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The District Ledger Jan 3, 1914

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The Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
y
Political Unity is Victory.
No, 19, Vol VII.
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JANUARY 3, 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
Year's   Resolution
TO PURCHASE ONLY UNION MADE GOODS
Moyer Will Return
with Bodygfiard
CHICAGO. Dec. 30.—Charles H.
Moyer, president of ihe Western Federation of Miners, who charges that
he, was shot and slugged by persons
antagonistic to the cause of the strikers In tho Michigan copper district ai
the time of his enforced departure,
will not return alone t'o the scene of
strike. A personal bodyguard, including his brother, F. S. Moyer, chief of
police of Boone, Iowa, will accompany
him. The brother arrived in Chicago
yesterday.
.President Moyer is recovering
rapidly.
Moyer Escorted From Copper District
—Miners Indignant at Action—Interviewed on Train, Tells of Assault.
(JREHN BAY, Wis., Dec. 27.—Lying
in a berth in a sleeping car, with his
head bound by a blood-stained bandage, Charles H. Moyer, president,pt
the Western Federation ot- Miners,
passed through this city, early today,
in a Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul
railway train, on which he alleges he
was forcibly placed and guarded by
two thugs until the train reached
Channing, Mich., at 2 o'clock {his
morning.
Tells Story of Assault
"1 was assaulted in the hotel Scott
at Hancock toy members of the Citizens' Alliance, and a man named Wad-
Thay were accompanied by three men
who seemed to be guarding them, although there was no visible demonstration of force.
Strikers Without Leader
'Moyer's departure leaves the strikers without a leader other than local
men. In the early stage of the strike,
C. B. Mahoney, vice president of the
federation, and Guy Miller, Yanco
Terlzch and John C. Lowney, members of the executive committee, were
on ithe ground, Moyer Joined them
after his return from aii International
labor conference in Europe, aud has
been in actual control of the situation
for several weeks. The other executive officers of the federation left
about a fortnight ago, going to various
places on union business. Mahoney
went (to Washington to plead for a
congressional investigation of the
strike- and Miller's destination was
said to be Springfield. 111. Terizch
said lie wae going to California, but
Lowney did not announce whither he
was hound. That Moyer's departure
was unexpected is evidenced by the
fact .that he had engagements for Saturday with several persons. It is said
on good authority that he went to
Hancock Friday night at a telephonic
request for a conference with Sheriff
James Cruse, of Houghton county. The
latter said that this conversation was
devoted to a discussion for means ot
protecting union headquarters here
and the officers of the. federation. The.
sheriff said that this conversation was
the curtains apart and addressed the
shot in the arm, dragged more than a
mile through the streets,  threatened
with  death  by  hanging and  finally
placed on board a Chicago train on the
Chicago,   Milwaukee   and   St.    Paul j
about 8 o'clock last night.     I   was I
guarded by two thugs on the train !
until 1 reached Channing, Mich., about
S a.m.
"A committee of 15 men. led by a
lawyer for the Calumet & Hecla .Mining Company, named Pederman, bad
been in conference with me and had
hardly left the room more than four
minutes, hardly time enough to get
out of the hotel, when the mob appeared.
Believe* Strike I* Won
"I believe the strike 4s won In the
Calumet district. I expect to return
to Calumet in a few days under government protection, state and national.
I have been trying to settle the strike.
The governor and attorney-general,
the latter having visited Hancock a
few days ago, acknowledged I have
been doing my utmost to act lit' -the
strike. The terme I submitted were
acknowledged to be fair. They admit
1 have kept my word with them, the
state officials and local authorities."
Action Denounced
At tbe local federation's head-
quartern, Moyer's deportation was
■railed a "kidnapping by the Cltlsens'
Alllancct." The action lit said to have
ctim'd no great surprise and It wan
miirt thai threats of such a possibility
hud been received two weeks ano. It
wax pointed out that these threats had
Iwii reported to Vice President Ma-
honey when ht- made a plea for federal lMvc»Mt"tftfin t\f tt\i> t*m till tin*-- tu.*
fore the rules committee of the house
of representatives.
