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The District Ledger May 23, 1914

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Array y*;,x Xx'%^M^^
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, .xfodiwtrial Unity is; Strength
The Official \Orgaji of District No; 18, U. M. W, of A,
Political Unity is Victory
INo. 39/ Vol; m&
THE DISTRICT LEDGER/ F^RME^ B. C, MAY 23, 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
Wt^$oMdte Assembly
Xt&AX-f?-X.^x^j-AA^iAiXA '     ~    " - 7 -7A lyy <-■<>*-; - >V •*- „
'§§mB^W^der^:X.'"'
V4.
Thirty  Miners  Detained: on ground
,S.Tl»at. Jh'ey Were- Brought In jn
X:, I 'Violation of. Proclamation  '. .
Is
7    -A TRINIDAD, Colo., May 16.—Twenty.
'.  '.'.filve miners imported into- the -strike
■ \.   - region" today, by., the  Oakdale Coal
^ ; ".Comipanyto work ih the' Oakdale mine
f A-^ -nenx lavetawere stopped by^Uutwd
-;.Sta,te8 ,regulars, under Captain C. C,
\   , 'Smith.;' Kvamen were .held- by -Gap-
yyA tainiCiiBhman at Primero,,a'Colorado
,'.,,' .- Fuel and Iron Company...property, on
• - :^ho ground that they .were employed
'<■'■•;;by the-company, in/violation of tho
AA" >. <»der of Col, Jamesfliockett against
«-.'.' -X^ ■ -importation r of, strike (breakers,
>. v:-/:None»of tlie men was arrested, or de-
-MkV..MPOrt*^.'^Thefbwo\oommarid*er8 recedv-
' \,;;'„; od orders-from."military headquarters
-   X'~tfaartfy *o"; vrevent them going to work
I  :-'.ln-theminosi-'; ' T '; ""'"'"  "
\  A, -  ;The detention of the thirty,minors,
, .^"Stogethor'With the,-notice sent out toy
• ',.,-; 7<3pb' Lockett earlier * in the. day warn-
o , "'fing the ooal 'companies against the
'.'Importation of men, brought the employment of strike breakers Into first
place among'the problems connected
with tho. strike; \
.' The developments of the day caused
'. the Issuance of. a statement of policy
**by the miJltary authorities.   Unless
A tfurther -orders   are   received   from
Washington, the attitude of the army
toward the. .employment of miners is
,." aummed up as follows:
VTMea brought. Into the district by
coal companies, will not ibe allowed
to work in tho:mInes.
>'v'DENVER, Colo.,~May 18.—The state
of Colorado has placed Its stamp of
approval on the murdor and cremation
of -men, ^women and -children- at Lud-
Hoyr-.tiy murderous mine guards- in
,> ■mJUtttametCn uniforms/ •-'.„' ■-
- TheH coal operators" paid some of
i those, (^ threo doliata a day to carry
,-^-. .v .oukihefr-work-pf daughter.   Up to|°Lany <»ua!ffy,.ynere tneyjave ar
.   -*•'-tba, ffimto /» nart.,,n\nm m^«^oM ***«! 1 vpportnnjty^o^get WSL measured
. A'"J   *'   ■**' r- •    '''' V   .
ly what laibor qui expect from the Colorado 'state government - Seven.hundred thousand-dollars of this is to'pay
tho militia.'thugs and operators' assassins 'Who for six months intimidated the strikera..ip. Southern Colorado,
murdered and assaulted them, Insulted
their womanhood and robbed and
plundered.-tlieir homes. This amount
-includes {payment-of-the gunmen who
wore responsible~~for the Ludlow horror. '
Colorado spent $700,000 in an attempt to break the strike of the ooal
miners. Today victory for the minors
Is ibut ar short distance away. Ammons and Chase anc others of the
operators' %>ols determined, however,
thai victory shall not come to the
miners until Ihey have spent -their
every effort, so they had their gam-
Wer led legislature provide. $300,000
additional so that the mllltla.can go
'back to the strike zone, if the federal
troops leave, to complete ^tholr work
of carnage. ,
The 'corporations played .their usual
■card in labor struggles this week when
they Indicted six men for murder and
more than'^100 for conspiracy to murder onoiman-w-ho was killed in the
Boulder County, troubles. -
. "Indictments of this character need
I not come as any surprise to men prominent In .the labor movement," said
John R. Lawson, who" is In active
charge ot tho strike. "Sometimes they
como because the county officials are
honest and zealous to'perform their
duties and servo their constituents
and in an efifort to preserve tho law.
Sometimes they come in a blind effort, to help the corporations in -their
mad scramble to destroy all vestige
of organised labor through intimidation and persecution,.' At othor times
they come -because some of the county
officials are anxious to build up on a
false foundation, at the expense of the
county and tlie -people, they are sworn
to serve a political future, r have not.
at any time been able' to discover a
district attorney who w*b even willing
to .prosecute the' coal corporations in
whose min«s>dozens,of men had been
murdered^, through their negligence.
The miners' officials or the miners do
not fear to meotja--Jury In any court
of any country,, where-they have an
Dist. 18, United Mine Workers of
America
^ .9 9^
^   *'        -■—■*—     -.■—.—■■--    ■ ... I I ,     M,     „  .,-..- .      ^        —,    — I      ....     .,   ■.«.■■■        , I...  —. ,.       .. .—*■..■■■     ... --I- ■ *.       I     . I..JZ* .    .^..H.. -——    ■■—.■■       .      ■■«■»
NOTICE
Re Victoria Day
This Holiday should be observed
t
on Monday, May 2Sth>
By Order
EXECUTIVE BOARD
A VVISO
i
II Giorno Delia
Regina Vittoria e giorno Festivo e
bisogna osservarlo Lunedi 25, Maggio.
Per Ordine del
COMITATO ESECUTIVO
Pass Bill Over
Heads of Lords
Disestablishment   Measure    Becomes eminent but it is also asserted that
Law—First Case Under Parliament
Act—Deprives Church of England
of Power in Wales,
LONDON, May 19.—The first bill to
become law under the operation of
the 'parliament act is the Welsh d;s-
rstabllslimmtt ibill, which passed its
third reading In the commons tonight
by a vote ot 328 to 251.
Renewed interest has been taken ln
the Welsh disestablishment bill during thc past month owing to its importance to tho church and churchmen. Under the parliament act the
bill automatically becomes law after
its third passage by the commons, no
matter whit action the lords may
take.
Among other things tho bill provides that so far as Wales and Monmouth nre concerned the Church of
England will cease to be established
by law; all cathedrals and ecclesiastical corporations will be dissolved;
tho iblshops of tho four Welsh dioceses
.will cease to be members of tho house
of lords; the political ecclesiastical
law will cease to exist aB law, and
no ecclesiastical court will have any
coercive Jurisdiction and the bishops
and clergy will not be members of or
be represented in the houses of convocation.
The Unionist press this morning
indulges in further criticisms of what
it calls the government's iniquity in
forcing the measure on the statute
book.
It is declared that tiie party leaders and lieutenants are nearer peace
as regards home rule than a fortnight
ago.
In some quarters It Is hinted that
when Sir Edward Carson moves third
reading of the Irish bill tomorrow Mr.
the cabinet is not ready to grant the
exclusion which is Ulster's minimum
demand, though comments <■« the budget d-qbiite on the grant of £500,000
to the Irish exchequer are evidently
intended to induce Mr. Redmond to
-assent to further "apparent concas-
slons."
$20,000 SUIT  FOR   DAMAGES
AGAINST CITY
Action  Entered on  Behalf of 8-Year-
Old Clarence Dyson—Had a Hand
Blown Off
. ■ ; •.;, .Ttho «me or. tWT.udlow massacre there
.Waa,.some question, as ..to whether
these awassins shouid also be paid by
thoiatata,-'< •   ;"• '';. « '','...-■' '...
IK"- ,' .*But when they, clothed with this
authority of the.state, dressed in the
uniform of its mllltla and using the
MMtoine guns of the operators, swooped town, on Ludlow April aoth, Aura-
ed It to the ground, killed and cremated *13 women and children and dellb.
emtely murdered Louis Tlkas and five
others, they did such a noble service
for Colorado that the state legislators
decided laat week to reward them hy
voting to <pay them.
, It thero'-wai ever afly qu'estiou that
^ortf{Ll8.*?n^ bo*y «»d soul oy
John D, Rockefeller, that Idea waa dispelled, this week wfaeu the state legislature met. Rockefeller and his gang
immediately took charge. Speaker
Slattery ot the House of Represent-
atlyos, saloon keeper and gambler,
whipped the corporation tools into
im. Publlo aeotlment alone prevent,
ed the establishment of a mounted
Coesaok foroe and a gun Wil.
Justice to which Iti&y are entitled."
Among those. indicted for murder
was W. ,T. Hickey, .Secretary of the
State Federation of Labor. .His case
shows how far the rotten government
of the state will .go in their struggle
to destroy every. vestige of labor in
Colorado. .Hlckey.'not only was not ln
the fighting iu which" one man was
killed, hut he was not-even in Boulder
County where the. Indictment was
ibrought In hy a grand Jury. But Hick-
ey Is prominent in the labor movement and that is sufficient reason for
indictment on any charge in Colorado.
Federal troops have restored order
Iu the strike district, The future must
take care of Itself.' The serious -condition of affairs In Mexico mokes It
certain that federal troops will *not remain in Colorado very Jong. When
they leavo the operators will soon find
an excuse to have ihelr net Ammons
tend the mllltla hack to ''preserve the
ponce." The people of the United
States know what thit potpourri of
-barrel house bums, Baldwin thugs, women and children murderers and cremators did before. A leopard cannot
| change its spots.  It Is Aut natural to
OZNAM
Straniva ^jctoria Dna
Tento svatek bisy zasvatit v Ponde-
lek, Maja 2Shi.
Skros Roskas
EXECUTIVE BOARD
CALGARY, May 19.- On behalf of
Clarence Dyson, aged ii years, a wrft
demajiding $20,000 damages from the
city has been issued by Duncan Stuart
and company.
The statement of claim is to the effect that owing .to alleged carelessness
on the part of city employees the child
got hold of some detonators with the
result that he had one of his hands
blown off.
The accident happened in March,
1913.
Detonator Left Lying Around
Certain employees of the city were
engaged at that time in blowing up ice
in the Elbow river. The statement of
claim avers that owing to extreme
carelessness these men left a box of
detonators used to explode dynamite
on the bank of the river. The child
in going by found the box and carried
it home. Being of tender years he
was ignorant of tbe nature of the caps.
He pounded on© witb the result that
the detonator exploded. One of the
child's hands was blown off.
The claim is made that the child
suffered great pain and the permanent
Asqulth will make an Important state- J loss of one of his hands, for which
ment as to the intentions of the gov-1 $20,000 is asked.
Grcm^s-Nest-Passs
Football League
Fernie vs. Coal Creek at Fernie
proprlatioa WU, however, shows clear-(nlvnl of slaughter and carnage,
1
Decision in Coleman
Coke-loaders' Case
I.N TUB (MATTER of a dlsputo between Tho Coke Loaders at Cole.
. man and The International Coal *
Coke Company of that place. '
My my decision dated March 10th,
1914, which waa concurred In by Mr.
*»mht, the President *A District No.
II of the United Mine Workera of
America, representing these eoke
loaders, I toned 4hat these men went
•atUled under tbe conditiona mentioned to be paid AU tor the total
mnaher of tons loaded during the
WMtli., IIImw that decision, another
(lueaUoa *aa arisen as to the date
from which tke men should lie ««"-
(led io Uio ft** referred to.
* After bearimt Ur. Smith and Mr.
MeNell, the latter representing the
Western Coal Operators' Association.
I fl»4 that tho data at wMeh thia
«lalm by these eoke loaders wan for*-
molly raised was tbe 18th of .Vovem-
ber, I»I9.
fly seetton D of the agreement dated
Munmhsr I7U, l»ll, ander tbe bead-
W«wiM»,* W Is tirwtt-Hnii «*im
dated .March 10th, 1014, commencing
and computed from tbe 16th day of
November, 1911.
Dated at Calgary (his 19th day of
(May. A  H  1914.
JAMES. MUIR,
f concur, Chairman.
J. B. MttTH,
President Dist. l§. U. M. W. of A.
form's  of  Imprisonment  and  heavy
fines.
•Since then the case* have been appealed repeatedly in the different
courts, this being the second time it
has been before the Supreme Court of
the United States.
It was plainly apparent from tbe
outsot that tho judiciary of the Supreme Court did not desire to convict
tho Labor leaders, fearing the effects
of such « decision upon public'oplnfon,
which was thoroughly aroused, The
Federation officials were acclaimed
not only by the Labor Interests but
by popular scntlmor.t, ns the defenders ot tree speech. It was confidently
predicted that no verdict would ever
be confirmed against them by the
court last resort, although the defendants Insisted upon a decision being
rendered In the case.
It Is now generally conceded that
Ute judiciary played a deliberate wolt-
Ing game. At one time tbe Labor men
were notified if they pleaded guilty
Judgment would he suspended, but
thia tbey refused to do.   They maintained their innocenco, nnd that thoy
The    eelebrated    contempt    case had acted throughout according  to
acnlttt PfwMmt Gompers, Secretary «*»r rtgbts under the law.  Now the
Frank Morrison, and John MUcbtll. *"!»*«»* Caari ■t*n',« ,tt * m*»* "»•
former Vlco President of tbe Ameri- «•»!•«♦ »«W- ««he defendants were
can ftderatfea of Labor, in which ««,,tL.,^y •h<H,if ta7* ^n ,fiBfuh'
tbey had sppetled to tbe United •* •»* »"»•*> guilty tbey should have
States Supreme Court against tho ibeon *"»»Wr acquitted. They wore
Supreme Court of the Dletrtct of Oo-i****r to >*•* 4b« WH *wl ww* d*
tumble, In the c«|ebr*tn4 eoutemut rfrou* *,,ftl * «tocW»fl' «lio«M he v*t*
torn, was reversed recently. Tbe mni4*1^'   ^^ " no ,toabt "baterer
AROUND TOWN
The Annex has occupied the attention of the city fathers very much of
late, and it Is not one of real estate
either, but a genuine solicitude for the
welfare of the inhabitants. The oity
electric light Is now shedding Its beneficent rays around and tho machin-
ery of laying down sidewalks is going
apace. The question of a subway beneath the G. x, track Is now under
attending a District Hoard meeting.
They expressed satisfaction with the
civic aspect of progreftnlve Fernie,
A question of paramount Importance came up for discussion beforo
Gladstone Local Union on Friday
evening. Tho coal company some time
ago Introduced a system of "three
men to a plsce," This was resented
at that time by the union as an attempt to violate the terms of the
agreement and an established custom,
The coal company, after much wrung-
The Coal Creek junior lacrosse
teaav journeyed to Fernie on Tuesday
evening to play the Fernie juniors.
Tho following was the lineup: Sunny,
T. Martin, H. Page, O. Hewitt, J. Now-
•berry, J. Gibson, I). Atherton, H.
France. I). Martin. F. Smith. As thle
was tho first match Coal Creek juniors had participated In, tho result
(Fernie, fi; Uonl Crepk, 21 speaks well
of tha playing itbilllleH ot some of the
participants, Robert Schram officiated as referee by mutual agreement,
nnd conducted the Kame in -liis own
Inimitable style. Although we do not
liko to place anyone's namo conspicuously yet, special mention should lit1
made of the prowess shown by Tom
Martin nnd Jin'k OiliHon for the Conl
•AM GOMPISS WINS
gUPRIHS COURT CAII
ttatvte af Llmltatlens Had Intervened
nod Contempt Oases Are Dismissed
discussion, and none will deny the)Hng, acknowledged that it constituted
necessity for tht ivwut:.  Railway Com., a biW-U of the **,i wnwui, but the
Through the kind permission of
General Mauager Wilson, this league,;
game was played on the old football
grounds before a large attendance,
Coal Creek representation being
strong. J. Wilson, of Ferule, Imndlod
the game in masterly fashion. Fernlo
showed a vast Improvement on the
form shown on their first encounter
with Coal Creek and from tho Itlck-off
proved rather aggressive, scoring the
first goal within tlmtn minutes of tho
start. Pete Armstrong equalized
shortly atter. Walker, centre forward
for Coal Creek, was the cynosure of
all eyes, nnd iu spite of his roptated
efforts to score did not succeed until
some llttlo misunderstanding between j Creek team,
the Fernlo full backs end goalor nl-]
lowud lilm to slew in und add ii-Dother,
This seemed to put moro life ln tlie
game, and Coal Creek ront inn-ally
pressed, and arising out of good combination Dick Thornton added another
goal, Half-tlmo arrived with Coal
Creek 3. Feme 1.
On resumption the Fornle forwards
pressed hard nnd from persistent effort Hart AriwuU scored for Fernie,
From now on erratic play on the part
of Conl Creek failed to Increase 'the
score, Fornle having the best of the
'i>Ioy, hut could not plnco the leather,
lu the net.   Time arrived wilh ««w! other Important jnalters.
Coal Creek 3, Ferule 2, thus adding ~
tirtotbfiv !r>af to tt'-Mr V.\nr<!e.
Gladstone Local Union
No. 2314, U. M. W. of A.
NOTICE
All members of tfladatotyft Local
Citkm are r«<iUf*U;U to atUtid a special meeting in ih« (irand 'Theatre,
Fernie, on Sunday ttcxt, May 2tth, at
■fi.iS p. m., to discuss the question or
working three men In a pl»e<», and
'I
T. II IMI ILL
1 "i r:
ralssloncr Kerr was In Uie dty lnve».
tlgatlng Into the matter. He was no-
eompanied by Mayor dates, Alderman
Uphill and the City Engineer. Tho
I many dangers of the crossings were
pointed out to him. Workingmen^fo-
Ing to and from their work, bolng
late, would take many risk* rather
than loee a shift. Again, little children pressed hy their parents to has.
nature of the work which they wl*h
ed to develop was iw*lnt$ through or
near some old workings, which necessitated Uie setting of very heavy tlm.
hers. It was therefore argued that
two normal men could not do the task
of this particular work. 1'nder th<?
circumstances tbe Local Union granted the company their wishes, hut
witli a distinct understanding In docu
tento the city for some household j montary form (hat suoh a system was
necessities, would crawl under the [not to continue longer thsn that par
Results—Last Saturday's Matches
Fernie, 2: Coal Creek, ,1.   Referee,
J, Wilson,
Michel, l;   Corbin,   I.    Itefer.*, ,1.
Hands.
Frank, 1; Mlkr-wit, «,   Kef«ree, Js*.
\Val»h.
Matches 'or Saturdsy
Hllkrett   v*,   Michel.    Referee,   .1,
WllftUII.
Coal Creek v* .Frank.   Referee, J
OZNAM
Vsetcy udovit u tltadstone "Do-maa*
Jeilnoty su plUiti) dostavlt sa nimorf*
adnu schodnu v t*ra»»4 Tt«trc, Fi-rnle,
v Ned»ly, >MaJ« stth o 6 hod t*i min
vet-.br ro*li*»*li*tit -fttnikn prseovat 3
muxov v iiWn « inie hiaunht* Mprsvt
T  UPHILL.
Sekretar.
cars that so often obstructed Tiiotnp-Ulcular dmelopment work under queit-HVaWt. i    i«m   t   ntfrnttr-*   4.H;*   f,»ad«««»n<t
tion called for. But what do we find? j Sorbin vn. Hosmer. itoferee, J, Van- I ulouw Micaie eoua rlcttiesti di inter-
Not only have they continued«work!n«tHeld. , {venire n una riiirilon** siNW'lalo al
•'thr«e men Ir a plate" in distinct »!«*■, W^'*" are ?„/.. abk to **•**; * ;«*«. airawu 'trmm fmttie, immontea t»ros*
latlon of the »fr*e»r»nt entered tmo ♦•g^Uiw. iwneeflnently then* wm Hjiiow u ,\iaMk. bt:#«.<;, p. «» f»« .lis-
by Stnieriutifmtout Shanks snd the «« ma^h twtwmn that eliih aod <Jole-j cutere la qaiaUone dl   tarorsre  tr«
son Street, and would thus endanger
their Uvea. The danger to vehicular
traffic wss alw great, be*»a*e of the
disadvantage of not being able te tee
tbe approach of a train. The commissioner agreed that the danger was
sufficient to warrant something being
officials of <»lad#:oue Local  Union,
but tbo company are attempting to
****** .*.*.»
i__    ^.^.^    ■_..«    *    i*      .       i M
done. It was also shown that tt thejwahe k a general practice of working
switches were removed past Jaffray i "three men, lu a piarn." whkh Is con-
Streot, making Ute railway at this!trary to tbe agreement. This scheme,
uiM%«rMuiy intraouitio, win  novef
*d altrt* erne lm-
»*..!....«u u.w t9t9*. ««u4 iv,ywi«4   *   atUKW   UWCS,   ifte   erosstflgi •*
"ta tit mm while disputes are be-
* tog torowmnt and settled, Um min-
ers, mine laborer* and n» otbm per>
ttio Uvoired, mast eoatiane te wetk
tteodint tottnoUmttnm aad antM ttoei
of limitations had Intervened. !»■< ***• »"»W to eo%?|et tbo de-fTltompton Stwet crowing.  The 'mont »ftf capadty of tfcf miner.  Although
■      - -" !—.*._        . mm.*.,   m.       -..9  .1 1         J,
■« 4ba« ender list daase. ttm*
reke toaderg wen boand to wm* t»
tli » flasl decision was reaebed nt
totkkt tbat thee tbey oely rewired
tbo lower rate for which tb*y gav«
reoelpts to the company. Ibeli that iim. "tOmkliotinr ot tk* vm* Aort
TWg treat legal battle woe tdnrtnd
la IHI and reached the tniMwae
Coart after having bad eOkvletlons te»
emded otfadtta* ih* ttaritt*na**i i*.  -n )M       —   ^ ntjmiMilM in-
tbw minor conrta.   The mnmcea al» 1 •ni»Mi   u u imd. b. wiwld bavs ob-
leged war* thst tba said defeedaau vhuw) ^ ^enggHy of some lealsls-
janaatlefsctory thing about tbn pro-itiBder petullsr snd except lonsl eondU   The AthVi> \*n
CommeiHIog oa tbe dismissal of tbe* posed subway it that tbe ground HjUons ti may prove to the /«*»**_ J ^^.^f^f
fendanta,
■fiMWII
caae, PreeUeit Oomper* said "I am»not the requitlte height above high
tatty tbo Supreme -Court failed to'trntt-r mnrk
m*b< ffiemott-M |«er powo
We Mis informed that urranKuwuia**fM»rtsiHt
sre being made by some of the teams',' T,
tu 'plsy ,Vlot)4a.y n*st instrad of Hat--
urday,* » ■ —  - '•*■-..*...*
 , ....^.™ g IUN IB K.
1st Sl'OHT*    ,
-—  ,    lrj«J*j   i-j»t.   ihi?   ttjjul-jt    u**rt(iitK
twsoHstlon ime» !« ibttti'ebi. tk* »"*••'•». htti >,* ■•« ■«■•>.♦ •>, i,-»r
on  Tueaday  and! ti-rulnriy enl<iy»bl# one    Ktter tb* nr-
uiniii.L,
««-**r»«n»ri(;>.
•»••
*iWb-l
ITM **     *****     ■•«•■■■ ft      fa ar r -am     ™-yr     -wat* ■»     — w p-. -r w ww » • .--^ ■.■_.*.„-_
The danger can  b*  r«»adlly seen {made preliminary srrsnswwenti  for'dinsn r»<itin«- <>f imHtn-^f* ind l***n
et *k* nm-wto* nrr tn w****f*n41nrt nfiftrm of 1-ttv  *>in-,r">      X  t,*v **,.' '  .»        ' . '    *    ' ■ ■
rtolated an fnjnncthm of Jostle*
tkmU bt the Dfatriet of Colnmbts Bn-
tt|tM Conrt agalnat boycotting tba
wmi ttevw * Rang* Company m
lion we are nosr ■eeklng."
*o *Kt*mint «■« ettma*ett*.'tbnt	
e-tattsttet that under e«»rtain piven wm-fof tjwtt will beheld on this occa-sion'ti." <hi»t»iri< *n
thm for vehlcntar traffic,   ttbtbitttb*
HILTON MN1PIT
(Htkme tbe wage-e«rnlng power of the
and the AMOcteMon ere making a ',. ■* ' »:n ■»'!<<l f-«rm
t. .'X    l.»|jll    iu    tl«
Tb'*» f..f-r"-»V|, thn
4b*»ft receipt* given under tb* condi-irom despite tbe oeurt's injunction by i To tbe Bditor, Matriet Uiltr.
U«M mebUened wa«M bet dhnrnWIefpimng it apon tbe ntrfatr. or "We? tw Wr—n* th* haoVfit' /fn
iLeui tu i\ic*ul*,a fi'ouit Um* -Mstpeay
Ibe mt* to which, aeeerdleg to my
ftedtnt blwee retem* to, tlmy mere
entitled, nnd tba ooly gnsellen yet
lo be letmrmiaed bt Um -into (town
wMeh this blgber Kto abMM b» prtA
I therefore tttd tbat these eoke)tiro la Us bandlfiw of tbo ****, fbn*.' pwm rrfrtrn tnem M ao^u a*.
)wobote Mwewutied to -m paid m tbwjtnf tbe defendant! guilty *n4h»£«*iMe i»
less, tr meets with ibe rennlrementa
for
city
number- , — ...
jcles thst pecNK-d over the crossingsIbfflbm Ot working
Ifor two dey*.  Tbe reetlts are as foMyow fntoreets.   Be np stid dolnir and Ima-Jeh will be placed and in the era*
low*:   Traffic over Cox Street —tatll-; v<rtoe-yow proteut lw ito un^r-'aln lint, the tniddlewtlght tbampk>j»blp of f"<«< ««^«' »»***t»- i4«tki«« »ltl» thi- h>-
Unm,  Ifibl;  adalts, tJWIj   vehielee.ImMMler.  fiemand the romtmny to live Irsnada will he toxxtbt Iwtween lMtl«
tits.     Jr»H«- mrr   I'bompsoa  Htre«tj«».> **»«♦ iMwr^Me^ and stimert a«we.
M meets wnn itm rtttimmaamimi*""^*^ ♦*« -.»*»-r--...»...„   _.	
n snbwsy for pede«t*Hane,   Tbelminer la fnereaseil snd the danger iojture of horse racing, motor evele and nx'nb^ v,*t* **\,v»,\ and u i»od»*t *m>-
fathem had a census taken of ibe life minimised by the setting of hug«i cycle rating aittd  ttttMitsntinl  prl^-n \»*r fnjoyoi |.y »h<  *^n;. rinc
t»r of-rtilllren, sdolts snd vehiji-hnbers.    But, fellof  worker*, thit are being pnt up for theso events, Th«-   mptn^r-.   of   ilo»u»*r   lodtm*
th>» ommattA nter tbs crosaincsIW«W«B of Working Is detrimental tojl^crosie,   besebali   nad   a   football -mui*   u fon-i- fiftit-n #tn»ns    Ti»«t
tfHT*.     ■*•.'.
