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The District Ledger Jun 6, 1914

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. Industrial Unity is Strength
No. 41, Vol. VI.
The Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
'*'-.
C,
■*et»i4wi ii- •
Political Unity is Victory
THE DISTRICT LEDGER; FERNIE, B. C„ JUNE 6, 1914.
"EMPRESS" SURVIVORS
Heartrending Scenes Recounted by Rescued Passengers-No Time to Prepare for Horrible Doom
$1.00 A YEAR
ral
Dist. 18, United Mine Workers of America
The etorles told by the survivors of
Uie sinking ot tbe Empress of Ireland
possess a'poignant Interest. Some of
them follow:
Mr. and IMrs, Thomas H, Greenaway
of the Salvation Army band had .been
married ln Toronto but a -week  and
during the fow hours each gave the
• other up for lost.
"We were notified to.go on deck
.- after the crash,", said Mrs. Greenaway
- in relating hor experience. "And -With-
out -feeling very nervous, we threw on
wraps and left our cabin, In the confusion I lost my husband. I do not
know how it'happened,   but I found
' some friends and one of them put a
life-belt;'«& me, All the time I was
looking, for my husband, and he was
nowhere to 'be seen. The boat tilted
farther and we were all holding to the
.. rail ior dear lite. It Kept going over
and -we were all forced to climb the
rail and stand on the side. The *boat
was nearly under by naw. I felt that
all iwas over and I ibega-a to -pray. As
I stood there aBking for Divine help,
I felt the water Bwlftly mounting. The
suction drew me downward, deep down
ln the swirling 'backwater, I could not
seem to realise that, death .was very
near, even though I had given up all
hope. My ankle iwas cut and I vjae
•bruised about jlhe body as a result of
the explosion. When I regained consciousness, which must have been tout*
a.moment or go later, I. found myself
lying across a chair In the water. I
have no idea how I got there. I
think that the explosion must have
"blown Ae right out of the waiter.
"Then I made myself secure and
■waited.  Soon a raft wltji two men on
JtUloaied^e-ar-me^^-iage-snaa-asd
. another were on it.  The big man held
-out a paddle to.me and asked:  'Are
you alive?' ,"
'"I guess I am, because tiie cut in
my ankle and the burns are smarting
. me,' I told bim. I caught hold of tbe
•tick, however, and he pulled me onto
the raft.. Then he pnid: 'Do not be
afraid, little girl, my wife's gone,' and
I answered, 'I lost my husband.' He
gave me bis coat That kept me warm
and I think it saved my life. I do not
remomber anything more until I
found myself on board the collier. I
have not seen those men since, and I
- am afraid they went' down.    In the
morning they took me to a hotel."
Separatee! Prom Hia Wife
Mr. Greenaway told of the separation
and of his subiequent adventures. He
went back to get some wraps for his
wife and, also to close the 'window to
prevent <watcr from coming in ond
spoiling some of their clothes. None
of the pat-Miters, it would seem,
realised the danger. They all seem*
ed to think sjmott until tbe laat that
everything would be all right, When
he readied the dank, sold iMr. Green-
away, he eould not find Us wife. Several mem-ben of the party had seen
. her, but whers she was they did not
know. As tbe Mat went over,, ho
climbed over ths rail to tho aide with
the others. "I looked around for ber.
but she wat aot la tight I decided
that tbe must de gone and all this
time ahe ttoo* but a few feet away In
tke darkaeat.
"Then f decided to go down with the
•hip," he coatliued. "I greap*d the
tall firmly and down we went Then
came (he exploilon tbat loosened my
grip aad I earns to the surface. The
ilrat (bine I taw waa tbe lag of a
table. I am aot a swimmer, but I
managed to reach It and there I clung
until lha pilot boat picked me up. I
w«a taken ashore and received splendid treatment in s hospitable home and
then thia -morning t went out to aee If
my .wife had bm tared.
HI found her st tht hotel. We wept
togethtr tor van Joy."
ttirt, Oftara, Toronto, with her little
•lri ellnging to fair tide, wns onn of the
"I -was awakened," said Mr. Duncan,
"by four whistles, which meant that
the Empress of Ireland had been bit
by some other steamer, whioh turned
out to be the iStorstad. This meant
that Captain Kendall was 'keeping to
his course;' then there were..bell signals to go full astern. Tbe engines responded instantly, and then the .crash
oanie, the Storstad striking tbe Empress amidships. The Impact did. not
seem serious to Captain Kendall, or
the commander of the Storstad, bat
it was sufficent to leave quite a space
-between, them. The'Empress launched
a (boat to see what the damage was,
and almost at the same moment the
Empress listed to one side.
"Before there was any 'warning for
the passenger to go on deck, the ship
lurched again and went down."
Many Died In Lifeboats
;Mr. Duncan's account   of men and
women dying In the lifeboat from ev
.posure shocked   his   listeners   who
crowded about him at Levis.   As the
J_300 or more men filed   by   bim, Air.
Mr. Duncan noted the predominance of
members of the crew.   Of this he had
not a thing to say.   "There iwas some
fog," explained.Mr. Duncan, "and it
was cold.  We were going very slowly
when the (first 'whistle gave the warning of danger. Weather conditions were
favorable after the disaster.".
' <Mr .Duncan described the early dawn
and the fine warm sun which-came,up
same time and'said, "The sun saved
many a life."
'Described iby an officer tn charge of
one of the Ill-fated -liner's (boats as
"about the -bravest woman of tie lot,"
Mrs. Kieney from -Toronto told her
storsMa-sriiaif-^atHeticr MtPfcumoiv"
ous manner. {'
She <was dressed lh a big coat many
-dices too large, was without a hat and
had lost every bit of baggage and her
savings of 18 months that she was taking with her to England, where she was
to stay for a year's holiday. Nevertheless she wore a bright smile all'
through end declared that once she
Btarted out, not even a ship wreck
would make her turn hack. She would
wait at Quebec while the shipping
company made arrangements to send
her to her people, for she was determined to have her holiday.
"There were four girls in my cabin,"
she said, "and the only thing of the
accident I know of was that there was
a Hg ibump, All of us Jumped up, but
I said I thought lt was only an Iceberg
wo had smashed, and was not troubling, when I found that the boat was
going over to ohe side, so I ron up on
deck and found out what was the matter. The boat was going over all the
time and I could hear people all round
the boat crying for help.
Slide Down Deck Into Sea
"I saw a man slide right down the
deck Into the watipr and I thought I
might as well do H al«, to I let myself go. I had learned to swim when
younger, -but did not think I should be
able to do ao now. However, I waa
going away front the thlp when suddenly a man came toward me and clung
to -my nlgfatolothtt, for I had been
obliged to discard the raincoat. I
shouted to Mm to let me go, for he
waa pulling roe down, and my cries
must hare been heard In one of the
boats, for something came toward me
and I was pulled Into a boat. I could
not got in myte\t for tbo man was
holding onto me. He let. go as soon aa
I was pulled Into the boat.
"I oould not help laughing when I
dM gat Into tha boat, the way tliey all
looked," and the plucky little woman
rtgarded herself with a smile. She
hardly approved of (he clothes as sold
In RlmoQtM, "It It too bad, though,"
the added, "I have ben working In To-
ranio IS moatht and now I waa going
home for a nice,'long
Fernie. B. C. June 3rd, 1914
To the Members of Local Unions,
District No, 18, U.M.W. of A.
Greeting, !
We beg to advise you that President Smith tendered his resignation
to your Executive Board on Monday, June 1st, and the same was duly accepted. Your Board therefore made the", following anangemcuts lu •* i: election
for tho ollice of President:
Election to be held on June 26th, 1914.   Nominations to be in the
■a 1
District Office not later than the 17th inst. Ballots to be returned to District
Offlice not later than July 2nd, and the Tellers will (commence the count on
July 3rd.
In view of the complications arising out of the Preferential System
of balloting, in the recent election, you are kindly requested, when foi warding
your Nomination to state what are your Local's wishes in conducting this Election, on the Preferential Ballot System or revert to the old method of election.
Yours fraternally, ^
W. GRAHAM, Acting President
A. J. CARTEE, Secretary
Coal Operators Start
Intimidatory Tactics
" Denver, Colo., June 2.—^fter two
weeks of peace, the Colored j coal ope-
itors have renewed the'r campaign of
misrepresentation, this tlmo by announcing that strikers fired on Fed-
en 1 troops.
Union officials receiveu rews three
weeks ago, through one of tbeir
sources of information that the operators would plaut guns and then announce that they belonged to strikers.
This information was published by the
ewspapers at that time. The firing on
Federal troops is a similar stripe   of
f     m.
murdered the innocents at. Ludlow. C.
W. Varaum, who is registered as an attorney, told the Law and Order bunch
of lickspittles, for instance, that tbe
■massacre of the little children and 'women at Ludlow was the most magnificent 'battle ever fought by citizen sol'
diery.
THE C.N, P. FOOTBALL
LEAGUE
Referee,
J.
„   holiday  and
ZS «l hm1W21^!2: i!E VS «*.KlS%*» with all-ny money went:
4mnd and HMIt boy were with her j toffc ooU,i,t>H
when aha left yittmnday, Imt tonight'
fiat half of the party can* back. It
wan « heart-reading story the told the
eotrmpondent hetween her sobs. She
dttertbed hi dslall the homrt of the
night before, whM the got separated
teem her httehaml In the tnrrtbla struggle for life with bandrdadt of men and
women an teklldmi in Um waters of
the ft tAwnrnm. P-Wr-M w lw i
•Mat-tat mbtbb floated erne bet, she!
*** ewibisun oi tint naefeMMt and hoy |
Mather ami flirt Meet om Whorl
"liy the way," the atld, turntat to
u.cih.r lady tKt'ej behind her, thv*
le the new** who i»»»».td me oot of '.ba
water. It la Mra, Motile, who wat the
chief ttewaf-deta,"
One ef Pleven ftevwrtftsm ft vei
♦»!'#§, I was th) stewardess," nnftf
.vt.» »oh.it. "and I nm tha only (ve
saved of the etevwi ft ** *•**-* r *■»
nosrd.
karat ttmoa dtt Captain Kendall re.
j i.« u, hit thlp m-t tfcree tlm** ri
1 tb* kml mon to th
•Matches played last Saturday:
Michel, 3; Fernie, 1.   Referee,
Moore.
(Coleman, 2; Hlllcrest, 0.
Jas. Wilson.
Frank, 1;  Corbin, 0.   Referee,
Sapds.
A meeting of the Executive was
held at Sanl-torium Hotel, Frank, on
Saturday evening last, to hear the
charges preferred by Referee Walsh
against certain players and spectators
at the game played at Coal Creek on
Monday, IMay 25th; also to consider
protests by 'Goal Creek and Hillcrest
clubs against Referee Walsh's competency to act as referee.
There appeared before tbe committee to give evidence, Mr. Qrabam, Corbin, Mr. J. R. McDonald, Mr. I. Hutton and Mr. Marplas of Frank; Mr.
T. Banns and Mr, R. Johnston of
Coal Creek. The committee, after
carefully considering the evidence of
the above parties felt compelled to
take drastic measures In ordor to try
and give hotter protection to the
referees.
It might be pointed out. tbat, Insofar
as the Executive ara concerned, they
had no hand in appointing referees,
and are in no way responsible for
incompetent referees being selected,
they feel, however, that lt It Incumbent on then to give referees the fullest protection, until such evidence
may be forthcoming thet warrants
their suspension. It it to be hoped that
penalltes tbat have been dealt out re-
gardlng these oases will bave their
salutary effect on the players and
clubs of the league.
-The replay will, In all probability,
take place on Saturday, June tilth.
Coal Creek thould play Hosmer on
that date, •hat It Is believed thnt
mutual arrangement-* with Hoamer
will be made to play on Wednesday,
Joan 1Mb. in Fernie.
Below Is a full report of finding of
the committee:
JTbe Executive of the Crow's Neat
rats Football League having consld-
ere* the report of Referee Welsh on
the game between Coal Creek and
Frank, which took place at Coal
Creak on May 25th. finds aa follows:
1. ithe Rtecottve finds that T.
Banna wna guilty of misconduct to-
warda the referee on the field and
suspended him from May tt until
Jane 16th.
s. ttbo ftxecvtlva finds that W. McFegan wta guilty of misconduct to*
warda the referee on tho field aud
suspended hhn from May ttt until
Jane MU.
to be replayed at Fernie during the
inpnth of June, the referee to be
chosen by the ' secretary of the
league, and Coal Creek to pay Frank
their hotel and-train expenses in said
replayed-gaiB-K-— ~
JAMBS  F,  MACDONALD.
President.
J. M. WINDSOR,
Vice President.
A. J. CARTER,
Secretary.'
CARDEMONE V8>CROW8' NE8T *
PASS COAL COMPANY, LTD.
Plaintiff Loses Case
This now famous case came on for
GLADSTONE LOCAL-UNION
■The members of Gladstone Local
Union held a special mass meeting in
the Grand Theatre_aa-3'uesday-*mora-
ing,
The purpose of the meeting was to
receive and discuss a communication
from Superintendent Canfleld. It
was a reply to the demand of the
local union tbat "three men working
in a place shall cease on the 30th of
May."
The superintendent pleaded that it
j was not to the best interests of the
parties concerned   to   force   him to
carry out the terms of the agreement,
owing to tbe abnormal conditions of
  this particular   section   of the coal
second trial yesterday    before    the j seam in No. 2 mine.
Honorable Mr. Justice Clement.   Mr.
llQ curators submit vory 'convinc-
..'. i.Uiiit that the strikers did the
shooting. They say the shots came
from the Union tent colony.
People in .Coloardo, however, have
Ej| long since learned to know that this is
& ■ no sign that tho strikers created the
trouble. The remember the case of
ony Laugowski, .who told the Congressional committee that he was hired by
the operators to Join the Sopris local
and start trouble. He joined and became secretary of the local, receiving
|3 a week from the Union aud $3*a day
from the operators. Longowski did his
work well. He planted the dynamite.
It exploded- and strikers were blamed
for the reign of terror. His testimony
showed clearly tp what limits the Colorado coal operators -will go in their effort to discredit Union men.
•This is the 'open season for indict-
cents in Colorado. Fremont is the second corporation owned county that had
indicted Union men. More than 50 have
been arrested on charges of murder
and attempt to murder ana held under
exorbitant bonds.
This makes 150 men indicted, with
Las Animas and Huerfano counties tbe
centers of the conflict to . be heard
from. As these are probably tbe worst
corrupted counties in tbe State ,the
entire relief list of .the strikers will
probably ibe indicted.
And while all of these men have been
held on serious charges^ It_ls Interests
STRIKE
THREATENS
BITTER
STRUGGLE
Macnell and Mr. A. M. Johnson are
appearing for the defendant.. At tbe
conclusion of the plaintiff's case the
defendants applied for non-suit, which
was refused. Tbey called as witnesses
for -the defendants a galaxy of engineering stars from all over the country.
The Cardemone case, as It well
know, arose out of the snowslide at
Coal Creek, December 30th, 1912, in
which snowslide six men were killed
and several Injured, Somo of the
actions arising thereout were settled*
under tbe Workmen's Compesatlon
Act, but upon the advise of Mr. Macnell, Cardemon© Injury was made the
subject of a test case, and this ease,
coming up before Mr. Justice Murphy
last IMay, the plaintiff was non-suited,
but Mr. Macnell appealed and the
Court of Appeal In Vancouver last November held that there was evidence
to go to the Jury and unanimously
tent the ease back for a new trial,
whioh new trial Is now being held.
PRILIMINARV  NOTICE
A dance will be held In the Social-
ista* Hall, on Monday evening, June
Hnd, Tht procetdt to bt dsvoted te
the .striking mlntrt ef Colorado.
The "Vets" will meet on Sunday evening at 7 p. m. in the basement of
Chrlat ehurtsh (Anglican).
■The steam roller and rock crusher
have been ordered and will shortly be
at work repaying our streets and avenues.
We are glad to announce that Mra.
D. Rees, who wat removed to the hospital laat Tuesday, Is now well on the
fond to recovery.
The Coal Company are nuking good
progress with thnir lawn, and when
finished tbeir grounds will present a
moat pleasing appearand,
of  the
 SionsUd with *
TfcMtg to FUtnmitkl wharf InnlM*.!**^ •» ■* ^* f*»» « »r  »»«
fog nomHtlon, and hom*Mtr1e*cn «t !-??•*"«!«• **<*dhg -r> tht ito v .-!
tht* »>!«u.n*l   ,.t IV.   » .
ito ani daughter, Mre. O'Ham sod- Cw*. tecond enhla steward, both of
dimly heard the tries of "Mamma,
mamma." It wai her little girl who
had been rescued, too. It all seemed
like * dream to Mm. O'Ham, who
raited herself nn awl polled her iktje
tlrt bilo her nm*.  *w. tYrfm   erwi
whom were In thn laat boat to leave
the thlp. 1%ey had nothing bnt devotion to esprett regarding the brave
navigator who tbey deefcuvd, dropped
eshaosed to the deck ef the collier
after hf* *ntw»rfintn*>n ttfurtt to eave
HU aU tht othtrt, too Urad tnd wore I *•»**  ****** * the Imnan
to tomntdier mwk ot tf-m «M«.u«   t*t! fretaht, that   was m /^-Mr- aei*rtfil]
the awful dlsan-ftr, bnt. ker recollection
of lh* meeting with her only child waa
■my ilvld-
a. The vit**txti** n**a th*** *h>*
spectators, by thatr nnteemly be.fen Wedi-HMi»-i«*
»*tnit, vntMiiioind xo tae Mopping of
ihe game alter fifty-five minutes of
play, aad the Coal *rnr#k ground la
therefore tMpended nom May Mtb
until Jane Nth.
«      Ttt*   r»«r-.M..r       ...... ...J^      ,^
Referee Walsh did aot control the
gam* In * satlstattory manner aad
suggests <ha« Mr. Walsh tend In bla
resignation as « referee In the Crow's
Nest Pass FbotbtU League for tbe remainder of tho season.
5,   The    tttetntlr*   dlreetn   foal
Creek Football Club   to pnt *nt*rno\lM* ll^Ur» "«***
Walsh hit tmpntm   In   eme**^1™" *»« *•* w!m'
Ladles'
Tht monthly tea
rX**tta  tt - m.,.» i  -,*
teea tO*h, ' nt thi-
home et Mlts Alexander at Jl:80 21?
Thn usual monthly mating of the
Ladle** Boaevoileol Soclty will |* j^
at the home of Mrs. Sherwood Kerch-
mer ou Snlurdey, tke tkb.nt *:M.
Wm. Hynem. Frank R. Wheats and
J. Larson were In town attending a
apedal boar dmeetlnr. They staved
at tho Waldorf.
Several dtlsens are kicking about a
particularly    vicious    "dewi^    that
threatras to eonrart. till  emit  d«ri
Perhaps   tbe;
However, after considerable discussion, a resolution was again passed
advising the members to cease working three men in a place. A deputation was then appointed, composed of
one man from each mine, with the
Executive Officers, to Interview -Manager Wilson, and acquaint him of the
determination of tho meeting-
The snmo plea was again advanced,
that tbe abnormal pressure of tho
roof warranted the management in
employing three men to a place in
order that the work may be rushed
through. HoK'over, such arguments
ne advanced by Manager Wilson do
not meet with the approval of experienced miners. Some time ago tbe
Chief Inspector of Mines stopped the
practice of working three shifts In
tbe 24 hours, for the reaion that the
accelerated removal of coal produced
abnormal pressure of roof and sides,
and a large amount of gas, which
greatly added to the danger of life and
limb of the miner. Manager Wilton
gave the deputation a written assurance that Immediately thia abnormal
condition (whioh le not abnormal I of
the coal aeam was passed through,
the third man would bo withdrawn,
and furthermore, that the company
had no desire to Introduce this system In any mine at Coal Creek.
The report of the deputation was
received and discussed In the morning and the adjourned aeaalon In the
evening It waa again reiterated that
such a system could not be tolerated
any longer, being a violation of a
long-established custom and a breach
of the atiwrnent Acting IVldf-nt
draham and Secretary Carter addressed the meeting unofficially. We
learo that the men ar* now working
two In a place and things have b*#n
satisfactorily adjnsted.
The news of th** r^lgntuion of J. R.
Smith came as a nnmt «urprioe to his
friends nnd supporters, The roaaon.
for taking such action was presented
IW# hon* «»M "M« ■*n«>wV*«"'  tit tVr'™
working* of the agreement nnd other
l*gal matters pertaining to District
It **«!♦*. placed   at 4he disposal of
t|»* officer* (n charge,
-irrg-ro"Hor<ntIiaT not a single member
of the militia or one of the operators'
ired gunmen lias even been mentioned
in the reports of these grand juries.
Considering that these imported assassins in the uniform of Colorado's
militia murdered nineteen men, women
and children at Ludlow and that the
miners killed no women and children
and only such men as deliberately attacked them, tbe results of these grand
jury Investigations should certainly
show tbe United States just how rotten
is the corporation control of Colorado's
county and State governments.
Adjutant General John Chase, who at
the head of the mllltla tryannlzed the
strikers for six months and kicked
Snrah Slator viciously in ' the breast
when he and his troopers tried to
slaughter parading women and children
in Trinidad, January 22, showed his
size as a "man" In n speech at Greeley
this week.
This pliant lickspittle of the operators who made a miserable failure of
trying to brenk the strlko for the operators and was chagrined when his
"mellsh" wero forced out of tho field
by the United States troops, expressed
himself ns follows:
"It Is with extreme satisfaction that
I read that the troops of the United
States are being made monkeys of and
that every time President Wilson tries
to make a move chaos results in the
house."
Chase Is now acting aa an evangelist
for the "Law and Older League," or
Citizens' Alliance. That one (icntcnco
thould show the people of the country
what kind of law and order Chase
wantt,
The operators are frantically grasp-
iuti every straw to win back public sentiment lost forever when their gunmen
London, June 3.—The building
trades war, which began in London
last autumn and will extend into a
national strike a week hence, threatens to become a prolonged and bitter tussle.
•The London Federation of Building
industries has made a sensational
strategic move, equalling that of the
building contractors, by the elimination of the new $500,000 headquarters
of the London Theosophioal society
from among the works stopped. The
society's trustees have now agreed: to'
employ Iftbor directly through the
federation, the latter guaranteeing to
supply efficient workmen, it, of
course, insists tbat only trade unionists shall be employed and it offers
Blmilar terms to such master .builders
as are ready to quit the employers'
federation and accept "tbo closed
shop" principle.
It. is believed that this policy will
be largely developed and ultimately
employ a majority of the 26,000 London workers now locked out and thus
provide a solution of the London dispute.
FLATTERING!
Last week, upon receipt of the news
that thc Empress of Ireland bad gone
down with some thousand souls
on board, we made arrangements    with     the   Lethbridge   Her-
aU     to     telegraph     ua     a full
account—TttWwiw done and the
Ledger was the first paper to give a
full account of the disaster in Fernie.
There Is, however, another paper ln
the town tbat does not believe in paying for telegraph news or crediting a
contemporary for special news that
they clip. The whole of the special
wire to the Ledger, w6rd for word, and
even the errors, was clipped and published without the slightest acknowledgement. We feel flattered at tbem
recognizing our enterprise to the extent of clipping our now#, but to reproduce our errors must be either rank
ignorance or dog-gone cussidness. Is
it possible that this was Intended for
a courteous acknowledgement that we
are invariably correct?
MISSED SHOT KILLS
MINER AT PHOENIX
Phoenix, Ii. C, June 2,—In a blasting accident at tho Gold Drop mine,
today, Kdoff Johnson was killed out-
right and James Logan, received injuries from which he may not recover.
Tho men bad loaded tt round of
holes and spit the fuse, but in the reports that followed th^y found Hint
ono of the boles failed to go off. They
waited a considerable length of time
and then went back, with the expectation of finding a missed holo, Just
as they got sback tho shot went off,
Johnson's body was badly managled.
LoRan, who Is now In the hospital, in
injured severely about the face and
one eye is gone. Johnson leaves a
wife and four children. He was about
42 years of age. Logau ia about 24
year of age and unmarried. Roth
men belonged to the Phoenix Miners'
Union and Johnson wa* nlm a member of the Scandinavian Aid and Fellowship Society.—Nelaon Pally N«ws.
Now on in the mining camps of Cumberland, Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, B C.
AU workers keep away. The Coal Barons are being aided in an attempt to br*nk
the strike and defeat trade unionism by
Bowser's Special Police and Soldiers,
•VWMiMbf   HAH TV
Of
IU
W4gn tn the latt," said the two men IWJJ? °JLM*y mh' !***•.
"itrteg erdwa, bat at last Nfc S MaiL.™l2?"w",."r* h«*,B« **aaM*i»d
The tntl detail! of the disaster may w»« *»« » **»». manned by onnwim, f *hf. **!*?* J.,w,|r*rt *y CM c»*«*
*e ettbered by in Interview with Mr. *"* *■» «' the bedraom HowardsI'J^^ZS™? " nmm ****>•
FWgws Dtftfaa ot London. England. *«* ** fM**4 *»d*r tbe le* nf tb* !2*fc'™t! ** mm *•**««•
%tr.1htn«m donrrthntt th> crcn'a at tlw I*"***   *** ^f^ft (Irapyod .«imI *** ^.l* •*?,r°t!. ?***'■ **M»  ''luufc[
nUht tnm the tlm* he bemtd tb* ffm
w-hlsff*.
swimming wbtm w« picked Mm np.
(Continued on Vngn FVwr.)
tnd fool t>aeb,  trbtrk
•Pwnb, nnhoM, the   pwr#g   of   ^
fvwl Oeek flnb and directs the
-W* are pleated to announce that
Comtndo Oaborne of California, «^m
!E*S ^T™ •» «• Wnd ointor of
2M?d,l!Sl *V, will siMMk at the
SotMlat  Unit on Wednerinr, ,1nrt*
>mh*   Many yearn ago Comrad* Os-!
iborn* rteittd !*«,„, „,, th#, wsm |
ther* being   only   thww   rttr SITta ^J^L"*, Wm* mn mmi'\
Prisoners   ta   ptrt^rm   tie   wSiTSJV**,f.^"^«*»J b* l« *«.
dutlea of beautifying the M. itnZ^JT*4   $mk'm   of'
...       , . 1,Bt ■MW*tt*ni.   We nn* upon »!! In-t
A vole of conduce waapaae** by terwrted to attend ■&»*!«?■, <
th* KtecwU* wiker* ot Oladtteaej   Ctmrn** y
♦ known blind	
CaHfctnfs, wft? Hpwak Rt
.Uv^l i .',*.** **> *m lufovNcd to the
Jrvtstlw* ot onr brother* wbo lost
lb-Mr Uv, through the disaster to tk*
Kmpr*** oi Iw'aitd.
W.  ftahOfTir
orator   and*
author of j
"*" "n ^uraday. June lub. * », «.