"The hint! ii<m«ii*n notion of the
ritlimu' Alliance Friday will have no
■effect on the strlM* situation except
ui st wrist hen the men m their deter-
rnlnos km to wlu," Mid one of the local
union officials tonight. "\V'« have an
ample organisation and plenty of
(und* and titan* to meet thl* contln-
geney were made week* ago If thu
»o-eall*d 'outside agitator*' are not
permitted the right of free specth and
legal anion in Mulligan, (lien Me wiil
till  upon eUlien* of thl* state for
awh  aid In  t-e-iilemhtii ;»«  m;iy  hi e«»
■eesntry,   The Michigan federation of
labor ht** many audi mm and th* ir
presence has been promised."
Retraction Unsatisfactory
it va* Mid to the relief eiimnililee
that tha federation lu..1 f<irbldilt*n the
COOK GETS BIG SCORCHING
FROM TWO COCKNEY GIRLS
Lecture  Before^ London Gathering  Is
Interrupted by Sneezing and
Rude Epithets
LONDON, Dec. 30—Two cockney
girls were tbe principal part of the
audience which welcomed Dr. Cook
to the Metropolitan music hall, Pad-
dlngton, tonight, at the second performance. The doctor had already
talked for an hour during tho afternoon at the London Pavilion, but he
faced the last task bravely until one
of the girls yelled "liar." The manager rushed down and tried to eject
the two girls, but they kept sneezing
and coughing, and even when the
doctor aald: "I planted the Stars and
Stripes at the North Pole," one enquired "Hi sy, Where's the British
flag?"
The gallery, tpo, began to make
enquiries, and the manager wanted to
eject the girls, but one said: "Gawd's
truth, we cawn't 'elp sneezing, ye
knaow." The gallery Kept* atter Cook,
but he called back: "There is only
enough room for one man to talk
here,"
A man answered: ''Shackleton, 'e
may be-in 'ere." The doctor scorched
Admiral Peary and the National Geographic society as usual.
Cook is getting $10,000 per week,
and is booked for eight weeks In London and nine of the provinces; that
is, If he survives the London engagement.
THE CIVIC
ELECTIONS
So far no new candidates have appeared in the field for civic honors,
and from the looks of things "she goes
as she stands." The honor and privilege of administering the affairs of
this noble and glorious burg does not
appear to appeal greatly to the ambitions of our citizens, although there
are a number who, as kickers, are
notorious. (Yes, ourselves included
when the other fellow gets too much
sop!)
The old Council never made many
promises and.consequently cannot be
accused of many delinquencies. This
is where they displayed considerable
wisdom. So far as the financial part
of the administration is concerned,
there has certainly been an earnest effort to square accounts, and we believe that the yearly financial statement will be very satisfactory. It is
to be hop that any surplus accruing
Mght or water will be de-
cing the present charges
■*, of course, after every
been male, and that
, sidewalks will receive
"of the hew Council.
THE MINISTER OF LABOR'S
REPLY (?)  TO FARRINGTON
11113.
from eitb
voted to
for sam<
allowance
our stree*
the atter,
01
Don't forget the Moose Social and
Dance on Monday next ln the K. P.
Hall.     Time 7.45.
held early In the evening and that at
no time did Moyer express any fear
of deportation or say he had person
ally heett the recipient of threats.
Sheriff Cruse added that he left
'Moyer at the hotel and that the latter'* departure was a surprise to him.
Citizens' alliance circles professed ignorance of the incident and refused
tp discuss It.
Grand Jury Investigate
CALUMBT, Dec. 30.—Chief interest
In the labor union troubles of the miners of the Michigan copper country
wus transferred today from Calumet
to Hancock, where the special Houghton County grand jury, which will Investigate the assault last Friday
night on President Charles H. Moyer
nf the Weatern Federation of Miners
and hi* forcible expulsion from the
district, reconvened to con»Ider many
incident* arising from the prolonged
tension.