Tin'K.1*   likifl-if   hrmh.r*-
ea\   t**i!rt','*   ;n   mm <u
WreSr*. Of V*nrour«ir, ard .Ia* X"\*\t,   ",t. ' ■-'■ • * ■ •'.•r'-.M*
• Im
fiMi-1
I
S. HANCOCK, HWiery. J»W
Jt*wy wro attempting to Ins*!1 tm- top^bof 8»pt*embcr.'TbehiirtMMof iul<*f \t> -i -<i ti.r UmsuI M*,* «*«■
William Hayson, John Ursen tadlplMw dWIetiltfee tn the wnv of rarrr- Vnithweirt ■rttmtt will be k*r* »n rwrn |Hon whtrh hc-strit It* «t.K-,\n*n .,♦ Kim
VVhcvi^y were visitors »o town'Inir out the agrr»rn.-rf jw-fe, ,     ,:,..,). . \V.   :,..-, !.»>, Mn>  Z"
i
^*1
#. '<"~Vc - x^mwf^m^
v".':--' ;.■**•  *x SS -.":,'.- -V.L"-"   s V    ~   :y*j'-X$S--   A1'? s.7*s ---%.x-.AA?***'?-'- ,
'   -• -.- -■,---.   ■   . • svr*■ ^■*.-." &.>-•?■■-«--
.*^ .. **   • ** ^■• *.,«■.     •?.•• •.***.;*
PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FEBlflE, B. C.,MAY 23, 1914.
Why Shouldn't -
You Feel Good?
._.- r
Too many of us OVERLOOK health
happiness In this world.
We grow careless about the MINOR
Ills of life and rarely experience the
JOY of living.
Tho average man or woman cannot
conscientiously say that he or she
feels FIT and WELL every day In
the year. Modern methods of living
ave against good health—and render
u* peculiarly susceptible to Indigestion, Dyspepsia, and Biliousness.
Our stomachs are always bothering
us. We grow accustomed to feeling
wretched—but not sufficiently wretched to bother the doctor.
But there IS a cure for this wretched feeling. Take 15 drops of Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup. This
great English remedy brings QUICK
relief  to  the disordered  stomach.
It restores the digestive organs to
normal Action and keeps them in a
healthy condition. It is almost purely
herbal—Nature's own remedy for aick
stomachs.
Get Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup.
Take it regularly—then note the improvement in your health.
Price  Jl 00.      Trial  size,  50c
Tor Sale by
McLEAN DRUG AND BOOK CO.
FERNIE, B. C.
^¥V¥¥¥y¥¥V¥VVVVV¥l)iyVVy»V^^V»y»VVyyyyyVvVVvV¥¥¥¥V¥¥¥¥¥»¥¥¥¥¥¥VV¥¥V^¥¥»¥'^»4¥»»
The
Revolution
THE  UNEMPLOYED—THE  PRID€
OF THE CAPITALISTIC SYSTEM
* 1ck**ickirkickicMckickick*#k^ >*******
[In the Times of April 26, there appeared a letter written by John Reid,
which gave such a, clear picture of the
causes of the Mexican revolution that
it is a Wonder that the editor allowed'
It to "be printed. Below we q"|)te a
portion of it.—Editor's Note.]
Start of the Revolution
It was and is nothing ibut a revolution of the peons. And the. first man
who .proposed any plan, Tto matter
how inadequate, to remedy the land
question wss followed. Zapata rose
iu arms a year before Madero did, demanding confiscation and distribution
of the great estates among the .peons, "me-
and political economy for two great {
eral agents of the. Palace in .Meiico
City—that they will be no longer policed by federal soldiers and spies.
Their common form of political society ,1a communal and tribal. But
now there is a pretty general realization that in order to protect thevn-
selves against the predatory rich and
the government they must have their
own representatives in Congress. Of
course, they are still very ignorant;
hardly a village that has not elected
In Mexico, as well as at home, the
idle money of foreign speculators is of
more importance than the wishes, independence, and ideals of th people
who gave it to them, _
The Peons Will'Fight Us
■It Is an Anglo-Saxon trait to con-,
slder al\, other races as inferior. A
great many of us honestly believe
that we will benefit the Mexicans by
forcing our institutions upon them.
We  know  nothing about the  Latin
Its head man who, It believes, will bp  temperament, and care less.   We do
a member of the National Legislature,
liut the idea is at least thoroughly im-
plauted the  the peons—for the first
JOSEPH     HICKS
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
MACLEOD Box 7
Visits Bellevue on  the
month
ALBERTA
14th of each
JOSEPH     HICKS
Advokat
Verejny Notar
MACLEOD Box 7 ALBERTA
Kaotlvuje Bellevue na 14 kasdy roesac
DR.   JOHN   BARBER,   DENTIST
Office: Above Bleasdell's Drug Store
Phone 121
Residence: 21 Victoria Avenue
FERNIE
B. C.
States. |Madero's proclamation to the
Mexican people from prison at San
Luis Potosi inflamed the peons only
because he promised to acquire the
big land monopolies and reapportion
them among the -poor. Bnt when his
government was established in (Mexico City, either he became conservative, or, because of political pressure,
he was unalble to carry out his plans,
or the time was too short; anyway,
the situation remained the same, and
the .peons became discontented.
First, Zapata abandoned him and
raised the standard of "War for the
Land"; then Orozco issued the plan of
Tacubaya, in which he promised the
peons free farms. In the twinkling of
en eye the turbulent north rose In
arms, -but Orozco betrayed the peons.
He had been bribed by the 'big land
owners to eipbarrass Madero, whom
they feared, and never intended to
settle the land question at all. When
the peons learned that, they abandoned his red flag by thousands and
returned, hopeless and disheartened,
to their homes. Zapata, who had acknowledged Orozco as President of
Mexico, renounced him. And that was
why the Orozco revolution failed.
When Carranza -proclaimed himself
"First Chief of the Revolution" on the
death of .Madero, he cleverly indorsed
the-iprinclples of Madero as set forth
in the plan of San Luis Potosi, ibut put
all the emphasis upon the restoration
of constitutional government in Mexico. Either because he was afraid that
if he made promises he could not fulfill them any more'thanjMadero could,
or because -he did not believe in the
wholesale distribution of land to the
■peons, Carranza avoided the question
entirely. He said that after the Constitutionalist Government was established and order restored In the country he would see what could (be done.
Zapata promptly denounced him, his
party and his plan, and declared that
Caranza did nbt Intend to make any
radical changes, and it is perfectly
true that the peons are only secondarily interested in the restoration of
ALEXANDER MACNEIL
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, ete.
Offlcet:  Eckstein Building,
Fernie, B.C.
If We Occupy Mexico
We are going to destroy all that
We have made ourselves responsible
for 'Mexico before the eyes of the
world. The first American soldier
who enters .Mexico City means the
end of the Mexican revolution. It
means that the United States cannot
leave Mexico until it has established
there a government perfectly suitable
to the European powers, and that government will not 'be suitable at all to
the Mexican people. We must suppress the right of franchise ln a way
tliat even Porfirio Diaz never dared to
do. For if the .peons were to indicate
their choice for President they would
probably elect a man who represents
them—perhaps even a -peon like Francisco Villa. vAt any rate, some one
who wojild give them what they have
been fighting for so painfully and so
long. And there is not a government
in the world which will allow that,
because the people's choice for President will take the lands away from
the rich who stole them, and return
them, to the people to whom they
rightfully belong. And that, you
know, ls confiscation—a crime under
the law.
The Government of the United
States has already expressed Itself as
being opposed to the distribution of
lands. iM'oreover, it would not dare
if it wanted to—which it doesn't
recognize such a man as Villa; in, the
first place, because he was a bandit
and uot respectable; in the second
place, ;l>ecause he is only a peon, not
a 'business man, and therefore impossible in the eyes of a democratic
nation.
Of course, there are immense European and Americanv interests in 'Mexico, many of them obtained Iby sheer
birbery, all of them rich ln the blood
and sweat of th§ -peons. Tite United
States could not recognize any desire
of the (Mexicans that some of these
illegal concessions :be restored to the
people who were cheated-out of them.
F. C. Laws
Alex. I. Flthe*
LAWE A FISHER
ATTORNEYS
Fernie, B, C.
Early to bed, and early to rise, will
make your boss healthy, wealthy and
iwlse.
-> Your muster can fire you at his will.
Why don't you arrange things so you
can fire your master? He.4s. unnecessary, aud more than that, exacts a toll
of ihe largest part of what you pro-
dwe for the privilege of letting you
work for him. Uo In a parasite. So-
clnlism will nhollsh him and hit. kind,
and let you receive the full social
value of what you produce. Think It
over.
DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED
liy   l.Hiil   uii|iil(<itilvUN,  u*   tlif.y
ivni'li   lli,-  il|».i*!i(i( ,|   million  •"!   (he
constitutional "governmenx;
Why Villa  Is  Popular
But Villa, with or without the approbation of his chief, went ahead
confiscating the estates of the great
land owners and dividing them among
'he people. For Instance, tn the State
of Chihuahua, he gave outright sixty-
two and a half acres to every adult
male, to be Inalienable for ten years.
He knew that many of them, especially the younger generation, were
so sunk in lethargy because of the
slavery of the haciendas as to have
lost all feeling for Individual proprietorship of their farms; he calculated
that tf they were not allowed to gamble away* or sell their properties for
ten years the ancient Independent love
of working the land would return. It
is significant that Zapata promptly
Joined Villa, and Is now In accord
with lilm, although he still renounces
Carransa.
The three years of the revolution
have educated the Mexican people
more than the tliirty-five years of the
great "Educator" Porfirio Dins. .For
one thing, thoy have traveled all over
tho republic In the revoliitlonnrv
iirmy, a thing that nayer, happened
beforo, und now possess a vory distinct national feeling, Villa's army
Is not composed entirely of Northerners. It conUlUM ■jiicii from Yucniau
•Tnllsro. Zacnlceiia. Vera Crui!, nntl tho
yvdornl district Itself.
The peon along the American bor-
At'f now knows ovcjry day what his
comrades In Rlnaloa and AgmiH (V
Denies -firo thinking, Every fttnte In
the republic, either covertly or openly,
l« in revolt, Where there are tole-
graph line* the revolutionists com.
municnte with C'arrnnsia dally; where
that Is Impossible wrekly mewnsers
not realize that the "Latin Ideal of
liberty is broader than our own, Wo
want to devitalize the Mexican race
and turn them Into brown, docile Am
erican business men and laborers, as
we have the Cubans, as we are turning the Filipinos.
As 1 write this, some of our newspapers are (publishing sickening headlines a/bout the seventeen heroic
American marines who laid down
their lives for their country In the
streets of Vera Cruz, The lowest estimate of the 'Mexican dead is 200. T-he
greater number of those who died
were not Mexican soldiers at all; they
were [Mexican citizens firing from the
roofs of their own'house upon a foreign army which invaded their country because some foreign business
men whom they had' enriched were
not satisfied and wanted it all.
Our efffclent, highly organized Roman legions will not find the Mexican
Army their most determined opponents. -It Is the peons and their wives,
the Ignorant, patient, generous race
that has slept for 400 years and is
now awake at last, and struggling for
liberty . and self-consciousness, that
they will 'nave to shoot. It Is the unorganized great mass of the people,
without adequate arms or any knowledge of modern warfare—"the embattled farmers," like those who stood
at Concord and Lexington—who will
be murdered. They will "take uip their
puns with reckless bravery and resist
us desperately in the streets and at
the doors of their houses. The revolution wlll.be done forever. And the
United States will bave quenched an
awakening race that might one' day
have loomed great ln the world's
history.
And if we can ever withdraw from
that distracted country we will leave
things worse than thoy were before—
an exploiting class firmly intrenched
in the places of power, the foreign
interests stronger, because we supported- them, the^great estates-securely re-established, and the peons
taught that wage slavery and not individual freedom is the desirable
thing tn life.—New YOrk Call.
Instinctively we think of tramps
when.'we speak of th© army of the
unemployed. But the mass of jobless
■people are .not that. (The unemployed
are made up for the most part of
willing workers, It's a reserve army,
and is the pride of the capitalistic
system-.
iWhen a wage earner , complains
that he isn't getting enough money to
support his family, Mr. Capitalist
System points put of the window and
says: "It you don't want your job,
•there are a hundred people waiting
out there ready to take. It." And then
Mr, Wage Earner closes his,face and
stays humble. , •  "   .
. In the meantime how do these
hundreds on the outside live? Some
don't. But those who hang on^how
do they do it? Read this:
, "Dear EJd—I am sending $5. mat's
all I can do for you, I'm sorry, i but
we are living on the ragged edge ourselves." _   . ,
That's a sample letter? to a man
out of a job from a brother or a
father or a friend who is trying, to
hold onto his own Job. And this Is
just the situation the capitalist system wants. The fear of "losing, jobs
and the struggle to get. then^ and
there ls not much choice, for the
fear of falling is almost as toad as
to fall. And don't you see, the moVe
people but of work, the lower the
wages? Some employers dismiss the
whole question by saying that out of
100 workers who want Jobs, three-
fourths of them are not efficient,
iThe wonder is that anybody is .competent or efficient under a system
that thrives on the fear of those It
exploits. But for the hope of mitigating this fear and Insecurity
through the advance of labor organization industrially and politically,
there would result such a cataclysm
as would make the French Revolution look like a game of shinny.—
Art Young, In the May Metropolitan.
J  T. GIDDINGS
BUILDER & CONTRACTOR
<• i,    . '■•
i.
Plans and Specifications Furnished For
AlLKinds of. Work   ;
Phone 123
Fernie, B. C.
* >M
CE. LYONS
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on first class Business and Residential property
IGNORANCE AIDS PRIVILEGE
Brutherhoudrov
Destruction
By Henry M. Tlchenor
Sometimes—not often—I fear for
the future. Sometimes, Instead ot the
vision of the summit, there appears
tbe dark picture of the abyss, down ln
whose depths the burled nations Ue.
There is so much to give Its hope; our
knowledge has become no -great; we
have traveled so far up the rugged
path, that it almost seems as though
we cannot miss our footing this time
un d plunge downward again to tbe
depths, And then, when all looks
•brightest, 1 think of Rome, and
Greece, and Egypt, and Babylon, and
the unknown and unnamed empires
that have only left their .history ln
piles of sunken ruins. They, too, had
knowledge. Some have left us works
of art and building thnt we of the
modern world have not approached;
they have left us ri classic literature
that shines Into the twentieth century; they have left us knowledge;
boast, If you will, that it was not as
sirenl as'oura, yet tbey had knowledge
C.UIIIOl
.  ,       ••ur.
Tliri.- I* uliiv "•*:<• Wi»!* In cure iltr.ii-
ih'Ch. ittnl iluil If* I'V i.'.mKilttitlomil rem-
t.illei-. Iu-iMiii-mh U i-jnifeil by im In-
flaiui .1 con ill dun  ni i !■•• iiiih'.iuh llniiiK
i'.f.i "V 1,':V,H,,u'h,il1" T','1"''   whon  tbin ride north over tho secret rosds er
tube In uiflfim.-il ylu   uive ti mm!i  iik '.\,-   »«^,„kii^      tttu-   *.**  i,.».i._  *,-
»«ui,.i ui tiiu-.iiWi h.*i.iiuu'. nu.i wn.-u il™'*  ■wpuhlic.    The  old barriers be-
n u iniii'civ eii.ne.i. i»eiifn.<4>< is iii.. tween coinmiinltlfs are -broken down;
1-i-j.iiIi.   runt   ntii..«H   ihe   iMt'bMiimniliiM'tliniHiht mireml*   nnd every dav mnre
■etMt l<»< iHk.'ti mil mnl thi* nihe n-mmi'il ,\t„,.i„„„0  i„i„ .«,„ Mu«tiiilni.
to  ll*  normal   e.Mi.lltloii.  lieailiiK   winiMo*'finn» J0'" I"0 revolution.
Ite .i.Ml....veil  fnl-wvei ; lillle euxex mil  nf j      \m\   there   III**   iMhO   ftrnWtl   lljl,   llllt
look upon, but It Is well to take the
warning of tho past. It Is better to
know what to do. and to do lt, then
to sit idly by and watch the coming
storm. Today wisdom comes knocking at your very door. It is In the
printed page, that the slaves Of old did
not possess. You can always discern
Wisdom from Ignorance. You cam
make no .mistake when you look for
Wisdom. Wisdom has but one message, speaks but one language—that
message and language is in a single
wOrd—<pKOTHKUHOOn, Our society
cannot be saved with patches and
plasters. Not while one human being
holds the power to exact the smallest
fraction from the laibor of another are
we safe. Exploitation, down to the
minutest form, must be abolished,
Mature revolts nt any semblance of a
master and servant society. Such a
society Inevitably rolls on to destine-
tion. Dura this truth Into the sou) of
.♦.he race, and every force in the .Universe will help us build upon an everlasting rock a habitation that shall.
stand and ibleas all the unborn years
to come.   Refune this truth, and bark
Ignorance ls the greatest enemy of
the working class. The majority of
laboring men, who toll day after day,
week after week) month after month,
and year after year, and who are little
above the hunger line, must realize
that there Is something radically
wrong with our economic system.
T'he man of toil whom Industrial
conditions have forced to -become an
nn voluntary tramp searching her© and
there for a job without success, -must
feel the injustice of a system that denies the willing worker the opportunity to earn the means of life.
•The idle man, who walks the streets
and beholds mercantile Institutions
loaded with all the necessaries of life
while he is ragged, shelterless and
hungry, must feel the conviction growing upon him that there is certainly
something wrong with a civilization
that permits strong, vigorous men to
die by slow starvation. =
The victims of wrong and injustice
arc ln the great majority but lacking
nn lnteHlgent_Cflnee<nt.lon nf the real 1
remedy to redress the wrongs from
which they suffer, they go on enduring tihe rags of poverty and the pangs
of want until death consigns them.to
the bosom of mother earth.
The comparatively few, are the oppressors of the many.
The comparatively few, through
.their economic power, are masters of
the bread.
Owning the natural resources of the
earth and tflie machines of production
and distribution, the few are on the
■throne of power and constitute that
■'Invisible «overnment" that controls
the legislative, Judicial and executive
departments of government I
If owning the earth and machines of {
production and distribution make the'
comparatively few strong ond power-1
ful and the oppressors of the MANY, i
then lt should occur to the MANY j
ttot right and Justice can only prevail, *
when the PBW are stripped of their i
economic power, by making the j
W.HOM3 PKOPLB the owners of the.
earth and the machines of pjroduotlon .
nnd distribution,—^Miners Magailne.    *
Established April 1899
W. A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail    TobaCCOntSt
BARBER   SHOP
Baths and' Shoe Shine
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
Our Coffee is Good-
a
-"-among the few.    Hut the masses
wero slaves; they were oppressed, de-
Braded, Ignorant, criminal and vicious. ,         .    .   .    ...    ...  ._„_
And the weight of Ignorance, child of!w2 plunge—back to the wild waye
degradation ani) poverty, overbade- N>enc«• w»^^nihT«« !Si* .Si
cd the scales; and the old civilisations! 'f 3w"fi*J°t?"e! "•"t^V^&.♦ u£
went down nards along the tame road that io
i.   1 .   i»    b..„..,i-,io« ia **,- nwny nntlonn have gone, only to slip
± ^^W^!°S^^i: w« «1 °* the'lr own drunken oryle.
iMan has a tyrant, Ignorance.   .   .   .
That   tyrant  has   begotten   royalty,:
which   Is  authority   springing  from -■
the false, while science Is authority.
springing from the trtie.   Man should
he governed by science,—V. Hugo.
The man who works at home helps
society at large with somewhat more
of certainty than he who devotes hint-
nelf to charities,—Emerson.
'more widespread; today the many can
rriui and write, and not the few; to- -i»ht —Vntinnal Itin-flnw
dsy the many have the absolute power' "'".-National mm*.
CORPORATION HIRELINGS
UNIONS   CONOUCTKO   PROPERLY
by    flllfllTli.    «')•!.!*
of
ten   ni''    i-f.ii.-fi.il
iiotliinK bin  nn  Inflamed conitltlui
tlie iiHieuu*. *urfuf!*«.
Wti Will iflve -fine Hlin.llml Iiollttt*
fur nny «•,!»,. ,,f I Lulu.*** icnttxe.l by
rfitntil) Dun cannot be cured by Hatr*
ii!ii\ uiiioiiK thu liuLlii't* but evell
amonit the wqmen and old men In
outlying villages and hRclondflR far re-
moved from the lines of eommunleap
nVinViiMMmV "w^ the feeling and the desire for
;; ,t. cijknkv * ro., Toledo, f>bin,!representative government They have
^/rtsiT^nV"?iiK f... ,.r.nMi.l«««W«4 ««» <»>ey will be no longer
«.Ti»» * j ruled by J«»fo politico* or other fed-
difference   between   knowledge   and    ,,n     ,
i wisdom.  To ho able to read and wrl:e,     ' "' .i'l^fL, ,rf . t_„_^t %_w fn.
a much, but to be wine is vaaUy more. war '» lh* ■*•< ■«* * f*,c•r,, m tor
The exploiter who nosea aa the
"friend of laibor" sometimes deekir-ee
that he Is In favor of unions, If only
unions were conducted properly.   For
  union* to be conducted property their
■     ...      ,  .    „       . „,    .    | by-laws and constitution must be so
The editor of the Newark Star hai I rimf^ „, to hn perfectly hnrmlei*.
., ^ ^^^ ^ wwt ^^ approval of
those "frlenila of latwr" who llv# and
grow fat on the surplUi profit extraet.
If the ancients lis it been wlae they hlddlng Interstate shipment of arms In
I would not have built their 'house upon J»U,J[ •*«*!* tor tht use of Btate mill-
DR*
PRICES
CREAM
Mtygpmder
b a protection and guarantee
against alum which is found in
tbe low priced baking powders.
•   To bt <m tlM atf• •«• whtn taytof
fctkbf pewritr, mtm&tm Um UW ud
Uk« only a brand shown to h* mad*
from Crwun ol tartar.
of government in their hands, would
they but use It. Yes, our knowledge
is ureal und general; but there Is oue
thing the  masses  lack, Just aa the
STiiffi:>&£? tS^^SSi^•»*«* *• rtrt,-w»- ^
"Cn<» h'tmn" ef Ihe Oolorado elvll
ed from labor, must become a "pink
tea" affair- * mutual admiration socl-
ty—whose members at all times shall
ho sands Of a social systwn that »1-,*>»,; A      .,,-■.   ^.,X"'^^!il, VSSSffiJ&SP *"*
lowed a few patricians to live off the That sounds well, for he goes on to wajw '»»*»«•]* «L"fMu Ml.
inftoror ttie many slaves: If they Ind say that "under such a law mine own- ™m art»».irl» gwr *»*«•
been wise they would hsve foresee* ers will no longer be able to lawn fJ^'M^rtt^^Mimm
that a soelal system ihat drives the field machine guns for their hind 2^ffl11!l-fiSRitJS^A8f
cleat majority down io degradation, guards to mow down men, women and worwmf man wno wrofaaway wa wt-
crime and vice-drives them to mad- children as wss done In Colorado."    -
Then this trilllant editor must have
taken a little nafi and forgot what he
bad Just delivered himself of.  KV»r In
a separate paragraph, not four inobea
from the fire*. »• tells us*
The folorttd* National flnsrd Is not
&
HIGH CLASS
Ladies' and Gent's
=TAILORS=
SUITS FROM
$30.00 up
Made to Measure &
order on thepremises
DeBurle & Company
Next Calgary Meat Market
P. O. Box 544    -     Fernie, B.C.
TELEPHONE NO. IM
■
tmm
nt'ss with the ravenous wolves of
wsnt—1# sure to no down when ttt*
rent up utorm burst*. If tbey had
been wise they would have built Ihelr
home \i\*>n » twrnor and •oondeif foun-
rfaiion,
But how muth «l?r.whh all tmrm lmrumnt ot State authority to
hossted^ knowledge of,«»J»«a. »ffa*« preserve order. It Is a faction la a
today than the snclwita •«■*? I^on ^i, #ar Ui rank, ir# niled with
tl* answer to this depends owe onlymon on lU w ra1tB 0f the mlnfflf
hope of social salvation. Are our use- ^p^tn,,,, i„i it |« virtually tliolr
fal worlf-T*. wlio ewiwpo«<» ui# omlw-,hireling. Tbls esplatna the merctteee
ity of our cltlsenahlp. enough *««er;e)iriIt<w WWWifc, by the Bute troops
iu me milierj utwiit* t*.
<«i>iwii to a***t* wMiMv
trom wreeV
j tt! li» luryr
• »"M,- **r» «?t*er thie th* *bett*t
IMVimMUTY and INOSPB.VtJB.V0Bs
and Joins hands wHh bla fallow men,
tn a labor orgnnlxatlon, Such sophls-;
try Is tmt the spsekras and delusive
lope ot esploltera, wbo know that thai
worker standing alone U helpless In!
presenting a demand for iscroaesd i
wages or more human* conditions.
If tbe worker loaee ble INDTVIDU-I
A1JTY or INrmPBJifHBNCK by »*.}
coming a member of a tabor organisation, then It must reasonably follow
thn* sn employer surrender* bin IN-
iHVintTAUTY and IMDOTKNDBNCW
■trtttftt hn r*Ut*am ht* eHmnttm* em the
I reetster of an Kmptoyers Association.
T. W. DAVIES
Funeral Dli^otor
and    Imbftlmtr
Head stones Supplied and Set up
oolbman   •^•t&w1-  Ausmrra
iii-wi* t*,*i  j,*.*!...,'!,'..,*** -^w.1.
1,. iv
nt-
mn *-*^^J*TSfcSrff £ >»«^>^^V^i^?>LSJ5?!Li?l t%i~« «%i«5«r'5?«5« si? «*«*•
■t old Is true, and that wisdom
-T " say or the National Ouirri or Colorado j ptoyero' Assoclstlon aa a member, tf
at the u l*1*1 *" itut ui lhe Naiio«sl timttd j.M fe« r«H ibst km an* ptoiatxint, bif
, of sll the other States.  The ranks are
i ««*••.•>.   mnmMit    la   rai.iillt    mrnmtnm m nu mv ainrr nintra.    im tnn-mt ntv   IndlVldttSllty   and   blS   IndOWndetieet
iSZTrnta ibTfaw'u msCuHiod- '^llnga Imust^Join bands with employert t*|
lit'r Uke In the daya of old, »ben .i fft. aeeetd'.ag to tbe reasoning of tbe | firotect bis Interests, tbst even *■
witten nodal structure began to • rum- editor of the Newark War. we should empmyer standing apart from »•• of
WeTnhrffmsrirripe^are there, bn** a f«ler.l law fortlddlng tt. In- Ms «ta«a winnrt muMain bla IndtrM.
tbla time, "lahorers" sufficient  for tcrstate shipment of arms^^ln bttb ev alimww «-. in bta
Sthe work?   This may appeal to )ou~   ««pt for the «»•>.,•>'"»."« 2L^Lto?VJ«-I2E22I T3J. ih.