'Bverybody |»rft«4.
Tlifw«»«rf? of wen arc cut qi *<h	
British Columbia, and there is no chance
for a man to get work unless he goes ,to
work about the mines to s»cab against his
fellow workmen
KEEP AWAY FROM VANCOUVER
ISLAND, B.C.
1
stm
y^>^s/^^%
^t^S"
>®M
i
iTA
;Wi
^^yfe^ PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERMIEi ■ R 0., JUNE 6,1914.
.**.'-",:■
A--'
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
*«i'-«<i-vsu---*im.v'»^^
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock In K. P.
Hall.
Noble Grand, H. E. Dames.
Secretary, J. B, Moiklejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Alello's Hall second and ihird Mondays in
each month.
John -M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie. Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m.. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
0. C„ A. Bunch.
K. of S„ D. J. Black.
M. of V., Jas. Madison.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
PEW Wvwvvv ■»¥¥-¥¥¥¥¥¥*
■UPMHf****
Morris HiHquit Tells U. S: BoardsfAim
of Socialist Party And Shows How it |
Always Fights For Labor
^••••*ii»****»*»*»**»»»»*»»jli»¥¥¥¥»»¥»»»»»»VVVVV¥V¥¥¥»»^
^tcktcbirk'klck'lcksick'tcki
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meet every Monday at S
p m. in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, F. II. Newnham.
Secretary, G. Moses.
139 McPherson Avenue.
LOYAL TRUE BLUE ASSOCIATION
Lady Terrace Lodge, No.
224, meets in the K. P. HaU
.second and fourth Friday of
i ach month at 8 p. m.
.MRS. J. BROOKS. W. M.
W. ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet
at the K. P. Hall first and
third Friday evening of each
month.
It. CRIOHTOX. W. JL
JOSEPH    HICKS
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
MACLEOD
Visits Bellevue
Box 7
on the
_giontb._
With Samuel Gompers, .president of
the American Federation of Labor, in
tlie role of examiner, -Morris HiHquit,
representing the Socialist Party of tte
United States, recently laid before the
Uie United States Commission on Industrial Relations at the City .hall ia
N'ew York, one of the most masterful
oral expositions of Socialism and the
relation of the Socialist, party to
trades unionism that ever has been
pipst-nttd   In New York.
First to Tako Labor's Side
Mr,  HiHquit declared  that the So-
..•i-AHst party was the first organization
to lane the field for labor legMntlor,
tlu: it l'as   consistently   aided    the
fule diiion movement ln fighting for
improved   conditions.    i'e   explained
! wiib cure, In answer to a multitude of
questions, tho dL1».er>.e betvedi an
-.■"ffit'lal expression of the party tird
tho utterances of individual Soolallsts.
IMr. HiHquit was at all times ready
with his answers   to questions.   During tbe morning session he had delivered a    statement    covering    the
work and aims of rhe Socialist party,
and his address covering an hour and
one-half  of   time.    The   questioning,
however, found him in fine condition
and he appeared to enjoy every moment of it.    The Board of Estimate
Chamber,   where   the   hearing   was
held, was   packed.     Frequently   the
auuience tbroke into   applause, compelling   Chairman   Walsh   to       rap
sharply for order.
Doesn't Oppose Organized Workers
iMr. Hillquit declared that the   Socialist   movement   was   not   in   opposition to    the organized labor movement, though many Socialists believed
that the   present     leadership is not
suniciently progressive.
President Gompers was called as
the first witness at the morning session, but he disliked going on tbe
stand. He said that he understood
the A. F. ot L. was to be the subject
of investigation and said he wanted
time to prepare data on the matter,
stating that he was ready to place the
cards on the table face up. After a
lengthy argument, he was excused
and Vincent St. John, Secretary and
Treasurer of the I. W. W.1 was called
to the stand.
When the afternoon session opened,
the   chairman   announced     tHat   a
ALBERTA  raidcal departure would be made in
14th of each  llie procedure and conduct of the session and that he would permit Gora-
JOSEPH    HICKS
Advokat
Verejny Notar
MACLEOD BOX 7 ALBERTA
Nactivuje Bellovue na 14 kafidy raesac
In reply to questions as to -industrial unionism, Hillquit expressed "the
opinion that the A. F. of L.' was.rapidly .changing its form. He said amalgamation of various trades in one-industry tended to .ibring greater solidarity of the workers.
In beginning his address, Hillquit
outlined the object and history of
the Socialist party.
Socialist Party's Object
"The object of the Socialist party
or of the Socialist movement may be
summarized in a fow words," he began, "the nationalization of the industries. The Socialist party believes
that the first and most important industries of the country, such as those
upon which the life and welfare of
ihe community defends, should not
•be owned, managed and controlled -by
Individuals or private corporations for
their .perBonul .benefit and profit and
without regard for the public welfare,
hut should ibe conducted as a social
function primarily for the benefit of
the community by responsible agents
of the people organized for that purpose.
"Concretely stated, Socialism demands the collective ownership of the
principal tools, sources <and resources
of wealth production. When I say
collective ownership,, I do not mean
by that national ownership of all the
industries in the, country. The Socialists would abolish private irresponsible ownership and would substitute social Ownership in such form
as in each oase would be 'best adapted,
to a. given industry.
"Far instance, we advocate national
ownership of Interstate railroads, telephones, telegraphs and other means
of Interstate communication and
transportation. We might well conceive of a -proper national ownership
and management of mines, for instance, or of such industries as are
already organized on a national scale,
as the great trustified industries of
■the country.
Others Best Run by City
"We would .probably conceive of
certain other industries wholly located iwithin one city and best managed by the city government. Then
there is the large area of municipal
industries, such as street cars, water- Convention
works and gas works which should be i party,
DR. JOHN   BARBER,   DENTIST
Office: Above Bleasdell's Drug 8tore
Phone 121
Residence: 21 Victoria Avenue
device or a new social scheme. It is
nothing ibut an attempted solution oi
certain problems which have arisen
recently and for which. Socialists believe the Socialist" program is the only
■answer." ;;
Hillquit then pointed out the historical basis of the .Socialist movement. He traced the development of
industry from the individualistic
handicraft stage to .its. contemporary
condition of large scale social production, emphasizing the fact that it
has accomplished the divorcement of
the worker from the tool of .produc
tion and concentrated him with bis
fellows In large factories and work
shops where he operates machines
which do not 'belong to him and the
exclusive ownership of which by the
Individual workers would be impossible. Ho pointed out the distinction between the social tools of production and their method of owner-
ership, and declared that it was the
purpose of the Socialist movement to
bring the ownership of the tools ot
'production into harmony with the
method.
Explains Class Struggle
He explained the class struggle and
said that it was at the bottom of practically all the big soc'a'. problems of
■the day, and declared that these problems would continue as lo*:*; as the
class struggle exists.
He touched 'briefly on some of the
big questions of the day—rhlld labcr,
unemployment, vice" and crime—and
said they all had their origin in the
capitalist system.   '
Hillquit 'was . particular to make
clear that the Socialists were evolu-
lonlsts, who neither proposed to nor
believed they could abolish the present social order out of hand. The Socialist iparty, he explained, receives its
principal support from tho better
situated workers. "This does not
mean," he Bald "that the Socialists
wish to encourage a labor aristocracy,"
In answer to a question by Thompson, Hillquit made clear the position
of the Socialist party toward tho labor organizations, reading into the
record the resolution on the union
question adopted at the Indianapolis
In   1912   of the Socialist
Health Restored By   -
HA.GERSVti,i,£! ONY,, Aug.! 26th. 1913.
"About two years ago, I found my
health in a very bad state. My kidneys
and liver were not doing their work, and
I became all run-down. AI felt the need
of some good remedy, and having seen
"Fruit-a-tives" advertised, I decided to
try them.' ...   {      ". \ *.•.*.. .
Their   effect,  I   found   more   than.,
satisfactory.   Their action was mild and"
the results all that could have been
expected.   •
My liver and kidneys resumed their
normal action after I had takeu upwards
of a dozen boxes, and I regained my old
time vitality.   Today, I am as well as
ever, the besthealthlhaveever enjoyed,
and- I  unhesitatingly give  you  this
testimonial for publication if you wish"
B. A. KELLY.
In huudreds of letters received by the
Fruit-a-tives Company, tlie same expression is used "Fruit-a-tives is the best
kidney remedy in the world".   At any.
rate, these tablets have proved the best
to the hundreds of men and women who
have been cured by taking them,   50c a
box, 6 for $2.50, trial size, 35c.   At all
dealers or sent on receipt of price by
Fruit-a-tives Limited, Ottawa.
Gladly.
operated 'by the eity. We might also
conceive of certain other Industries
so unorganized or perhaps unorganiz-
FERNIE
B. C.
ALEXANDER MACNEIL
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, ete.
Offices: Eckstein Building,
Pcrnls, B.C.
C. tews Alex. t. Flatw
LAWE A FISHER
ATT01WBY8
Fernie, ft C.
KING'S  HOTEL
iim* »U|»|mh*<I wilh  it,**  in-ftl
!.l.|tHttx ami CiH'M*
\V 111*4-1
iiersTo"questlOTTnil5uItr"   "
"In your statement of tho objects
of the Socialist party, did you Infer
that lt was the purpose of your .party
to help the trades union movement in
gaining better conditions for the
workers?" was the first question.
"I did," he relied with emphasis.
"That has been the policy of the
party always."
"Has that always been the policy of
tho Socialist party.?" Uo was asked.
lillquitt explained that this position
has always been maintained by the
Socialist party. Gompers then tried
to show that the Socialist movement
has on several occasions encouraged
tlie organization of unions opposed to
existing trade organization, but Hill-
qultt declared that this was done 'by
the S. L. P., not by tae Socialist party.
"Has factory legislation been recognized (by the Socialist party?"
Always Aid Factory Legislation
"Wherever possible the Socialist
party has aided It. It took an active
part in 'promoting workmen's compensation, State insurance, Industrial
legislation, old age pensions and child
labor legislation,"  Hlllqult  replied.
Oompors next nskcrt WUpilt
whether he knew thnt the Workman's
Compensation Act was pawed at the
Instance of the State Federation of
Labor, the latter replying affinitive-
ly. Hillquit was then asked
whether thc Socialist party was In-
MntiiH'uua in passing It.
"It did not and could not. if It had,
It would be much better than It is,"
was, the quick reply.
Hillquit went on to explain tost tne
Hoeielitt party was the pioneer tn Ihe
flKht for  labor  legislation
tho a. K. of I* took up the right for
uni*r_itrtne!rTiTitTrrr,S"TO"D*5~§veir'in-'
cnpnblo of municipal operation. They
might be operated by co-operative
bureaus under certain government
supervision and control.,
"Socialism does not necessarily exclude private ownership and private
management of purely Individual industries. Xaw this social program is
by no mann-Sr of means an arbitrary
- Hillquit Closely Followed
'Hlllqult's remarks    were    followed
with the closest attention. Mrs. Harri-
mSBT^nieiriHF"w^^5riilteniHI~iiF
tentiy, iwas nodding her head affirmatively. None tlie less an interested
listener was -Samuel Gompers, who
occasionally raised his hand to bis ear
as he bent forward, ln order not to
miss a word. When Hlllqult expressed
hia opinion of the Civic Federation,
Mrs. Harriman and Gompers exchanged smile*.
noise when tlie cause stops
Gladly.   Watch and see.
'Remember, dear masters, that you
cannot crucify this noise on any cross,'
This noise has come Into the world
to save your souls, . It may sleep. But
It 'will not die. You may think lt
gone. - But it will always .return to
worry you, Tyranny hates thia noise.
This noise is the one thing which
makes it impossible for Injustice to
granary the harvest of.its .perfidies.
This noise, dear masters, le going to
save you in spite of yourselves. It is
not going to save you because you
alone would 'be worth saving. Or <be-
causo any one alone would be worth
saving. And this noise will save the
race. You will find that no oue man
Ib secure" until all are secure with
him. For money will not make ypu
secure. Only justice will make you
secure. And this noise that today eo
puzzles and often so enrages you Is
justice. And justice will save your
soul.
I toning you a great noise, dear masters. You point your telescopes to
heaven. But no telescope could divulge to you the secret of my noise..
I am neither, kind nor harsh. I am
only just I am not the noise of revenge. I am the noise of reciprocity,
I am neither for any one side nor
~any""*otn*er"siae:   1-ahnor
"wprk performed there, of/the -marvelous .machinery,;the.,^highvwages, the"
oomjpany houses, Colonel ^Goethalsj and
the cost din millions' of. dollar-si-' 'JNofw
we are learning-a" little of :ttie;cost to.
the working ejlase in Wood and* -life..,. j
"inquiry was;Tecently made: of .the
Washington office of, the, Isthmian Canal.Commission as to the accidents oil
thel'canal, lives ,lostJthr6ugh" -iocideait,
malarial fever, and so (forth: * Strang?
■to-say, th§ Washington otfitje did "not
have these1 vital' statistics. It, has a
record of the cubic yards, of. dirt - re^
moved right.up to-'the time*th©"last
boat left .the .canal, 'but as. to such
trifles as tend cut off, legs amputated,
oar even lives lost—such little details
as these .are not,kept in Washington.
.SQ,Goeithalsiw*as asked to unliiajer. He
h$& done so, ■ partially, at 4-east, .re-
getting that''our records dojnotr- give
all the information."- The records, incomplete as they are, tell the following
tragloetory: „ .."."..
Lives Lost
May 1, 1904,   to   March   31,   1914,
1,219- „ ...
These figures only include "lives
lost through accidents happening on
the work, except that it includes 167
deaths from.accidental drowning, all
of which did not occur on the iw-ork."
Just' what distinction ls made at Panama 'between lives lost "on the work"
and otherwise ik not clear" in Goethala'
report. But it-Is growsome enough in
Us incompleteness:
Accidents'
■Accidents (resulting in Injuries, August!, 1908, to August 1, 1914, 25,101.
An average of over 4,000 a year.
Malarial Fever
We have 'been regaled with fanciful
stories of the Isthmus ae Ibeing aa
healthy as a New England village.
Here ere a few' Illuminating  tflgurea
from Goethals* record:. - •  . V- >. •)"-- ■-„---"-• • - -.-
'• May-O904, to^larbhTSl," 1914; Suf«;y*".\ 1
few&f^m; malarial feyer, J98,875;.di^d:- ;;/;.
from/mala'rial:-fever,k743.';-.. -'*;' >rf■"•'-"(■ 7
"*:-' >::'.," *"«-J-Typh6ld"Fever      , -."-•- .::,"//{•;,
.^January 1,. 1907,-ttf March 3i,i914;^:',"'. t
Suffered from   typhoid .fever,-"1,162;, "j '•,: ',
di§d £rom typhoid fever, 228.  -    -","'.    ...,,*.
,..;In spitejot ithe "-^ffiiciency" that has5 ". .v.
marked' tlio' *oonstruotioaf of .tihe canal,'-      s '•
the?- accidents  arid  deaths  •compare A      -
favorably with m^,n.yv.of J<our" ■wars.,     '.'.
;in the SpanlsteAmorican" war those -
who were, killed br/dded'ottthe-ibaittte-
field or from/wounds numbered 26?;Jin,'.x
the -JMextcan'.wair,', i\049, - while jn'tjie •*.-»
;war of. 1812 ..those ^rtio were: Mikjd?'onr; -
the„ -battlefield' ,or died)- afteorwardij "totaled i,985r" ,:*,   -'-...._ "~ -      ".*."..,
■ -Yet ten ..years^cpnquesirof -Pansjma^ .
hSa, cost r 1^,' 2Jl90"V.WklngTO-ep'e, v
corpses .through accident and f ever! In s
4-ke; Revolutionary war .but" l,735^1lves n
werelost «U (told, -Including those who"'
were'klljed'oh-"the fleW of .battle and '',,
W'ho'_JIed' .aftenwirde 7. from," ctheir ~
wounds..; €0 it" is well "that" our. good"-"
patriots should know  that, the ditch*
through Panama haq .to date oosi.more ..
Uvea than, did wresting the liberty of
of  the  colonists, from   "British tyranny." ,     ■---.""
.The Mexican war,.whlchi gave   the
United States its western .smipire, end .
the wtar of 1812,7wbtoh tiwlsted   the"
Ion's tail so that It has never regained
It original beauty—the two ware ell
told cost ibut 2,134 human lives,' 'while
the conquest of Panama "tor the -shipping truet has cost 2,190.
Nearly $200,000,000 a year are paid -,
to the victims of military shot,   shell
and  disease,   while   hot. 200,000,000
cents are- paid to the victims of   industrial shell and disease.
Three cheens tor the   flag!—N. Y.1
Call.     •     -   ■• v
&.*■!
J. T. GIDDINGS
BUILDER & CONTRACTOR
Plans and Specifications Furnished For
All.Kinds of Work
What's All the Noise About?
le nor for |
"a3:n   atfj"
nybody to I
Phone 123
Fernie^ B.C.
By Horace
Traubelr In
munal
Chants Com-
What Is all the noise about? Do
you think we make this big noise because *we love noise Itself? We do not
love noise any better than you do,
dear masters. Out we love certain
things which a noise big enough may
brings to pass. That Is why we make
a big noise now. Dear masters, you
hear this noise .wherever you go. You
stuff your ears. You hear the noise.
Your sleep nay toe very deep. Deeper thun the eoundlng of sens. But
this noise is very loud, lt Is louder
than the deepest sleep. You may
make your life lusty witb the counter
noise of trade. But this other noise
that you do not like out-noisee your
noise. Tbls noise Is a noise for even
tlm de-.it to hear. ! We are sorry for
you. How oould we help being sorry
for you. We ere eo sorry for you thet
we are almost tempted to be quiet.
Dot wo nro so much sorrier for ourselves that we must make the noise.
DININO  W»mi   IX t'OXNKtTlON
. Listen, dear masters,   What do you
"*•""»'think of om?    uotM^    IKhn ft grind
.. ,   , ,. . , „,„   J,     ..Hand grunstle in your cars?   Does It
he passage of   labor aw. ouly »ft«r tock ttnhtwtr mA ra*mf|uotiiM!#ss „f
It had irclvcd \nUnk\e miss, .:km  bumonie am^m    lloe,  lt „„,,
from   the Socialist party.     H» «W|IB4,tWblr(l4   tm<*r  mi   ^^
igtilost your tympanum*. Wbut do
you think uf itolw-T Till* noise eo
shsmeles*.    Thl* not** so   blatant,
If. MILLS.
Pnp
A RITOUT TO THt POtM "PHIt-
OSOPMY"
Btiitw* Wtmrtn'i* Hi»be*r«:
ill     13*.     Mnwll'l      **    *..«.•«   ;
joti prtnu-d .1 '."Win er.Mtl-MI
oi>hy," whi-ch was rvvoiimg
♦.mutt -c*»nti»nmn»nt,
nplnkiti* *»n ♦'     I
Hpiit-rv
•»»hi!«.«.
iu    i«*
Von eaktd  tor
\. tli ul..   IU   wllit   10
jwii iltw folkiwiuit~-a retort, as it were.
»'lr**t***m»ll» ifOtti**,      M. ■>■ C.
H« ho! »Mt! tbi* is a hdly piece,
.Vrnl mtc it 4* }ti>.,*« .iun*.
Wtefeii I, ihe tut-kku -ui too tern,
I'm P,*eat»,k,ir * »y*» fc*"W*
mny are toiling snd teittag.
WMk' I hllt-Holy sln« my «o«#™
llc said,
I when   the   workmen's   <i»tnp«'ti*ntkH» I
mnvt'm*'Tit first stirtod In this   Btate, \
imoHt labor men did not know w1to<
jit was   Hilbinli wont on to wiy that
i NVw York JO-optratwl    with the. Bo-
jclnllM i.rt} in d^urlnu the passage
of tbi* first c<im,,^ts#atiin act in thl«
'fltate, wh!<U was (l*»fliir*?d uncon*tttn-
j ,kmt»l Uy tli« courts.
'   Says Oewptrs -SptsVi fer Hi-mttlf
When tlon»fN»rs   af«ln referred   to
1 Holm,  Uilfcitilt    told   flompcr*    that
thou«h be iisd imbtlshed angles m
■f'li' ff Arret inn «rCT« apiMMtmt i!h» Ho-
>lali«t putty. tb*y w«»w» not the vlewi
of a good porloj* nf «he mpiBNT-thlp
uf the A. r. of I... tin1 *>';im<» tm Vrb*'
This noise .without sense of proportion end piece. This noise of the common, This ttolse of -pvery dey. This
ruilM of the hlnh rond.
You do not like- to Ik. invaded, deer!only be replied to ta we
niAsters.  You »:t at your table end j wtrrender.   Flattery will
I am making it as ugly as such a noise
must be. I come Into your church end
Interrupt the serene platitudes of the
sermon. I enter your editorial rooms
and make it bard for you to dictate
your paid opinions. 1 Interlude harshly
upon the ruffled verbalisms of the
courts. You have supposed I was
many things. . And you have invented
many words to describe me. Yes, oven
words to curse mc. But I ant all one
noise, Gup word describes me, I
strike tbe note of discontent. When
you hear me you may know you ere
in the presence of rebellion.
Dear masters, you are doing every*
thing you know bow to suppress m«
You try persuasion. Yotl try threat.
You try the law. You try injunction.
You Increase your armies and nsvlee.
You cajole the coutts. Out all theee
ere subterfuges. These do not touch
the nerve. So you find that our nolte
$0** on increasing. You wonder. You
try charity. You throw s library at
w.?. Yovii vow** fov m«'> with » h,fl¥*!*vttat,
You uppweut me with a college, hut
I remain unharmed. You discuss thle
myetlfying phenomenon You ask the
chur-ch to reply to my noise. The
church points to its creed, Ymi ask
the elate to rely to my koine. The
state points to Its police, You not
society to reply to my aolse, Society
point* to its parlors. IM hew can my
nolae he replied to by the evil from
which It is n rmltt   My noise  ran
way.    Ry
not  np./*
noise Is not a noise calling anybody
repentance. It Is & noise reminding
everybody of salvation. ' My noise ie
the one way ot salvation. I aim the
voice and matter of the commune. I
am the cry and silence of the universal
life. «You build olttea In'vain it you
do not 'build them for me. I am the
clamor of the underman. How can
you'build your overman if not on me?
I am .the rebel famine issuing its bulletin of warning. I am labor grown
to a consciousness of Its splendor. In
my noise you find labor nt last honoring itself. Labor hae too long taken
Itself et your estimate. Mow labor is
lifted to the realm of an adequate self-
reapect. .That, dear masters, le iwhat
my noise means. That la what my
nolso mean*, no matter in what form
or phrase it comes. Do not mistake
me. That noise Is a ejrmptom and
symbol of resurrection.—N. Y. Call
XsnjBrn
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on first class Business and Residential property
J
COST OP THE PANAMA CANAL
TO THt WORKING CUM
"Hy Julian Pierce
Sn the Panama canal near* ita earn*
pletlon, certain Information I* leaking
out that i* Interesting tn Ita bloody
tragedy to the worlting elase. We
have heard of the treat engineering.
Established April 1899
■ '"■.»       • ,      "'    o^ r i. 	
W. A. INGRAM
Wholosalo and Retail   TobaCCOHtSt
BARBER  SHOP
BlUtARD ROOM
this noi»« im*.** in.    You hate yoar j VltujH-tatltti will not reply. JUiirrend-er
eontmt* snd mit***.  Hat the noise l»«lon« will reply.
nifsu.f ts-m »•,,■ mitfl^ »»» »H# ch*t-! !»m yo»» think, t%t*nr wm*i*m. thst
mt Whs* Aw-* it mean? I* m^btrehlde noise Is ©air a welttot The wHs«
murt-d .»,;.*uum it* trrerMWwe!. The I is the l«**! part of tne. My nntm\
note** :. uiituuhfiiiy. Your ton une Is'alone would not be dangerous to ye*.
a temple i»i«.t this nol*» br<Nik* In on It Is the eil-tnc' i*n*k ofthe noIs» that
. 9. itt. \\h*n yon attempt to *or»Wp ihls.lt innttnton* to yoa. I ihink ibid,
snHrs w*>r* tmt th* i»!tp*mMlmi of 'tie)|H,!s)> sMnUm mi^ 0ihme.  You could {something In    your blood
jitwiaHt! t»»rty,   "Yo«*[ ant*!** hswj
.,           ,  ,.    .**,-..•. r,4,9, rtt *%,
it-lull** M»iw#.n« e*ttinr eontrrA td
i fedfreUon." mtmi o» iiimwu
Questran** ee Oee*ral ttrlke
«t*y-
not • v»n go into yoar rtotm and be your hreln i*>Hs yon ttila,
If not In
The tymp-
,9,-   *,n-X
I am sorry for lout of aJMrths-r's lifts,  ttot the lit td
I nm far more my nolm- 1* ik* Saw td the heart.   It
Ou
log.
their  tent* a»d Mood 1 grow
•«ron«.
Ho. b«: h»t «f» «» » b*"1*'
Wh#r» the mUttona tdtstm aad die,
Th* ■»H!teB*~th* tolllag eattl*"-
t^nr *i mi\ifmnir**t mm em It
iteevtxtt tb<- oatine**«ronton*
Who vrtdirx mv untimely **d,
Mine ia h l*t*. ai-e-ttb living,
And my God i* my Utttm-ttbm*.-
Th* ih<w*hJtfui r«td*«mB my ttdty,
SXn« the mmm»f«t dmtd* my timo.
I A'.itibu".* xki'tt %rt»wWj
ft, - vrrrtt nf r>bt}n*t*fdtr
Haxr aa ttar| *.ti ot tlitlr trouble*
,*l     .. •.«   UrtttH,.       HI9.9-   *■■**.',*.  i     *■■*,..!..*.   »    *. ,   *      *-■ *.     , *     .   »*»   .- •**->.* 	
.,..     ^i,, ^ae **bt\* Sa IXetl     Itwn • *•'* atWI *»«•"••♦( *'tv* «««•""■ t *n -ntd '
t rmdM    Thrmiffh nrery ehtnb and I lev** a not** my tmt*t than you dla.
< keyhole, through Otm the aolPhi them- j Or n fight,   in to mbtf m erill.   Or
11«'" . tan**:;    this    ao««c,      Im*|NAVUllMl*M}', SO MW  lm X   lalitlg jm   plt'iMmtt'
\ ptewm Ita deem*.
^.,*rt. »«« ni" iti'iiu,*'- m ■««  ......... «)i-i(«4, d**r asasiers*.