, It 1* believed that the Moyer Incident will not be investigated Immediately, a* several important case*
which were before the grand Jury before the Christmas vacation have not
yet been disposed of. The coroner's
examinatfon of witnesses who wero
in Italian Hall attending a Christmas
eve festivities when the panic was
caused by the cry of "fire" continued.
Everyone connected with the Cana-
lltnit  ftnntf  nt- fammOTa  mill  Ytnva  ran.
THOU'MtDS FACE
STARVATION
son to tool gratified by ths showing
made by the bauk during the past
year. Shareholders not only received
dividend, disbursements amounting to
12 per cent hut were also presented
with the greatest net profits In thS
history of the bank amounting to $2,-
092,000. These earnings' are $ill-,000
greater than they were in 1912 and
reflect somewhat the prosperous year
enjoyed bys the Bank of Commerce.
DOTtg the year tbe Wink '6&mM:-'&ti)
j its combined capital and rest account
slightly over 10-V4 per cent. Other
evidences of progress are found by a
further examination of the report
which shows large increases in -quickly available assets, heavy gains ln total assets as well as an addition of
$1,000,000 to the rest account.
In brief tbe showing is most, en-
couragtng and Indicates very clearly,
ln so far at least as tbe Bank of Commerce are concerned, there have been
no evidences ot business retrenchment
during the past year. The net profits
made by the bank In 1913 are the
largest ever earned by a bank in Canada,
PARIS,  Dec,
persons <i»« In
^29,—Thirty  thousand
danger nf  gtai-vliw ftr
Springfield, Illinois, Dec. 23
District Ledger,
Pernie, D. C.
Writing from Scranton, Pa., under
date of Dec. 15 I addressed a letter
to Hon. T. \V. Crothers, Minister of
Labor for Canada, in which 1 pointed
out the gross Injustice done the striking miners on Vancouver Island by
reason of a report treating with t.he
Vancouver Island strike, and submitted to the Department of Labor by
Royal Commissioner Samuel Price.
My letter was published In the Ledger and was self-explanltory, and
proved conclusively that Commissioner Price was either utterly incapable
of making an intelligent report on the
Vancouver, Island situation, or that he
was controlled absolutely by the tnine
owners. '      ,
In reply to my. letter ihe Minister
of Labor wrote me as follows:
"Ottawa, Dec. 17, 1913.
Frank Farrington, Esq.,
c.b,, United Mine Workers of
America,
Scranton, Pa.
Dear Sir,—I beg leave to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the
15th instant re labor conditions on
Vancouver Island.
It would be Impossible to discuss
this matter within the four corners
of a letter of reasonable length.
Faithfully, '
(Signed)   T. W. CROTHERS."
,A careful reading of the Minister's
letter will reveal that he Is absolutely
indifferent concerning the matter; no
desire to correct the wrong done the
Island miners by the Commissioner's
report, Is expressed by the Minister;
no attempt is made to justify it, and
not even an apology Is offered In de-
Unemployed Demand
Work in Calgary
March to City Hail and Sends Deputation to See the Mayor and Aldermen—Conference Resolves to Give
All Aid Possible—Sifton and Borden
Asked to Help.
CALGAHY. Dec. 31.—A deputation
of the unemployed, who said that they
represented 5,000 men out of a job in
Calgary, waited on Acting Mayor Tre-
glllus and some of the aldermen yesterday and demanded work or, iu default, three square meals a day and a
place to sleep until something could
be found for them ,to do.
The deputation was received by the
acting mayor, Commissioner Graves,
Aldermen George Ross, Costello, Carson, Adshead, Carscallen, Freeze and
William Ross, President Campbell and
Vice President IBerklnshaw of the
board of trade, and President Deven-
ish bf the industrial bui-eau.