! yon who at* reading tbla  Are you at ready u> wreak "merrtleea csmsg*" j nine^nn* mtastM^lo dm!»•
jrorb. rtoing y<mr b,-*« ok\\* ii* »«.. la v.ilki dUord«*. ^'UL LjSJi tl£. ,J,£Z.2Z
•nines?   If yon imagine the fninre is;   itoi when a man Is ao broad-minded j «»• ^rtora mitaM* tb* inner nmtm
,aU smtcth Mint J">" "^ ^ *»*: ;that tic ^n edir n 1**^™** '^^^S^JSSl^Z^^^Jl
ubn simple tbat !» *«jtf»l to free iteouWcsa mner st one ati.llhe *gl*g^^M^S!??V2aLSm
the wortrers from their esploltlng'time, we ran bartlr aspect bim to ^S!r^.Mifc .« 2SJ^S2TSJ. IS
"tmttetn ot bte*4 is » flett* onr, the >mM*M «btn l^»W •»» *£» J**l Am -u« X^JSSLi,moil
roaster class will go down-will 90 tlone of the atrttfife betwwWi t***i'S_1* \__l_*S? a^^WSSSLWl
Royal Household
Flour
Till Flour that makeilhe wbitttt,
lightest Brtid tflfd P«ttry tfiit wW
aatitfy the most particular taoatewife
down as went tbe maater class td tbelmii espWsl.—N«w York
ntttbmt wwdd, mn most go dowu attterti
CtSk
monatroas. insane and abnormal thing i
-Wex ox wbnt moan****.. ****** **t* iv'\.\
ami when tbt eraeh eome*. If we amti
not pr*Kp«re«l, If we sre not wise l
pnottgb, all ony pi down together, j
Thl» Is not a pie««ant plrtorc to
tbw. that bis Mor wm «■****• to
prodne* dividends.
I    Wbon tbe wothwt    .
l*on**frma and its flnm-lnfol tobtn be*
SkHoffo GUP6 Itttr- stSbS*'1**
rmrtmnnti
.^~^ ^^.— - — jaide the pale of tba labor mefMHml
mfiwSShOtWm}-***"* Macule*.
A. I. BLAIS, Grocer
Frank; Alta. *£&» Bellem, Alta. '^wSvT*r^*i!*l!!p?!^^
■• _" -v -1: it * A k®t>l:}
- X.  ''■■■■ XX'HfM^f^
■¥\    ->.
.1  .*
THE Dia'XIRIOT UBDGgB, l%RME, SB, C, MAY 23, 1914.
GLADSTONE LOCAL
~ . J-No, -2314 v ..'.
•. Meet first and 'third Fridays,
Miners' pall;" Fernie;. second* and
fourth Fridays," Club Hall," Coal
Creek, Slck-Bene«t attached.—T.
Uphill, Sec.,.Fernie, B. C.
HOSMER LOCAL
, ,     •. .   .   No. 2497,
• Meet every Sunday at 2.S0 In K.
P. Hall, Main Street, Sick Benefit Society attached W. Balderstone, Sec, Box 63, Hosmer, B. c.
MICHEL LOCAL
;        No. 2334    -
Meet', every. Sunday afternoon
at  2  o'clock  ln  Crahan's   Hall.
Sick Benefit Society" attached,—
H, Elmer, Sec,"
n   PARK LOCAL
.   No. 1387
Meet  every Sunday.]   Sick and
Accident- Benefit Society attached.—Michael  Warren,  Sec.,  Can-
more, Alta.
, Bist; 18,u;M.W.A
COLEMAN LOCAL
-".  _„y,,;        No..2633 \A'
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. In vthe\Opera : House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec. ■'
PASSBURG LOCAL,
■- " No. 2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at .2 p.m,
in Slovak Hall. SJck Benefit Society attached.—Thos. G. Harries,
Sec, Passburg; Alta.
HILLCREST LOCAL
, No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
In month.   Sick and Benefit Society attached.—J, Gorton, Sea   .
CARBONDALE LOCAL
■ • '   % ....   No. 2227
" Meet every, alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. -in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Mitchell, Sec, Box
105, Coloman*.
,BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday- evening at
7 o'clock In the Bankhead HaU,
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
, No. 949
Meet every second «.nd fourth
Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.
in School House, Burmis. No Sick
Society.—TJios. G. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Moet every first and thir*d Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. in
Union Hall, Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
■        LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
-       No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 in Miners' HaU, 12th Avenue North.—U Moore, Sec,-Treas.'
Labor Organisations in
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
.Meet every Friday evening at
7.30 ln Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached,—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
- No. 481   ■
*' Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyrio Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
In the Socialist Hall. —James
Burke, Sec, Box 36, Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877 '
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock in tho Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Elms, Sec, Corbin, B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30,   at   Boarding  House.    Sick
and. Accident   Fund attached	
Max Hutter, Sec
^\l^TV«^Y»\T.-S^v*\1Vi\tf«\1^M\tY*Vri
On September 30, 1913, there weredustry. reported 70 per cent of the
in New York State 2,643 labor organ- total - gain in all industries. Of tbe
izatlons with 665,248 members. -Both clothing-textiles increase, 98 .per cent
in number -, of organizations and in was ln New York City and 82 per
membership all previous records were'cent was in tbe garment trades in
surpassed. The total number of new j New York City. The membership of
organizations formed during the-year the textile trades doubled and of the
was 312, but 109 organizations dis-shirt; collar, and cuff trades tripled,
handed- and   10   amalgamated   with the increase In each case being prac
other organizations,-making the total       "
lapses 139 and a net increase of' 174
In the number of new organizations;
the largest increase in any years since
1903. Prom .October, 1912, to April,
1913, there were 134 new organizations with 73 lapses and from April
to October, 1913, there were 179 new
organizations with '66 lapses;
The membership Increase was unprecedented. In * the first half of
the year, the Increase—116,946—was
greater than that for any other entire year. In the second half of the
year, there was a further increase of
21,630, making the total increase for
tho year ,138,576. or 26.3 per cent.
The average number of members per
union was 219 as against 213 in 1912.
New York City had 29 per.cent of
the organizations and 74 per cent of
the -meim-bership. "Of the Increase ln
memibershlp during the year, the
metropolis had 82 per cent. The
average membership per union was
647 in New York City and 92 elsewhere in the State. The number o-t
.localities In the-JState having at least
one labor organization was 219 as
against 214 In 1912^
The   number  of   localities   in   the
;SJtate  having 1,000   or   more   union
: members on September 30, 1913, was
j 33; an Increase of 2 as compared with
1912. . During the  year,  4  localities
[ (Amsterdam,   Ilion,   Ogdensburg  and
Port Chester) entered the list and 2
tically confined to New York City.
The.Increase in the restaurant trade,
etc.,. group was due chiefly to the
strike among Brooklyn .barbers in
May, 1913, which led to the formation
of a new union with 4,500 members.
The. growth of organization in the
clothing industry is the most striking
feature.of the table. On September
30, 1912";- this industry for the first
time took the leading position as to
union membership in the State, exceeding, ty 200 that of the building
Industry. On September 30, 1913, its
membership was nearly 80,000 In excess of the building industry, and included one-third of the total union
membership In the entire State.
Ninety-five per cent of its -membership was in New York City.
In Septemiber, 1913,-there were 292
distinct trades or branches of trade,
each of which had. at least one labor
organization as compared with 279
such trades a year ago. In 65 trades
there was a union membership of
2,000 or more as compared with 60
such trades a year ago. Eight trades i
—toasters, knitters, underwear mak-j
ere,,electrical apparatus makers, car-
clage, wagon and automobile workers,
laundry workers, dock builders, and
shirt -makers—appear in this list
which were not included in 1912; and
three trades—rock drillers and tool
sharpeners, steamfitters and helpers
and  boiler  makers—which
PAGE THREE'
:;.-v^£!*Jf§
t ■\c*8
. — — _.—   „        —.,„  were   in-
(Corning and Geneva) dropped out of .eluded ln the last a year ago do not
It.    In  27 of these localities, there appear In-tho 1913 list
TO EVERYONE
IS WHAT THE "OCEAN*
GIVES ITS POLICYHOLDERS
Here are a few claims we bave paid of late
$35.70 $31.40 $10.00 $14.26 $21.42 $50.00
10.00 57.15      20.00 10.00 12.84 115.00
17.50 37,10      18.50- 12.84 37.71 450.00
54.30 18.55      17.00 6.00 20.00 19.20
$17.99
64.60
26.97
50.60
'The "OCEAN
i»
ia the Largest ACCIDENT Company in the
The "OCEAN" PAYS DAILY over $15,000 for ACCIDENTS
to POLICYHOLDERS
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp. Ltd, of London Eng.
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist Agent
Miners' Union Hall Block  %   -       Fernie, B.C.
(were increases In membership and in
,.6 .there were decreases. Nearly. 96
per cent of the total union member-
; ship of the State were in these 33 localities.
j Every industry save one (tobacco,
j which remained stationery) 'gained in
•number of organizations. In- the
[building Industry, the gaine were distributed, the largest being that of 10
organizations inthe building and paving trades. ,Of the total increase of
35 in transportation, 10 were ln railways, 10 in freight handling and 8.In
.teaming and cab-driving. In clothing
and textiles, there was an increase
of 15 organizations in the garment
trades, 12 In the boot, shoe and glove
trades and 5 in th© textile trades. In
the metals-machinery industry, there
.were 12 new organizations in the iron
and steel tradeB and 6 In trades other
than in iron and'steel. Of the 23 new
j organizations In the miscellaneous
group, 10 were of up-Slate paper and
paper goods workers.
I In membership eyory Industry
gained.   Ih the building industry the
paving trades, there having, been
slight losses In the other two subdivisions of that industry.' Of the
total gain in tho .building Industry,
77 per. cent was In New York City,
chiefly among painters and decorators. Rochester reported the next
largest gain, 13 per cent of the total,
the chief Item being 800 general building and street laborers. In transportation, there was a gain of nearly 8,000
members. Buffalo reporting 87 per
cent of the total, equally divided between railways and teaming. In New
York City, thero was a loss of nearly
2.000 members, chiefly In the navlga-
tion trad-SB.    Tho clothing-textiles In-
The union membership increased in
54 of these trades, decreased in 10 and
remained stationary In the organization of actors and chorus singers.
Coat, pants and vast makers, reporting a gain of 31,000 members, moved
up from twentieth to second place In
tbe list; waist, dress and wrapper
makers, with a gain of 23,000, moved
up from sixteenth to third place, and
basters, entering the list in 1913 with
a' gain of 10,000, took, thirteenth
Place. There were decreases of as
much as 2,000 members in two trades
only—hod carriers and shirt makers.
In number of organizations, 30
trades ln this list increased, 8 trades
decreased, and 27 trades remained
unchanged.. The largest organizations
were 11 organizations bf boot and
shoe workers, 10 of coat, pantB and
vest makers, 8 of paper and pulp
workers and of longshoremen. The
largest decrease was of 5 organizations of electrical workers.
Tho Increase of men ln the organized trades.of the State -was 20 per
cent and of women 111 per cent  .This
*-gaiiun£a8_confl.Bsd-to-the^uHdiRg-and4more^
of tho union membership of women
increased the proportion which organized women bear' to the total
number of organized workers ln the
State from 7.0 to 11.8 per cent. The
Increase of women was localized industrially in clothing and textiles (98
per cent of tho total) and geographically In New York City (96 per cent
of the total). The'number of organizations composed of women exclusively increased from 16 to 24 during
the year. There were 5 unions ot
electrical apparatus makers with a
membership of 614, consisting of
women only, formed ln' Schenectadv.
—Xew York Labor Bulletin.
Political Promises
Not Fulfilled
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
INDEPENDENT ORDER
Or ODD FELLOWS
Meet* every lYe-dueeday
evening at I o'clock la X. P.
Mall.
NoWo Grand, II. B. Barnes.
Steratary, J. D. MolMaJohn.
ANCIENT ORDER Of
Meet at Alsllo's Hall aso-
end aad third Mondays lo
saefe «eath.
John M. Wooda. Secretary.
Panto, Doa tt?.
INIOHTS OF PYTHIAS
Mart ontf Tnnoiny at IM
(Lin. la their own Halt. Victoria Avenge.
& CL A, Bltttlk.
K.of *,& J. Block.
Ot. oi #,
A little more than a year ago the
\ political spell-binders were busily engaged In Impressing upon the minds
I of the sovereign cltisens the necessity
j of placing In the presidential chair a
i disciple of the Immortal Thomas Jef-
■ferson.   The orators of tho Democrat-
lc party In the most vigorous lsn-
guage denounced the rule of Republicanism,   and   with   specious   argil-
ments, deluded the soverlgn voter In'o
the belief that with Democracy triumphant,  tho  clouds   of  adtarslty
would disappear and that homes that
John D, Rockefeller.'Jr., whan be-^"S^Stm^S^tTit.^
tore the cAntrMiinMi «,»l.iit^, n., ,r,)' would become radiant In the sun
:?™J.?*_?0P*™<>.»»» committee that um ot regenerated proeperttf .Mora
MY CONtCllNCI ACQUITS MB
Investigated tbe strike la the southern coal fields of Colorado, declared:
"My conscience acquits me."
Rockefeller, Jr., knew that the win-
than a year has passed away, since
the eloquent champions of Democracy
predicted prosperity with the election
of Woodrow Wilson, and yet, those
SS--?*- *S-!.r famU,MJ **• **#*_»who etand in need of prosperity, ara
rrom fn# tint-iees owned by Standard	
Oil aad forced to make their homes
In tihe tented cltlee built by the Vntb
ed Mine Workers of America. Rockefeller, Jr.. knew that hundreds of Innocent children suffered from the bit-
lag tlasts of a frosty winter, and yet
the CONSCIKNCH or tbe multl-mil-
llonalre did not seem to charge the
tiOOSTBR of unlvsralilee and church-
••. »»* anr erlme against humanity,
Rockefeller, Jr., knew that crtmln-
els and convicts bad heen gathered
from tbo contacted districts of tarte
•■"M* '"y^**1 '"to «» *o*tie»
coal fields of Oolorado, and that theee
graduates from Jails aad prisons wera
armed far Standard oil to shoot W*
mission Into tbe strikers
Rockefeller, Jr.. knew that all the
power end tatoMce of Standard Oil
waa tmmtkt bn bear en tbt fovwnor
of a state who lost his spine in the
oreoottto ot Mammon, snd <fbiw the
anted power of a elate heeai
properly of Standard Oil to
natoeUm In tbat "liberie" ef
aliil uaklu* (or ihe l-uKtlliueui of the
prophecy proclaimed bv the wheel*
horsee of the "unterrlfled and unwashed."
Prom the time that the Princeton
professor haa honored the White
House with his important personage,
Congress has keen squandering Its
time on the tariff and currency qnes-
tion, and witb all tbe wisdom of Democratic statesmen, tbs grant maas of
tbe people of this country are finding
It moro difficult to suppjy tae lamny
larder.
tteeutlful flowers of rhetoric In
long-winded speeches on the floor of
Congresk will not paint the bloom of
wealth nnd joy on the haggard face of
hunger. Tbe roar of oratorical thun-
(ler-ln the national halls of legislation
against tlu> -vUncy of truais end corporations will not bring a single loaf
of bread to the hovel of the pauperised worker.
The ayslem of exploitation that
makes a multimillionaire and en
army of Involuntary tramps, must be
banished, ere man ean enjoy "Hfe,
liberty and the pursuit of happlneee."
(Collective ownership of the earth
and all of Its machinery of production
aad distribution, Is the only remedy
that will drive poverty from the race
or this planet.—Miner* Maaaslne.
.■,.,MI-——«!■■!.,        „„|||   ,  ,J j,,,,,
PUO PATKIA MORI
• Ikilce et decorum est pro patria
mori," which being Interpreted means
that It Is eweet and glorious to die for
one's country. Why, of course It Is.
Suppose tbat you were hungry and
cold this laat winter and that, being
desperate, yoa enlisted In eltber the
hrmr or the navy; suppose yon were
one of the fortunate ones who were
ordered to Vera Cms to kill a dirty
"greaser," snd then suppone thst ihe
dirty "greaser bad killed you before
n»«,«tt«.. nt tt,. «►„».!— .1... .*_ Jffitt *ot * *°°* chance at htm. Jest
mS*&-t !£ A2mIi£B£*.££ f£* l-*mom those things   wouldn't  yon
2S^^%. iki .»^«rt^-^n*Wff»l onrtttm of a national cham*
!£SS* nvJt i^T^htttTf^^ JS!T'■*• *• «*"* " ■■«■■« tnntrnl than
*b ti tt*?n££Z,T«rW?„„«t1^,r irt|,iR' r^Uft' wh* *"» «rwet#d far de-
J*. on the nnancsR of the country. fmvSthm ttmm ^ mmt
3S    CorpoMiloBt aad tHiete asve be-*   As ibe (tween ferbia deeerttoa, he
LOYAL ORDER Or
noon
Meet
Hi,>; -«.., »*om«mi4Mtm, and tto'fctti* *^^i »t%Mfl:VrC'% ^v,« ••■...
suss sm {as^i^a^
hot wti#n i wee m iimi arm? f
WHS"
!a'i'j>j.wi.'i
1 JHliB1 9
TIMOR** WAHTgQ
IvtHtar*   tttt,   toahrt,   titr
women and eMMnn wera emwated **»T «Kf «f MHMtaaee In Amaru* twopie
mnrifer • pwtenton: and jte'Wii&'-tlmvUWSmtmm-'wW
saintly teetlemaa. wbo bee erled eet DseiWKrajr «ii RepoNkeeie^ ami *»]»,«f*      . ....   mm,iMm. ^ I
acnlttst wtilte etavery. wbo baa f^Hbat botb parttaf ara dominated by , *Mut* '•tffi f.Mh, ml^mt ,»^f»
njeh^t fasde to lauaeh a war against thoee ;«*p<alee of tbinidtr ^l^ZT^i&t ZZLE^JPl
tbe Uaner trafHe. wbo deaatee tw nk kings of flaaec* whoee wilt eeeMi to -1* /•»"« (I*yi?^"^t°f_^m' rUw
verettU m^mttbmm^ ehmrtm, bnKw to "tbe ommn ot the people."^l 1!PJ*«L« Jjgjgj "
Titers
ts certataly eometkluo mtb  _„_ ,_           w„.
.   w«b n rONRCIKWU'tlie pto»i>1#ma Ibst tn*m Vt- *- ■**■*>*■
k*»*iati»«*4u'L',    " *** v»i:"'1' ■""■ *•*•* ****** tta tot* impmettmmd, not will tt nr*.tl*
i.rutitunn onn tare Mwefce ee Vte-t'*«>»•» lea* eemmlited*y ihet«H.|t%» tmnetmm tmtm bbtmrn «s
*   fm^m *Mni)i« -«kk *■   mm* *AxA.m...;JatRy of eokWera and eaiiora wbo t-w*i.
K**t»*i^^«^tt^i7^Mi7Tmtt«l*'*t*  Ihelr   sSorioei   tmrlre  wttftf
«itZ ttos«2L2Lt«JiLa±L.»,'i»f* «if,r,f",» *«•«•» ***»«. *^-
Ili^ISJiJliJ rtStSS-'W.**1 f"**?.*^* s;f dntwnt tmd btmbbt tdttn*
lerta Park (IranMn. Ceel Ci*ek.       Iwreby tbat le raeiMmcffele  fer »he>Wi.r aad mwntbbtd,
Ofwnfmani f«tl feet ttwg, I. tiers of i ^3w ot Umor tbat baa MmImmI MMl,   -rbki wMm. *• weft n nmmt* *****
tentt*. » imben apert, heml nil ts dhMWced tbe elate ef CeterMo. Reek?   .:.tT .T™^».",..^w." **mm*r
rear or ttntb paint for mai-HUts.!.    j^n^-^twrw *tnr*m*
AR timtera I* be wnm In at one* toi   „,     , 7-—* ———
W. R. PUfKRT,- TSv* "l*5* han•* 8r,{*, »»*"••* no l«-
Ub bl. Coe! Creefe Mlee*. nreertea ew ttt* ***** rwnwtmt* wmb.
l*f FWMe. tC       wt in eketlen time*.
•tetfliemamb^
bOR*ai mmI asi^im-i
if uuman   W,w«».
ea**Jy < rank tag tbe
tltma of mffffomi of auman
*ho*i> f*i'''» sre twoaiaji
1*-* t$M**.m fitgtra sit -kenaw
waul. ^"
to re<-
*f
buettky
* t ,i      '
,,.,,. ,     w*»,       . •    ,        ..,9*,l±    .W*-.     *p.9,0,-*t  ,
ft t.i i '.md. itm »&l4h*n, haunt
4r*A ifcae alls*.   Of rnmm* y«*« ei*f
-  '.1 •■  Yf.tV -Tad
<Vt«tt«W-»w 'ekee awsy everytMnf
'rt,'-*.' '..-iikt-i- ft.wlC»:.«j "*"*j tn*
«i<«'*' »" tf* *t,* trnvtn*-***-    Ttttia-n ■*•»**
1-l.ii.   * •*..» .ii.-!», Ahd tji,   U-   t«|X«4
m*'fc ft .'«■•!<♦ tft«*nrk»
Every Night
a Sunkist Orange
Every member of the family
should eat Sunkist Oranges just before retiring at night. Eat them
at meals and between meals. For
- no,other fruit ever better insured
good health.
Heavy withJuscious juice, sweet
and delicious. They are free-peeling
and so   tender-meated you can
Sunkist Oranges
Sunkist Lemons
eat them  whole without
any juice.
Sunkist are tree-ripened, glove-
picked, tissue wrapped, and shipped
right from the tree, so are always
fresh and full flavored.
Will you buy merely "oran&es "
or will you get "Sunkist?"
Prices are low. Get a dozen now.
Sunkist Letpons, madam,  are   the equal of
Sunkist Oranges in quality-practically seedless, juicy and richly flavored.   Serve them
with fish and meats—they are the best
looking lemons.     Try using their
juice wherever you now use vinegar.   See what you're missing by going without the
Sunkist Brand.
Califdrnia
Fruit Growers
Exchange
105 King St.. Ean, eor. Church
Toronto, Ont.
Mail us this coupon and we will
91, 1   sfnd>"0"ourcoinpIipjentary 40-paze
recipe book, .hovviDff over 110 ways of nslw
Sunkist Oranges and Lemons.    You will also '
receive our illustrated premium book, whH elh
Lif", h°W Ui trade Snak,*t wrappers for bea   ;Sl
ITjtV;    J"St send this C°»P- or call Tlbl
above address.
NAME
ADDRESS
"I Want to See Every Miner carry
one of these Sick & Accident Insu-
ranee Policies."
If you are Interested, read
the following:
DOILTJ.O_SE^yQUE=WAGES
Should you get Blck or hurt who is going to pay your
bills? Should any misfortune befall you, would it mean
your ruin and necessitate your re-sorting to charity?
Should you find yourself tomorrow flat on your back in
tho hospital, who is going to look after your, welfare?
Should you lose your good right arm, how are you going
to make a living?
Here Is a proposition that guarantees that you do not
lose your Income. A small monthly premium will guarantee you cash payments whin you are unable to work
through Injury or sickness.
The policy also provides liberal
payments for loss of life, limbs or
eight, as follows: " *
1   Lobs of life Principal sura
Loss of both hands.Principal sum
Loss of both feet,.,,Principal -sum
Loss of one hand and one foot....
Principal sum
Loss of -sight of both eyes	
Principal sum
Ijoss of either hand	
Half principal sum
7 Loss of flther foot	
Hnlf principal sum
8 Loss of one eye.	
Half principal sum
In addition to th<>s<> benefits Uie
Itoltcy will pay you a pension of one-
half the monthly Indemnity for five
years, whould you lose your 1<»ks, arm*
ur t'>e*ilKlu.   This is positively the only pension eeheme
that has ever been Inserted in an accident policy.   If you
!o».o your U'Kk. >«ur arms or your ••>«mh, you i-nnnoi work.
or, to say the least of it. your earnliiK a Will y Is very
largely impaired,    Thle policy will not only pay you a
largo lump sum .Ur.ui, but will give >ou thu monthly pension for five year*.
The benefits of the policy urr doubled 1< the iiijurl»'«
art* Hustelned whilst tke policy-holder Is riding on a rail-
road, street car. steanuhlp or other conveyance.   •
The policy cover* all kinds of sickness, without exception, end twyt indemnity as long as an average lllneen
continues.
The principal sum of the policy ii increased one tenth
every «i* months, so that the longer you continue the
policy In force the more valuable It becomes.
At th«? end of five years thc company guarantfet* to
refund one-half of all Ihe premiums if there km been
-31
-^Jl
'   T.I
■m
'Ml
tio -"Htm.    If
>A E"
Xk ot UvSurt-1 jva ftX
i*M»i *\ . *l   *J*tii
yon meet with «om# sickness er accident.
™*f» *« n* "lfi," no bttte-end no "draw-
WM'ke.* The *or.l» •mad for whet ttn»y rept**-
•em end wbnt tkey ImtHy mn eeelly be
•wepso,
A men's eerelnf yonier 1* w# moot tnl'H.-
Me ee«et. Ills esmlne nosrer eemiete ef dis
•i»*rtji, his -br»iB» an4 ta* p»nNNmflty. If, therefore, ble eertiing po»-r i« hie %<mt ««Mt «h*
leest he «w do le te pretert tt. eefieelaltv whe«
h« «*» do so hy myltttt m email n tmttti-am It
he does not protect It, be sennet think It Is et
any valuo,. mid lie mxm Imvi* * very bow eni*
ton of hlwee».  A men's eeraftg pow*r Is the
Indemnity. If you are fortunate enough not to be sick
or hurt, half the money comes back to you In a lump sum,
Aiid ton Mil appretttiU' thl* lump sum tmith mor* than
yc: uist the small monthly payment.
This policy is absolutely vital to your welfare.   It
iiM?*it» for >ou comfort and »ecuri«y when sick or ln)ur*»<*
It Is n gold bond-e straight proml**' to pay when you
are sick or hurt.  And mtnemtwr, tb*< money come* to you
when yoa need it most.   The time will come when the
j.rot« Hon will be to yon your t»e*t friend In the time of
grantee! need.   Yon can wt the (wHc) nmy and feel ab.
solutely Rtsured that your ineonn» will be wmtlntiwl whtm
t rem bil ng, tbwthtfwl?   lion't yon realise what
It would have itiinut to you If nxt-b an eretd-Mit
bwl realir t^»^n*'«^Ml,   IWt )oo rcal^*' that
tomorrow yo« ttmy not »»e w fortunat^-that
yoa may be mangled or crn*h«Hj?   And <fon'<
Y*>i lea-}*  (U*t Uxl'tb I* *;»u|* t**t »#*v*t*ii*.i
■nmtttitfi   Sett »■##*, or n*tt memtb ytet mtt-r
b* tint on your back, bd^te**, A»»n end oai
•so far as y««r earning poettr it <jmn;tn*4,
tkm't yon r*e»t*# the h*imllia»)«»n and emhir
r»»*m*«nT nf rnlttttw npnn *»rangers for help ot.
such a Hew?   Jioe't yoa tmtlt* what « Wow tt
wmH Im Ui your pvtd* ead to your meehotftt?
If yew get etch, who ta eolog to pay >"«r em.
._....,„..,     9l„„,u     ..     «,C     9.4M9.    *W*.
vroteet tho trmttAailtm th* ***-h*u«i*itii** mtr*****.,.,
tn Xmnm n» xiawdm Oomo aay HMNneet.