I,tit* *..«« * **/ *•** a^.-t-**, kM»9*,k*tiii -9. tttottt tttr ft** %t*a,» i«Mt <**%> ***. »iMt
;th# ms«Mn-vry of ib* fo»en»m<w*«.     uritae.  Heeause 1 haw what Is going, nt^ppmll »h» popular h«p» woall die.,. ■blub jii'n iriniL
-Whfn tho    worker*   are   stroai;; to happen to yo«.Yo« do not. Bul I »» If mr nom renmd   ftm mmkt hatejl TKzX, aiSHVIUl
| riwush to win by a gen-tral etrthe they | eo mueh gladder for the r?si that I ftn I «ttrrthi«« ioer oom way. tbkt ttooU
* wIII !** «r*wit *mmnb to take ■pomm*Iwty eorrom tot yo» aomewhst |al# ant oot bo good tot ytm.  Aod it       "
fortorn.   ftol goahout Mtrudtng. I who had fer •*.  Jwwt at tml aa
,    tta*»4H'J»  t'U*..  ttma'ihiii,t i    5J".
;about the st-n'Ml strike as a means'
tut ill" imtthroA of the prparnt
Baths and Shoo Shino
and LUNCH COUNTER
-Our Coffee is Good*
D
j
ana
DAVIES
Funeral  Dlreotor
and   Imbtlmir
HMd»ton«» Supplltd and 8«t up
COLEMAN    mmimWmm   AlePPrTA
HKli*am#t^
»K»hittrfUtWih«*jrwW*«- i
•Ion nt tttf mafhln^ry of the Itm***
tnent and aeeomplleh th«dr end." was
ih* r«-it'*j*
<Umv*r* 9rt»<t If tt wfi* no* trtn
■inai   tbt*  HOfi»h««   petXy   imrr^tni   **
[■rmttwnttm aad *a bringing abn-at itaiMM.
'•lm  tfeiwieh rerahwto*. IIIItfaH   i»faot* ■
■■ ptlrd that th# RertalhM* pnrt? nttnedtoitmm to ilMifWMt
*f»#>mi»l»*h   it*   ead   tUrMtte   etein-l
*i**',%rr   ra,****    *•»**«   ***e/ttfktoott ■:
' ,.'h«(*»     )!#. atffo AK,,%r*4 that    Ihe-
p*Xfr
weald he
tt
am th* nolae yot dread.   I make peo-
,.',« tUUft'-aktt -iu. ii-it 'i/aii'  U lt-.'Uui.
I tail *Mf*f than eter to thom who;
d*ini*iix tlittsw-cff."* as?-'*** m: >.*' !"•■*■
I aa the ton #1 no.*' tlsn 4m.-*
to toy pleasAnt thing*.   I
ytrut  tmpumry.
I nm dtteminad to §i»*»tr# up
mbo nm aatlsllwl   with ih*»-
The tNM wiN   mtite
heperrti H tf*frft"*-mr"nr frny- • ▼*• wild, kwott Uw*i 4Uta**
ixfiti^rertntrt'itiMomm***** ««w^. «f *»*»•« »**- ^!Lf^LTl^itt?ISl"thJZ.l^?^
IMr own*^i.   "IW,   k* »<»f on mnlk ktmw that a noise tomx xw* un'it »•
tie ter  m   u,  Hum evtfjtWhi tmt
usa ■*»>. ?.'i i" *r« mMm ^''i'""' ftt*
«»fM ta ntdmt to tmm m  the w^;
'TilfX     If""" T'      fft"*fl *tf     ^WW'
fiutin. That « what gtr mtm mm'
tot, flat i* what meet bemm bo*
torn wot ntdm dimmteett W« 4a tm;
lot*nd *n ta*panooi» th# i»o*s*. W#!
»r^ *a y io h#.i» it a# a*long a« ft Is,
neatwrnty.   «> «tii ghwRy at«9  tfc*.
****0aattmmmammmim
mjgjjiu.Ljjsfi
strife,
TT*afc 0*4 fer «h« asiM •Hi H§]!ft*ly. "tbemitnttm nny k**em,t tntf
A»t m •*** end my ****** mo.l«mttome nad take things away
tha
that Mlae.   I am i«t
I am wMhhm
amkiag   tha,
aotst auy lw>.,
SMJMGurt
^^^F^^*^P**^P*.*^P ^.^F*^p^y^.^^___ ... ^^L^Mt^—m^^.^ifa^B*y>tt   i ilMMlMll WOl w.« m *^^
_^^^^^^9^^     m-lm.   .199.  ^.9. 999^9199.9^9     {■HVUFa| 1H1H|P     |     Mf If    MM  II ¥  Q
J. D. QUAIL
tfltr«!w*r*. pgint* nod Hwm
Ckaniiuc UttMite
FRESH FRUIT
Should tmm • tawfft jmrt of «wjr J*f«»>*idtet
now tint tbt hot weather bat arrived. Don't
forget that wa aa ttiaat are atwaya here wilh
fresh Finite #itt<§ VecttaMi* a* mm aa ttity •««
oo tha market
A. L BLAIS, Quality Grocer
Frank, Alta. .33. Bellevue, Alta.
,
4»S; ?H •-Sft :v*t^- ,"';,,r~ •gy-^i-- Yi-~X-y:-y:j,'r~-- -,. yi -~ Xyj.- ■■ f^——^^--^^-^--"rr-1-
-';/   "yASS\y\Av :t. X;~r-;* f*'.:•. --.*-. "    •      ,"   .   ;;.. -'-;>i-J,-.  -~     -•   »„    '", i- '""-V"; ',V,v.
:5i     , • f   " 'WT-T ■=- *
*.-i.i.:-;~i' ,V-*
.-*-:?   • •-    ■
,n^^*rr~-'--H^-^^^-*r*%?^.-:^^
THE DI^miOT LEDGER, F33ENIE, B. 0., JUNE 6, 1914.
,* --I?- •. . . „.
rrHr
• - >';-i.:.jsJl v'.R"^-Jy  ' ' -.  ' *. '-*  """,     "     "-."      •'■'  '-■" -,"   •      '-   *    I ,    ,* ■      -" .     .
fcf'.'.C-
5'    ' <*
t\
raMtfLtas^M^^
■"■■■■■' ^GUADSTONP LOCALS   „,
•-("■IJeet" first and' third Fridays,'
. '.Miners' Hall, Fertile; secondhand
/fourth: Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
"Creek. slcT*-..'Beh$flt attached.—T.
Qpjiill, Sec.1; Fernie;' B. C,,   "
*;       ,V   HO&MER LOCAL      ',-'
%■' S'A.ASS,No. 3497 .-    .,    -
77 Meet every,Suriday, at 2.30 in )C,
,.-P, Hali; Main Street.   Sick, Bene*
.'■ flt^Society attaghed.-^rW.ABalder^.
. "stone, See.,; Box 63. Hosmer/ B.'.Cj
:'    MICHEL-LOCAL
-•,/■"•'"   • ; No. 2334 '    '
Meet  every  Sunday? afternoon
at  2   o'Qlockt-ln" Crahan's   HaU.
. . glok Benefit." Society- attached.—
H. Elmer, Sep.'        r.  • '"
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387    ,..
Meet' every' Sunday.'  Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Michael Warren, Sec, Can-
more, Alta,
.     HILLCREST LOCAL
* . No. 1058    ,
Meet second and fourth Sunday
In month, Slok and Benefit Society attached;—J. Gorton, Sec. .
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No., 2227
Meet every alternate.Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Mltchelli Sec, Box
195,' Coleman. "
bankhead Local
', .        - No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
7 o'olock in tite Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin,
Sec, Bankhead, Attn. -
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet,every Friday evening at
7.30 in! Miners* Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. .481
Meet evfry first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
"Loughran, Sec.
-     COLEMAN' LOCAL':,
■"' '. " no.-2633.1 -.-.:;:,• •_ :'
■ - Meet 'everyalternate-Sundayat
2.30 p.m. in the1 Opera House,
Coleman.—-J. Johnstone, gee ....
-.    - PASSBURG.LOCAL      .
',  ., No.'2352,: \.' AS7AA
."Meet every"Vec9nd,and.'four.yi
Sunday of each.month at 2 p.m.'.
in'Slovak Hall.   Sick Benefit Society' attached!—Tlios, Q. Harries,-
'Sec, Passburg, Alta,.-   ' •    - -
.-',    BURMIS LOCAL. SX   v-
.: No. 949';
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of■ each month at 10 a.m.
in School' House. Burmis. No Sick-
Society.—rTHos. G. Harries, Sec,
Passhurg, Alta.,
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL ,
";       No. 2829
Meet evfery first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. in
Union Hall, Maple Leaf. No Slok
Society.—Thos. G, Harries,. Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 in Miners' Hall, 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec-Treas.
-    BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431 _
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
ln   the   Socialist   HaU James
Burke,   Sec,   Box   36,   Bellevue,
Alta.
.CORBIN LOCAL
1 No. 2877
' Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock ln the Club Hall. Siok
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin, B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every" Sunday'afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Stck
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter; Sec.
A
TO EVERYONE
IS WHAT THE "OCEAN" GIVES ITS POLICYHOLDERS
Here are a few claims we bave paid of late
1)135.70
10.00
,17.50
54,30
$31.40
57.15
37.10
18.55
$10.00
20.00
18.50
17.00
$14.26
10.00
12.84
6.00
$21.42
12.84
37.71
20.00
$50.00
115.00
450.00
19.20
$17.91)
64.60
26.97
50.60.
|Tbe "OCEAN" is the Largest ACCIDENT Company in the
world
The "OCEAN" PAYS DAILY over $15,000 for ACCIDENTS
to POLICYHOLDERS
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp. Ltd. of London Eng.
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist Agent
Miners' Union HaU Block      -       Fernie, B.C.
Emfil
■l. i - *•":
-^'^^%j<0tft*W^
PAGE THREE £
oyers' Xsociation
And 7hetn tactics
By Louis Buflenz, itt Central-Blatt' and
Soci&l Justice, St, Louis, Mo, "
Within the laat few years ,a new and
abiding factor has -been 'introduced
into the labor situation in this country
in tlie -establishment of huge "organizations, of .employers to wage war upon
similar organizations of w&ge workers,
thus -giviiig to the field of industry ithe
appearance of a great battle ground.
Associations of employers dealing
specifically1 or In a great measure •witn
the labor,| problem have not indeed
been uncommon In American, industrial history. Every period Ot tha* his--
tory, In iSact, that has seen the rise "of
organised'labor ~movements has likewise witnessed .the formation of employers' associations to combat these
organizations ot the working class.
In 1834-37, .when trade union activity
was quite marked, general trade unions
springing up in almost all the larger
cities, anU when "strikes," according
ta a New York newspaper, "were all
the fashion,' tho employers in the
various places affeoted banded together to counteract this movement,
inveighing against the laibor organizations, we learn, ln a manner quite "up-
to- date." And in the Civil yar period,
when the National Labor Union and
the Knight of St. Crispin flourished,
and the Brotherhood of the Footboard,
the forerunner or the Brotherhood, o£
Locomotive Engineers, the Cigar .Markers' International Union and the
Bricklayers' arid Masons' International
Union came into existence, employers'
associations arose to bitterly attack
these unions, to protest against the
so-called "closed shop" policy, declaring that 'wages should be determined
not in an "artificial" manner, but by
the unerring law of "supply and demand." All of these "organizations,
however, were of a temporary nature
and at no time have they paralleled
the associations of the present day In
either magnitude or in the elaborate
program at -warfare upon the organized
laboring class. It is within the last
two decades that these associations
have acquired1 that permanence, self-
consciousness, perfected organisation,
and numerical strength which they display today, with great defense funds
at their disposal and with representatives ln almost, every State, and
whioh "endow them with a new personality and an augmented importance." '
The only organizations of emlployerB
which, up untllthe'present'time, were
pf permanent duration were" those
which were founded by purely trade
purposes. The *Moroceo Manufacturers' Association, for example. Ib now
MMMai«BMUliil*SUailWIH^
To Sports Committees
*.
The Fernie Coal Creek Excelsior Band is now
open for engagements. Satisfaction guaranteed
For Terms Etc. Apply
THOS. BIQQ8, 8eoretary,   Fernie, B. O.
CASH MEAT MARKET
Saturday Specials
■•tf Soils
Fr*fthOook«ITrlp*
Albert* Ortfttntry Butter
too Ib.
1SC !b.
1*0 lb.
121c lb.
TOO 2 lb*
Every description of Sausage and potted
Meat made on the premises by Expert
We Kill The Finest Ranch
Fed Cattle
Eckstein BIL, Fernie
54 years old. "Por a great many years,"
declared Wllloughby, in writing on
this-matter," employers In many industries Stave had their local, and
national organizations for the consideration of their special trade interests."
"Originally," he adds, "these associations did not Include In any way
among their function that of even con-
slderlng, much less of taking action
in relation to labor matters. It was Inevitable, however, that, as the trade
unions made their demands upon employers generally In a trade Instead of
upon particular establishments, the
employers should utilize these organizations (or the consideration of these
demands. As the principle of collective
bargaining gradually extended, many
of -these associations added to their
functions that of treating with lahor."
The next step ln»the foundation of
agencies to deal entirely with the matter of labor, wos not a difficult one.
In October, im, the Journal Dixie,
located In Atlanta, Qa„ and edited by
T. Ilk Martin (now general manager
of tho .*Tacoma Chamber of Com-
! merce), published an editorial showing
I forth tbe need of a "National Assocla-
* Uou of Manufacturers," lu order "to
properly uadsrtalce the development of
trade relations with Mexico and South
America" and to "prevent a -halt In the
movement of trado oxtenilon." "The
indtvtdoal Influence and strength of
the members of auch an organisation/'
It wm also urged, "would thus become
co-operati-TO, and could bo centered,
witb powerful force, for tboimssage of
favorable reciprocal treaties, suitable
tariff laws, and for tiie establishment
of mora perfect transportation faclll-
ilea." Hundreds of copies of this edl-
uii t»i a«i« eeut tu ike HMtmHacturere
of tke country, resulting, after certain
Iwllmta-fttT steps, in the formation of
tbe XatloM! Association of Manufacturers la tbo Cltgr of Cincinnati on ibe Ud
of January, IMS. Governor <MrKinl*y
of Ohio (afterward President) and Senator Ftorafcer of tbo same Suite were
among the dlgoltaHee preeent at thia
convention. Mr. Tbomai Dolaa. of
Pfelladeipbia, was elected a* first
prseident of tbe or**alsatle« and an
orvanlaaUo* committee under tbe
ofcelrwaesbip of Tbemu i>. Mann, of
Cincinnati, wnn placed in cterae of
tbe eeabryottfe eeoorfeUo-a. In January.
IIM, lb* flrtt. official cwnfeatt-k* «■*»
told in the CHjp ef Cbieagot pmtat
"o atraMMoet feUere," but Is tbo tot-
lowing ynot at Philadelphia, under Um
presidency of Theodore C bontek, ot
Unit oity. Urn foundation was laid ter •
vnnuumnii ergMKlmUfla, dettailfte votr
Mm wnn adopted nad aeflf* work be-
e«*. tome «ee taw .*«UMai Aseoaar
iim* uT M,.iLif.)i I j.'i.u W.i. >,'.4i\ •*» . a***,,.^M At
f*H!t«1ar toMtmy !o union laibor, **);*rWk>u.
tenet bat oeteaalMy for tlw Mit -per*
POM UV miTpMMS f-MM MM eofflmet-M,
•e. -Hiia, Uww^^i^, *vp.e airn wtet tn
•■■* .■ tm leumvnw nevfon wua
taken ecalMt tke ettbt4Mn> fcwr pad
tbe ami nn—piiuti km and at th*
Mav Orleans caaf«Mloa ef IMS,
Dsvtd id. Perry ot tadfnaoptit, P«el
d«» of the aa«>daUen. mnie ike rtit*
tbmn ot capital aad taker ea tepMtaat
(meiem, damotint elnp»t hts eaUle ed
following'the anti-labor declaration of
the'-Notlonal Association o£ Manufac-
tur^re, many other unions of the employers of labor siprang up in various
parts Lof the country and in various
trades;" - panufiacturers' associations,
indiustrial^associations, employ ers' as-
soqia.'tlons> -citizens' alliances — the
United!.>!TyiPothetae in the. (printing
trade, ;-td .giiflt'e but a few of the larger
trade- .organizations; the National
Metal Trades Association, established
ln the fall', of 1899; the National
Founders'; Association, .formed in 1898
out <jf the "old. Stove Founders' National
Defense Association (which had ibeen
in existence since 1886); the Illinois
Coal Operators' Association, established in 1897; the Dock Managers' Association, cbioposed ot all the leading
employers in this industry along the
Great lakes; the National Association
of BmplbylngJLlthographers, the \mer-
iban Cotton Manufacturers' Association and the powerful Building Trades
Employers' Association of the City of
New Yprk.
Some of the associations, though
founded for purposes of defense, 'were
not openly hostile to the labor unions,
'but sought rather through collective
bargaining, to work In harmony with
them, But the vast, overwhelming ma-
Jorlty were practically opposed to any
of the organized efforts which the
workers could at all put forth and
wero particularly antagonistic to the
"closed shop" policy.
Out of this hostility sprang the C'ti-
zens' Industrial Association of America and, the -American Anti-Boycott Association. The former organization,
form'edi in 1903, a-t Chicago, under the
leadership of President Ptyry of the
National Association of Manufacturers, and ■permanently established at
the Indianapolis convention of the following year, "to do for the employers'
associations what the American Federation of Labor has done for the la'bor
organizations." Its "Platform of Principles" reads as follows: ,
No closed shop.
No restriction as to the use of tools,
machinery or material except such as
are unsafe.
'No limitation of output.
No restriction as to the number of
apprentices and helpers, when -of
proper age.
No boycott.
No sympathetic strike.
No sacrifice of independent wonk-
men to the. union.
No compulsory use of .the union
label.
—■'principles which received the ap-
■proval ot President Charles W. BJiot
of Harvard University, who declared
in regard to them: "I find every one
of these principles to be in defense
of private and ipubllc liberty.," In
Decemiber, 1913, there were affiliated
with the Citizens' Industrial Association (50 National associations, 60 State
nnd district associations, and 335 local
or municipal associations of employers. After an existence of some three
years, however, it was deemed neces.
sary by those Interested, to obtain "a
closer co-operation than seemed to be
afforded through tho Citizens' Industrial Association," and, as a consequence, this organization was merged
Into tiie National Council for Industrial
Defense at "a meeting of national
trade associations at tlie Waldorf-Astoria, New York, August 19, 1907"~a
meeting which bad been brought about
mainly through the activities of President Van Cleve of the National Association of Manufacturer. Fourteen
National employers' associations joined in the establishment of tbe council,
among them being tho National
Pounders' Association, tbo National
Metal Trades Association, tbe Erect-
ore' Association, and the American
Autl-BoyooU Association.
This -latter organization is deserving of especial attention. U came into
being ln 1902, with a membership of
100 loading employers, and haa been
continually increasing In membership
until now, Including members from
the A rl antic to tbe Pacific wbo nto enraged in all branches of Industry and
transportation. The objects of tbe ftse>
eoclstion aa atated in its constitution
are no follows:
To protect its members and their
employes and promote tbe public web
fere, by proper and legal resistance
to boycotting, picketing, unlawful
strikes and other labor conspiracies,
and by cooperating with the public
authorities la tke suppression thereof.
To oppose federal end State lefts,
tatlon Injurious to tbe public good,
which would Impair the rights and
remedlee of members la the employment of labor or destroy industrial
freedom.
lo educate the public tn a better
understand!** of tto tttwstleni wlat
in* to the emplonnrat nf labor
The eervfar te which tto members
are entitled te mi. down ae follows:
•toli to entitled
*5s/
V\<
$>
*H\\y
'4/   J'fllJ F°r Prevention of Disease
By Natural Means
NEARLY all forms of disease are traceable
to sanitary ignorance and an imperfect
action of the liver.
Eating between meals is a frequent cause of indigestion and intestinal disorders, because introducing
a fresh mass of food into the mass already partly dissolved
arrests the healthy action of the stomach and causes the food
first received to lie until incipient fermentation takes place.
The liver, unlike the stomach, is constantly secreting, and when
too much carbonaceous food has been taken, the bile becomes
too thick and consequently unable to perform its office. Every
intelligent person, who appreciates the inestimable value,of
good health, should read the "Rules of Life" set forth in the
booklet enclosed in every package of
ENO'S "FRUIT SALT"
By strict adherence to these rules, even those of impaired constitution have been made healthy and conparatively robust. Eno's "Fruit
Salt" is a health-giving, cooling and invigorating beverage, which should
be kept in every household in readiness for an emergency. Where it has
been taken in the earliest stages of disease, it has in many instances
prevented what would otherwise have been a serious illness.
Order a bottle TO-DAY from your dealer.
Prepared od}) by
J. C. ENO, Limited, "Fruit Salt" Works,
London, England
Agent* for Canada: Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Limited,
10 McCaul St., Toronto.
£t';
4&
4
as Jhe Anti-JBoycott Association to
practice law or to give legal advice or
furnish lawyers for litigants. Under
tills act, tho tarpent-ers union endeavored to have tli© association enjoined
tttxre. conducting suits In New York,
but in a decision by Justice Ford, of
the Xew York Supreme Court, while
lt was held that the defendant* had
violated tho Penal Law, lt iwas declared that this violation could not <be
legally prevented <b'y injunction.
Tho Importance of these associations of employers ln the Industrial
problem, becwuse of their magnitude,
their ceaseless actlvlea and close Interrelation, can easily to seen- u
matter which subsequet studies will
just such a program In view, the
neyly launched I. W. W. brought together every freak and bug In the
labor movement; even crooks and la'bor disruptions, and Mr. IDebs will
confess that he was forced to repudiate tho "Frankenstein monster" lie
had aided to raise.
Again, If we »et the example of
seceding from tho esbtablished labor
movement because our ideas -do not
meet with, tho approbation of tlio majority there, would we not establish a
precedent lhat could be, and would be
followed by every impossibllist and
'malcontent In our own organizations?
we fear wo would only lead up ta n
series of divisions and    subdivisions
even more striking reveaU  Por thej that could only end In the utter nnnllil-
student of economics, In endoavorlng j lation of organized laoor.
to formulate a program of   construe-j    Industrial    unionism    will    como;
tlve reform looking toward the establishment of greater stability ln our industrial relations, a thorough appreciation of this fact ls uibsolutely essential.
must
slbly
SECESSION NOT THE
WAY TO UNITY
como  through  odiuatlon;   pos-
througJi mu<-h adversity, mony
defeats suffered -by Isolated crafts.
Tho man who advocates* industrial
unionism In his craft organizations,
providing ho does not secede, mill
eventually too recognized at tlie true
prophet.
The United Mine Workers is an In-
dustrial organization; by advice and
example we hope to point out to our
fellow-workers In the craft union tho
benefitH arid necenslsy of otir form of
unionism.
If the writer was a member of the
mo»t isolated of craft unions, right
there he would remain, in his craft
union, but ever advocate the hotter
wny; always advising affiliation with
sister organizations; fighting opposl-
tion us best he could, but never seceding from tbe many who must be educated before any of us can ;tossibly
advance.—rnlted Mine Workers' Journal.
!«g»l a<hke from ike emum. et tbo
a«Mrtotinn «n matters within tb*
aeop« of tbo wot* of tko aaaoetatlo-n.
ww •uy ww,ifiN*N^ wMfnRft H*ir!il nfthw
for protoetkMt MUMM labor ooMiiti*-
tiitn may mt**d Wa toon to tbo Ka-
wotlf* noaftf for wmwtml   It (bit eo-
On another page of this Issue will
<be found a communication from Bu-
■ono V, IH**. That Mr, Debs ia In
deadly earnest la evident; that he Is
boneot In kk belief >tbat tlio -proportion ho submits Is for tho beat Inter--
oats of tbo -workers bla long record of
•acriflOM, his s-olWorn-Wttln* achieve-
menu wtll bear all-anfflcent wltnoss
to.
Out in thii liuUnio we must tako
Issue with bim; not because we do not
favor tlw> tad he se«hs, which, If we
andtrMand Mm, ts <h<» *-jn<-n*!<m of
organisation by Industrie*, but be-
oauso wo also took that end; wo differ
with Mm Inasmuch ts we boliovo the
program bo proposal would most likely retntd Instaad of advance the evolution of craft unions Into In-iuttrtal
union*.
Wbtre r«a an   iadasirfat   unionist
bett propagate bla advan<*d Ideas?
|   in our opinion, fn tho onion of hia
tojoon yarttciiiar emit, atfrocaUna   at-
ii the n        i% ™"8B
HomeBank*Canada
Tk«f» an mmjt Mvtefi aeemtaU, ■ofaaaimOtlka !!»*• Butt for tptdal
purpotttl to* latitat*—a tKMM)u>U*r naj ba *a*laf up to m»k« paymant
asaiaM a mortgiga am hi* houw s or to par a premium on M« lift latntaact, ll
li a rtf ul»r practice w.U» many Horn* Bank <t*po*iton to ap«i aparial Kcoualt
tat tuck pttftpmta and to arithilrair th* atwwy al tha aet of lha alt Martha.
ta yttti vhw tt»y haw «ifful*nt lo make tke aatataaty paxaatat -$.
Mtao orrics an*
a antNCNfO ih
TORONTO    OlMN-ti M«*atia
■RANCMM ANO COhNftCTIOWa TMHOOOMOOT CANADA
J. P. MACDONALD, Manager
VICTORIA AVI,, .:. .,. FIRNII   B. O.
fllUtion, ttmatKAOMtlon with oth*r
ernft unions la tbo same Industry;
thon further affiliation tntil the ob-
t*rt. k* n**ka ia tttmwiptlab*d,
•km!   Wo reniin* tbat also     Rot
•vottttoa wUli ttot bo hoffte-4.
What tf .am tttlkmed Wr. IWwi* nd*
■ptttwwm i»*99twtfoe,lbjnentmwmy bo|*wot   if we ****** men UM -Amer-i
Imperial Bank of Canada
hiao orr ice, tohonto
Capital Autnerttto ..   $10,000,000       caiMtal Paid Up ....      7,000.000
Htwrvi fund ...,....      7.000.000      Total Aittta     71,000.000
O. n. WILKII, ProalioiH        NOfl. KOtT JADHAV. ytetPmn.
•RANCMl*  IM   MltlTIIH COI.UMIIA
Armwhnnn, CronbrwMi* tnr*lt, OoiOsn. Kamloafo, Miehsi,  Nslton...
Rt^Moao, VtMOMwor aod VlatoHt,
•AVINOt OIOAATM1NT
latortat obetaoe on daiMOtta at t>»rvti*t rata from dato of dt
wwwmiv ttmnu+u * *» mw***
,..w int^tum m w*# *a«tt- j mi** i*im  mut-i-iiHtat*-, -a* mfMnNMKMMt i m
iby th*-*- Atntttmn i"*4*.utk* of tabor; j
eniin* n nsaMbKC or ro«riwtt«i of all I
wko favorwt tb*  pnwnm  oaUlaed, I
who. thlab row. woold antwor web
  ., - . faff *
Tbt ftrw ttm totm ettbf We aaao-
rtatloa w«» that of tb* ttattoft
Swlt^bboard and Dwppiy Ompony, "In
wbleb tb* btaboat nNnrt of IHlMlfa
b*M that a *»ttkm to ewmpt^ tbe «w-
piojer to ^»<!aet a ekMMd sbo|» fa H.
ta»! and erD»iaal.* tt later rotttnd
on tbe wu  oj li. K. Lome b Oo.