Alfred "Budded was the spokesman
for the deputation, and h§ presented
a resolution, which he said had been
unanimously adopted by the "league
of the unemployed." The resolution
demanded of the council that the city
should furnish work to all men lhat
applied for-at least 30 hours a week,
regardless of race, creed or nationality, to married and singly alike, no
matter how long they had been in the
city. "
Three Square Meals
As an alternative all applicants \yill-
ing. to work were to be furnished with
three meals, worth 25 cents each, a
CAMMHT. Mich., Dec. .11.—Federal intervention under the amended
Krdman Act, haa been asked by the
Western Federation of Miners as «
mean* of settling the copper miners'
Htrike.
A telegram colling attention to the
L. O. O. M, SOCIAL AND DANCE
On Monday evening at 7.45 sharp
the abov-e order will give their first
social and-dance of IOH la tbe K. P.'s
Hall. You are requested to maka an
effort to be present yourself and persuade as many other brother Moose
as you possibly can to be present also.
The musical programme,will start at
n p.m. sharp and will continue until
it.So, when refreshments will be served. At io Mbarp dancing wilt commence to a first class orchestral accompaniment.    Don't forget to bring
lawsibllSty  of sueh  action  was "sent \ >'our Jfd3' trii'mU' who are »P^lall>
today to President  Wilson  by O.  N, i lnvl,w»-
iliiiuii, flnet of counsel for the West- i ■■ ■» i< ««s>>ui   ...lji'x,— ;.;    j "'
ern Federation, at* a sequel to a con-,
U'Tt-w** b-!i> !a*«,   nlfihl  bet wren  h'.m \
and John II. Jk*nsmore, solicitor of tli«» j
department of labor, who ls here to I
find a  m-rain "f wttHnK the contro
vi-rsy.
Will Identify Flsnd i
CAMTMKT.   Mich..  Dec.   31,-0. N. !
Hilton, chief counsel for the Western
Federation of Miners, expected today
to produce w!tne*iw»*  who would
freezing to'death lii Albania, according to reports from .William M. Howard, New York, who has just finished
a 400 mile journey through the remote
mountainous districts which he traversed by cart and afoot.' As a result
of the Servian occupation, he says,
more than 100 villages and towns have
been destroyed. Twelve thousand
houses ' aVp been burned and'4,000
men, wontUi and chiidreil' kiil-Sd One
hundred thousand persons are homeless, of whom, Howard estimates, one
third are likely to die of cold and hunger. Many are living in cornstalks,
lean-tos, against the ruins of their
homes. There are 9.000 refugees In
Tirana and 5,000 in Scutari. Wanderers were frequently met In the mountains; some of them were clad in gun-
nysacks, others walked in the *now.
their feet tied up with rags,
A war between Bssal Pasha, director of confederate Albania, and Ishmael
iKemal Bay, head of the provincial
{autonomous government la predicted.
Bssad Pasha's troops were met at 8a-
blsta In the district of Goto Borda,
moving to annex the territory north
and east ot tbe Shumkbla river.
Tense ot tne commissioner, .xnererore,
I ask that you publish this letter so
that as many of the workers in Canada as are reached by the Ledger may
be warned not to place too much faith
in the Department of*Labor as now
administered. ."..■■..
Yours truly,
F. FARlUXpfON.
BANKHEAD NOTE8
■aaJTira^a place to sleep umu TITey
found work.
The discussion was general and,
lasted over an hour. The representa
lives of the unemployed men Insisted
that it was the business of the city to
■find* them work or to feed them. They
found fault with the methods of the
associated charities. Some of them
thought tbat sawing wood for six
hours was too much for the meal supplied in return for that service.
Ask Farmers to Help
The city's officials explained that it
was Impossible for the municipality
to make direct payments from the
treasury ou this account. The public
works department was finding employment of all the men possible. It
was agreed to communicate with all
farmers who could be reached, by advertisement and otherwise, to get
them fo give work to as many men a?
they could at a living wage, u was
also determined to list the unemployed.
