4» ,» * ui^t..>.*> ■*,.-% 4* .......,,.,t it
lost «)«»«» tliroagh dc-H'-rilon. tporl, tlw tor«M,>r a-m-tA i»> Jjj:».. ii.n-
,.__**..-*. .*.  \mn, chairman,  an!   T.   A.   Mtirr-av.
COAi CPfRATORS AHO x-eptimmtmlm td ii,*.   :m :..  ahilt- ii.r
MINERS GET TOGETHER  latter la'atgaed hy VV  A. Vn,',*.. t, ;»n-
—  }w*niatlTsa'Of thft *oni*iioy.
CtxiT'-'ViVtt. 0»;?*ft,  Xroti tt-VonV:   Tb* tnniwrtxy njn r ■- *.*r. V:rV,
„«,.^,,a*-»   nM  wn»n«i   mtn«-r* td lb*^box   ihe   r»fnmmt*">^nih-,*i   i«   fi-rv-flv
  , „v..w„w „,„„„   ., ..     **•'!! nt'*' tn pint rw^f^-^n^rn *m*'»n«t tti# anm* arttrtti'
There will ho two shows?"th'eVwt a't;»n »«t«wr»< '« emnt* wage aoslMlfdy to tib# fl. T. V »*
",3o and thn setoftit at, |», 3ft. , ,;.a' Tuc^.lny. at Columbus, |er» rallrosith
Uy mi*«t*«i rt*|ktn«t.   .."itsit> of llie writ
*nown and talented members of tin-
society wltl be heard In veeal and In-
a-.ruait-ux-il delation*. Th« *msna«<-
m#..»t d*»sf rih# H as "a nltht of good,
clean, sparfcifng entertainment." but
fffa-M- to tab* an}' rUk* for brokfa
fttrial d1«ort!cm» and t'ltccialve mirth.' *'
.-■J*    t****,   j***,**,n   it*   A,*!   it*,   \t**t    ..,,*    ,,*,.-  -v. ,     ,»
i.,.mi.4e tvtnt* ut «.<»»i- h*r, mui it i* *,,i A
n nmve n*e*tlr.n a*, to bow Jon* th«i'of l'.-**
*£**& ataman) <j:<  ** .nit,  •sJ,*-* foU,:■ ■ ■  <■'. ..■•
ment. ! ).,i.. %*■
AlrhwieTt  th* a»,t*r»nt*y*g*nenil  fcttUVv   ■'
**r'.f*i'i*,   the   *»*|.**.*'''.«»   f-ftvffiwsr   "!'].('
*h* mittti* hrn  ri. ttrbt  «n hnl't  rtiH'* ■ -i '■ •-•*
fi   iriifw.   re,*, tTlfT   prtntw*1)**   <J1^nrr:"rH'!*f il'l    \**r -■*.-■'-.
notlh'f *-<"»t' {tant General Chaa* continaM to do" t,--f,fn
I K>. i .'it;'*
• i
.*,,,*,. , ,**,,,*ti n> * h».*l «»! ♦•mtvft-
i.)i •■■<* .Wiiii.v.    "J'b,» «"»',te#,a'Hi!iiir>
' Kwtf'ftay at-t-r* w»-ll ft,nr*«»»rt.
; ■,,-, ft »'iit***l tit i':"i-it ift-),. i*](,«-f n
if,-," Mitfi.Ml-.oft i'c*!*| v,»ti--h. «i|t|.
• -rr'*t'"4. ?,M'**i'*.'-!'i»-*s ;:- ? *.,nzt*
''*.   rfh-r  Jii.U]   A," I ',•"(   },fi**,,
*l i*     f,l-rlt-     hrrtXr,     tf,     ttflll,     l-.f„i
t::t t'l" tlAi-iTo U'V.ti-. U.tl
tAttv wtllatlttt. WJtlt <h«* #.*#t»-
ft,it ItnttiUH'M. *(9 we^ttgvjtgyV^gT
•**/~*
.lF,^'V>&icV&flit:****t
"■'•■'X ~xy:X^ry$ks* t~;
,«*E»"l»t. ,.'«.■*
. ,.*•". r> "■•-j..'-'- ,   j / .   -^*-*jr «.
PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
THREE
FAMOUS!
5CIEHT15TJ
Dr. Andrew Wilson, Dr. Gordon Stables and Dr. Lascelles
Scott, the famous English analyst, have all personally tried
Zam-Buk and expressed themselves
convinced of its treat healing value.
Mrs. St. Denis, of Thompson St.,
Weston, Winnipeg, suffered lone
with eczema ; and,finally her doctor
said only JUm-lluk could cure her—
another fine tribute of a scientific
man to this great herbal heater.
'Mrs. St. Denis says : "The cc-
rvnia broke Out on my nose ancl one
Ante of my face, I could get no
•sleep because of llie irritation ami pain,
and my face was in such a shocking
condition that for two months 1 did
not go. out of the house. I applied
remedies iind my doctor treated me,
hut without effect, until one day he
said that the only thin-? which would
be likely to cur.emc was Zam-Buk. I
procured a supply and to cut a long
htory shorti in a lew weeks Zam-Buk
cured  me  completely,'  leaving,., no
Zam-Buk js a ante cure for cuts, «cild«,
burns, eczema, scalp tores, ulceration, inflammation, pilo, etc.; alums an embrocation for
rheumatism, sprains aad sciatica." All drui-
eintj and stores at 50c. bor. or po^t free.from
Zim-Bok Co., Toranto, for price. Refuse
hjrmful'substilutcs.
54M-BUK
The Victims ofthe
Industrial Battlefield
it is almost impossible to form aStates while in the line of their em-
.The. shortest way. to,something to
sat is th-ft way hungry men .will .take.
If that way leads, through crime, riot
and bloodshed; tlii> fault lies not with
the hungry men, but with those who
have the-power to provide them -w*itli
}dbs.' -,,..
'Reducing the hours of labor does
not reduce wages, It Increases them.
When the hours of labor are. reduced
more meu must ibe put to worlr, twhlch
which raises wages. And it increases
tlie Socialist vote because it gives you
time to think. Socialism will roduce
the hours of labor,
correct estimate of industrial disabil
•ities in the United States.    We have
no authentic statistics on the matter.
The English statistics show that one
factory worker out of every thirty is
•injured each year.   With a .population
of  91,000.000 and  one out of  every
thirty being injured in gainful occupations we would have almost 1,000,000
j injuries each year.   Perhaps one-Third
j or one-half of the employers carry lia-
j bility insurance.     The experience of
| :he   liability   companies   show   that
j thoir cost per injury is about $30.   ln
■ mil, $i'0,000,000 were paid out for ia-
1 juries.    This  would show  6CG.O0O injuries reported to liability companies.
I If this were only half,-the total would
ibo one and one-third millions. ■ From
carefully prepared statistics in  Minnesota as a basis It is estimated that
fatal   accidents   to   workmen   In  the
United  States amount to. 25,000 annually and non-fatal approximately to
1.012,000. "•'■..,
We are compelled to estimate the
extent of injuries in Indiana. Our
laws require employers to report injuries, but this law is not complied
\yith. In 1912, 3,413 injuries were reported as occurring in factories. Of
these eighty were fatal. Thirty-seven
miners were reported killed and a total of 1,3S7 injuries were reported in
mine work. Returning to an estimate,
we find that Indiana has a population
of 2,700,000. If 30 per cent of these
are engaged .In gainful occupations,
we have 810,000 workers employed in
the'State. If one of every thirty is
injured, we have 27^000,'accidents a
.year. The census shows 300,000 (workers in industrial occupations, having a
payroll of $100,000,000., The accident
rate for 100,000 payroll Is more--than
fifteen. This makes at least 15,000 accidents to the 300,000 factory workers.
This doss not .Include agricultural' laborers or those who work for themselves. Including this number, •'■**■©■'
probably have -800,000 workers and
•fully 30.00.0 accidents.a year. Employers', liability companies pay out annually $500,000 in Indiana. An aver:'
age, payment of $30. makes almost 17,-
000 accidents.
•■•. In tiie' State of Washington, wher6
145,000 employees come under the
compensation act, there are approximately 12,000 injuries a year. This
would make about 25,000 annually for.
Indiana with her 300,000 industrial
workers, so we are very much at sea'
as to the exact number, 'but it Is
doubtless between 15,000 and 30,000
each year. Nine per cent of all deaths
are due to accidents or violence. This
.number Includes 45,000 a year in the
United States and includes «U7 ro*
ported in Indiana. Twenty -per cent
of the deaths of young men, under
twenty-five Is due to Iriflimtrfat -aei\U
ployment. This is 3.82 per thousand.
For the last ten years 18,346 was the
total of deaths reported. Doubtless
many were not officially mentioned.
In 1911, 3,602 persons were killed in
the mines and quarries of tbe United
States and 63,301 injured. This does
not include many minor injuries not
reported officially. •
Railroad Employees
In   190S there  were 3,405  railroad
employees killed and 82,487  injured,
or 32,451 killed in ten years and 607,-
425 injured.
In 1893, ibefore the automatic coupler was used, the number of railroad
employees injured per thousand was
seventy-six, and the number killed
was 2.9 in Coupling cars. In 1908, after the law had been thoroughly enforced, the number killed was only 1
per thousand, and the nunrber injured
was only sixteen.   Which would show
I. iM. Rubinow, liability statistician,
estimates that 40 per cent of all workers are affected by disease and accident and 7 per cent or 8 per cent -by
industrial accidents and the average
•disahility for all workers is ten d&ys.
I presume he mabes his estimate from
the German insurance reports, which
show that out of -every 100 persons
injured 42.7 men and 35.6 women were
disabled, with an average of 18.5 days
for men and 23.4 for women, or 40.8
for all worker® were disabled for 19-6
days a year. To every 100 men insured there were 788.7 days lost iby, dis-
a*bility each year. Every 100 womon
averaged a loss of 8.33 days a year,
or an average of 800 days for every
100 workers, or an average of eight
days for every worker employed.
Among agricultural workers 5.6 per
cent were disabled by accidents.
Thpr© is a rural population of 1,577,-
000 in Indiana, and 30 per cent, or
that much Injury can be prevented .by 467.000, are doubtless employed;  this
due care.    «" .would* ibe a 'basis for estimating 25,000
Sickness accidents    among    farmers,     which
It is fair to estimate that 30 per shows the necessity for social insur-
cent of our population are occupied in ance among farm laborers.-Henry W
Capitalism reduces pour wages until you are forced to put your children
into the factory tor tite few pennies
their baby hands can -gather. Then
the boss reduces your pay until you
get no more than you did before, and
your children are killing themselves
for the boss's profit. Don't vote for a
cradle-robbing system.   *     .
dents. One coal miner out of every
fifteen is Injured every year. One
railroad worker out of every twenty
and one steel .worker out of every
five. The number of dependents who
sutler with each worker Is about two.
So we have approximately 50,000 people In Indiana directly affectedly Industrial Injuries, and the community
at large has a serious burden as the
social and economic effect of this condition.
Coal Mines
From 1889 to 1908, 29.293 coal miners  loot  their  lives  in  the  United
gainful occupations, or out of 91,000,-
000 there are 27,000,000 workers, and
that 40 per cent, or 10,920,000 of these
are annually disabled for twenty days.
This would make 218,400,000 days lost
through, disability. Counting that
there are approximately 810,000 -workers in ' Indiana, and. assuming each
average a loss of-eight days annually,
we have an annual loss of 6,480,000
days of productive labor, which means
the joss of many comforts of life. .
We can. corroborate this in a measure :by the. reports of the United
Stat§ labor commission on condition
of steel workers, Vol. 4, in which it Is
shown that those who are injured lose
on an average fourteen cays each, and
thnt the average time lost for each
maii,' counting .the entire number em-
.plqy.ed,is more than six days in rolling
mills .apd almost'two days In • 'foundries from injuries alone; not including'sickness.
.'Our fraternal -organizations have
within their ranks men of more than'
the,average a-bility and character and
men who live under*more than aver
age'conditions. Some of the members
are merchants and professional men
and a number are farmers, so taken
.together their health is above the average. The grand lodge of. Odd Fellows of Indiana for 1912 reports 82,-
210 members and $104,840 paid, in
weekly -benefits, for 30,440 weeks.
This does not include the first week
of sickness nor that class of disabilities lasting less than one week, but
It makes an average of two days for
ea$h member of the fraternity.
The weekly benefits .paid hy the
lodges of the Knights of Pytbias of In-
rtlnna    wn«  ftpprnritnatftly   f.l(A   tmn»
Bullock, iu Indianapolis 1'nion.
JOINT CONFERENCES
IN  MANY STATES
out of a membership of more than
65,000; in 1912 there were $119,441
paid In weekly benefits. This Includes
nothing for the first week and. only a
dollar after the thirteenth weok, (but
on that basis more than 30,000 "weeks'
benefits have been paid, or something
-like three days' average loss for each
member of the fraternity. If all disabilities were counted, the disabilities
of these fraternities -would probably
show a week for each member, as
large sums were .paid for "other re-
lief" uot Included 4n the report of
"•weekly -benefits."
A tentative agreement has .been
reached, between operators and miners
of 'western Pennsylvania embodying
the recommendations of the policy
committee In Chicago; accepting the
elimination of Clause 3 of the Cleveland contract, thus leaving "the way
open for adjustment, of local iueaual-
itles."
Joint conferences are in session, as
we go t'o press, iu Illinois, Indiana
(bituminous), and Iowa. The operators In all of those districts having consented to consider the local differences, and accept the basic scale as
set forth in the Chicago policy.
iMuch coal had 'been" stored in an
ticipation of a .possible general shut
down; as a natural consequence work
is very poor in all of the districts
named.
In Ohio there' appears to be a better
feeling growing between the miners
and operators.
While each, side is apparently
standing firm in its announced position there is an undercurrent tending
toward a reapproachnfent between the
contending parties.
IMany individual operators in that
district have signified a willingness
to enter into contracts on the mine
run .basis. So far no action has heen
taken, the miners' officials still hoping for a general settlement, or at
leas*, settlements In most of tiie sub-
districts,
Kv-rpp-tiivg   (thin.   th-^_mtnpjA_^n_^li±hft_<>nnr<>agajj, A4-4fee-*SOUBd-Of-4fe4i
of tbe districts are working pending
final agreements. The present scale
and -conditions prevailing, with the
mutual understanding that any changes that can- be computed will be retroactive, dating from April 1.
We have every reason to hope and
expect that scales will be signed' in
the near future In. all of the organized districts, carrying with them Improved conditions and at least tbe
same wage, with the least dlstuitoanoe
of business during the readjustment
period In the history of the organization.—United Mine Workers' Journal.
SPECIAL!   VAUDEVILLE ENGAGEMENT   SPECIAL!
The Goal Creek Dramatic Society
MR. CHAS. PERCY
MR. J. H. HEWITT
MR. J. HARPER
MRS. MITCHELL
MR. A. PRENTICE
J. GASKELL
R. SAMPSON
Overture, Piano
Character Comedian
Whistling Soloist
Descriptive Vocalist
Scotch Comedian
Violin Selections
Scottish Ballads
The Coal Creek Comedy Four in "UNCLE TOM'S CABIN11
(BURLESQUE)
UNCLE TOM            -            - Trebor Hguorobitlib
■PT»»n*T t>t? *f»r»rrr? •*     ■   ? ■»»     **
***-*i«w*»   *^—  <9**Ktt-.t99                       - ililifllit Utiexm.t'AlU
LITTLE EVA           -            - Sahc Vcrep
TOPSV                      -            - Saj. Nosdivad
?. FAWLEY
G. FINLAYSON
MRS. C. PERCY & MR. J. HEWITT
IN THE FULLNESS OF THE* TIME
[By Frank Stuhlman]
Charge once more, then, and be dumb!
uet the victors wh6n they come.   *
When the forts of Folly faH,
Find the -body by the .wall. '
—Matthew Arnold.
In the bygone time of the Stone
Age the organized selfishness of the
ancient world 'built a wonderful city
of massive walls guarded by impregnable towers of iron-like granite to
overawe the .tillers of the soil and the
workers in" the crafts.
In their -pride and arrogance thev
held the workers as but slaves, fit
only to minister to the pleasures of
those who, hy means of force-and cunning, had made themselves into lords
and masters. From their -stronghold
they levied tribute upon the workers
until all but a meagre subsistence was
kept from the toilers. And the spirit
oi* the people was 'broken and the
yoke became heavier, they only bowed
the lower and none dared resist Uie
hard taskmasters.
In the time of the people's deepest
misery a man of them grasped his
stone ax and strod towards- the frowning towers of the city. And his fellows said, "Whither?"
And the man answered, "I go to
beat down the walls of the tyrant's
stronghold."
And they all said, "He Is mad! iThat
which we could not do together he
goes to do alone! Surely the gods
have put a curse upon hlra. And we
will have naught to do with hlra lest
our masters slay us in their wrath."
Hut the man heeded them .not and
went up to the walls of the city. Day
after day the man struck with his
stone ax at the foundations of a great
tower. The' years came and went, the
summer heat fell upon him and the
winter's cold bit keenly, until his hair
grew white and his sinews stiffened
with toil and age. yet so little, ever
so little was the impress made on the
stubborn rock, As he labored the
tyrants jeered him,.for.the toil seem'
ed to accomplish nothing; and what
chilled his lonelj* heart even more was
■the scorn of his. fellow .serfs, for whose
good he toiled. For they held him as
a fool who would attempt tlie impossible.
One day a guard upon the city waH
threw a lance, in careless derision, at
the man .and smote him through the
heart. Then .both tbe slaves aud the
masters said, "The madman who
wasted his We strivng to overturn
the Imperishable order of things died
in his folly. Let his fate be a warning to all those who would subvert
our beneficent system." And the
Jackals and vultures quarreled over
his bones and he was forgotten, .and
dt was as if he had never ibeen.
The long, long ages .passed, races
came and went again, civilizations
flourished and decayed; but still the
■mighty Oity of Injustice overshadowed
the workers and Greed sported the
tpeople A9 ever. At last a prophet and
'warrior arose In the land. His words
iwere as living fire to the hearts of
Established April 1899 a  .
WA. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail   TobUCCOWZSt
BARBER   SHOP
Baths and Shoe Shine
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
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We Handle only Fresh Killed
Alberta Meats
A trial order will convince you that theyare the best and
our prices the lowest .'   'J a     '..
21bs Creamery Butter 65 Cents
Prompt Delivery to Any.Fart
DAVIDSON,
Turner Block, Wood St,
Mgr,
Phone 52
Rl
ElG-J-MSJgfSISraJSISjQ]^^
THE
Bellevue Hotel
COMMERCIAL   HOUSE
Character Sketches
Society Entertainers
A Night of Good, Clean and Sparkling Entertainment
First Show Commences 7.30 p. m.   Second Show 9.30
ADMISSION:  ADULTS 35c.   CHILDREN 16c
trumpet call the scales of ignorance
fell from their eyes, and from bis inspiration -selfishness fled. He marshaled the Army of Brotherhood
against the walled city and besieged
it. Again and again he Mrled hia
forces against tlie lofty towers, only
to have them driven 'back utterly defeated and despairing. At last, when
even the great heart of the ca-ptaln
began to fall bim, It was discovered
that the false of one tower wae undermined even to fallln*. For here It
was that the man with the atone ax
had, in a century long past, worn his
life away, scarcely cutMng Arougti
the .surface of the moaelve rock. But
the forces of God carried oa his -work.
The rains fell and the water ewlrled
into the crevice the man had cut. and
washed ahout the foundations, and the
frost and cold crumbled It more and
-more, and even the thread-like grass
roots tent their Uny aid Jn disintegrating the granite until, with the iwork
of area, it needed but a .blow to shatter the Imposing tower; Then the
captain of the people battered at the
und-mnlnwi utrtietur* and leveled it
to the ground and the -hosts of Brotherhood passed Into tho oity. When the
•buttle waa over the people crowded
around the captain aod twined hia hei-
met with laurel and acattered flowers
before him and hailed him as redeemer and victor.
■But the warrior saW, "Come."
And the people followed him, -wondering. *
At last he stood by the (bleached
bonus of the man with the stone ax.
The captain unlaced hts helmet and
bared his head and said, "Behold, here
I* the victor-—the forgotten one .who,
agea ago, struck the Mow that In tht
fulness of tlmo brought the victor)'."
In the aftertlme when the walb of
the City of Injustice were utterly dont royed nnd the ttnl* ot Brothwrhood
waa tbe law of the land, when no man
strove for glory or gain, but each
gave tonic* to all for the lore of all,
and when none were called rich who
had not love to five, a shaft of mntbXo,
pure and white at an angel's wing.
waa erased over the grave of tha man
with tha stone ax with this Inscription In letters ot gold upon It:
"Ood will not permit the endeavor
to fMrrish."—Now York Call.
MIR DOESN'T DIE-
IT HASJO BE KILLED
Hair often eontlnSM ta live and
grow long after tha doath at tb* twdj.
wt it la often killed tbroagfc neglect
or mis«f#,   Aimott always the woman
or man who** hair Is falling out, or tt *
Mrlngy, Hfeleas and dnil-tooktmr,  Is!
mUmy to blame l4*e*u»* of aot firing tt tha proper ear*.   It ta aaay toi
i .-*»«• **»tv vt i»v men.   t-*te ttMtmmy i
IIIMr IVMiMfW tn n-nVf 11 ^tir.r,'*-, s't/t
land silky, and Harmony Rtmmiioo tot
Ikowp tbo hair and acaln thoroogfelf j
•yl-nkm.    In   (•  MltSytfysif   grtflfaiNNNl
(with tra* ret*.   Sprinkle a (title on
I yoar hair each time h-tnTor* brushing
■ft     fmttntna  en  r*XX    **n*   a-vn   kw
change color of -hatr, nor darken gray
half.
To ke#p yoar hair and scalp daa-
drufftfnw and dean, aaa Manaonr
gfesM|M». This »ere liquid shsatpoo
ia amit coavMltat to uao. giving aa
tnatantaaeoas lather that Imawdlataty
pmetfwtas to e***y pert of th« bntf
nnd scalp, inaoilnf a <jaitk*. thorough ,
ftaaasfa* Wash*** off last nn tplcfcir. |
film ttUUlki t>k*k.i**.U...  UW»» ittlif  * tw* ;
iwmmmdn. V-tm-Mm mtbUm tbnt enol
I haras tho hair, aad leaves ao han*-'
* D4<**s or MkUti*!**.
Both pre para turn* com* ta odd i
jtlnfwd. wry or/naniental bottle*, with*
'wfoMdtf to**. HsmtMi? Hat? Bmni!-'
ifler. tl.OO* Ilanaoft-r mempo/y Me. I
'Hoth ttmr*itt*»d to -satisfy yon Hi J
ievery wny. m i&ti money both, tttddi-^k
ionly  at th* mm* than ".WW) Htiall!
Best Accommodation  In the Pass.—
Up-to-Data — Every   Convenience.—
Excellent Cuisine.
8UITABLE  FOR   LADIE8 AND GENTLEMEN
«l. A. CALLAIM, Prop.
BELLEVUE, Alta.
USE CRUSHED STONE
Foryour next Concrete Work
Any size from 2 inch
to Sand
No Screening No Waste
PRICES PER CUBIO YARD
At Crusher
2 inch
1
U
1
Sand
GMDD SOR/UU Ml
OMcimvvn
$1.KI
1,25
1.40
1.50
1.45
In City Limits
Dtllvtrtd
$1.60
1.75
2.00
2.50
2.00
Sptolal Prleo on Largo Quantities
CMIIOM AT OftUtHIR INOUfM LOADING)
Cement, Lime and Plaster for Sale
Lat Ut Da Your Noxt Ooneroto Work
■xeavatln* Dono at Roaoonablo Prlooo
Wm. DICKEN
P.O. Box 246 tEfmiE, S.Q.
mow* io
t
A:
Tlta WUtal utad ta oatt Typa for this
Papar It supplied by
Great Western Smelting &
f%   r*   •       /%
Kenning vo*
SMELTERS A REfSIrS OF METAL
971 lain St       - -   Vaaemmr, B.C.
BBSS
[Awsvo.
LHvp^^jTry the Ledger for Job Work r-V5
i4&jilktWi**feMW-^f-^
-*A..A?*h
\.*i"*S ,-^Ji
"v-i*i."'V,',5i,'i.!>'J; i
-V©'^'3'"-"■;•>'•' ;
iMfalPnjwDij^ctirppist. 18,Di
V^SfcS-^i-tf'-xr-
,'    GLADSTONE LOCAL
No. 2314 ,
-Meet.first and  third'Fridays,
Miners" Hall, Fernie; second and
fourth Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
' Creek. Sick Benefit attached.—T.
Uphill,''Se'c^ Fernie, Bi C.       -  -
sX.. ... '■ HOSMER. LOCAL     .-■-
No. 2497,        -   -.
Meet every Sunday "at 2,30 in Ky
. P. Hall, Main Street,. Sick" Benefit Society attached.—W. Balderstone, Sec;, Box 63, Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334
NMeet  every " Sunday  afternoon
at   2   o'clock   in "Crahan's   HaU.
Sick Benefit Society attached.—
. H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet every. Sunday.   Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Michael  Warren, Sec, Can-
more, Alta,
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
in month.  Sick and Benefit Society attached,—J. Gorton, Sec
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.38 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Mitchell, SJec, Box
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
* 7 o'clock in the Bankhead Hal).
Sick aiid Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet every Friday evening at
7,30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec.
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2633
, Mbet every alternate Sunday, at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec
* - PASSBURG LOCAL
""''""* No. 2352
,. - Meet every second and< fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak Hall. Sick Benefit Society attached,—Thos. G, Harries,
Sec, Passburg, Alta.'
BURMIS LOCAL   .
No. 949
Me«t every- second and fourth'
Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.
in School House, Burmis. No Sick
Society.—Thos.  G.  Harries,  Sec,'
Passburg, Alta, ■
. MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hail. Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' Hall. 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
In the Socialist Hatl. — James
Burke, Sec, Box 36, Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock ln the Club Hall. ' Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin, B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House, sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter, Sec.
»»¥¥yVY¥V¥¥y¥¥V¥¥¥¥¥¥yyyyyy-yV^
A  Thousand Years
From Now •..
By FEUX GRENDON   !
iAiikAAAAAAAAAAA*AAAAAAAAAAi<AAA*AAAAAAAAAkA*AA***A***AAr\AAAAA***A*A**AA*A*A******
Financial Statement
ASSETS
British and Colonial
•Government     and
Provincial , Secur-
dtlea .-. .....$1,364,731.62
Foreign, Government
Securities  U.3C4.973.44
British and Colonial
—rsairwsy .nortgHg-B
Bonds and Ordinary Stocks      425,720.70
American Railway
Bonds  3,835,873.34
Miscellaneous Debentures   1,837,380.44
.Mortgagee on Freehold and Leasehold
Properties and other Securities   1,418,282.86
Freehold and Lease-
mold Premise* — 1,279,878.21
Branch Agency end
other Balance* ... 1,248,974.66
Cash at Bankers and
In hand      686,567.88
Investment* and
Cash in Trustee's
lands      68,887.42
LIABILITIES
Reserve for Unearned Premiums on
unexpired risks ...$3,636,239.43
Reserve for Undeter-
mined Claims .... 3,218,000.00
Reserve for General
Contingency Fund . 1.658.493.95
-H^ervefoirunclam.
ed Dividends aria
all other Liabilities
(except capital) ..
Surplus to Policy-*
holders	
735,892.72
4,182,644.48
By Felix Gren«on
Suppose you woke up one day in the
forty-eighth story of the Metropolitan
"flower and found that the world had'
been laid in rulnsr and that the only
other survivor wis a distraotingiy
beautiful girl—what would jtou do?
This is the problem that faces Allan
•Stern, the remarkable young engineer
in "Darkness and Dawn," when he and
Beatrice Kendrick awaken from a
sleep that has lasted 1,000 years, In
fact, ever since 1920, the year in
which a titanic upheaval convulsed
the earth aad totally disrupted civilization, r-
Aillan's problem is complicated by a
weak habit that human garments have
disintegrating to the course of tea
centuries. Beatrice, mindful of God-
iva, "draws tho sheltering (masses of
her hair about her." But, in spite of
tbiB -precaution, I am sorry to say
that Allan is guilty of what the author
weaifly terms "untoward thoughts."
To give the hero his due, he does his
utmost to conquer all such unholy
promptings, and If we remember that
he is a Socialist as well as an ardent
champion of advanced ideas, and that
a sleep of 1,000 years may well make
the best of men a.little hazy about
the exact provisions of the moral code,
we shall he able to Judge his case
with charity.
Besides, Beatrice is promptness itself In taking the situation in hand
and saving the reader <£rom moral em-,
barrassment or ethical distress. For
when "her perfect body, beautiful-as
that of a pagan dryad-, roused -mysterious passions in the engineer," and
when "his passion leaped up like -living flames," «he withdrew from his
burning clasp and, "instlJled with" the
eternal spirit of woman," says firmly,
"not now—not yet!" With this cold
comfort, Allan (no less than the reader) is obliged to rest content Nevertheless, his untoward thoughts cause,
him many a thrWllng fall from grace;
ieaich fall bringing him to grips (and
to salvation) 'with the inaglc words,
"not yet." I am -bound to confess
that, after the 400th page, the mere
repetition of this insidious formula
begins to pall. Luckily, on page four
hundred and—but I must not anticipate. s
He must be an intrepid writer who
offers to the public a new work in a
field that a thinker of Mr. Wells' order has made peculiarly Ms own. Mr.