W# bare In mind isW: «b«n, with
OtAfIfltl CANNOT BE eURIO
liy t*ntl
ngntk |k«    .
Tbaf-S bi tteit
'   - -if
anplir*titmit   aa tt*r r-ann.nl
dlMMIiNnl  |w.ft|f»n  oi   Ils*. Mir,
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
•ni Wttmm WALxn.cv4>,Lur>.tixx.i
•tomt AIWD.As«HOm-ml*Mmsgsr
'*  .      Hit     il.-j
• »* llnfnsj
. ._  tut* way i« «■<•»• 4*«f.
i«  ^n.f »h«iF t    '         ' •   •■
-.  , _   —..,. r. laaeteaaa  4»  a**»*»*»I
toa enbm em tb* •**• nb«p,mUmimt »b* rnttKi ffatwu-tbo f^^!^"*R ^ftffff^^ U*. *"
■iks, U* *mmm>4*Urhi w*M an ** tn»»«»i   iis»w»rf   Msntsr**   •***•►—-ttwtat* i* inn***** *•*.*«   ***** » i-.wtm
tmn ^wntm nwrnteeier tnmtbtf-mbdt^ t***tbm **lt  %%d the -tftetnat jw»-'»»««w. »m •-«;»■»*  «■*>  *** *,«*»»?>.«>
vontm* ud to attack to a •» ttmtbudmm'^an r<i4Mnitimi of l*b«r wbtHb-law *a*taam* tma-rtt nr* #-■»■*.« -.,<,*♦ mt*
)MHlr b—erred edbmn. mmi**d t\bamt»*m, «»f nw mdwottnoolSSliSS 2rtf •*/•*••••♦   m]"'h "
Tb*onmadfotfeai today, otnmdtoo i*. **t** »?.***,* tbt* Vett** <nmh*rh*mAf id mSrJmt^r-tA-*" ' * "
*• m^***T"' * w«few! of.o' r*.rv*n**rt  nnd  3mm fa  X«<«,^;«r«a^\^Cr7«U
etrnm xm waaaffatum. bbtmtoe bt r«*  Tb* tmMntww wt ma trnm^tSUtm ml«»*«»". -»/»♦'*•■&*•
many fftata*«f 3f>*Hntan. tk* *mpU.y *-*•« !•«••* an art, whi«li r#nt into' ''•l£r,l Si^iMi'l [.A XA7" ,'.",V
ttojdt*oawttwmt#yvmjmm<*      >****,**#******. mi, m*tm * bt   WtfVlRBS^* :"  l ^
* *w nam y«M«Mr« **4 efmieaf ettmno tee ***otlaHu** ee^rjgjml "*** "*^" *'" ' im tm$n-
mn, $i5,oow)oo  ttsavi fuio, $13,500,000
BANKING BY MAIL
Aootml* may bt opened it «vwy branch oi The Canadian Bank
k of Commwe to be operated by m% and win wcefttt thc same
w«^: ^^ »«w?fon ai Is tfrnx to Ot other JcpottmoiU nt «w Riak'A
*>?i httineu. Money may te deported or withdrawn In this wiyu
tttiitoctorily ai by a pcwotul visit ta the Bank. «"<
B. P. Powler, Manager Fernie Branoh
;. ,J;Cr I
!. ^-'jr'iai
.*■*.*:..   >«>*l
■   7*'^S-f
.'..tt
'■ *^'|
'-'sil
^l
■?l ±&M
"S^PKP^^^^^S^**-.^^t^^^M
mm^^
m
"
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C., JUNE 6, 1914.
®
feb* Disf Hjc* £*&&**
®
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year" in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
i\
for the execution of all kinds of book, job ahd
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
'THE LUDLOW MASSACRE"
A true siory of tlie two wicks' war, ol! about
20.000 words, with 20 different illustrations,
written liy Walter II. Kink, publicity agent f4>r V.
M. W. of A. Pmc 2f>c. A correct narrative of
I'vonls sinee 3884, giving history of oppression ol
mineworkers and cause ol' present, trouble.
Kv«ry mine worker in District 18 should secure
a vopy of this book, and what, i.s more, read it. Xo
man is better qualified Ihan "Waller II. Fink to
publish such a book, and no man lias worked so
hard to give the public a true and correct version
of affairs existing in Colorado he has. Tireless in
liis efforts to give publicity to the mineworkers'
cause. Walter Fink has supplied every labor paper
'and capitalist papers thai would publish his imports) with a budget of news every week— some
times twice a week! There has been no let np. and
the Ledger readers have to thank him for reports
that have appeared week by week in our columns.
The work will materially assist the miners to collect
funds and carry on (lie fight—and that fight must
be Avon. Send your address to "Walter II. Fink.,
care of II. JI. W. of A.. Denver. ColAradn. V. S. A.
Youavill be asked to subscribe or'purchase a ticket,.
and by YOU, we mean every union man who carries
a union card. "We want you to recognize this as
YOUR fight, and to recognize it by contributing
toward this venture, whether it be dance or concert.
Most of the strikers in Colorado have lost everything they possessed. Some have not a stick/of
furniture and only the clothes they wear. The International Union has fed them and housed them,
but there is a limit even to their funds, and it behooves every union man to lend a hand in fighting
the most corrupt aggregation of apologies for
human beings that ever disgraced a so-called civilized nation. Funds will be needed to fight the
trumped up_ charges that are being made against
every miner who has taken any prominent part in
the strike. To defeat the machinations of the corporation 's prostituted courts and secure the release
of the mineworkers will 'mean a long and bitter
legal fight, and iif the satellites and legal vampires
are not satisfied, previous experience tells us only
too well what will happen. "Labor omnia vim-it"
(Labor conquers everything) may have been true
three thousand years ago, but it doos not fit in too
well today, and if we are to defeat the master class
and win this strike, they have shown us (until the
lesson has become tedious) we must play thoir "own
game. But to do this we want funds, and we want
you lo help.
SURVIVOR'S TRAGIC STORIES
(Continued from Page One.)
THE STRIKE!
There are many who insist, that the strike is a
lime for holiday—a time, to eat. sleep, fish, limit
n tii\  trniiM"4iIIy__i>iijoy..lifft_;_ it_t.iiiip_J.ft._nniL-JEAKiaLJuir.
and let; the other fellow do his own share. True,
il i.s a new experience for the average worker to
know that he will get his next meal without risking
tho dangers of thc mine or the possibilities of losing his job, You can find some, excuse for men who
have been harnessed to thc drudgery of modern
civilization if they do feel inclined to regard a
strike in the light of a holiday. There is. however,
this possibility, viz.. that when we are working we
may look upon the struggles of our brothers in
camps that are on strike, as enjoying a fine time,
with lots to eat aud nothing to do.   This is not the
The
Ihe
x-cvy start that they would not be permitted to enjoy unalloyed bliss: they knew that they would be
turned out of the coal barons' mansions (f)';.and
they were not disappointed. Their fight has not
been a* holiday and they have not the facilities to
enjoy life that we in this district have, Colorado
offers little to tho sportsman in the way of fish
or game—that is the parts where the mines are situ-
Hied and the jneii arc denied the opportunities lo
kill time tliat wort* enjoyed here. Still in spite of
fire and lead, General Chase, the Law and Order
Alliance, Governor Adams, and Iloekefeller's sensitive (and elastic) conscience, thoy are still on
strike, and will remain so until their demands are
conceded.
It is intended shortly to hold a dance or concert
position of affnm-s in Oolorado, far from it.
mineworkers   in   Colorado   recognized   from
To those who may think that absence of news
from the Island means the strike has been settled, would state that this is not the ease—far
from it. The men are just as determined as ever,
and were it not for .Tap and Chinese that a patriotic
Conservative Government permits to act as strikebreakers to defeat British subjects, there would
not be many of the Island mines working today.
Mineworkers are warned to keep away from the
Island, and we cannot think that any intelligent
man in District 18 would go to the coast without
first ascertaining the condition of affairs there.
THE EMPRESS DISASTER
The press has had plenty of copy this week relating the various incidents in connection with the
sinking of the Empress of Ireland. What was inconceivable last week is easily understood when
we realize that the big liner was hit amidship by
a 6,000 ton collier laden wilh coal. The Storxtad
must have hit the passenger boat and tore open
her side; water poured into the gap; the ship immediately listed; those passengers in the berths on
fhe^Trie-TOTueicTTCTpr^^
Avere immediately dyowned. Those who gained the
decks were compelled to cling to the hand rail to
save themselves from slipping off intoN the sea. and
when they were thrown into the sea tliey were
either struck or caught by the wreckage. With Ihe
ship listed so badly it was impossible to launch
Captain's Brave Work
"At once lie commenced orders with
the idea of getting some of the people
who were still ahout the ship. But
it looked as if we were not to he allowed to get away without injury. Three
times we came to grief,' but each time
we as. narrowly escaped. To begin
witli we dropped the .boat, the davit
rope caught and the liner was heaving
•fast. The rope whicti> was attached to
our boat was "being; knocked, down and
th© prow of our boat with it. Three
of us got up and. managed to get clear
when we looked up and found that in
waiting for the captain under the lee
of the 'bridge we had come directly in
line with one of the funnels, which
was -hanging over our heads and coming down to the boat so quickly that
all we could do was to push out with
one oar, and in doing go we broke IL
"The funnel missed us by inches.
We then thought we were clear,
but not yet. Pulling'away from the
ship to avoid the suction which was
becoming apparent, we found that the
wires stretched from mast to mast as
part of the wireless apparatus, lay
right in the path ot the -boat ahd had
us imprisoned in an'area of water that
was fast becoming a whirlpool. To
get out of this we, managed to -pull
the wires over the prow and then rowed toward the Storstad.
"Then the orders came short and
fast. Captain Kendall told us that all
men who -were wet through in the boat
were to stay on the Stordstad and all
those fit to row were to return with
htm to the rescue. Taking five bed-
room stewards, he returned to cruise
around the Empress and soon returned
with about 50 people. A second time
he went back and then he took an oar
himself,, besides giving the orders.
Again he brought back a large nunvber
pulled from the water and then he
went back for the last time and once
more returned with passengers. He
staggered from the iboat to the deck
of the Storstad and collapsed In a
heap."
Death of Mr. and Mrs. Irving
.Mr. Lawrence Irving, the famous
actor, and son of the late Sir Henry
Irving, went down to hi3 death, according to one of the survivors, as he was
trying to help his wife over the starboard rail. - Tlie vessel gave a last
lurch before she settled and as the
deck tilted, Mr. and Mrs. Irving slipped
■bark against the cabin and the waters
rolled u.p and grasped them.
iMr. Thomas Smart of Toronto says
he believes he was the last man to
speak to Captain Kendall before' the
collision.
"I was sitting out on the upper
deck," he   said, "when    the captain
^vaiiOT^innrounraifWsttfneo'ci-Mit
tain and three mates, and that ahe
■was able to saqd.out only, one of. ber
lifeboats.     -,
The,J3iant Can Opener
The sharp point of an anchor projecting from-the twisted boiw of the
Norwegian "-collier Storstad may explain why that vessel did such terrible
execution. An "examination,-today, of
the collier's shattered plates revealed
the anchor-jammed In a position
where it could have ibeen- ripped
through the hull of the" Empress like
a great can opened. The anchor point
and portions of the battered fiiteel'surrounding it bor.e stains of blood.   "
Montreal, June 1.—The Government
investigation concerning the sinking
of the Empress of Ireland, will *; be
held in Quebec and will begin Tuesday, June 9. This announcement -was
made today at the office of the Canadian Pacific Railway, owners of the
lost vessel.
■mer's first real live automobile. Between a live Board of Trade and a liver
automobile,, this "city is" rapidly sten-
-pi-ng to the front.
- J. Ayres'-won .the poolshott at 600
yards, with 32 points,- winning ?2;
C, QHJonnor, second,, 28 points, winning $1,25; J. Bain, third, 26 points,
wining 75 cents, "and ;M. .McKlnnon,
fourth, 24 points, winning 25 cents.   -
Ideal .weather" was. experienced, and
if the attendance and interest is
maintained, considerable extension
•will -have to ibe made to the range.
UVANNI  ON THE MAT
Joe Uvanni will surprise the fans
when, on Thursday, June 11th, he will
meet Sam Clapham, England's light-
heavyweight champion wtfest'ler, on
the, mat at the Fernie Athletic Club.
Wthen, in 1908, Joe defeated Lex Clayton of Winona, Minn., he demonstrated then that he could wrestle as well
as ibox, but Joe says there Is more
money in 'boxing, thus his pursuit of
that vocation. Clapham has been
meeting all comers and giving a dollar
for every minute over ten to those
who could stay with hlra that length
of time, so there is a treat in store
when the scrappy Italian meets the
English champion, June 11th. There
will be some good local boxing preliminaries and on the whole the Fernie Athletic Club's show that night
will bo well worth seeing.
Regal White Wyandottes
.  ,,    •____     -  --■ x
Dbrcas(241 egg) Strain
A few early hatched cockerels for sale ih the fall
.     18 Write    -
Wm.ANTROBUS
Coleman    r   Alberta;
-1
High Class Photo Plays
THE CITY COUNCIL
and said, 'It Is a nice ijlght, but it looks
to me as though a fog is coming. You
never know how soon a fog will drop
on you at this part of the river.'"
When the crash came,   Mr.   Smart
says he-saw Captain Kendall on   the
bridge.   He was holding on to the rati, j
shouting orders to the crew, leaning)^
boats, while of those boats that were launched sev- ove* a»d waving Ms hands.  He heard j -
The Council held a meeting Friday
last and accomplished quite a large
amount of work. They evidently did
not relish digging up $20,000 for
schools, and used considerable diplomacy to evade same—or delay the evil
moment. One must give the Council
credit for a certain amout of fairness,
and as custodians of the public funds
they have to .exercise every discretion
in spending same.- True, their action
with- reference to block 28 not being
ln the eity limits cannot be taken seriously, otherwise the water and light
could mot have been extended outside
the city limits.
The bald facts of the case are,
briefly: The trustees want to build a
new school and for this purpose want
$20,000. The city does not want to
grant this, and says It ls not necessary
—that the population and number of
childea does not demand, and that the
jni*j*aani'.-^/1J'Lf\Al_awJii^.iy-ii^_Mi.*lll^^Arw*«^1r2_
v*v.w*f9^n«—
dat all the children for the next year
or so.
Later on it was proposed (by Wm.
Jackson and seconded by Robichau,
that the opinion of the electorate be
sought on this question, ond a.vote will
be taken on June 17th.
eral were capsized. •
There is, as usual, one very sinister, but no
doubt more or less correct report, viz., that tho collier was under-manned, and that her crew only
consisted of 12 men* including the captain and
three mates, and consequently they could only
launch one lifeboat. These charges are, to be investigated, and ns tlie investigation will be puhlie,
there is reason to'believe wemay learn the true,
facts. There is one very certain, fact, viz., that,tho
weather could scarcely be blamed for the disaster,
and that someone blundered, There, must have
been criminal blundering on someone's part or the
KinpresH of Ireland would have landed her passen-
gen* at * Liverpool*) nclny.
So far as can bo traced, not n Kingle passengor
from Pernie was saved. The shipping company"*
hoolcR givo the, names of eleven passengers, two of;
who were infants.   Ono ennnot picture or imagine
htm sny:    "Keep your heads, there, ■♦
and don't, get excited." )♦
When a 'boat' dropped sideways Into
th'? water the captain seeme;! to ical-
Ize that the liner was lost, and he
shouted:
"Get the People Out"
HOSMER NOTES
Hosmer and Coleman meet in a
league." fixture ■ on Saturday; klckoff
at-6:45,   It Is to bo hoped thetowna-
"Hurry up thero, everybody.   There | W'« w"l tarn out and support  the
Is not a moment   to lose.    Get the loca1*' toott» financially and noisily
stewards through the corridors, If
the doors nre locked, break them In.
(let the people out, and don't forget,
the women and children must come
first."
"He spoke through a megaphone,"
•aid Mr. Smart, "but there was so
much screaming and moaning that IiIb
voice was drowned. But he atuck W
his post to the very last.
"When I got to the Lady Evelyn 1
snw lilm stretched out thoro and thoy
wove flying him brandy. When ho was
able to speak, ho looked around and
asked 'where'a the ship?'   A paaaen-
A few Russian citizens of Hoamer,
somewher«on <tho broadl Aatlantlc, owe
our local agent a deep debt of gratitude, because of his having shipped
them via the White Star line, Railing a
day earlier than tho Empress of Ireland,
The guardians of law and order in
Hosmer have been kept pVetty busy
this last week dispensing Justice and
arresting   evil-doer*,   most   of   the
; trouble nrlitlng   from   Imbibing   too
! heavily.
j   A pleasant social evening took place
I at the home of Mrs. Rankin on Bntxir*
FRIDAY
SELIG SPECIAL TWO PART FEATURE
UNTO THE THIRD & FOURTH GENERATIONS
OR . •   -
BLOOD WILL TELL
The Blight—<Pathe drama. Making Eight-Ton Ropes. Capital ot
.Malay States. Fashion Laws in Swiss Qantona;  Pabhe Split.
SATURDAY
Pathe Two-Reel Special
A Thief of Heares
An intensely dramatic story of the flery love ot the Spaniard,
beautifully enacted among some of Spain's flneBt scenery. A feature of the story is a very thrilling (bull fight. Fine acting, fine
scenery and stirring scenes make this a good offering.
The Price of Human Lives—Edison
Produced In co-operation with the National Association for the
study and prevention of tuberculosis,
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10TH
5   REELS-FEATURE .EXTRAORDINARY—5   REELS      .
GERMINAL
Or The Toll of Labor
A five-part adaptation hy Pathe from the novel by Emlle Zola;
Hopeless love, faithful unto death; jealousy and hate that are stronger than love of life;'greed that conquers justice; heroism that rises
to supreme heights; cowardice that angers, and unselfishness - that
thrills.   This is Germinal.   Remember the date, June 10th.
m
Matinee Saturday at 2.30—5c and lOc
I Prices, 10 S 20c. -i-ORPHEOM ORCHESTRA
GET   THE   ORPHEUM   HABI.T
ger. wlio looked llko a doctor, told hlm|ffl>;f ? nK la8t'     The RUe,t"' *"ho
(he ship had gone down.   On hearing lnc "'If *'«"• »"<1 Mra. .1.0. Grant, Mr.
llm mwiish of tho pnronts mul thn mifferii'tff of j this Captain Kendall burled hia face * .    ,.*,' n-ri,n< *'»• Wardrop. tMr«.
ia a Piece of tarpaulin and-cried   a*!?"1"'.?,,.w'M» °' »»«■ Orout. Mumm.
t .*    c**   t -i.i        i .. though UU heart would break." W'neh, J. Tioblnaon, J. Slmpaon.   A.
tort* of the St. Lin wen eo p<htip<1 tliem down mid] statement! Confllctlno -toutta «nd other celebrities,   report
th01 having upeiit a Jolly cveiilnK,
tluiHi' IiiiIk'k. wc can only hope that tho broad wa-
tort* of the Fit*. Lin wen eo parried tliem down mid
speedily obliterating all terror and suffering, bore j
and ffive Ihe pi-ncwd* in llie striken, of Colorado, thom peacefully to the Great Ueyond.
Bfatrtrt Nn. 18. Ittiteb €ttw itorkwa of Anwrira
fcy( ,' ' \°\
[2   oisimci U]
tvl  No in   JS
Montreal,   Jane    1.—Pending   —,   ,        t    ,„„„ .     ,
full Investigation Into the Bnwes* Inspoctor \\llllams w,xu making tin
* disaster, -which has beon promised #»>*; M*nn1 bispMtlon of the mlnea thia
'the marine department and which, ac- w*j*' ,
W.ng'to a ,.*Uttwta> made, by., T"" »^»'l;'« 'w«H.t. l.lta th«n
} Wreck Commlinloner Lindsay, thia' ",M c'r) ,nM,,t ht"'e b^*" md'Bf *?•
i morning, will ho held In Montreal, i^*** >"* *«>#k. They made no ml*
i MM can be learned to throw light on' ;;,,,w Ml:oul *Mw Uio bunttag up oa
Itho rauae of the tragedy.' Captain *e<'ff* fs,J«J **-*> •'though »°»« of
I Kendall's statement  haa been offaet h <tld }.0. »*?  «me  «'•«»'   mlmr*
=rc\
The Surprise of the Season
Big Wrestling Match
JOE  UVANNI
OP PERNIE
SAM
vs.
CLAPHAM
LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION WRESTLER
OP ENGLAND
■mem
nes
■R
On Thursday, June 11th, at 9 p.m.
IN FERNIE ATHLETIC CLUB, (INGRAM'S HAUL)
Good Looal Preliminaries Gen. Admission $1.00
NOMINATION FORM
Iltta iB tn (Krrtifjj that
aomowlmt hy that of Captain Ander- faf;ofr vii *lllrt-    ,   ,„,
son and hia crow '    Ho"n,*r ,en«> again-st Coloman will
Thorn still remain at Quobee, mor«i',,c «h««m from the following: Ward,
than SOO corpiea, and a large nmrtior W "•*™,' Mw- clBr'f' ',r»«lt- ****"
or them will ko to unknown $mn;jf,r,,"< ^"''tfT1' Burk* low* M<"
Many ot thorn helongod to the atecr.!(l0Jf"|J"1; ^n^n- ,,,„,.. ,
m, "     .       . i   The Hoard of Trade held their inual
" Wa. Collier Unmanned? ;™a™*mw*1** '« «h« l»*elfle Root
Cfaar*#. that the collier 8io»t»d J„oc'm' /fm «! •«*"«•» «w«« *«
was nnd«rm«nn-*d »i th« time of the!?" "8 •"* Wi,w'**"W *mw *•* '*»*
<nl!l«|i»n w|fh tlm tt\*t.f Kmnr-vv* ** ' , , . . . . ._ .,
Ireland, made today, will hi Inveatl-i H*^ »i»ad dreaalnt Ht tho llotmw
iwit ti, charge* based on * atateuwot of * J£* r'*'" ^^^ ^ h^„ „>*.,»„
survive™, who dcejawd tho collltr!   'ni« ^rreapondisnt haa beon sotting
Imd only 12 men, Including the cap-
was duly nominated for the Election of President, q/|p
i
a regularly appointed meeting of this Local Union on
 1914
m\
ronsted for leavfnt  ont a cotiplw   of
linjnitatlon ihtremm. If that era*y old
•fork wonM Imt go nwny, thore might
(Signed)
President
/LOCAL SEAL/
Secret-rip,
Srrlamttuu af (Caubifiatr
Bf*«*B» t -
7A0k:,
I hereby declare I am eligible according to the Constitution to accept thn above
nomination, and express my willingness to become a candidate for tho said election,
(Signed)
afmttn-mni-tmt.**
••»•••»•«*»*
The Store
of Quality
and Service
W<» aro now booking orders for Croston Straw-
IwrrioM   for   proaerving,
price tonality guaranteed
HOSMER INDUSTRIAL
Association Ltd.
HOSMER    -.   B.C.
(Oppeaitt C, P. «. Otpot.)
| i be « ohanet to koop track of thom.
J>     f*hn/' |tn«nmr Cl^ttHn  Xtltln   VrtmHk.
ftlon held « »tHX»tt ahnot on Hnndar.
yxm iiai, Mutk atii-Mm mtmioera ltirn-t
i«il uut to comtwui for the prlim,
\   Im th* Mtafght   ehoot   vtor* thft
I mine, i, o. Ay ret   took   tho   flrtt
h>rtie, -with it total of IS-, C. OtJohwof
' i.ritnllttr  ,.,,,„,„,*    ,,.t.1.   (ill,    ,,,*    „.*.,„,„„
i ■..,.....,.. ..*.«»,.te
Fa alerting silver spoon.
]   Othe* tmtoo mere:    A.   Onibert,
It: A. ..Msnndell. so;   O. Howk, 11;
It, llrooka, 77; si. Jaahec, 78; M. ,Mc
Klnnon, 76; 1. j. thrown, 75; 1. Jteln,
78; A. Nonwl, 7fl; tl, Brown, M? a
■ •Mills, «», ami A. Anti*rttm, 1%
j   The handle* f« t»ritt©« were mm oy
! O. Hone*, twal m, and A. *Monnd*lt.
<m, emh null's   ii a<!-ftrilni   filter
isp-eon.
| Th«» *m**ra*r«*t»!i!!> f*e I* $j j»#r en-
ftinm, and *»t.h member receive* IW
|wwtiid of frw ammunition on pnyin$
' .■Snroto* xrbn tntentta ^nfflnp hfs Jnto
I Hhould t»(...t.K,* UU Mii«-tkle before
f h«nd, or b* h linhltt io have hfa d»|
Itkarturc all i-Uol to Hadts, ft* w«H aa
fcftvlnt to volw» wim tlHtpP
wait. The Hoamer Utetf O*. mm
ih« tmm to he the owner, u* Hoi*,
Send/or Five Roses
Cook Book--
COUPON
Om* tmm i* %mJkm tam Canto
tw»i<«ili
fif-iNC A MAHUM. OT COOO KOPU mddh
ettSBeok Ihm b^ 99±9^^SL^afai^^ ^m ^^^^ --r**^^^ j^^^^^^wk
tatxaaM tmm d fam 9Wft ttam Omad-aQ €mtti.
AW UU Mm*«• ib -t-mmmtXmm-iirmUnatai
t > tat, ril d aAlA *U»» t*n* tmhh d*tt%M aid
wdmbrl %f iMnyattwIi »,iX,t4i)t).
j#wt iwr fiiwuiyf tt ttt^i tt ttt wiwwi iW|tnw w. twro. WffWlfOt
vrmm Otwuu wiMiimjt uo.   Trttw-Wood Oo.
DISTEIBUKjBS-JTlJfimE, B. 0. .  •'•;•**-.;        »t*:*3i-'f»'**M{.;
i^arnirtiTjjfigp
4^f:^n
*VjT    ' jf    • -.-yam
*.
THE DISTEIOT LEDGER, FEfifflE, B. C, JUNE 6,1914.
PAGE FIVE
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ^ ♦■<$> <a> -^ ^ •
***** of TKe,  District Camps
\;**&l
».;*
BELLEVUE NOTES
By "Vexatua".
4
,• iBortt-^PoiMr. and Mrs. Harry White,
» daughter. iMother and -child doing
-well. '
The -toaroea sticks have arrived at
last and Che boys are put every night
■practising. It we can't raise a football
team-wo. can a lacross team.