Never • dot mmm hex eawMlee e Jong «*t
td eternities td the •**• el oetbbm mud ateb*
new iwnnittee. l«o«t ywi tmmmbtt, m later
then yeelerday or the day before, ym tnm *+
mi*il e tn tS-iu. Swjur-v kt ** wtturt* tt*-*-. >>v
•MMwea*.* 4««*k4w*u wi m mtuvmt*    nf tlw    •«(*!*) flt
ymt teeth"—md the mpetkmtt Mt ym pnU,
,,.,, „ ....    .."•*,«,.»« ,,,,** «%*,# m nu,)  9tat me mtiO
*^-p    *t*i*.l   lr.    -**.*.,.»■    . ,-.,t   ...9,.    -I*-, **.,**,11 .-1
Vim rmetm ettmd to d*hy n twitter no
lUal to j«*Mr wetfeee.   A few hoar* mny mean
lemf r^t-t,.   *%■*■ nhii'{iiitrt**,-^ ,*,(,# ^.a-iisj  *•■&,■• ^-jj
-knpfAnrm, end th* lm* of your Mttrlegs, iwr-
heps of n ItfHfme.   RetB#««b#r, tlie wtttm't* td
f«V**%\    4^99,   **-lt,   -f'4"f99-*.     rt    ..,-f,■•.;.-.n 49 T»l ,-* i' *J, »l*
#e teMy wttet tewierrew tnny net let yen He.
It Ie etears b*xt*r to be *mv thee terry.
Don't Delay-as delays are fatal-but come up
to our off ice AT ONCE and let me explain
our policy to you.    It will cost you nothing
Boom t, Hamilton Building, Fernie
Box 57S      Offir* Open Onn*  fr* 0 f* nor.
n*4
»!*.(•* ■, >#*«k? tjoed, hy it*- n:/.*,«*h%.
S* I***?-** term tb* watbdOU flat**. '
<V
CrltWi W. C
Crow's Nest txtprrttnttitiae no,
Leeei Agtnt
. 9. Morris 3.*.   ■?*..
PAGE FOUR
■t
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER.Il'ERN^B.C, MAY 23, 191i
,   ***       *   ***
_"1 */»,-„-«■*■
-  "-'J,\k;
'  '- <• ■•*?<-■
i. *— ....   *(>
~1l-' .'.-^V-i*'***1—"^^
r." : Si7''^*'X:'"AXy^S^i
M:
- SJ'.-ll ~**
- -.ir, -**•
™-    *% i.'*,-
Asa -x '"'-7S-.
kA'^/il7:7'Aex
®
UJ* SisfruJ &%£r
a
Published evejy Thunday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription.$1.00
per ■- year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. TJp-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
solor work. Mail orders receive special attention,
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNKAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
It is a weakuras of human nature to criticize,
and i»> this direction we plead a great humanity.
Still, hy analyzing the words and actions of others
we become more cognizant of our own weaknesses
and imperfections. You eannot hold the mirror
without getting an occasional glimpse of your, own
self. Our opponents can never be accused of parsimony so far as criticism is concerned, but occasionally they will tittilate the minds of their own
class with their righteous indignation (?) at the
liberties allowed tlie laboring classes and tlie misfortunes of tlie unfortunate rich. The latest wail
we have noticed appears in the editorial columns
of The Coal and Coke Operator. Commenting
upon the action of Upton Sinclair and his colleagues in parading in mourning before J. 1). Rockefeller's (junior) mansion in New York, this journal rips out the following junk for the edification
ami commiseration, no doubt, of its readers:
"As between militant Suffrngels. who destroy
property in England, and 'mourners' who pace
before the doors of rich men Ivho happen to have
money invested in property where labor troubles
develop into anarchy in the United States, one
Sets an inkling of understanding why so many rich
Americans can expatriate themselves and acquire
cit/izens'hip in foreign countries."
Ignoring for the time the sufferings of those
•'expatriated" ciHizens lolling in villas on the shore
of tlie Mediterranean or being bored by the excessive gaieties of continental.Europe, \rc'might-consider the misfortunes of those who ''happen to
possess money invested in property where labor
troubles develop into anarchy." These individuals do not ''happen" to know what workiug eight
or. ten hours in a dusty, gaseous and foul coal mine
-Jltflans: they do not, happen to «»\-neriencg_thp _
drudgery of the miners' existence; with them life
is one continuous kaleidoscopic round of variety.
The miner sleeps, works and eats (when he earns
enough). He sleeps in a shack and sees his ehil
dren grow up in surroundings that the men who
''happen" to be rich would not tolerate their cat-
lie to exist in. He oats in this shack nnd in the
mine; he consumes his food in the mine undei'
conditions more revolting than those of the shaek.
He has to eat amid dust and dirt or not eat at all.
Silver and white napery are not conspicuous in a
coal mine when the miner dines. He does not
'happen" to possess these luxuries and J. 1). &
Co. are taking particular care that lie nhall not
be burdened with same.
Further on in the name this journal adds;
"Surely the efficiency-of Anglo-Saxon Common
haw principles is ooxing away, or else those chosen
to adm'nister it are betraying a singular anil as-
tiininhiiig sympathy with law-breakers."
if the number of indictment* returned against
Hoekefeller in any indication of the oozing process,
then wo are inclined to believe that tho "principles
of law" have undergone a process* of squeezing
that eliminates any danger of tho ■■worker further
sapping same.
The chagrin of The Coal and Coke Operator at
the supreme court'* decision in the Oompers, Mit-
ehell and Morrison ease ia pathetic and their eout-
ment is one of those inexplicable literary excrescences which uiuht mystify even its mont anient
supporter and rentier. The caption ol the editor'*
fii-M* leading article, which dtntlM with it meaetuf
likely to benefit labor orgniiizations, is "Commun-
iente at Once WiUi Your Congressmen" (!), Hi*
comment upon the previotndy mentioned cttne is
M follow*;
) "It would seem that the cowardice of politi.
*s\nm, who have long been subservient lo labor
union official* who had the temerity to threaten
I heir |Militi.«l life, and who have twisted rightc-
oUKuesiK in law-making in order to shield thein. hn*
wpread it* pertiieiotin influence to the judgi'* of
pvon onr high-mt court."
The ludieroiwne** of appealing to politician* if
they ar« »uluH.rvient to the hi bor union official is
too funny to new! comment
less than the reflex of tlie fight and the shattering
of that expectancy which buoys us up in our efforts. The instinct to fight and survive is just as
strong in us as in our opponents. It is the result
of countless ages and generations of striving and
struggling that has been iu progress from the day
the tiniest protein struggled and established, its
existence. Prom that very moment when life first
found expression, we have paid the penalty jn one
long continuous fight and struggle. There is-no
room in the fight for quitters. There is no higift'
in condemning the union and claiming such methods obsolete because a prostituted press claims that
labor is defeated, for so long as the union is a
fighting organization, so long will it live. The
efficacy of the union and its actions may not always be apparent, but the fact thai they endure
is' sufficient evidence of their necessity.
And yet there is no such thing as defeat; humanity was never defeated, or we would not exist' in
present day society. The coal and copper barons
as individuals will die, but their types will survive. The gunmen and hirelings will cease to exist directly the demand for their infamous service
ceases. Evolution may modify their types, but
they will be just as revolting then as today, if they
are used by the exploiters of labor. To this age,
they are necessary for the capitalist—if not, tliey
would liave gone out of existence. How long they
will be necessary depends upon you.
Charles \V. Post,.the millionaire, who ended his
life so tragically, was a bitter opponent of the labor movement. He fought it at every opportunity,
he appeared to check it, but he did not. Post is
dead; he was not necessarily a bad man, he was
fighting for his particular class and fighting as we
would see our own class fight. His antagonism for
the labor movement acted as a stimulus and was
the means of bringing hundreds and thousands of
workers to see and appreciate the benefits of organization. The strikes in the copper country and
Colorado have not been in vain; not one single
blow has been struck, not. the smallest drop of.
blood shed, that has not been productive of some
good. True, it may not appear apparent to us from
this portion of the continent, but we know that it
is impossible to regard the efforts of these men as
futile—they are not, and both they and us will reap
the rewards of their, selfsaerifice. .
Lockouts, strikes and disputes will continue, and
must so long as we market our labor power for the
price of existence; they are an. expression of
discontent with our condition, and the result of a
comparison between our method of existence and
our masters.
■^-JB^^t~the-laborel'^n1^3t^T^ever-despair7^te'^^I^^)t■
quit. We cannot imagine a greater insult to the
memory of those who have fought and died for the
freedom that we at-present enjoy (or aa some would
have it, should enjoy) than the attitude adopted
by those who would persuade us that things are as
they are, and there is no use in .trying to' amend
them. „ ^
JUDGE SUGGESTS
STATE1HSURANGE
^ ....
','1 thlnH It a reproa-ch to our jurisprudence that men wlio are injured in
these -industrial occupations should !ba
forced to resort to questionable actions against employers," said Chief
Justice Hunter In-the supreme court
yesterday afternoon in dismissing the
action <for $3,0(MJ'damages under the
Employers" Liability act brought hy
.Patrick Ward against the Canadian
Pacific" Railway Company. iThe state
should make -provision for these industrial cases- Just as for the deaf,
dumb and 'blind, he continued, and he
went on to point-out that very often
the plalntflff^ ..In ,such actions were
successful but -that their reward was
not great alter the. solicitor had deducted his charges and that eventually the charge thus collected .would
come heck against the community,
which Is' the state/ In the case which
was before thtf oourt yesterday It was
the opinion of the chief justice that
the plaintiff had approached the work
which, he was performing In the
wrong way and was guilty of negligence which did not warrant Mm in
Bringing the action for damages
against the company.
,TH£ ORPHEUM.
We ■are informed that tho^e respond
slble -for.'-*>re-.prote6*ttori' in jtttifr-faim
have ' recently ^.visited. thev. Qrpl^m
and expressed unqualiped'-.-praige a-i"
i ho very 'thorough jtn-jumer' in, whi<^
the" management. has guarded ;agaSnst
the possibilities «£ an outbreak" c*f lira:
The operating rponi'ls'f-without' doubt,
the safest and iaost up-to-date in this
whole Western,' couorty,' while the
auditorium, lias -accomiaodatlon-second
to' none. .Wide, comfortable seats,
provided with iplenty of space to- aK
low passing to andTfro;Ka picture,
clear, fenerous *utd "distinct,'-%;lthout
tha , suspioion-ot -a -flicker,' or .eye
strain, - .these are some of; thVpoiata
that recommend this house" to"'-its
patrons?-' .The feature for Thursday
aad Friday,. Is a Vitagr&ph in tiwo
parts, "Children of the Feud," a .thrilling story of hatred engendered -by
the parents, vendetta, ls imparted to
their children, but through the marriage of a son and daughter, the opposing factions agree to bury their
differences for ever. On Saturday, a
special aviation feature in three parts,
"Wrecked in iMid-alf," will be shown,
This is one of those modern realistic
and gripping stories of a' daring fight
between aeroplane and an automobile.
For next Tuesday, "The House of Die-
cord," a Blograph two-reeled feature,
is billed.
' -v v
Photo|$PIkys
* \ .  • THURSDAY AND;FRIDAY't
VLTAGRA(PH^S%}IAi;w6-^^ '■'• ■•?{
Charles II. Moyer has been re-cleeted president
of the Western Federation of Miners without 6p
position, aa was Secretary Ernest Mills.' This dis
poses of the vaporings in some of thq plute papers
that Moyer did not represent the miners, was too
radical, and so on.  The fact is that, when it comes
to engaging in a general strike, Moyer ia oue of
the most conservative labor officials iu^hc eoun
try. He knows that the cards are stacked that the
capitalists hold tlw trump cards which are usually
clubs, and, therefore, advises thc workers to become politically as class-conscious as Ihey are industrially aud take possession of the governing
power and the trumps aforesaid.
The so-called Taylor apced-up system is to be
given battle by the workors in Milwaukee. Tlie
decision was reached after many of the unioiiiats
heard a lecture delivered by Frederick Taylor, the
discoverer of thc scheme to gouge the workers to
the limit of their endurance, Just what form tho
wnr against Taylorisiit will take is not yet known.
The matter will be brought up at the forthcoming
session of the Wisconsin State Federation of Labor,
when pliHiK will be outlined to begin it general fight
against the driving system.
The South African sfovernmetit haa, "in defer-
ftifi> to the feeling of all parties in Parliament."
almndoiied the idea of punishing all but a few of
tbo principal officials who were connected with the
rwent general strike. The ''feeling" was largely
fxperieneed by the smashing defeat that the gov.
eminent received in the Transvaal Bute election,
when 2.1 Ijabor men and only two old party can-
did Hte* were elected to the Legislature. It !• likely that the protection of the "ringleader*" will
n\m be abandoned before long.
THE ISIS
Tonight, Thursday, the great Dumas' masterpiece, '{The Count ot 'Monte Cristo," will occupy the screen. On
Saturday, the 'management has secured the greatest melodrama ever pic-
turized, "Kissing Cup." There are
four reels to .this .picture, and one hundred and fifty splendid scenes, and
every scene is a "punch." This film
was produced iby, the great Hepworth
House, of London, without regard for
expense and with a great caste, including the 'best known and cleverest
picture actors In the wdrld. The
scenes include a motor car race, the
aeroplane to the rescue and a most
exciting race scene in which "Kissing
Cup" is shown getting; off a stride
ahead at the barrier, and followed
round the track by the camera, she
comes in a winner by five lengths.
The delight of the hero is only equaled by the amger of the villain, and thfe
final tableau Is nothing but what the
title suggests.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦•♦ ♦ ♦ ♦-♦ <►
♦ ♦
♦ HILLCREST NOTES ♦
Hillcrest.visited Frank on Saturday
to fulfill their league fixture. <They
kicked-off on scheduled time. Hillcrest started the game at a fast pace,
which was maintained until the whis-,
"tle^blew*:—Tbe~^ineT*5ultBd "in-a-TWin-
for Fratik of 1-0, Considerable dissatisfaction  was   expressed   at   the
♦ ,TABER NOTES
•-».-< -',.--,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Tom Sneddon .-suffered a serious
loss on Monday,when, his house and
granary on his .homestead at Grassy
Lake were" destroyed by .fire. .The
house was occupied <by his brother-in-
law and family, and contained practically all they owned in .this world
including $25 in cash. The granary
contadned 150 bushels of oats and 60
bushels oif wheat, which was all destroyed. Coming at this time, it is a
very serious loss and we sympathize
with Bro- Sneddon In his misfortune.
The <band .has received an offer to
play in Grassy Lake on May 25th, The
financial reward Is not very great,
but the hoys may go for the day's outing.   •   ->
Several residents of Taber visited
Lethbridge on Monday to file on some
oil claims. . ,
Alex. .McRoberts is going to Bow
Island to 'work for a few we^ks,
Jim Kelly and Pater Head have gone
to =work oii. the Irrigation ditch out
norths ■  .
The case of Joe Lyons was heard In
the' Supreme Oourt at Lethbridge on
Monday end Tuesday. Decision will
-nofbe handed down for a day or two.
handling of .this game and the referee
severely criticized.
Mr. Peal Is the new manager of the
Co-operative store, and took over his
duties on .Monday lastr'
The Socialist Local will hold a
smoker in the Union Hall on tbe 25th
of May, commencing at 7 p. tn. Tickets, 50 cents.
■Born, to (Mr. and Mrs. W. Legge, a
daughter. -Mother and child doing
well.
DEAFNE8S CANNOT BE CURED
by  local
aoh the aueueti domil _   ...
&y to cure deaf,
institutional i
cauaed by an
, . applications, as they cannot
reach the diieaaed portion o( the ear.
There u only one way to cure deafness, and that Is by constitutional rem-
• . Saturday was pay day at the Can
ada West aud iwas a pretty blue day
for the mlners.'-as only, one day had
been worked. Wages drew ran from
25 cents to J4, .which Is a very substantial amount to support a family
on. One thing was very noticeable,
tbat the doctor got bis fifty cents whe-.
ttoer the miner had anything left or
not. The doctor's agreement expiree
on June lst, and notices have 'been
posted calling a general meeting to.
Sunday to discuss a new agreements
. rrh* difiners' Sand will -play in the
park on Saturday evening.
edles.    Deafness
In
flamed condition of the mucous llnlnar
of the Eustachian, Tube. When this
tube Is Inflamed you havo a rumbling
sound or Imperfect, hearing, and when
it Is entirely closed, Deafness Is the
result, and unless the Inflammation
cnn be taken out and this tube restored
to Its normal condition, hearing will
be destroyed forever; nine eases out of
ten are caused by Catarrh, which Is
nothing but an Inflamed condition Qf
Hip mucous surfaces.
We will vlve One Hundred Dollars
for any case of Deafness (caused by
catarrh) that cannot he cured l»y Hall's
Catarrh Cur<>,   Htjnd ror t'lrcul-sis, trvr,
P. 3. CHRNBY ft CO., Toledo. Ohio.
Hold by Druggists, Tio,
Take run's T'amlly Pills for constipation,
L. Backus, of McCutcheon Bros.,
left on Tuesday night for Calgary to
look over the oil proposition* in that
city. (A number of business men ol
Fernie have secured tbe services of
Mr. .Backus to act as agent for tbem
In the purchasing of stock.
Boost for the L. O. O. M. picnic in
August.
Shihh'sGw*
•TABS MlllflUft N"*LB THBUmOS
•TOPS vOUQHo puice. u cbht§
wmsmmimKmmmmtmm
THK "WHAT'i THK TOKf POLICY
The "mutual benefit system" that the i'cnnxyl-
VHiiin Hflilniad insisted upon thrusting upon its
employee* because of the goodness of its corpora-
■■*..
Suddaby's
(The Rexall Store)
Ice Cream,   Ice Cream Sundaes
Egg and Milk Drinks
Ice Cream Sodas
Wt Have tlevdn flavors in tee Cream Sodas:
Strawberry, Raspberry, Cherry, Pineapple. Lemon. Orange, Vanilla, Chocolate, Ginger, Sarsapa-
rtila and Coffee.
MMWMWWW
"Ww ,H»«*<*" \n xier+mmrv adviee st all times,) •"»•• m,m "«•• owu •!'«"««*« »i trnttim***,**, ttm, &*.
and mav 1* implied to Imttt leader* nnd wink »«*»»"*"»«* *< * *>**m> *Mim ximmd i» dilutstUm
M.. Tlu. wmk.btm4. woliHIv individual. W|M,| them imo remglning i^isfiwl with |m*ent «»mli.
'What's Hie itsef" Mtttmle. In a TOW|.|tkinifc-a«»v«l«nd Cilmn.
u'hil#- llu* lea«W U'Imi lacks!"
udopts the
■i*<**t> t«. HtlV •ir'frtlttJM-ttWHI.
Egg Phtwphato, Sod* PhotphaU*
Etf 1A8*. Milted JVXk ftr!tii tt
without Egg,) In* Cvtem Suud««*
with delicious Note, Fmit a Syrup
-A thrilling story ot th-o Kentucky-jMounitalna, .The hatred engendered:
l>y the'parents is imparted to their children. •* trough the mawiage
of a son and daughter of' the, opposing families*;-their differences are
buried forever.      , '   '   -      ,.   ~'» ...:-'". -_-,   -.-•     •",-...-
"'    ',    '    /     SBLIG SPUT COMEDY AND £CBN*C   ,'•   >' .'
DISH WASH DICK'S dOTOTBRFBIT
SUNSET ON THE! INDIAN OCEAN
THE GIRL ACROSS THE WAY—Blograph
THE OUTLAW'S GRATITUDE-tubin x  •
SATURDAY
* '
KLEIN ©-ECLIPSE SPECIAL FEATURE IN THREE PARTS    .
-   "    '      . • .'-'' '   ■"' \ "
Wrecked in Mid-Air
A realistic -and gripping story of a daring fight -between.an aeroplane
and an automobile;' A thriller; .-'-•''     •**•'
•    -     • TU1»DAY "'"'•■\:',^ I xA
The House of Discord
.\        BIOGRABH FEATURE IN TWO REELS -:
Matinee Saturday at 2.30—5c and 10c
Prices, 10 & 20c. -:- ORPHEUM ORCHESTRA
GET   THE   ORPHEUM   HABI,T
For all Fishing, accessories
Flys, (hit, Lines, Rods, Fly
Books, Baskets and Reels
For the Speckled Beauties try our
Rods & Flies.   The Cheapest & Best
McLeans Drug & Book
Store, Fernie, B. C*
To Sports Committees
The Fertile Coal Creek Excelsior Band is now
open for engagements. Satisfaction guaranteed
For Terms Etc. Apply
TH08. BIQQ8, 8«oretary,  Fernto, B. O.
HaBRBBSSS
Saturday Specials
tli»» omirAgf <»f lil* r<onvli»ttonn i* no lorwr hkHrr   >* ••■ *«t*»»«U »»»■>.■«***■*»-» &*i ;»>* o*;*»»*;
!,»I* of it** in lhat mjmeily.  JWiety in ttm\«\\«\, <***»» H**fct<* <■••. °™ «* lh« "»*MM «p«n tdw\*»
whether it want* or not, to fwragnix" t »».«•• rt«-t!»>» «»!■ country, recently liwrt*! nwit Kltl* Umf-
wtiu nr- Iw!,.ik. l»ut the »|»l<«f«t who U *ttnt*ttt\l«* '"» «•» W •nv«U»P» wf *mploy«9i which .It-
to .Irifr »\m« m * l*ekiwljt*i<*» and r**i«w.l num.j*•■*«* ,,ow I^««* Co*»*ro, an ancient Venetian,
t„r, tni'kmv ti,** **t*uutm *,>**\ tM.-kU>uv tluv «v«vy  "^ *» *» ^ V*™ ftW h? ^tmmiw <mh> 2R
wan who ti^mxxen th* dnt*wi nnA o1ilijr*»ioii< toitJottiifM of food Mch diy,   Th» in pmlmbly » «H»li-
t'Fnh'n> inxoUi'H, nuurwr or lj»t<>r j* rrif-jrult-d io ih^i «•*>«' hint t« »hi« "i'od." tntttVotin i\**> « »-.-.;tt*-tH.»» j
hmp »t '%n*x W«n«" «nd Wtem   Thn nnlon manfo* wif*» i* deemid •dftoaWe and tk»\ it in wull j
whtx look«* for »w fhlnf* in.inraHaMv fwwiMwdUttr Ihi-m Io lwgin training down to lh« ^iun<*}
of «n ii4«h»l*nt tempmnient and m^ttt m find Hw| *«**-.   YnMAf if Mr. Oorntm «n«i mme ttt hh\
ttme <&ira«4mtti<» in other*. :i»luic «dfi»in**m wm: mmptfitsA to stand fur Ihi
lUny ***! iwu, however, arc inclined to ftt j drivimr m*i r»»hiuH lUV «Hk*»»:lwwiI iui^u *U,k».
denpniHtMii »h.-n Wwy h«ftP nf th<> "hn«1tln'(t" ttt] tmrrnttny* they wntlld 1M& wmMnrnh]* mon- food I
•••lllnf off ot n *.nb*.   Rven thteu* nt rtmng per-11«» h«**«|» ii|» their eiwrgy t©ba i» fit«omlilbu l*» jiro.
«ma1ttie« will |*mlt themwlr« t« <-rit^lie and i dm* wealth fnr tha maH» elaa«.-<1eveian«l I'ili.
Mindewn their Vadem    TM« i« nrdh'mt more nr'^en.
•w*******-—rf*—
AU theee are guaranteed pure, wholesome drink*,
while the Sgg drinks are particularly nutritious
If you have not enjoyed one of our lc* Cream Sundaes you have missed one p; the most delicious ef
Confections,,
Visit Ihe Hew Stove which is complete to the smallest detail.
E. SUDDABY
The Rexall Store
N.
Baaf Bolls •
Pork ftofitftt ftfum
Pork Sautasw
Froih Oookod Trlpo
lOo Ib.
18o lb.
IOo lb.
Utolb.
706 2 mi.
Every description of Sausage and potted
Meat made on the premises by Expert
We Kill The Finest Ranch
Fed Cattle Kf*" r -^?-^*^^y^^^^^^??*?^^^^^?»
1 /^ •
■ "-V-.
r(!
*'r --r^ti^'^v iVS'Yc->*"-.• .'•":>;-..- '   Xa--'- 7'"A7 A' .-7 y s^^^X^Tx'^AX^ • '. •.••*.
!/ -yXA-kiiA^-t-XX .;.- ~-"v:'..* ••<•*> -• >--■--  -■ "-    AAA' ■ •'. *^..;fc~>\r -: -~
r.-fg^^g'fC X^7rXft;X,X., ••^•,---T.-. '^'-- ; r^-..-;y ^-■•■AjAr^k.X'   .      -.
:'"*1>
^^>;*^ ♦<* ♦ <► ♦.<*-•♦ ♦;<*y ♦$»*► .♦♦- ♦ ■
THE DISTRICT! iaJDQER^^JNIE, B. 0., MAY 23, 1914.
♦"♦ ♦ ♦ «►'♦♦' ♦, ♦ ♦ ■
PAGE FITS
:♦<►,♦♦ ♦''•*
' ^ ♦-♦ ♦ '♦ '♦ ♦♦♦ ♦"♦-♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
'■♦'♦^.♦•> ♦'♦-♦.♦•
,  ♦=:-,;      BELLEVUE NOTES        7*4*
■>>♦/- ,.   *,, Byf'Vexatut"'  ''-.   - ■' ♦
■:^ .^- .•;-■•'"■.-■- i- ■;♦
,--♦..♦•♦-♦- ♦ ♦..♦«♦;♦.♦ ♦ ♦ ♦
A-XSXX'.'-"■•-'  :'    '   •'' .  '     ~       --''I
■.. v-Mrt, Allan Hamilton-and family left
*~; camp lou' Saturday.for her -home' rJa
'•■Wes<vll'l*,r:N,;S: \ -,-- '_//-:   "v -;.
-1: Quite > hage crowd -went to Prank
,; oh""Saturday, to take lu the gam© be*
.-.tween-Hlllcrest and Prank, ;--, ■
."• ©illy-.■Evane^'-the livery man, has
;, purchased the lot next to the Southern
•-*. Hotel ana -will mpve-hls livery ban*
:yto that «lte.
c   B. Merlin Is now occupying theMwr-
ber -chair at Cole's popl room..-
Oharlie -Carlngton, an old' timer of
-tills campi' ^lew In this week from
jthe States."
•"• iMlss Mary -Beasley has severed her
connection w-ith. the ^Bellevue .Hotel
and Intend*taklngo vacoiUon;
*"' iMri Delaney) iShn -BleetTtclan' at. the
Bellevue mine, has severad. tats con-
'■ section, with tlie company and taken'a
similar, position at Frank.      .
The Lawn Tennis Club has been
3>usy fixing up the skating .rink for a
: tennis oourt
Miss.Shone; the-matron'of the Win-
; era'. HoepUal, Coleman, ,1s spending a
; few days wltih her "sister, Mrs. Robert
^'Erans.