England not only, possesses courage,
he has a fertile fancy and an infective
adventurous vein. Except for these
qualities, his novel wouldn't have
entertained us as it did, and we
shouldn't have read the six hundred
and seventy pages through. The fact
is that when two sleepers awake in
2920, their loves "and dangers combine
to keep our hearts on the jump. They
believe the earth to be all their own
until, from the jungle in Madison forest (near 23rd Street) they are attacked by the Horde, a race of savages evolved from a non-human stock.
Total AsSStS
...113,431,270.68
CLAIMS PAID,
$13,431,270.58
INCOME
Net   Premiums   Re-
ceived (less  re-Insurances   and   too-
. nu**)   $10,003,848.18
Interest   on   Invest-    /
ments and all other
sources      390,469.42
110,894417.60
EXPENDITURE
Losses, Commissions,
Salaries   and   all
othor payments ... 18,743,527.25
exceoD 150,000,000.00
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp. Ltd, of London Eng,
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist Agent
Miners' Union Hall Block      -       Fernie, B. C.
verlte in the nick of time, and ruotes
the Horde with this high explosive
and .with the able help of (Beatrice,
who fights at her lover's side like another Amazon. Nor is this the sum
of her services. In her partner's rare
hours of ease, she keeps house for him
in .the .Metropolitan Tower, turning,
when need arises, from domesticity to
the several professions of nurse,
crack-shot, huntress, comforter, comrade; and second-in-command. Her
versatility' inspires Allan with a
'^wealth' -df' intimate, yet respectful
adoration," which by no means destroys "the magnetic sex emotion that
thrills and attracts and infuses them
both."
After the battle with the Horde,
what a turn of speed-the adventures
do .take! Allan and Beatrice set out
on a journey of expiation during
which they plunge down a cataract
and find a bi-plane; a relic of the
Wright brothers era. The machine
ie rehabilitated and a flight is started
to the ends of the earth. But the fuel
gives out, and -the lovers are stranded
at the .bottom of the Great Abyss,
one hundred miles beneath the earth's
surface, fltiere they are captured by
the iMerucaans, the descendants of the
noble American race, who live in
gloom near a sunless sea. Though
hardy and courageous, the Merucaans
have loot all record of their former
glory, and* by succumbing to their
murky environment, have deteriorated
into barbarian's leading the cheerless
lives of a primitive fishing-folk.
It would toe impossible to relate all
, the neck-breaking perils that now 'beset our lovers, fairly pelt them indeed,
until an escape from death is a mere
tonic for an* after-dinner lethargy. It
is enough to aay that the heroic energy and indescribable fortitude of
Allan and .Beatrice are central factors
in bringing the Merucaans out of the
Abyss and establishing them on the
Earth's surface. There, thanks to the
influence of propitious surroundings,
the barbarians revert, as it were, to
civilization. iMoreover, under Allan's
Socialistic teachings, they expand
with a rapidity that would have flabbergasted Darwin, for, being a bold
and1 fearless people untrammelled by
plutocratic bonds or traditions, they
not only coyer the planet with mechanical inventions beyond the hope
of the men of 1920, but inaugurate an
epoch of real equality and brotherhood within a generation and a half.
The story closes at the point where
Allan, in extreme old age, abdicates
an almost life-long Presidency. He is
succeeded by his oldest son, the unanimous choice of the Merucaans and of
the author as well. It is a little sad
to see nepotism, all unbeknown to Mr.
England, showing its cloven hoof in
this paradise of the future.
Is the reader shocked at learning
that an Allan junior appeared on the
scene? I trust not. For candor binds
me to confess that a time comes in
"Darkness and Dawn" when Allan's
untoward thoughts gain a human, all
too human, response from Beatrice.
Let me hasten to assure the Grundys
that it all happens in the most proper
way. Allan and Beatrice stumble upon a phonograph and a number of
records. Among these—O ineffable
is-TJ*jrh©--Fenn—of-tter
aloud, he promises to love, honor, and
keep his wife, while she swears to
•love, honor, and SERVE him. Evidently feminism is a back number in
2920.
There comes a crucial moment in
this duly solemnized marriage. Seat-
rice, fongetting that the economic independence of women will make a
female as desirable as a male, anxiously asks Allan one day whether ho
will 'be angry "if it is a girl!" He
magnanimously answers: "Of course,
the world's work demands a chief, a
head, a leader to come aiter me,
but—" Though he does not finish the
.sentence, his tenderness reassures
her. It did not reassure me, however,
and I felt decidedly nervous until, several chapters later, it turned out to
be a (magnificent boy.
I suspect that there is a revolutionary allegory in "Darkness and Dawn."
The iMerucaans, like the working
classes, are thd slaves of their environment in the Great Abyss. Sticking
(through untold hardships to their
leader, Allan, tbey break tho chains
of this environment in one act of con
ceatnated determination, and emerge
from their prison to initiate an'enlightened society from which slavery
is completely (banished. Here, IMr,
England's political convictions enlist
our sympathy. In general, the thread
of sustained adventure forms the most
captivating part of the work. The
author has a real gift for romancing
entertainingly, and a real power of
graphic description. ' When his people
talk you hear them talking, when they
act you see them acting. And the
lively streams of incident flow convincingly enough, once the initial
miracle is granted. In spite of his
curiously ,atavistic sentiments on sex
relationship and other human matters,
■Mr. England is, all told, a rattling
good story teller. He would be an
even better one, if he stuck exclusively to romance, or if his sociologic
observations were shot through with
a little less tradition and a little more
life.—The 'New Review.
Socialism does not ask you what you
believe. It asks if. you will think and
act for all.
Men do not get rich by creating
wealth, but by absorbing wealth that
others create.
IBeauty is said to toe skin deep. But
capitalism skins deep. Perhaps that
is why it is such a beaut.
The interest of the .worker and the
capitalist is not identical from the fact
that the interest all goes to the cap!
talist.
All Week!
Luscious
"Sunkist" Oranges
at Special Prices,
at Your Dealer's!
The best part of breakfast is a
juicy, thin-skinned, Beedless "Sunkist"
orange. ^ "Sunkist" oranges are the
finest, juiciest, most delicious oranges
grown in the world.
Buy them by the box or half-box—they are most economical
and keep foj-weeks.
Carefully picked and packed by gloved hands.
The cleanest of fruits.   Tree-ripened.
Use "Sunkist" lemons on meats, fish, poultry and salads.
Thin-skinned.   The juiciest, finest lemons grown.
Rogers Silverware Premiums for
"Sunkist" Trademarks
Cut the trademarks from "Sunkist" orange
and lemon wrappers, and send them to us,
We offer 27 different silverware premiums
—all Rogers A-1 guaranteed Standard silver plate.    Exclusive '
"Sunkist"
design.
Actual
Tbls
elegant
Rogers Oraogo
Spoon seat to you (or
Sunkist" trademarks
and 12 cents.    "Red Ball"
©ranee and lemon -wrappers -count
same as Sunkist"
In remitting, send amounts of 20 cent* or
over by postal note, postoffice or express
TQCT.
Send yonr name and full
address for our complete
.  free premium circular and
club plan.
Address all orders for premium
silverware and all correspondence to
California Fruit Growers Exchange
105 King Street, East, cor. Church   (ig>)   Toronto, Ont.
Solemnization of (Matrimony1, toy Bishop Gibson." Arm In arm, bride and
bridegroom listen reverentially while
the phonograph chants: "Dearly he-
loved, etc." and'"Wilt thou have this
woman, etc." I observed that when
Allan re-p-eats the words of the record
If the fire department were 'privately owned it would be a menace to the
home to propose a means of protecting it from fire apart' from profits.
MAN'S LIFE IN DOLLARS.	
A Winter Night Tale
and An Analogy
Realty Co.
INSURANCE AGENTS
Not many years ago, la the mountains of Pennsylvania, an a, midwinter night, with the mercury just
exactly 30 degrees below aero, some
one whom I know started on a long,
lonesome journey.
A big, splendid aad highly Intelligent horse was pulling the sleigh.
There was nothing to do for Uie traveler but to *lt (back and admire tiie
•wonderful -panorama as It aiid hy in
its daleidoscoplc beauty.
The almost daylight of a full moon
shining on hard, froieo snow oreated
countless myriads ot small scintillating diamonds. You could see these
Ice diamonds on all sides—on the
trees, the rocks, the edge of the
mountain waterfall—everywhere.
The high-rising mountains, covered
with their block-green hemlocks men-
tied In white, completed this marvel-
oux plcturo. In an environment like
that no one could avoid dreaming
dratuis. . . . The squeak of sleigh
runners grew softer and the sound of
bells fainter, . . . The forest, tiie
mountains, the moonlit sky. all melt
ed away Into a dim, distant symphony of sound and color.
■4nd t.h#n from thn land td notttbere
In modern warfare It costs about
$15,000 to kill a man. In the Boer
row this Item came as high as $40,000.
The Balkan iwix-up with Turkey, was
conducted more reasonably — flO.OOO
tourned up tn making one man food
for powder, Gorgas, In the canal
zone, has heen saving human life at
the actual cost of 3(2.43 the Individual.
Sanitation ln the isthmus under Gorgas haa cost just 5 per cent of the
total canal building expenditures.—
Review of Reviews,
person. But It is the right thing to do
for your own sake; for the sake of
your family; for the sake of humanity.
So, the next time a Socialist tries
to wako you up, don't kick. Listen to
him end follow hts advice. If you do
this you will come out of your .stupor
all right; and In a hurry at that.
When you eventually do arrive, and
find that you really have brains of
your own, then you will thank the
one who aroused you. and your gratitude 'Will he just as sincere as that of
the lone traveler the nlghjt he camo
nearly freezing to death.
This, my non-Socialist friends, is
the end of my story and my analogy.
You may read what follows If you
wish. It Is intended, however, for my
Socialist Comrades,
Comrades: I know each and every
on« of you have anywhere from one
to a hundred frown Intellects on your
hands that you are patiently trying lo
thaw out. IfcHi't get discouraged If
they Insist on remaining In wage
slavery. Jiang on to them and never
let go until they wake up. When
they do set  wise they  will stand
THIS NEW MEDICINE
SAVES YOU MONEY
35125
HERE IS A SQUARE DEAL
and peaceful security as well.
With a policy Jn our oM line
company, you.can go off on your
vacation or visit the ends of tha
earth and you know you're secure.   "Hie best in
FIRE INSURANCE
is always cheapest and especially so when It doesn't coat
higher. Don't deiay about that
renewal or about tbat extra insurance'you want hut come right
in at once and have it attended
to.
M. A. KASTNER
SOLE AGENT FOR FERNIE
ALEX BECK BLOCK,
FERNIE, B. C
jChmtlft CoW Water
■^-^^^WV-^M W^ww^^^'^^^w TWfWw*
Now is the time
for protection
You cannot afford
to lose when we
etm   protoct   yon
anldMt nil* for tbm  nresent  nil*  of I •"d .builds you up to ft health*, normal
golden rale for the present mie ot ^^^   ft „ „ „,,, wrnrtonA tonic
a ,
I      FREE STENCILS
l   ■■*
t-idtd -M a__Mm kw
^EC|^£yi^s*r
*t*H*'
J. D. QUAIL
wf wm w
Hardware. Paint* aad House
Qfttfifffij' Utensils
FERNIE       -X       B» C
Afents fer Oliver Typewriter
Co.   MstWnes at tt
dny.
We are druggists right here in your
town and make a living out of the
drug business, -hut It is 'because people have do havo drugs and not (because we like to see people suffer—we
don't. Our duty Is to render the best
service we can, and when someone is
aliing, we are Interested in seeing
them take the best medicine there is
for their particular trouble. Wo don't
recommend "cure-alls," as we don't
believe there are such things. We
don't want $uu to xpumI more thai)
you have to. Borne of you get small
wages, and when you're sick, none al
all, and you should get tha most you
can for your moiiey.
We  recently  came  across a  new
remedy for lncr-easlng strength and
building up itf-opl* who or* run-down
and emaciated.  Wo know that a slight
trouble sometimes grows into a «crl>
ous one, and to stop It in the beginning, will wive yon money In thn end.
This now compound Is called Rexall
Oil** Oil  Kmulslon.    H   In the best
remedy, when you nre run-down, tired
Wilder   to* •hmMw"W,'r«nnt«">   Mrttmo-ao  mutter  whnt   the
there came quietly down the most wo«">»f «» »'* of h«manlty~*«d | "J-^ IKSy.K
welcome aluSber \**r  known.  Xo Kv&^^^
one had ever experienced tu-vh mm* ,lw ««"»*> "»<** 9n'» *«»«!W<" w * __.. ........  *.^..,.u.. ■
fort before. Triie. there bad previous!) beeo some sharp pang* ol suffering from the Intense cold; tout
that was all over now. The twwder
feed tone to sleep.
When he woke up the experience
waa painful. How. sleigh and traveler were at a strange home. Lights
were shining from the frost-coated
windows, and straoaera *«*r* pound-
iHy th* wayf-aw and trwtil«g him
back and forth through (he *tutw.
T1if> ttttd tnkt-n hi* oltcx-* and stockings off and were rubbing bla face*,
tears and hands with miow, ■
Md h* pat wi» a fctek? Well, you l
J*a»t U'i Ur .'.1.1 M,i tl**- fnnn* >*t' *.
of it all wss that the mure h* klrkfd ■
tb* more It we*m*A io pleotm hu u,t-:
mentor*, tie prau'suul that h« ***
*l«i#f»y snd Insist^ tm lining |«*ft olom;
to He down mid rc«t (In the sonwi.f
Itoarerer,, that wade no jMffetwnc* \
  » ......  i       , ...... 4,       ^M "
i-khrn tm r**». The e*ar> Am* ae*** !»•«»
,*rti«-r. Im« anurw w«t«r. »»a mscIii
' *o*<**r4ittn 4me a trifle warm-*f imir ,
lb* jHr**f-«!lair owe,. iMdly mrm* ■mtmlA
ew Msoteets and m rvdhet store. K**r> f
\num* ot this treaUsfnt was -pttlnfali
. Iti the 4-KiiipftM: but lh* ■»»•.'-V»i <*»*
ttMhMk.  MM*   ttaat   l*M»lU   MHtMikt'tUf),
I   Xow, k«re la tbe analogy:    Von S
Miow works** wbo rote tb# tbr**!
cai*it.ali>tlc tk k«*~ ytw a-r* nw -Malty :
bent-imbed Jo«t as comptet*Iy »»»4 ab-«
foiuu 1 > as this traveler wa* froa*n ,*
-physically, Thtn*» seem tnnt m right -
to yoa bow aa thejr do to tm* »>m !•'
ti*w,i»t* ki o-eih.   Hut toe)*! out for,
HIGH CLASS
Ladies' and Gent's
=TAILORS=
i
DR. DaVAN'SFRENCH PILLS rku.
•almsea k**3w *t (*KTf«i ftasm imw
09.. St CMkfttttMNI. flats**** _._ ___ -.—
PH0SPHON0LF0R^EN.^[r::;
and builder of good blood, strong mm
<lc, good digestion. It cusuins il>|to-
phosphites, which tone the ni»rv«'S,
and pure Olive OH, which nourbli«'»
tha nerv«». tbe blood and th* «'ntlrt>
ayat-Mn. Pleasant to taktf. Contain*
no stcrihoJ or hablt-formlng dnigs, W*
promls" thnt If jou ar« not perfectly
•atlsflfd with it, *t*'li give back your
iiftei'er .* tn<»«»'J »* *,M*n »* yon tell tm*.   Hold
-    '" "'Wily *,« 'It*- ?«» IMail 8'Wr-., .1^1 ':;
va-  - —-- .this toan only hy us.   ♦!,*«    S. K.
I,*m' Raddaby.   I»mtglst,  Vlewrln   Av«*nn«'.
far «4t« at gl#a»4»ti'» D*v§ •!•#•  '|v»**, it. C,
SUITS FROM
$30.00 up
Made to Measure &
order on the premises
DeBurle & Company
Next Calgary Meat Market
P. O. Box 544     -      Fernie, E.C.
■■^"i
t
TELEPHONE NO. 196
J
HP99S
VHslttrt kt ****• »M »nhM tttmamfwiey
>f*tatwit<* wMtiirtMymi to.B * Ww.or
tw« »<W II •< *t«r rinsis. •» »»f **« "" t»m*t4.
antti
*tt*t*!*  Tm* *.*..*« u,mm Co.,«. UttliarMMa,
]| after r*mHt ti fat worfmr* tnetm m i
,*.!'•■&?,» Ui '7-  -runiili-tfu ut »»h..,*^.. ,
»jkd eftwumlt  iiam-iiK-m,    h  »»«**,
yoar finish a« tree mem,   Th«-r*  1*',
wrtfbem nbtoi nni d«*"d U/ratsi ti   ft!
All propm* twJewts to tb* wwlter, emrn*. it, may bn torn aa painful to *'
box ba IM» tb* s*»»«*i hate efttlMstta y-mi to -be mrtmeed from yemr mr,'*' £
of It Isabanrf »» It •* *» Sit*** ««* • It** r'-jsi-r'
C. Eo LYONS
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on 6r<*t Ha<3<* Bhqi.
xM
f
C A.
Grand Union Hotel
COLEMAN, Alta,
Best of Accommodation
We. caler to the wvi-'/tttigmutt's trade
CLA11C ... Proprietor
A Ledger Ad. will do it
mt
fSH
?«   T»t*r
»**##■»»!»•*»
> *t. tM*i*OT( nwn. Ana.
#*.*« H. Rbmef, If label, tt, C*
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' i:*- -.!.' v.k »m«m* tbtm. AMa.,
'^^^^F^w^^KoFww
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{«siM| fcraJKsia saCar  " -   " ^^
Itm
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**^BbiSms SiMiSr
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,t«mr*ia»».    It r*wm~r* ^tn^-i't
t   We gomottw K to d* t.-.»    Ymt
lommy trW bo tmodel If It f*; * #f-
tt«r • tn»r fWI
Ei'^Sfe^*®*1 * ** *********
ocationery, etc.
OLD COUNTRY PKRIODK
BB I#I*BV v E
■w-mn^' j r. •• 'A.$
,*W    i7*    '   .   -■—^.
-T-^yawgfy'F • vy-^ymr"
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PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
THREE
FAMOUS
SCIENTIST!
Dr. Andrew Wilson, Dr. Gor-
don Stables and Dr. Lascelles
Scott, the famous English nn-
alyst, have all personally tried
Zam-Buk and expressed themselves
convinced of its great healing value.
Mrs. St. Denis, of Thompson St.,
Weston, Winnipeg, suffered long
with eczema ; and finally her doctor
said only Zam-Buk could cure her—
another fine tribute of a scientific
man to this great herbal healer.,
' Mrs. St. Denis says : "Tlie ec-
fcma broke out on my nose undone
side of jn. "face. I* could get no
sleep because of the irritation ami pain,
and my face was in such a shocking
condition that for two months I did
nut go.out of the house. 1 applied
remedies and my doctor treated me,
hut without effect, until one day he
said that the only thin? which would
be likely to cur.e mi;, was Zam-Buk, I
pa-cured a supply and to cut a,long
story shorty in a few weeks *Zam*:Buk
cured me completely, leaving no
scars." ■-.':■•.-'
Zam-Buk ii a sure cure for cuts, scalds,
burns, eczema, scalp sores, ulceration, inBim-
m.,i;on. riles.etc: alsoij an embrocat'oa for
rhrumatism, siiralns aa*-sciatica:.' -All ini-,
gists and stores at 50c. box, or.^-jt ftee/rom
Zam-BuV Co., Toronto, for price. Refute
harmful substitutes.
fcM-BUK
The Victims ofthe
Industrial Battlefield
It is almost impossible to form a States while in the line of their em-
.The. shortest way. to. .something to
eat Is'the way hungry men .will -take.
If that way leads through crime, riot
and bloodshed, the> fault lies not with
the hungry -men, but with those who
have the j>ower to provide them -with
Jdbs.'
Reducing the hours of labor does
not reduce wages. It Increases them.
When the hours of labor are reduced
correct estimate of industrial .disabil
ities in the United States.   We have
no authentic statistics on the matter.
The English statistics show that one
factory worker out of every thirty is
injured each year.   With a .population
of ill,000.000  and one  out of. every
thirty 'being injured in gainful occupations we would have almost 1,000,000
injuries each year.   Perhaps oue-'tlunl
or one-half of the employers carry liability insurance.     The experience of
the   liability   companies   show   that
their cost per injury is about ?;J,0.   In
lull, ?20,000,000 were paid out for injuries.    This would show 66G.000 injuries reported to liability companies.
(if this were only half,-the total would
l be or.o and one-third millions.    From
! carefully  prepared  statistics  in   Min-
j iifsota as a basis it is estimated that
j fatal  accidents   to   workmen   in   the
j I'nited  States amount  to, 2,">,000 an-
imially and non-fatal approximately to
j 1.012,000.
We are compelled to estimate the
extent of injuries In Indiana. Our
laws require employers to report injuries, but this law is not complied
with, ln 1912, 3.4K1 injuries were reported as occurring in factories. Of
these eighty were fatal. Thirty-seven
miners were reported killed and a total of 1,387 injuries were reported in
mine work, Returning to an estimate,
we find that Indiana has a population
of 2,700,000. If ;:0 per cent of these
are engaged .in gainful occupations,
we have 810,000 workers employed in
the Sta.te. If one of every thirty is
-injured, we have 27.000. ■accidents a
.year. The census shows 300,000 (workers in industrial occupations, having a
payroll of $100,000,000.- Tbe accident
rate for 100,000 payroll is more ■•than
fifteen. This makes at least 15,000 accidents to the 300,000 factory workers.
This does not 'Include agricultural la-
•borers or those who work for themselves. Including this number,"we'
proba-bly have -800,000 workers and
■tully 30,00.0 accidents, a year. Employers', liability companies pay out an;
nually $500,000 in Indiana. An aver:'
age. payment of $30, makes almost 17,-
000 accidents.
In tne- State of Washington, wherfe
145,000 employees come under the
compensation aot, there are approximately 12,000 injuries a year, This
would raake about 25,000 annually -for
'Indiana with , her 300,000 industrial
workers, so we are very much at sea
as to the exact number, 'but it is
doubtless between 15,000 and 30,000
each year. Nine per cent of all deaths
are due to accidents or'violence. This
numiber includes 45,000 a year in the
United States and includes 117 reported in Indiana. Twenty per cent
of the deaths of young men under
more men must ibe put to work, iwhich ♦„„„.,. «„„ ,„ A .„ ir. ,„,,,.„♦,., ,    „„,
„4^t..r^r.^_ti,s^_!^^.A.^9t9. #__- •- v__I_tw_fMiij^mr.e -Is.-due^,teL_industrial_aeoL
-— -»-attuvc^,-
"jolnsr
which raises wages. And it Increases
tlie Socialist vote because it gives you
time to think. Socialism will reduce
the hours of la'bor.
Capitalism reduces jx>ur wages until you are forced to put your children
Into the factory for toe few pennies
their baby hands can gather. Then
tlie boss reduces your pay until you
get no more than you did before, and
your children are killing themselves
for the boss's profit. Don't vote for a
cradle-robbing syutem.
dents, One coal miner out bf eivery
fifteen is Injured every year. One
railroad worker out of every twenty
and one steel worker out of every
five. The number of dependents who
autfer with each worker ls ahout two.
So we have approximately 50,000 people in Indiana, directly affected*by Industrial Injuries, and the community
at large ha8 a serious: burden as the
social and economic effect of this condition.
Coal Mines
From 1881) to 1908, 29,293 coal miners lost  their lives ln the  United
ployment. This is 3.82 per thousand.
For the last ten years 18,346 was the
total of deaths reported. Doubtless
many were not officially onentloned.
In 1911, 3,602 persons were killed dn
the mines and quarries of the United
States and 63,301 injured. This does
not include many minor injuries not
reported officially, •
Railroad Employees
In 1908 there were 3,405 railroad
employees killed and $2,487 injured,
or 32,451 killed in ten years and 607,-
425 injured;'
Iu 1893, ibefore the automatic coupler was used, the number of railroad
employees injured per thousand was
seventy-six, and the number killed
was 2.9 in coupling curs. In 1908, after the law had been thoroughly enforced, the number killed was only 1
per thousand, and the nunvber injured
was only sixteen. Which would feliow
that much Injury can he prevented by
duo care.
Sickness
It is fair to estimate that 30 per
cent of our population are occupied In
gainful occupations, or out of 9-1,000,-
000 there are 27,000,000 workers, and
that 40 per cent, or 10,920,000 of these
are annually disabled for twenty days.
This would make 21S.400.000 days lost
through disability. Counting that
there are approximately 810,000 workers in Indiana, and assuming each
average a loss of eight days annually,
we have an annual loss of 6,480,000
days of productive labor, wliich means
the loss of many comforts of life.
We can corroborate this in a measure ;by the, reports of the United
State labor commission on condition
of steel workers, Vol. 4, in which it ls
shown that those who are Injured lose
on an average fourteen days each, and
that the average time lost for each
man,' counting the entire number era-
.ployed.is more than six days in rolling
mills ,ajid almost two days In -foundries from injuries alone; not including'sickness.
Our fraternal "organizations have
within their ranks men of more than'
the.average ability and character and
men who live under more than average'conditions. Some of the members
are merchants and professional men
and a number are farmers, so taken
.together their health is ahove the average. The grand lodge of Odd Fellows of Indiana for 1912 reports 82,-
210 members and $104,840 paid in
weekly benefits, for 30,440 weeks.
This does not include the first week
of sickness nor that class of disabilities lasting less than one week, but
dt makes an average of two days for
each member of the fraternity.
The weekly benefits .paid -by the
lodges of the Knights of Pythias ol In-
I. M. Rubinow, liability statistician,
estimates that 40 per cent of all workers are affected by disease and accident and 7 per cent or 8 per cent toy
industrial accident^ and the average
disability for a,ll worker^ is ten daysT
I presume he makes his estimate from
■the German insurance reports, which
show that out of every 100 persons
injured 42.7 men and 35.6 women were
disabled, with an average of 18.5 days
for men and 23,4 for women, or 40.8
for all workers were disabled for 19.6
days a year. To every 100 men Insured there were 788.7 days lost by, disability each year,. Every 100 women
averaged a loss of 8.33 days a year,
or an average of 800 days for every
100 workers, or an average of eight
days for every worker employed,
Among agricultural workers 5.6 per
cent were disabled by accidents.
There Is a rural population of 1,577,-
000 in Indiana, and 30 per cent, or
467,000, are doubtless employed; this
.would be a basis for estimating 25,000
accidents among farmers, which
shows the necessity for social Insurance among farm laborers.—Henry W.
Mullock, in Indianapolis I'nlon,
JOINT CONFERENCES
IN   MANY STATES
^lana-jras-appiroslm&tely the saaa«4—E3rxep*UE&_OlUo,-Uie-4a!ner^in_ftlli*-he-epprfi«sd,-^—-At-the-sound-of-
out of a membership of more than
65,000; in 1912 there were 1119,441
paid ln weekly benefits. This Includes
nothing for the first week ahd only a
dollar after the thirteenth week, but
on that basis more than. 30,000 weeks'
benefits have been paid, or something
■like three days' average loss for ea»h
member of the fraternity. If all disabilities were counted, the disabilities
of these fraternities''■'••would •probably
show a week for each member, on
large Bums were paid for "other relief" not Included In the report of
"weekly benefits."
A tentative agreement has been
reached between operators and miners
of western Pennsylvania embodying
the recommendations of the policy
committee In Chicago; accepting the
elimination of Clause 3 of the Cleveland contract, thus ■ leaving "the way
open for adjustment of local inequalities."
Joint conferences are In session, aB
we go t'o press, iu Illinois, Indiana
(bituminous), and Iowa. The opera't*
ors in all of these districts having coiir..
sented to consider the local differences, and accept the basic scale as
set forth In the Chicago policy.
•Much coal had been' stored In anticipation of a .possible general shut
down; as a natural consequence work
is very poor in all of Ihe districts
named,
, In Ohio there' appears to be a better
feeling growing between the miners
and operators.
While each side Is apparently
standing firm in its announced position there is an undercurrent tending
toward a reapproaohment between the
contending parties.
IMany Individual operators in that
district have signified a willingness
to entor into contracts on the mine
run basis. So far no action has been
taken, the .miners' officials still hoping for a general settlement, or at
least, settlements In most of the sub-
districts,
IN THE FULLNESS OF THE* TIME
[By Frank Stuhlman]
■Charge once more, then, and be dumb!
uet the victors wlien they come,   •
When the forts of Folly fail
Find the body by the .wall.
—Matthew Arnold.
In the bygone'time of the Stone
Age the organized selfishness of the
ancient .world built a wonderful city
of massive, walls guarded by impregnable towers of Iran-like granite to
overawe the tillers of the soil and the
workers in" the crafts.
lu their pride nnd arrogance they
held the workers as but slaves, fit
only to minister to the pleasures of
those who, toy means of force and cunning, had made themselves into lord®
and masters. From their stronghold
they levied tribute upon the workers
until all but a meagre subsistence was
kept from the toilers. And the spirit
of the .people wns broken and the
yoke became 'heavier, they only bowed
the lower and none dared resist the
hard taskmasters,
In the time of the people's deepest
misery a man of them grasped his
stone ax and stroil towards- the frowning towers of tho city. And his fellows said, "Whither?"