-The stork again visited this iburg and
left a fine, big daughter at the'home of
Mr. and 'Mrs. J. T. Simpson. Mother
and child doing <well.
Dr. .'Miller ot Edmonton, the Deputy
•Minister of Education, was in camp
this weok and met the trustees of the
Bellevue school 'board. He also gave
a short address at the conclusion of
the Union meeting and outlined the
plans for tho technical school they Intend opening througout the Province
during the .coming winter.
The population of Bellevue has   increased «onaiderahly recently. •  'Born,
to..Mr. and 'Mrs.   William   Newton, a
■daughter. iMother and child doing well.
James Burke was In Fernie on busl-
oiesa 'Monday and Tuesday.
Dr. iMoKenaie, who has been a Banff
tor a faw days, attending a medical
•convention, returned this week.
Tom Burnett returned to camp again
■on Monday.
«Mr. Delaney, the electrician at the
Bellevuo mine, has moved his family
to Prank, where he 'has secured a (position.
Bellevue Local Notes
Our -meeting convened as usual,
nvlth the president in the chair. A
.-good crowd was in attendance.
•Correspondence was received from
District Officers, informing us that!
they had declared the election of a
-candidate to the Trades and I^abor
Congress null and void. Just why they
did this they did not state, and we, as
ji local, desire further particulars.
A communication was received from
President Smith with enclosure from
Commissioner -McNeil informing us
.lhat in asking for a finding on breasts
which were less than ten feet high;
-we had not gone through the proper
-channels. -'How he arrived at that
conclusion we fail to understand, as
we endeavored, at the time of the
. dispute, to settle with-the local man
agement, but failed. Our contention
at that time, and at all times, is tbat
when the seam is less than, ten feet
high, the agreement automatically
ceases, and that a day wage of $3.00
should ibe paid. On-the other hand,
the company wish to treat it as an
abnormal iplace, which means to those
affected a reduction of 30 cents a
day. That, at 6 cents a meal, means
five meals.
We. were also In receipt of a wire
requesting us to send a representative
to a special meeting of the Executive
Board, to hear why President Smltn
refused to attend a meeting of bur
local. The request was complied with.
The sick committee reported that
the photographic plates of Brother
Hagg's injury, sent by Dr. McKenzie
to Dr. J. B. Murphy, the bone specialist of Chicago, had, unforunately,
been broken, and ' that it would be
necessary for lilm to have a .photo of
the Injury -before he could decide.
As regards 'prices, they are not exorbitant, but the committee were
•pleased to report that the. brother
■was getting along very nicely.
The measuring committees' reports
were accepted 0. K. in one -mine,
the other-not having completed its
duties.
Pit committee reported having
drawn the superintendent's attention
to the fact that, there were two of our
traveling roads not in as good condition as they might be for traveling
"safely. The superintendent promised
to give the matter his immediate attention. His attention was again
drawn to the fact that many of our
fellows were losing time owing to full
chutes. The superintendent explained
to the committee his side of the case,
which was accepted as satisfactory
by them, and promised not to set any
more miners on until he was in a
better position to handle the coal.
-Miners who are readers of the
Ledger please note.
The secretary was instructed to
write the Medical Health Officer In
regards to the sanitary conditions
.prevailing in this eamp, and also to
the District Officers,-informing them
that the eight-hour law was 'being
openly violated in this district.
The   secretary    was  .further    In-
COLEMAN   NOTES
iMr. Hiram Dougal has taken over the
bakery and confectionery business
from IMr. Stephen Machin.
'N. W. Hlcky hap taken over the Pioneer livery tbarn,' from A. P. McDonald.
From information gathered only one
passenger from Coleman-went down in
the ill-fated Empress of Ireland, John
Sovanic (third class passenger) who
was going home to^his wife and family
in the Nywise district, Austria. Deceased worked for a considerable time
,ln the International Coal Company in
Coleman.   I
Gllllvary Creek Coal Co., $50; Georgs
Olalr, ?50; Local Union 2633, $20;
Cecil Gower, $20; W.. L. Oumittee
(mayor), ?10r H. S. Goodeve, $10; A.
Knowles, $10; P. G. Graham, $10;
Harry Hill, $X0; A. M. Morrison, J. P.,
$10; J. SAC Burney, $10; Canadian
Bank of Commerce, $10; Dn It. T.
Ross, $10;i; Or. W. O. Connely, $10;
R. Eastwood, $10; Coleman Hotel, $50;
Gourlle & Grenier, $10; Maletta &
Colosino, $10; Plant & Antill, $10; William Graham, V. P., $10; N. W. Hickey,
$10; Local Union 2227, $10; West Canadian Co-operative, $10; W. Evans,
$5; R. Easton, $5; E. Eacot, $5; X.
Celli, $5; Dan Rodgers, $5; B. P. Mc-
Ewan, $5; West Johnston, $5; Steve
Janostak, $5; II. H. Roberts, $5; C. L.
Goez, $5; T. W. Davis, $5; George Vei
Special high muss was offered up lnjl°tIe.r^ *J>} ■*■• Joseplj. $3; S. Campbell,
the Roman Catholic church pn Monday
■morning by the Rev. Father JDetestre
for the repose of tho souls of those
who -perished by the sinking of tbe
Empress of Ireland, and ln the evening
Benediction ot the Blessed Sacrament
was offered up for those wbo lost their
lives ln that fearful catastrophe.
Large congregations were present at
both services, the Rev. Father Deles-
tre preached a .powerful sermon from
the text, "In the midst of death we are
in death."
On Saturday morning, tbe 30th of
May, an unfortunate accident occurred
at McLaren's lumber mill, whereby two j the Province of Alberta
of the employes were Injured. John J day, Dr. Miller visited
Brockup, who was employed at what is
known as "docking," sustained several
minor bruises, but nothing of a very
serious nature, but his companion,
Michael Johnson, however, was not so
fortunate, and sustained a fracture of
the left arm and several severe bruises.
The cause of the accident was the
breaking away of the -carriage that
carries the logs from one part of the
mill to another. Both men are progressing favorably, In the -Miners' Hospital, Coleman,
On Saturday next the bicycle and
dinner set will be drawn for a W. L.
Oulmette's store. The drawing will
take place at 9 o'clock-sharp, and all
coupon holders are requested to be
on hand. "
' On Saturday morning, about 10:30
o'clock, an accident happened to Fred'
structed to -post notices summoning to! Wlsla, who works in room 123 York
our next regular meeting all those.!Creek District, of the' International
who worked   on   May 25th.   Kindly {Coal Company's mines at Coleman. A
note. ,_^-_ !large stone fell fm_jiim_^ui<Uuij_w
coal
$3; H. Clark (time keeper), $3;,Steve
Maehen, $2; J. Koshuk, $2; Guss La-
cost, $2; J. Genstole. $2; Coleman Cafe,
$2; Lee Yat, $2; Coleman Realty Co.,
$2; Pred Cox, $1-; D. A. Donohue, fl;
A. Grant $1; E. Uaddad, $1; E.»lor-
rino, $1. R. Bheard, $1.
Tbe Order of Owls wish to thank all
wno to kindly subscribed to the lst of
July celebration, and given a good day,
the committee will make the spores a
success
On Friday last we were favored with
a visit from Dr. Miller, Provincial Superintendent of Technical Education for
During the
both mining
plants and interviewed quite a number
of men'of all classes and nationalities,
regarding the -possibilities and scope
for the work Which he has in hand. In
the evening he addressed a small but
representative gathering of men in the
clubrooni of the institutional church.
He told the meeting what had been
done in Calgary, Edmonton, Lethbridge
and -Medicine Hat, likewise informing
them of the anxiety of the Department
of Education to help the spread of
such work. .,
The school board expressed their
willingness to provide rooms for the
technical classes, also light and heat.
The Department of Education to furnish money for the teachers, with a
grant, supplemented, if needs be, by a
small tuition fee from the students.
As a result of the visit of Dr. Miller,
we will in all probability - see evening
classes in elementary English (for non-
Don't Forget Sale of Men's
And Boy's Clothing
ON SATURDAY JUNE 6th
AU Mens 3 piece suits reg. $25.00 Sat. $20 00
All Mens 3 piece suits reg. $23.50 Sat. $18.00
All Mens 3 piece suits reg. $21.00 Sat. $16.00
All Boys 2 piece suits reg. $6,50 Sat. $5.00
All Boys 2 piece suits reg.   $7.00 Sat.   $5.75
AU other suits at cut prices Also good range
of Boys Knickers and. Bloomer pants at cut
prices Also some good lines of Mens pants
greatly reduced.
Reductions in Groceries, Dry Good and all
Mens Shirts
Fresh Fruits Sat. Reasonable Rates
HILLCREST COOPERATIVE
Society Limited
HILLCREST   ::   ALBERTA
The mines were idle from 3 . m.
Thursday until 3 p. m. Friday, also
from H p. m. Saturday until 3 p. m.
Tuesday.
The summer -weather prevailing has
tempted the disciples of Isaac Walton.
Several good catches being reported.
The decislou of the Crows Xast J'ass
L'.ifc'ue cwvulive in the cisa of l-"r:inl>-
«s. Co;ii Creek was received up here
with howls of disapproval; and the
question asked now, is: "Why was
the ground suspended?"
We learn that the replay game,
Coal Creek vs. Frank, is to take place
in Fernie, on Saturday June 13th.
Coal Creek F. C. journey to Hlllcrest
on Sathrday  to fill their league engagement minus Banns und McFegan.
Sports at Coal Creek
As reported last week, thc unfinished
events of the sports would be decided
later. These events were billed for
Thursday evening. The following being the winners in <he respective competitions:
Relay race—First, J. Gibson; second,
J. Uuchanan; third, Mike Armstrong.
Egg spoon race—First, Marjory
Mlchell; second, Maggie Martin; third,
Hilda Young.
Human wheelbarrow race—First, J.
Hughes and W. Glover; second, N.
Patternson and-M. Armstrong; third, J.
ICrkersiey nnd J. Monks.
Three-legged race, 10 to 14 years—
Firs!, Joyce and .1. Buchanan; second,
.1. Eckersley and J. Monks; third, J.
McCourt and J. Dooley.
Three-legged race, under 10 years—
First, Dooley and J. Corlett; second, II.
Buchanan and W. Puckey; third, Con
gan and J. Frame.
Stand jump, 10 to 14 years—First, J.
Gibson; second, -M. Armstrong; third,
J. McCourt.
Stand Jump, under 10 years—First,
Harold Puckey; second, M. Puckey;
third, Kenny McCort.
Wrestling—First,   J.   Worthington;
second Robert .loyce.
Quoits—First,    J.    Kay;     second,
Walker.
Snaps—First, A. Atkinson;  secrfnd,
.1. Harrison; third, P. Davison.
That the   gymnasium   installed   In
Billy says that Pete is the champion
new laid egg eater of Canada. What
do you say, Pete?
.Wm. Harrison has left for field and
pastures new, tout .will return in the
sweet subsequent.
English),   mathematics,   and   mining, j connexion  u-m, «,« rv.»i Vw.... o.....
"StaTOa earlyTirtbeTall; with others in
manual training, domestic science aud
business subjects at a later date.
These classes should be a great help
to the boys who bum the midnight
lump in the hope of educating themselves, and   wo hope that   they svill
deserve
MICHEL NOTE8
.Mrs. Thomas Jonklnson and three
sons, Henry, Jonathan and Willie, arrived hack In camp last week, having
spent a holiday with Mr. and Mrs, Tom
S'pruston, Cumberland,
him  in some loose coal which, for-
unately  for    him,    happened   to he
lying in his -place at the time ot the
accident.    It took the combined   ef-
forts of five men to remove the stone
from him.   Fred owes his life to   the
stone coming lu contact with a prop.        ,    ...  ., ., . ..
He was removed to the Miners' Hos- "ect with the success svhich they
! pi tal and attended by Dr, R. T. Ross.
He ts recovering rapidly.
Born—June lst, to Mr. and Mra.
Ji\ck Campbell, a son. Mother and
child doing well.
William Ilaysom was In Fernie ou
Monday and Tuesday, attending a District Board meeting, his place being
taken In the check way cabin by D. H.
Hyslop.
Coleman va. Hlllcrest
' On Saturday, May 30th, Coleman and
Hillcrest football clubs met In a league
match, at Coleman.   Play ranged   In
mldfleld for a time, till Kellock   and _„, „ ._
BankB, with some very nice passing, {gone to join IiIh
transferred the scene of operations to'
Hlllcrest gonl, where a corner wag obtained, but nothing resulted,  On  the
klckoff Hlllcrest irot going and carried the leather down- to the Coleman
goal, and Holmes was called to save a
fust shot, which he did in good style.
Ploy settled for a time lu the mldfleld,
until Roughead sent  on   the ball   to
Cairns, who tried the Hlllcrest goalkeeper with a fast shot.   The   same
player  tried   again but   failed.  The j
Coleman ulayers at   this   tint*   ot
the game were playing good football
and with confidence,    Hlllcrest onre
more, by   determination, parried   the
sphere down to Coleman's  goal and
forced n corner,  which  wm nicely
pla-red. hut Jackson uot thu Iwii on
his head, and headed out to Kellock,
iA.iu iiui-'.**..tl Uia **<«,■» <*|i tc* tii* Hlllcrest
end, nnil had hard line* In'not scoring.
Coleman kept up   Ihe   i»re««iiro   for
t|iilte « time, bnt  the Hlllcrest  backs
wero playing soundly and kicking In
has proved of service to the juveniles
was evidenced on Thursday evening,
when the wrestling \toumament for
hoys under 10 years was staged, as the
svlndup of tho sports. The juniors displayed some knowledge of the ancient
art. Jimmy Yatos was the official
referee, and ho certainly was kopt
busy, There were ten contestants and
each name was placed In a hat and
drawn out iu pairs, The rounds resulted as follows: First. .1. Simpson;
second, J. Parker.
Semi-finals—First,   J.   Worthington
and B. 'Martin; first, II. Joyce and   J.
: Parker.
■ Final—First, J. Worthington; sec
i ond, It. Joko,
> Thursday night's encounters In tho
| wrestling arena led us to wonder
whether Coal Creek will some day be
The monotonous round of life was
■broken by three days' work in succession, as the Canada West mine worked on Friday, Saturday and Monday.
The total for .May was five days.
Tom Sneddon Is going to try his
hand at sheep shearing for a couple of
sveeks.
.Mrs. William Cook arrived in town
| this week, after u few months' trip to
the old country,
Alex McRoberts was visiting his
home on Saturday and Sunday, accompanied by his employer, Peter
Uegg. Peter has a contract for six
miles of gas ditching at Bow Island,
and we are very glad to know that he
is paying his men a fair wage of 3u
cents per hour, where other contractors
are only paying 22M: cents.
Mr. Howard, superintendent of the
Canada West Company, is a way, attending the annual meeting of the company aud will probably be gone for a
couple of weeks.
The Eureka mine is having a change
of namp to the ltegal Coal-Company.
Negotiations for a sale of the property
have been going on for some time, and
the deal is pretty well fixed up. Some
Chicago men are said to be interested:
iRow Island football team came to
town on Saturday for a friendly game,
and iwere beaten by a score of two
nil. The game was practically one-
'! sided, as the ball was only once in
'proximity to the Taber goal. The visiting goal-keeper gave a good exhibition
and be was kept pretty busy. But for
his good work the score would have j
been much larger. i
The Taber boys go to Leth*:irids<i on j
Thursday to play the Callies. The
team svill toe: Posvell (goal); Mahon,
Bateman, P. Carr, J. Carr Battersby,
McLuckie, tMcGillvary, Brown, Col-
quhon, Cartmett.
IMr. Miller, of the Provincial Educational Department, was in town ihis
^eali^Qn--.4>us{n*9ss^ir-Cvnirection~wit1r
the technical school question.
Some of the young fellows who are
out of work havo joined the militia.
The question waB brought up at the
regular mooting on Sunday and the
local executive.waB ordered to inter-
view the tsvo members ofthe local who
(had joined, nud explain to them the
use" to which the mllltla were put—
namely, to whip the workers into sub
jection in case of strike, as per Colorado. The press committee were also
instructed to voice the opinion of the
local on this matter, through the columns of the Taber Times.
A lecture will be given in the 'Miners'
Hall on Friday night, by J. B. Osborn,
of Oakland, California, who is touring
this .part of the country on behalf of'
the Socialist party.
The town authorities have received
word that their bond sale has been
completed, and tenders for the water
extensions will be called for next
week.
$8
HILLCREST
Opera House
Bright, iuterestiiiy, educational subjects. Projection
clear and sharp. No flicker;
no eyestrain. Music hy Hillcrest Orchestra.    '
Doors open 8 o'clock; start 8.30
Admission - 25c & 10c
HILLCREST
ORCHESTRA
Open or Engagements
for
Dances.
Concerts
Etc.
UP-TO-DATE MUSiC
C.V. EDWARDS, SECRETARY
HILLCREST ALBERTA
Phone 74, ring 2
Mr. Joseph Littler and James H»*d-i n^reVentw^
man boarded the 7 a. m. train Tuesday, cu route for England.   Joe   has
family   at   Ashton
training received reflects eredlta'hly on
itho trainers.
      . , ,. . , The projected   baseball   team   for
Makerfleld  who went February   last. roal (Yfl(>k „„ becotm, 0„ ciUMI,heij
He Joined uls brother, Matt, on vMom fflCt ,,)nu.tice tatag   j,eld   during the
day with a number of friends, who] WP„ictit victoria Park.
ijuve him a ttood send off.
John Crawford, constable, left here
Tuesday-, for Toronto,
taking up a residence at Natal, near
bis business,
The visitors to Victoria Park were
entertained to n good exhibition of
laoross   on   Saturday   evening   last,
Mr, II. (3, Lockhart left Old Town, j when the Co«i Creek whool boys en
Stephen T.  Humble
Furniture, Hardware, China,
Stationery, etc.
OI.D COUNTRY PERIODICALS
BELLEVUE
Alberta
tcrtalned Duiilop'g tt*>am lu   the first
(tamo    of   the    Fnrnlo   Schoolboys'
donco near the opera house, Old Town
We nr** pleased to   announce   that
Wnn, Porter, who mot with an accident
a short time uno, fallltiK and dlsloent- *
(Mr. Silvio (Iris has taken up a real- \ t-mmie.  Tite neat play of some of our
schoolboys evoked rounds of applause,
Tho Coal Creek cotitltwnt runiitnff out
winners » goals to '». Hob was tickled
lo death.
Inir hia collar bono  ls orottroMlUB fa-!    Th® hmm Um'r in vMm n Rrettter
loJhh- progltmstug Mm||<)W of m mhhtUif, of n,jh hm tlmr,
voruwy. ■ |})f! 0,j Bj11Jrt liro|,0i,inon,    a   match
■Michel Local I'nlon have responded tcol- placu 0)| XUtUtrU ,.,,rW )H1 Tll(.,.
to the re<ine«t from the Internationalj,,^. tvi,ninK between foal Crw«k.Ju.|
to Mil the Oolnnmh m!ner« hf   ,tn > <iuj# -Mj} ^^ ^mmfKt rt,mitm, m.
itatliiK »MW. and the local are fully |„ tt,„ fop (Vwl rwk »,,. (; ,,my toT
convinced that the money eould not bei'n„,'"     ,.  «..,,..„,
l»iii iii » moiu worthy cause. .  *   ,    ,'„„.," „" ,   ,
1    In spring a youni? »mn'*s fnnrv turns
Michel vs. Pernls ito love.   Why doe* Jimmy ulna: Oh,
•This roati-h *»» played Hfttttrdny l»«t. Jean, oh, tlmo, my !«n!iist .)»•<>>' j-?!m!l
nSSfffff,
On Sat. June 6th at 9 p. m.
Tho Ticket That Wins
The Bicycle or Dinner
Set Will be Drawn
good style.    Illlkreat  centre carried *
the ball down the field, but Coleman's «he following composing   the teams:
halves were not to be beaten. The Cole- Mk'hel-~J.   Mourcs,   goal;   I'anrluge
man forwards were working hard for «nd Hampton, tacks; 4. Trnvli, Owen,
n goal and Cairns sent In a mro good j Wearer. halfb«<K; it. Sudworth, Jlur-
Shot.    The   Hlllcrest     goal   t*nder »r» 3* Utttnn II. Brown. W. Holmes, !«'««n'ant In thl* mmp.
rbtted out, hut the same \dnyer getting f«r*«rd*,   tVrnle-iootier. goal; link*     Oil *iwnn   nre   float in?   <
th* tall made no mistake and g«re the I lej*. Shields, btxtk*:   Mills,  Whtt«4*&w.' to**'* nrmiml hew at pre«»>w.
Hlllcrest goal keeper   no   ekenr*   tdtlUley, imitlmtk*; Ikmtb, Wntsott Tom-      	
saving, on tho klckoff, play went JHm*oi», .lolmwn. Myers, forward*. J.
ao*ii from one goal to anotl»-»r far a 'Moores, Coleman, rt»fi»r#e, Th* pmo
tlm, m'M Mctfcmt!, nht i **«•!• *j*:*««**.; *i t,.A, ,,. _.„ ltetutv * nwm
Uttte-i pen, a*nt «*»<•§ mi Kdt-xk, In «'«>«*'» <*f ■»p*n«i*-.,or.», and *«» vrt uy
hl» cool, methodical wny, eaught the-.**•« until Michel sored, Hoon atter
tall and -scowd number two for C«|* I this Mleh*l were awarded a p«n»in
man. Nothing daunted
moro msdo a raid
but tkm ttotnnnn wa>*.^w, ,w ,„„-«,„, m.
forwards.   Hslf time wss called with I
H. G, GOODEVE CO. Ltd,
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware . Furniture
XV,.    " "!   t.,   ,   •   i .
■ * ••   J'* ...u»„„ ..uiii li.i.-jJ   ti, H,\i..'i  uUii ni  inti-
torn prices.   Call, write, phone or wire,    Ail order* ni^n
prompt mt.'htioii,
I* you are satisfied, tell others.    If not tatliflsd, tttl ui.
we in-niflml tbe tin    cut   orriusira,
.llm my?
Our congratulations to ArCuf Mercer on bis appointment »* eolli.Ty ne
the I
Mr. mid Mil  John JMe-tMiprren I n<
Silken over Canyon, cotJ«*e. formerly j
occupied X Mr, and Mr*. <1irf«t
ViV.»,l.
AMMWnt. '*H!-:?;!K VOTRsJ     .4
Ntot**--H5»ve y<»ur laundry ttotk done I
al IVrnl* price*.   All work el#an and i
Coleman
Alberta
F. M. THOMPSON CO.
II
For every doUar yoti tptnd with tu you have one
ebanoe ef wiBntaf one ef the ebevt mentioned
raJaablt prtfW.
Tb; £:;;•; -iiJiu* 4 **» oytwn. wo *uwm» uwuku* jttm
bare ef winntaf. Yen ftt bwt quality Mdlowwt
pri** here, w have tn year wiuti wppHed at thii
itor* and bt in ling to ftt that btautlfol Mt of
diibet or tht Mfb-fradt bicyolt.
Be on hand  Saturday evening,
June 6th, at 9 o'clock sharp
W. L OUIMETTE
Coleman        -        Alberta
mtMt. mtler**l on***    Uro*n l»l*.ed ik*. tall i«<o ihe net. I%«*'H «"^-    »•"'»' ««» tM »"«"*»^i
on Colenum's ■tal.lllair ttmo arrived with ilkM lading r»* **wr> W«i«w«lay af^moon.   Veiy
r __     .ni# tn cglliNl irlth!«»l*» «*r« «>«» ««« «*» oamtetmlve, blnr.'i    Tht H<»ir. Jos.   I»»iSI».   II.   ft,   left t
* ■».**»i«*t ***>etmia to xo*nette, \mu mmu mmt ituw mm* «»« Ur« <,',"*•*«<-*(«»  w«•««•*(!*>
t>ti thr ri".'.iniil)1|,H.u A iih,, lU.lkt.'.ti'iA '7'    'A'- *     ■■ ■ • ■   •'■"■" .'**■** * tn.,**,*.) ,       ;        ■' y!- "A ' i-
wer**     d*M«»t«rtr-Pd    to    'ttdnte   i^titid Jo^Ktii found Ihf wt.  %mn, ntmt A. f^XX*'?r  .    .'"'
'"""'   » ... 4. t   V■ ****.■ KB-suSfand   ttttMuammamiM* I   ah
Phone 25
"Th« Quality ■tor***
Blairmore, Alta.
ior victoria,*
** i, .ti.. **■**,
y-fM-iti^ilhsit i
mere awarded another t»e«M»|tf,' MWImdtst ehuf*b.   U« meek the €•«•!
to   mot*.    Fran i«'«*k fnrada gsre mm a fare*#ll  so.
ll
arrears and farriad ik* ball down   to i <bey
■ Cowmana goal, tat Holowa vas quit*!Nt Jotnaon failed   „   _ _.
laafa la deallgg witli nny ot tlw shots j Ihan on. MlrhH improver their (day i*-1"* •»«• l»r«»wit#4 hltii »Uh » eomplete
| that eatma bit way. >ww4 ftfM-tit  v*«*.?*4 «*yn*t»     Tt»# trawi* **t et tHt^-fea'arfttt**-
iMmmm torero n eorner, bm nothing I "a* toll ot eirettm-tnt all through.; lb* w»i <»f the smfclng ef the ttm-1
J*««U«4. CVrtamaa forwards «arr<#il the ^'rni* trying hard to rednee Mlefcel'a ***• ** trtland we* re*f*t.<! la thl*^
hell again dowft to the HlllerMt widH^d. nnd « well rotitvatod gamo <mdw!*!**»l» *•«•» iwwfoBgd regret. Th«»f
■ltd CaltrtM trim broogtd  »p for off * In tevor or Mi.h*l, 3 go.*»U to I. aymiwthr of all th# eamp r<~* "ttt to'
dido. OoIwmb «*r« rnidonbtedly 1**! A Cortction •" """"^ '•* «»«ae<ilo« there*Ith.*
SyrAm!T^fjty'*^,>t tim l    W* h*^* t«*lr«| the following from JK' "M0**1 ""?Ww «< Ui   »-»*« f
•Mt,tattlllte*KttgMlkafV«riniatni-',«,^Mi ,„*., ,.„,...,*.,,.,„£:„. r*rd|v* *' Mooa# take emt* ih,- at'rr
kt-AimhU, *m\ do whnt thoy likcu Ctde-     «....        ^.  ..     ..' ■Il,4n"  Mlh  l!»e  lodge  :.*>,■   «.:.    iw.
my we»moptmdtornmmtlmnffZ'"hl j,,,'. (./M, "J f" '''' J' ' j*   tt*^1**-   *»-»"» «« ««»-•'   ""*»'
•etmmt Of one of th« HlllerMt hota*.*,. Li!! -i   '.    ^. J1"     »'»*••«•«» report   the   mlt.ea   tree
|«tM determined   ft) MN   ftilS -JL12I H'^J^t^Tt4'.. Ut n**" N»«"«»*- «• «*•* «l»h
Wa half koobn womZemn^t T"" **?■*— lkm^ miT""; ?*    J£**> v*»- ^w • «■--   -"»- ««
\trtth Om ar«r» ntntidlnT-^mn*'^"-, ^"'^ * i*ra**lwo- «*• ««»** «■« the tWnlt* ot the .«■«».. . r„>
I Wtkon, rater** i*a,T*r , »*™". ■• bnto trare.| the eaatfi oo foaedna  to ,-■ r-«-!.« «M
^*?SfiZFe&V^\^ ****** * ■«?&£.;£ rt,,.... 5i,e o*
«. woo ar» aoniac »Wta la Col^Jtbe mtnukt- nod l»^6T«Bt*nee too***l mted the awlew of ettetkrt rmhtmi
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, CROCKERY
and Everything in Shoes
Our Gwffrv **firV-  i* rr\trt-n-irt*rt wW*j   ?!?h* Jh.C
choicest brands.   A full line of Fresh Fruits
and Vegetables always on hand.