" -X E. Hagg<..wio was. injured' In *he
mines 6ome time ago, went through an
operation for internal troubles this
week ana Is doing as well as can <be
. expected..' """
, >vlA fire," that came near wiping out
thejxdty of.iBellevue, was.discovered
at'the.rear of. one of the business
-blocks.    :
1  Cyr'and^Smith's batcher team made
a bound tor liberty on Friday, ibroke
. up. the rig and badly, hurt the driver.
After being attended by the doctor he
was able.'to'proceed 'home."
" iThe Bellevue band gave a .concert
-.In Bellevue on Sunday. v -
»Mr. Harry Orr, the manager of Cyr
,• )T-h*giPlt Committee reported having
seen .the imanagement lnjregard\tp' too
mlany: qew" men -iavdng Sjeen «e£ on.
since  we ,r«lar*ted -. to". wj>rk;~' oausing
♦ ♦ ♦► ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦
of work, but .when -they learned the
state of affairs here they were very
disappointed and quickly bade us
goodbye. ' -
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
•much -tlnue to toe .lost owing 'W'so    1 Notwithstanding'"the-' scarcity   of
way fuH <^ut^9, but'.we'.j^ess it wiH ~" *„fi8  £   ^   camP   ^or   several
be. ^edled'by^the,time,these lines SJued to
are in ,prlnt. r .■;-■:■      "...-',•    n  „nr7i"Th"
iprint
r -A motion tp^adjourn^cdncluded our
usual lengthy .session.,       *\   -'.",'.-
LETHBRIDGE NOTES
iv
and Smith's ibutcher shop, has "been
laid' up for Ute '.past week with a 'blood
poisoned tand.
•Borai, to Mr. and Aire. Harry David-
eon, ,on Saturday, a son. Mother and
child doing well." '-'-*' j£
'Mr.-William'"Goodwin returned to
camp on Sunday after a week's 'prospecting. -.'.-■-_
- (Mr. Geo. -Bateman -received word
?tWs week thiit his brother-had 'been
. killed in -the Old Country.   '  .
An. Italian ehoe maker froin Maple
Leaf "Is erecting a store'In the camp.
He, will jbe, ready to, receive, orders for
-ghO-B* trtan tuny -nar* ■nf_Jli«LlHgaa-j*n-A.
Ttewdnyn. .,  -•7"--.  . .'.;   •*   '"..
.   After n few weeks absence trom
the Ledger, we will again endeavor to
.keep our fellow readers p-OBted as to
conditiona here.
Slnoe our last notes appeared we
liave hod the -pleasure of seeing all
our District ottlcers and International
Board iMember Rees. We also have
bad tbo opportunity of enjoying all
(bat nature had to offer for the last
.three weeka^ owing to tiiis, company'e
<leslre to inatttute new methods of
■working, to apMe of what tbe tgree-
ment nnyn, But we are now hack at
work, having gained all points tn dispute, and we members of Local 431
take thia opportunity of thanking all
tfaOM wbo ln any way hdped m fnthe
; atUUnlnc of <kir ends.
Otir meeting convened ab usual with
the werfdest in tbe chair .before a
fair crowd of Interested wortcert.
The mtnutea of our -previous regular, and epeda! oeitlnis were adopted
ae read. Oorreepondence from Boon*
taryfieHamr, of «he Alberta Federation ot Ifcbor. giving ua a •aminary
of their doings during the la* three
monthe, wm ordered .filed. A letter
(rom the Chicago Federation of. Labor, leeUhf oar co-opemtlon In get-
tli|< the eentencea commuted of the
Iron and -Structural Workers who
were heavily sentenced some time
ago, bol even organised labor draws
geographical lines to limit their own
usefulness, atKt Just when we «ere beginning to think otherwise.
Committees' Reports
•The Measuring Committee's reports
were accepted aa 0. K. They appai*
enily have an easy time for once.
The Relief Committee found It ab-
walntely aect*»ar> lo Ilnhteu oue ot
our brother's burden, aa K had be.
eome more than he rould bear, ae his
source ot credit bad been cut off. Develop yonr memory, boys.    „,
______________________S___^_______m
'- Th^work aroun-4 the mines is very
dull, only. two. daya a -week, but we
hope they will' take a turn for the bet-
ter soon.
/The "funeral "of W. S. Pearson, late
court stenographer, was held this af-
.ternooh. from his residence on. 13th
Street. North. The merabere of the
picOice department acted as pall bear-
ens In honor of the deceased. The
police are also defraying the funeral
expenses. District 18. U. M. W. of
A., wae represented by Vice President
Graham and J. Larsen.. Interment
was made in the public cemetery.
Rev, A. Ci' Bryan conducted the ser-
vice.'  " - - '
Before" a record^ crowd the Xorth
Lethbridge United >nd the Ckllies met
In a league football game In Adams
Park last Thursday night. It was. a
hard and test gdine all through, the
N. L. U. liavlng the best of the glame,
with no score at-half time. On resumption the N.-L. U. -went away with
ts. dash and only for the agility of Mclntyre in goal they would have scored.
Shots were put iii from all angles and
wdtb.true aim, but the Ca|lie goalkeeper wlajs lirilieataible. After having the
best of the .play all through and potting at the Callle goal foj fully twenty
minutes,' the-Callle forwards got away
with a rush. Eastbiv heating the de-'
fence, passed, to Lintiing, who seized'
tihe opening and' put a low shot, the
ball goihg in., the fax., corner out of
reach of Dunlop. ' Thore being only
len minutes .to go this reverse made
the United increase- their efforts to
score, tout without avail, as Mclntyre
gave a classy exhibition of goalkeep-
Ing and frustrated all .efforts. The
game ended 1-0 "la favor of the Calllee.
A pretty wedding.was solemnized
at St.'. 'Patrick's Church, -when Mr.
John -Seamon and Miss Annie Koste*
lentfk were united in.marriage. The
"533 customj was carrfiSJ ouTIn full, the
wedding party., going in .procession
from the home of the' bride to the
Church. Rev: Father Mlhwegan tied
the nuptial knot.     *.-.{"
Rev,.C. Atkins left on Friday to
take up his abode In Saskatchewan.
Before leaving he wae presented with
a tpurse from the I. .0.' 0. T., with
good wishes for his future ln his new
home.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦      BEAVER MINES N0TE8      ♦
management of the I-yric
entertain, the sports with
a good show of-movies and a free
dance on -Saturday nights, but to. the
great disappointment of the youngsters especially It has 'been announced
that the hall, will be closed until pros-
ipects become brighter.
(Mrs.--Dave Muir, wife of the pit
wss, went to .pincher Creek hospital
on ITuesday of last week to undergo
an operation., We-are .pleased to say
that (Mrs, Muir is about alright again
and eicpected home before the end of
Ihe present .week. •
-There has been quite an epidemic
of surgical, operations amongst the
married ladies of Beaver recently.
Want of regular employment amongst
the bread winners is said to be res-
ponsible for most of the maladies.
The painters finished decorating
the new saloon over a week ago and
that edifice looks exceedingly*' well
from the outside at present. Those
who were Inside last Thursday evening were treated to an impromptu entertainment. A young man, formerly
employed at the mine, came Into camp
in hopes of finding a doctor to extract
a tooth which,- according to his statement, prevented him from either
sleeping or eating for over a weeK
As the nearest doctor to be found
lived at Pincher Creek, John Lough-
ran, who ts a man of many parts, volunteered to cure the sufferer without
■removing the offending tuesypeg, and
in u few moments had the patient In
that stage of hypnotism known as
anaesthesia. After removing the pain
by deadening the nerve while the pa-
■tlent slept, he showed the audience
several hypnotic experiments, giving
•them a very Interesting performance
The subject, on finding himself cured,
was very grateful, and as he was
known to be up against it, a whip was
made which resulted in over $4.00 being handed to him. This and the cure
of his toothache sent him on his wav
rejoicing. .
Although .we feel an apology is due
to the readers of -Beaver notes for
their non-appearance in . last week's
issue, yet we can only repeat the old
■tale-^missed the mail—and as the
stage does not always leave at the
same time, this is easily done:
A gentleman who was going to Pincher Creek in hie auto car at the time
however,, undertook to deliver the
goods at the post office, hut must ?iave
forgotten.    .
The Rev. Hamilton; of Beaver jlnd
Mountain IM11I, has resigned hlft_naA
tre■ saying Ihe,will 'be unaWe to be in
Coleman yoa., M&y 21th to administer
•the "sa^ramtent of confirmation to the
Catholic "children of the parish of
Cglemaif and other towns in the Pass.
On- Sunday, the 17th, Hia Lordship
Bishop Pinkman, of Calgary, administered *he'sacrament of confirmation
in the Anglican Church of Coleman to"
eleven of '.the congregation (seven
adults and four little girle). In the
evening His Lordship Journeyed to
Hillcrest and opened a new Church
and dedicated it to St. Francis. About
forty ladies anil gentlemen accompanied him.to Hillcrest. .Mrs. E. Willfeuns
sang a solo In her usual masterly
style. His Lordship returned to Coleman and-left-on Monday for Calgary.
•Mrs. Samuel Shone, who has been
sojourning for several months, has
-returned and renewed acquaintances
in Colemian.     -
iMr. and (Mrs. Alex. Morrison were
passengers, on Tuesday night's train
for Calgary and points east
'Mr. Eckersly. who has had charge
of the 41 IMeat Market In Coleman,
has vacated that position and proceeds to Edmonton on Thursday, the
21st. His place is being taken by
Mr. Howe, of Frank.
The old hackneyed phrase, "Nothing doing," sums up the Industrial history of Beaver for the-present, and
tbe catnip Is test approaching that of
"Sweet Auburn, the deserted village"
made famous by Oliver Goldsmith In
hie celebrated poem. With the exception .of the mine officials and the few
men employed about the boilers, almost all employees bave lelt the camp
and are seeking fresh outlets for their
labor power. Amongst others who
left the camp last week waa Wm.
Davies, who acted as local secretary
here for three months last summer
but resigned .when offered the position of Umber boss In the mine. Bill
has gone to Join his wife and family
in North Yorkshire, England, and as
he Intends spending the remainder of
his time on mother earth In the land
of hts nativity, we wish him a safe
Journey nnd success,
Joe ftmlth, bsriber and pool parlor
manager, paid a visit to Coleman last
week, but finding the place praottolal-
ly dead he packed his grips and left
on Tuesday in hopes of rinding a crib
where cash Is more plentiful.   As a,.„.
barber Joe was considered one of the mb- *"d purchased a thoroughbred
b*»t i\n<I being a mvirtclan of no mean
ability he mads many friends nnd was
torai^autles aTfer~2? years' missionary
service in the west. For some, time
past, gossips have been .whispering
that the elders and „ their minister
have not pulled together in ohuroh
harness-very agreeably, and that some
of the spiritual advisers held the Idea
that a younger parson would draw
larger congregations. He was well
respected by all who knew him, and
although his sermons might not possess that power of fluency or elegance
of oratory which some clergymen acquire or are gifted with, yet his kindly
disposition and genuine personality
more than made up for these shortcomings.
Doctor Connor visited Beaver last
Tuesday and conveyed Mrs.'Dave Muir
from Pincher Creek hospital to her
home. We are pleased to note that
■Mrs, .Muir has quite recovered trom
the effects of the operation she under-
went a fortnight ago.
John tougbran. looal secretary, Is
spending a week or eo at Coleman
with Mrs. Graham, his daughter.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ COLEMAN NOTE* ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
John Ijougfamn is spending a two
•weeks' vacation from Beaver with bis
daughter, Mrs. Jonathan Orabam.
0. Lowe, who was spending a two
weeks' holiday from Spokane with hie
brother-in-law, James Lamb, returned
on Saturday night's flyer.
Wllllnm llaysom was attending' a
District Board meeting from Saturday
until 'Monday night along with Vlfce
President Graham from Coleman.
Tom Merrlmsn made a bustoeee
(Hn to Lundbreck on Saturday, tho
TENDERS WANTED
o For band tor sports to be held In
Coleman on July lst, 1914, under the
Order of Owls. %Apply to John Mitchell, Box 105.
MICHEL NOTES
Michel vs. Corbin
- These two teams met on Saturday
last in the league match. This being
the first-match for Corbin, considerable interest was taken in it and when
the players turned out a good crowd
of spectators were 'present. Corbin
had a good number of followers from
their own town. Following were the
teams: -Michel—Moores, goal; Hamp.
ton and Partridge, backs; Weaver,
Whitehouse and Roberts, half-backs;
Brown, (Murray, Sudworth, Ball and
Holmes, forwards. Corbin—Walker,
goal;. J. Clarke", W, Harlin. backs; J.
Strang, W. .White, Ed. Jackson, half
hacks; A.'Hayden, D. Stbttbart, T.
Overton. R. Stobbart, W. Llghtfoot,
forwards.   J. "Sands, referee.	
The game started full of excitement,
Corbin soon Ibeing the aggressors and
their play and skill.will prove their
position among the finest leaih'ir
chasers that have been seen In this
Pass, Michel played a much better
game than the week previous, and
will soon be in their old form. .When
Uie whletle blew honors were divided,
one goal each.
<Mr. Graham. Harry Massey, R. Gar-
butt, Tom Owen and ladles were visitors down here last Saturday taking
In the football game and renewing acquaintances.
•Mr. Tom Williams was down here
last week end making his usual inspection of the minds.
New arrivals from the Old Country
were M. D. (Macdonald, surveyor, and
J. Trought (London), They took
twelve men to tbe coal prospects up
the Elk river.
A farewell party was given on <Mon-
day at the Venesia Hotel, Nfctal, to
Miss Emma Simmons, who Is leaving
the town to be married to Mr. Nell
Taylor. The marriage will take -place
at Edmonton and their future home
will be in the far north. Happiness
nnd prosperity we wish both of them.
' The mines were idle from Thursday
ll p. ro. to 7 a. m. Monday.
A good dance and supper was given
on Mondny night In Crahon's Hall.
Kverybody enjoyed It
iMt. James Tonhey, Ben Ball, J.
Newman and T. James were visitors
to Fernie on Tunsday for examination,
three for 3rd class, honors; James
Tonhey for 1st class, honors.
iMr. Arthur Hopwood was down here
at the Trites-Wood store for a few
stay in town unless il* was the gentle
man who had ihe honor to ride as far
as tlie coal chutes with him.
The football committee, thinking
pay day the opportune time to raise
the shekel.s. staged a married vs. single'game. A hotly contested game
ended In favor of the benedicts hy a
score of two to one. Adamson and
Pow for the family men and McKelvle
for -the .stiffs were the goal scorers.
The collection suffered considerably
by the result, the single part of the
congregation being too aggravated to
cough up. The married portion, while
tickled to death and willing, naturally
had other' and more pressing demands
upon their surplus wealth.
A .party of local Knights of Pythias
were visitors to Fernie on Tuesday
night to exchange fraternal greetings
with the members of Fernie lodge,
and report having a good tlmu
The late arrival of the cash on pay
day kind of disorganized business for
the day. Long faces were very much
in evidence all day Saturday. The
power of money wae thoroughly realized by we liberty loving British, and
unBritish, wage slaves.
There seems to be some doubt in
Hosmer as to which day will be kept
as Victoria Day. Well, we ought to
do honor to Good Queen Vic. boys,
whether it's Saturday or Monday. One
can hardly realize how much these
-patriotic holidays mean to the working class. Between the Good Old
Queen, Edward the Peacemaker and
dear Uttle George, we certainly have
something to be thankful for.
Corbin and Hosmer meet Owe don't
know where) on Saturday in a league
fixture. Stories of Corbln's prowess
have reached our ears and the Hosmer players' stout hearts quake with
fear (I don't think) as a consequence.
We are given to understand Corbin's
ground will not be ready for a week
or two and the same is to be played
on neutral ground. .Whether in Michel, Coleman or Fernie Is not known
at the time of writing. Hosmer team I
will be chosen from the following:
Clark, Wardrop, White, Balderstone.
Burk. Richards, McKelvle. Pow, Bur-
Unson. Pruett, McGovern and Watt.
A lunch counter, a la Ingram's, Fernie, has been opened ln° the Pacific.
Anyone wanting hot pies, sandiwiches,
beans, coffee, etc., can learn more
about same by investigating.
'Hosmer'B birth rate took a consider-
■wbie^ump-dWiB^tEe"pa"srwTOk7^oud
mammas and papas galore being'the
result. (Say, Roosevelt, watch Hosmer grow.)
'Tis a strange coincidence that this
paternal government of ours who can
do no wrong seem to own a certain
bridge on a road leading to—well,
where I need not say. The history of
the making of this road Would certain-
ly be Interesting to say tbe least; uny-
<how they are making no hones about
wbo the material belongs to.
Jim Lanier, rope rider in No. 2
mine, received a badly crushed hand
while following his employment on
Thursday last.
"Arising out. of a discussion on the
running abilities of two of our local
celebrities, a race was stagea ou Victoria Park on Monday evening before
a fair sized attendance. The younger
contestant won, but the crowd wanted
to know why old IIIH looked round as
he would have won if he had kept
going.   "Good old Lanky."'
Regal White Wyandottes
Dorcas (24 egg) Strain
A few early hatched cockerels for sale in the fail
Write
Wm.ANTROBUS
Coleman     -   Alberta
Coleman
Realty Co.
insurance Agents
COAL CREEK NOTES
The mines were Idle up here from
:t p. m. Saturday until 3 p. m, Tuesday.
Saturday 'was pay day. A large
large contingent of Creekites Journeyed to town to partake or the amusements offered by the city.
Mr. end Mrs, Lowther Morton and
family left camp on Tuesday for a
sojourn In the Old Country. "It may
be for years or It may be forever."
Owing to Frank Football Club coming to play up here on Monday ln their
league engagement with Coal Creek,
there will be no match played on Saturday as per fixture card.
Wanted, 500 people to make use of
(lie grand stand on sports "day. Tlie
kiddles aro wearing that anticipatory
smile as the day approaches.
Vj&Ay Bannister has left cnmp to
take up a position In the band along
with his father at some place In Saskatchewan.
A large crowd of people assembled
In Victoria Park on Sunday afternoon
to -Aline** the practicf «ame ot In-
f rosse   between    Pernio   and   Conl
Now is  the time
for protection
You cannot afford
to lose when we
can   protect   you
Agents for Oliver Typewriter
Co. Machines at 17 cents per
day.
HILLCREST
Opera House
Bright, interesting, educational subjects. Projection
clear and sharp. No flicker;
no eyestrain. Music by Hillcrest Orchestra.
Doors open 8 o'clock; start 8.30
Admission - 25c & 10c
HLILCREST
ORCHESTRA
Open or Engagements
.  for
Dances
Concerts
Etc.
UP-TO-DATE MUSIC
C. V.EDWARDS, SECRETARY
HILLCREST ALBERTA
Phone 74, ring 2
Stephen Ta Humb 1 e
Furniture, Hardware, China,
Stationery, etc.
OI.D COUNTRY PERIODICALS
BELLEVUE
Alberta
very .popular in this district.
Pat Corrigau, one of our old timers,
blew In from Burmli loot week aeeon*
pealed by othtr two mlnere In seareb
Values that make a trip to Ouimettes
big stores on Saturday worth while
Ten only Qnj Tweed 2-pie-re Anita, niton 3fi. 37, 3K; worth
♦10.00 to I12JW.  Haturday $5.00
MmV Colored Wonted ami Blue fler&i* Suite, special for Hnt-
urday :~-
All lioiu wort!* mm Helurxlay fSftOO
All flfilfK wvirt*   nm RfiHml**   IRAft
AU Unit* worth   lft.00  Hatnrriav   1100
AM Mil* worth   MOO  Xftttirriny    7.60
BOTT GLOTHIHO
Wejuive « full ranee of the   ctlebrafal UOH BBAHD
0L0VBI1I0; witH donM* bn*** end ,lnn*i*l,. c^t   lm* it). . i*l,ir,tt
tor tvte bojn.      -•    ■*
Good Bug* of Bop' Knfekm and Woocw Panta
1MVI0TW IHOBS ABI TBI MBIT OOOD SB0K8
BOMALWO HATS All TUB BUT RATI
We uro ftfenta for botli thee* line* in Cokman
With «*eiy dollar'a worth of flood* yon buy for em* we gxx*
yuu a TICKET, TU*. «lv*wi»t« taken |tiaw on Juni> bth. awl
the bolder of tbe witmtef tieket my hare their thom ot a
BIOS OBAOB >I0?OUI or b WM* 9f WBOl DIHHl* SET
W. L OUIMETTE
Coloman        .        Alberta
dayi.   Arthur !• taking hia family to 	
mnro.   Tom Intpwi-s to malic toum ox- -Fttnit, bavins aeturwl n .wwlUou «t,-rrt*k.   it wan il-wmwi n«lvi»anu' to
cunloni to the North Pork thle aum- the atom up there. | m|x „,, «,„ tmm fttl), n ver) „clUw
I Mr, 8am Moore*, from ColMi-mn.jifnnio *«» witness i-n-JIns in ft v,',n
waa vIiUIdk down here for a f*w for the purple and itold aid* by « to I.
■"*•• On   Tueaday   evening   the   Trltee-
• Wood Co.'* leam look frliht nnd *at-
♦♦ loped away down back Ooyoto Hiroi.t.
remittitur In general rnnnnlmp or Uio
conveyance.   Cyril Mlchell, who »««
^ ^ on the rig at the time, wan novoroly
-.. bnileed.
The station limt Friday nlulit wm
mer.
An up-to-date (hooting gallery ia
about to be erected in the Grand
Union billiard pariora under the man*
alternant of Dan Rogera.
The Waetern Canadian (fropemtlve
Society it running a -prite eompotl-
tion at preeent. The prlae l» a hand*
tome feraae bedatead.
Oeorge Strnano pulled oot on Fri-,
toy. the 15th. for a holiday In Italy.
Ob iatarday, the l«th, a football
matoh took place In Coleoian between
the married and elngte men. A vary
good end dnteraettaf mm wae playod
la which eaeb aide teomd two toala
Kor tke married men W. Cowan aad
MeOweM eoored: for the tingle men,
J. Kelloek and .1, MeCtnler.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
HOtMIR NOTft
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
An   fiK-otuiter   bat wean   .1.   Vatea*
H. G. GOODEYE CO. Ltd,
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will funiUh your hotmo from cellar to (turret and at bot.
turn jjiittfc.   c»ii. -Aine. jihotift or wire.   All orders given
prompt attention.
If you art Mtltfltd, ttll ethin.
If not aatiifltd, tell ua.
Coleman
Alberta
*■,"'« ■*»*». ««m*»w iigma and ranoi
■**!»»/..t-a,.
roartoua merriment when   oheti, ob!,|K>nui»liw hhM in a viworr for hi*
>e»: oh! ie*:   The great moaul, Vllly j prlckl) roajeoty.
In town. Anyhow It waa a mighty abort Vatdenr- In the Mlobrtou. itmound
££ Kj .iS!'"II!2 J? Jb*  "flfrVW* •< Ho.m*r. wberw Charile hat ae*
clock. «»4 tto cloek didn't atop either. Irnred work ia th, mlnea.
Tbo  grnat ;i»lly' had  notified  the!   Arlalug out *d « *keiUwte. m*A* he-
| team eat tfowa to tea and refreah-i Mav en* »h# Wrh ennt -nf xivx^Z"',.^
meat* ftjwrtHM uy sWi. an* Mra. ttm* • tmderttanrt. would net pemtr of «
SttoT *—*****-« *« """iJJfJl X ^L^ti^irSS* «»ifcere en Mondey ■«,. «• tre pi* J.
Aft httemotkMal main* k*. w» i°   '? ^", "ho" ga*>nr» '» **"*•' Uo report that owing to the klndnon
    *••-*-   -    **•*.■•■«   ttmota  M*wM(fi«tn wm t*n*e Vtrni* tn tt «. m. for!
gioekr-meke and aleo, yoa my be I Coal Creek ae« th* return train in th.'
wire, all tke toTcmm.it ataadarijavenlng will be mn at 5 i« „ m. in-'
bearer* of the cIt)-from the lord chief \ acrnd of 4 n m. .. um.«i Ti*r. will ■
juaUre to tbt- official Hy eoteherM** « t^ann mnt,K ,.„„ ,.,„„ „
tber bad hlrwl rtire tojcarry tkem t»;r*nh, klck^rff »b«ril> an.r mnrb1
Slewa and you «an bet year tintype >il*,   rbere wit} «t» h* e ^w hold i
thoy bvl ao*<* pih.«r WfllnH.y  ^.u'./v ' 1,.  l4l- ( |lrtl  »,„„  „,„„ ,
to dtteuta.   Ftret tkere wat the eld af tlw PVMttnti tint,
rt*aA-   -ai.il,.fl   tbt* rlvt*r h;itt     i*)'r1    .1", •    l        il.
*MWommie,tot*pmttnt***m:nh0 it, 1,   II m thw Job j« FwJ.'.lita €n£        *"*"""'
\ titty.   PR-r-PEn
Apropo* ot the tport« 10 be ktM up
■armnati/t
r,th between r#reaehiallvet of fleet
Und aad Haglaai.
■Mian ftratketa, tmnUnt room
nnrw for the pant eft montht la the
Minor** Hoapltal. left Oolema fer
Wlaalpt* oa Wodae^y algM% pao.
N
F. M. THOMPSON CO.
Phone 25
•Thw Quality Store"
Blairmore, Alta.
Mkm a. Sbeoew w|m» hae been onn
leave of obotmro for «ti tomtit In i
'ti<    .i.|.;i|< «n
rnwrn-nrltir •
SS.'J
the Mteee** llmtdul tnm tke ttr.h
ofjao on. and to on.   Howeror. mny rtelll ba keU. .fa,. M*»v* r.n^ «iu
mto. Joeeok MarMtt wht* %__, 1L__ • IWIb! ,il0t thm *»TIU*a J*** ^ i»• «<»eo to nnocoentol r^Hm
otra^W We^jt^t^,i»rc,mWna   to  ap*^   •   whwM   day     in* ttorm tnm* koo« .n«n kmVi.\
waieo, om nmttit ttUUi In CW^, a&«a, no doubt, til loeal aaatt wMinroond «WJy
ma oo ****** tk«. mw ■ h„ , *mll. .   r ,*■,. Irja, ^ tu lL .J J^w-
witn  taeh   ttobhtrlag
ron«Utui«nfy,   ilv*rf   In
an
IvO
Tht nm people la CoUma h#M.^^   a
o rorr nmyoymeo dorm tn ttrtoney-t over hi» r
«JS»«?T!.,T^ -* ***** ttoottotnnntenent at tke emit   We k*v*
vmamt <• <ko Mor. ftdbot t*d-f*-\ ht%net "f»nr during We an toe ttiort
Mwrtrtiff't *T"ttJi titirtif"
beepfttt o« Friday     rewlr.tr to!
•ome mttttnd#>niMftrlintr Hnn   *,** no
■rtmrnyooon aiwaltJat bt* %a4 the *t '
wttao proeod too «m«h f«r h<r. Ilcaa
ei to reyoetv howtrer, eh* l* progrx-en-
lm fcvorably.
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, CROCKERY
and Everylliing in Shoes
Our Grocery stock is complete with only the
rnntr»»rt   -hf**a*dr*        n  r..tt  t- .        r tr       i    a-*
•   **..«...*-.»*.      u tun   k»M*w w»  4 k-wati  I'iUIUl
and Vegetables always on hand.