And tho man answered, "1 go to
beat down the mills of the tyrant's
stronghold."
And they all said, "He Is mad! iThat
which we could not do together he
goes to do alone! Surely .tlie gods
have put. a curse upon him. And we
wiirbave naught to do witli him lest
our masters slay us in their wrath."
But the man heeded them .not and
went up to the iwalls of the city. Day
after day the man struck with bis
stone ax at the foundations of a great
tower. The' years came and went, the
summer heat fell upon him and the
winter's cold bit keenly, until his hair
grew white and his sinews stiffened
with toll and age, yet so little, ever
so l'ttle was the Impress made on the
stubborn rock. As he labored the
tyrants jeered him, for tlie toil seemed to accomplish nothing; and what
•shilled his lonely heart even more was
the scorn of his fellow .serfs, for whose
Eood he toiled. For tbey held him as
a fool who would'attempt the impossible.
One day a guard upon the city wall
threw a lance, in careless derision, at
the man .and smote him through the
heart. Then both Uie slaves and the
.masters said, "The madman who
wasted his life strivng to overturn
•the imperishable order of things died
in his folly. Let Ills fate be a warning to all those who would subvert
our beneficent system." And the
jackals and vultures quarreled over
his bones and he was forgotten, and
It iwas as if toe had never been.
The long, long ages -passed, races
came and went again, civilizations
flourished and.decayed; but still ifehe
•mighty City' of Injustice overshadowed
the workers and Greed sported -the
ipeople as ever. At last a prophet and
-warrior arose in 'the land. Hie words
iwere as living fire to the hearts of
of the districts are working -pending
final agreements. The present scale
and conditions prevailing, with the
mutual understanding that any changes that can1 be computed will be retroactive, dating from April 1.
We have every reason to hope and
expect that scales will 'be signed* In
the near future In all of the organized districts, carrying with them improved conditions and at 'least *ho
same wage, with the least disturbance
of business during the; readjustment
period In the history of the organlza-
tion.—United Mine Workers' Journal.
ORPHEUM
On Saturday, April 18th
SPECIAL!   VAUDEVILLE ENGAGEMENT   SPECIAL!
The Coal Greek Dramatic Society
MR. CHAS. PERCY
MR. J. H. HEWITT
MR. J. HARPER
MRS. MITCHELL
MR A. PRENTICE
J. GASKELL
R. SAMPSON
Overture, Piano
Character Comedian
Whistling Soloist
Descriptive Vocalist
Scotch Comedian
Violin Selections
Scottish Ballads
The Coal Creek Comedy Four in "UNCLE TOM'S CABIN"
(BURLESQUE)
UNCLE TOM - - Trebor Hguorobsllib
LITTLE EVA - . Sahc Vcrep
TOPSY - - Saj. Nosdivad
?. FAWLEY
G. FINLAYSON
MRS. C. PERCY & MR. J. HEWITT
-mniuii- vi~~*Oil«D
trhmpet call the scales of Ignorance
fell from -their ey«8, and from his inspiration selflshn«ss fled. He marshaled the Army of Brotherhood
against the walled city and besieged
It. Again tind again he hurled his
■forces against the lofty towers, only
to have them driven 'back utterly defeated and (despairing, At last, w>hen
even the great hourt of the caiptaln
begam to fall bim, It was discovered
that the hone ot one tower wto undermined even to falling. For here It
waa that the man with the -rtone ax
had, In a century long past, worn Ws
life aiway. scarcely cutting Arou-gfo
the .surface of the maaalve rock. But
the forces of God carried oni bis iwork.
The rains fell and the water #wlrled
Into the crevice the man had cut. and
.washed about the foundations, and the
frost and cold crumbled It more and
more, and even the thmd-Hke gmas
roots lent their tiny aid 4n disintegrating; the granite until, with the iwork
of nten, It needed but a blow to shatter the Imposing lower: Then the
captain of the wle battered at the
undermined -structuro and leveled It
to the ground and the hosts of Broth
erhood passed Into the oKy, When the
'battle was over the 'people crowded
around the captain and twined' hit hel«
met with laurel and scattered flowers
before him and hailed him as redeemer and victor.
•But tho warrior Mid, "Come."
And the people followed him. 'Wondering. *
At last he stood by the 'bleached
bones of the man with the stone ax.
The cn*p.ialn unlaced Ms helmet and
bared his head and Mid, "Behold, here
It the victor—the forgotten one .who,
ages ago, struck tho blow that In ths
fulness of time brouitot the victory."
In the afterllme when the walls of
the City of Injustice were utterly dost roynd nnd the Rult of Bmtto#rhood
waa tbe law of the land, when nd man
■trove for dory or gain, but eaeb
gave wvieo to nil for the love of all,
and when none were failed rich who
had not love to flvo, a shaft of marble,
pure and white at an angel's wlug,
was erected over the grave of the man
with the stone ax with this Inscription in letters of gold »*pon It;
"God will not permit the endeavor
to perlsh,"-New York Call.
Established April 1899
W. A. INGRAM
i _ . ~r
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BARBER   SHOP
Baths and Shoe Shine
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and LUNCH COUNTER
r
v..
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A trial .order will convince you that theyare the best ahd
our prices the lowest    '    '," '.   ,.'•'x
2lbs Creamery Butter 65 Cents
Prompt Delivery to Any Part
■\
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Turner Block, Wood St.
Mgr.
Phone 52
IEl
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Srtlo Cnrn*ti«t
Character Sketches
Society Entertainers
A Night of Good, Clean and Sparkling Entertainment
First Show Commences 7.30 p, m.   Second Show 9.30
AOMI88ION:  ADULTS 35o.   CHILDREN 15c
HAIR DOESN'T DIE-
IT MM! BE KILLED
Hatr often continues  to live tnd
K»w long after the ileuth ot thtt hod),
t it Is often k!!M through neglect
or mlm*e.   Almost always ihe woman
or man whote hair ti falling out, or U
stringy,  lifeless nnd dulllooklmr, ifl
•ntkrui; to blame bcoaus* ol uoi tiring li tho owner car*,   It Is «asv to
<««« rmte wi ton mil.   in iiaraoor i
Hnlr TVinHWtT 1t> timid   !i s!nH;, u«fl
and silky, and Harmony -fthantpoo toi
koop tho hair and scalp thoroughly I
*rk«n.    It  In  deSSflitM}   witumtd,
wlth tno rom.   8|ir!nkl* a llttlo on
yoar half oach tlmo !»#tor» brushing
It      Com*tri*   no  nil    ina   n*«t»   tin* '
dwng* color of hair, nor darken f toy
half.
To koop your hair and aealp dan-
drnflftfroo and dm, use Harmony
ghamjioo. This pun liquid shampoo
ia moat «oov*ni«nt lo woe, giving an
Instantaneous lather that Immediately
p*n*tr*t*a to nt*ry pen of th* hnlr
nud scalp, iunuring « <juUk, thorough
oteanslfift. Wash*] off Just as qokkiy,
, UW>  «Ui*U« 0)M*k.,kH>.| IttHt-K  util.v   a   Ir,**,
■ momenta,   iotiui-^t nothing ihat t»n
I harm tho hair, and leaves no harsh-
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(    lloth   ikr«i>ar»Ui)ni   rom*   In   odd-
| shaptMt. very ormwiimtai hottlos, wtth
•j»d*fthJ*T -toj*. H*r/M*jj flair Ifewnti-
ttittr. II wi     llnrmoni'  fthitmpno*   M*.
net* gwtn-im-MMi tn satisfy yon IB
i ovtry way. or yonr money hack. Sold
'only at  thr more limit  *,oo© Hoxall
gioroa. and In this torn only hy w,
X.   VL   tttddahy.  Dmggfst,   Vktorta
Atrnm, Fowl*, n. c.
THE
83688388
Bellevue Hotel
COMMERCIAL   HOUSE
Best Accommodation  In the  Pass.—""""   '
Up-to-Oate — Every   Convenience,—
Excellent Cuisine.
3UITABLE   FOR   LADIE8 AND GENTLEMEN
J. A. CALLAN, Prop.
BELLEVUE, Alta.
USE CRUSHED STONE
Foryour next Concrete Work
Any size from 2 inch
to Sand
No Screening No Waste
PRICE3 PER CUBIC YARD
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2 inch
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GRADED SUITABLE FOR
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in City Limits
Dsllvsrid
$1.60
1.75
2.00
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Speolal Prices on Large Quantities
(PRIOIt AT ORUtHlft INOLUDI LOADING)
Cement, Lime and Plaster for Sale
Ut Ui Oo Your Noxt Oonoroto Work
■xoavfttlng Dono at ftoasoneble Prlots
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P. O. Box 246 FERN1S, 0.0.
PMONIIt
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The Metal used to east Type for this
Paper It supplied by
Great Western Smelting &
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SMELTERS A REFINERS OF METAL
971 Main St       •   ■   Vancouver, B.C.
■MSB
T^t335E!3iK*»7J»»j5r
Try the Ledger for Job Work
nfui. 1  '. Ar-iV-   •o'S*"",***' ,■*■..„   ' >'■"•   .• ,-.}c"*a~" ,
"■it
ji. -*; ft*,  ..s-vTui,..?-^- -7,t,wx.i .-7*■. * in^^:mw*^*
'■'->*,'   .,   ■=   J"~XX*'f-^"t^H,'K*W^
:^r«r'-'5P3r
•nn -jsJ -.*^t-*-ZW:.-i«ijijiSJf,
localflmp^r*ctoi^Dist^8^)l!p:A
\f-?*'lilV '■"'■fl
■•^^VtW^S.^^.11^,,1—-  -J*JiI
»*««-<»Vj~^»^-*T^<^~~" -—
Wr
J
fc-
GLADSTONE LOCAL
No, 2314 .
• Meet first, eni third Fridays,
Mirters' Hall, Pernie; second and
fourth Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
Creek/ Sick Benefit attached,—T.
Uphill-Sec,, fernie,- B: C.
.,: HOSMER LOCAL
. No. 2497.       -   , •
Meet every bupday'at 2,30. In TC,.
P. Hall, Main Street. Sick Bene.'
(it Society attached.—W. Balderstone, Sec,-Box 63, Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334
*"Ofe<»t every . Sunday afternoon
at 2 o'clock ip " Crahan's Hall.
Sick Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet every Sunday.   Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Michael Warren, Sec, Can-
more, Alta.
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
In month.   Sick and Benefit Society attached.—J. Gorton, Sec.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.SO   p.m.   ln   the   Opera   House,
Coleman.—J, Mitchell, Sec, Box
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening: at
7 o'clock tn the Bankhead Hall.
Sick aiid Accident. Benoflt Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec., Bankhead, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet every Friday evening at
7.30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
.BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p,m John
Loughran, Sec.
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2633
Meet e\$ry alternate Sunday, at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—,J. Johnstone, Sec.'
. - PASSBURG LOCAL
* No. 2352
. Meet every second and-' fourth
Sunday of-each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak Hall. Sick Benefit Society attached,—Thos. G. Harries,
Sea, Passburg, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
Meet every- second and fourth
Sund&y of each month at 10 a.m.
In School House, Burmis. No Sick
Society,—Thos. G. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta. •
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hall, Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' Hall, 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, See.-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p;m.
in   the   Socialist   Hall James
Burke,   Sec,   Box   36,   Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock in the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin. B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter, Sec '
Financial Statement
ASSETS
British and Colonial
Government and
Provincial -. Secur-
dtleB  ; $1,364,731.62
Foreign, Government
Securities   ,1,364,973.44
British and Colonial
Hallway Mortgage
Bonds and Ordinary Stocks     425,720.70
American Railway
Bonds ...3,835,873.34
Miscellaneous Debentures   1,837,380.44
Mortgages on Freehold and Leasehold
Properties and other Securitiee   1,418,282.86
Freehold and* Lease-
mold Prem-lses .... 1,279,878.21
Branch Agency and
other Balances ... 1,248,074.66
Cash at Bankers and
tn hand      580,567.88
Investments and
Cash in Trustee's
(hands      68,887.42
Total Assets $13,431,270.88
CLAIM8 PAID,
 „_, LIABILITIES ■
Reserve (or Unearned Premiums on
unexpired risks .. .$3,636,239.43
Reserve for Undetermined Claims 3,218,000.00
Reserve for General
Contingency Fund . 1,658,493.95
Reserve for Unclaimed Dividends ana
all other Liabilities
(except capital)
Surplus   to    Polley*--
735,892.72
holders *. 4,182,644.48
$13,431,270.58
„ „   „ INCOME
Net   PreotfumB   Re*
celved (less  re-ln-
surances   and   bo-
. »u«»)   $10,003,848.18
interest,   on   Invest-'   /
ments and all other
aourcea "   390,469.42
$10,394,317.60
EXPENDITURE
Losses, Commissions.
Salaries   and   all
other -payments .. .$8,743,527.25
eXCEOD $60,000,000.00
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp. Ltd, of London Enc.
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist. Agent
Miners'Union Hall Block      -      Fernie, B.C.
AUfe-MtiB-B l« (MS.
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twin flat broth.
AlaUatina walls
makatha ham
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chssritil not
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'wall Ute k»bo-
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ll(*sMm«M.||
wWUrdatwUk,
sg«,bM*ms
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1 farmaajr fl
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wsBsst-ttM won Military. Tba? ,
mwbrgtnfo, No Inaset or dtisaas |
f-smtMllM ia an AUbartint wall,
woM Am aH Alabaitfaaa.
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"*■«*■»•».»  4um«i*h:
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A
From Now
• •
By FELIX GRENDON
******H^*hkkkkkAAAAkAAAAAkklikA.k*nAA*^ir**i^^
By Felix. Grendon
Suppose you woke up one day in tbe
forty-eighth story of the Metropolitan
Tower and found that the world toad'
uvea laid in ruins and that the only
other survivor wis a dtstraotingly
beautiful girl—^what would you do?
This is the problem that faces Allan
Stern, the remarkable young engineer
in "Darkness and Dawn," when he and
Beatrice Kendrick awaken from a
sleep that has lasted 1,000 years, to
tact, ever since 1920, the year In
whioh a titanic upheaval convulsed
the earth and totally disrupted civilization, r*
Allan's problem is complicated by a
weak habit that human garments have
disintegrating dn tho course of ten
centuries. Beatrice, mindful of God*
iva, "draws the sheltering masses of
her hair ahout her." But, ia spite of
this precaution, I am sorry to say
that Allan is guilty of what the author
neatly terms "untoward thoughts."
To give the hero his due, he does his
utmost to conquer all such unholy
promptings, and if we remember that
he is a Socialist as well as an ardent
champion of advanced ideas, and' that
a sleep of 1,000 years may well make
the beat of men a.little hazy about
the exact provisions of the moral code,
we shall he able to judge his case
with charity.
Besides, Beatrice is promptness Itself in taking the situation in hand
and savins the reader -from moral embarrassment or ethical distress. For
when "her perfect body, beautiful-as
that of a pagan dryad-, roused mysterious passions ln the engineer," and
when "his passion leaped up like living ' flames," she withdrew from his
burning clasp and', "instilled with the
eternal spirit of woman," says firmly,
"not now—not yet!" With this cold
comfort, Allan (no less than the reader) is obliged to rest content Nevertheless, his untoward thoughts cause,
him many a thrilling fall from grace,
each fall bringing him to grips (and
to salvation) 'with the magic words,
"not yet." I am hound to confess
that, after the 400tb page, the mere
repetition of this insidious formula
begins to .pall. Luckily, on page four
hundred and—tout I must not anticipate.
He must be an intrepid writer who
offers to the public a new work in a
field that a thinker of Mr. Wells' order has made peculiarly his own. Mr.
England not only, possesses courage,
he has a (fertile fancy and an infective
adventurous vein. Except for these
qualities, his novel wouldn't have
entertained us as it did, and we
shouldn't have read the six hiindred
and seventy pages through, Tlie fact
is tihait when two sleepers awake In
2»2orraeir*Iov®"ana"daTigers "comibthe
to keep our hearts on the jump. They
believe the earth to be all their own
until, from the jungle In Madison forest (near 23rd Street) they are attacked, toy the Horde, a race of savages evolved from a non-human stock.
Being an engineer, Allan invents Pul-
verite in the nick of time, and motes
the Horde wilh this high explosive
and .with tho able help of .Beatrice,
who fights at her lover's side like another Amazon. Nor is this the sum
of her services. In her (partner's rare
hours of ease, she keeps house for him
in the .Metropolitan Tower, turning,
when need arises, from domesticity to
the several professions of nurse,
crack-shot, huntress, cqmforter, comrade, and second-in-command. Her
versatility' Inspires Allan with a
'^wealth' df intimate, yet respectful
adoration," which by no means destroys "the magnetic sex emotion that
thrills and attracts and infuses them
both."
After the battle with the Horde,
what a turn of speed-the adventures
do ..take! Allan and Beatrice set out
on a journey of explontion during
which they plunge down a cataract
and find a bi-plane, a relic of the
Wright brothers era. .The machine
is rehabilitated and a flight is started
to the ends of the earth. But the fuel
gives out, and *he lovers are stranded
at the bottom of the Great Abyss,
one hundred miles beneath the earth's
surface. iThere they are captured by
the IMerucaans, the descendants of the
noble American race, who live in
gloom near a sunless sea. Though
hardy and courageous, the Merucaans
have lost all record of their former
glory, audi, toy succumbing to their
murky environment, have deteriorated
into barbarians leading the cheerless
lives of a primitive fishing-folk,
It would be impossible to relate all
^the neck-breaking perils that now 'beset our lovers, fairly pelt thorn indeed,
until an escape from death is a mere
tonic for aa after-dinner lethargy. It
Is enough to say that the heroic energy and Indescribable fortitude of
Allan and Beatrice are central factors
in bringing the Merucaans out of the
Abyss and establishing them on the
Earth'® surface. There, thanks to the
influence of propitious surroundings,
the barbarians revert, as it were, to
civilization. Moreover, under Allan's
Socialistic teachings, tbey expand
with a rapidity that would have flabbergasted Darwin, for, being a bold
and1 fearless people untrammelled by
plutocratic bonds or traditions, they
not only cover the planet with mechanical inventions beyond the hope
of the men of 1920, but inaugurate an
epoch of real equality and brotherhood within a generation and a half.
The story closes at the point where
Allan, in extreme old age, abdicates
an almost Hfe-long Presidency. He is
succeeded by his oldest son, the unanimous choice of the Merucaans and of
the author as well. It is a little sad
to see nepotism, all unbeknown to Mr.
England, showing its cloven hoof in
this .paradise of the future.
Is the reader shocked at learning
that an Allan junior appeared on the
scene? I trust not. Por candor binds
me to conifess that a time comes in
"Darkness and Dawn" when  Allan's
untoward.thoughts gain a human, all
too huinan, response from Beatrice.
Let me hasten to assure the Grundys
that it all happens in the most proper
iway. Allan and Beatrice stumble upon a phonograph and a number of
records. Among these—O ineffable
■Providence!—ds "The Form of the
Solemnization of .Matrimony, by Bishop Gibson." Arm ln arm, bride and
bridegroom listen reverentially while
the phonograph chants: "Dearly beloved, etc." and "Wilt thou have this
woman, etc," I observed that when
Allan repeats the words of the record
aloud, he promises to love, honor, and
keep his wife, while she 6wears to
love, honor, and SERVE him. Evidently feminism is a back number in
2920.
There comes a crucial moment .in
this duly solemnized marriage. Beatrice, forgetting that the economic independence of women will make a
female as desirable as a male, anxiously asks Allan one day whether he
will toe angry "if it is a girl!" He
magnanimously answers: "Of course,
the world's work demands a chief, a
head, a leader to come after me,
but—" Though he does not finish the
sentence, his tenderness reassures
her. It did not reassure me, however,
and I felt decidedly nervous until, several chapters later, It turned out to
be a imagniificent 'boy.
I suspect that there is a revolutionary) allegory in "Darkness and Dawn."
iThe -Merucaans, like the working
classes, are th4 slaves of their environment In the Great Abyss. Sticking
through untold hardships to their
leader, Allan, they break the chains
of this environment in one act of concentrated determination, and emerge
from their prison to initiate an■' enlightened society from which slavery
te completely (banished. Here, Mr.
England's political convictions enlist
our sympathy. In general, the thread
of sustained adventure forme the most
captivating part of the work. The
author has a real gift for romancing
entertainingly, and a real power of
graphic description. ' When his people
talk you hear them talking, when they
act you see them acting. And tlie
lively streams of Incident flow convincingly enough, once the initial
mlra-cle is granted. In spite of his
curiously atavistic sentiments on sex
relationship and other human matters,
Mr. England ls, all told, a rattling
good story, teller. He would toe an
even better one, if he stuck exclusively to romance, or If his sociologic
observations were shot through with
a little less tradition and a little more
life.—The New Review.
Socialism does not ask you what you
believe. It asks if. you will think and
act for all.
Men do not get rich by creating
wealth, but by absorbing'wealth that
others create.
Beauty is said to be skin deep. But
ca-pitalism skins deep. Perhaps that
is why it is such a beaut
.The interest of the .worker and' the
capitalist is not Identical from the fact
that the interest all goes to the capi-
lalisi.„-__ _	
A Winter Night Tale
and An Analogy
All •proiwwty b-rtonit* lo tke work-w,
but be lets the *msi*i**r bare ext 1mlvo
i nm of it.
Not many years ago, In the mountains of Pennsylvania, an a midwinter night, with the mercury just
exactly 30 decrees below zero, some
one whom I know started on a long,
lonesome journey.
A big, splendid and highly Intelligent horse won pulling the alolgli.
Thero iw«* nothing to io for the traveler but td silt -back and admire tbo
wonderful panorama as it wild toy In
Its daleldo-acoplc beauty.
The almost daylight of a full moon
shining on hard, frozen snow created
countless myriad* of small scintillating diamonds. You could see these
Ice diamonds on all aides—on the
trees, the rocks, the edge of the
mountain -waterfall—everywhere.
The high-rising mountain!, covered
with their black-green hemlocks man-
tied In white, completed this marvel-
on* picture. In an environment Ilk*
llmi no oue vould avoid dreaming
drt'Hiun. , . . The wueak of «W»h
runners frraw softer and the sound of
bells fainter, . . . The forost. the
moiintalna, the moonlit sky, til molted away Into A dim, distant symphony of sound and color.
•And then from the land of nowliw**
thoro -fame quietly down tho mont
welcomft slumber ever known. No
one had over experienced such comfort beforo, True, there had pw-.v,.
vjoimly been some nhnrp pnnga of uuf-1 -Wd.
ferlug from tbo Intense cold; but
♦hat w«* all over now. The lrav»h»r
had Rono to sleep.
•When he woke up the experience
was painful, Horn, sl-nlgh and traveler t.*Ti m a MrattKti home. Light*
went ihlnlnir from th«» fro#t-coated
windows, and stranger* wi>ro pounding Ihe wayfarer and trotting him
back nnd foHh tlirmiuh the xnow,
Th«y Imt! mlwn lliu rhmu and stwk-
ln«m off and were mbblnt hia faw,
mrn am\\ band* with «now,
i    IMd he* put up n klekT   Well, vwi
, ju»i <*-<* »«' <iiu,   mm ut* sumo part i ~
I ft I, ,,ti .,.,,,. .»,.,* ,*>,   ,, ,,,.   I.,  * v <   ,*
the more It «e«*med tn plf-i-i**** hit tnr-j
rwntor*.   He protested that be was j
aleeny nnd ltt»M*d m heltiit Uti nlou:
to m down and rest Hn tt«e aoww).
However, thnt  made no dlffprencp
,,,   1 t.*    ! ,.t,        ,  ,.     .     t ft
him no rest, fhe next doae wa» tee
walier. Then more waiter, an«t each
succeeding doae a trifle warmer Ihan
tbe preceding one. I^iatly came woolen blankets and a red hot stove. Kwry
Mag* ot thl* treatment wna painful
In the extreme; but tbe method waa
rltrh-> flrtt! tb* n»*nltn tuit.lvt-xr'nry
Now. htm ia tba analog*:    You!
ff*llrw   imrlora  who   vntt*   th«  ibrr-f
<«aptiallmi«' ti<-k#t*--,tiwi arc mentally
benumbed Jitet aa eomnkttely and »*>- j
*oltjtfly «• this traveler wa* frown
physically.  Thlnna an-etn jnat n« rifbt I
to you now as they do lo one *Im» £» j
trmtinn to d*»th.   llut look out for*
, after result* if )-«u worker* intit* on j
1 «     "**.*     *    ' * *  *l   ••1I..lL.    14*     ■&,!,,,*t,,.l.   ,
mud  ertMiomU*   lunmntte*.    It   mean* j
yonr flfiteb n«  fro* mon,    Tfi-n-   <*
at-rfrfom nhoarl »itj<! don't forgt! it    it;"
courso. It may be j««t at |»*Jj»ful en*.
you to two aroused from your m<»nt«l
lethargy aa lt Ih to tlww out n freexiug j
If the fire department were "privately owned it would be a menace to the
home to propose a means of protecting it from fire apart' from profits.
MAN'S LIFE IN DOLLARS
In modern warfare it costs about
$15,000 to kill a man. In the Boer
row this item came as high as $40,000.
The Balkan nvix-up with Turkey, was
conducted more reasonably — $10,000
burned up ln making one man food
for powder. Gorgas, in the canal
zone, has been saving human life at
the actual cost of $2.43 the Individual.
Sanitation in the isthmus under Gorgas has cost just 5 per cent of the
total canal building expenditures.-*^
Review of Reviews.
Our Treat
All Week!
Luscious
"Sunkist" Oranges
at Special Prices,
at Your Dealer's!
The best part of breakfast is a
juicy, thin-skinned, seedless "Sunkist"
orange. "Sunkist" oranges are the
finest, juiciest, most delicious oranges
grown in the world.
Buy them by the box or half-box—they are most economical
and keep for weeks.
Carefully picked and packed by gloved hands.
The cleanest of fruits.   Tree-ripened.
Use "Sunkist" lemons on meats, fish, poultry and salads.
Thin-skinned.   The juiciest, finest lemons grown.
Rogers Silverware Premium* for
"Sunkist" Trademarks
Cut the trademarks from "Sunkist" 0T&atC^^^TtHCJ^^^ TM*
and lemon wrappers, and send them to us. ^^gjraaJSJBgg^ eleeant
We offer 27 different silverware premiums ja/BS?i&*x Bo*«? o«*»j»«
-all Rogers A-l guaranteed Stand- ^jg^^^SSS^SlSSSSL
ant silver plate.    Exclusive ^£S-*-^>nd 12 centa.   "Red Bait"
"Sunkist" ^&Z5^^    oraMre and lemon wrappers count
.   ._, ^^0za^^   samea» Sunkist."
aesiga. _A___^_^\_ r__&?T?^    ht remltttajr, send amounts of 20 centi or
^Pl^^wB^     over by postal note, postoffice or eipres*
Ot     ___W?r^        ^.   \9^       money order.
Sia*)J_r Vn\-  Send your name and full
' address for our complete
free premium circular and
club plan.
Address all orders for premium
silverware and all correspondence to
California Fruit Growers Exchange
105 King Street, East, cor. Church    (ig2)   Toronto, Ont.
person. Rut lt ls the right thins to do
for your own sake; tor tho sake of
your family; for the sake of humanity.
8o, the next time a Socialist tries
to walce you up, don't kick, Listen to
him and follow his advice. If you do
this you will come out of your stupor
all right; and ln tx hurry at that.
When you eventually do arrive, and
find that you really have brains of
your own, then you will thank the
one ,who aroused you, and your uiutl
tudo will ho Just aa sincere aa that of
the lone traveler the nlghj -tio oame
nearly freeing to death.
Thia, my non-Socialist friends, la
the end of my story and my analogy.
You may rend what follows If you
wish, It is Intended, however, for rny
Socialist Comrades,
ComradeH: I know each and every
ono of you have anywhere from one
to a huiulm-J lionou iiuulltniU on >uur
hands that you are imtlently trying to
thaw out. Don't Bet dlacouraned if
they InuUt on remaining In wage
slavery. 1 latin on to them and never
let go until they wake up. When
they do get wise they will stand
shoulder to shoulder with you in
arousing the rest of humanity—and
then, by and by, we may be ablo to
live clvlIUml Uvea and substitute the
THIS NEW MEDICINE
SAVES YOU MONEY
We are druggists right here in your
town and make a living out of thr
drug business, hut It 1b because people have to have drugs and not ho-
cause w(> like to see peoplo suffer—we
don't. Our duty Is to render the best
service we can, and when someone is
ailing, we are interested In seeing
them take the best medicine there is
for their particular trouble. Wo don't
recommend "cure-alls," aa we don't
believe there are such things. We
don't want you to spend more than
you have to. Some of you get aimall
wages, and when you're sick, none at
all, and you should got the most you
can for your money.
Wo recently came across a new
remedy for lucruukliiii fctnmgth und
building up icoplo who are run-down j
uvid imadtUtd. Wu kuu.\ that * all^lii
troublo sometimes grows Into a aori>
oua one, and to stop It in the begin-
uing, will ttuvti you nioimy jn thn end.