Fresh Strawberries and Pineapples For
Saturday
■tw
11
■'?!!U!.*.V,,Ir,1,lt:. „ <^**r * Owia.'ifte hrvhir. tni irrrgt ytm %>,', u
tm. lataraatiOMl Coal «*, »M; h* tllt ^tter ta yow aeit 1mm.
iiitern-ftilojiftl, mttn ki-. "tkni u., hi-
jmWma menmnt aa.
Solo Affontt for "INVICTUS^ "RKOAL,"
"K" mako RNE SHOES and LBCKIE"
MINES SHOES     .
K<-.-
-\*  \,,;)f
I'lAnA
!<• frwm
miv
-A
j  ri-
t* '    Th
t-\-
are
wt*rth
.** per **it\
^mah
tt
b. ?
**u V
ft
j*»f*****,e<*'it<H*J,
t'**mm*twfim
' m»y
Ut.
Tho Storo That 8AVES You Monoy ■St-ES'
i'i". ■"'jn'
*,,   „   «-"     ^.
'   .">" '-* .
14<#- a ■
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C„ JUNE 6, 1914.
\i<-rzi$XA'SA*X-f^ASA77^'"'"-AS--iX, "&'''-£X&i&**'*x'-'J$.v-'~ cr**-;'- fy '.''
The Corporation of the City of
Fernie
BY-LAW No. 149
A By-law to assess, levy and collect
the cost of the construction, as a work
of Local Improvements of permanent
sidewalks under 'By-law Number 146
and to raise upon loan itho necessary
monies to pay the cost thereof.
WHEREAS the Municipal 'Council
of the Corporation of the City of Pernie did by By-law Number 146 authorize the construction as a Local Im-
■provement, of permanent sidewalks,
upon portions of the following streets
in the said City of Pernie, namely:—
.Mackenzie, Victoria, Pellatt, How-
land, McPherson, Dalton, Bethune,
Lindsay, Mason, Chipman, Nlcholls,
Morrice Avenues, and Walmsley, Gem-
mill, Wood, Cox, Hanson, McEvoy,
Thompson, Rogers, Drinnan and Davies Streets;
AND WHEREAS the Council deferred making assessment until all suoh
work had been carried out and the
uctual cost ascertained;
AND WHEREAS the cost of the
■work or improvement as shoufn hy the
Joint Report of the City Engineer and
Assessor is Four thousand, five hundred and thlrty-olght dollars and
eighty cents ($4538.80), and such
amount is required -to be assessed
against the owners of the real property beueflted by suoh Improvement;
AND W'HEREAS the report of the
said City Engineer and Assessor has
been adopted by the said Council;
AND WHEREAS the said Council
has raised from the Home Bank of
Canada on a temporary loan the whole ing:—
SCHEDULE
Showing the real property immediately 'benefited and the proportion in which
Uie Assessment is made on per foot frontage
of such costs, namely:—Four thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and eighty cents (?4538.80) and
it is intended to 'repay aame out of
the proceeds of the loan to be raised
Hereunder;
AND WHEREAS as .the said Council has decided to distribute the payment of the cost of such works .proposed to ibe assessed hereunder over
a period of four (4) years and to borrow the monies necessary to defray
such cost upon the special rates levied hereunder upon the lands and Improvements benefited upon, the guarantee of the Corporation at laige;
AND WHEREAS the total frontage
upon the said work of local improvement of the real property and portions
of the real property Immediately 'benefited is Eight thousand, five hundred
and ninety-nine and one-half feet
(8599.5 ft.) and the cost chargeable to
the property benefited Is as aforesaid
the sum of Pour thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and
eighty cents ($4538.80);
AND WHEREAS the Corporation ot
the City of Fernie desires to pass a
By-law for the purpose aforesaid;
.THEREFORE the Municipal Council of the Corporation ot tiie City of
Pernie, enacts as follows:—
1, .That the real property Immediately benefited 'by the said work of
local improvement shall be that which
is .particularly mentioned, set forth
and described in the schedule follow-
Col. 1
Name of Owner
Oscar Erickson .
Gee Han 	
P.  Bambino   ..,..
R. Migale  ..
R. Oaravetta ...
Sam Lee  	
-Sam Lee 	
William Barton .
William Barton ,
John Reid ,.
•Mike Gimi 	
Tony Caravetta .
George Loxton .
George Loxton .
James Easton ..
J. P. Bushell ...
Thos. Robertson
Wm. Eschwig ..
J. H. Wetherllt .
A. P. Haddad ....
Santa Pascuzzi .
Percy H, I/ewis
Lot
4
7
8
9 ,
10
11
12
is.
14
15
1
2"
%3
%3
%4
%4
5
6
7
%8
Col. 1
Name of Owner
Dr. I). Corsan	
Mrs. C. M. Corsan ....
J. F. Rudnlcki 	
Gladstone Local Union
Dobson & Willlngliam
J. \V. Dobson   	
Mrs. Eliz. Todd  	
Chas. P. Hill  	
A. J. Fnrquharson	
Ellen Turner      Pt. 6
Wm. Hawthorne      Pt. 6
Lot
I'Jl
13
It
2
3
2-3 of 4
1-3 of 4
5
.    Pt. G
City of Penile ..,
Francis White ..,
District Ledger ..
District Ledger ..
C. N. P. Coal Co.,
Wm. Hawthorne .
A. T. Hamilton ..
C. A. Wilkes ....
Methodist Church
Methodist Church
Methodist Church
C. E. Lyons 	
Mrs. A. Elley ....
Ltd.
"sanvurnnnnrTT
Mrs. Lelia Ross
Alex. Macnoll ..
A. C. Liphardt .
W. P. Muirhead
.1. D. Quail ....
J. 1). Quail ....
O. V. Johnson .
Alex. Beck  	
S. P. Wallace ..
S. F. Wallace ..
S. P. Wallace ..
City of Fenil*f< .
Mrs. Geo. Bella          '2
Kootenay Telephone Lines        3
John Hunter Estate  4
Emma Klrhpatrlclt .--.... VA-; .'•
.Mary MePaninliar  W'i ">
7
8
9
Pt.10
Pt. 10
o
14.
3
4
5
6
7
. Stt 8
Nfc 8
 •*■» .
 w -
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Block
1
1
1
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
i6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Rate
pet-
Feet    foot
front front
iTotal
60
60
60
13.5
13.5
9
4.5
80
1
2
1
4
4
4
2
2
13.5
13.5
13.5
80
'150
77.5
8.75
8.75
50c $30.00
50 30.00
30.00
7.42
7.42
4.95
2.47
44.00
.75
7       8
Annual Total
' Pay-   Payment ment
$9.00 $3C.00
9.00   36.00
.50
;55
.55
.55
.55
.55
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.55
.55
.55
.55
.60
1.50
.75
3.00
3.00
3.00
1.50
1.50
7.42
7.42
7.42
44.00
80.00
53% 40.42
.59% 5.21
.59% 5.21
Mrs. Marie Hoelzol ...
Ellz. {'niuphell  ,
W. K. Vnnco	
Ibahclle Wi-IrIchworth .
Mr-   W. J, lllim-lcll ...
Aiigele Chnrdon   	
AiikdI'' Chnrdon   	
J. B. Turney	
J. li. Turnoy	
Geo. W. Hartley	
Archie Maclean 	
Al. Rlzzuto 	
Al. KlKXUto 	
KnljyhtK of Pythlnti ,...
h. K. McDonald	
Al. Rlssuto  ,,
Al, KlJruto 	
H, P. Wallace	
Jos. Alf Ho 	
Hherwood Herchmer ..
Bherwood Horchmor ..
Krands Whlto ,,......
('nthcrlne llohlchnud ..
Catherine Roblchtmd ..
W. A. InKram 	
Bophla Ite-an	
Catherine Morrison ...
George Grandln ......
•Frank flean	
W. J. 3. Morrison
Hugh Carllle 	
Wm. Ilandley 	
CinuiiU.ie.ul 	
John llean	
John llwin ...,.,....,
John Mean	
II, A. -Berlgan 	
tleorae Harton 	
(tunnc-a Itarton	
I. K. fJo-mt ..,,.....;
Thornton ft Morrlaon
K*tl M*l*etn	
Percy dleaa 	
Philip CnroteJle 	
School Hoard 	
V. 3, rugby ,	
c. J. Wttiy	
1». faroadia	
P. <'art»#**ll*	
f*. Caroaalta  ,
K»t»« A!4»r
nmma Aldur ...
p. V. Jans** E»*i!# ..
6
7
8
U
10
11
12
IH
14
15
10
17
18
19
20
1
2
a
4
5
«
7
H
9
XI
11
rt. 12
pt. ia
Pt.U'
Pt. 13
14
15
All
1
2
l'i, a
rt.3
i
li
fi
— T	
7
• 9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
14
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
21
21
21.
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
aa
n
22
•2S
22
met
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
to
 iTl if
4
1.2 1.00
1.2 1,00
1.2-1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 l.OO
1.3 1.00
1.2 1.00
1.2 1.00
60 1.10
13.5 .55
13.5 .55
13.5 .55
40.25 .55
40.25 .55
84      .00
17.5 .76
17.5 .76
17.5 .76
4    1.50
2-5 .70
2.5 .70
n.:>
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.r,
B37H~jLVTTa
75
70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
68
84
.14
.14
34
fit
68
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.S ,10
2.5 .10
t.t, .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.5 .70
2.6 .70
10
1
3
3
4
r»
i
s
*
2ft k
25
214
&
23
5t»
3fi
»
2«A
2»
29
tn
29
3t
tf
3S
m
78
?»
34
34
78
7*
10
10
10
10
10
1181
r.
5
&
5
fi
3d S
il.fi
4i a
.54
.54
.54
.64
,54
.54
M
.W
.83
.83
.83
.83
.84
.83
.78
.75
.75
.76
.75
.70
M
.8.1
.W
,U
,83
m
88
8«)
3.00
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
GO. 50
7.42
7.42
7.42
22.14
22.14
50.00
13.42
13.42
13.42
6,00
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.76
1.76
1.76
1,75
1.75
1.76
1.75
1.76
1,76
1.76
1.76
1.76
38.83
18.41
18.43
18.41
18.43
36.83
36.83
48.48
48.48
24.46
84.47
49.68
43.83
7.50
7.60
7.60
7.80
7.80
9.00
2.23
2.23
1.4S
.74
13.20
.23
.45
.23
.90
.90
.90
.45
.45
2.23
2.23
2.23
^3.20
24.00
12.12
1.56
1,56
 Q_*»n__
 VT-10   *
.90
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
36.00
8.90
8.90
5.93
2.97
52.80
.90
1.80
.90
3.60
3.60
3.60
1.80
1.80
8.91
8.&1
8.91
52.80
96.00
48.50
0.25
6.25
_3.<l Jin
Valentine Oppl       %S
Dorothy Hamilton 	
Joe Taverna	
Sam Parks 	
P. Burns & Co., Ltd	
John J. George 	
P. It. Lundle 	
Western   Canada   Wholesale Co	
Patsy Audia 	
Marlon I. Ward	
Miss Jessie L. Dobson ...
Wm. Newlng 	
O. Ulfsteln 	
Sam Lee 	
Valentine Oppl 	
Pred Miller	
Mrs. S. Orr	
Margaret Kerr	
Jules Andre	
Jules Andre	
Wm. McDermid 	
Wm. Kummer	
John Johnston .'	
Miss A. IM. Andrews	
Ching Wing Kee 	
W. G. Barclay 	
Sidney Glllett-	
Thos. Griffiths   	
Kennedy & Mangan	
Kennedy & .Mangan	
John T. Mangan 	
Mrs. Mary Palmer 	
Mrs. N. P. Wriggles worth
Harry Willlngham 	
A. T." Hamilton 	
Hattie E. Whelan	
N. E. Suddaby	
C. N. 'P. Coal Co., Ltd. ..
McGladrey Bros	
.McGladrey Bros	
H. Snow  	
Lily Kenny 	
John Phillips 	
H. W. .McGuire 	
W. J. Adams 	
Jane Bullock
9
10
Pt.l
2
'     3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
'I
?.
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Wm. Currie
W% 14 & 15
.36
.36
.36
18.50
2.23
2.23
2.23
6.64
6.64
16.00
4.03
4.03
4.03
1.80
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.62
.52
.52
.52
.62
M
.52
.52
.62
.52
.52
.62
.62
.63
.52
11.06
6.63
6.63
8.63
6,53
11.05
11.06
L. O. Snow   E% 14
Emma Letcher	
Emma Ix>tcher  	
J. M. Clowers 	
Angus Smalek	
Jozef Stelliga 	
Jozef Stelliga	
■Mike Kubiness   	
Mike Kubiness
jAh«__ftn.rJjul±	
1.1
6
  7
  8
  9
         10
,         11
         12
ln
JEJA'iJtI&_.15„
BlOCk
3a
32'
«2 -
32
32
32
' 32
32
32
32
32
'-33-
- 33
33
33 ,
33
33 -
33
34
34
34
34
34
34
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
38
38
38
38
38
40
40
4Q
40
40
40
40
40
40
, 40
46
46
46
46
46
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
43
 iSi.
Rate
"Per.
Feet   foot
•front front
' 41.5 .60
41.5".60
41.5 ,60
41.5 .60
41.5 .60
41.5 .60
116.5 .60
161,2 .55
95.7 .58
'   95.7 .58
95.7 .58
8J.2 .60
IO"    .75.
10     .75
5
5
5
5
10
5
5
2.5
2.5
5
5 -
41.5
71.5
41.5 .60
41.5 .60
.-75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.90
.90
.90
,90
.90
.90
Total
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
68.12
8S.68
55.93
55.93
55.93
48.68
7.50
. 7.50
3.75
3.75
' 3.75
3.75
7.50
4.50
.4.50
2.25
2.25
4.50
4.50
7       8    :
Annual Total
Pay-   Payment ment
7.50   30.00
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
7.50
20.44
30.00
30,00
30.00
30.00
30.00
81.74
26.60' 106,41
16.78   67.12
16.78
16.78
14.60
2.25
2.25
1.13
1.13
1.14
1.14
2.25
1.35
1.35-
,32.6 13.55
."20     15.71
24. SO
24. SO
,35
,35
,07
,71
,44
.44
41.5 .60 24.SO 7.44
41.5 .60 24.80 7.44
41.5 .60 24.80 7.44
41.5 .60 24.80 7.44
41.5 .60 24.80 7.44
41.5 .60 24.80 7.44
68 -.67% 39.15 11.74
68 .57% 39.15, 11.74
68 .57% 39.15 11.74
68 .57% 39.15
- 68 .57% 39.15
114 .51 -58.42
39 .55 20.92
i39 .55 20.92
39 .55 20.92
39 .65 20.92
89 .55 20.92
39 .59 20.92
>39 .55 20.92
39 .55 20.92
34 .54 18.42
61.4 .58 35.70
61.4 .51 30.70
61.4 .51 30.70
61.4 .51 30.70'
61.4 .51 30.70
4 .7-6 3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
20.04
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
63.24
22.74
.51
.7-6
.75
.75
.75
.75
.88
.88
.88
.88
.88
.88
.88
.88
.55%
.88
4
4
4
4
34
39
39
39
39
39
39
.39
114
39
36.5 .50% 20.30
3«.5 .50%'20.30
36.5 .50% 20.30
36.6 .50% 20.30
36.5 .50% 20.30
36.15 .60% 20.30
36.5 .50% 20.80
36.15 .50%' 20.30
3fi.K  .RfllA 20.30     6.0S
67,12
67.12
58.41
9.00!
9.00
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50
9.00
5.40
5.40
2.70
2.70
5.40
5.40
16.26
18.85
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29:76
29.76
29.76
29.76
46.98
46.98
46.98
46.98
46.98
70.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
E5.10
2-5.10
25.10
25.10
25.10
22.10
42.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.60
3.60
24.05
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
75.89
27.29
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
11.74
11.74
17.52
6.24
6.2S
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6.28
5.52'
10.71
9.21
9.21
9.21
9.21
.90
.90
.90
.90
.90
6.01
6.82
6.82
6.82
6.82
6.82
6.82
6.82
18.97
6.82
6.09.
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09. 24.36
6.09' 24.36
3.60
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
72.60
8.91
8.91
8.91
26.57
20.57
60.00
16.10
16.10
16.101
7.20
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
210
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
3.10
2.10
44.30
33.10
23.10
33.10
32.10
41.30
44.20
Henry Elliott .... E% 14 & 15
P. A. Riches  E% 6
Dan Willis  .....* ...W% 6
Robert Smith   7
Jos. Johnson  ."  % 8
Harry Halgh    % 8
Stephen N. .Moore '...... % 9
Alex. Bunch   % 9
Cow.per Stephenson  10
J.   A. Broley   % t
Cecilia Lukas    % 1
John Rauter  2
George W. Goole  % 3
Jos. Hamer
Wm. Dickinson 	
Wm. Dickinson 	
John T. Mangan
Wm. Batc-man ......
Howard Marshall ...
.las. A. Broley ......
Chris. Dlngadale ....
Man' Podblelanclk ..
Mrs. Clara Morris ..
William Jackson
Mlsa A. M. Andrewa
Robert Kpelra 	
% 3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
r>
4S
49
49
•49
49
49
49
49
49
51
51
51
51
61
51
51
52
52
52
62
52
63
63
53
53
53
36.5
34
34
68
8
8
2.5
2.5
6
101.5
37,5
79
,61
.61
.75
.75
.75
.51
.51
.62
39.5 .52
.50% 20.30
.56% 19.20
.56% 19.20
.56% 38.40
59
6!)
66
66
66
66
66'
Ti
.52
.52
.56
.56
.56
.56
.56
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
S599.5
4,89
4.89
1.87
1.87
3.75
51.37
19.38
40.76
20.38
20.37
40.75
35.75
36.96
36.96
36.96
36.90
36.96
3.76
3.75
3.75
3.75
3.75
34538.80
6.09
5.76 ,
5.76
11.52
1.47
1.47
.66
.56
1.12
15.41
-5.82
12.22
6.11
6.11
12.23
10.72
11.09
11.09
11.09
11.09
11.09
1.13
1.13
1.13
1.13
1.13
member of the family
should eat Sunkist Oranges just before retiring at night. Eat them
at meals and between meals. For
no other fruit ever better insured
good health. *   < ...,- —
Heavy with lusci-pus juice, sweet
and delicious.. They are freerpeeling
and so tender-meated you can
eat. them^ whole ;withput losing'
iiny; juiced :.' " ■' ^*". •'■^■.Cy.-^^i^-
Z Sunkist"are treeeripened, giove-:".;
picked, tissue wrapped, and shipped x
right frorp'the tr^e, so, are .always'. .
fre^h and full flavored.   J •;     ; X'V
Will you buy merely "oranges,"
or will yoa get "Sunkist?'»-*      *
Prices ai-elbw. Get a dozen how.  -.,
Sunkist Oranges
Sunkist Lemons, madam, are  the equal of
Sunkist Oranges in quality—practically seedless, juicy and richly flavored.   Serve them
with fish and meats —they are the best
looking lemons.    Try using their
juice wherever you now use vinegar.   See what you're missing by going without the
Sunkist Brand..
California.
Fruit Grower*.
Exchange
105 King St., Eatt. cor. Church
Toronto, Ont
, Mall.us this coupon and we wllt.c
send you our complimentary 40-pag&
recipe book, ihowing over. 110 ways of using"
Sunkist Oranges and Lemons.. You will also.  '
r v receive our Illustrated premium book, which tell*.
you-how to trade Sunkist wrappers for beautiful' ■
table silver.    Just send; this coupon or call at.th&
above address,
NAME
ADDRESS
and come Into force on the First day
of July, A. D. 1914,
14. This -By-law shall ?>e cited and
known tor aU purposes as the "Special 1910 Local Improvement By-law
No. 2, 1914."
Done and passed in Council assembled this 14th day of May, A. D. 1914.
- NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE tbat the above io a
true copy of the By-law upon whldh
•the Court of Revision will sit In the
Council Chamber, City HaU, City of
Fernie, B. ,C„ on -Wednesday, June
24th, 1914, at 8 p. m„.Mountain Time.
If any owner or owners desire to object to the- assessment made by thle
By-law^ the requisite petition should
you demanded that the militia be given
over to the coal operators.
"So long as 'law and order' was
being -restored lii ithe coal fields to
the -accompaniment of.a death-laden
rain of 'bullets shot from rifles and
machine guns, little waa heard from
you -save upon such oocaaions on when
Norman Angell addressed yodr4>ody,
upon the subject of 'Peace.'
"When tho crowning crime Incident
to the restoration of 'law and order*—
the Ludlow massacre, horrified the
country, nay, the entire world, what
stand did-the Chamber of Commerce
take? Did the slaughtering, shooting
and..suffocating of men, women   ana
24,36
23.04
23.04
46.08
5.87
5.S7
2.25
2.25
4.50
61.64
23.26
48.90
24.45
24.46
48.90
42.90
44.35
44.35
44.35
44.35
44.35
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50
5e TlIe<rwEh -tfie undersignedten^lear
days .before the first Bitting of the
Court of Revision.
ARTHUR J. MOPPATT,
City Clerk.
City Hall. Pernie, B. C,
•May 15th. 1914.
SEE8 THE ''CLOVEN HOOF"
these rights our 'brothers and sisters
tn the army of laibor, (together with
thedr balble», paid iw-tth their lives.
"Even -will we keep in our memories
those slain at Ludlow, for they have,
hastened "the. time wheu the-.hosts x>Z
labor twill realize their social might.;
and industrial .power and usher ln o-[
time when-the "bullet, bludgeon an-i
torch will cease to sym*bollze 'law Gild.
order* .of the Wnd Colorado has /witnessed for. mo-abbs past."—Miners (Mag.-;
azlne. ...   -„•
-*■.■ A .comedian, in a Paris* theater re-,
oently made a <great hit out of a painful
van .IwihlftB et mother*' ihreaata ajl I incident   ^Mle tndulgtng.ln a Wt--bt.
2.   That the said shares and proper-1 fixed, printed, stamped, or lithograph-
(Ions of Uie said wum of Pour thousand ed facsimile.
BJxfmjvt
14.54   58,17
14.54
7.34
T.3I
H.90
13.15
3.25
2.2S
2.IS
t.n
1,25
137.44 248.33 VttM
4.13     III     4.1*
4.13     1.S4
4.13     1.24
4.13     l.|4
4.13 1.24
22.(2 A dl
25.00 i,m
n.m   t.wt
68.17
£9.36
20.2«
5Mt
53.51
9.00
9.00
0.00
o.oo
1.00
4M
4M
tAJ*
4.M
SUM
MM
BBS
DRpltiEES
CREAM
BAKING POWDER
il Pure Crtom of Tartar Powder
Indispensable to best results—saves
worry—raves trcrh—saves money-
stives health saves complaints nt table
five hundred and thirty-eight dollars
and eighty centt ($45.18.80) shall be
a*«e«iwd on tho various portion* of
the real -property beueflted In the
manner and to the amount aet forth in
tho Seventh and RIghth columns ot
the Schedule In ttoe next preceding
section ot thia Bylaw; and the raid
property and (portions ot the real property aet -forth »t»d described In tho
achedule iu Secliott I of tUU Dy-law
contained, are heroby assessed accord-
intrly wUh tbo payment of the amounts
set forth In ihi Seventh and Eighth
columns of tho aald schedule opposite
each Mid portion ot real property.
3. The amount ot tho opedai rate*
assessed aa aforesaid against each lot
or part of a lot respeeUvtiy shall bo
divided into four equal partf m by
the Seventh column of the Schedule
In Beetlon 1 hereof and ono Of such
part will bo •■seated, levied and collected In tbo flrtt year aad each subsequent year for three yeart after the
tint pasting ot thl* ny-law during tbt
Four (4) yeara which iho debentnroa
hereinafter mentioned bare to ran.
4. That It ittall be lawful (or tbo
Corporation of the City of Fernie to
borrow upon th« security ot tbe tp*-
eta! mtes hereby Impoted ud tm tto
credit and guarantee of tbt Corporation at largo by nay ot tbe dotMmtnm
hereinafter mentioned, front any per-
ton or perion*. body or bodies top
toomxe who may bo willing 40 adrance
30 00 the tame a *um not to aweed la tbe
who!* turn of Four tbonsand, five bun-
drod   and   thlrty-oltbt   iottars
eight) i.nu (1453110).
5. That it aball bt lawful for the
May or nt die CofporB-tton at tlio City
id fernie to cnaos any number of 4*
* id.   ,»nWi,.it.*,.;»
7. iAlt the aald debenture* aball
bear Interest at the rate ot Six (6) per
cent .per amurm from the date thereof
which Interest shall be paid and in-
eluded In each annual Instalment *o
payable ai the branch of tbe Home
Bnnk ot Canada aforesaid.
8. It aball be lawfal for tbe Mayor
and Council of tbo aald Corporation to
dltpoaA of the aald debentures at par
and to authorlie tbe Treasurer to pay
out of tbo tnm so ratted by the sale
of tbo tald debentures all expenses
connected with the preparation and
printing of tbo debentures and coupons.
The Trade*' and Labor Assembly of
Denver, Colorado, hat -withdrawn its
delegate* from 4*he Chamber of Commerce. The Trades and Labor Assembly has at last recognized the tact
that the Interests of the exploiters and
parasites who make up the Chamber of
Commerce do not barmontze witb ibe
Interests of the workers.