Fresh Strawberries and Pineapples For
Saturday
Sole affenUfor "INVICTU8,*' "RIQAL,"
"K" make HN6 SHOES and "LKCKIE"
MINIS SHOES
hf«'ii j-iwr tK-kett from mir m*h r»<»i»t^r.   Thrv
.»r»v wnr;h .*« j»»r n-nt  t-unu  uhfii.v«r tir<»MMtti'«i
*^»mMietif»iic May let. '
The Stor* That SAVES You Mousy
x,%$
:si$i
-^
t*J*i%
kft-t -
'.  '^'i9|
X-'&
->. '.. :*,.i
-.--.S3
:'Y'-'S
•' '  '..It
m
"-•is
Si   .\*&
- .j-JS
■*
--X}
y$
~t
■i
-.*?
>3
-■'■§
jsE
i.9* ts*-'*,•.. -J*
"\> ""-*-•
'•779->A\
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGBE, FERNIE, B.O., MAY'23, IMl
The Corporation of the City of
Fernie
BY-LAW No. 149
A tBy-law to assess, levy aad collect
the coat ot the construction, as a work
of Local Improvements pf> permanent
sidewalks under 'By-law Number 146
and .to raise upon loan the necessary
monies to pay the cost thereof.
WJiBREAS the" Municipal Council
of the Corporation of the City of Fernie did by By-law Number 146 authorize the construction as a Local Im-
iprovemeut, of permanent sidewalks,
upon portions of the following streets
in the said City of Fernie, namely:—
Mackenzie, Victoria, Pellatt, Howland, McPherson, Dalton, Bethune,
Lindsay. Mason, Chi'pman, Nicholls,
Morrice Avenues, and Walmsley, Gem-
mill, Wood, Cox, .Hanson, McEvoy,
.Thompson, Rogers, Drinnan and Da-
vies Streets*
AND WHEREAS the Council deferred making assessment until al\ sudh
work had been carried out and the
actual cost ascertained;
AND WHEREAS the cost of the
work or improvement as shown by the
Joint Report of the City Engineer and
Assessor is Four thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and
eighty cents (14538.80), and such
amount is required to be assessed
against the owners of the real property benefited by suoh Improvement;
AND WHEREAS tflie report of the
said City Engineer and Assessor has
been adopted by thc said Council;
AND  WHEREAS the said Council
of such costs, namely: -Four, thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and eighty cents ($4538.80) and
It ls intended to repay same out of
the proceeds of the loan to be raised
•hereunder;
AiND WHEREAS as .the said Coun-
oil has decided to distribute the ■payment of tbe cost bf such works .proposed to (be assessed hereunder over
■a period of four (4) years and to borrow the monies necessary to defray
such cost upon the special rates levied hereunder upon the lands and improvements benefited upon the guarantee of the Corporation at huge;
AND WHEREAS the total frontage
upon the said work of local Improvement of the real property and portions
of the real .property Immediately bene-
fited is Eight thousand, six hundred
and nine and one half feet (8009.5 ft.)
and the cost chargeable to the property benefited Ib as aforesaid the sum of
F iur thousand, five hundred and thirty-eight dollars and eighty cents
($4538.80);
AND WHEREAS the Corporation ot
the City of Fernie desires to pass a
By-law for the purpose aforesaid;
THEREFORE the Municipal Council of the Corporation of tlie City of
Fernie, enacts as follows:—
1. -That the real property Immediately benefited by the said work of
local improvement shall be that which
is   particularly   mentioned,  &et  forth
has raised from the Home Bank of sand described in the schedule follow-
Canada on a temporary loan the whole j ing:—
SCHEDULE
Showing the real property immediately benefited and the proportion in which
Mie Assessment is made on per foot frontage
Rate
Name of Owner                     Lot Block
Dr. D. Corsan       *12 1
Mrs. C. M. Corsan        13 1
J. F. Rudnicki         14 1
Gladstone Local Union             2 0
Dobson & Willingham ..3 6
J. W. Dobson     2-3 of 4 6
Mrs. Eliz. Todd    1-3 of 4 6
Chas. P. Hill            5 G
A. J. Farquharson      Pt. 6 6
Ellen Turner '..    Pt. 6 6
Wm. Hawthorne      Pt.G 6
City of Fernie           7 6
Francis White           8 6
District Ledger           9   . .'6
District Ledger Pt. 10 6
- C. N. P. Coal Co., Ltd. .. Pt. 10 6
Wm. Hawthorne           2 7
A. T. Hamilton           3 7
C. A. Wilkes           4 7
Methodist Church           5 7
Methodist Church           6 7
Methodist Church          7 7
C. E. Lyons  S% 8 7
•  Mrs. A. Eliey  .'NVj 8 7
Sam Graham            9 7
Mrs. Leila Ross         <*10 7
Alex. Macnell         11 9
A. C. Liphardt   12 ^9_
ISTTrMuirneaTr"."."Tr.-:7r7     13 v-
J. D. Quail        14 9
J. D. Quail          15 9
G. F. Johnson         16 9
Alex. Beck         17 , 9
S. F. Wallace        18 9
S. F. Wallace        19 9
S. F. Wallace         20 9
City of Fernie         12 14
Mrs. Geo. Bella     .    2 19
Kootenay Telephone Lines        3 19
.   John Hunter Estate          4 19
Emma Kirkpatrick E% r> 19
Mary'McFarquhar  W% 5 19
Mrs. Marie Hoelzel          6 19
Ellz. -Campbell           7 19
W. F. Vance          8 19
Iaiibelle Wrlglesworth .,,        9 19
Mrs. W. J. Blunilcll         10 19
Angele Chnrdon          11 21
Angelo Chnrdon          12 21
J. II. Turney ,        13 21
J. B. Turney        14 21
Geo. W. Hadley        15 21
Archie iMnclenn         Hi 21
Al. niitzuto         17 21
Al. Rlwuto         18 21
Knights of Pythias       19 21
L, E. iMcDonald         20 21
Al. lUzziito           1 22
Al. HUzuto            2 22
R  V. Wnllnof ,.,        3 22
Jo*. Alello          4 22
Slii>nvootl Herchmer ....        6 22
flhorwoot! Hprclimrr ....         fl 22
Franclt White          7 22
Catherine Rohlehnud ....        8 22
Catherine Roblchaud ....       • 22
W. A. Inaram       10 22
Sophia tkwn        11 22
Catherine Morrison   Pt. 12 22
Oeorae Grnndln   Pt. 12 22
Frank Bean 1't.U' 22
per
Feet foot
front front
60
60
60
13.5
13.5
9
4.5
80
1
2
1
4
4
4
2
2
13.5
13.5
13.5
80
150
77.0
8
Total
.50c $30.00
.50
.50
.55
.55
.55
.55
.55
.75
30.00
30.00
7.42
7.42
4.95
2.47
44.00
, Annual Total
•Pay-   Payment ment
$9.00 $36.00
9.00   36.00
Name of Owner Lot
W. J. J. iMorrlson Pt. 13
Hugh <3arlile   14
Wm. Handley     15
Government   All
Jofcn Bean  1
Jdhn Bean  2      ,
John'Bean  Pt.3     *   *
M. A. Berlgan   'Pt. 3
George Barton   i
George Barton  5
I. E. Covert  6
Thomson & Morrison ... -.  .7
Neil McLean     8
Percy <Bean   '... 9
Philip Carosella   10
School Board    28 &
C. J. Digby  1
C. J. Digby  , .    2
P. Carosella   3
P. Carosella '.  4
P. Carosella  5
Emma Aider   1
ISmma Alder    2
P. V. James Estate •.  3
Oscar Erickson   4
Gee iHau  5
P.  Bombino     6
R. iMigale    7
•R. Oaravetta —'.  8
Sam Lee    9
Sam Lee   10
William <Bartou   11
William Barton   12
John Reid  ia
•Mike Guzzi  *  14
Tony Caravetta  : 15
George Loxton ,     1
George Loxton'  2
James Easton    %3
J. P. Bushel)    M&
Thos. Robertson   %4
Wm. Eschwig   %4
.5
6
7
. %8
• %8
:       fl
10
.  Pt.l
• 2
3
4
Block
22
22
■   22
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
ib
. li)
.55
.55
.55
.55
.60
.53%
.59%
.ii)
1.50
.75
3.00
3.00
3.00
1.50
1.50
7.42
7.42
7.42
44.00
80.00
40.42
21
9.00
2.23
2.23
1.48
.74
13.20
.23
.45
.23
,90
.90
.90
.45
.45
2.23
2.23
2.23
13.20
8.75 .59% 5.21
17.5 .59% 10.42
4      .75       3.00
1.2 1.00       1.20
1.2 M0 1.20^
Itvu xT2ir
4.00
2.12
1.56
1.56
3.12
.90
.36
.36
~rr£
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2 ]
1.2 1
1.2 )
60
13.5
13.5
13.5
40.25
40.25
84
17.5
.17.5
17
4
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
00
.00
.00
.10
oa
55
55
00
76
76
5 .76
1.50
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2,5
2.5
2.5
2.r.
5
5
5
fj
5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
68
34
34
»4
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.70
.54
.54
.54
.64
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
60.50
7.42
7.42
7.42
22.14
22.14
50.00
13.42
13.42
13.42
6.00
1.75
—rao"
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
.36
18.50
2.23
2.23
2.23
6.64
6.64
15.00
4.03
75
75
75
75
.75
,75
.75
.75
,75
.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1,75
1.75
1.75
1.75
1.75
36.83
18.41
18.42
18:41
.03
.03
.80
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.62
,52
.52
.52
.52
,52
11.05
5.53
5.53
5,03
36.00
8.90
8.90
5.93
2.97
52.80
.90
1.80
.90
3.60
3.60
3.60
1.80
1.80
8.91
8.91
8.91
52.80'
96.00
48.50
6.25
6,25
12.50
3.60
1.44
1.44
—j.t*4'
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
1.44
72.60
8.91
8.91
8.91
26.57
20.57
60.00
16.10
16.10
16.10
7.20
2.10
2,10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2,10
2.10
2.10
2.10
2.10
44.20
22.10
22.10
22.10
J. H. Wetherilt
A. F. Haddad	
Santa Pascuzzi 	
Percy H. Lewis 	
Valentine Oppl  	
Dorothy Hamilton  -.
Joe Taverna	
Sam Parks 	
P. Burns & Co., Ltd	
John J, George 	
P. R. Lundie  	
\vesteru   Canada   Wholesale Co	
Patsy Audia 	
Marion I. Ward 	
Miss Jessie L. Dobson
Wm. Newing  ....*.	
C. Ulfstein  	
Sam Lee" '	
Valentine Oppl  	
Fred Miller	
Mrs. S. Orr	
Margaret Kerr	
Jules Andre 	
Jules Andre	
Wm. McDermid	
Wm. Ku-mmer	
John Johnston	
Miss A. IM. Andrews	
Ching Wing Kee 	
W. G. Barclay 	
Sidney Gillett	
Thos. Griffiths	
Kennedy & Mangam	
Kennedy & Mangan .....
John T. Mangan...	
Mrs. Mary Palmer ......
Mrs. N. P. Wrigglesworth
Harry Willingham 	
'rartQimnr
RateV
•per
> Feet toot - -
•front front* fTotal
34      .54   ^18.42
68      .54 36.«3
68     .54 36,<B3
25A1080     .80 86.50
78-    .62 48.48
78     .t>2. 48.48
34      .63 24,46
34      .63. 24.4;7
78     ,64' 49.68
78      .63 43.83
10     .75 7.50
10     .75 7.50
10     .75 , 7.50
10     .75 , 7.50
10     .75 7.50
1181 .7t)
5      .83 4.13
5*    .83 4.13
5      .83 4.13
5      ,83 4,13
5     .83 4,13
36.5 .60 22-.12
41.5 .60 "26.00
41.5 .60 25.00
41.5 .60" 25.00
41.5 .6tt 25.00
41.5 .60 25.00
41.5 .60 25.00
41,5 .60 25.00
41.5 .60 25.00
116,5 .60 68.12
161.2 .55 88.68
95.7 .58 55.93
95.7 .58 v55.93
95.7 .58 55.93
81,2 .60 48.68
10     .75 7.50
10     .75 7.50
5      .75 3.75
5      .75 3.75
5      .75 3.75
5      .75 3.75
. 10     .75 7.50
5      .90 .   4.50
5      .90 4.50
2.5 .90 2.25
2.5 .90 2.25
5      .90 4.50
,5      .90 '4.50
41.5 .32.6 13.55
71.5 .20 ,15.71
• 41.5 .60 24.80
41.5 .60 24.80
9
10
G
7
8
9
10
. 1
2
3
4
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
1
25
25
25
25
25
25
35
<25
35
25
105
28A
29
29
29
29
29
32
32
32 .
32
32
32
'32
32
.32
32
33
32 .
32
32
32
33
33
33
- 33
33
33
33
34
34
34
34
34
34
36
36
36
36
36
36'
36
36
36 '
36
38
38
38
38
38
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
46
46
46
46
46
Annual Total
Pay-   Payment ment
5.53   22.10
11.05   44.20
11.05   44.20
\ Exempt
14.54   -58.17
14.54
7.34
7.34
14.90
13.15
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
2.25
'58.17
29.36
29.36
59.61
52.59
9.00
.9.00
9.00
9.00
9.00
827.44 248.23 992.93
1.24
1.24
1.24
1.24
1.24
6.64
7.80
7.50
7.50
7.60
'7.50
7. -50
7.50
7.50
20.44
26.GO 106
16.78 67
16.78
16.78
14.60
2.25
2.25
1.13
1.13
1.14
1.14
2.25
1.35
1.35
.68-
.68
1.35
1.35
4.07
4.71
7,44
7.44
4..96
4.96
4.96
4.96
4.96
26.64
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
30.00
81.74
41
12
67.13
67.13
58.41
9.00
9,00
4.50
4.50
4.50
*,50
9.00
5.40
5.40
2.70
2.70
5.40
5.40
16.26
18.85
39.76
29.76
41.5
41.5
41.5
41.5
41.5
41.5
68
68
68
68
' 68
144
.39
39 ,
39
'39,
39
39
39
39
34
61.4
61.4
61.4
61,4
61.4
4
.60
.60
.60
.60
.60
.60
.57%
.57%
.57%
.57%
.57%
.51
.55
.53
.59
.59
.55
.59
.55
.55
.54
.58
.51
.51
.51
.51
.76
24. SO
24.SO
24.80
24.80
24.80
24.80
39.15
39.15
39.15
39.15
39.15
58.42
20.92
20,92
20.92
^«0.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
20.92
18.42
35.70
30.70
30.70
30.70
30.70
3.00
 a__AA_
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
7.44
11,74
11.74
11.74
11.74
11.74
17.52
6,28
6.28
6.28
6.28
6,28
6.28
6.28
6.28
5.52
10.71
9.21
9.21
9.21
9,21
.90
 _QA.
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
29.76
46.98
46.98
46.98
46.98
46.98
70.10
25.10
25.10
85.10
126'. 10
(26.10
126.10
25.10
25.10
22.10
42.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
36.84
3.60
__3T60
for such debt and' by sale of the whole
of the Teal property or any part thereof- an4 ten days* notice thereof .published in one newspaper circulating in
the said Municipality stall be given,
10. If the.owner of a*ny .portion of
tho; aald--property hereby assessed
shall "-desire to comtnutie.Jtbe apodal
assessment imposed by .this By-law he
or she, can, do so by paying. to "the
Treasurer of the Corporation oh or
■before the 15th day of .November, 19.14,
the amount set opposite the real property mentioned iu tho -Sistfli column
of the Schedule in Section 1 of-thiB
By-law contained,- -    '   -i"
11. That the Corporation 'ot the
City o| Pernie- do -. guarantee the
monies and Interest .thereon. to be
raised under the authority of this Bylaw and .the Council as between tbe
City and the various persons assessed
hereunder and so as.in no way to interfere wi>tih or prejudice the assessment and special rate hereby Imposed
or the charge hereby- created on the
lands and .portions of the land will out
of the current year's revenue pay to
any.person or corporation from whom
they borrow the money upon the se»
curlty of the debentures thereby authorized or to the several respective
holders of the said debentures, the
several respective annual payments as
they may from time to time fall due.
12. The money to be raised by the
sale of debentures herein authorized
shall forthwith and after the receipt
of the same be paid to the Home iBank
of Canada in discharge of any moneys
raised or advanced under tfhis By-law
or authorized in connection "with the
cost of the said works.
13. (This .By-law shall take effect
and come Into force on the First, day
of July, A. D, 1914.   .'
14. This -By-law shall be cited and
known for all purposes as the "Special 1910 Local Improvement By-law
•No. 2, 1914."
Done and passed in Council assembled this 14th day of May, A. D. 1914.
NOTICE
TAiKE NOTICE that the above Is a
true copy of the, By-law upon whioh
the Count of Revision will sit in the
Council Chamber, City Hall, City of
Fernie, B. C, on Wednesday, June
24th, 1914, at 8 p. in., Mountain Time.
. If any owner or owners desire to object to the assessment made by this
By-law tbe requisite (petition should
be filed with the undersigned ten clear
days before the first sitting of the
Court of Revision.
ARTHUR J. /MOFFATT,,
City Clerk.
City Hall, Fernie, B. C,
. 'May 15th, 1914.
THE
->,     * ••
COMMERCIAL   HOUSE
. Bast Accommodation Jn th"e;T,Paaa.~ "
*   , Up-to-Dato'— Every   Convenience.— ''-
Excellent Cuisine.  ,
SUITABLE  FOR   LADIE8 AND ,«ENTLEMEN
J. A. CALLAN, Prop.
BELLEVUE, Alta.
Grund Union Hotel
/   :<   COLEMAN, Alta.   ':'        \< '
Best of Accommodation
We cater to the wbrkingman's trade    ,.
G.AaCLAJA* :-,*  *x -Proprietor
Hattie E. Whelan ....
N. E. Suddaby .......
C. N. P. Coal Co., Ltd.
IMcGladery Bros	
McGladery Bros	
H. Snow	
Lily Kenny	
John Phillips	
11. W. .McGuire 	
W. J. Adams	
Jane Bullock .
Wm. Currie ...
L. G. Snow ..,
Emma Letcher
Emma l^etcher
J, M. Clowers
Angus Smalek
Jozef Stelllga .
Jozef Stelllga .
Mike Kubiness
•Mike Kubiness
John Gnrbutt ... W%
Henry Elliott .... E%
W%
E%
14 &
14 &
9
10
•lt
12
13
15
15
6
7
8
9
10
11"
13
&J5
■F. A. Riches  E% 0
Dan WdlllB  \V% H
Robert Smith         7
Jos, Johnson      % 8
Harry Halgh      % R
Stephen X. iMoore      %9
Alex. Bunch    % D
Cnw.per Stpphenson' .....       10
J.   A. Broley ..'    % 1
Cecilia Lukat    % 1
John Rnuter          2
George W.Goole ........   % .1
% 8
4
6
I
2
S
4
5
„  ,.
2
3
4
Jo*. Hawer
Wm. DlcWnton
Wm. Dlcklnton .....
John T. Mangan ....
Wm. .Bateman ......
Howard .Marshall ..,
Jaa. A. Broley ,	
Chris. Dlnntdale ....
Mary PotfbUrtanelk ..
.Mrs.-Clara Morris ..
William Jackton ....
MU* A. M. Andrewi
Robert Spelrt 	
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
47
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
48
49
49
49
49
40
49
49
49
.'!
51
51
Al
51
51
51
52
52
52
Wi
52
53
S3
53
53
&3
4
4
4
34
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
114
39
36.5
36.5
36.5
36.5
36.5
36.15
36.5
36.15
36.5
36.5
34
34
68
8
8
2.5
2.5
,70
.75
.75
.88
.88
.88
.88
.88
.55%
.88
50%
50%
3.00
3.00
3.00
20.04
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74
22.74'
22.74
63.24
22.74
20.30
20.30
.50% 20.30
.1)0% 20.30
.50% 20.30
.50% 20.30
.50% 20.30
.50% 20.30
.50% 20.30
r,
101.5
37.5
79
39.5
39.5
59
69
60
66
66
66
64
6
5
6
5
:.
.50%
• 56%
.56%
.56%
.61
.61'
.75
.75
.75
.51
.51
.52
.52
.52
.52
.52
.56
.56
.56
AM
M
.75
.75
.75
.75
.75
20.30
19.20
19.20
38.40
4.89
4.89
1.87
^ 1.87
8.76
51.37
19.38
40,75
20.38
20.37
40.76
35.75
36.96
36.06
36.06
36,96
86.06
3.75
3.75
8.75
3.75
3.75
.90
,90
,90
6.01
6,82
6,82
6.82
6,82
0.82
6,82
6,82
18,97
6.S2
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09
6.09
6,09
6,09
6.09
6.09
6,09
5,76
5.76
11.52
.1,47
1.47
.56
.56
1.12
15.41
6,82
12,22
6,11
6,11
12,22
10,72
11.09
11.09
11.09
11,09
11.09
1,13
1.13
1.13
■v 1.11
1.13
HERE ISA SQUARE DEAL
and peaceful security as well.
With a policy In our old line
company, you cah go off on your
vocation, or visit tiie ends of the
earth and* you know you're secure.   The best in
FIRE INSURANCE
is always cheapest, and eeipeci-
aUy so when lt doesot oost:
higher. Don't delay about that
renewal or about that extra insurance you want bub come right
in cut once and bave it attended
to.   '"
M. A. KASTNER
SOLE AGENT FOR FERNIE      \
AL.EX BECK BLOCK, « FERNIE, B. C
Would that we had the words to ripple your blood Into flame at the miseries heaped upon youf class by the eminent gentlemen of Canada!
•Mr. Worker, 'what are you going to
do this summer? Are you going to
burrow along like a 'mole, or are you
going to come out in the open like a
man and face the capitalist system
with a go-to-hell attitude? Get up oh
your toes and reacih for a bunch, of
plute-_whittk*fir«      TMg   trilr*   vnnr   nlrt
3.60
3.60
3,60
24.105
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
27.29
75.89
27.29
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.36
24.3?
24.36
24.36
23.04
23.04
46. OS
5.87
5.S7
2.25
2.25
4.50
61.64
23.26
48.90
24.45
24.45
48.90
42.00
44.35
44,35
44.35
44.35
44.36
4.60
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50
blue jeans and send us the kale -for.
eiibs, and we will waft the message of
freedom irom coast to coast. What
are you going to do tbls summer?
AGE BARS YOU FROM
OPPORTUNITY
Good   Placet
Young-Looking
It'a up to you to be one.
Gray Hair ls tbe biggest handicap
—but it's alio the one you can most
easily, escape.
Hay's Hair Health restores gray
-hair to Ite natural color and vigor. It
ia not a dye, lt it a tonic easy and
•safe to use, stimulating and nourishing the scalp and hair-roots, Imparting new life and vigor and giving that
healthy natural look whioh It to et-
sentlal to a youthful appearance. ' It
removes dandruff.
Your money will bo refunded If It
falls after a fair trial.
$1.00, 50c, 25c.   Get. it at our ttore,
Sold and recommended by 'McLean'!
Drug Store. Fernie, B. 0.
Imperial Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO
$10,000,000      Capital Paid Up	
.Total, Aetata	
Capital Authorized ..   910,QOO,QOO      Capital Paid Up       6,925,000
Reterve and Undivld- Total Attata 72Jiooiifio
ed Proflta          8,100,000 AWU ' * V'' *'     72'<W0'000
D. R. WILKIE, Pretldapl HON. ROBT JAFFRAY, Vlce-Pret.
BRANCHES  IM   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Arrowhead, Cranbrook, Fernie, Golden,   Kamloopt,   Michel,   Nelson...
Revelstoke, Vancouver and Victoria.
-SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Interest allowed on deposits at current rate.from date of deposit. >
FERNIE BRANCH A.M. OWEN, Manager
~£L
ORIGINAL 1 nfLA
CHARTER  ,00*e
*MMC« MA«ON
gvwu M«N*«n
I
A Joint Account with the Home Bank it a very convenient arrangement
- for a man and his wile, at the wife may deposit or withdraw money in
lha absence of her husband and the husband may at tha aame time'
operate tha account at if it were in his personal nana only. L1
J. F. MACDONALD, Manager
VICTORIA AVI,. -»- -:- PERNIE   B. O.
J
vvv
•■■>  '**' .'7.X
* *.  •»    .. **
Better to be Safe
own e   	
Than Sorry
MOST people, wlien Ml fediat wtll, think—"I
will wait and sea; perhaps 1 that! leal better to-
■m«r»wn        A*   t**idt   f   **t*ta <d\a   i^*i*,*9***,t   **.a   ;f
Eee't "Fruit Silt" rid* tHe tfdm ot Anett* form tdtA
prevents the spread ef the malady.
EN(ySwFRUITSALr
aaam the IK'»n> wnvlrinni   rw»v*»*ii*mi» -die arriitntJititlrm it
pouoo to Hie blood, which, when allowed lo eoclowe
unchecked, mitht develop into Fever. Without mch a
wmple precaution at Eno t "Frail Sail." thc jeopardy of
life ii unmeately increased. Better be safe than tony.
Eno'i» much more efficacious than ihe effemtcaif waleri
of potassium or soda, and it supplied to .yoa at lets thoa
oneientii the cost.
Order a hollle 7TM3AY frrm ymtr Wal deaW.
Ptipotti only bn
J.C.ENO, Ltd./'Fruit Salt" Work*
London, England
Agents far Ca—Jet ttntrM f, KHcMa A Co* Uwlttd,
Id VLCeaii ii, T*t*»v*.
S-5M.
JI^S.SO
2. That the said thare* and proportions of the aald sum of Four thousand
five hundred and thirty-eight dolitrt
and eighty centt (H.VI8.80) shall he
assessed on the various portion! of
the real property benefited tn the
manner ami to tho amount aet forth In
the Seventh anil Klghth columns of
the Schedule In the next preceding
section of thit Hylnw; and the said
property and portions of the real pro<
party aet forth and described In the
tch-Mlti!* in Hon ion I of thl* fly-law
contain^, ar* fc-wby atseatei! aeeord-
Ingly wkh the payment of the amounts
set forth In the Seventh and Blg-hth
column* of xUe mid achodalo opposite
mirh said portion of reel peojiwtf.
3, Th-w iv mount of the epenltl rates
ataeaaed aa oforeeeld against eaeb lot
or imrt of a lot retpectlvely shall be
dlvldwl into four equal parts at hy
tho Revonth column of t.n<i flrhortulo
In Section 1 hereof and one of anefe
-nn«t n-tlt -fa, *<M*«aM   to-HM tieA **k
lected In the tint year and eaeb aab-
l*t .|,|..,4-.    jk-.fr,     ,'**,..'     i.,tiV.4     J«t»lt,r*   Ali-tJ*    iftt
flrM psaalng of this Ity-law during tho
Pour (4) rears which the debentaree
faereinaftar meailoa«d knxe to run.
l.  That tt shall be lawful for the
Corporation of tho Wty of Pernio to
1 .   .   .1,    .1..    t ,i
rial nateV hereby Impote'd and on the
credit and guarante* of tbe Corporation at targ» hy way of the dabentnrn
hereinafter mentioned, from nny per-
aon or pereons. body or bodl<* eor>
■porate vrbo may he willing to sd-nwrn
the name a earn not to exceed in the
irbn'n mtm rf roun 'hi'irn-•*•.•• *f*.-.- *■..■
dred and t*hlrty-«ight dollar* and
rttbtr *mmm« ittwiaoi.