This new compound is called Itexall
Ollvo Oil Kmulslon, It Is the best
remedy, when you are run-down, tired
out, nervoMa—no mutter what tho
cause. It dooHit't merely «tlmutnt«
you and make you f««l good for a few
hours, hut fakes hold of the we-akwms
■rtdw'i^'ter'lit lr*£irt' wio "ot \ ™t^\™* WL"}! i°J I'l8.!^",".™^
HERE IS Jl SQUARE DEAL
and peaceful security as well.
With a policy tn our old line
company, you can go off on your
vacation or visit tho ends of tba
earth and you know you're secure.   The best in
FIRE INSURANCE
is always cheapest and especially so when it doesn't cost
higher. Don't delay about that
renewal or about that extra in-
fiumnce you want but come right
it^tjonce_fl*ndJh*ai£e,lt-atTpnd «*■***—
M. A. KASTNER
SOLE AGENT FOR FERNIE
ALEX BECK BLOCK, FERNIE, B. C
"SI
r.
DR. DtVAN'S FRENCH PILLS »
fatetlnff Wil for Ytenton, ttalmor thiwiior
110, mM it all Iwtg atom, er mtttrti tn any
mmjiJ«3*lJ'';*l'»M.   T«tfro-tail. B*vi*
pfl0SPH0N0LI0RlEN:^^M
msttor's
two fof
ilYmliv
•I
condition It Ik h fciil nerve-food tonU
and builder of good blood, *»tro»» tuns
cle. good digestion. It contains llypt*-
|iiioa|ihi(-*H, which tone the ni»rv<»n.
and pure Olive Oil, wliich uourlttlitt*
tho nerve*, tho blood and the entlit*
tystom. I'lea-iant "v »«k.' <'<>!«*,i,!,!!»
no alcohol or halilt-formlng dm«s W*
I«wnl«" »h:i» If you nre not jM-rfeclly
Hme M4 »«!»! teams "my j «tWl«J wilh «• *•)" *>^ '>»'* Wr
ile-vrlUtouHitymi np. p «l»t. er j money ha soon ns you tell us. HoM
Uruv Mn-fM, m \tf imI]iwiir-ww-li**ionly m' tin* 7,««o llfwtll Htorp*-, nml tt|
thia town, only by ua.    fl.Oil.    S*. K.
_...._       «, jHuddaby.   UniitgUi,   Victoria  Avium.,
at ilstMhira Drug Start lpflrnle. 0. C.
HIGH CLASS
Ladies' and Gent's
=TAILORS=
SUITS FROM
$30.00 up
Made to Measure &
order on the premises
DeBurle & Company
Next Calgary Meat Market
P.O. Box 544     -      Fernie, EX.
TELEPHONE NO. IW
Vim •«•! I
Vitality: for Kitri
W'sal* "
ol |trir..n iu au«ui a \,%w 04, tit. CatiiariMit,
Ontario,
for aala
tanfaiuhSt'u
Nature's Purifier
EVERYONE b m ^emaaUwtai to *•
W^^WPy W mHMf W->M M>% -■■It*, M
' tfnr*.. m m* •*r»«i> cm* nt *T«***ilv«r*
■_wl»» otja ainaiitf Ael ij *^-t«jwl
taaaafat tat *WW auan at ataeota
bn'timr aitrrlM ha mn »>•<♦ tit. ■*»
unpmiKtif • at a nlr aad *M*etHw t*i»irtaf aaaaa it
f-aa't Trail S«h" Mar %a eddr takf at aaf
tlmtttaataaHtat-mt.lattma mwitmmam tt imam
aad il.« vaaaataanam at ttaam tit aaaatHtaan*
ttmn Um*.
Otiatn Uada TODAY from avet Mr.
ft^fmr-iiS 6t,1p ty
I C. ENO, IM, "FrttH 3nW
Work*, London*, Eaglaad
Af.nli Ut C.auUtHm*U t.lUXtblm4
Co,MmU*J. 10 H«CMilSl,f*w*Ml*.
C. E. LYONS
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on first c)a*<* Rainess and Residential property
Wfr
%f
Grand Union Hotel
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater lo the workingman's trade
G.A, CLAIR ... Proprietor
A Ledger Ad. will do it ^lyr-wwww^gs"?^'*-  "jSftjW'-KC tp/rsfi^-r* -y •- i y»n: '■■ y'""'"
- ■?
■ ,?,,,,,,.y,,,lu„,.y,^^-TCTy^,^
nWWilH'tfWlWH^U^^.
,<•
-■M^fJU^lWtdJpftfHIWgfflVMW
tt:
» Sij Ht, nt j.** "       *i**j£_     « s .,   „ j *.    *    H   -i     J      r
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE,   • B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
c ,.      :*i, ■.., *.-- * ,-jt ,,   -~
-;. -v  , **. i ,•'■)..,     .    *  >
i -     ", *    ^   ,    '!      v, '   .   ,  , -     .
1 I  ,     -. * Vi'.l   "7       i       .)■-",:.. ,    -A    %■
J".   *;'.*."  - ,,t,\  *. K'" Vs.v    AAsXA,.*. .;    ' AA iSli-   '
,   >
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Pernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
P. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
SlONUfcaXABEt.''
•^£B&]£&&^'
OUR CELEBRATION
■Tht' celebration for May 1st must bc successful
and tlie members of Sub-district'No. 1 should endeavor by every moans at 'their,, command to make
tMs 60. Let this occasion demonstrate in no uncertain measure the strengtli of the U. M. W. of A.
and the importance of the coal industry; -let it be
a boost of our strength. Thc mine workers of this
District are the life and existence of the various
towns'throughout the Pass, and we can do no harm
by occasionally impressing this upon some people.
Parker Williams and John Loughran'will"be here,
and both are well worth listening to; see to it that
you are present to demonstrate your strength and
what an-important factor you are in the life of this"
Pass.
We are * compelled on another page to reply at
some length to a clergyman of the Church of England, who'writes us from Coleman with reference
to a paragraph that appeared in Hillcrest notes of
last week.
Without attempting to apologize for any remarks made this gentleman by way of reply, we
would point out that the Ledger can perform no
useful purpose by quarreling with the various
churches or clergymen throughout the Piass. They
have their viewpoint, and we have ours. Just so
long as there is no interference on the part of these
gentlemen who oater for the spiritual welfare, just
.so long are avc content to let them severely alone.
iShrTHmTspBTOlen-n^^
ate religious dissension 'and ill-feeling among the
membership, and absolute freedom so far as religious matters are -concerned should be enjoyed by
all in exactly thc same manner as political or other
opinions.
Tf man possesses any "inalienable rights" it
must be the right to "think," and while it may be
argued by some that thought precedes action we
eannot hope to <tontrol "opinions." Individuals
should have a perfect right to think religiously or
otherwise.
OAN CAPITALISM BE REFORMED
Tho Reverend Father Augustine Ryan, D. D.. in
his debate with Morris milquit in KverylmdyN*
Magazine, takes his stand for "Reformed Capitalism."
Capitalism* he maintains, is not all bad; in fact,,
with the evil 'el-iimin-ated it is quite an acceptable
system.
What Father Ryan Mis to see is that one cannot
eliminate the evil in capitalism without eliminating
capitalism itself. -
THE EVIL IN CAPITALISM IS NOT MERELY
INCIDENTAL TO IT, BUT IS THE ESSENTIAL
CONDITION OP ITS EXISTENCE;
*
To illustrate:
Every one will agree that unemployment is one
of the greatest evils of capitalism.
According to reliable authorities there are in
the United States about one million unemployed
in times of so-called prosperity. This number
swells to five million and more in times of business
depression. \
Every one. 1 think, will also agree that few of
the other evils Of Capitalism can be successfully
combatted so long as the unemployed problems remains unsolved.
Unemployment, besides being a prodigious national waste, is the fruitful source of poverty, vice,
crime, insanity, suicide, drunkenness, disease, wife-
desertion, inefficiency and slothfulness.
Every social M'orker, every charitable organisation, could confirm this statement.
THE ARMY- OF THE UNEMPLOYED, IS,
HOWEVER. ESSENTIAL TO THE EXISTENCE
OF THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM.
Capitalism cannot furnish permanent employment to all the people without committing suicide.
This can be easily proven:
If all workingmen and women were permanently
employed, every strike would be won, inasmuch as
there would be no "scabs" to take the places of
the strikers.
It is immaterial whether a worker calls,himself
a Republican, a Democrat, a Prohibitionist or a
Socialist, in Uhe last analysis every worker wants
the same thing, which is—ALL HE CAN GET.
I never knew a workingman, no matter what he
styled himself politically, who would work for
three dollars a day if he saw a chance to get four,
or for four dollars a day if he saw a chance to get
five.
If, therefore, every strike eould be won, the
working people would keep on striking until they
received the equivalent of the full product of their
laboiyand capitalism would cease to exist.
The unemployed man, or rather the fitfully and
-iri^gularly^'empi©yed~iHan~the"Tnueh'*despised"hobo"
wandering from town to town in search of work,
is, therefore, the cornerstone of capitalist society.
His urgent need, the wolf hunger in his eyes, that
and that alone makes the worker submit to exploitation.
Says Gilbert K. Chesterton:
"If we simply ask what has been the main fea-
ture, the upshot, the final fruit of the capitalist
system, there is no doubt about the answer,
"The special and solid result of the reign of
employers has been UNEMPLOYMENT. Unemployment not only increasing, BUT BECOMING
AT LAST THE VERY PIVOT UPON WHICH
THE WHOLE PROCESS TURNS."
Capitalism, therefore, cannot he " reform wl"; tt
must be ADOLISHKD.—Ralph Korngold.
Communicated
The Bditor of thc District .Ledger.
Dear Slr.-~Vo«r Hillcrest corre»-
pondi.'Wt'* t'Xii'U'i'uiHe of verbosity liua
dimmed hlf* rctine of veracity, He
has soared to fanciful helshta of clo-
<iuei)-ce In a futile attempt to bespat-
ter the Church with mud. Possibly
hi* lu«* spent a few sleeplcs* nights
•endeavoring to figure tlio number of
dollar* ruined amomjfti IiIb eommd-w-t
for the erection of the <'hurch to
which  h« Mt.ru <-'i<'h ti-trona offence.
The paragraph that Mr. Watkins--
Jones lake* exception to appeared in
the lllllciH'St -notes of laat ■ivi-eli, nad
rend «R follows:
"The morala of the cltlnena of thia
burn are improving at a rato that
threatens to make Hulley's comet look
like n funeral cortege. A Church hae
bran built and tin addition to the
school also made, tho funds for same
having, for the mont part, beon rained amongst the workera.   Having got
Cook Book—
BEING'A MANUAL OF COOD RECIPES crefully
ctioMti from the contributions of over two thouund
•uccettful uicii ol Five Rows Flour throughout Guild*.
AUo Uieful Notes on the various classes ot good things .
to nlillof which have beeiv carefully checked and
re-checked by competent authority.
Mftm year Envelope to LAKE OF THE WOODS MILLIH6 CO, LIMITED, WINNIPEG
DISTRIBUTORS-^FERNIE, B. 0.
Western Canada Wholesale Oo.    Trites-Wood Co.
Crow's Nest Business College
AND ACADEMY OF LANGUAGES
J.  W. JBennett [Principal
Free Competition
Two non-transferable Scholarships, each for Three Months'
Free Tuition, -will be awarded'for the best two papers explaining reasons
"WHY YOU SHOULD TAKE A COURSE IN THE CROW'S
NEST BUSINESS COLLEGE"
YOU have equally as good a chance as anybody else. Because you are a poor scholar do not let that prevent you from
trying.
It is NOT by the literary style but by the originality of the
ideas expressed that the papers will be adjudged.
This competition will close May lst.
Por further particulars write to the College.
P. O. Box 574
Ffernie, B. C.
EMSJiSISISIS*^^
J. T. GIDDINGS
BUILDER & CONTRACTOR
Calgary. Ailta., April 13th. 1914.
To the Editor, District Ledger.
Dear Sir,—-I am forwarding you a
little information regarding the unemployed in Calgary as per your request
in Ledger to local secretaries. I am
a '"-has been" secretary and correspondent to the Ledger. There are
thousands of unemployed' at present
In Calgary. At the City Labor Bureau
there are about 6,000 names on the
books ot men wanting work, -besides
the thousands that are walking the
streets. Only this morning there
were hundreds of men around the labor 'bureau there, the same every day.
Last Saturday they had a squad of
policejnen"chaRin«rthe men sway; and"
no|w also tihey have a placard -posted
up advising the unemployed to go out
of thd oity to look elsewhere tor work,
as there will not he much work doing
in the city this summer. Now, iMr.
Editor, -where is 4t possible for a man
to pull out tc, when he has not a cent
to help -Mm on his way and no prospect* of work anywhere? If he Is
caught riding a -boxcar, he is liable to
sixty days in. tbe pern As lor -myself
I -have been bote since January. I
have tried for work ot any kind, but
tt to always the same—nothing doing.
I have also e wife and four children
defending on me tore living In the
Old Country. It is a Case of Ood help
thein just now, as I know their case
must be terrible.
Hoping tbls Information will be of
use to you when writing your circular.
I remain, fraternally yours,
A WORKBR.
FOR SALE—Splendid R. C. Rhode Island Red Cockerels, $2.75 each; also R. C. Rhode Island Eggs for
hatohing, $2.75 per setting, 12 chicka
guaranteed; laying records, can't
be beat for this Western climate.
Apply Jos. Stephenson, Box 61, Coleman. 144
POR SALE—House containing ; four
rooms, clothes closet, toilet and
sink; 'price $175.00. Apply 68 iMc-
•Pherson Ave. 172
Plans and Specifications Furnished For
^  All Kinds of Work
Phone 123
Fernie, B, C.
LIGHT  TEAM  FOR  SALE,  suitable
_for_exDMB8jDurpQsesi_Apply_Ledger
-Office.        " 176
A SNAP—One acre lot, half cleared
and ploughed with five-roomed
bouse (inside unfinished), food
barn and chicken -houses for 500
-chickens. Robt Jones, West Fernie.   ..; •       i«9
POR SALE—Barred Rocks, Rhode Island Rede and Wbite Leghorn Eggs,
13 for 1.00; -eggs guaranteed.; Andrew Goodwin, Bellevue. 170
FOR- SALE CHEAP—4 roomed Plastered House on half lot. Terms to
suit purchaser. Apply J. Beveridge,
79 Lindsay Ave. Also two roomed
Plastered House on half lot. Apply
J. Beveridge, 77 Lindsay Ave.   171
Tn uru'lfy U'» ,nrkit«H,v ami allay hi* lit Church, the next thine In the aboil
itiixfiv, I '.v!nh tn inform him tlmt Hi tinn of Hundny night -picture shows.!
Im Ml, A friend from England do- m same threaten to affect the attend-1
imti'd the wit*-*, anil two-thirds of the!mice at our rollnloua edifice, ll l«l
«-ok» ot th«» <ilifSc«> have InM'ti defrayed rumored thnt the ii boll tion of checker;
tmm a fund Mibst-rllM-il to bv an Hns- iplaying, cards, (M»ol nnd other profane;
iwii Ui»Miii,iir> CMH'iHy, wohii »it,t> i tnmie* on Kiiiuliiy. vvUHoilo*", -iVIiitii-;
ninkfui a liiier.il kthi< to my own *ttt* Hog Is nlfto strlelly prohibited, while:
lMMt'1. Chnrclimiii 'n the cttmo have (time aro enniiUlerlitK the Imposltlott'
voluntarily and gratuitoucly nsHlHtediof « iiennlty for unduly long hair and
In imttltiR tin the hullilltJK, ami when i the utisliaven." j
an effort will he mtide to pay off the!    ll»'for«' rniklnif any comment* upon
•Iffleit, jirtt-a'itlotis »ui in  '.aki-n '.rat'Mr.  lV.ttk!.n«-.ton«?»' letter,  no woitH ,
ytmr rornniKinditit  W  m»1Ii•Itcd  ami  llko to correct a «erloti» error In the;
roWbed of hi* mite,   I riml! ln> j»leatw»d correspondentV paragraph.   He sttate»
to witl lilm a free copy of our Moral    for   the*, most    part    being   rained;
<*oile. no that hi- may learn it* ninth  mnoiiitst  the  workers,"    Our correc-
<(tntuiiiiiilm«»nt, .iUni in "tli«> wh<»le of which wa* f»ro-,
In   ci-frrcn: i- to the cIii.*!*iik of iln-' ■!-wt tl hi   i-vploHIng the worker.*."      ;
.Huni|i»>   |iU«utv   wIiowm.   I   not)   a'uti*.      It Im ikm our intenlioit lo "Uenpatter
tl>at I hrne tind tm imml In "»<■ iiuiHiit.  tit*- t'Vmreh with mini." anil we nn* nl
*t*htf..iv', I *•, ,)'-'\]*. n\i'*lvu\ th* I'-titi*        l ■•-     ••■■   nn'li-r-t'ttid   tli<*   ri-v-f-M-iifl '
Xo minimer wlMiex to (omiwl folk to  sent *hen li<' claims that the tliilcrv-iit
no to -t'itun h   but *!ncer|ry |« a com-  i-'-irr*r-»jM»u«tu*»t! "Han twarwl to fanciful ■
fit   .. .4.S.S. , ..     ,.•   . ■   .        .*,,<*..■      ,,      S       ,    . ..,....,'r.      ,.,      I  tl.tj,*,   if.t        \l,     &      tUttil)     9ti"   i
mnt,i   r'ah*    *:,   pnfrirr-e,   «tatn»#i   tair   ", *n\**" »n i',i utnie '
win n   An   iiifi.iiiji an ,r   iin;i. iii.
Mr   VV.tikihF-.lotit.**. uur aii>
morals of the young and InpfMNrtOB* ''*!"r   Churchmen,   me.l   hn.\p   tli
.ti!.
'If
Any
.rl.it! ...
!i';n*- •-.:.' .(iiTirf ;fi-r
nf ill- Hatieiu iry are
•more rnnd'i- *•* in ln,<*,ll"'-!iiat ui"*
tttiij.A   jiriMssi--"*   thmi   Htiwlaj   imlnt-
--"i:h'e-.t f<-ar *!i-»' "i* i'-sTi- <n 'i<>-
",i>',. IiIm effortt* nr that it Ir* ii"ff«-
• ir* in 'I-i «i t« |iroi«< on*- crtc*cti.
fiuft*.     We  ill,  (mt   care  •higher "»
*e«ce In «ftril#. |mw»I   tlio «ther "uri*- friend" from KttRlanil or fblns rtnnat-'
i.U-lf      ttlH,: » A Utttt'     iltitiHtl.llliit        ***■ <*i    '.>,*•   till*-,   »!,*»■ l-lt-l   «l»    HI-   iiit*'    'Hilt-*
• *•  ...      .1 •*.,*•..,.    * f   ,-        ,   ■•
f am Mire ii  '.wniM n»"n.' 1*«•• li ittt, r f>t*t* t-avo tifpn ilffri'-'il *nm  a fund ;
*rii?K and -cdifylns to myself and all t»u^-*cr'--»#d to bv an Knullsh Mission-.
*.,'/.*   ;    . ■{  ■"     "-.ly   1"..'.y,.J    A.    ,,-)■     ..,; --*    ^'■■if'.'j.   *jr-]l1   'li c   '«;**J|   50   ttltOMO .
resiiond-ent »|»eiit a few of hl» l-elsure Mr   VVMlrlwKlcnei",   w'theat   anv   ne-'
motrmi'*   in  f'enrinp: tin-   nrnotim   of *■*   'K*nry  ve-Hionltf,  that the Vtiorm
.      *        ......      *l     *        .'     f*ii.     'I.:,*,*     'I.      4       li.^t'-i. 'f .      -      Vi.,*     **   *'      **-'"',• *  '    >*     'l*i I.
an* ore «»r*i>lt-nf t*hc*fi »)»ril Jlme-*. and l»»tll-* tAr itiinli. vf-» t»lr«i  cnit  >-,*
tha* tii" n*'ilf of lit* cn«in!ri  tw jihH- "h« hi '** of the worker*, whether thst
i>tin!   -'m-i.t&M-ounlv   wi'b  the   total worker in* in  lllllcrest.   Kneland   or
ni-*-i\,i<* of tite t'liurch and il»e e**vt of Hong   Kong      Hiirely   the   reverend
ihi* iuik*'t l> nt Mie «|iy *r|i«K»l d'lr;!** "**t,' Wno*. lha! th*. Clmrch |iro,lu<e«
•it,- n'tttt*  jwriod     iwirlni!   1*113  I  tw- le  the mh-VM- «,'  •••aiiit nothtef   anil
ff',tt-<l !»*-*«» than t"*t* tot »tl|»end froro t»'» attempt to *how ihst the worker
!,*.,,,,if.   "|   li'il,-rt f    *"*  f   fin   ttf**  ht* dt»l wot ran'rlli'i'* !« tbt, mm*  fwntrtte '
.*i,iii,..J  «!   !J,-idiiii   Mm-  liui'.!.worked uauavtine th.i' u imin i-dncat-j-.J. n* *:.-
•i»tn»r.    I'Tt'-wbitit and   vlnttln*  at  a prwoinie J»e i». rv»r w*m»*>
"Xo minister wishes to compel folk
to go to Church, but sincerity ls a
commendable virtue." We do not
wish to handle Mr. Watk-lnsJoues too
harshly, and we u*ree "sincerity is a
commendable virtue," but there is
scarcely a single Individual member
of Um Anglican clergy today who can
afford to bo sincere—he dare not,
Hick in the Kngland be speaks of, he
will bear tlie Anglican ministers (and
any other ministers for that matter*
applaud and preach militarism and
endorse the "big navy policy to protect, the Ilritlsh Isles nsnlnsf the tier
man hordes that one day threaten (?)
to overrun Great Ilrlialtr—the same
■Herman nation who produced that
Kreat apomle of AnullcanUm, Martin
Luther. Today. Mr. Watkins-.lones
nnd his friend* are ho scared of thene
tteopie who lifted th»m from the
fhralldom and ennlavlntr bond* ot Ho-
mtiiitttm, that they are willing to bur
i!"ii Ilritlsh taxpayers every year In
order to maintain an overwhelming
horde of armed letaJUed assassins
and would encourage every able
belled man to commit the vllewt of all',
* rim*.* murder. And, mark >ou, thei
■t'hureli, which the reverend Kent [
claims lo he the cimtodian'of morals,
will endow the mllltla and atteiiipt i
to JMis'lfy same by prav'.nv for the
triumph of British arms! Sincerity!
.Muruii.!
Heml un n fn »• cony of yonr moral
code, Mr. WatVlns-JnTvt *, «ad we will
review it for you, Show us bow th*
worker,   who   !*   fwMUh   enmich   to
.-,»,'.-.,5 his -Rjin.*-. tiiu ,* imt, in nny,
wtnm than thn worker who Is tdotfe
cmuit^h to Ih  iiulu-4 by » brithi unl-,
form an I tin* fri,-in ry *«f thi?" ni'fltla ,
into jtln'ne n hats I of legalised miir
dererg.   hH w «eo it your moral cmle
coin tains   any   charge*   agninwt    the
tnm   *hii>  i-mt>io)er. whether  nm
luvi*  coernro  enmiah   to attark  ihe
»n»iii|»iii«i» mtur mutator, anni tur-,
Coleman, Alta.. April 13, 1914.
Bditor, District Ledger.
Slr.—la the chief of police of Coleman trying to augment the police
funds lu antidilution of another advance In salary, or Is he trying to
make himself a by-word from ono end
of llie l'a«» to Hie other? Hy his actions ct late be Is certainly playing
the autocrat with an Iron hand. I
think a   chartre  In   this clenartmtent
. would be beneficial to the Inhabitants
] in gene-mi and visitors In particular,
before tite Bulletin's sohem* of excursions for Coleman comes to paai
or more accommodation made In the
jsaol. us it Is a certainty half the ex-
cur^.on.i-**-,  would   iret   lodged  there,
'Councillors cf Coleman please not.
I    Yours In anticipation.
KYB WITXHtlH.
TENDERS
Sealed tenders are called for kalso-
mlnlng the Knights of Pythias* Hall,
Pernie, B. C, Not necessarily lowest
or any tender accepted. For further
particulars and Inspection of the premises see John Carailchael. Tenders
received up to April 25th, 1014.     189
F.GGS FOR HATCHINQ
Barred Plymouth Reek and
S. C. Whit* Leghorns, *U6 per
16  eggs. • White   Wyandettss,
$1.76 per IS eggs.
ED. C, SMITH, Wardner, B. C.
GRAND
Theat re
CURSE < * GOLDEN LAND
IN TWO PARTS
This story shows how n man may forget his own family In his thirst
for gold
THE ACID TEST
♦
How science helped along the course of true love
OXYGEN ALONG THE PAVAS RIVER
IN RORNEO V6fy Instructive
SOMNAMBULIST
CIRCUMSTANTIAL HERO ' - •
■w*>.  . Comedies
The management has secured Prof. Zaccaro to
entertain the audience with Saxaphone selections. ',,..   '  ■- '   • ■'  ■„.    ,
ALLEN PLAYERS ON MONDAY 20th
Tickets on sale at Theatre Box Office every
day from JO to J2 a.m., and from 2 to 6 p.m.
ClassifledAds.- Cent a Word
j AN'OONAS 8. C.   KOOS  FOIt  SALE
from high class heavy laying stock
i    (Khfppard's strjtini;  *i>o tier sit-
;    Mnn; fertility guaranteed,   N, Ken-
uwly, IT! Howland Avenue, Fernie,
184
IIOtWtiHOLD   ItOtlUS   FOIt   BALK
cheap, including new bal»5f earring*.
too Howliind Avenue. m
WANTBD BY YOONO PBH80N-
KmjdoymMit by day or as maid.
Ai-^v   Mr*.   A.   Tb(?m*«,   ttfytutit*
....   P. i.i,,- \« h"al.
J.  LYNE
Carpenter, Furniture  Repairer,
Etc   Saws Sharpened.
Prices Moderate.
139 McPerwn Ave. Femle. E C
TENDERS
Tenders are invited for parmlsston
to sell refreshments In the City Park
on tMny 1st. Successful tenderer will
have exclusive right to tell refreshments, excepting alcoholic beverages-1
Ui.1)' uao -tiiii-U-ur miV, 1h> in-ti^lcl.      i
All tenders must be in by April 16th j
and should he marked with the word
"Tender." and addressed to T. Uphill,
Secretary. Gladstone Local 182
Regal White Wyandottss
Dorcas (241 egg) strain
Pen 1.—Headed by n son of
a 234 egg hen.
Pen 2.—Headwl by a grand-
son of a pen which averaged
no eggs per hen for Ute year.
A few settings to spare from
Hi-ran  imia.    «J,w  l»«r  »»iUiiti
of 15 egws.
Wm- ANTROBUS
Coleman    -   Alberta
WANTBD—500 men to hsve their
n>««sure uken for made-UMirdor
mitts from lli.w* up.   Hats supplied
In nil  rotors  to  iihtIiIi  milin,  miy
siyle.   Parsfiorium Tailors, ovrr Mc-
IIM''
1313    L KjLMUJSm* A JRbJE#
WmrnWu Bmelusiv* PIetur« Thaatrs
BEST
ALWAYS
»r,»* i*>n ftni,»  mt-if* i(i,i>i »<**.,i»M...i( im
il.*
<r *m<!( it ntnufrut.iDt, ■•■.KfttiMU * nc  * '11111,
1  ji,,,,
.i,», r.mto^ik  *t\*
■*.* 1 '.1* r*ti itraul
• o S'i •■«!! •M-H-i.-l -ind fnritwr e'etra
1
, 1 ,-
-u   i ,..■
•      I •      1 •     ;
•i,     ,   ,,      ..,.„»
■"   1   ,   i.l     (*<*Ul*H
■ ' ' ,rt I t\    It ., ,,    - |\r
Wfil ,V!( »    ' <•    PO'
'   ,    ' **, .'
*.,)9,.,l       ,1       ..        .*^t^
'    . 1    11 •,'-•,•■■'-■»
from 'h<- rfcanr** «if ernf! ««m!«-mtrtn-
'iiifcly   ,,.• 'luiSi'* •')
(  :,.«   j  .(   ,|,-,!,*i,k* of ,.t»t««rlita   Ui'o
%m (nnriv'Tiy wl«h mm id ymir <*<ir
Iffi'itli-'t S'   '■    'ut !■" 1'    mil    wi-t:'      Ji'
Hn*.   h»r»   I    »-**'•'   »<,   v»<a*   thl*   MlW:'
(pM*<!)('  UH"X'.Tt*f 'fnr-rnritrlr-»  -m^-lin  ■"     t*  ■ *
tswflMMtlty end mwliclfta*!* *« bmoido  • >t,-\,<*,\      if h»- l« tr**-.* *,r mt*r.*\
fb*" SifiioniTjt t'- -    ■!(
Tr-ttwflws i«« «ll! find room tt*' ihl«
retmtttktm
I stb*. >Mir» f-&l*)bfnlH.
f»  J   WATKIN<M(*»\'Ktl.
Ret tor ot AwtH-sau -('httrcb. C'ol-»awu.