The Chamber of Commerce during
the strike of the coal miners has ungloved Itt hand and shown 'beyond
every question of a doubt that It 4s
against organised labor and ttands
solidly fpr tbat Industrial oligarchy
that has uted gunmen, State militia
and a 'prostituted State administration
to defeat the United Mine Workers In
ita effort to establish humane conditions In the coal mines of Colorado.
Tho Trades and Labor Assembly, tn
-withdrawing tta delegates from the
Chamber ot Commerce sent the following oauttlc .letter to that body:
"At a regular meeting ot iho Denver Trades and Labor Assembly hold
iMay 10, a resolution was presented
and unanimously adopted calling tor
tbe withdrawal of our delegates from
your organisation.
"It la but }nst that reasons bo presented for th* stand wo have takan,
and tbe undersigned were appointed as
forth the faintest condemnation from
your -member-ship, for this, the fouleet
crime committed 'since time ita course
began?'  No.
."You then attempted, by methods
which would shame an Oriental despot,
to intimidate, terrorise and bludgeon
tho press into silence.
"Whether these infamous tactics
were the results of shame, fear, ter
ror; we know not. We do know, however, and rejoice in tho fact, that
your efforts failed.
"Notwithstanding the Bourbon-like
attitude of your body, we trust that
ibe thousand historic lessons which
prove that liberty and injustice cannot be shot or bludgeoned out of existence, will not be last upon you.
"The rights of assemblage, free
speech and .free press are the moot
precious berltago a people can .possess,
the maintenance and furtherance   of
horseplay on tbe stage ne wacrtisr:r
head violently, entirely  by  accident;
against one of the pillars of the; stag©
scenery.   On bearing the thud, every- ■
body uttered a cry.      ,
"No«reat harm done," said he-. "Just
hand me a towel, a glass ot -water and'
a salt-cellar,"
fThese were broug&it,- and ho sat.
domm, folded the towel In tlie form of
a bandage, dipped it in the glass, and
emptied the salt-celler on the wet part.
Having thus prepared a ooimprese, according to prescription, and when
every one expected he would apply it
to hit forehead, he gravely arose and
tied it around the pillar.
ShikMGwt
OU10KIV STOP* COUQMS. CURES COLDS,
MUM THK THROAT AND I UNO*. OO CMITI-t
9,  Tho amount so assessed and!a committee to acquaint you with tbe
levied as&laM tvi-fh UMk.ot pwti of tatl-i for oar action  in  tht  matter
lots es sforetald tor each year shall
bo paid as to tbo first year payment
on or before tbe last day o( December
1114, and as to sack subsequent pay-
ments on or before the last day ot De-
eamtwr tn tbo years 1115, 111* and
1117, and ta default thereof shall boar
Interest from and after snob data
respectively tt tbs rats of I per cant
psr annnm until paid, and may be
recovered together with all costs In
tbat behalf by distress and salo of tbs
goods and chattels of tbt person ilnbl*
for tuck debt and by tal* of tb* whole
of tbo rtat property or any part there,
ot aad Itm daya' notico thereof pub-
I tbed ia oat newspaper circulating It
tht* said Slaatclpallty shall be gtvett.
to. M tlw owner of My portion of
the said property b*r*by **ess*d
shall desire to comorat* lh* spsctal
atsiwinettt impoted by this By-lsw bs
or tha can do to by paytaf fo th*
Twssarer of th* Corporation on or
bototo tbo iitb day tt ttetemtbet, MU,.
tbo tmmot set opposite th* t*tl pro-1
abovo referred to.
"Until vory recently It mon tb*
opinion of v*ry many ot th* assembly's
delegates tbat th* Chamber of Commerce was ad organisation whoa* aim
constated in h* advancing of th* Interacts of th* City of Denver and tb*
•tat* of Colorado.
"Itt the furth*ranc* of that* Interests which we b*il*v* shonM be synonymous with human* right* and
a**ds, yoa hav* tpent yoar *ffort* fn
•Misting abtontee coal-lords In troth-
tag th* contUtuUonal ttgbta «f thousand* of onr fellow cittern*.
"V#v#f, to tb* best of oar IumiwI-
*dg*. have yo* *o»e*d yoar pr*t**t
tgalaat tb* falter* of tb* coal con-
paail** to Mfere* th* taws of th* StaU
which were framed to safeguard tii*
lives of 4b* worktra tn th* »o*t haa-
ardout of all occupations.
It Will Mt OHM M a *Mk to jrM,
asiis
HERE IS A SQUARE DEAL
and poaceful security as well.
With a pottey in our oM Une
company, you can so bit on your
vacation or visit tho end* ot tlw
earth and you know you'r* ae*
cure.  Th* best In
fi-tS. INSURANOE
Is always cboaposr. oM oatpool-
ally so <wb*o it doesnt oo*t
higher. Dont deiay about that
renewal or about that est** to
•urance yoa want bat com* right
In «t one* aad bar* H attwnod
to.
M. A. KASTNER
•OLE AQINT FOR FIRNIE
ALIX1ICKBI.OCK, tt
rsmmcikc
I mont rMhentwesP' to be mad* for S-seh I *7'I(
M-MtMMHnl HU Utn WttMl. WHM**«
i sum* ot * Moaayt *** bowttv-w *s***tt>>
i iag tbe wkm of. Vont tiMMSMd, Mt*
! hundred and tMrty-^ebt dollara aad
|eighty e**t*j|4ltSJt).i»d eebbot
eeomjHm
M  dnbwntnr
u* S'iii *-iv ir
n?1aw contained.
11.  That th* OotpomUo* «f
tnt el  *f*c«aiiie do «wawH** th*
monle* and laterant wrm <• b*
•rrtlfffl t «d th*\a\ytt\*n te t\t* wdnen af -f»WI«Y-rM« fwM
^U^t, UraETL.'nS iZLHS'i*»!«•* »»*•* th*sotborlty of tbtsBr- £■£• iralnly tot th* 9***** *+
*i»»«at of Mt toss than Oa* hwdrad)^v ,„,*•, ^ -cm-m-** n« Www* th* f*fe*ta tb* *«*«• Itiw* omwtokne tb* I
sTfTf inDvnma V9in|iiuyipu« cmn in nny i
other tme In tte Obtm.
Wb*a tb* ari**f* *»d»rt*ok te or- j
«bnMktiSfc hAkUteJhMb* Uii i hihhb nbb kjfcig iomh bek
UnWMBVSp ^^tW^^^Ht^'We ^^w^^^w w^  wn&w w^^^w m^
OM of mm- d*b*»t«rw wbleb mny be
for a lewar aa»**at If deesHed mpd**
Itt by tb* aald Mayor tnd all neb do-
bentnrt* wall h* sesltd in'h the *e*l
of th* tsmmdkm of tbe nty of r*r-
•I* and tlgn*d by th* Mayor and City
a«rh thereof.
Ctty and th* rarlow miwm
horewSor and to at la ao way to to-
terfere wkh or pra}*dk« tb* imw
aHMit aad tmtm rat* beroby haaowd
or «k* ckarae b*r«br created on th*
h»i* tmd vortioM ti Mte iMd em tett
ot ttm Mnm y*MH r*vt*** pay to
,i— ^l^j^^^l^,*  ^^^ ^^^^^^99^^oba^ma   __tttUtltlb'
wfTV |WPTwWIf rfr lW!WFTPPrw'llW*  IHni
*. Alt the MM <.ehenii.il a «*b*})jtb«y borrow the moony «PW» lb* •*-.
htmr mom nt tb* d*t# after tb* ftimf rartty of tk* deMittrab' ib*raby a«-
fwsatag «i xb*a U>-U*. ami »*»»*)*) kotibwtkimi -uir to kl>*> »»*.*v^l luaycctuc
IhiW*» of tb* said debeoLtuon, Ute
Mv«Mt ra*p*ctlv* aanwal payitatt a*
tbes «*y trom ttaw tf tttt* «aB *•"•
11   Tba moa*» to b* ratfd by tht
•*!« of debwrtare* heffl* **tliat1**i
•Ml iwikwHk no* bttter tbo tw*t*
td th* mm* *»• rwM t* Ibo 11«m« muw
ef c*naffa ta d!frti»nre td *wy ■*»*>'
rabwd or *dtwtetd trader thk Mv
or aat^»rUed la connection witn ta*
wt tte atti* wmIds.
11 «M* By4a* ahaU tak* alfo*
  pay***)* in Foar «*qatt aana*l
liiatalateata from tb* day hmttaftar
tt**tte*«i f*r this ItyUa in tab* ot-
leot. at tb* B»»a*b eUk* nt il* Htme
wank ofCaaada tn tb* cr» y of FVrnf*
la ib* piiw1«<* bt W.<r..-b -rtf-Buddo.
tte detdtmn-ted thea-m «M ahitn bare
tUachfd fo tftrw rewpin* for ?be p*y-
aHMtt of **«b af «*eb aanittl tmstal-
BM»»t# and the signature* of ih* Mayor
aad met* et tha rvw»oi»«.» rampeet-
iTotr ta tite wag*** star be etibw af-
tabty  Yaa aaplaadad t>*
wofb of th* gnnm*n  rtefaN*d
th* dent aad dlv** of fk* ahna*.
-T%* tMraame* of the** k*tslaas of
tb* tadsatttal eoafllet did aot, ta yaar
wHfantraa, *fv* eootttft ptwlVWf to
tlw alogaa. "A drahter Cttorndo," eo
Tr:n ^-n^flred nnA f^ftw tlt-mwa^ VttmAn mmt *«t>.
ply t*l« y«*r*« dwmnd. Mw» thnn ftwtr tmmtmt
thonsand in world-wide Mrvte*. Wt h»ja Jmt
received taotiiar eon*tfi»m«i>L Flay it safe-and
order yoar Ford toddy tram
The Hanson Garage
CRANBROOK     -     -     -     B.C
lata* kaadrai M-tan lo tb* trie* at a fbti raaakoat;
tb* tooting mt **•*<«* haiMl«t*d «U fitly, T. O. tk Gno-
MJkvmraoicHnuj&Tfc
■ffcat-tWlmWeem. flekm-ut-SmaUa
at ait tamo tmm.nt
«if.fwjtB*jof Bitot. Vat
,tBt.r.»rt»
,. f-i.
ffi^^lt.
*MA WWW
■*%A,^t^r,*te&
nevtt".
Onurtn.
mvtb Mv« <»., St. OlthMtM^
Per *»t* *t tliaiOiri 0v«| Otto
J
■iff- I^wI^^ax^F^^---' '
..^.taammfm
•t" ■ .S-.i
' -* VS. -'-. I    V,. s   t
- --s -. -
Uf.  •
THE DISTEIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. 0„ JUNE 6, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
'%
and
Beware of
Imitations.
Sold on the
Merits of
Minard's
Liniment '
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
I- ■'•
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
I
Dry, Goods, Groceries, Boots end
Shoes, Gents' Furnishings -'.
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT  HOSMER,  B,C.
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Pull tupply af ftllewini
for an appetltlitf mail ta
chette from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
andBggs
Try our Cambridge taitt.
aft* far temerrow'a break*
fatt
CALL OR PHOffl
Citeary Gattts Co.
Pto*w M Weetl ttraat
PIRNII, •. 0.
;ffirni6?FflrtjSieelB
■ ■-.,.,: '•-.'*, - i '   .- is ~    s,"   "s
i.M
■*. '       I        --V * , >
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross & Mackay ?»
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDougall, Mgi
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
Our Checker
Column
District Ledger Office, 'May'30th; 1914.
Communicated
CUMBERLAND
32
28
20
27
"24
\9
16
n
23
IS
30
26
lb
»
12
11
.14:
17
•8
21
13
11
H
10-
^
All matter- intended for publication
in thi? column should <be addressed
•IThe Checker Editor," and should
reach this office not later than first
post on Tuesday of each week.
Correspondents will oblige hy Quoting the position of the pieces" at the
stage when their play comes in.
Con-tributors -will oblige, by arranging their play, ln tabular form, four
columns to the sheet, the first three
columns being of equal.length.
Answers to Correspondents
E. *B„ Sprlnghlll, N, S.—Many
thanks for your games, which we will
use next (week. Slight error In game
No. 4 (Dundee). Position after 38th
move Js: Black on 1, 2, 12, 15, 20 and
28. White on 9, 10, 22, 27, 30 and 32..
Black to play. You continue: 19—24,
27—23, 24—27, 23—18, 2—6, draw.
This Is obviously an error, as mere
Is no'black piece on 19. Kindly cor-'
rect above and oblige.
• Aocoresp^ndeot sends us the follow-
ing.a^count.otS'Ports at Nanaimo, and
-the'itriumpfi of the Japs over the noble,
■freedom-loving (Britisher. .The desire
of the operators seems to -be (for a Canadian union, ibut Asiatic, workera for
ithe union. - -,*§uch loving devotion \for
one's -country finds no parallel in history—only in;fche 'history of capitalism
and •the "White (!) B. C. Government:
Empire'Day, May 24th, 'being oa Sunday, the satellites of capital celebrated
this day on Monday, the 25itli, aided 'by
their 'understrappers. Special trains
were run from all the subunbs and
every possible convenience -wae utilized to round-upall those simple but
•honest slaves, on- whom the mineawn-
ers are depending to defeat the alms of
the striking-miners. The result was a
pitiful sight for any retainer of the
preseut order to look upon. Out of
about 300 men, Asiatics comprised the
great majority, while the real British
were represented iby an insignificant
residuum, and to mend all, the whole ,if there were any they had not the nee
every prize they competed for, and
having had-a year's rest since then,
without ever feeling the -pinch of hunger, and -being free from any mental
worry, except an occasional report
that the strike twas settled, -not having
to inhale the poisonous atmosphere of
the mine, it was quite evident that the
only way to augment the badly depleted wages of the scabs, was by (bar
ring the strikers. To see these scabs
competing for the money prizes, with
that worried and hungry look common
to the wage slave class, reminded me
of a cross between a mule with a
burch of carrots arranged so as to remain about throe feet ahead of him,
and a dog with a cracker on the end of
his tail. There was to be an old man's-
race, the age limit toeing 50, but in this
as well lis every other industrial centre, 50-year-old slaves are as scarce as
hen's teeth; they are mostly worked to
death long before they reach 50.
Whether it swas 'because there were
none eligible for this race, or whether,
How   About   Your
Housework?
Problem No. 13
By -Mr. J. *F. Thomson, Strathcona,
Alta.
WHITE
mmm
BLACK
■Black men on 5, 8, 9, 11, 12 and 15.
White men on 13, 17, 20, 21, 22 and 23.
Wnite to move and draw.
—Selutlen-te-Pfebleni^NspJ-a.
BACK TO THI LAND
There are -too many "dreatnorn and
thinker*,"
Aad not enoutft Ullera of the toll:
There   are   too  many   eatera   and
drlnkera
Who ute up tbe produeta of toll;
There aro too manr boottert and
boomer*.
With nannera too eaey and bland;
We're carted  wlfh  too many con*
aumera.
We ought to go bade to tha land.
There are too many gettert and taken,
Ai\<t ni>t -MwigU m«Mi. who produw.
Thorn are too many broad rolling acret
Untouched and untllled—oot of ate;
Wo attek whet* the grime and the
grit la,
And the atreot* with the poor  are
a-twernii
We're crowded too nraeh tn the clllea,
Wo ought to go back to the farm.
Wo'yo tot to ho workera and ptowert,
Wbo awoat In the fWdt llko true
men;
We've got to make onn ot onr powot*
To make tha land ntottom* nfcatn.
What, tne? On a farm?   And to ttay
thare f
Well, nol tore bundle nt nail.
1 waa trying t« ahow yon tho way
theft*
Hot til «tkk to tbt city myatlf.
TW-mu.
■Black men on 6, 9, 10, 12, 13 add 18.
White men on 13, 19, 21, 22, 24 and
29.
White to move and draw.
22—17      25—22      24—20        21—14
9—14      23—27       14—18  •     27—32
29—25      22—18       17—14 19—15
18—23      16 22      10—17   .Drawn
We have received eeveral cuttings
from the Northern Weekly Gazette,
from one of which we abstract the
following. The cuttlnga were aent by
Mr. O. Wood, Coal Creek, B. C.
iMr. Newman of Mlddleaborough
writes: "J am tending you a very Interesting game, which I found ln on
American -paper called The Guide
Pott, which you sight find worthy of
publishing.
"Crete"
fly Mr. ToHuride; Colo.
11—15
23—18
8—11
27-23
4-8
32—27
15—19
24-15
10—19
23-10
11—20
a  Mr.
to draw
affair was conduoted (though not officially) by (the American consul, wlio
lis the official head of the mines iip
here, and who ordered the mounted
Cossacks to ride down women and
children in /the' early stages of the
strike. It was advertised that there
were |1,Q00 ito he given away in prizes.
I haive no reason to doubt the truth of
this statement, for there was not one
Socialist, I. W. W. or trade unionist on
any ot the'committees, 'but all good
Christian, respectable citizens, colliery
officials and would-be officials, merchants, doctors, magistrates, etc., etc.
But somehow, on looking over the program and the prizes to be awarded,
there are $600 or $700 unaccounted
■for. This is nothing to 'be wondered
at, when >we consider the strike and
the stagnation of the coal mart, which
In Itself 'preseniiB a peculiar state of affairs? viz., a horde of obedient slaves,
pleading to be exploited, and a ;pack
of human wolves willing to comply
with their requests, which kind of
hospitality cannot 'be rendered, the
mine owners only being able ito profitably exploit them from one to three
days .per week. As it is, those people
wlio deal dlreotly with the wage worke-
rr, after ho receives his pay are the
first to feel the effects of these crises,
and; aa the committee were composed
of euch people, you could hardly -blame
them if they did endow unto themselves a -part of the swag and call it
"wages for superintendence," In the
celebration-of Empire Day on this.pc-
casion, patriotism was compelled - to
take another step toward tha grave;
strikers ibeing barred from entering
any of the events.   If /that does not
Rnrarenaerremaant of paifloffamlfiaf
exists' amongst the strikers, .then the
'best thing any remaining 'patriot can
do for society is to leave It, and the
quicker they leave It the better for all
concerned.   You may love your King
and country, even though you are  a
slave, and do not own any more land
than that which you eat along with
your food.   You may   celelbrate   the
birth of a deceased King or Queen, but
only on conditions that you submit to
being despoiled of all the wealth your
laibor may produce; you must obey my
orders; you will work when.I aay so.,
and reat when I aay; you will accept iln theIr efforts to   make   themselves
In return whatever k pleatea roe . to|heard: a" onG coul<1 hear-wat the Jib-
give you, without any complaint; thut *®r'' Jn'&ber of the Asiatics, who were
essary 50 cents to enter, 1 cannot say,
but the race did not come offr The
vigilantes can tell you what became
of the prize money. The' most exciting
event of the day was the final for the
baseball game, wliich was between a
team of Ja*i>s. all miners, and a team
wliich was mostly composed of the collieries clerical staff. Much to the delight of the spectators, the Japs made
rings around their opponents and came
out winning easily by 8 points to 4.
The spectators seemed very one-sided
in their applause. Whenever a smart
move was made by a -white man, the
only encouragement came from the
American consul, the committeemen
and a few hangers-on. But whenever a
Jap made a -pointi the spectators almost all of whom were Japs, Chinese,
Indians and a few negroes (while with
a 'few exceptions all the white men
were in the enclosure, acting on some
committee or other) would yeM, roar,
throw their hats in the air and act
like somebody mad. Probably It was
consoling to them to see the Jap coal
pushers whip the British pen pushers.
During the excitement, one of the
white 'players discovered some strikers' children applauding the Japs. This
was more than this, mental eunuch
could stand. He began to insinuate
about having nothing to do ibut oat and
sleep and $4 a week. The consul seemed to be relieved some by the incident
as he-began to applaud these Wrlle remarks and encourage them by referring to the officials of the local Union.
However, nothing came of this Intimidation, and as the game closed with
the Japs winners; black In the face
and frothing at the mouth, expressing
repwr^nrstai~ittnit'sweaTni^-he—o$r
gan to hustle and bustle around like a
fly in a -pop bottle. Apparently it -was
not intended that the Japs should walk
away with this prize, which twas $75.
•Phey were to be given $25 for the beat
wrestler among them. However, it was
not too late to mend; the wreetllng
match had not come off, aad eirange
to say, It never did come'off. I presume the committee knows why and
what became of the prize money,
When the time came to give vent to
their patriotic feelings, although some
of them nearly lock jawed themselves
Noted doctors have said th'at housework is the .best form of physical
exercise for women—for it not only
DEVELOPS but BEAUTIFIES.
Tho  healthy   woman   ENJOYS   her
housework—she takes pleasure In Keeping things spick and span—and tt costs
her practically no effort to do go—be
cause she Is HEALTHY.
. Are you healthy?   Do you find yourp
housework pleasant and invigorating?
Or do you dread it .because you don't
feel "just right"?      That "don't feel
just  riffht"  sensation    may  NOT  be
/forth seeing a doctor about—but it it
a pretty «erUin  indication  that  you
are  suffering  from  Indigestion,  Constipation, Biliousness or Dyspepsia.
Next time,you don't feci "just right"
just try 15 drops of Mother Seigel's
Curative Syrup. You'll get relief—
(ltiickly.
England has TESTED and PROVEN,
for over 40 years, its worth. Then- It
is recognized as a standard rem-et1;;.
It is almost purely hertsal—Nature's
own  remedy   for  disordered  stomach.
Price $1.00.   Trial size 50c.
You can get Mother Selgel'ta Curative Syrup at
McLEAN DRUG AND BOOK CO.
PERNIE, B. C.
"'I Gpow Hair, I Do"
Fac-simlles of Prof. A, Garlow.
Bald at 26.
Fine hair at 55.
I POSITIVELY Cure all hair and
scalp DISEASES. Prevent BALDNESS
and premature grayness. GROW la*-
dies' and children's hab rapidly.
I TAKE NO DOUBTFUL cases and
positively cure all I do take. Hair
can 'be fully restored ou all head*
that still show fine hair or fuzz to
prove that the roots or (JAPILLIARY
glands are not dead. -"
I HAVE A. PERFECT system of
HOME TREATMENT for outof-ttie-
CITY people who cannot come to me
for personal treatment. WRITE TODAY for Question Blank and PARTICULARS. Enclose stamp and mention this paper.
MY PRICES are reasonable My
cures are POSITIVE and PERMANENT.
PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW
Tho World's Most Scientific Hair and
Scalp Specialist
Room 1. Woldon Block,  WINNIPEG.
MAN.
22—117       1ft—19     i2—17
9—14 26—21       12—l«e
18—9 2-« a    21—26
ft—14 17—14       18—19
17—10 7—io      28—18
ft—15 14—7 ft—a 4
18—22 3—10      18—14
8—11 2ft—23b      9—18
111—17 19—28      17—14
11-10 30-53 10—17
2*—25 1—5 I W. wlna
Jamea Lena tubmitted thit
capital, which repreaonta every nation-
allty under the tun, addresses British
*ubjectt through an American consul.
Apparently, these vigilant committees
realize (that the atrlke breakers, like
themselves, are much more in need of
the money than the ttrlkert, whose
lot It nothing to be envied, and aa the
fow ttrlkert who participated in tha
•porta on Empire Day laat year  took
probably complaining of the manner
In which the wholo afrair had been
conducted. Tlie whole aBfalr wat a
manifestation of the bankruptcy of cap-
Itallsm. If lt had no more aupport In
other places than it had here tn Cumberland, It would never tee the tun
rite again. Would we wait for election
day.   I think not.-
A SLAVE, Pro. Tom.
THE INCENDIARIES
ROYAL
HOTEL
FERNIE
W
Bar Unexcelled
AH White Help
Everything
Up-to-date
Call in and
see us once
JOHN PODBIBLANCIK. Prop.
We Are Ready to Scratch
off your bill any item of lumber not
found Just as we represented. Thero
Is no hocus pocus In
This Lumber Business
When you -cant spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip In a
lot of culls. Those who buy once from
us always come again. Those who
bave not yet made, our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't en-
-eeaater-lf'they-bought-thelr-lusBbw—
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealers In —
Lumber,   Lath,   8hinglet,  8ath  and
Doors.    SPECIALTIES—Mouldlnoa.
Turnings Braeketi, and Detail Work
OFFICE AND YARD—McPherson ave.
Oppotite G. N. Depot P.O. Box 92,
Phono 23.
There must be contlderthli> merit
to the measure that u | ending In Con-
great to exempt labor or«tnltatlon»
and utrlcultural utvocUiloio from tlm
provision* of the aml-tinm iaw, et
they have been construed and Inter*
preted by the Federal court*. The
bill la meeting with betted denunciation from tbe Journailatlc apologttta of
15   19 2
23-l«
i*—tea
22-18
16--19
JI-26
10-11
3*~1»
in—2*
»—1»
List of Locals District ! 8
J0   21
W. wint
8-*
10—1%
W. wint
lft—7
19—34
27-33
84—27
W. wint
to eorret Roblnaou'a Guide,
var, 75, alto Kear*t Reprint of Drum-
mond, Snd edition.
b Submitted by iMr. Tellurlde to cor>
reel Mr. keet, wbo -played 22—18,
16—22, 28—17; drawn.
c 6-9, 17—14, 10—17. 21—14,
9—18, 23—14. 15—18, 31—26, 12—18,
28—24.   W. wint.
d   5-9. 17—14, 10—17. 2l~R, ft—9.
18—14, »—18.   W. wint.
Variation 1
12-13-      10—1%
31-2«      27-23
Variation S
18—16 10—7
10-14 1—8
111-10        7_j
Variation S
31—2«      14—18
1—5 e     28—14
2«—2S      18-18
P—48       IS—IO
18—13       1ft—It
e  Sow, Mr. Bditor. thii It very Intonating, bwt I tbtnk tbe game can
bn drawn 4»y playing 1—*. ■instead ol          ,„,„,.,.
1-*, aa follow*: 1—1 2ft-22, »-l3,[rs<io b? wdt Wto-tpt'*# eaWtoig im
!»—18, 12—!«, 18—11, ft—1ft ami the'Bt j,*,* «„.*„ nuU4*d to. fan thfr*> he
draw 1i obrlont, | any doubt ilwt .if Utfa   pminml   hts-
From another latno wo nottract tne;CoriK,« |rtW ft wifr not pan* mnnt-nr In
l*5S**-W j tbo court*?  Wbat It tow eo*n*tit to ke
Wl** fnttt-9*Tt*mi amm-r* ar*a t**m*tta*t9ai » . r* , *,   •»■;.  »;-,..««.