:.. That it *h»n '■* !..*rM- r.»r -b*'
Mayor of tbe Corporatimi nf the City
of Fernl* to toot* any r.timVr of d
one of such debentures which may ibe
for a letter amount it deemed requisite by the aald Mayor and All such debentures thtll be scaled with the tml
of the Corporation of the City of Fernie and signed by the Mayor and City
Clerk thereof.
1 All the aald debentures shall
bear date aa of the date after the final
patting of this ny-law, and ahall Im
made payable In Four equal animal
Inttalmenta from the day hereinafter
mentioned for thli By-law to take ef-
tent, at the Branch office of the Home
Hank of Canada In tht City of FVrnle
In the Province of British Columbia.
aa daetgnated thereon and aball bave
attached io them coupons for tbe pay*
ment of each of such annual inaUil-
menu and the algnataree of the .Mayor
ami Clerk of the Corporation reepeefc
ively to tho coupons may be either affixed, printed, stamped, or lithograph'
ed faeeimlle.
bear Itrterett at -Mia rata of Mx (41 per
nem iter annum Irom tbe tint* xbertoi
a Mch Interest shall be pa!4 and Included in each annual Instalment ao
peyafele at the branch of tke Home
Bank of Canada afoneald.
.«    It shall he lawful for tbo (Mayor
*»**» *_vauv*» u* una ***** t*9*>,Vt*t**+iM*9 iw
dtapote of tbe aald debentaree at par
end to authorise tbe Treasurer to pay
ont nf thn turn to raited by the tale
of tho snid dflbontttree all expentee
connected with the preparation%and
printing of tho debentures and con-
pone.
'.t. The An.o-awt soi Ml"toed tttt'f
levied against sucb Iota or parte of
1 —■ i« fl-Vi-va-iM tnr ****h veer shall
ba -wild en 10 ih*» flrat yesr payment
on or btdore tbe last day ef December
?*H. snd an t.i miifh oobweroent pay-
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
UK EDMUND WALKBR,CV.O,ll.D,IMXUPrtaWaot
ALEXANDER LAUD, GanaralMaaaaar JOHN AIM). Aaat Oeaewd Manajtr
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 "IBBWE FUND, $13,500:000
TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES
totted by The Canadian Bank of Commerce enable the traveller to
provide himself with funds without delay at each point of his journey in
« convenient yet Inexpensive manner, They aro issued payable In every
country in Um world in denominations of
•10, t2Q, $50, 8100,
with the exact equivalent in the moneys of the principal countries stated
on the fact of each cheque,   They art economical, absolutely safe, self-
identifying: and enaily negotiated. 811
P. B. Fowler, Manager
Pernie BranoK
EMt«ei^t«Mij>ewye«bee*>
^ ttfersofflpWt ef AbbMtlne we4
I       FREESTFWOLS
9***********^.i*****************m -w-M^wpv W-i^^-W-M^ Ria
^^gmWmWmWi wWl tONM fW fM 00*
eempotli ot^ immI
_.   tula ya-ttf lUase
tt •
Tw*> hundred and fifty thnnsand Fowls won't «n>.
ply \kt\* yenr'a demand. More than four hundred
thiramnd in world<wide ierviee. We hnvo just
received aitutiivr -uoiwigiinieul. Ha} it nafo—aud
order yonr Ford "today front
The Hanson Garage
CRANBROOK      ...      B.C.
-tr
Sewn hundred dollars la the price of a Ford runabout;
the touring; oar ti ton-rx hun<'r<;.t aiiJ fifty. F. O. tt. O-ir
brook   Write ue for particulars.
ttt
J. D. QUAIL
bMilnrvw to be, ralN-v! "tttrtd Improve t nente tm or hetor* tbe lett day of Oe-
; meat Debeatoret" to be mode for sock i«-M»b«r In tb» years 1915. 191* »&'*
Mm* ot money, i><v !,..**«•*•< r **u<*t»l-i W< and In •t'Dfaelt tbareof tbell beer
^ in* th<* earn of l-W thuuMnd. tire ■ interest  from  and  ettt/t toeb  de-le
. ,.^-^.i.wvt  wil'.v '..,-. -  ..«..** ,*-*.i\*....twl^  a'.  m.w IJ.:*,'. 'tt. *. PC." ~   .   fc o«—j»»••■*    ara~t~L..    »^jt    ajH9...mm
■ -nighty c«»t« illWvtii.i, «;„t earh t.t. fi*r annum until paM, and mey be  nWawarc.  PAWU   aOO   KOUSC
1 tfhif   «-*r»M   iMfr-ntimM   \rbxr  nf   tbnt ternvr-nd tntr('»Tii»r with nl! weft fn —' *
amn'int of r.nt lev* tlmr. tlno Uundrwl' that li«-ljalf by dWrifts snd na5e ofthe
' dollars Hteft-twH,*tW».' ■- .;.„*. <-,■*■,. r.t nrtAt *&4 fSmxtt* td tko pnamn WeMe
Cleaning: Utensils
FERNIE       x       B.
C.
mmmm mFi
,' "S5?.eS-r- '~"iX-"i-'XfV *- *» 1Si^r*.'. v*-"VssffiS, ,1
'sAA-tiJS
:Af^^m^^M^^B,
'.-*;
TteHotel
One of the
Best
C. J. ECKSTORM     .Prop.
. Lethbridge, Alta.
Original
aod;
Jdrtly J
Genuine
THE DJBTMOT 1EDBER, yEBKffi, B. C„ MAY 23, 1914.
Our Checker
Column
District Ledger, Office, -May 23, 1914.
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
I
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
Beware cf
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
1 Minard's
Liniment
Fernie-Fort Steele
Brewing Co., Ltd.
0iited Mine Workers
of .America
OFFICIAL
wmm
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
-'All matter 'intended for publication
In this column should ibo addressed
'TThe Checker Editor," and should
reach this office not later than first
post on' .Tuesday of each week.
Correspondents will oblige by quoting the position of the pieces at the
stage when their play comes In.
Contributors -will oblige 'by arranging their play ln tabular form, four
columns to the sheet, the first three
columns being of equal length.
Problem No. 12
By Mr, J. F. Thomson, Strathcona,
Alta.
WHITE
Bottled Goods
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and
Shoes, Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
-BRANeHinAT^HOSMERrBiC
Central
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
■■■■■■■
Ross & Mackay Props.
m
&
m
BLACK
Black men on 6, 9, 10, 12, 15 and IS
White men on 13. J9, 21, 22, 24 and 29.
^•White to move and draw.
The above ending was drawn across
board against a well-known" veteran
oxpert.1—Ed.
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
, Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Pull supply of following
for an appetising meal te
choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge 8sue-
agti for tomorrow's breakfast.
Cr.L OR PHONE
Calgary Cattle Ge.
Phene M Weed Street
FlRNlt, I. C.    -
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
.«
A. McDougall, Mft
i
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
w
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
A "l*fedff«r" adv. it an
Investment.
List of Locals District ! 8
Ne. Name tee. end P. 0. Adtfreee
,17 WMte A»b Mine Wm. Mareb, Taber, AW*
21 Bankbeed .P. Wbestler. Bankhead, Alto.
4*1 heev»r Creek ,T. Loagbran. Beaver Creole, via Pincher, AUa.
'.*?.'' VA.7i9f a-etttm iMiew. tow* to, imtnrtto, Alt*.
SIM BWrmore , W. a Ghrietophers, Blairmore, Altn.
tin Barmls T. 0. Harris*. Paaabanr, AUa.
JIS7 Carbondale J. Mkohall, OnrbondeJe, Colemen, Alta.
1U7 Onnnore....v Michael Warren, Onnmore. Attn.
• 3633 Coleman ».,.,Jf, Jobneton, Coleman* Alto.
St77 Corbin Cleft When, Potbtn, tt. f.
113C CMnok Mine*......... inn* Homo, Obtouok, en Dtawwd CUjr, Alt*.
Ml4 Tonte The* TV*I11. Vend*,*, C,
. INS Prank Era* tietvan, Frank, Attn.
*4tT Uoener  W. BiMeretcoe, Hentns-r. B. C.
IMI lintcfwt .Joe. Gorton. HNIereat, Alta.
174 LntMfftdge L. Mom* 1711 SUtfc Avene* Jl. UtkbrMi* *
UM hotUbridee OelUertee... .Pmnk Banrintfaea, Oealhnrst, Alt*.
Sll* Maple LfW. T. 0. Herrtee, Paaebanr. Alfa.
ntt Michel... II. El»er, UUbti,B. C
•IIS Pmtdbont T. 0. Warrtet, Purtmrg, AM*.
103 Tiber A. FttterNW, Tnbor, AM*.
ttm Oeortetown, C-*t*ore...K!as {fatter, Oeorfetown. Ommmnw, Alt*
Our Prize Problem
Black men on 6, 9, 10. 12. 15 and 16.
White men on 13, 1$ 21, 24, 26 and 28.
White to .move -and draw.   • *
■As wae stated laat week, we are offering a prize for a correct solution pf
above problem, the solution of tbe
author being taken as the standard.
The prize will ibe a copy of "The British Draught Player" or Its equivalent
^n-HtemturBDnSe g-ame. AH" solutions must 'be ln tabular form, four
columns to the sheet, the first .three
columns being of equal length. Envelopes, containing solutions must be
marked "Prize Problem," and must
reach this office not later than first
post on May 30th next. The first (and
neatest) correct solution opened on
that date wUl be declared the winner.
-We are expecting to receive quite «
number of solutions, ae the problem Is
not a bard one to solve, but is merely
given (1) as a test of the solving ca--
packy of our readers, (2) as a test of
tbe interest taken in tbls column.
Below we give two "switcher"
games, played In the third round of
the Vecent Scottish tourney. /Theee
games are published by the Glasgow
Weekly Herald, and are annotated by
Air. 0. M. Bonar, ex-champion of Scotland.
9—13   21—17
Al. -Bonar   White. A. Umbte
'   Indianapolis, Ind., May 12, 1914.
To the Officers and Members of Local
Unions,  United   Mine  Workers  of
America:
Greeting:
The International Executive .Board
of <the United Mine Workers of America has given -tlie most thoughtful
and serious consideration to the miner's strike ln Colorado. Thus far it
has. been • an. awful conflict. Many
lives have .'been lost, much property
destroyed, while the state itself has
been burdened with an indebtedness
in excess Vf„ one million dollars.
We deplore the loss of life, acts of
violence aiid destruction of property
which have taken place. We are for
peace and the establishment of right
relations between employers aud employees. 'We have exercised our efforts at all times towards righteous
dealing, a friendly conference and an
arrangement of a just and fair wage
scale ln which tbe rights of both parties are clearly set forth' and fully recognized. But what are the facts?
Who is to blame? Upon whom must
the responsibility for the conditions
prevailing in the mining section of Colorado rest? We herewith set forth
incontrovertible facts and then let the
public decide for themselves.
Before a strike took .place, the miners asked their employers to meet
with them and listen to their grievances. They pleaded for a hearing, a
meeting with their employers and an
opportunity to be heard, but to no
avail. .They asked again and again
for a conference, ibut each time their
request was refused. Each morning
they left their homes, bade their families good-iby, went into the mines,
risked their lives and performed (faithful service. Theirs is a hazardous calling, consequently many were killed
during the course of employment Government statistics show that covering
a period of ten years past, more men
were killed per thousand employed in
the coal mines of Colorado than in any
other mining section "throughout the
■entire world. If they were good
enough to mine their coal, why should
their claims for social justice be denied? They could not get a conference, and so they did what any self-
respecting workingman would do.
Tliey discontinued work until they
could be hea-rd. Ninety-five per cent
of all the men employed ceased work
and are still idle. The statement
widely circulated by the coal operators' representatives that ten per cent
of their employees were attempting to
coerce and control ninety per cent ls
absurd and unqualifiedly false., The
small number employed are Mexicans,
Japanese and incompetent strike
breakers   who   have  been   imported
the Colorado miners are just aad well
founded. AVe support .them most heartily in demanding a fair, just and honorable settlement of all their grievances. We deem the exercise, of the
right of the Colorado miners to belong
to the United Mine Workers of America as inherent and tbe establishment
of a labor union among them as essential to the preservation of peace, the
establishment of social justice and a
protection against, the imposition of
unjust conditions in the future. Without the protection of a labor organisation'what chances has an individual
miner in dealing with powerful financial interests well organized and as
represented by John D. Rockefeller,
Jr., whose name Is synonymous with
Standard Oil?
This Ib a recital of facts and a clear
definition of the attitude of the United Mine Workers of America in its
relation to the striking coal miners of
Colorado. We ask for peace. We will
do all within our power to establish
permanent peace. We submit that a
sensible, honorable-and humane way
by which this can be established is
through a .conference of the representatives of both sides at which a settlement, honorable and Just, is brought
about.
On behalf of tbe International Executive Board.
JOHN P. WHITE,
President.
PRANK J. HAYES,
Vice President.
WM. GREEN,
•Secretary-Treasurer.
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF
AMERICA
Indianapolis, Ind., May 12, 1914.
To the Officers and Members of Local
Unions,   United   Mine  Workers  of
America:
Jromjome-^the^arge^citles.^Itri9tfirs7rwll<Ml
reported that a condition of .peonage
prevails because many ore held ini ithe
stockades    surrounding    tbe   mines
against their wtll.
Black. 0
9—13
21—17
17—15a
25-21
8-11
17—14
10—,17
21—14
C—10
22—17
13—22
a
b
26—17
15—18
24—20
2—6
20—25
18-22
25—18
10—15
28—24
15-22
32—28
Now tbe "Switcher,"
Very strong.
8-9
17—18
9—18
23—14
1—8bo
27-23,
7—10
14—7
3—10
24—19
10—14
13—9
e—is
30—26
14-17
10—16
12—19
23—7
drawn
c   11—16 Is also good.   1,1—16,13—
9,,4-8, 24-19. 1&-24. 28-19, 8-il,
In an effort to drive back their striking employees the operators began a
policy of persecution and the establishment of a reign of terror.
They evicted the miners from their
homes and employed hundreds of vicious gunmen, many of whom bad
been Imported from cities and communities outside of the state. They,,
armed theee men with deadly weapons and high power machine guns,
some of which were Installed In steel
constructed automobiles, which moved
quickly from place to place for the evident purpose of terrorising the miners
and their families. Many miners and
ttoelr representatives bave been shot
nnd killed.
Greeting:
We are In receipt of resolutions calling for a general strike on account of
the situation in Colorado.
■We wish to report to our membership that we have given these resolutions our most careful attention, and
have canvassed the situation most
thoroughly in regard to the feasibility
of calling a general strike at this particular time.
After surveying the situation from
every angle, we have come to the con-
slusion that lt is not the part of wisdom for the miners in the organized
states to engage in a general strike at
this particular time, believing that we
can better aid our gallant brothers in
Colorado by remaining at work, thus
insuring in a financial way our fullest
support to the men, women and chil-
-.**■* o-oenu-m}- ionB^ngag-K
Industrial
struggle  in
The homes ot the striking miners
have been Invaded, shot Into and
many of them completely destroyed.
•Hundreds of the striking miners bave
been thrown Into prison and confined
there without a charge against tbem.
The officers of the United .Mine Workers of America have been harassed by
legal prorp<>illnnrB, Indictments In tbe
courts and civil suits aggregating a
million of dollars. Newspapers who
•fapoiMPd tho cnuse of the striking
miners and ensnypd to print thp truth
bttve btbn boycotted "nnd threatened
with financial ruin. A long list of per-
nncutlon^ culminated In the mam-mcre
at Ludlow on April 20th. The brutality of the gunmen seemed at that time
to reach Its climax. Tbe homps of »hp
27-34,' 12-ltt, IB-12,'iT-lV-li'-^ (Htriking miners wero#riddl«l with ex-
7—11. 14—10. 6—14. 10—7, 3—10. li-~1 Woslve bullets fired from deadly mn»
g, t 6  8—3   11—111  20—11   15—19 '♦"bine guns nnd then, like barbarians,
24-15, 10-19. 3-7, 14-18, drawn,     j th«»' *W>»-W the torch, sparing neither
9—13   81—17 I wonjen nor children,  After the battle
«n...   n .. t,       i*"88  over  •*•*«•■»   children,   ranging
. i   •«       7M,*r*, from six month* to ten years, and two
12—19       '2"~*° j women whose bodies were blackened
?*~-5 ..ail  bu,nu;ilj   net* 4*W«*n   from   the
'«   i. I •WoWng rulnn of their burned and
I.l   »»troywl homes.   The Btate of Colo-
8"■-**> mdo waa covered witb shame, while
«    Ilthi wk°'* nation looked on with awe.
16~101 No fouler crime or more brutal deed
32—27. wm ever recorded on the pageu of American hlstorjr.   How
Black, A
0-13
21—17
11—15
25-21
8-11
17—14
10-17
31-14
«-lo
82-17
13—22
11-17,
18-11 ♦
14—10
J-la
tl—IB
!!-«
* |—g
11-44
11—IS
Umblp
20-11
8-22
32—28
4-8
24—20
6-9
28—24
9-18.
23-14
10—lfi
17—43
I—II
18-lb
.11—18
20—11
7-11
M-80
16-19
10—16
11-14
ti~tt>
20—Ifl
19—24
16—11
24-28
11-8
28—32
8-4
33—38 :
4—1
16—19
11-47
11—81
17-18
19—20
80—S3
22-26
2»-i8
M-M I'll—IS*
in the   great
Colorado.
In view of the importance of the situation in Colorado, we must be in a
position to properly finance the strike
in that state indefinitely, until the success of the miners' cause is assured,
and a general strike at this time mlgnt
jeopardize our position in thiff respect
without adding material to the success
of tl.e Colorado strike. We have
reached tbls conclusion only after mature thought and earnest consideration of the various Issues that would
be Involved in a general strike. It Is
vitally necessary that we continue to
feed, clothe and shelter ,for sn Indefinite period, the splendid men, women and children engaged in this
strike, and with proper moral and financial support from all trade unionists and llberty-lovlng citizens throughout the land, we are thoroughly-convinced that the Colorado strike can be
won In the not distant future,
Of course, if conditions In Colorado
{lo not Improve and if we do not receive proper protection from the Fed-
eral government, thia policy may be
changed to meet the exigencies of any
new situation that the future may de-
\ olop.
We call upon our membership every*,
where to bold them^lvfii In wllnpp*
in answer any call we may make upon I
■UiGiu,   Vou can rest assured thst we]
ara firmly resolvwl to carry out any^
movo which we believe to be benefl-!
dnl to the Colorado strikers, but at!
this )i<utl(iil»r time we arc convinced
tlmt the policy we have outlined above
t*t tho wises! rourxu for iu to purnue.
On behalf of thn international Expc-
iitivo Hoard.
JOHN P. WHITE.
President.
PQANK J. HAYK8,
Vko President.
wm, an ken.
«(•<• ft*''AI".' Tv
THE COLORADO SLAUGHTER
, Two radically different versions are
published concerning the events that
preceded the massacre at Ludlow,
Colo. One ds that the strikers attacked the militia without warning. The
other is that the militia were the aggressors, and, without adequate reason, advanced with machine guns
against the tent colony wnere strikers
were living with their families'. For
fourteen hours the' battle continued,
aojd women and children to 'the number of thirty were killed and about
twenty, men.
.The version of the strikers concerning the conflict is strongly suggested
by the lack of news as to casualties
suffered by the militia. Whichever
side was technically the agressor, it is
manifest that the military operations
were carried on a way that even Hu-
erta would be ashamed of, and that
the- soldiers for the time being acted
like savages.
Colorado for nine months bas been
trying to establish peace by the new
method of law enforcement—that Is,
fby suspending parts of the constitution end inciting public officers 'to
acts of lawlessness. The fundamental
rights of free speech and peaceable
assemblage bave been denied. 'Men
and women have been deported. Others have been thrown for weeks into
jail without charges being made
against tbem. The preposterous doctrine bas been advanced that it Is
possible at one and the same time to
have and not to have martial law in
the same territory; that the regular
courts shall be in session and yet at
the same time a military commander
may arrest, detain, and even execute
whom he pleases.
It is time in Colorado as everywhere
else to revert to the old method of order enforcement—that Is, under the
law and in accord with the law. The
new method has not worked well. It
has been a failure wherever tried, and
•has aggravated instead of stopped industrial disturbances. Paterson had
six months of semi-anarchy because
her authorities were lawless. The Calumet region has had six months of
continued disturbance because of official lawlessness. In Colorado, after
nearly a year of outrage, things are
worse than at the beginning.
The average man knows when fche
.public authorities are playing fair and
holding the balance true when there is
an industrial dispute. 'He also knows
when there is favoritism for one side
and when there is solicitude for the
protection of constitutional property
rights and no solicitude for the protec-
tion of constitutional personal rights.
It Is high time to get back in this
country to the old-fashioned legal principles. It is high time for those concerned about the maintenance of property rights to see the impolicy, if
they cannot see the wickedness, of
asking public officers to pick and
choose among rights, upholding some
and avoiding others.
The trouble in Colorado is over the
determination on the part of certain
employers to prevent the organization
of laibor unions amoiig__lhe]jL.emi>!o>i_t
.-         '              '                     *   ,i        'X.   "' '.    X"'D^
7>>*Vi -vftev. -?£$
PAGE SEVB»
m
■ ~ iv Hi
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Fine hair at 55.
I POSITIVELY Cure aU hair and
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and premature grayness. GROW ladies' and children's hair rapidly,   i
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cures are POSITIVE and PERMANENT.
PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW
The World's Most Scientific Hair and
Scalp Specialist
Room 1, Weldon  Block,  WINNIPBO.
MAN.
-    LUiU^g^
■sen. The effort to block the enjoyment of a highly prized right which is
specifically recognized by the laws of
Colorado Is tbe cause of the strike, as
IMr. Rockefeller has admitted. -Men
willing to epend vast sums to prevent
their fellow citizens exercising privileges guaranteed to them by the law
cannot claim to be law-abiding. The
spirit of anarchy is in tbem, for there
ls anarchy In tbe doctrine that one
man'* rights are better than another's.
—New York Globe and Advertiser.
CANADIAN
Pacific
Victoria Day
Excursions
Fare & one third for round trip
Selling; Dates, May 23rd • 25th
' Ret rn Limit. May 27ch 1914
R. DAWSON,
District Psssenyar Agtnt.
Calgary
We Are Ready to Scratch
off your bill any Item of lumber not
found just as we represented. There
is no hocus pocus in
This Lumber Business
When you cant spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip in a
lot of culls. Those who buy once from
us always come again. Those wbo
bave not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't en*
■i»Bnt6f-if-tbey~bouibt~their~iumberJ
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealers in —
Lumber,   Lath,   8hlnfllei,   Bash   and
Doors.    SPECIALTIES—Mouldings,
Turnings, Brackets, and Detail Work
OFFICE AND YARD—MePherson ave.
Opposite G. N. Depot   P.O. Box 22,
'  Phone 23.
I
KINGS  HOTEL
'-:i.:y.
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF
AMERICA
Indianapolis. Ind.. May 13, Itui.
AN APPEAL
i ttttr mi,t|>|liNl with  tli*-  Im**! Wl
; Ui|tiiirw .uhI cin'n*
An otd tmt good line.
A bad mistake, playing one neve now
» tbe othi
and draws thus
•fT_j»«i~:"7" ■;•"*"**.•   *,v" eould men re-
sj-f*! strain tbemeelvei when their women -,v_ ,»_   .   _ . _     .
**-?. an* eblldren were tbus slaughtered To "manlied Ubor, Its Friends, nndj
»-" i and their fcodie* burned In their own    ?, «f»l»t**le PaWIe;
,!**! fbomee? " i „ Ur iMtruettoM of tbe International j
ly-* ]    This Is ah awMI ani-rlftce, nil of Kx«cut|ye Board, Unlt«d Mlnf Work-1
tlaa wh,cl> *0ttM >>**» ^*" avoided If John I «r* of, J*«"»1,c".1 wo »«**1 «* >'°« tm!
\lr\i! »* Rockefeller. Jr., who olmpim sn"h ■ n™n.{* ****** **• •Wklng m!nm!
T"r * powerftil poeition In th* nn»nH«r<u,l,l,,*,,r tnmUUtn In Colorndo
J-J iforM. would bav« »poken one word i ,Jil*'L,l,I!!*!.ltt ,0.r »°*««Uttatle«i and ■
f-J. i tntortne i eettleweet through a meet. 11"^*1*1 '"f^nM* yep atrwgile. |B, f
&*«»• coal eofmvftiea and the w^a#nta* '^ "»'B« owrewtoa and of ritbi I
jtlvas of Ma etriklng employee*. And **£?« ?JT£uZH* ,lW.*r °Lm i
—   ahall   this war  of  extemlna- •^Btn 8!ld }*««<»» «* 1-ttdlow, fW'
IHNINO lltNIM   IN <*<>NNKt"T!ON
W. MILLS,
tty
ROYAL
HOTEL
FKRNIF
Bar Unexcelled
All White HelD
Everything
Up-to-date
Call in and
tee ut once
JOUR PODMELARCII, Prop,
^WXSSSlSffBSm
bntptn the other.   It-n Is eometftton w"»ii? lt"l« no tong*raT"£ ,^?B.A^^
St«u» Htawd Thieef Wert
Weetm Ughted
__   __ -      ..    .m   ..«   aMMMMM   ..    »....*«    «««■..-* ww .r-ai.ffHi  #'"u» .muni  Itll W-fJIf-PRI  If
27—23.12—1«, l*-V»trw»iitt# for ntrlitl pntltm nnd Indus- »!Tl«!2« nnrnormn-
15—1*. »-«. *~», *«-ll, Ith-tl, It-Uriel freedom, bnt Instead the humble *%$? ««»*   ,i,.s„,   fi,lllB^iiB  iJl
IS, 9-18, .11-21, 7-10, 12—Sv io—t4.>MlMvi» and ttoelr ta»ltttt to.C«oiMo.llliy'H-'2^...i«." i„h,Vt iffiU.M
1-8,11-15. 8-T, tl-tl, tf-JS, If-1 ere flthilna the battle of the common JWr etrtiiile aiaip*. Jobn l». Rotkej
Wt   t    XO    **«*, ■ ««**     JJJW     «««»MV >„„* lh* *mtltrt*h*'r»™aa«thTTft;i
bmmrn to t^motmdntm !22l*l? 'T%£"A ^1" '*' , tmmex «i xm i'»aw#«t o« tn* United *
J. O., Fenrte-Thanke for eotrtfflm.*??S*7 "J, .iJJiS' SS22H gitJl;.«**«*« t*««w«^ kl*mm>ml represent.*
ifona. Bolntlon to Problem Mo. 19. •*I*H',# i*S^JTSJhh!* sSSmU, KT1**1'* t*»l Mf R«wt#f*»»*r nee hte f*1
thMfh le the mate tmm, «ff«« SlITA ILmmSI aTtiSTsirfh!«««»«• lft *^»» * *•«* WM "»lto*1
•llgblly from tbe anthor's, as yon vrlil, I Jsf'SILSSi !TSi^k»toeSMtMSY'  «£!•*'- Wl»»« b* «'«B(*' «»* »»^»tit«>r*
no dOttW. have noticed.  f-Jevrjr we fett-«'"* JS,"!" .*TL *!S1«   -RflSTl. Jtl' iwiueei. k* *mum*4 io b* Me«*r thnn
■<»-«-. ^*d. MMirj-MM*. m,9m9    99 •«.».. %..,...   mttawt*r tnna-X  '***    yit*       irlwrt* rati -w* .
eeen Vbtd**rtbetrm.bMbmmm-^ eewlhlMi be tolerated hy a trm peo- .
bttrnd tn, M and U In Um' Qtdde ■SK^JjS^'Sr fB?o^t!^: I»,*?  '• Mr. Itock#f*ll*r end xk* imet..)