1'* •*     ''.,    I'.: cl *'i    mI '      ■   -    H1
'm   !■«•    tr-.f* ■"   t*.,*   I***"*.'ft   '••     ->*,t*   r
•   '".'   »:*  nrrtl ITJ'   \lT'9iltlt •■(!»*,   »:,«!
'*!.»- *h** On wli  *■•.-'.'•■• ' • *  -i''if '.-
%k" tranna fmm bftart,'!   1,9 <iv>n>
!>i»-i Iif ili'ult tlj" {tin •» i!j»;  ,a;;«. r;
«c*me trom1!
inlf«i Hiiv 1«« tirohiWtlng r1*w«- from
re*-*l»»n«   contribution*   from   hotel
jt^(wf, ,;•,•. th.n*- tt-iuwrt h'l ",.,■ 1'A
thirst and vilest of traffics civilisation
hss ever known. fllnc*rtty! Ywt -know
•in-   *tu»  TT-if.-eMn*  nf  -I*
It U not our tonrapoodtm who
*bwi'tl tinnr* the amount of tnnb
spent at a hotel bar. bnt tbme inter-
f *t«»d in the dividends ot the brewery.
N'o   doubt   Uie   reverend   n*ot   ts'
swsre of th* atlitnde adopted lo th*
ItlmboTMi In fhe Hon** of Itttnta mm*
■ ' ■■i--ii\*. tvo yt-ars «««,  *b<n  ".ti- l:itij
mr William llarrwrt lalmdwrecl bl*
.       .,   ^..,t,t  l*i'A.     Tu^l al.*.l,iiu^ lit i,,*,,
tUui.Hid todex, ultltomii aumi mw>
tti to hide same nn4#r th«» gul#e ot
't'br-i^.la-ii ti»w*r';t|" *ii4 "(■-(■irutii.nS.k'i
t > mr!/«>" FtniU>. If >'iu ooacli *
and vl«H n ettttUm etgbt mlW from
^fA^-jBJir-f**. **f ■t'i.t*b"**t'*t: i". -.'nn-iiil
reiit*a, mv d»r irir noo i>rr-«ln**#* ttoth-
•"T «"> fsr na f**riti*r *at"****i it roe*
ftiit-l. but yom Witwir*- f**r vour «-t,-n
' t nci-t.- ih* *t"itHS> x\vn\ *\>t* .\i.rk
• - ;-«i!a^', atwt if >*ua <io ao* em
?; ■*. Mr W'aifclt-rtooi**. jwi *;h tr**»»f,
».- do»« em -wet- Thl-% »■»>■ s^m
H»*«h. *!«* H bi s*m*rt!»elf't** »l»«^ti«t*>-
t, rrn« soar fliwrch, jour ellwand.
are sll gottsn from tb* worhfr,
prRXITfRR  Vtm   RAI.K—•  Aonbl*
beds, I cbild's crib, I *it*ntton ta-
Mf. tW.* tm-tv Uf mnt, . tkldelrtfli
t,i»>, ran**, binter. 1 wicker rock-
(n« chair,   I   Im'iyli blah  cb«lr, t
i*,ttf9    *t,(**r-ii,m    >*.*»,sl>(      *    *a*rtna
room chairs. 2 tmeben cbslm. 1 combination drt«a*r and wasbatand. linoleum for 3 rooms. Iftrary of l?nl-
v*r«al History (written by Israel
Kinliit «'Uln»*>. Htferware Lilirnry of
Comim-rrlaS l«aw I* mis. I. C St.
Refeiwttf* Library nt Cntwm and
Trntr-mfrt, romrd*** wftb Ifistmc-
I,,;, (aj,»*r» and drawlag pletm;
t*ir mm'a bleb tlbbnt toots,. «w-
t<-,.l,».   *,i,ii,>*   tr.,(ni», tl,•*»«,. k(.l»nt.
ktrka, etc, AM td ihe *t»v« urttcJes
will b* uA-t at half regslar prtce,
ti+iy.h'tt.i Istfitin itrattliiMy w«
,.:.(! ia ftr«. *\»a* «»dttl<vn. Apply
at IS* Pclfatt Ave. !*•
Au A   '.WAV.   Tw   Cuaklua    Vuv-i-
Apply ,'.:**i Vs-ftocta Ave., Vend*. It
r 1ST
PtHMGREE AIRKDVLEft-l  bsv»  S
r, *- i:... tborassi^rsd pedigret
Atmdaie 1*npa a«l grown lto« for
mh 1 writ* At we. W. P»n»«IL P.
O. rondo, Vt. €. Hi
SPECIAL   FRIDAY
CRICKS   ANO   MARTIN   PlATURt
On Land and Sea
2 REELS—PROOUCED IN ENOLAND
■^«**-N*-*^V>*^*-******^*W-»»l>***'*V*'»»>*^*V--^^
SFSCXAX. SATURDAY***Matlncc aad Evealti^
*, nirlWi," ■■"-.- t* :n, <i*-M*Mfin In h\i*h iy},hyXi-   1V,i<  i-.i.'i  Wu- Wit   i,T iVif  l-.V-vt,*. 1 uv  „i,rt   An   'Mt*
who sfol* fhe formnlse
RED POWDER
,1 r**lm    H*e ih* complete dftnolltlon nf n »««(mf> bnlldlng by high enploslves, nome great mob sew**,
fir* apt'iriiuk  tbe situation of the arch idotter and bis Innocent wife and child suspended from s derrick above a frantic mob clamerlng for (h*lr lire*,
A WHIRLWIND OP SENSATIONALISM
SPECIAL MONDAY
A Stolen Identity
;   Wit* knmie Awgust—2 reels    \
SPECIAL TUESDAY
the Cliffs
i-Rsel tstair
-^WW*-M^W^WWWi»MWWWWWWWWWWMM>»
SPECIAL WtONESOAV
Mlr»ele Mary
t-Reel Vleter
.
tb«.»r
Kit,".;
Extra Special for Thursday, April S3
X^l l&rV^JLJLCL
The Everlastina Success       6 REELS
,Svi)*rl*ia> gr*al»»*t pl*y by Augustus Tliatnas. Produced utw!*r ^i*r««nttl I'twHtlon of v'h* *u-
i a atefcty c«st of MeirafpoUtM Favorites ai»4 orlslaal Ariaotw player* IstMiag €|ril
• orifrfMil It***, t«*M*i*r *hh m rsst *my wt Cooboy* C«<*Iowj*« awl smlfBe Wemtm ■ ,  -v1 ■ 'uo K'l-   ,-'   '-• '   '    -s •**■.,       ,■ r ■ •> . *-• j  *•»        -t
rsw s»'nimn*i|imi»*>nii*«^ «.
»*Mk «UMUX=M*)M»«Hmtl
l«w4Sn*lt*M*U
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, PERNIE, B. 0., APRIL 18, 1914.
PAGE FIVE
News  of The  District Camps
-<In
I.-*. /
-* BELLEVUE NOTES
Dr, McKenzie, who has been absent
trom cnmp for a time, returned again
■this woek.
IMr. Edward Cole, one of the Junior
football boys, -met with an accident
in a practice game, which has laid bim
■np aver since.
A -minifer named .Martin Lascosky.
■wm hurt wbile following Ms occupation in th© pillars at No. 2 mine this
week. He is recovering rapidly, at his
borne.
Vice President Graham was in camp
tills <week on business.
Mr. and .Mrs. C. W. Johnston, this
week received a 'fine young daughter.
Mothor and baby doing well.
A crowd of tho young people took
tn the -basket social at Frank Wednesday n-lght.
The game of football here on Friday resulted in a win for the scrubs.
(Mr. and Mrs. John R. McDonald
•were visiting ln camp Sunday.
•Mr* and iMrs. <Dlek Randall have re-
it-urned to -camp and Dick has now
taken over the pool room lately run
by Bill Walsh. Bill Intends going
Nortb.
Miss Maggie Burrows was in camp
over Sunday visiting her parents.
The Italian people of tbe camp held
a dance te the Workers' Hail on Saturday night. A large crowd was in
attendance and everyone had a*, good
time. v
Dont forget Ihe basket social and
dance In aid of the football team.
Tbe mines in this -burg have Ibeen
Idle three days, Friday, Saturday and
Mond&y.
The Lyric Theatre ran a special
•cowlboy film on Easter Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Glendlnning iwere
up from Coleman on Sunday, the
-guests of IMr. and Mrs. Robert Evans.
A christening ceremony on Sunday
among the foreigners was the occasion of a general mix-up, booze galore
being much ln evidence. The police
cells were all occupied over night as
a r«teult.
A large crowd attended the 'hard
times basket social In the Church on
Monday night The affair was a success from every standpoint.
♦ PASSBURG AND VICINITY
♦ By Observer
to the *fa«t tbat the party in question
is not under the controlling influence
of a mother. However, this should
not prevent her behaving when -in the
company of others.
As a imemiber of the United Mine
Workers of America, with no authority
xo inforan the readers of tlie,Ledger
-what the policy of our organization is
in District 18, hut the policy of this
•institution ini other districts is firstly,
to observe and fulfil their obligation
and all of us should have pledged' our
honor in that respect. Therefore it
would ibe unnecessary to explain the
policy of any collective body what to
do in case a member was dying of
starvation, without -fear of contradiction, there are hundreds of thousands
of dollars given out for relief purposes every year either from the international, District or Sub-district. At
no time except in District 18, who
adopted such a system of relieving the
distress by appealing individually to
their fellow men. Therefore we have
no system, because ,wo have not endeavored' to create anything along
these lines. Some of us may differ
on this point but personally I fall to
see anything that is advantageous to
our membership.
The inception of the District Ledger
plant was going to be our defence
fund. Unfortunately it proved a failure. Next caime the medium of education, and glancing over the last Issue
I have come to the conclusion that as
far as being educated through the columns <xt our paper Is concerned;, a person Is under a delusion to think of it
[Had the correspondent ibeen a little more specific in his criticism we
might have been able to reply or
amend, but are unable to understand
just what It is be takes exception to
—Ed.]
Mra. John Stevenson and Miss Margaret arrived' back on Saturday trom
Scotland1, where she had been on a
visit to her parents.
The damee held in Miners' Hall
Easter Monday, under the auspices of
the band, was a success * in; every
sense of the word, as we learn that
there will be a surplus of $50.00 to
place to the band fund. There were
refreshments in abundance, which
were liberally served • between each
and every dance, which was kept up
till 2 a. an. The music was supplied
iby Charles Peacock's orchestra, which
consisted of piano, violin and corpfet.
HILLCREST NOTES
-:—Gssid^oBS-pr^a^as-ia-thls-^eUon.
of the country are so bad that It is getting monotonous to have to record
same. BunniB. closed down at the beginning ot this year with prospects
of reopening very poor. As a result
-between eighty and one hundred men
-were thrown out of eraptoyment. Of
tbls number, twenty were married,
and there are thirty-one children to
keep. Raselburg closed down on January 2l«t of tbls year. It Is rumored
that tbs mines will reopen on the 16th
of tbls month. Tbls has relieved about
one hundred and fifty, men of employ*
ment. Seventeen were married, and
there axe twenty-eight children. -Maple
Leaf is working one or two days a
week, snd -giving employment to eight
miners snd one driver. Previously
there wore employed sixty to eighty
miners.
Tke amount of relief given to members of Passburg and Burmis Locsl
averages about 15.00 eaeb man since
tbe mines dosed down; $2.00 each
for the women and $1.00 for tbe children. We cannot possibly issue any
more because there is not one cent left
to srt?e,
We sometimes wonder whether the
miners in the striking zones are not
living much better than we ln District
is. Five dollars worth of the necessities of life given for a period covering
lour months doe* not permit of Intern-
iwrance or overfeeding.
Acknowledgement
l>a«sburg, Alta., March 110th. 1*914.
A. J. Carter, B»q„
Fernie, B. C.
Dear Sir and Bro.,-—Your communication dated the 2t»th instant, In which
was encloses! a cheque made out to T.
u. Harries for the sum of fifty dollars
<$r,o.00). for relief purposes, is here-l
with acknowledged, j
Fraternally yours, i
T. (I.  HARROW. Seerwary, i
We learn that Mr. James Fiiidluy,!
general manager of Maple Leaf, has!
tendered Jils resignation, which takes
•effect on the l&th of thl* month
Mrs. J, 11. Duncan and family returned from Ktko. ll. ('.. on Sunday i
evening, after a tmutlon of two weeks,
A da»,«* wan held In Uie Slovak Hall
on Bat onlay night, under the stiaitiett*
of the Passburg Dancing Committee.
A ptfaaant evening was spent. Mr. (I.
. The mines worked steady four days
last week, and If Dame Rumor is correct wo shall be employed for six days
hereafter. On the strength of the
above, a number of old timers drifted
back, (but so far have been unable to
secure work, therefore it is good advice, if you are away, to stay away at
•present
The bird with the elongated legs
was around here last week, and left a
fine specimen of the masculine gender
at Mr. and Mrs. D. Brisco's residence.
He extended his stay,' and delivered
one of the female specie to Mr. and
Mrs. Matheson, -Mothers and babies
doing iln©.   *'*" r^'JT'*..*
T.hA   inral .atoftthftf   <>1<*a-Bei-B   nf_ahlsi
camp journeyed to Coleman last Saturday, And played a friendly match.
According to reports there were periods during the game when relations
•were a little strained, and the referee
received hia quota" of criticism, expressed sometimes rather forcibly.
Some of the iboys being of the opinion
that the town of Coleman, and especially! the Justice department thereof,
required little assistance, donated
alx plunks each, (Audi Alteram—hear
the other side.)
Brother FUeher wishes to convey,
through,.the Ledger, bis thanks to
tboee who So generously helped by
their attendance and contributions at
the recent benefit football match."
The Local I'nlon here has erected a
drop curtain in their bill. This has
■been painted witli a scene—Boston
Lights—end is very effeettve. We are
acquiring some of the capitalistic
tastes here.
•Brother Tipper was successfully operated on last week. We hope to Bee
him around again soon.
The Local Union has decided to
hold their meetings every alternate
Sunday during the vimmer months.
Ail brothers are asked to assist our
Kucretary in gathering Information so
•that a true statement of condition**
prevailing here may be placed before
our fellow workers in Great Hritaiii
ainl other countries.
Soolalltit meetings will be held every
Sunday night In the Union Hall at 7..I0
p. m., to which we Invite all rebel* ami
opiKi^ition.
P, Hacked had the misfortune to get
his arm broken by it fall of coal In N'o,
2 mine on Wednesday last. Dr. Rosx
attended to his injuries and he is tiro
Keeping favorably.
LITH8RIDOI NOTES
♦ BEAVER MINES NOTES       ♦
♦ ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
There ls very little fresh taking
place here at present, as things are
about as quiet as they could very well
be, The mine was Idle the whole of
last week and will apparently do ditto
this.
On the 8th Inst., we received a
cheque value $37.50 from the Carbondale Local, per John Mitchell, secretary, and on the 9th inst a cheque
from Fernie Local value $50.00, per
iTom Uphill. Needless to say, both
cheques .were welcome visitors to the
camp, as they enabled our Distress
Committee to deal more generously
with urgent case*
A .meeting in connection with tihe
doling out of relief was held on Thursday, 9th inst., when provision tickets
to the value of $45.00, were given to
men with families. Needy cases have
been assisted for the- past three
weeks, and it has been ° decided to
meet weekly for the purpose of continuing to dole out assistance, so long
as we are In a position to do so.
In conformity with instruction re*-
ceived from the education authorities,
a meeting, of thp committee and officials of the new Beaver Mines School
District was held in the early part of
last week, -when it wes agreed to post
public notices calling a public meeting
of resident ratepayers to be held at
Beaver Mines on the 24th Inst, at l
o'clock p, <m„ to decide whether the
proposed school district shall be formed and to elect three trustees. The
poll for the election of trustees shall
remain open for one hour, and we
hope to see all who are interested, in
the new school district present to give
the undertaking their blessing. Should
the school district be formed and the
three trustees elected, the new school
will be opened in a week or thereabouts.
MICHEL NOTES
Litbor rnnditi-Mi-* remain unaltered j
both nt tbe mines sud outside Isbor
In the eity, the nines only hsvlng
two days for the week. Tniiy tbls
eity at prt-s«»t it choke fall of economists, as lor instance, take tbe proposition for Arbor Day as report-fid In
the Herald: "Wanted. 4.00« men of
all creeds and professions to give on*
day's work to the city on Henderson
ism? "!.,",M Hm mton "*!*>*• a ^;^b hiTSS
plying Ihe munic.
Th* Otxu rv< r desires to give a little
advice to «eme ot the young people
wbo wer* In attendance at the above
riant*. It a certain young lady cannot
e-**M*f1 h?r*elf pray-fr!;.', b*r shewe
would be |->r*f*rflh?e t« her preaewre
on future «:<a*lom. We are (netlne-d
to temper onr criticism, having regard
<o*t tli« ratepayers many tbouaand*
of <',i»U»n» and unlet"* iMtmeased of nn
tttto eneta none; lo get tber*. | d«n*i
know how tbe Herald's proposition
will appeal to th«» majority of working)
atta   u',.<, _\   ,'„,,  ,,itt*,i,  «..«,«•  Urn-*ai
■urwblnc In »b»lr *«<-h«|iier and as Jit- J
ia thtlr riiplKMrd.   No doubt ■»*>
th
LYRIC
THEATRE
Setievuc
Ail*.
Motion Pictures and
Vaudeville
DONT PAIL TO ttt
A  *>■*►*-»••*» Ksssnay Wetter*
Cvwtedy
'Alkali Ike's Gal'
MONDAY WIGHT
—HUB
LYRIC THEM CO.
I all realise it scald be Hi" «»->payer*
j who would have to pny for the lm-
iwi-vem-ents. ir *wh mu upccssary. at
I tbe perk. Two months uno there was
i*-fo*mt tk\t%i lemllftM t» a **>ry an-
(enviable position. WHv not tun the
l ,9,4ti*» m *,«r*e latuai** to «om tm
'At<- V.V :' Av. u i,'uly i . *\„ *\i1, i,f
I wages, and let thi»tn retain thnt Ind*
j pendent spirit of manhood with which
'mslwif emdw-td tbtm.    W« *»*■ *<'•
oaalnted with one partlcnlar en** ed
an Knglldbmsn wbo "truck l^>thbrl<'g*-
tin   TnTmtim   art*   *trf*h   t>l«    ,«>r,.    .*,,,»
seven eWldreti, and during that time'
lie kss picked op fJS.ee at odd Jobs
•nd ts worn thin banting any I bins in
tbs shape of work nltkt, noon and
tooruiujf.   Tbe f-vcMii** of nock men,
lean be better la»fin#4 ihsn 4mrffb»I
,*d.   I bop* tbat If say Uborlas men
I do turn «f» thet. day st the rmrk, tt win
I bc to t'.xprca* their ti-fUuu*
I    PooMmiII and Its danters to tbe ivov-
..t.i    J, ...*   .-»:u.....»ll*.n,» ttl  A ,!,*«.»  k'atk
>-Un mmk, skes in a itmrtk* «umi
I there **r* no hum than fn«r aetlAewa :,
IIXAvk ftwi-ili IwJ bin inti urui bnditm •
above tli* fttxvw. lv fltoraet* ked kte,
ahmtdt* pun tmt.:  M   l^ngsn had Ws|
; iisiM*- btMtt-lit'tt ttim-t, *»fl X Vtwn bn-t ■
I bis kairw mta-mhrd.   Ther art* alt mttra-'
I' tew %h*trr tetania* end wilt he tot tmm*'
time. (
Mr. ,lnm«« »t«>*art. wife and fsmlly.,
. l*t# of lUasw-MSwn. rtcottoad. ani rent •
| Is ik* *tty on natmdej sMtrotat snd i
ikavv talwn a h*ms* at llatdf#tfBt' mith f
{ths witfMNrtsttiws of iMthic owb at
iSn. I ffiise.
A baseball match between Michel
and Natal took place Good- Friday,
which resulted in even scores.
The football chasers are setting
down to practice. The match on Good
Friday with the Possibles versus Probables was interesting, each side striving hard to obtain honors. Eventually
the defence broke the Probables' forward Hne and won 3 goals to none.
Mr. iMel Taylor, Franola Newman
and Miss D. Newman were visitors at
Corbin on Monday to provide the music tor the dance which took place in
the hall.
On Thursday next, April 16th, the
Fraternal Order of Eagles are holding
their annual dance and supper, also
•presentation to James Mercer for his
services as Worthy President for the
year 1913. A large number of invitations are sent out by the members
and a ffood few members ln different
parts of the district are expected.
Mr. and Airs, Owen, manager P.
Bums, Natal, were visitors to Corbin
Monday last to take ln the dance and
renewing acquaintances.
The coal company officials are busy
these days UliljiK samples of coal
from various senros, Clean coal Is the
object. Some of the seams show Indications of becoming cleaner.
An accident occurred to Ang-elo Cas-
sino, an Italian working In new No.
:i mine, on Tuesday last, by, coal fall-
Ins: from the face onto his lc*. We
are pleased to announce his Injuries
are not of a serloun nature nnd that
no lionci are broken, He was iak-t-n
to the hoitpltftl and received attention.
The Waster Hunday services were
well attended nl the Roman Catholic
nnd Methodist Churches, a few of the
ladle* and wntl»'m*,n showln* thHr
in.it-.itnl iHit-iiiM to soed effect on Hun-
dji.v fveiilns «t the Methodist Church
•uul were grwitlv appreciated by tho
n-HBrftKiitlon.
Michel Local Union Notts
Ttic rr-aular m«*etlns was held on
Sunday last at 2 p m.. Uro. Uldwr.l
,l«n«»* In thn chair. .Minute* of previous meeting **rf> adopted a* read,
The Irfjc.il secretory mid a letter from
T. I'ltlilll concerning the sports at FVr.
i»!« on .May I at, but no action wa*
taken Probably tbt' small atleiiduiice
at the meHlnir was the cause,
tiek Committee Report
T*>'- ta-t* ex*-* ths* wi-r-p !<-ft fur In-
i«>stl«8!lon were dealt with. The report proved th»»m »o be newly case*.
tiit-i-tuui* ;bv 1*^41 I'tiiun ilo*tiat»Hi
♦b«»m *;*<»« «-!»ch
'The sf»<*^<»t>',» ***** f*1**! '.*'•** by the
sfcrpiary mv* accepted, tin* ttlvvnnr*
was the |oftt!i>*i: nf the lockers !n the
w»^h Uu!!*-'!'. Mr, IlUKsel, KUpi'i'Iiit-nwl-
ettf, pr-imtslnt fo tnnke some pro> lulon
to witeictard the wash bouse. Men
holdm* lockers should see that tk«v
naif ■»<-.»».    utf *uuiier»i«ti(i nan* a
I •    '       I H    *       . *,*,.* i. .,.!,,,-,
tbem nnloekwl.
Tb#r» Is the :tl*y Ikiy crbd-iratlon at
P-nrai!*' thnt -um'U,-<> m nmSi tut^iim to
decide wbst they Intend to do concern.
In* It nnd -not hav* « bwirh kicking
If      ••»,,.      *l,.t»lft,    *,!•       <-•       it*:.--.       *   * * 1     -
members.
George 'Marley and sons have been
doing quite a bit of improving on their
property in Wigan.
Louchie McMillan paid the camp a
visit on Monday. He says work has
ibean scarce with him lately in Chinook;    "
(Mrs. Seacott paid a flying visit to
{leaver'on Saturday and returned on
Monday.
Tom O'Donnell was accommodated
■with a box car last week to move his
household effects to his new home in
St. Alberts.
(Matthew Richardson is expected
hack from the fisheries on or about
the 15th of this month. Some of the
Iboys are -looking for a faw good fish
yarns on his return.
Percy tho ipool man has taken over
th© .moving picture place and is now
making improvements on the floor,
etc., to make the place more comfortable for the picture goers next fall,
when he expects to put on good show3
and get good results.
George Benson was In camp last
week for -the packing up process. He
says he has secured1 a good Job up in
the Red Deer country and is moving
his family up there this week.
NORDEGG-BRAZEAU NOTES
Our camp can beat anything on the
map for transients; you can always
•see someone flitting.
The jobless are ill-advised in rushing in here, as there are always
enough raen on hand to fill vacancies.
We were pleased to see Carter and
Rees, of District 18, arrive in camp on
Saturday.
After going over the ground the
union officials mentioned called a
meeting for 9 a. m. Sunday morning.
It was very inspiring to see how
•promptly the top bunk house was filled for Sunday, morning's meeting just
after 9 o'clock. Dave Rees called the
boys to order and presided over the
meeting. He outlined the position of
the International organization, etc.,
and made many pointed statements
which should be carefully heeded. At
the close of his remarks a motion was
made and carried unanimously toy the
150 or so present that the camp be
organised.^ A. J. Carter then addressed the gathering, reviewing the history, of District 18 and its struggles,
etc A motion was then made and
carried to affiliate with District 18.
Officers were then selected and owing
to it being lunch time the meeting was
brought to a close.
lt_ this jorgan-ization "meeting JU
-any
1fMefR)5"of what the Local will be
like In future, we wil compare favorably if not surpass any other Locals
In the District.'"
On Sunday afternoon Carter and
Rees had a leagthy Interview with the
newly-appointed officers. iMr. Lock-
wood Wray, late of Fernie, very kindly lent them the sitting room In his
splendid canvas villa which overlooks
the top part of the camp.
Easter Sunday passed very quiet.
No special services were held apart
from the organisation meeting. However, that should prove a memorable
event.
The townslto Is growing rapidly,
but many of thefre who have-no particular love for the bunk house do not
see it growing fast enough.
We wonder who will be the first
female resident. Borne of the company officials, Including Mr. John
Shanks, superintendent , were out
fishing on Sunday and brought back a
few fine specimens of bull trout.
We have no scheduled time yet on
our trains. It's a case leaving may be
today or may be tomorrow.
♦
HOSMER NOTES
♦
Maxim ScIijIiu was given two
month**' "hard" by Judge Ilrown trying
to carve out a fellow countryman'n
eye with a J^ck knife.
Hosmer* tirxt football game of Ihe
season, married versiM single, attract-
I'd a fair crowd to tho ground* ou
Hat unlay lust, and after a hard tussle
the hem d.eu managed to win their
wny to f.itne tlocal» and victory by
the only soul s-ored. Naturally the
sy«np*'.h!e* of the spwtator* were
with the family men an t 'b-* r-owV!:-
ed with the fact that they* were ordered by their '.eivi,j to *n-t>i ii-nv,-! '*■■
in* more Hi.iti the single ntlffs could
nuccfsftfully cumbat. The following
In rocs i -•:-.,,,'".'.'i.ti the u:,;r:'!«.d imsA*
team: llrook**. Prtiett. Wardrop. Jamie-
non. -Mc-Hovem, Moore, Clark. Whittle,
Pow, Watt. Ad.imaun, ot whom War-drop st:d I'niHt at back played a good
game. We are utterly disgusted with
the slii-Ki-e tt inks, the only time ihey
got a move on being after the mntch,
when you couldn't see them for dust
hikUia Ik roc.
ll teems that ai"r all there wasn't
tt member <»' 'he Hoard of Tridc pub
lie nplrlU-4 ' ii"U«ll iit the recent s#*
IT- t    ioImUi'     '«   jmijmsve   u   jjincuil
half-bolldn) ;* week for the Mores In
llot-iiier Him-lv tln» elii**lv«< nickfl
un t Um!   sr-ciit  «»  obstacle to Hu
so take the hint, ye miners and backhands. Ths fate of Hosmer trembles
in the balance.
Professor Schofield, of Fernie, has
been instructing a few Hosmer people how to tango and hesitate.
Joe iBelak, a miner working in 14
chute 'B level, toad the misfortune to
break his arm, a piece of coal from the
roof striking same while he iwas
running a coal machine being the
cause.
A store rig had a narrow escape
from being drowned on Tuesday. The
driver wished to give his rig its annual and drove Into the creek, but lo!
and behold it vanished. Raymond
Ducharme, by gosh! came to the rescue and after various hairbreadth escapes and lots of strenuous striving
managed to recover the rig, not much
the worse for its immersion.
T'he school trustees in this place are
up against a serious proposition with
regard to finding finances to meet
current expenditures. However, they
have passed the .Minister of Education
up and taken the bull (or we might
say Ballot Box Bill) ,by the horns;
results: teachers' cheques handed
over, bills paid and everybody happy
for the time being.
Pete Marsinch, the 41 butcher, and
Harry Maundrell will have a "free for
all" making sandwiches for the fire
brigade dance. These .gentlemen being adepts at handling the beef, we
sure expect sandwiches with something in them.
At a well-attended' meeting of the
'Footfba-11 Club, Messrs. Kendall, Willey
and' Robson were appointed a committee to interview the management relative to certain matters affecting the
Club.
Mr. Robert Alderson and Miss Jean
McKenale were married recently at
Coleman and are now honeymooning
at iBamff.
The teamsters of the rival livery
barns in this burg evidently work on
the commission basis, if the struggle
for a trunk which occurred on the
depot is any criterion.
In the spring a young man's fancy
lightly turns to thoughts of love. Oh
you iB——! what a soft lilt there is to
the voice when confronted by a pair
of handsome dark eyes amongst the
peanuts and oranges. There are others!