(at    Booth  Motto*,   botwoon
Representative Keating of Colorado,
In lolling of the condition* In the Hook-
efeller domain, acknowledged:
Steam Heated Throughout
Electric Lighted
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
With Private Bath f&QO
Fin Proof Sample
Room* tn Connection
! VS^WW***W*IVWWI^-^^<MVWW»^*M^WAW***^^<WAWW»W^W^WW^WW^
"For mom than ten yeart the coal
(ompfihle* of tho vouUhtii part ot oun
Stute havu owned ever) official.   Last'.
fall limy kmt the district judge   and i
district aUonu-y. but thai It their nolo
organised wealth,   The Xew York 8un!•l,*lr<",,•   u,Mrift«'*'i «wn »»>o hav* dtrett;
eompfaln* that th* w#b«ih?i> "la drawn1'0 Proteat have ken pertOTttfri. mil"/
with an attempt at great aitfulneat.1' I,n »•«* «**>• <MV«" «u;- The admin-1
liut ita author* have not blinded Tbe
Hun. It fett pre-reived the purport ol
tbo plau to exempt organlaed labor
from the operation* of a law that wa*
, 1 detigned to prevwnt mntmbi^* ttt tbe
product* of Itbor ratber <bau to pt*
vant tbe worker* wbo produced tbem
from "eonapiring" to got higher
wagea. and it bat d«iounr«l tbe meae-
ur-H a« nn InvaMon of th* pwoid***'* llh-
ertlat and U>« prercwatliea of tbe
fwirti.   Th* -Hwn any a:
"What a wan-bitoat p-itV.U dUarai-a
it would be If the -ttoverawent of tbe
I'ulted Water »<-r* bntrn** rt-il in tta
dealing* oritti »n«ii antral** a* thoa*
that  hi*** h-ixnj  jwr-jwtrati-H  In  tW prtattd t.,» ntnu.
ittratlon of tbe law ha* Ihou a farce.
As aa t xaiiiiilt-. Hui.a.n: ut iu. n Iun-:
heen kilted (n the southern Colorado)
Coal field* In the ls»t lm yeutt, yei'
no Coroner't Jury, e%**vi In <m« **.w, *
hat returned a vertdet holdltm the *
eomptny rt>*pon»ll>l*. tht» blnnm b*ln«
placed o» lb« dead ajlner," {
Tin- law* of the atata bave h**m |g.|
norel ami violated.   Tliu aiiw u*-tirr*;
bad romplet* pottMMton.   Kvwything i
wan lu tin ir favor, they had no rttaiitc
10 'far*.,    »*•«    ili#y    oV-M-lix.M .j    *,t)**
tbtnf, tl.- final appeal whteh to ex*r
mttd** whi-n !'i|»m<|<"»   end   teltth* bt*
turn* Intolpftnt—tk* appeal id tb* op-
the WALDORF
MrB. S. Jcnningg, Prop.
L. A. MilU, Manager
Excellent Cuisine — American and
European Plan — Electric Light —
Hot & Cold Water Sample Rooms
Phones-Special Rates by the month
European Plan Rami Raits
50c and Upward!
American ptai Rile*
12.00 per Day
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 W. C. Oilgtopbtri, Ualnwrtv Alt*.
 T. O. ftaflrtee. Paatborg, AM*.
t............»3. tnlbebtwa *uaaoooooit^ Common J-itn.
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rtosik , Kvan Wotvui, Vb%nk, Alta.
11-MBVT***t **«»**>t**t«t W»   plwii^nwiWIM*  VVWMiWg   wK  V*
IIOkrMt.., Ita. Gono*, Mnirtoat, Alea.
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»Wm*)Vi Wr \w, NWIfA fAMWMIVffo M^ft*
fieermtown. Caw»«ra...Maa Under. Oewgotown. Catctgra. AHa.
........ItaiTf <iltftoMM^ NaMogg* ete
owl tv^tntn, ni^wia^
bill--It,
•k   ii
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JJ-Jl
8-1 i
17—14
lft—17
81-11
tt* tn
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26-17
11—18
Tbe only thing that aated «'«l«r*do
fr«* rmmtatHm'-iH^   *ttmid*tt>   m*r-
throw of the ntltw u*ln« oiigareb) and
nbe **Ww owe *■'* .'*■ tilt** nod p«l»
Ht***** bn* bP-Mt th* >*mttnrlia wt   tht*
Jiww'„.-W.r *,v «.rv-n etna*** #«r r*~«,i*9  Ammtwn i**>Pf -tb« Mtaonty of ti*
i tM Htort *M mtnnmy falls tnd w#» --"*■'«*•** *»** ■*-*..*.-•- ■•*» ^-**«'»
  sara glad to noti«» tint ew»   t*w»-|fi!!l!j!** *'**"*"* lil' ***! rSL4*
Itbeeommlttw  of tbt  VltlMd Otim\«m*s*m**t wWjf nwta. T»oy
Sftistf on Intrtatnte ttmmm* hate *» ww *gM ***■   Tfeft)' l!w ** **flt
THK
Bellevue Hotel
COMMERCIAL   HOUSE
■•at Accommodation
Upto-Oat* — Ivory
fcatellitttt -Cutit-ino*.
*tnr*t*i*   er*tt  i tniVi
In ti«t Patt.—
Cenvtnltnca.--
n*m ,tn-ttrt omnit
^bMboioy own mm. HogerMM.
4. A. OACCAN, Hrop.
BttUMVVe, AiU.
W~-4Ra
kit "tut
tt—18
I»-I6
W—II
IV-2J
1*HM
11—18
2t M
1-4 b
*tt~tt
7—16
s-1     *\~~rt
a Tlio tmonm
IT-«
»-lf
14-1
1—11
18-11
IT- I*
ttHIt
♦ -•
it—»
t+»4t
ot play
*• •*• .<•*»*••*.»* *»j.i.~...,...».
Sb—18 Tke Son'* ewiei-ptltt* of tlw ootrage
If—1* in Colorado ** nm tbat Roekaloller
St—-U j and t fc* fopfbaadod M«a of treat
8»—38 | wcalib bate wo»opoll«Nl th* load aai
fl—M ;bov# Mifi feoAtl ttot*.   Tbat It
19—C> jconetitatkmat, legal  aad  blgbty   ap-
21   tdv   ;r'->*.'i'',r- r,» -"N mneniHtottt nt dhW*
tl—*1 l polley.   Tt* •colwado eotrag». ta tit
]1    it     -5*'n> ,•"'■'■■■  '' tbt- nr*t* aftt* a*itert90r't*tf
1—13 \ J* "W'uli •»[«■♦•', 1* IMt»a J» tbt- WWih
I*—lid «i"d nnttbiet of tbo sriMt*.   Tat we
j do wot want wtr.
" rmm tf*m*r- nrt fa* * <•-,"> *t
and bnnett. not tf ttirv *?mM tm
totted Into a poeixUm <m**h *« tb*1 Col-
otwdo miner* mart* tetrad Wo. it tbey
tbOOW find tb«>«w»lr#« In »b* letnsww
tbat 'tbe wearttingwifa of Colorado
fOMHt *tbot»««4v#* ta etter tb* met*
norr* oil tjodtotr. bow Imt -amU tb*
AmtrUfMb ptotocra-ty la*: 7 V-wili in
$not$ttMt"oo*e It tnm !•* m*d a»«t*
fcrtly*
If tbo Norl^f-Htert and Uoimtn aad
pmttwnm -fNAt aot <*>*>!■*:.«■» nwdi
Grand Union Motel
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater it? the wttrhityjfmans trad€
G, A* CLAUx ... Profirtctor
1
STs
^k'
v**:
r$H
**M
■    11^*4 .
- •   1*. 1
■ tsM
M
nootiiai ^iswtU -t^.^, + i*ju w*i*3 -mtwi idmiui
trm tMe ttot* tbat boo boo* fttbtto*^ - h* nbk+ *o perteiae in  ib*  Vtdtoed*I w*»* ttt** lo tt»*ir tin »r».i **.i,..r*'iivu
od wooli Hutko a goal alaal volmnoe. cltii vet that Injunetlont and Judge*fibey wottMmk protekr tixnu,,.   Rot
b  Wymtte %«tk flay* 8—tl t*f*.!fc*i**- tlmt Um.teihtm* -mi title* tbetr|tlwy arw tot wfav.   la*<  m- mt*f
i  21   iO lxx*i   au«I   Ckfak   w«h*U.LkM.*.   U^^^CclUit uwawd ava';UUu*a*.tut,uuul tlut «-»«i» *.*-.   ;; .   >,c>.fii*
by 8—ll.*-*. W„   . , |tv»a   tbo  oertrwot   awl   topwuto I reaottnttt of aortal  n»4 ttmmtdt
Can any of out readava eboi»si«mrt. *tiH xh* mtlW* awt W* R<m\-.r»UUon* »hatl b*   tb***.*,   uul   k«p
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What* Black
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«and bl* titl««,
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•*r~$km Torn **■*»«.
«>r«*»lt* tb* «e»k nud wotkevt -*^!»intf a wet-it* oter   "bt*   t*\*xbmo.
the world to tba* tb*re than be no^n^A   b*   tmt   bf   ttmyer   tmd
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%-.
PAGE EIGHT
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. 0., JUNE 6, 191f
/■
Yoti Got a*.
Economy in Shoe Purchasing
Many people purchase low-priced shoes under
the impression tluit it i$ economy to do so. But
il: is not economy.
Because low-priced shoes must necessarily be
made from low-priced materials—give but half the
wear of high-grade shoes nnd cost a good deal more
in the end.
INVICTUS SHOES
cost little more than mediocre shoes, yet tliey are
the highest grade of footwear you can buy.
They give more real service than two pairs of
" popular "a priced shoes, plus the comfort and
smart appearance that is only associated with the
finest footwear.
Straw Hats
"We have been successful in getting a few of
the New York novelties in Men's Straw Hats, high
crows in fancy Sennats and splits and Panama will
be shown.
See our big range of Panamas, priced to meet
everyone's purse.
Child's and Boys' straw and linen hats, in all
the 'wanted styles, on sale on Saturday, priced
from 25c to $1.75 each.
Now that straw hat weather is here, get your
choice before tlie best shapes are sold out.
Silk Shirts and Pyjamas
Just arrived, a large shipment of silk shirts
and pyjamas, also silk finished Pongee. Call and
see these lines.
Silk Shirts  $3.25 to $ 6.00
Silk Pyjamas  6.50 to   10.00
Silk Finished Pongee Pyjamas 2.00 to     3.75
A SPECIAL SUIT OFFER
r** "■_'._
Regular $40.00 Special For Saturday $2S,00
Suits that are cut and tailored along the very
newest lines, and are exact models of all the suits
shown in the eastern cities today.   AVe can fit you
with any size, and will show a specially good range'
of colors, including navy, and black, regular to
$40*00 for $25.00
Women s Kid Gloves
r
TQ cents per pair
Kid Gloves for women, per pair 79c
This is an extra special bargain for every woman, whether she n'eeds gloves or not, tjiey are particularly fine quality of French kid,- good, evenly
sewn seams, in all sizes from 5% to 7Vi>, colors,
black, brown, tan and white.
See these in the corner window, all oue price,
79 cents per pair
New Embroideries
3 Yards for 25c
Big range of insertions and edgings, made in
fine swiss muslin, good for washing and wearing,
special, 3'yards for 25c
Short sleeve, cotton vest, 15c each 7 for $1.00.
Good practical weight for summer wear, has short
sleeves, in a well-knitted quality, special, 15c,
7 for $1.00.
Women's Ready -to-
Wear Hats
Regular $7.50, $8.00, $10.00 and $12.00 for
$4.95. Just 35 hats to choose from at the low price
of $4.50. You'll have plenty of time to wear them
this summer; they represent an uniisaally good buy,
regular to $12,00 for  ;$4.95
Grocery Specials
For Saturday
Family Mixed Biscuits, per lb .'.'. ;$ .15
Kinkle Corn Flakes, 2 packages ior, \.    ,15.
Braids Best Coffee, ground, 2 lb. for......,'.    .85
Reindeer, Condensed Coffee and. Milk, per tin   .25
Lombard Plums,' 21b. tins, 2 for.      .25
Grape Jufce/quts.", .;. . ..50
Crossee & Blaelowell's. Jam, 71b. tins  1.25"
Cross$ & Blackwell's Red Currant Jelly, 1 ib
glass ;    ,25
.   Crosse & Blackwell 's Vinegar, pts., 2 for     .25
Shamrock Matches, 2 pkgs 35
Red Cross- Picklesr quart, each 35
Heinz Dills, per dozen  |     jJO
Heinz Pork and Beans, medium size, 2 for    ,85
Heinz Tomato Catsup, pts    .25
Siam Rice, 9 lbs. for .',    .50
School Scribblers, 6 for     56
"WKtte SAyan Washing Powders, per pkg 20
Panshine Cleaner, 4 tins.; 25
PATENT MEDICINE SPECIALS
Castoria, per bottle *.    .25
Seidlitz Powders, per-f)kg. ., " 15
Zam Buk, per box..; 35
Honey, Almond and Cream, bottle. 40
NestleV Infant Food, per* tin...:..; '  .45
Lyman's Talcum Powder, large §ize ;..:.. \25
Enos Fr\iit Salts, per bottle .......-m..-. 75
Abbey's Health -....- 50
Middy & Balkan Blouses
From $1.50 to $2.75, cast the garment to wear
in this extreme hot weatlier, they come trimmed
witli red or navy blue and in all sizes from 16 to
38, from $1.50 up to $2.75.     -
Waists 95 cents
AVaists worth much more than the money,
showing in plain and fancy, short and long sleeves,
high and low collars, a splendid opportunity to buy
a dandy wash waist for, little money, regular to.
$2.25 for , 95c
Money Sav-
ing Prices
-TR^I^ES-WQOD-CQM^ANY, Ltb
The Store of
Quality
\
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL   AND COAL CREEK
"GERMINAL"
•This Is one of the most poworful
novels ever penned, depleting Mie
turmoil and intrigue of a strike of
miners. The novel ts a masterpiece by
one of the greatest literary artists
that ever lived, and the scenes have
•been produced witb a faithfulness and
accuracy, that permits one to absorb
the whole novel in a synoptic form
and yet thoroughly appreciate the
wonderful passion and pathos tbat
the author portrays In bis complete
work.
The most Interesting character In
the story (not a heroine! Is Catherine,
a young woman born ln the tollsom
poverty of the mines, going down Into
tho bowels of tlie -earth with tho men.
She (possesses greater courage than
oil the men who go to work with her.
Wo realize" that we stand In the pres-
ence of a gifted artiste, a full grown
mistress of her craft, and we delight
in paying homage to such unwonted
■power.
■The struggle in tlie depths of the
shaft, after Souvlnar, the anarchist,
bas flooded the mines, Is indescribably realistic. The pohotograpy, of
Iho best Patbe standard throughout,
Is perfection itself in all the scenes
udder tlie earth, One of the strongest
moments in the book Is Zola's An*
aerlptlon of tbe entombed Catherine,
who, with her lover, Lantier, and her
husband, Chaval, has -been caught In
a flooded trap from which there
seems no escape, How much more lm-
(iH III
Wed. June 10,1 NigM Only
Tite Canadain Hercules
Ursus The Great
Urtwa will perform feats ef ftrenftlt never yet equalled. A
few ef which are •• follows: Lift and support 100 pounds In
• ten* ef Hsreuiss. lend a three-quarters laeh bar ef Iren aertw
hie neck. UH a bar*tll end twt men (a tela! weight ef ever
•Oft o***A% abev* hie head.
England's Pride
The ev'cktet eon meet Mienttlie 171 pound weellor ef the day.
Pronounced by experts to be the coming champion. Clapham will
meet all comers and will Urn 11.00 a minute fer every minute ever
. * *       j ,        .        ,
.944     r^44..-,m-9a- 9f9tllrii..9.,44     99r,4       4.-9rtt94 49.4,      ..*.#*      •*.>»      t9^r^r„^       9*4,10      .fr *#..*'*>*-.
•It tttiittt, .r->»-4 h*f Vhr 'tftdtfn hrtt wretfi-i**
PRICES SO cents and 35 cents
SATURDAY JUNE  8th
Mutual Movies
•♦Shorty's  Sacrifice"
" The Vlyleaf of rate *
a*HU Father'. Wife"
K*>r«n''*'»?** t'Atot*4$
ts
Buy a Commuter's Ticket, Good for 10 Moir*
ing Picture Shows, Price $1.00
■press! ve than tbe .printed page is
this scene on the screen. The fierce
strife for the last piece ot bread, the
revelation of the craveu heart of
Chaval and the unconquerable courage of Lantler are -portrayed' with
consummate skill; the tremendous
strength ot the scene is always tempered with a delicate, humanizing
touch.
On Friday, there is a special two-
part scenic feature, entitled "Unto
the Third and Fourth Generation," or
"Blood Will Tell." Also a Patbe
drama, "The Blight;" "A Proposal
from the Duke," Edison, and a Patbe
split educational reel.
For Saturday, a two-reel Patbe
special, "A Thief of Hearts." An Intensely dramatic story of the fiery
love of the Spaniard, beautifully enacted among some of Spain'* flneaf
scenery. A feature of tbe story ts a
very thrilling -bull flgbt.
THt OR ANO
The new management of Uie
Grand have shown considerable enter
prise In securing Sam Glapham.-one
of tbe finest light-heavy weight scientific wrestlers of the world, and
Ursus, tbe strong man of Canada.
Sam Clapham commenced wrestling
when lie waa 13 yeara old, and when
17 annexed tbe north of Bngland amateur championship, afterwards entering the professional ranks and defeating In his first two ma tthe* RavUts,
tbo American, and Hector, tbt Italian
Ju-Jltsi expert. In less than five minutes each. In his open challenge to
any man la England, which wat lw
sued following tho two matches mentioned, seven men accepted. Clapham
won all elaarcut decision and draw
with tho remaining challenger. Later,
before the National Sporting Club or
London, he won the the light-heavy
weight championship ot Keglaad, and
ttm preeeoiod witb the Lord Lonsdale
belt 1« tojwn of the same, which  ho
MOW holds.
Somo lattn i.;in« noten tn #onn*e-
tloos with Oai.h.infi physical development are: With a weight of l?&
((outran, he has it blr*pn larger thnn
that of Frank Ootcfr; a eheet measure-
meal of « Inch**, an ospaaaioa of
seven im*-***. no* no tou n*tdt lit*
claims to oo the beat dore-loped mat I
Vi H*a mwhMM. m XbO -Mtttt-C
A tion pragmas of ffcttorae, tola*
tag tbo following fttaift, bos horn arranged fer ftaMfitjr *Hflt "Shorty's
Saerlftee," -Tbt flyleaf of Fato,"
■"-iff* W9,.ttr.f3 wm** *■** i -V, , ..,., ,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
♦ HILLCRE8T  NOTES
Quite a number of oil sharks are
In town, but we are Inclined to wonder what spirit of generosity H ls
tbat persuades these gentry to travel
so far from home to accommodate us
with snaps. Can It be tbat they regard the gentle and unsophisticated
miner as an easy mark. A little care
may save a whole lot of worry.
The quarantine laws were no doubt
instituted to be observed, and not
abused. The method ot observing
tbem in this camp does not afford
much protection to the Inhabitants,
nnd we would advise thoso responsible for their observance to get -busy.
The new manager of the Co-op. haa
decided to reduce some of the tines,
and you will not lose anything *by
perusing the Ledger columns and
visiting tho atore.
W. Oakes of OJleiiel <waa visiting bl*
brother, ft, Oakes, here laat Saturday.
Conl Creek Football team will be
visiting here on Saturday, June 6th.
THI   lilt
THE   HILLCRE8T  COOPERATIVE
Under new manageniont, this store
Is evidently adopting up-to-date and
aggreslve methods, nnd from the
sale advertised in another column, it
ls evident the store will in future
conduct speolal sales lor payday and
week end. To begin with, the men
and iboys' wear department /will re-
eelve attention, and a substantial cut
is noted in all prices, Other departments will also have tlieir prices cut,
and fresh fruits and other seasonable
dellcnclcs will bo on mie for Saturday,
-*=
of Comedy.**
A r*>pr««e«tatttit from the factory
tho IIReCo Range Co., Ud.. wilt
demoostiat* tiMr otUfw Um of
rabies, heart***, and otuebments fa
ear Mmw em Frtd*r, Jwnn ttb, from
Ik a, *», to I p. m.
Yew mm tarttad to tome tad see
how to do your *oa*aer eookisa •» n»»-
oot h*«l, odor, of danger la yonr
k!*&#«, at ut otftemm ot only ?5 e-si*
ro tt.m * motifh: also to **-■**. the
FlftaOo r»*ft* wbHb Nm tm half
tb* fad wstti In nmj other nttge, -usd
etree bmtter aerate*, arttk It*"*  »iVyr
asd aUeaUoB. J. P. QUAIL.      f^
During the past week largo audiences born boon entertained at ibis
house, which offers comfort and accommodation second to none. A
beautifully clear, fllckerless picture,
an even temperature, with every mechanical device to remove fool air
and distribute pure, fresh air in tho
auditorium, comfortable and commodious seating accommodation, thus*
ara som* of ihe advantages of tbe
Isis.
On Taesday one of tbo fluent color
ed three<t**rt films ever producod, "A
Serpent tn Bden," waa acreeaed. Although tho plot was of * rather stereo,
typed order, this was more than eom-
pensated for by the betatlfat acting
and snperb photography, tb* color
lag was correct In ewy detail, and
the picture wvMeneed a rwnarkahle
advance la tbo coloring of film*.
For Salnrday next, the msnagement
havo screened tb* «M Bag!!* rowan-
tie drum* hy -fhsrlotto IT. ftranlOt
"Jano IGyre.**  tbe story la known t*
tmnat ttt ma   IwW *rrm    m*    itltiilitWli' tft'
agate, Hor by fltmlnv tb* wotwl wo I
wave sossetatag oetier than tb* snoot t
perfect Ulaetrated edIUoa Otot pro-i
dwntHI. Krerf «♦*♦ Bm bt*tm *«t«4J
with aamwwltagt staged a* aeewrato-j
ly aa powlW*.   Th* fire, wteti* of!
in tb* elMtag sceat* *V* all tbaT«Mild
he faulted and striklagly retlMk*.
A tmecial for Taeoday fa "SptrttaaV
ism Kxposod," la ihrt* reals, la thl*
all th* tri««« reaorteil to by apfrttl**^
Ms to tool tba poWkt ami aapwmt*
tb,*m fiMiu tlwtr wM'.'j Ate iktii ta
this ffctaro. |
wkif tt .ir*<-rih**.t is an ctfrft"
Kpedal ttmiun it U1U4 ior Tkurt-.
day, in* Illh. Richard ITardtngj
I****' --SoMki-* of rort***." la flrei
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed tenders will fo received by
*he undersigned for (applying la-bor
only In the construction of a fence
around tbo Annex school grounds,
Speclflelatton* may bs bad on request.
All tender* must t« accompanied
witb a marked cheque lor $25.00, and
be in the band* of the Secretary not
iat*r than is o'clock own, June Mb,
1014.
J. 8DIOKBN,
Secretary Fernie School Board.
an
•Mr. W. C. Cavanauglf and Mrs. Cav-
anaugh left here on Monday for a
visit to St. Paul, their old home. They
expect to be back about July lst.
City Engineer Ramsay haa some
fine, up-to-date maps of the city for
sale.   Price $2.00.
AUTOMATIC RlFLB—nemlngton, 38
' cal.;    spleudld   condition;    slung;
peep rear sight and Ivory Up foresight.   Apply Box 380, Fernie, B.C.
LOST—*A. email envelope containing
money. Finder please return to J.
W. Quinney; c. o. Trites-Wood Co.,
Ltd., and receive reward*.
Crow's Nest Business
College
And Academy of Langauges
J. W. Burnett, Principal
Classes arranged for any time
during day or oVsning
Write Wet PVMO-uhit
Johnson-Fateoosr Block
PERNIE      :-:      B. C.
Classified Ads,- Cent a Word
 ^	
TO HENT—Two unfurnlsahed rooms.
Apply 139 'McPherson Ave., Fernie,.
B. C. 203
w     .MiiMMin.       ,w.m*jimW-iiiw—I
FOR SALE—9-roomed house on full
size lot, ateam heated throughout,
'bath and every modern convenience,
large oithouse, ahd lawn ln front.
The -property 1* surrounded by a
well- built fence and makes a splendid modern up-to-date home. Also
Lot 3, Block 48, for aale cheap. For
full particulars apply to The Ledger
Office. 198
FOR SALE—Horse, buggy and har^
ness, Horse sound, weight about
1050:- harness with' collar and
hames and breast collar. Now; th*
whole lot choap, $135. Apply Box
380, Feralo, B. C.
FOR SALE—Cabbages, cauliflower.
Brussels sprouts, bod oatobago
■plants; also flower and ho** plant*.
E. Dodd, back of Annex Mbool, Fernie, U. C. SOS
FOR 8ALB-400 laying hen*, at HOC
oach, Including our Imported pane
of 8. C. Black Minorca, 8. O. White
Leghorn, Ancona, R, O. Brown Log-
born and 8. C R, I. Red, Klko
Poultry Yards. Elko, B O.     311 -
.1
j
12. ni &» tt'Miiiui1 Ln.,
tl*   J
Mr. Fred Vaact t« the Shetland
saw (ia, Xo.
ISIS THEATRE
Wmrmlm'm Bxolusivm Ploturm Tli«»tr«
BEST
ALWAYS
SPECIAL SATURDAY — Matinee and Evening
WHO HAS SoT MAD THt OLD tNOLHH ROWANTIC OSAMA SV CHARLOTTl H. BAONT1!
TAW   WOV
PJctore adaplid frem Broa(o'a.CanM»s emotion*l novel. Um grows up in aa Koftlsb orphan bow*.
As a governess ib* learas to torn ber young employer. There ia a mystery in th* bwist; tt tarns ogt t*
be tb* •mploy««mad wife. The Ore, t*ocnn.ot Roirb*ilcr. aad death of lb* mad.wlfe in tbe closing
*e*n* «V» all ono conld wish for.
Produced by Unlveiul" in tw9 t*eii, with Kthel Ursndln a* Jan* Kyre.
<*W^^^***s,v<,A^*>^*^^^^^^^^^MVM^VM^»WV^V^V^VWMMVW^VW*^^V^WVVMW^S-'-^>*.^^»V<^*^^^^^^^^^l^>
SFIRITUALISM   EXPOSED
All th* trlehi resevtod to *y *pWtwHiat* to fool the pwMle and aoparat* them from ib*lr money are
1 t      tt i        ■   ,
COMPLITt INSIGHT INTO ONt OP^ TH tOsiATtST; "OtT SICH QUICK" SCHtMIS
EXTRA SPECIAL Thursday June 1 Ith
RICHARD HARDING DAVIS*
Soldiers of Fortune
With Dustin Farnum at (<Vati Bibber'1 "All Star" Production 5 • Reels - S
'**WiW<'w<'*-*'***»m%ivvvw»»-*»»»w^
IMS tm SXOtLLS IN SVSSVTHINQ PIRTAININO TO FICniSBS
Home* of tlie *'Univer«ca Ffoirsmme" Beat Iss the world

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