Will use gnmo tt anything new In It. ™(,!'t"1*'" *'.'  Y*.J2C««i™ <S •*• •» rfPresenta larger and more,
PImm note rule $ at. bend of column.:JS"2fA«    xvuh ILTlTitftZZSFmZA pwerfnl than the totemBient bf the;
andbaveatryatonrprifepfoM««i.    ffS^iSion   1 ffit^Mtal **•»•* ««*•*
                                           fliw determination, the Inlted Wm     W|| fmi |<wp M^ >mt timmky,
|^f[ and yonr eeppott   We cpimiI to yon i
latta '* t«**»Wtt«t !)Vtfmii(»vi> mnt tlVi«-r»ni> and
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
TJ.c  LtAiitng Commercial Hotel ol tht City
Wit* Private Bath »100
ReenwMCenaeclien
.    >.ii|».i) aihi ii!it-r«uv huh
. -. -.-.. tboogb ;h"f»|W»!?y«,«*f,,'*,rty •«< »it«rely
,*   K»«M for a prrfo.1 of mu Iuua >«hu!Z Z^n  « "l"!'.lh" I"''^'' ,1s ,*-,,n*t
i i mil un im1 their ri«2tt* «r« recmnited ud .T " tkotk'mlm, Jr.. *btw imn^C: ;
Mll.Nlt.I«i)    honomhla   wtil^nerit    broottbt *»:»2*WweMr nesoelateH* wkh fltaitd.i;.
£U"3|efe* Uboot. W* ^Jedii* to iImw tb« mmon**!™.   „ ,_
MefJfcP^lef the Intwrwitlonel onanlsatlou and,.■•■• >H '^mttkm to Wm  firw»n. :
»•« itete Uf. nmo^ inrt.,n.i«>ii..
7*S'fco'l,*r**T ebtemedy tbttdnto tmr'mum*!™
^^ iint *p«*fpew» to mtppir them with iimm-m'
.    „ tmrpim* to mtpplf tlNMHi telth
imrBBi irtrt ™» •"«> «o»l anppert owll tlwlr
.•i.^_!l...TbM!-»»^.finkw •*•>• i*rt^«irt«*rt ami an hmttn*
ble waf* orale eetttewint le fctvntM
about.
W« kttte oonsleteMly worfced far
peart end a penceftl eeletlen of the
potnu at leto*    tlw gvtevnseee of
Fee eale et Iteeedeim Dr«f Wbm
Pfttfernally yonr*.
PRANK J. JMYBH,
_.._ j. Tien ppeswent.*
WM. QMOtS.
wotttnery-Trnnonrot,
™e WALDORF
Mrs. S. Jennmgt, Prop.
L. A. Mill*, Manager
Excellent Cuiaine - American and
European Plan - Electric Uf bt —
Hot le Cold Water-Sample Rooms
Phonea   Special Rates by the month
**WBw^.-^^WMB w9eNKl w^W^w wwlwi
AowrtiiB Piu lulw
ttoa |ir lay
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,>) j**j
PAGE EIGHT
THS DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, TB. 0.,
Vffs.;^oi'*;r-
. «* na '-^x vit -X
'     *   •   *   .^£          v*P
«*v||
. t *> "-'T
^~- V: ^\-    ■'..
' '. -
-*,,-*:
MAY 28,
1914.
1" "",  '-X . ;
'
■*\-" i
A*   ■ .?v?'.'~J>c'• .j~"'  ~\v- •  .***."■■ % j^jxX ^i-iZyj-7 .""'V''."-^2 ir""A>v"*    7z'y?    '-."'
-   '< -      •   *■.-■ i *   ■   . ■ is     "   ~i.-''-  \" A. y ~' Ai'.*.X -----t"-' '\-~—:'£--',-"   v\' ..1...,*;-.
-   a*1***    -■*.*.        ** * -        - "^ ^* ^ ■*^ds***i»iM*»'s,*v*s**\
7\x*s_-^- .-A7
NOTICE!   This Store Will be Closed all Day Monday ttg^gggfe
Mi
s -:-■" -'-.■V-
£ootf «S' 5/toe Zte/tf.
Ladies' and
Men's White Oan-
vas Shoes ami
Oxfords, Ladies'
White Nebtick
Button Boots -w'i'bh
high toe and military heel. Price
$4.50
Ladies' AVhite
Canvas Unttim
Boots, very dressy
and etiintWtivbh*.
Prict* $2.75
Ladies'     White
Canvas lilucher Oxi'tir
able SIru*.    Per pair ...
Ladies' White Canvas
''av*9fl-*fw,
1, a verv neat and
l'liiups. with or
serviee-
.. $1.85
wit liout
straps, a good fitting Shoe.   Price per pair.. $1.65
Men's fine quality Canvas Shoe or Oxford, new
and up-to-date.    Price per pair .. -.  $3.75
Men's Gray Canvas Oxfords, new round toe and
high military heel.   Price per pair  $3.25
Men's White Canvas lilucher Boot, a good wide
and comfortable Shoe, good Quality canvas.    Per
pair    $2.50,
'Men's good quality Canvas Oxford, a comfortable and serviceable Shoe.   Per pair  $2.00
We carry a complete range of Tennis. Lacrosse
and Running Shoes in White and Blue Canvas.
Straw & Linen Hats
Men's, Boys'
and Children's
Linen and Straw
Hats in great variety are shown in
our Men's Clothing Department.
Prices from 25c to
$5.00 each.
Boys' and Children's Cotton Sweaters for hot
weather, low cut neck and short sleeves iu Navy
and Red, and Red and Navy combinations. Saturday price ,....  3 for $1.00
BOYS' WASH SUITS
Second Floor—From'$1.00 to $3.75 per Suit
Just the correct thing for a boy from one year
to seven years and made of good quality Ducks,
Perealles and Chambrays; best washing and wearing colors.   Prom $1.00 to $3.75
BOYS' WASH BLOUSES From 65c to 75c each
Good range of light" antTclark colore to choose
from; starched and soft collars.
From 65c to $1.75 each
..* .-   Sportsmen       ?
Are you all prepared for your fishing, hunting
and camping trips this summer? We have
a very complete stoclc of necessities and conveni--.
enees for these occasions. AVe will 'dev-pte this
Saturday to the display and sale, of our., outing
accessories. ~'
Hunting Coats  $2.50-
Khaki Suits  $5.00
Corduroy Pants  $2.75 to $5.00
Khaki Shirts   $1.00 to'$1.75
Pongee Silk Shirts  $3.50
Boys' Khaki Norfolk Suits   $2.75
Boys' Khaki Bloomer Pants $1.00
Boys' Khaki Overalls and Smocks ... each     .75
Men's and Boys' Outing Hats in Linen,
Khaki and Green colors  50c ty $1 .UU
TENTS
For those who really intend to enjoy the outing
season we have Tents, both in Silk and Duck,
Camp Cots, Stoves, Pack Bags, Hunting Bags, etc.,
to help make it comfortable, and convenient for
you.
Tents from 6 ft. x 7K» ft. x 2 ft. wall up to 16 x
20 x 5 ft. wall, and the prices are very reasonable.
We also carry Tent Flys for most of the above
sizes.
The famous Teslin Camp Stove makes cooking
a pleasure. It folds.into a space 12^ x 24 x 2%
inches, and when set up you have the oven and all
conveniences for cooking a good meal. They .come-
in two and four hole sizes. Come in and let ns'
show you a complete line.
Wonderful Values in
Women's Corsets
We are discontinuing carrying the following lines and will
sacrifice them at 95c per pair
to dear them out; values to
$4.50.
Bias Filled Corsets
> P.D; Corsets
Nemo Corsets.
P. 0. Corsets
Have small sizes,, but if you
are fortunate enough in getting
your proper size you will get a -
wonderful Corset value.   Your
size   may   be   the   first .size
nlil   mit   an fthn-n  no p».rlv  fl«
possible,
pair ...
Special per
95C
Women's Siiifs
You will have to -'.*'". "k -K ■ y
hurry for these Wo- • - • '•-.,. /-*-»
men's Suits at' '" -.    ,-„ . -: -
$15.00
Values    formerly.
#27,50, $32.50, $40.00
and'$50.00.^
22 only 'Fah.cy
Suits, cut in this season *& newest styles,
and shown in the
very newest cloths..
These - Suits embody
all the newest style
features as shown in
the Suits iu New
York today.
Seldom if ever
have the people had
an opportunity to
get Suits such as we
arc offering at such
a small figure. This
is a wonderful value,
as these Suits are
perfectly tailored in
every detail, ■ and.
correct in style and
materials. 22 only>
so we advise early
v> shopping. See^them
in the window. Regular to $50.00 for
$15.00
TWO LOTS OF SILK WAISTS
1 REGULAR TO $5.00 FOR $2.95
2 REGULAR TO $8.00 FOR $3.98
Lot No. 1.—In this assortment you will find
Waists that are in every way suitable for ordinary
and dressy wear. The colors and styles are good:
There are 36 Waists in this lot. Special 00 QC
the prices, run from $4.50 to. $5.00.   OZlUll
Lot No. 2.—Here you have a chance to purchase
a real classy Waist for less than half price. * All the
newest colors and styles and all sizes   ^[0 QR
in the assortment. Regular to $8.50 for   VUIUU
MIDDY WAISTS $1.25 to $2.50    ,
All sizes for "Women and Misses' wear; plain
white, also trimmed in assorted trimmings on collar and cuffs.   Special  $1.25 to $2.50
CLEAN UP OF SILK Per yard 26o
and Dresses, in all colors.   Values as 'high as $L00
.   in' ,*
Lima Beans\........ v.".'...,.,._.'.'_'.. A, 4 lbs.
Gilt Edge 'Black :ixy*\ ...A.; 77;.' per hottle
... Government"€Hamery.Butter ...-..-.'; 3.lbs.
.", ..Ca'na'daTirst'Cjceam AAA  family size
1 v Canada First'pream .',.->....,.,,. hotel size
Quaker Oats' i.....'.J *,'-. *'. - - "large package,,.
„    Rpbin Hood Porridge..Oats ...... 5 lb. .carton".
.    Lowney's Cream Qhbcolates ....,..... pei* lb.,:
ftiley's Cr&rax Taffy, ".,,..'.;'.. ij. A'rAX. A'*. ;
Golden Nuggets '.>...,,;,' .-v.. • per, Jb. ^ •
Braid'fi Best, Coffte, fresh "ground ... 2 lbs.
" Fry's Cocoa .'A}/i % tiu>
Snyder's-Oatsup; pints -. per bottle .
,Lombard Plums, 2 lb, tins ...*,..7.~... 2 tor.
^ ''Oranges .*..-. pet! % case
Oranges, per. dozen _20c to ,
A    Dal ton's Lemonade .". :.. "2 bottles51.
'Lemonade Powder  7.. large tin.
Hoses ILime Juice...: A.  quarts"
Heinz Pork aKd Bf ans, medium size r. 2 for •<
Heinz Tom*ato,i3oui^ . .. v...,... "per tin
. Camp Coffee -and Milk ..." per tin
' Rogers' Englisl^Syrup '.' ;.:. 2 lb. tins
Carrots ,7.AA^s...vi\.. ., 15 ,lbs. for
-,      PATENT MEDICINE SPECIALS
Castoria '.v.;.-'.,...;l.»..7.■.;.-.*.:..-..-per liotrtle-
Seidlitz Poiwdera .">,... .'vper packet-
Scott's Emulsion . -T.....'  .large size-
Beecham Pills ..,..".  per paickage.,
Lyman's Beef Iron % Wine ...... vper bottle -
Lyman's Talcum Powder ... :;."■; .* large size
Lyman's Talcum Powder \...;,.. small size
.Allenbury's Infants' Food ..... No. 2 large
oAllenbury's Infants! Food   No. 3 large
Eno's Fruit Salts .. ^ per bottlo
for
26c
-.MS-
;20 '•-
1,00
,10
.20
.25
.20.
r.35v
.35 ■:
.15
.85.
• .25
.30
,25
2.00
.60
.25 <
.25
.50
.25
.16
.25.
\15.
.25
.25
•15r;
.75
.20
.40
.25
.15
.85
.45
.75
NEW EMBROIDERIES AND INSERTIONS
at lOoper yard
Big range of. new patterns, of (food quality of
muslin, good widths, all this, season's huy
ing.   Extra special, per, yardr.......'...,
DRESS GOODS
Regular $1.00-^1.25 "for 59o per^^ yard
.  The cloths are good wearipg andjerviceahlo ma-
terials, suitable for'Separate Skirts; Dresses and
Suits.. Gopd range -of /colors ,to Vehoose
from.  While they last, your choice'....*.
ONE BIG RANGE OF FANCY NECKWEAR
,,.:,85o*per.pi«K5e ■■*-7**^ *■•,
10c
59c
<K"
styles for early -summer wear,
they.last/regular to.$1.00 for
Your choice while"
35c
♦•ft.
Money Saving Prices
TRITES-WOOD
The Store of
Quality
\
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL AND COAL CREEK
J
THE HALF HOLIDAY LEAGUE
The above league Is composed ot
five football teams, the Bunkers. Butchers, Crow's Ncgt Trading Co., Team-
•tors and Trites-Wood Co. Opportun.
ity is given to outsiders to Join and
l»lay for any of the team* with a ro*
Btriction that onco they sign on for a
particular team ihey cannot tranafer
tli-nlr eervicft*. T*h« league eoenxn to
imve betm »ucc»«fiful In procuring
■om® of the moit energetic and r*pre-
afutativ© ui#iu ol tilts lowu, aud -tlioiiW
not havo Uio slightest difficulty- in
earning out thc schedule arranged.
On May 26th the Banker* play Trite*.
Wood, and on tho 27th th» Butcbort
try conclusion* with (lie Teamuter*.
lioth game* ore scheduled for 7 p. m.
Next week we hope to publish Uie
name* of officers ana a full schedule
of games.
McLEAN'8  DRUG STORE
This store is making a special display of dainty china ornaments, suitable for souvenir and decorative et-
fects nnd a whole window full of this
delicate ware, with a variety to wUis-
fy the most fastidious counolsseur,
may be seen.
Tlil# storo Is also malting special
prices for all fishing nct'easorles, ?«oh
as rods, files, fly hooks, llne», Iwders.
reels, baskets, etc., nnd fishermen
will find that this store can supply all
their requirements at eataJogue house
prices,
ASK FOR
DEATH OF W. 8. PEAR80N
It was with genuine grief that the
many friend* of W. 8. Pearson h-^ard
Of hi* death, which took place on Sat-',
urday last at Lethbridge. After a
short illness he succumbed to pneumonia and pleurisy. Tbe deceased
came to this country about six years
ago, and worked In tbe mine* at Coal
Ctitak. ile did not, however, work
long in tbo mines .before securing the
position as private secretary to\ General Maimer Ashworth. HU know,
ledge of book-keeping and ths »teno-
graphic art, coupled wit* an Intelligent and broad -sympathy with the labor movement, led tbe Wstrlct Ksec-
utlve Uoard to select-him for the then
vacant post at tha Dlitrlct Ledger of-
| flee.   He was also engaged as their
1 stenorrapher for four «uceesslve con-
|v«ntlon«. and It will be aiUnltted by
the delegates of tbe several conven-
] tions tbat be was an Invaluable rn-
I qulsltlon.     Th»   District   Executive    The Revision Court wm held on
' Hoard mov#<! a vote of eonMence, the »Mond«r, ehl^flr to coneMer objeetiooa
An enjoyable social evening waa
spent hy the Ladles' Aid ot tbe -Baptist Church on Tuesday. Tbe little
gathering was presided over toy Mrs.
Westby. The musical part of tho program was rendered by tbe following
members and friends: Solo, Mrs. T.
Prentice; solo, air. T. Lamb; recitation, iMarlon Westby; solo, Miss
Whalley; duet, Mrs. Prentice and air.
T. I/amb; solo. Mlna Lloyd; dialogue,
"Taking tho Census" (Ibis was not
the census taken of the crossings),
Mai-ion Wwtby aud R. Farr. The
next lttiiu on the program was of athletic contest, wbleb produced much
excitement and uproarious laughter.
Refreshments were served after tbe
games by tbe young todies of the
Church. Everybody expressed -themselves satisfied witb tbs evening's entertainment.
THE RIVI8ION COURT
FIVE RQSESJFLOUR
Tlie World's Best
i
I
Send > Five Roses
-—■ m mnatmtmmtmmmimmmmmt."»-»' miww "*|       ^0^ 4| IPtt <■
txmvtm     * I tVi#%lr  R/Vtlr^
*•«, «*-, mt tm_m ttm*. I   Wn*0%J%JXtk    Ma0%iW\0mtkmmm
■"•      ■ .. tin* ir^MU i
» «*•-.- J  *KAS A JAAAV.1L Cf OOOO MattS *atdJa
\.      W^tM-ri.  .9949  -**  | .*.. 949999- * 99104 ^llH^th tt C-WMfri*.
».*»    —         , _.     ~~*~-      ^t,,, i.;^  .*., „„ fi*, 9mj9m ti.j... U ft 4time*
.„,        . It   »>»*«*  ' »l. V X— tmi «W*»S< «<W.MI md
r-„  i   ,.... i*"i1.ri      ■..'""j"!'.'''.-..!     ♦.•.111   k i 1 ,   I uUUT.r it  ..li.*mlj..
mmysnt:ittdaft %iwt 9Mturn mm tpyemktn&mt,
WittU-m Cjuwd* WbotiiKtlt Vo.    TriUa-Wood Co.
\ same to be wired to Mrs, Pearson, snd
I Instructed Vice President Orabam snd
I Hoard Member l»»rKii tu attend tb«*
j funeral on Tuesday.   At the funeral
members  of tbe  jw'Jco depanment
acttd aa pall bearer* in honor of tbe
'4ecMse4. who was  formerly police
J court clerk.   Tbe police are also ds-
|fr.»ylng the funeral »\|»ensM..   t%e
burtsl took place at the public «*m»-
twy of i-ethbrldte.   Iln leaftts ft »M-
iow Hid five 'Any Uul*- children to
| mourn bis los*.
Mr. Charts 8. Morris, provincial
' i*,.-jiu.ii::-s Xn .„' a c. *»i r*»4 taia
ag^r for th* Cuardlsti. f*si»ttf »»d
UwirsHty fo, i* psilm • vlstl to ibis
«Hr, arcomiianied by Mrs. Morris Md
son Unlmd. Mr. Morris baa paid a
visit »o »»rale before md seeared Mr.
Cb*rl«"» tskuMm tut M* teymmtvlMi*
tlve.   Utsrinc Wstwvlous visit ot om
1 at.** tiv  attHO <*«*••«*«awm   wwtm.
'    '     ■■      ■    '       . * *■■■■*» -\,. ,<,t\.; 1,
International' Board Member Roes
and Harry Elmer, of .'Michel, will leave
tomorrow to attend the Rocky Mountain convention*,
•Mr. David Hyslop was in town today attending to ousiness on behalf
ot t'he District Ledger. He looks and
feeds well under tbe capitalist system.
THI U O. O. M.
There will he uo tneetiug of tbe
abovo Onder on Monday next, ow-lug
to tbe observation, of Victoria Dsy. On
Thursday, tbo 89th, tbs officers snd
all brethren wbo desire to accompany
them -will journey to Michel on tbo
ISO train and conduct initiation them.
Quito a number of the ofd Country
peoplo in ibis town havo never bad
an opportunity of partaking of tiiose
delicious drinks and confections Cor
which the American and Canadian
.people aro famous. Ice cream sundaes, ice cream sodas and ntllk and
egg drinks are rarely seen outside the
ibig towns ln Oreat Britain. These
drinks, when property mixed, aw not
onlv wholesome and refreshing, but
very nutritious. What U better or
more wholesome than an egg or milk
drink, delicately flavo-rod with wmso
or vanilla, or sundae with luscious
crystallised tnitt and dellciously cool
ice croamf N. B. Suddaby Inform*
us tbat be bas no less tban eleven
different flavors for los cream sodas,
while numerous egg and mllk drinks
wa be mixed with flavoring to suit
Kola pbos
It is, to be hoped that a good crowd
win collect and give tho brethren at'tho most eptourlan taste.
Michel some Idea of the profreos the lis ono of those dellciously aromatlsed
order is making. drinks tbat will aot as a correotative
* for digestive troubles and cuts ths
dloost for ths I* O. O. M. picnic in »osi obstinate headache in » few
August. (minute*.
Classified Ads,-Cent a Word
FOR BALE—9-roomed- bouse on fuU„;
size lot, steam heated, throughout,
bath and overy modern convenience,
large outhouse, and lawn ln front.
Tbe property is surrounded by a
well- built fence and makes a splendid modern up-to-date home. Also
.Lot S, Woek 48, for sale cheat?. For
full particulars apply to The Ledger
Office. 198
FOIt SALTS CHEAP—t rootmod P^
tered House on half lot. Terms- to
■ult purchaser. Apply J. Beveridge,
79 Lindsay Ave. Also two roomed
Plastored House on half lot, Apply
J. Beveridge, 77 Lindsay Ave.   171
FOR 8A1,B—Small McClary book
Stovo and large Kitchen Table. Apply No. 4 Howland Ave. J04
LOST—A small envelope oontalaln*
money. Finder -pleaso return to J.
W. Quinney, c. o. Trites-Wood Co.,
Ud., and receive rawari
i    '
I!
to tbe names already on tho Provincial voters' list. Tbo Socialist Party
v*nn represented by Mr. I). Itewi. Mr.
Oliver WlnsUnley and Mr. William
Allen, and iHndetone Local Union by
Mr. Aubrey Snow. The Conservative
Party sent their champions In tbe per. t
sons of J, R. Wallace and Chief Mc!
Dougall. -The Liberal Party seemingly baw abandoned all hope, bnt Kd.
Kumer did pay tbe court* a flying
visit. Dressed tn his working rags,
<h# registrar thought ho was aa la-
trader sad quest loan! bim according-
If.
One visitor st the court walked forty mOea, when no objection «as en-
tered against his name. If as objection waa (lied against Ms aame* how
many miles would he walbf For answer, please uunmuntcate with Inspector Fletcher, of ffosmer.
Nambor of names phMmd oa th* list,
im. *«w*«r oi ooynouoon saeutsw*
....    9'9l.     * ,'.4      il)      ii...',     ,'..'■,     J. lil-i}. la -j     i*t    i^iUl;
«.■" Ttoundaiy eoontry and tbe Oww, rn*iaed, 25: otiJwtJoas withdrawn, i
aad bus best rory sacoesstal la dotag! We bap* tlmt tntatar MteMst wHI
a large tMstaeaa, espectaiiy ta Phofrjhe shown at tb* Mat wrM—. For
six. a C whet* b* paid aa aeddeifttal} worktacmen mint tern to wsl-wslaad
dMth ttt**matty td tww,* to * drlt-!•*>**. m****!**** tkot ham* th* ssaatev
tntt htm who wa* mik* ir tae i»n»*y j rtst* tn posstwstaw *f fuHtteat pwrer.
mine*, aad atvettal other miners who j  ....
rverive monthly fodemnltles tangtag P"^ wmn^mm--t9m
from I4A.M to •».*>. sceordlog to
thHr poUrt** -tor deb tad*>maHy.       t
Th* OaarMaa  Oaawalty  t'om^ayj
^^ h*t*n fnrtonnto In oot b»vlo* not *
claim* ia Ihis dtetrkit so for. *Mb ti,**,
ttttrntnlon of on* clstm st Mrnnttrtar.'
atbltb W*s T*MI t*»m-»4lv*i "v om*r*a-
nto titont* la th* Dank ol Rumtlum j
IH'Mlttt.
ISIS THEATRE
B«ST    '
ALWAYS
WrnWm Xxottaottro FlcHar« Ttt«a*lv«
SPSCIAZr SATURDAY — Matinee and Sveain^
A ORBAT IUCINO MELODRAMA IN t IHBRL8-IS0 S1MJSNDIP SCKNI8A
"KISSING CUP"
This tt a nmsiof wWnw of ths tnm Drtry Lane flavor, A Udaapp-td Jockey, a (brilllrtg aatomcMt*
race and treses* te th* sick of tlm*, as aeroplane night and an •getting horse race combined with a
real lov* story mak* 4M* * *ar* fir* wiaa*r. Fall of ««thm aad suspend*, rroduud by lt*^«ortha,
Undoti, with a notftbl* oast of Kngllsb stars. ALSO TWO OOOD COMICDIIM
MOffl3lA,r
i. WAJIMBI KOUUOAX IN
WM. WAV AND USAlt ttAiJUl IH
Tbe Ladles' Aid n^'«*   et Knm\
•Tbnttb *!H b*W * w.lf  .■' ;";.*i ;.fd,'
tftttt-*- *■»»«•»• end b«m* t *cb't*e 'n it»*i
Cbarfh tansw. Ma? *«•»-    After-r
asms ts* »W 'h* wrv«l    Mt**l k*
urenm and cake.
■sam
Crow's Ntft BttsioMt
Colltgt
Aad Ktedktnt ^Uag««Vli
J.W.
(srsstyl
during day or eeoobnt
FERNIE
!?»V,
The Marie Skin! A Dbetor's Deceit
*"¥     *«***^Aisr     mm^m   v   Mvst Imp «m.f» get th* wtto for Mn
bttbt VUdnt torn**, thom BMaa^s f^aoas aoval  f   tb* tttalar Imi lh* ItsttWI wt dow* as a Im
To i*c th* wtt* tot himself
th* iislor tem tt* hashsad ftt down ig a lev*r
EXTRA 8PBCI AXr TH*rm4my May Z*
mm, «■*•mmm motmu
CAPRICE
4 Mela  Wkb Mary Pkhfevd s*»gnrtid»y Bnust Trim and Owe* Jtoor*.  A JehghlNl
•I aoctety, laws ami tha grsat <t*fdsa»a,  A sw**t play pwvhw «he piasaam trwh that
all. am *«l» «C A* bin* mtagtai «Hfe Ub* veto* *f th* dly.
THI thtt OTFIfW THU MtT ANO ORVATMT VARItTV  OtTAINAttl
drama
4*v*ls
it -.
4A&-"   fSX'H

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