With regard to the matter of the issuance of papers of administration,
we think red tape is carried to the
limit when a widow has to undergo
such expenditure and delay before she
can get her deceased husband's wages.
The Hosmer Industrial Society has
taken the matter of a half-holiday in
their own hands.   The butchers are to
be congratulated alsdTnjthe matter,
Of course they don't peddle Ico cream.
The Athletic Association have at
last taken a tumble and will now purchase a few billiard cues. It is a
present a case of one cue for four of
us.
Mr. Morgan, the genial host at the
Queen's, has opened up his bowling
alleys, and Is at present doing a
roarin' trade.
Mr. Doty, well known locally lor bis
skill with the mandolin, was a guest
of the manager of the Bank ot -Montreal and entertained a number of Mr.
Kendall's friends.
Mr. -Mills, the secretary of ths Board
oi Trade, interviewed tbs C. P. K. officials at Cranbrook with regard to
tho re-establlshment of the local train
service. We are given to understand
that a change will be made shortly.
A car is to be attached to tho way
freight between Cranbrook snd Fernie.
(The company ran a special train on
Tuesday night, leaving Fernie at 11
o'clock, for the convenience of Creekites who attended the show at the
Grand Theatre.
Tom Emery, n-ight timekeeper at
the mines, is off work suffering from
an attack of la grippe.
Accidents at Coal Creek
George Wood, a driver at 1 South
mine, had the misfortune to be thrown
from his horse and dragged along the
ground for a considerable distance. He
-sustained severe bruises from head to
feet.
The 6 o'clock train was held in waiting on Tuesday evening to convey a
miner by. name of Tony Rato to Ferale
hospital, suffering from a compound
fracture of the leg received from a fall
of ooal while following his employment in No. 5 mine.
George Harvey was removed to hospital for attention to liis foot. From
infonmation received we learn that
the unfortunate fellow had a rail fall
on his toe, almost severing the member. Aifter attention by Dr. Workman
he was removed to Fernie.
Arthur Slade received Injuries to
his arm on Saturday owing to the unruly conduct of one of the horses under his care.
Mrs. D. F. 'Markland was admitted
to hospital on Wednesday to undergo
treatment. We hope for a speedy recovery.
Fernie will be full of attractions for
Creekites on pay day, our foouball
team having arranged a practice game
with Fernie and our amateurs appearing at the Orpheum.   Come in crowds.
.Maurice Frogsham and family have
left camp and taken up residence in
Fernie.
George Vickers has gone .back to the
Old Country'.
Several of our well-knowns have hit
out for fields and pastures new curing this our period of prosperity (?).
Sounds of rejoicing emanated from
house 167 Coyote St., on Sunday evening, the occasion being the anniversary of the natal day of the hostess.
•The Fernie lodge of Loyal Order of
Moose are holding a smoker on 'Monday evening, 20th inst, to commence
at 7.30. Now you Coal Creek iMoose,
rally round and take the songs you
promised to sing. A good time is assured.
No more will the melodious strains
of Wrigley'a voice charm the passers
by. on the team road, for he is away
to the Bear Greek district.
HILLCREST
ORCHESTRA
-aMjMWMwaw^^j^iwiwM™ « ■■■—■« im-aaa-mammw*m**^
Open for Engagements
for
Dances
Concerts
Etc.
UP-TO-DATE MUS C
C.V. EDWARDS, SECRETARY
HILLCREST ALBERTA
Phone 74, ring 2
B. P. McEwen
Jeweller & Optician
This ls the shop where you
can leave your watch and
rest assured that it will be
repaired with expert skill.
Jewelry neatly Repaired
Eyesight tested and
glasses fitted
Coleman :: Alberta
COAL CREEK NOTES
Tlio mines were Idle from 3 p. m.
Saturday until 3 p. m. Monday; also
3 p. m. Wednesday till 3 p. m. Thursday.
Tho umtnl KnRter celrtbntlons w«>re
held In all duo pomp and ceremony by
the Slavok fraternity of the camp.
W*» ro-an-t to roport rc*kle»» driving
from the mines it* aRa!n prevalent, We
would aifaln llko to Rtate the roads
were mado for |K"5o*trlani also.
Ijicrotmo ls still liooming in the
camp undor the pood boosting «>f our
worthy llob Bctoramm. Th* committee are considering variou* ueslmis
for tho Junior**' swifter*. All Information can bi* obtained from 8yd. .1.
Ilorton. secretary.
Onr loifll amateur* aro artica-ring m
vaudovtlio m (d«f iit jHiotuu in.-.,.'.- uii
Saturday <imy <!ay>. A good pro-
t»r«innno nin*1»i»!ntr of burl-^-im's,
■character skHohos, 0,0, 5* (irr;tn«o«l
l.ook for announcr-menta.
Tho local |i"ith»-r ch*>or» lir Id a
pwtlro gam-" «*« ^'ivl^y l-» ' *em*c
good footwork bo'.nc shown. We hope
to swnre «>nu- of th<- tin-Ann* this
time, boys.
Tho return Intorclub «**«»».•< t«"*ooi»
Conl Creek and Fern!-* Ciub« took
plni'o nn Hntim'ny I act lo «!'«■ Club
room*. -Ureal excitement t<re\-»'>■*.$ tm
Tin* vnrldii* annn-s *i»r«- i'-. t>r«»i4Pi>»»
Tb<- ':»<! that 'Y-,1 Vf,.*\ •».*r< HI
ttelw* behind In the gnm-m st Ferule
jf nt  in created  enthuftsum     Th"  to!
JUST ARRIVED
A Car of B. C. Potatoes
and Apples
These are all No. 1 Stock which  have been
well kept during the winter
RMSHHMM
A. I. BLAIS
Frank, Alta.  A77u  Bellevue, Alta.
H. G. GOODEVE CO. Ltd.
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
W« will furnish your house from cellar to garret and at bottom |>r!c<s.   Call, wrl'.c,  ;>SsOi:.c ur  a.Ec    Ail  order*  K'ven
prompt attention.
If  -/(.it  mt hniialtaii, Uii vihcis.    if not satisfied, tell us.
Coleman
Alberta
kUilA  ;,*-ili«  > «>**im**i!   Unit  ll   ll*(*>
wi-elc
COALHURST NOTES
Pwwp-wH nn* i IWAf ftr!i;U'vr tu
CnnsihurM tbls last two *e*ka. tb*
min* worltlnt day about If re-nnr***
ate inie #»**rything Uwlt.* f,o«rt for *
tnir aetematta work snd s good fail
and «1at#r.
Beiutdey wss t»») dsy, and a aim-.-
tma tm* et. thar. t^itt* n numbtr of
men kept dear of lbs pay office all*.
t*.-ih*t, ah'ilti mhtrra mom fort una t**
ft»if  aenttett  mnttrtr: *i>  p.-ty   tfii;   ail!".
man with. mXt tbe mlm ked mi* worked two »*fft» in Hi* fwtwftfif. ftetter
Itwlf nml ttot*, however, a* the mltn
bas work** thro*' «blf«*
Teddy fttrlsitd-s hss bum tnklm sd
a-mtMK* td tbs tdntk Umon by pntins
an np-fodat* t**-** tf**tad fit* -,-tn,y^ 7
ty to Hawklmn.
We nhsil beau to think Alwrdontans
and Jews i>fe4.»mlrKtte amongst Ilo#-
mors un niiuh   iKijmuiiuii.
(bom iitmim pain. X, F, Kendall and
W, RdImihi were lunlced uo'tm it round
town together «ollrMing refrcitthmfnti
r-,9   •*■ ■    ti. 1 .     .,*    *   t*       it*    .   ,
place on Tue**l-«jr nest, the 2ln»
u   m   IHiline,,   \u±\,   i.mi*   ul'   l*i>  ul
l'-til-   )-iru)   ii-itiiTUUifiti    -tUiuml-li'ltt   Ulr
due to rwhe reeotnttton in the nmt
»«tare tor wrwtet-a r*nd*t*d by th»
elark «f the toxtti and tlth eomml«-
-»Ioni-r»hit» route.   Tb'n are Use fsltb-
ii*** luttle* of fnoee swJ gnartiian of
Kb*- inters* !(■»«  will b*
Harry nnd <!f«rgs evidently didn't
t*ke Irtn-vtli- io tb* emat-A ot «n»*l! boys
btstily ye»e4 ®4rte*'. Why d«tnt yen
rh ntarrJed*
HoMnrr teeiB» lo tm t very fort »tin-
***■*. .*,*,
in
,.».**    ,4 at.,:     1 *,
, -.,. .. , -,, ,
rimei*
I'ti.tl i'i-
• , k
|\r::i.
%?.,
bllHsnl**
7t«»
Ml
|m>«!
•.'",»
I (lull
rri'i'tnyi*
tf'tt
■lift t
at
A'
•hv t.t* .t '^.i.iu
to pre** reiwrta Tbls 'twrg m a writ-
•>St»- F*«''•»'ft-. ,t*ft *t\t t*n**ti»* tin'
tn'ti* h*!,'-j*>--'-* *i be *'»flt'.RSf #H ;!»ys
a stm-i.. Way on* earn ransa's
thtr.i*- ***. a 5*% bere, pr-Mf!dS»s ftm
were t*e*er kr««*»n •*» gt-rt* any *sel
rhit f,n a Iw*« In, tbt* part of the «-«t».
ir» vt il )•**>« are fortanat* f-nuMtrb to
lw mail r»*'i»?R*.v!*e>l. Hew im<% ifcit
-...-. *,'' .":':•'. i'V- .-a "A Ul.tL au I
Jvc»tt*') 1 i» i«ir»> 10 laat. ar ran not •&*•
ftriSfelv #*:ite
*)"■>,,. ,(.*;• ,«<»!»i'!ir are Imni.'^.- T'tni*
E«e« th*? ■■-.i*i>** th* prt*n-*.'ti--i- eK
tmk i%m(*mm the tool tssttaf tn*. bf
ih** mitif-r* l» raotlderaWi t*dw*d,
mi* are V.-.Xf io be f-b^tttt'.Ai-i st'/b
that. horHWe »per*r*. nermpknm**ni.
t'tt'it t'.rt'fk see thns 'be wim?■>»*?-* 'if
tbe  *tiiti»er,  whleb   wtll t»e arnni^i
!»■;•»c-r*;i,   T*., - -;■."--* «*f i** ■<■'* -
tor tb* Wgfffwt ttre-.tks at b*tM*r'» unit
Wwl   were   the   foll-nwlns:     Hlltlanf*.
Trim f!tr,* I---'    *,.•.,-■'    tt-,»  t'l"i 1*   '   « ■■•
mm. dhide.
A biwilidrtwn of th«- tan ai I itawtb
mine on Mmi;l,ny n>Wfi*s!»t eaas*<) the
roornlttg sbtf? to t»e idl<- 01a T*ir«.t,*s
Our ItM'*' rua»u:<le ,* lery bu»>
these days pre|i*ring u* *io mm*
ot th*e ptitee at the fmd><*eu4 bo-rt*r«t-
t»lf»l amow tr, ht* h«-t«t tm %er#
llwliig 10 U,e uiliiij'- ■■".-:■'" !,*!..';«
t pi**** on   Vllf   !»*,   tbrTf   ■IIS  ftftt   ha*
*,».»»    HlWl'.lt   it-'Ut   «.     V   .I**.   '**   .1'.*.*-   **.*.*.   *....*-
j4«y Arr«i<«ei»»«i».,* *:*■ \*-mh u..%,,-.
(fer Mav JJith. I*ar»es'1»'* **ter
I iut-k Vt miii Uid ii'jiii x,:,ji,, ".um, ':..'»>
i pltal tawt at*-*'' t*tui i;i.» I '•*» *•-«: s<-i.
jsrewnd again, old tmn
, Tk* *otM *!.-*>;*■ t-x-t ", •»;*• -os*•*»■*■*
Ic*'»t, IS'b teat h~->* it-t-n rr»**i»'i*>*»t
» an*t**in*rmti9ii »!!' ->»■-•* •>•-,**. reur
• «tsnh ** to «h*n th**-- ev.-n», i*k** pie**
SMIobb Gone
6(1
F. M. THOMPSON CO.
»*Th» Qufsllty Utorei'
Now is the Time That Boy
Wants a Suit
.um un-   ». Si. i HuSiv^tS I o.    t« fhf  phm*  lo
liny it.    WHY?    H-cniiHi'Mf luivf ju*f iiriivitl
100 NEW SUITS TO CHOOSE PROM
$2.75 to S8.00
Styli'fc iiihI iiuilfiiiiU l«» pltjft*  vim.     rttittc in #tit«l
Iff m \mi\i> it.
Do not fall to too our now stook of
PRINTS,   GINGHAMS,   CREPfcS,  and
FANCY COTTON RATINES
Sttli- Azi-ui** tot    \S\'U"lV.>" A    K   With* Shttt-%
IMmt inrmmt mir SfMtclnl Oroc«ry Price*
THE STOBE TRAT IA VES TOU MOHBY
Phone 25 Blairmore, Alta.
m. maaaaif'iaa**' -?"*1fT
rwyj^iwtay'arr^' ■■<■"■'"-■*- *ti--'.,\1--' •■\r'^-*^^-----~^r*^Ttr°p Iirv,,i,--y.-ri*y*.,.y1?^ny1^.;-?yn.^
■*.'-• O   t    .**■..    * \ X* -' -,       '- s      '- S        -f ^ '     J    *   * "-','-*•-     >   \'^r-' -   . ■  -XX*$**•»■ "■    ^ ■ -"^A'A'XX'Xi^^^h*     - --j*--i**'r'*>.'*o;'.;,-•».'-,
„i|inii.,f,i„,*, i,ilW,,„w,i.,|,.,n,*u ,.,'.**M^,ii*,'.|i*i"i,HHHjWIJ*ftfitlW|flf iHfiily-aiii.,,,*-."*,****,!,,
' '"i! <fl'P*n||0'''»)et'iyjt|ryej)i>iftw
SSSS^^S^^^^^Wi^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^5
rarr^
"HIS simple rule of health is daily called attention to by every doctor in the land, whose 6rst question to
the patient almost invariably is, "Are your bowels regular?" Yet there's not one person in fifty who
takes proper care of the bowels.   And the result of this foolish neglect is nine-tenths of all ill-health.
If today you are unable to free your body of waste matter at the usual time, or if the act causes straining,
pains and discomfort, don't kt that, condition occur again tomorrow. Unless your bowels can carry away the
waste materials left after food is digested, decay sets in, the poisons of which, taken up by the blood, increase
the risk of Typhoid Fever, Appendicitis, and many other serious diseases.
In treating constipation, there is a right way and a wrong way. The wrong way is to take harsh purgatives which even though they do clear the bowels, cause griping and nausea, injure the delicate tissues, and
so disturb the normal functions as to cause the return of constipation. The rigid way is to help Nature to
produce natural movement, without pain or discomfort, by using
exoMtcMea
VANCOUVER ISLAND
■fi
.i-j'fC
ii-ily*"v,*"
fr***
*-#k
'-«-■?-**'
Strikers Stand  Firm  Though  Persecuted—Victory in Sight -
?Ai ,v ■
IDS
Uphill?
More
Than
One Hundred
Million   Were
Sold Last Year
This   enormous   quantity   was
used with good results by busy men
who suffered from constipation, due
to  lack   of  exercise,   or   indigestion
caused by overwork—by children whose
parents realize the harmful effect of common purgatives—by old people whose systems   cannot  stand   anything   harsh—by
women during pregnancy, and after childbirth,  when any medicine   with  a violent
action would be particularly dangerous. Many
of these people are your neighbors and fri*\ds.
Ask anyone who has ever used them—they'll
tell you Rexall Orderlies satisfied and helped them.
■a gentle laxative in the form of a chocolate-tasting tablet. One of
these tablets eaten just before going to bed will help to restore
your bowels to normal activity ai a time when, your body
being ai rest, ihe medicine can do its best work. As a result
of taking that tablet (or say two, if your case is ob
stinate), your bowels will move easily and naturally
in the morning.   The use of Rexall Orderlies
for a few days afterward will restore normal regularity.   Even chronic const,
pation is benefited by them, and if
is not necessary to continue the
treatment for a long time, because, instead of driving
Nature, they simply help
her to help herself.
This
Is Our
Guarantee—
You
Risk No Money
If Rexall Orderlies do not make
your bowels act right, tell us so and
Sold only at ths mors
than 7,000 Rexall
Stores and in this
town only by us.
In vest pocket
tin boxes,
10c 25c,
60o
we'll give back your money without
asking a single question.   There is no
red tape to this guarantee.    It means
just what it says.    You sign nothing.
We won't hesitate, or ask you any questions.   Your word is enough.    If Rexall
Orderlies do not do all you expect them to
—if you don't feel better after using them and
find that they are the pleasantest-acting and best
laxative you have ever used, we want you to
tell us and get your money back.
N. E. SUDDABY, Druggist
"The Rexall Store" - - Fernie, B.C.
The court cases arising from the
so-called rioting during the -third*
week; of August last year are now finished. At that time over two hundred
men 'were put dn prison. .The men
'were all remitted' from the lower to
tfie higher courts, and in the earlier
stages were adlvlsed to take a speedy
rather than a jury trial. The first
group of men to be tried were from
Ladysmith and tbey had .been fed to
believe that some undeTstandinig existed' between the crown and defence
lawyers, and were advised on this
understanding to plead guilty, expecting the time they had served would
serve an punishment. However, on
the day they came up for sentence
some got two years, some sixteen
■months, and others eight months,
When this -was found out tbe defence lawyers demanded a jury trial
and again the men bad to lie in prison
awaiting all the red tape necessary
for the ohange, bail. In the meantime,
being denied'. They lay for three
months before getting iball, and then
only through the agitation going on
dn the country.
iWhen. the jury trials came, first
they were tried in groups, thus allowing the defence lawyers more challenges as to jurors and giving a
chance to select a fair-minded jury.
The first few cases tried in groups
iwere acquitted on the ground that
•there was mot sufficient evidence to
convict. The crown lawyers then decided to change tbe method of trial
and bring each Individual before the
court; this ohange gave the deftemce'
lawyers only four challenges as to
the jurors. The result was that the
crown always bad a jury to be depended upon.
In each case after this> method was
adopted a conviction was made, ahd
in the meantime the'-men found -guilty
had to He without sentence.
The government evidently found
the trials too long and expensive and
two weeks ago mtfde a proposition
■that if the remainder of the fifty-two
•men. would plead guilty to a oharge
of unlawful assembly they would drop
all other charges completely and give
an understanding to recommend to
the court leniency for the men awaiting sentence. The men were at first
afraid of this, remembering what
had happened In the .beginning.
However, in the end they decided to
adopt this course, and as a result, over
•seventy were either allowed to go free
or given suspended sentences. However, I am sorry to say that nine of
our Nanaimo men got one year in
jail, two six months, and Brother Angelo, from Bridgeport, Ohio, -who is
employed by the organization as national organizer, and who had done
good work here among his own (Ital
ian-speaking) people, got a sentence
of four years. It is well known to
the men on the islann, and they desire the men In the organization to
4«i©Wr-4hat—-thi
If you are pot healthy you ARE
working uphill.
Disinclination to work or play is
not—in nine cases out of ten—caused
by LAZINESS, but by sickness.
That "don't feel good" sensation
won't send you to a doctor—you probably don't think it is serious enough.
But it is almost a sure sign of Indigestion, Dyspepsia or Biliousness.
Next time you "don't feel good" try
15 drops of Mother Seigel's Curative
Syrnp. You'll get relief—QUICKLY.
This. old English Temedy has been"
TRIED and PROVEN during the past
40  YEARS  In  every  quarter of   the
earth.
It has a wonderful effect upon ths
stomach and stimulates the digestive
organs to  normal action.
Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup ls
almost purely herbal—It is a distillation of certain Roots, Barks and
Leaves—Nature's remedy for a disordered  stomach.
Order a bottle of Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup—try it out, then note ths
improvement  in your  health.
Price $1.00      Trial Size,   BOc.
For Sale by
Mclean drug and book oo.
FERNIE, B. C.
'$'■*$> X".'-*\
-■fl
HE WILL BE VINDICATED
[&kjoM Means "KING OF ALL'— Ours is 7fteTt&xaMstore Jn this fou>/i,
Fiendish Scheme of Utah Fuel to
Crush Unionism Fully Exposed
That conditions exist in Canbou
county among the enslaved and peon-
Ized workers in the ooal mines that
would put the coal camps of Wast
Virginia or Colorado to shame has
been a matter of common knowledge
among the organized workers of this
state for some time; that every effort
possible has been made by tbe Utah
Fuel for some time to keep these men
disorganized and enslaved has nlso
been generally known and that a human volcano slumbers in that corporation ridden hell that will break forth
ere long and envelop all Umh labor
ln the most tremendous labor war In
Ihe history of Ihis state has been free,
ly prwimpd. but just whnt wore tho
specific methods of the Utah Fuel to
keep its Slaves in subjection were not
definitely known mull this woclt,
when th<> viii'Xi' chance that the secret
nswits of ih!s tdave driving company
solicited a union man by mistake revealed Kome of its darkest pra-ellces.
Frank Miller, a Bohemian coal miser und <t loyal union man, was the
person approached and Thursday Ills
revelations to Matt Alflrevlcb. secretary of thw Mill Smeliermun, -Local
201, nt the l.rtb-or Temple, uncovered
a condition tliat all union men should
know.
Hid v.i ',ii,: U MUI-h's nUirj ab
told to Matt AlfirevUh:
I wan looking tor n job when a
man rcpn tw ntln-se hlmtif-lf to he a Mr,
Ht-mek »ii-(ir*t*ifteln«d mc '\*\i\ r:i!<I he
would pet me :i good Job and w«cnre
for nm a bonus of %_:< a month if I
*«• wlHItiK to do th- work 11- mid
ttot Ue .-.,.» Aorkiuj; "„,i i!..- »,luli.,
InwiWHtion f'otnpfiny. efficiency In.
upecuit'N for mine*, ntlUuyn and milln,
nnd he took m« to ih« otfb-e of thl«
oonsi'.iiiy In the -Indue building.
"I pretended to want the }ot> ami
the plan of work wa» laid out for rue
-a* follow*- I wa» to tro lo 8unny»!dt"
mid k«» fo *-»i»rk in one of the nv,*i
Mitt*'*   u-touKln-K   to   she   rub   Fuel
Company and was to work as a coal
digger while I waa used as a spy to
report all agitation, dissatisfaction
and moves toward organization. I
was to report every night and they Informed me that this was for the purpose of 'getting rid' of all undesirable
characters. I waa to get a good Job
and iin addition to my regular pay was
to receive a bonus of $25 a month. A
ticket was secured for me by thia
•company from tho Utah Fuel Company and a letter Introducing me to
the mine superintendent and securing me the 'Job.'
Hero Mr.  Miller produced the. following letter:
"Utah Fuel Company, Office of General Manager, 7th Floor, Judge
Building, Introducing Frank Srn-
mek, Mflwh !!-». 11H4.
iMr. A. L Ilally. Mine Superintendent,
8untiy*lde, Utah.
"Dear Sir.—This will Introduce to
you Mr. Frank Sramek. who It an ex-
perloueed minor and comes to us well
recommended. Will you sec that, ho Ih
given employment at once?
Yours truly.
"II. <i. WILUAuMS."
"I was to go by the name of Sramek
Instead of Miller and I won instructed
when ninkitiK reports or writing letter-! to the company never to sign any
n ;-**•'
("•!"
8-2.'
LEGAL RIGHTS A TRAGEDY
During the strike of the coal miners
of Colorado an effort has been made
to ascertain whether civil or military
authority predominates during a conflict between exploiter and exploited.
It will be remembered that during the
laibor troubles of Colorado in the
years 1!M)3 and 1904, Charles H. Moyer
of the Western Federation of Miners
wna seized by the #tate mllltla nnd
held m a prisoner, notwithstanding
the fact, that the courts were open
and that civil authority wns master of
the Industrial situation. The case of
(Moyer was brought before the Supreme court of the state nnd after nn
exhaustive hearing, the highest court
of the state held tbat the governor of
the state was supreme in his official
acts, that he had the right to say
when an Insurrection existed, and furthermore, had the power to imprison
and even kill, and that his official
aot* could not bo reviewed.
Justice Steele, who was on the
bench, dissented from the opinion
handed down by the court, but the
judicial dictum handed down by the
Supreme court of the state of Colorado, lias been made the LAW and ths
precedent eutabl'.shcd by the Colorado
Judiciary, has been quoted in other
states to Justify the high handed
methods utilized by mortgaged gov-
i-ruoi-K, who pandeivd to the interests
of corporate anarchy.
on the 12th of last January "Mother" Jones wa* seised s few hours after her arrival in Trinldnd and hold
Incommunicado for a period of nine
weeks. During her Imprisonment
counsel for tlie  United  Mine Work-
UA    ui    Si.lit i.t-l   4»*»«J    ill*:    ?iil,111!iim
court  of  the  state to  take  original
WHENCE COMES SALVATION?
<&.       tit
only to uao the rod-t'--
That the Utah Fuel Company lined n I Jurisdiction, but the court refused
thorough going spy system to prevent; and lier case was brought in the
tho organization of its employwa has (District court of Houthem Colorado
been generally lielievpd for some time.'wherw Standard Oil Is supreme and
bat It hn« not been known just how-it*ihn District court handed down an
opermt-w*. It* ayfttwn or that it make* opinion Justifying the arrest and de-
tise of the -tilobe Inspection Company.' tentlon of "Mother" Jones by the
Rffieiency InsiK^tom, j military, and quoted the decision of
! Mr Miller informed Mr. Alflwvlch the Supreme court of Colorado In
that he had been miblwted to per«e-, tho Moyer case ns a vindication of tho
mt Ion In the form of Intimidation be- Judicial attitude of the lower court
catme Iii- had not fulfilled the part of! Tito -Moyer ds-niaion was uned In the
the ttitrcem-eitt fti******! of him and j "Mother" Jon** case, reitardle-** of
tisd t»\* left ti,,. fWy -j,,,*) it!V| rei-tin-nd ■ tbe fact that (Swraor Ammons
*ili« railroad ticket furnished him j nav»r Iimmi-ctI a proclamation of mar-
thrnuRh ihe good office* of lb* Utah | Hal   law.
y-<:\.     'A       ■•■,•■   *'...'.'  "•   l.islnS ull!*!,      TliM   til*   tii      >iu,ii*-|      ,iolll-»    tt«a
< up w-ver' Hmo* ?ti bla rnomtnc pise*.  apti-Milwl to the Kupr.»m-v court of tb"
*nd   tv-n.i'tui,!    ■*!t|>   .irrest,    Intt-r- 'suits, bus   tlw luAii  hiimit her ***»*
: Mountain Worker. WJMi to i,« hrou-slut ln'tur* the hl*bfcr,
The uhove jirAAf In the Iiiter.Mwm- 'court nml th- hrl.-f fii,.|, the miilurv
("i!n  Wort*-r,  publish.-d tn  9A1  l.nfce, | ImmidU   "Mo'.li'T   Jlhm   to   t'ktuvtr
■ ihnwit   tlmt   the   exploiter   m   unlntr >nnd told her th.it xlte wn* fit liberty,
, »"tnr>   »rikjn,**»i  to tlt.ittru)    tbe   UUtw (    A* ab* was* r«-l*MM««| and tfivf-n her
mevwiien'.     llegardl-"**   'if   th*   fact.> fre-dfirn    -there   waa  entitle* fnr fhe
...  ,,,,   ft,,,.,./..*,    ,n, nu**  wutuuntti, rutin   io   i»,j*h   ii*jMH».    .|*ue   niiiuar>
No political party or faction can win
an olectlon under capitalism and
make good to the people. Thousands
of voters throughout tbe nation had
the utmost confidence in men of the
■Bryan and Wdlson stamp and 'believed that if they were placed in power
everything would soon be all right.
iBut the supporters of these men are
doomed to disappointment. Bryan -is
'H>unk" and Wilson, while he is playing the game .probably as well as an
honest man could play it, is absolutely powerless to deliver tbe people
from tlie rule of the capitalist class.
Both the Democratic and Republican parties stand for capitalism, and
it ls tho capitalist system that <is getting the people. Instead of times getting better with the Democratic saviours of the people in charge, they are
getting worse, money Is scarcer, th©
unemployment situation moro acute,
tho cost of living Just as high regardless of tariff reform, nnd the promised
deliverance of the people nowhere in
sight, liml the nepubllcan party won.
its lenders would have been Juat as
helpless to inaugurate happiness,
peace and prosperity under the system of capitalism which is a system
of rdbbery and exploitation of the
wealth producers of tho land.
Try out the old parties, people, till
doomsday and relief will n»ver como.
The impossible cannot happen. Vou
cannot maintain a system of robbery,
nnd experience peace, contentment.
Justice and Joy at tho samo time. At
no time and place has either of thn
old parties ever proposed to abolish
•T-ipltntlsnt Then9 cnn b<» bnt nnri
remedy lu this case, snd that Is the
nbolitlon of (his rotten, outworn old
t«ys!cm nnd the Inauguration of a Just
economic avstem. nut instead of this
meaning wilvatlon by political leaders
It means salvation by maas action.
The capitalist masters snd their po-
IHIcsl flunkies will never voluntarily
(tnuinotpato tho exploited wage worker* and farmers under capitalism. Ths
workera who nre ths victims of the
canltsllMf sy#t«m must anlt-n In a po-
Hi (cal party of their own in order to
capture tbe power* of tovemm-em
und administer them In their own In-
tcreM.
When  the   producing  classes  srs
tivvlf in «e«» *hat Ihey ar*» t*rfa*intt tbe
wealth thnt is going Into thn bands
iof «*i«* millionaire* and sre mid* to
understand that their salvation de.
p*nds upon tb*m«*p|vM, tben with one
*!n«ke nt ♦!(•■> ballot box tbey cnn tin
more fot,' their umtcrUtl gain and ulll-
mui.- wi,-t| b-'lntr f.h*in lh#y eon 14 In u,
given for any property damaged, tout
because he was a leader In the strike.
We here are not sorry all those
cases are over,, as it has been an
anxious time for all the men concerned and their relatives, and during
the trying period one young man from
Ladysmith who got a one-year term
died in prison under painful circumstances, another Is lying In the hospital in a dying condition and more
than one child haa either been stillborn or had premature deaths from
the strain of conditions, and many"
more have been ruined for life.
The government of British Columbia and Canada have much to face
ln the future which they cannot bear,
this when a spirit of decency and (fair
play In the beginning could have prevented the strike and all its consequences. From appearances It now
looks as If the government ls tired of
•more than the trial cases; they are
also tired of the strike. The situation looks ns good If not better than
it ever dW and the determination of
the men on tbe Island, together with
the many peraecutlons they have bad
and successfully borne have proved
that the United Mino Workws luwe
come to stay forever. The men hero
realise the splendid efforts that
Ihelr broUit'j's on tho American side
have mado to keep them In food dim
lag their struggle and are convinced
they In return will show the same
spirit when this fight is won, as
"win" Is the undoubted end of tbls
struggle and this struggle means, the
establishment of the onwnidation on
the Canadian aide.
(IKO.  PKTTKSREW.
The ipeapte of the State of Colorado
must feed their bosom's expand with
■pride, when they think of that big,
brainy man whom they placed In the
governor's chair in the year 1912.
Governor Ammons has had ithe opportunity to show the .metal out of
which he is made. There are none in
Colorado who have any doubts as to
his traits of character. His reverence
lor law and his loyalty to constitutional rights command the praise of every
conscienceless exploiter and workless
parasite within the confines, of the
Centennial State.
The governor proved to his constituency—the mine barons—that law
and order must be maintained in (Oolorado even though it became necessary
to shoot striking miners, raid parades
of women and children and hold in a
military Ibastile a woman eighty-two
years of age.
It Is said that the governor is contemplating VINDICATION, and will
come before the people for an en-
dorsement of his attitude during the
•*■" ' i-vyi-A^X,, ss -•   .*  " t.,
Societies
"X
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every. Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock in K. P.
Hall.        ■
Nob-le Grand, H. E. Barnes.
Secretary, J. B. MoikSejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello'B Hall second and third Mondays,in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
. ■ "
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C. A. Bunch.
K. ot S., D. J. Black.
M. of F„ Jas. Madison.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meet every Monday at 8
p.m. In K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, T. Uphiil.
Secretary, G. 'Moses.
139 McPherson Avenue.
^HBeof the coal miners. There is
no question ibut that he will GET IT,
and bis VINDICATION will be of the
same character as was given to the
notorious * Peabody, who when last
heard of, was smoking a cob-pipe and
presented an appearance that would
raise no question as to his eligibility
for enlistment in Coxey's Army.
It Is to be hoped tbat Governor Ammons will "stand pat" for a VINDICATION, -for the workera of Colorado
are yearning for the coming of that
golden   opportunity,   when tbey can
HangFerLow
wishes to anno-nee that he
is opening on   Saturday,
April 4th, a First Class
RESTAURANT AND
LUNCH COUNTER
at 296, Victoria Avenue
Noodles & Chop Suey
Hang Fer Low is open to
purchase young poultry for
his restaurant, from those
having same for sale.
march to the polls and deposit their
VINDICATION in the ballot box for
the WEAKLING whose LAW and
CONSTITUTION .was the WILL of
corporate anarchy,
AromonB will get a VINDICATION
that will relegate him to Ills ranch,
and the people of Colorado will try
to forget the disgrace tliat sat for two
years «beneaith the dome of the state
capitol.—The Miners Magazine.
Imperial Bank of Canada
*#•*»•••
6,925,000
72,000,000
HtAD OFFICE, TORONTO
Capltsl Authorized ..   110,000,000      Capital Paid Up"
Rsssrvs and Undlvld- Teti| A„,u
ed Profits        8,100,000
D. R. WILKIE, Prsiiltfsrt HON. ROST J AFFRAY, VlOS-Prtl.
BRANCHES  IM   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Arrowhssd, Cranbrook, Fernls, Golden,  Kamloops,   Michel,   Nelson,..
Revelstoke, Vsnesuvsr snd Vlctorh.
8AVINC8 DEPARTMENT
Intsrsst allovvsd on dspoilts st current rats from dsts of dspoiit.
PERNIE BRANCH A. M. OWEN, Msnsflsr
HERE'S GOOD NEWS
FOR DYSPEPTIGS
We hsve good mm* tor overy oer-
son In this town who has any form of
tttomach trot»b!«. It la about a remedy
for indigestion and djspopsla lhat so
have so much faith In as to offer it to
you with our tpersonnl guarantee that
If It do«?s not relieve you and satisfy
you in ovcry mrsy, ws will refund ths
money jou paid for It without question
or argument of any kind, Yoti rink
nothing; olther Rexall Dyspepsia Tablets .will relieve your stomach allnwntft
or thi* tncney you paid for thwn will
be banded back to you, There Is no
nd  tape about   our  guarantee.    It
81!<:«;,.*  i",i*.  »fth?.»   Jt  mjj,     YlIOT   H-Miil
l« i-ttMMiflb    If Retail I1yap#fw(a Tab-
1-f-tn 'lon't tatlsfy you, the nion«>  1»
ywir# and we want you to bave It.
lt«>x.ii! Dynpcp-ftla TnbMn woth«- the
Inflamed aumiach. ch-uk tu<awbtuu
snd distress, *tlmii!nfo n lii>althy ne*
cr*Uon ol nmirle Jule*. Sid In rapid
||   THE     |^ A   3»1864
HomeBank»Canada
team**** ma aaunaanaaa
niii gmci ma
tamta NM-tN
I
Money Orders for sale nt nH Branches; they cost only a
few cents.   Prevent any possibility of mistake*
when sending money through the mails. u
J. F. MACDONALD, Manager
VIOTORIA AVI» -s. -:- FIRNIK   8. a
I
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
•tH EDMUND WALKER,CVXULLD, DXX. VttaUeot
AUKANDHt USnXtX-tkmntbtHnneowt        JOHN AIM), Ass*
l«ff-t!nw of bard labor nnder the pms-iSn)i ^mt^^u* ,nrr*mti*,** nt t**t* **m i
'•"""      ,     ..  i*»t«J o*n> »o <|UfcMy rmtme the atom-1
*•*••
,1     <W|,
»h*»r1ff*«
-UtCAM
BAKING POHDtR
Made from pure, grape
Cre?»m nf Tn?!nv
Best for nood food and
flood health
ito slum
,(„,   .y-f,   j,f,i(f>,*.   *i1*ii(i«?r»«T!i--rt. ! "\1*Wbr>*r"'   .t<n-,(, ■   Inrmtt,   in   IV-nvir    »i« ' 1°*'   ',*|p    *''on
offi«»,  nta*ti» miltttn,, fw!f*r.il ;ort!i»r to exon* n rtssb brttr-wn c-tvll t I*ckmm»v«Ic.  or
"*:iv"   ---:'   ■-■'■■■   "":'»,'*••   X'lAi"7   '  ,»;;.!  nSAA.iJj  .iuiiiuiAi.
o mpprriw Iff-Hor In It* flptit n*Biiln»t
i,, *
* nwhlnir «ny  mttp-mnt  to
f firlrtrtitlfii   of   iiiilonliunt
■ -luv-f-*.
I     T!w «-ms>lr,\« ■-.   nHliotll  anj   Kfniiit-r-
of < <>t,i»< it-Hi i'. ». .uclii-n Tor '.Ui- .luil.i)*
• jiiwi*  'lii»  -ad", ns  il«*»» nnd  Bi%«-«
t h'm tX,* prift' of 'rmiwjfi 'r, lurtrnv »!>,,.
\>i*o\ii*.     St*Hb*r   -Min'b-fdlthy ntntf    n^v n\*-o >M «r<-jtlv'
«  Taft.    Neither eaa | fn  promotinit  r«>«tilsr bowel  set Ion. i
tu ..;j j««r.4. ,       , M **'^*" "', **#*«»f't»^ *v;«.-^:;  i>;»^.^u. T*b;..-» «(« **>iii
Mother" .foni*. nft*»r bHnR rclefif. •*pJ.b,r J*"/*""*'1"* «nd nnltt yoa f only st the l.nm rt»»*a!! fHotvt, and In
tl>l#-.*,
♦•-I, Tivt*\i  t't>]-r,\rtt*ii for Trinldnd,
•biitj'lwl't* to tako »hl« ««tr-n we wtll hsv-tlthl* *o<kxi only by  m
t*•v;i'«-i!',%t>   ft-r'   t ■*r--*-i'tmt*lr,Ti   mntttetit*^''••-■ ■     "'.      , ,   <    ti
Thrr-ft nitf»,
B,
tin* **mi»t«vr'r r*»«rtrt«i to tti
l**: .;,       -',■*       **
#nr»*nd th«» tmrir and fxlaeed In Jill without rharc*\!,° ,*»" "°mt wh|,,''' rtrtMssttwi wtwt (r»nt|srl«. Vlclorla Avenue, PeraJe
amon*   hi* i wnrrnn* t*r d««* pme*ee *d ts*. ttot te\»**f***ruy crumble and fall as It <tfct C,
»n« armwf ihmi.t of fVorado |,n Hom"
Irt the Marxian «Io«sn, "Workers
of tn»> wiirid »ml!»>, ymt hav* notblnx
to into im! your -r-hsins. you Itayn a
%(*,-,,1 to K.iin." tifTorao the ttnlvtrssl
'        ■•       i" :     ,,   i"   ',-.?.i.„{
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 '"BBBWE FUND, $13,500,000
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
tamed by The Canadian Dank of Commerce snablo the traveller to
fMutiwv luuuMtii *»itii luuu* wiinoiit uvmpr at v.un point ot nis juuiney m
H *.4.,tli.J.i9,ti J 1.1  .l..\y\.t,Ai**9  >M.*i*U*»l,.        »..*J   ***9i  .Aiu-vU   *,i9\J-A94tt9 19.**%*}
country ia ths world in denominations of
•10, $20, $50, 8100,
with the exact equivalent bt the moneys of the principal countries atated
ott tho face ot cadi cheque.   Tbey are economical, absolute]) safe, »#!f-
utenui>ing anu sHuiiy negotiated. ot*
ffl.r.-*'.»
i« ft
t* . •   i
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•i»fi«,«   ,-.r
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••    Mtn*r»
h.-'d \,s
inid-i-T th«- pl««ft of "milliarv n«'«*•»•!!y."\
lli-r en*** will again l«- broiuiit b*».
for»» th#« «-rnirt», Ik« «h*n h*wr «s«»» it'
n.tiHit to w-neh tb«* Hujirt m* -riurt In j
• '* nf'ti'hlVff "bf tvt-i t •■•'•* »«> '-'ii „
ii'-r Sitt-AtHU. lit ot*i<l 11.1*1 llf .iiirtiii-
t,it* tlf-rW.tm r*nAt*r*<l b*   s  wir,«n
'mil u«l.nl * nntl   in   !>»>».   *'i>rii <.ti'!-
♦■ t n Ko*«-r»wr with Hit* i«-*.r or .1
fiir »h*!l n*tn*fn a* *hf f„l\V • > * i^
iikm i»f»o*r o« etrik* »:.-i  '-> j j-.-i.Jj
,b" arrvw* *ft,l tmtfrl^orrir.' • » ,*t i, .»>r
officials by *lie military, «tit r. - *»,.:«
' if ...UV-**'  "f '"'*' '  ••/■•■'•'■ "       - • < *
t , -r+f   rt*****   at*tt   r*r*r-»ll'"'i. ■    •    **
• r .; wider lb* relfin >*.   .1. '   '■■..   i
■eu*. » fOK-B Nwt a tra«r*dir-  1*.   «■•,
t*r« .\fa#rairtn**.
 |P. D. FOWLER, Manager
PERNIE BRANCH
NOW* THI«f
We otter One Hundred Dollsrs ]t»!
ward for ttey rt1*" nf Vi'trrh *bit run
nm
b» .i.-*sr,J>«j. b«ii' will'be a«i»r*s<lediJM^ *» Kult?.Jti'JJ*}1'* iM**n_ «"*"«•
V    *t„. ,„t, „.r.*<*,. t+mtvititmdth lri*    ,,* •••,•'' ' I**1-*™ * «''>*. Ti>ti.rtfi, O.
>')
haiiii'iif'**
'!   »^ r ,.., 4.
A  inUt*  md   pen**.'
and  trno  proaiwlty
SV-iH rrallt?.—I>»»x
.1    ■t'l,,- . -.    f...    *;(.,    1.. ,
ttetr*   him   itrrt'-f-nv
ttr litjKiUli
S/r/Ms Gun
eutcavt «ror« cou4ms. cuata taios,
-scaks thk thwo»t *.sti iuh«s. as smte
,.,**,»*   t , I
1'    > 1 ill"**,   UI'll   llf- ;
j•i!;,wl,*,.'.""■' ■ ■'' *"•'. »'i'»s«i-i««it Mmit* 1
i H*t hl# fli-m.
j N.v.Tio.NAt. njtU-ti or i'mmmkic-tk.   »
I .,, ...     , T»l*d.». 1*. 1
*M#..t *•*. * 1,-iii'   r .,,,*.  .,.   t-tk.u  lt,t*,„-t,.
jly, at'llt.K tt,ri-,u\   ur»->n Hi* I.I-mwI «n.|/f
i»i,*:s*ai«
h^ltl-i*
T,.h**
j>i,d*.ti
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11..
... ,*'#{■•#.   f*   .'tutu   fm-f l
l.v   *»1l   l»ffi»«;l»f#,
! *.:,*.(' ;*   l','.\-   l,,\   i-.,,i*»|).
wmommMmmsmmm
To Sports Committees   |
The Fernie Coal Creek Excelsior Band is now
open for engagements.  Satisfaction guaranteed
For Terms Etc. Apply
ROBT. CONNBLL, Secretary
P. O. Box 090 • Pernio, B. C. lk        •-■■ yyx, 'i\-:ia - ,fi i"-t'v--' « ->\   ^ '*-        "'.    "../*.'        .--'
Ar^^X^^^yT^^^^^^^Sfv
-'•     • - A3".
-**,:
i t**\
P?i§
€- }
'W
"Wji-jS
i   «A
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•1 '4?
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE,   B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
The Hotel
DALLAS
One of the
Best
C. J. ECKSTORM      Prop.
Lethbridge, Alta.
Pa<ssburg
Hotel
You're always welcome.here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
The
Original
and
Only
Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
Minard's
Liniment
For our Foreign Brothers
SLAVIANSKE ODDELENIE
(Slavonlen Part)
Zaciatok unie
Od tj'ch Cias, Co Slovek jestvuje, oe
v2dy oielil k tomu, aby on, ked' 'bol sil-
nejSi, ipod-manil slabSieho. Oielll k ■tonm, aby sotrofcil svojbo bli2n6ho a tak
aby z pmce toho sM>§ieho mohol lit!
v blahobyte a dobrote.—Po cel-5 Yeky
silnejgi l'udia sa spoldovali ku tomu
ciel'u, aby so slabSimi narabat' mohli
dla' ich l'ufoovole a aby; dch mohli
Cim nanajni?.Si stupen stlaClf. Tento
sposob pauuje e&te aj po dues.
Hlavnym ciel'om spolcovania sa sil-
nj'oh, toohatfeh l'udi bolo to, aby nie-
lenlen utlaClll islaibgich, eliudcibnjch,
ale aby ich tam aj udr2ali. Mu&ovia,
?.eny a deti, ktor6 pracuju a vyrabaju,
boli a su efite aj dnes v indlosti tfch,
klori tuCneju a -l'ahko si Biju z toho,
■fo im robotnici y potu tvari vyrobla.
Vdobe, ,ked' 'tu v Amerike jestvo-
valo otroctvo, ono bolo ii>ova£ovan6 za
trajlcuju, »u2 vojaci sa tu dobre toodda
ku tomu, aiby profoovali svoju zrufi-
nost'v naraibani so zbranou^nu2 ddu
strielat' robotnikov!
Ved' do &a. len za pos-iedn-5 dva roky
tu v tej "svobodnej" zemi popachalo
krlvd voci robotnikom, to neraoSe -pero
o:plsat', ,|ei -, in vera ai neuverltetoe,
len2e oCityuni sv-edkami dokaran^.
Vo West Vlrginii kkpitalisti anali
ipencierov6 vlalcy, na fcfcbrj-ch Miali
kanony a z ktorych striel'ali na ti-
clij-ch a ■ibezziUrann.'f'ch robotnikov a
jieh rodiny! V.Colorade a Calumet
sa to nma6 staid. Rodiny gtrajkerov
musia v krutjcb zimach. v * Sla-trock
bjvat', muaia *tr,pet' biedu, <poneva-3 ich
2lvH*elia opovaZia sa'p^taf to, Co im
i/ravom patti;
ltobotnici, druliovia, Sia je to vina
ie 8 nam! tokto zaobchodia? S nami,
ktori udrsSuJeine tento svet, ktori ma-
mie silu. ktori poCitame na milliony
hlav a predsa dame sa brstke kapital-
J&tov drZat' pod ich nohaini? Ci nas
niet. dost', aby sine ten kapitaltetick^
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg;
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and
Shoes, Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH  AT HOSMER,  B.C.
Feniie-Fort Steele
Brewing Co., Ltd.
Beer
and
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesalo Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross & Mackay *»
celkom prlro'dzen-S, ba ked' sa raSalo system   jedn^m   Smahom   so   sveta
smiefcli, Ci nemaime ku tomu silu? Oh,
mame, mame my ohromnu silu, ale
jeduo, nam vol'md chybi a to je to, ie
nevieme -spolocne, svorne a bratsky
spoludriat'. Necheme s"a vzdelavat',
nechceime .priloSSit' piece k ple.cu! Ale
imyslim, ze pride raz <*as, ba verim,
ze prist' .musi, ie sa vftetc! raibotnici
naraz prebuddme a postavime sa v§et-
ei do; jedneho Slk-u a sanetieme tento
nam .tali ohronuie nepriatel'skj* ka;pi-
■talistick^' sysWm a vtedy al nastane
nam tak? zivot, pre jak? sme boli
stYorenl! :'   *
• Teda ku praci' robotnici, dneSni ot-
roci kajiiitalism*u,f kaZd? jednotlivec
pracuj* usilovne.na polepSenl svojom,
lebo poBtiVoist' a svedomitosf nasa
musi zvit'azlt' a takdfo base vit'aztvo'
bude skvel&.aia, ktore c.elj svet sob
divom a uctoii hl'adet' bude!
ugltovaf asi v roku I860 aa zriiSenie
otroctva,* tu 1st? rev. Fish, ktorj' v
torn f.ase bol .presidentom Weslyan
university, vyslovll sa: "Otractvo je
boiske, poiievad'i v bi'blii je otroctvo
bohom za _ spravhe uznatd a v, novom
znkon-e na'ehadzame, ie budeS pokor-
ny, iioniSenJ a posluSn? tvojmu pan-
ovi.".
Tato .povedal kazatel' vtedy a dnes
najdu sa tie!' nuiohi—Cest' v^nimdiam
—ktori to uzavajii- za spravne a" uofias
Strajftov hovoria' to tym, na,.- ktor^fah
maju" vliv. V^ak toto sa stalo i' vo
WestHioreland okrese poCas strajku
roku I'M. ; .
Doibii otroctva sme teda preXili, ale
len v-theorii, iponeva6 otroctvo este
aj dneg viac-mencj jestvuje; ■ ba sm-elo
moZeme, ,povedat'-, ze moderne platene
otroctvo je eSte horsie, ne^ bolo pre-
dosl^. Predtjm, Iced' si "otrokar ku-
pil ot'roka, iimi pbstaral sa o jelio
cliovu, o baby, o lekarg:; ked' otrok
onemocneU;aikidy ho nevoluiai do um-
Ornej, Ver,m) t'aZkej praci, pbnevafi si.
svoj-ho oti'oka, svoj majfetok -chrandl.
Ci dnes, ked'- niektorj''-, farmar, alebo
in^'Clovek'kupl si kona, 61, ho on on
zapriahne do t-kk'ej ■ farchy, o ktorej
imysli, i.Q je to pre toho kona mnoho?
Nie! To neuCiul, ponevafi kona by
d'lho-neraal a takou .pracou by ho ch>r»-
tro zabil a masledkom .tohc ztratil by
dost* hodnyvgro§.iTeda tak to bolo
aj s otrokmi. Majitelia otrokov, dali
si na torn v&l'mi, zaleiaf, aby sa ich
otroci pracou tak nepretiahli, 2eby
nasledkom toho zamret' mohli, lebo
otrok s£al penlaze.
Teraz, v dobe plateneho otroctva je
to celkoan ina6. Dnes majltel' fabrdky,
alebo ban© nemusi platit' cverkj; pend-
az za btroka, teraz ho dostane za istu
mzdu a z'a.tu mzdu predava i\)botnik
svoju sily:  Tu majitel' veru malo dba
ZPRAVY Z BELLEVUE
(Bellevue" Notes)
Tu bola praca na par dni prerugena,
lfibo dil'a udanida kompania bola ztra-
tila "order" ale netrvaio to dlho, a uz
praca zaso bola obnoyenqj. .Miniiiy
t£2den robilo sa v utorok, stredu a vo
Stvrtok, tedo tri dnl a ;ftko p66ut-', teraz dostala kbroilJania iia 1S00 ton o;b-
jednavku denrie, tak tedy' by *fime bu-
ducne ni zase stale robjlh-' I "v stared
•majne, kde sa. doposial* nerobilo, zafi-
inaju starj'ch majnerov do prace brat'
a to sa zda na to poukazovat', ie kompania chce pracu idolovahia uhlia ce-
lou silou obno'ylt'. Keby. to ien,,6im-
skor ibolo!
Ze cvidenle tela dopomaha nam ku
zdraviu telesnemii i duSevnamu, to
■snad' netreba ani moc vysvetlo'vat',
ved' 1 jedno naSefslovenske prislovie
hovori,  ie:   "Vzdravom
hynu, v tetfto chladnej cudzine a to
vlastn^m naSim priCinenim, a my ani
krifcom slamy nepreloidme ku ich
zachraneniu. Pride ddet'a zo Skoly
domov, hovori inou recou, rodiSia ho
neupozornia na to, ze ma hovorit' inou
r-eCou, rodiCia ho neupozornia na to,
ie ma hovorit' po slovensky, vyjde na
ulicu i tam lea cudzou recou hudie a
nasa mila sladka slovendiria stava sa
mu odiwrnou, protivnou a cudzou. Slo-
venski rodicla, ruku ha srdce! odpo-
vedzte Hi je tomu nie" tak? Ci je to
nie pravda?
Ale nemalo by to tak byt! Slovenski
roddCia, no£e privykajte svoje ddetky
ctit' si tu rec, ktoru vy ako dedictvo
vaSich otcov mate; nech vo va-Sich
domacnost'ach hovori sa len a vyiuC-
ne len po slovensky, nech sa deti vase
nehanbia za tu red, ktora ma byt' ka2-
d6mu z nas svatou, ale uecb oni las-
kou a. uctou lnu ku nej, nech smeiym
Celom v-2dy a, vSade hlasla sa k svoj-
mu slovensk-imu povodu, sue hotovi
branit' a podporovat' vsetko to, Co
narodu ku prospechu slu^i, aby ste si
na start dni nest'aSSbvali, ie ste si od-
chovali'neprajn^ deti, ktore v;ise Sed-
iny za niC, ba e§te snad' za posmecli
maju a za vas sa do konca i stydia!
UGte ich tej ypsuej, hrdej a slovensku
■povedomost' budiacej piesni: ".In som
Slovak a Co je viae, uehanbini sa za
to!" .. *       ■
Xeehce.m tyinto ]>ovedat', itt nema-
ine nase dietky u:it' inyiu reCiam, ano,
Jajme im tu prileaitos-t'; obzvlaste ked'
to moie oblabCit' ich existenciu, ale
domacnost', na&a v kaidom ohl'ade
nech je cisto slovenska!
A ako najiepsie udrzime domacnost'
na§u slovenskou? Tak, ked' budeme
•privy.kat' nase deti, slovenske knihy a
■Jasopisy Citat', ked' budeine ich ucit'
slovenski .plesne.. spieva-t", samii sue
zivym prikladom, lebo ni6 tak neprit'-
aliuje, afco zivy-priklad.  '.
Nugihrad'to sa dl'a toho zachovat',
uvidit©, io vychpvate sebe dpbr<5. deti
a narodu na&niii verinycli synov; a
dc-Sry, 5o on vel'mi vtejto -cudziii^ pot-
relbuje. • '■'■".   ' - v
■-',.■■        . JIaloveisky.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦■'♦ ♦-♦ ♦ '♦.♦ ♦
b ♦
JOSEPH    HICKS
Barrister ?nd Solicitor
Notary Public
'I Grow Hair, I Do"
Pac-similes of Prof. A. Garlow.
MACLEOD Box 7
Visits Bellevue on the
month
ALBERTA
14th of each
JOSEPH    HICKS
i
Advokat
Verejny Notar
MACLEOD Box 7 ALBERTA
Nactivuje Bellevue na 14 kasdy mesac
DR.   JOHN   BARBER,   DENTIST
Office: Above Bieasdell's Drug Store
Phone 121
Residence: 21 Victoria Avenue
Bald at 26.
Fine hair at 55.
FERNIE
B. C.
ALEXANDER MACNEIL
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, etc.
Offices:  Eckstein Building,
Fernie. B.C.
OUR CHECKER
COLUMN
•District Ledger Office, April 18, 1914.
e. C. Lawe
Alex, I. Fishc
I POSITIVELY Cura all hair and
scalp DISEASES. Prevent BALDNESS
and premature grayness. GROW ladies' and children's haif rapidly.
I TAKE NO DOUBTFUL cases and
positively cure all I. do take. Hair
can be fully restored on all heada
I that stili show fine hair or fuzz to
prove that the roots or CAPJLLIAHY
glands are not dead,
I HAVE A PERFECT system of
HOME TREATMENT for out-of-the-
CITY people who cannot come to me
for personal treatment. WHITE TODAY for Question Blank and PARTICULARS. Enclose stamp and mention this paper.
MY PRICES are reasonable My
cures are POSITIVE and PERMANENT.
PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW
The World's Most Scientific Hair and
Scalp Specialist    ■
Room 1, Weldon  Block,  WINNIPEG,
•■       MAN.V
LAWE & FISHER
ATTORNEYS
Fernie, B,  C.
KING'S  HOTEL
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDougall, Mgi
MS
Full supply of following
for an appetizing meal to
chooia from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge t»u»-
agt! for tomorrow'a braak-
fait
CALL ON PHONI
Calgary Cattle Go.
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
ie:   "Vzdravom   tele,   zdrav^
duch", a toto snad' tamulo 1 na mysli
-^^S^^n^«^V±'^frrt^vien^ kurs pre dietky tak, ako 1
Phont M
FEftNIt,
Wood ttrtot
B, C.
A "Ledger" adv. It an
investment.
List of Locals District 18
tra pracov&t', alebo nie; malo dba o
to, Ci ten rbtootnik do zajtra dofcije,
vSaklho ten tfobotnik nestoji iiadne
peniaza a ked' zomre, ked' bo pri -praci zablje, nu2 na jeho miesto ma knod."
in^ho robotnlka, ktory ochotne preda
svoju silu, svoj Jlvot. Ked' robotnlk
teraz oohorie, jeho zaraeabknavatel' sa
o nobo ani neobzre, Co on diba, vSak
aj na miesto nemocneho dostane ine-
ho.
DneSni robotnlcke pohyby su len
ova-elm predo&lfch dob. Dnes naS
robotnicky pohyb smeruje ku emancl-
cli rabotnika. V Spojen^ch Statoch,
prave tak, ako aj v in?ch krajlnach,
rem®selnlcke sdrauJenla datuju sa od
doby, ked' sa od doby, ked' sa zafiai
filrlf priemysei. Predtyni, ked' ror-
nlctvo bolo tou hlavnou oestou vyil-
vy, ked' dlol'ne boly «Ste mal(5 a •ked*
cela v^roba potreibn^ch veci vyrabana
bola Ion v domaolcli dlel'nach; ked'
Sustor robll obuy, doma, ked' kovad
robll lopaty a motyky doma a ked*
kaidy remeselnlk mai svoju dlelnu
doma, vtody sa o remegelnlckych *8dru.
ieniach nedalo ani royaler, .ponovaC
knitiy bol svojlm vlastnym panom.
Ked' ale zavedend boly rozllfln4
stroje, ma&lny a dlol'ne na rozno vy.
robky zafialy sa »tavat', ked' tioto
dlolno zafialy vytlskat' remeselnlkov
z domaclch dleltil. tu remeselnlcl x.aC
all ui cliapat', ie Ioh domaco dlelno
nk« su vstave konkuravat' s dlelnon,
ktora vyraba ootrebniS veci pomocou
Btrojov vo verkom.
So ravedenlm strojov do prlem>iier-
njch zavodov, uaitaly aj smeny v
BpolaCenakom ilvote. Hrva zmenn,
ktora nnstnla, bola tu, t.e. z neodvlnl6-
ho robotnlka atal an robotnlk podrla-
denf. Stroje nokroclly tak rfchlo, ie
v kratkej dobe nezoatalo prileiltoatl
pro Jednotlivca, aby na mohol svojlm
zann-Btkanlm v domncej dlelnl vyil-
vlf, Tl rome-selnl-rn, ktorl predtfin
pracovall ktxtAf vo svojej vluxtnoj
dlelnf, fiutenl bol! Jut' iirnpovat' do
tyrh vei'NJch dlolnl, kdo ttx intf pint,
mtisell y«lt poCet hodin denne roblt',
Ki»«C mnjltolia miesto toho, aby
mzdu ito(h»y»l)l, zafall jn anllovat". tn
robotnici vidoll, ie aa muila na minkf
iqwiiob sorganlaovnt', aby tak mohli
koittrolovat' trh robotntekoj ally, to-
Joat, aby «1 urflll m*»dJtl aobou cerm,
m ktoru Kudu svoju allu preda tmt'
maJUelom tlloinl. A toto bol safilatok
unlo.
MaJiWIa ifth fabrlk mall hnwl'
plan pri ruk*», te ako by mohli prnkn-
alt' takladanio unli. lined' al najntl
rozl^njdi Jplrl'ov. ktorl *tri«hll tie
kaldf iwh)b robutitltiuw a kited' to,
■fo vy*pehovnll, or.tiumlll majltel'om
ktorl imtom tjch robotnikov, Icion lw-
11 Cluriiiu uiu«, kiiud a prac** vypov«i-
dall. A veru prvi hlii»«t»iltt i* niritn-
tori m organiaovanlo robotnictva boll
al kruto prenaaMoiAni.
Vzdor tomu, i« umobi tnkito klMM-
utclla sunlftll lie* flop), rolmttitotvo en
ncpr*fti»fa.|H(» apol^nralo, orjivinl/wvulo a
to ink. te dnc mamo unl«». ktor« po-
Eliiilu ea aiat-tatfi* «m'»»
lerni a majltelov fabrfk »tnlt  m
pre starSioh a za cvi6itel'a a In&truk-
tora tohoto kursu povolali osvedCene-
ho B. G. Gearyho z Maple Leaf, ktory
•svoju Cinnost' ui i zahajll. Dietky sa
cvlfila v utorok a Stvrtok poobede a
mu2»ki v tie satn4 dnl veCer. Prlblasif
sa inoino do cviCenla u instruktora
kedykol'vok a z akejkol'vek narod*-
nosti a kto je mllovnlkom tejto ducha
a telo 08ve4ujuc&j zabavy, Iste pouille
tejto prlleJltostl vsoj vlastn? prospech.
Zpravodaj,
VYCHOVA
(Education)
m32 H31 m®Wm 29
Bar suivplied with   the   best  Wines,
Liquors and Cigars-
DINING  ROOM   IN  CONNKCTION
Vel'ky vjznam pre kaid^ho aioveka
v rudskom konanl a my&lenl una vzde-
lavanle sa, trlbenle ducha v dobach
vjvlnu dloveka, hotujuceho aa k tomu, aby posluill tak sam sabe ako 1
svojlm bliiinlm.
Ked' pozorujeme vjHIn veci u l'udi,
kde 'postarant* ibolo o to, aby m vzde-
lanoat'ou l'udft Iftlo ku del'ii, za uakut-
ofinenlm vfieobecn^ho blaha na zeml,
aby v l'udstve upevnena bola zasada
dobrej vole pre gpolocnf. vzajomn^
ilvot, fo tam vldimo? Sjiolocnu ano-
kojnost', bea ka2djc.li 1 t.fch imjmen>
iioh vlastnostl k ne.progpfH.liu ,lneho,
Keby l'udia vo vftetkjfch vrstvach,
ui t'l cliudolini, cl 'boliul I, vz-delanl I
malo vztlclani, Ion vfieobocinJ blaho
naroda na myell mall. l>ez vjhradnt^ho
prospechu svojej osoby. ktora oprotl
celku je len nepatrnfm r.rnkom, tu
niot pochybnostl, le by sa potom
vfcotWm dobre vledlo na zoml, leibo by
m Imtom vRptcl starall o vSetkfch a
podobne starali by aa vftotci I o Jed-
notllv<>n.
Ku toniuio pos|M)lltfmii dobrl Je pot-
MmA VBdPlavnnln. v.vchova, staly <v)><
v l'udatvo, od doby chapanla, ai do
dcrfiy niuiBkogti. I'lidsk-ej ally.
ie to atarftln. ale vMy dobra n os-
v.wN'-enft  latka,     Sie  l*»n   hnvnrlf  n
vxiieinvnni  a   vjctiovo  tuiftlcli d|etol<.
al«» uakiito^nlt' to, nby vfehova 1 d'nlej
po<«Vv<ovajia   bo',
All matter intended for publication
in this column should be addr-essed to
the Checker Editor, and sbould reach
itois offloe not later than first .post
on Tuesday of each week.
Correspondents sending corrections
of play will oblige by quoting tho pood,
tion of tihe pieces at the stage *wh«n
Mielr play comes ln.
Contributors will oblige by arranging thedr play in tabular form, fou-r
columns to the sheet. The first three
columns should be of equal length.
Ruled paper Is desired.
Problem No. 8
By Mr. .1.  F. Thomson, Strathcona,
Alu.
WHITE
ROYAi
■-. ■ -,i - *
HO Til
4                                                                                                                 1*  *
''%   *                        *■        '
FERNIE
*           •  • -iS A .-
"                                                                                                           .   1
Bar Unexcelled
All White Help
Everything
Up-to-d^.te
Call in and
-=see=us=once-
*om
0s-mm
**Xi
■tsxf
mi
m
tm    fx     vt"$    v™a
&&      V!,        'ATA      ttf&
\. m
i-i tyj%
^3    ,%)\m''A?isi
■X*
! tii '
BLACK
lilack men on 2, 10. I" and 21, White
men on 9, 30, Ml; king on I. White lo
play and win.
A -flnt) example of end game play
across board.—Ed.
We Are Ready to Scratch
off your bill any item of lumber not
found just aa we represented. Then
la no hocus pocus ln
This Lumber Business
When you cant spruce ve do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip lo a
lot ot culls, Those who buy once froo
us always como again. Those wbo
bave not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't encounter If tbey bought their lumber
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
■— Dealer. In —
Lumber, Lath, Shingles. Saab nnO
Ooori. 8PECIALTIE8—Mouldln-ja.
Turnings, Brackets, and Detail Work
OFFICE ANO YARD—WcPheraon ave.
Opposite 0. N. Depot. P.O. Box 22.
Phone 23.
JOHN PODBIELANCIK. Prop.
Southern
HOTEL
BELLEVUE, ALBERTA
Everv
convenience
and
attention
Meals that taste like
Mother used to eonk
Best in the Pass
Jos. Grafton, Proprietor
z detlnstva do ob-
vjchovy pot-
pevne n  roiumn<-
tfm. ktoti valuptiju
Mnnnkplio Jlvota.
A kde Jo nam naj vine
robnt'1 t
Nejvlar vjfohovy treba poskytmit' |
tnm, l«lo nedOMtiito^nA Hkoletvo poao- >
bila na vy**hovii iifiAlch dlotok.
A Jah« te Jo to Ako!*tvo nafte v sta-
rej vlastl? ak*1 I* ono lu v Amerike, v
Tcml avobody a iv)vunpraviuii>il? Vi<ru
bb-d»e. vwl'ml bl««dn«!
N'b HlovPtmltu neM'nstnn mailarlta- i
(la  aadrta  iK»siup v/.d«ln»;iiiiii imfthoj
I'ndii; tarn tiNtH'stvo tettlt- m vIh*- /«
vvannfiwlnmt. -fbvaloti fl od ni-noit, -ike '
/.« {nallMU H KVfitutilllOII Vyilf>tMMI 'ttt»r. I
nk   rtnltx  rnhnV  m;i S   iwdroKt   n.iiii   li .
jdu£<"VtKf  wumimU,  /!ikri»8t««l,v n  zmr-J
J foil «a modlif. »ku ho u-f-ila Jelio trat-,
(kit, luat*' «uy»lt.'!'. lii.*; nnr<»»l inilovat' »•
Jtnkto vvrhovavnlu^  nttblrb  doll  ^fv*
;muml<->  tmrt.vol.vJ   nre naft,  dut-ovne;
IJKir-itlll* «  tttitt'^tttit nirrvl •
I    A  to naii-H ninOJinvo V tnjto *lobod. i
Problem No. 9
Hy   .Mr.   ,1.   F.   Thomson.   SrrMflironn
Alta.
Illaek nmn on fl, !t, VI, 1.1, :'T; kln«
on :»l.   Whlto mon nn 1".  11. )«, ."». :!".
White to play and draw.
Contain* a nice atroko, falrlv well
hidden- Kd.
tH,
II.
Solution to Problem No. 6
lllack uicii on 2, ',, l'i; kin« on
f Whit« nitfii on It), is, 17; IiIhk on
1 Whlto io move and draw.
The  author   nny**  ot  thit*   *>iidin«:
) "Tbls oi.'.'urrod in a («1uh«<i»  l<-.ii«u»<
J match.    My opponent, n  Mr. CoutiN,
•thoti-Kht  Ik- hnd  !h<» ruiih>  won. .ui.l
'**■»(* f»!ttli'.*K iii hia Rt-.it *i»ilf iiU-itrtui
with lilniHi-ir. but In- mn a bin miriiriK"
wh**H  I alining 'he following":
il ■- J,i        \t ■ i 11-- i h- :i
Slram H-tated Throughout
Lkunc Lighted     1
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. 1. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel
of the City
Rates $2.50 per <Ujr
With Private Bath flOO
Fire Ftoof Sample
Rooms in Connection
lii   11
d r.«*i i
Solution to Problem Ne. T
Mark man <>r< I,'!, KIiikh ou i'i and
III. White int'ii (iii 1-. iin. Miij< on H.
Whlto to niov-f and ilrov
;to —'i*      h■- »h      ■«'•;   t;      sr.- ^t
^|,-,*-.y^ ,l9l,'f9,
is,*, umixe (ti'i-urrcd i>»-i*w«rt tl   M.
the WALDORF
\    Mr-.
Ne. Name
n vvm-t*-A«h .Mine ..
29   lltslcbend..	
411   Bee v«r Creok	
481   tl*»l-wrne	
3141   Blaimore	
ttm Bnrmis,..,
ff*7   Cwhoti-tnl*	
IM7 -CnniRora..,...........
■wn fnknur...	
£*m   ifcrtoin.	
Ilf«  <'hl»i">k Mlnte	
SSI4   Femkt	
UU   Finn*	
tttC   ttmw.r-r	
*ma   tHVrr***      ..   .   	
.VI4 ljhtlibTiAn*r...........
MM U-ttoiMn* CoUletim.,
t%n Moptnitmt	
2X14   Xtttbnt	
tm Ponton
UC lnbor.,
SMI
tonwnwoeeen
******* ******
ttmȤtMwb,Outwore.
See. and P. 0. Xdnrtu
(Wm. Mnrtdt. Taber, Alta.
J-*. Wh«atl*y, f)«nkb<ad, Alta.       <j
 3. loughran, Slenxer Creek, via Pincher, Alu.
 Jamos Burke, Iio* 26, IWllevuo. Attn.
.... W. C. Cfetiftophen, Malrniore, Alta,
..... T. 0. HarHee, Paaabur*. Alu.
 I. 3-Uu*1»bU, Cn(Uunl!ii«-, X uii»tnan, Alta.
.... MlrhMl Werren, C*nmor*. Alu
.,—I, iuwitsiun, iultiiMin*. Alu-
 tieou mnn. Corbin. It. C.
..... J»«. Horn*, Cblnook, «t» I'Msnsoad «ty. Alta*.
 Thos. I'phtn, Femie. R C.
 Kvan Mormn, Prank. Alta.
,.,.. XT. iUtdemme, lloemrr, ti. V.
....Ui. livtUUi, UilU.i«<»i. AU*.
 U Moore. l«3l Slxtte Arcane, .V, Letfcbrhft*
Kmnk narrlnjjbflm, (JoaUnirnf, Al'a,
...T. O. ttnnttOt. Pontbot*. Alta.
• • • ff« ISMMtft JiMMNf \% v.
♦ n * Ti Qa JIAfrtM* PMMM9Y* AmM.
Tu, kd«> by smf <*l mohli thudovafj
o,5 niilti'.t,*.'!* b •«*■ ,m uel-t'\H**i# tnHolak* ,.
natnvv, atoj'mf noflnne ton manionon
oinnm«'Til,  dlvnmr- c:i  rnhrndnjiif, ako
r«».i\ycb alllaiu'iach u irnaloi-b. Unli
jau Mine nonranlsovanl, ieh [wntaf«!
j ii.)lruuntlu itm U tomu, **> do rotnych
vladnych uradov noaadia avojleh l'udi,
j ktorl vynaNJn tak^ zakomy. ktor/- »u
'"     '      .        »-. «„».<.»«* tutm.ft'i.it)*!,
organisacii. VJak aj lent ehen ob
ratir 8h»wnanov protltrostovj xakon
v Bpojonfch Htatorh protl robot nk-
kym urilam. A Islf aom, te ked' h.i
robotnici n*pi#1ni* k apolofisej urarl,
te *>«koro prldP doba, kd« bude ■#>«•
ei»njl sakon. le r«rf»o»nl*Pi btidu pokn-
fovrtf.'f .1 x'<i*tit-m* ti tn, U M il,.mm
in-fiaikej uriif.
I    v*ak n* tem mlwtth »*«/»» fri<
ii«n*'    i'lutrw* do CatnmH, Mlrb, j.ta
| rit-e do Trinldnd. Colo.. « tam nenirl*'
jr»J>i nas robotnikov hex' akHkAt'w*
iprmoy:   A jeitii J« ake prtfinn, rak
[t.t ie int.* to, i* sm* soritiMthfoianl
{    Kapitalistl  to  ul  tuk d'aiokn  ; ti*
jiiiMlll. li- na iaiitio kfvnnUe k"h niky
ifi*,**-*  lm  *r.1x  nmn,l,i   ..^iu  teA |M>.
(moc.   A ti tjth vuj*k«>f eml tydrtia-
»»Jii?    Ibi  ekte /»o«    Ty^b   vojakov
) inualni'* my rohornl-il  vydrllavaC mi
fro. te ked' kapitalitti then nMtde r
mdwj hrmjlne tntnl' obebod • uoi lm
to neebvn dorolH', noi potto Um to-
t»km, nby tm Wli is fcanifnjtotov, Kod
ueckto tobotnkt dottdk' to, bby
ItalWl • Mm! narafcall   ^*
tlu* Bidhnr
mpnt.
t\
l„
juiiii
;l
T(
mir..:
?.':
99. . i. .'»..-,.!>, .>tuiia^ci
ANYONE
t      CAM
DYE
; THII« CLOTMU
  WITH ,
DYOLA'
I Tba Dy« that eolers AMY KIND!
}     ofCfc^Jrtpg^jWiIhe
k ^l^HMil   *|HMK|M& C&ttmWLt    _tt^_\ __l_^_^_^. }
GRAY HAIRS 1 HAH01CAP
\ Tendency of Modern Business Is lo
« Fnvor the Young Men
ThU ta i|w> >«,i»c rri«n'« nf< Kv
s *ry*0benn yo*t find thr- b'.if .!•'*'>»< In Ok-
ihand* of yonnx mm.    Th»- H!>i«-ar-
• not** nf ntt*  tV'i-'fi"       ■•■••   ,',"•*
, Youth and «»ffl«*ii»ii«>- are iir** m*l;n
■{In th«» fy-wi of bnslvK-ijR met,
InhiI !H » tf* lft-:tv !!::•'■<■  t ■, y.  -, .»ur
j«'Imnr«-a when it* w» rn-.  '.» j.n'v*-n»
! or cnr<» thf-m.
^    H*>> flair ileaiU* n-im-n ;,i<- tia-
uirtil ettliir to rr.iy h.-»:r    ■■■>.  .*-* .>♦;•■•
J wtll kn«w you u*> It
It   H   KO"   ii   ,)',       }■     -    ■      t :   '■ -A
I thit  rt*.tttrtrt*i*itr    -'      ' ■ '
'•he »calp. i«iii>}»ll.» !.. -       .   -  .*.-
la new !***** wt Mv i„r •.„,■•,■  •- ■f
\ l»rinifln«  bnrk   Ifh  t. ifuni  • ■ -   ■■   '
j hixnrianr*.   It rrtoovr* .'"i!"""
We Kuanwteo It to An thi*    V.nr
'money will b* refunded If ii r.i * at-
tw * fair trial.
-tl.OO. bbe, Ue,  an H at our  tore.
fOM «M ff<W0mK»ide<l by M<Uan«
Excellent Cuisine     American and
European Plan     Electric Light
Hot at Cold Water  Sample Rooms
Phones   Special Rates by the month
European Plan Room Rates
fiOc. and Upwards
American Plan Rates
12 00 pw Day
\r**m*k*ia0*w*i*%*i%d***id**^^
Stephen T. Humble
Furniture, Hardware, Ch^na,
Stationery, etc.
OLD COUNTRY PCRIODI
BELLEVUE
r^-sass 'fS'**r.;?*'-*!
,-<7' ^yyXS  A^X*M^A7A*.?piyX v^^V*^^V,>V-^^-^S^^^ v XPXA: X^-
-,.    -,.-.-   •* "ij*. * < .»*•*■> ,- Ah   .* ,"*. -    4*'--   ■> y -'.i,*   '-•>*-• y . * j*4, >«*'*-&-'- -.-"A t •(*-,*, -.   -v   -■. _ ,-• ,•
.:" -    "'   : A* r," i.   "--I,;'    ■" .,'■"        , .A',A:A. ^'" '  y.%'    ~
PAGE EIGHT
- -is«rr"—<
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, PERNIE,       B. C, APRIL 18, 1914.
/,
it-
%
GREAT PAY DAY VALUES
Men's Work
Shirts For
Saturday
$1.00
Here is a genuine money saver. This week we
will sellour Khaki Drill guaranteed Shirts at $1.00
each. All sizes in stock, collar attached, all buttons sewed on by hand. Don't neglect this opportunity if you need working Shirts. Saturday only, each	
$1.00
Men's
Summer
Underwear
50c. per
garment
Balbriggan Underwear, natural color, well finished, all sizes 34 to 44.   Will be sold Sat- r ft-
urday at per garment    DUCl
Men's Pyjamas
Oottton Pongee Pyjamas in a variety of shades,
iwade with  military  collar and  frog  fasteners.
These will be sold Saturday at per
suit	
$2.75
The Style
Subject
The value of good style in the clothes you select
cannot be overestimated. To give dlothes that certain touch of correctness which you are desirous
of seeing in your garments, is distinctly a question
of ability on the part of the maker of thc clothes.
The quality as largely a matter of honesty.
We believe you will "get what you pay for, in the
matter of falbrics and linings, if you buy clothes of
a reliable make, but if you want style combined
■with quality, it is a question of ability, not 'honesty. The 20fch Century Brand tailors have the
ability—hence the style you always find in these
bench-tailored garments.
Mens Odd Pants
':    -\
Men's Odd Panto, made in dark Tweeds, of good
weight, all sizes from 34 to:44. Regular A j r A
values $2.50 per pair.   Saturday price   y f |tj{J
Great Hat Sale Sat.
at the BigSto re
**
Men's Belts
A great assortment of Men's Belts are now ready
for your inspection; narrow Belts with patent adjustable, Gun Metal, Pearl and Inlaid A4 FA
Leather Buckles.   Priced 60c to    $ 11 VV
Ask to see our live ldatherBelt; it is something
new.
House. Dresess
-—Siae^6^f-Percals-4!^e-ia-b^t^eat--
ing and washing quality, Ex-   $1  ft ft
traspecial    OIlUU
IJjsiigfsjsigisigisigjsiaaB
Bath Towels
Showing a particularly good value in Towels.
Twenty cents eadh.   Big Bath Towels in plain,
white and 'colored, fringed and hemmed. Oft A
Each   ZUlll
pBsiaiaiEisjsjsraisiBisisis^^
Ladies' Dresses
We have five extreme Fancy Suits in
the Ready-to-Wear Dept. They are priced at $40.00, $45.00 and $50.00. Remember there is but one style to a color and
certainly only one size.   These Suits are     I
color as well.  Reg. $50.00.
Soft Felt Hats in all the hew shapes and colore,
will be sacrificed for Saturday only., In our Wg
window will be displayed Fedoras, Telescoped,
'Stiff Hats and the new High Crown Railroad
Shape, in* colors Brcrwn, Gray, Maroon, Navy,
Green and Black. These are all good buying at
/ $3.00 and $3.50, and will be sold Sat-' (H Cft
urday only at each     \l -nil
SEE WINDOW DISPLAY
Children s Hats
,   Never before have we shown more varioty in
shape, color or trimmings in Children's Hats. Now
is your opportunity to get your child a Spring Hat.
All the new shapes in Felt or Velvet are shown in
Navy, Brown, Fawn, bream, Gray or Green in a
wonderful variety of new Shapes.   These will be
on dispJay in our big window at our Spe- f rA
cial Satunljy Price  IJjIJ-
SEE THESE IN OUR CLOTHING DEPARTMENT
Mens Lite \ Hose
at Sat prices
3£rs.$t00
—Mdn-Bla«k^r^asri^so^!«^vai^y^ai«st4«2_
signs in Fancy Lisle Sox in Black, Tan, Blue, Gray,
;Mauve, Maroon and Green, will be on
sale Saturday at 3 pairs for .........
$1.00
SEE THESE IN OUR CLOTHING DEPARTMENT
Look At These Special
Shoe Dept.
Nothing sntisfioH n pnrtieu-
lar woman ns will a pcrfect-
iitting shoo; with it goes a
feeling of absolute content.
This Hhut rates one of our new
"Empress" .styles. Wc have
many others in hluck, which
we will lie jtleuml to show.
Clearing miIo nf l,iidi<-.s" Shoes for AA PA
Saturday anil Mondny »t por pair ...   U£ivU
Those SIidcn uro broken lines unit odd xizes in
our Im-sI iiiMkitt of fontuisir. Thoy nro Patent*.
■fJiiit Metal, Vioi Kid ntul Tans. Regular price*
ranging from t'.i.Vt in #.*>.00 per pair. 00 Cft
Saturday K|M-,-tai per pair     $£|*jU
Don't iiii%**i thi« opportunity of procuring « pair
o|   | llt'W  ,«*|M'i-Hll   l>IH"l»flil)<»,
Foot bafts & Foofbaff Boots
Wo have in stoi-k Ihi* «e«*oti n lino of Kut/lisli
I-Vtntbntl Hoof*, I Iio celebrated Kmbekny Shoe.
Tti<-*«' I'.<<>,••» uri* mntlf io tlm-*- <l»l'l"'-r«-»i'  >»rt<!»-»
in Whilo and Tan leathers Willi *rt>%n \mtv. on *u,\**-*
and aro  warrant oil  to give  perfect  *;itrsf»< tinn.
Si/.os .1 '•» 10.   I'rieo* por jmir ra?iy;m{?
froo $3.00 lo ,	
Football* frM» fl.60 to $4-W.
$3.75
m
Grocery Specials
PAY DAY SPECIALS
Lima Beans 3 lbs. .25
Canada First Cream, 20 oz. 2 tins .25
Robin Hood Breakfast Pood ... per packet .10
Krinklo Corn Flakes 4 packets .30
Lowney's Cream Chocolates per Ib. .35
Prairie Pride Flour 98 lb. sack 2.90
Prairie Pride Flour 4!) lb. sack 1.50
Pure Lard .;,........  5 lb. tin .75
Macaroni ..-  10 lb. box .65
Red Cross Pickles,' quart Sealers ...... each .35
Blnck Jiwk Stove Polish * per tin .10
Heinz Beans in Sauce  2 tins .35,
Swift'* White Laundry 8oap 7 bars .25
Mago .... • • • ■ /*... • ** H>«. -26
llcinx Tomato Soup per tin .10
Hogvr-8' Pure Cano Syrup per tin .15
S'ju'oinl Blond Bulk Ten  1 llw. 1.00
French Pea*  1 H». packet .10
11. C. White Potatoes per 100 lbs. 1.50
Mnow Ball Washing Maohirifw '... .8.00
Itoynl Canadian Wringere  each 4.00
Copper Bottoht Boilorn  each ^00
PATENT MBDIOINBS
Hoott'n Emulsion  large ni*e .75
'/.mn Buk iwr Iwx 35
Oln IHlk   36
lloooham Pill*  -.  .-$0
HoldHfi! Powdom  por box .15
hyman'H THleuin Powder  large tin* £6
Dress Goods
Wo aro now showing (Iio ."Mi-inch yard-wide JKilk
,,      , , * .
-M.H.*     *,'*'..«,#.*. .   *-t      •****   <■«-*     I   «..|* ***.'**    *t      ,--*,',        4.«*       *.*'*,    -
-.,••.   v ■■•••• t   \       ,   ',   .   ty ,...,',.*■■. r .*     *
}*uf tliVM* j.oijni',. i l\wy un: um-\t.■*:))< <'.    PI   Cfl
r..,woa   vlivU
Crunte$ English Prints
7 YARDB FOR $1.00
Bout grade Cruitio* Knglixh I'Hnf, froo from fill-
itur and a good wanhor. 100 different A4 AA
putlormi to *hmm> from. Hjw. r.il " y,\n.   *9| |||U
Furniture Section
HAVE YOU VISITED OUE NEW FUBNITUBE
SECTION?
This part of our store is bound to inteireat you,
for tho showing of new up-to-date Furnltur'o is
complete, all tho best in pattern and finhfo which
forms a most attractive display in this dean while
showroom. ■   •*.   .
A complete line of snappy new fr«u and Brtum
Beds always iu stock, which, when completed with
tho famous Ouarantced Alaska' Bedding kind of
Springs and Mattresses, make that sleep-inducing
kind of Bed.
Our Mock of Dining Room, Don and Library
Furniture is surely worth looking at. Thc Office
Kiimmiro and lU.k (W wvlion ih now up to the
minute with « g»Mid line of the pv«»r popular
Worniche Sectional Book Cases in Golden Oak,
I'lllUltl  U«K  HIOI   iinwi-uti.     llim  IK  tliu   1 MellllVlll
■LotiUiry iilow ol KottpuiK )our imh>k*.
Our spring stook of Go-Carts, Carriages, Sulkies,
Chair Carts, tie., Is also displayed on this floor.
We aro now in a position to supply you with tho
best from the common Kitchen ttwir to your last
need in this line at pri< e* that cannot be duplicated in this part of thc oountry. Come in and
look around anyway. You are under no obligation
to buy.
Housefurntshing Section
JThts is one department of which we are jiwtly
proud. Hero you find tho Carpets, Mfta, Window
Shades, Portiers, Linoleiuna, Oilcloths, ^VWlP^jar,
Braai and Wood Curtain Rods, oto.
This departijiont'is most interesting, as the com*
bination ofcol6t#in Rugs and Carpets,-the riot of
colors as thc amall Rugs aro sprend on this largo
floor, all go to make it well worth a visit at any
time.
We -have just opened up a shipment of English
Slats, and we can supply same at prices thai will
astonish you.
All the samples of our immense stock of Linoleums and Oilcloth art on show now and the price*
are lower than ever before.
Come in and sc* its anyway, whether you roqolf*
anything or not. We are glad to show yon onr
stock at any time.
WOMEN'S SEPARATE SKIRTS
25 PER CENT DISCOUNT FOR FAY SATURDAY
tlbmm from «ny Bkhrti in owir <e-M'm nlimk, from
H'-fli*   #1*»> fttX      Vnn trnt t  tt\ptm****t ist -OH WW* **WI
n
'-Viliinl:1," fiTiV**
FANCY NECKWEAR
One Wf 15*1 of flsncy X*"fi!w«ir~-4»Wt*, Cellars,
\Uxinn, etc, this st*son'» newcut ooliim an
t.ffi.e     Ih-rndn* tr* dt tbi- HMnrdnr   tttrh
WOMEN'S WASH WA11TS
•tow SS to 42, f«r Me saeb
Thi* in an except tonally good Waist value. Iiin-
jrerie. fancy  vesting ami  pique  Wafarts
Pric«l regularly at #1 JO; for each ...
50c,
95c.
Money Sav*
inz Prices
Vi
TRITES-WOOD COMPANY, Ltd.
BRANCHES Al  l*i;HNIfef MICHEL, NATAL   AND COAL CREEK
The Store of
Quality
/

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