A resolution was unanimously
adopted to take up the matter with the
provincial and Dominion governments
and the following letter was sent out
last night to Premier Sifton at Edmonton and Premier Borden at Ottawa:
Letters to Premiers
"Dear Sir--At a meeting held In the
mayor's office this afternoon with representatives of the board of trade,
industrial bureau and the city commissioners and aldermen of Calgary,
who met. a deputation of the unemployed, the following resolution was
unanimously passed: —
"'That, the city take up the question
of the- unemployed with the provincial
and Dominion governments of the province of Alberta with a view, if possible, of open'jig relief works to alleviate the present distress.'
"If you can give some assistance in
the matter,'I trust you will do so immediately, as the case seems to be one
of urgency, and any help would be welcomed."
Parade to City Hall
DIED
Dec. -X at the King Edward Hotel.
Duncan Hiewart, aged about U. Funeral Saturday, Jan. 3, at 2.30.
Deceased, who was a school teacher,
had been advised t'o obtain outdoor
employment on account ot cardiac
troubles ind had been staying at tbe
hotel for a few days, A post mortem
revealed an advanced stage of heart
disease and the actual cause of death
waa gluii as ui)u (.mill*, lt was not
thought in'*-rHKarv n, hold an Inquest.
Corporation ofthe City of Fernie
•  _	
ELECTION FOR MAYOR AND ALDERMEN
The Christmas tree waa the most
successful of Its kind held In Bank-
head for years. A splendid program
was rendered by the children, assisted
by Mr. Turnell, who kindly showed
two appropriate moving picture reels.
The various committees were on hand
to assist Santa Claus, with D. 0. Wilson in tbe chair. Much credit is due
to those who worked up the neter-
talnment.
Mrs. Dunnigan and daughter are visitor* at the homo of her non Kdward.
Mllly MoCardell. accompanied by
■Norman Smith, l« visiting tbe home
of his parents for the holiday*.
Born, on Dec, 21, to Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Wheatley, a daughter.
Mr. Wm. McDonald was hurriedly
called to Moose -law by news of a
serious accident «< h!» youngeKt brother, un ciigliitti un the C. V. IL.
whose Injuries proved fatal.
Mrs. Wm. Ron* wan rulUd to tlu-
home bf her parent* at Burdett by the
death of hef mother from typhoid
fev«»r
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ CORBIN NOTES ♦
♦ ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
A body of the unemployed, ntimber-
ing uhout 250 inen, who carried a banner   Inscribed   "We  want, work,   not
charity," marched up to the dty hall
in the mbrning and lined up on the
street while a deputation of half a
dozen or so went in to see tiie mayor.
The afternoon' conference Was arranged for and Mr. Treglllus, going out on
tbe stepK announced that everything
possible would be done by the city t'»
take care of genuine cases of distress.
The acting mayor's little speech was
greeted with a cheer. AH nationalities
were represented In the parade.
fabllsh th* liifjjflty of the man who
shouted "Hn" at the Christmas ov*
celegrstion, causing a panic which resulted In fhe death "of Vi persons.
■Mr. Sliiioo j«?»«ff.1«j asked that the
coroner's Inquest be adJimnMd oatli
»at» today. He spent last nlsht and
the early part of today trying to confirm his t*»llm<wiy He declared th»r
no witnesses will be placed on the
-* *~ 9*9-9    .   . .     *.      ...   -  "t*u'd *111*** *• l* «•««»■» they can
tm Of f».«*> raised for the relief ot j ^^ p^m,. (de«! if Nation
IH'llLIC NOTICK l» hereby given
lo tht, «>ledor» of the Municipality bf
Fernie, and Fernie ttcbool District,
that I require the presence of the said
«•* j elector* at the Council Chamber, City
Halt, Fernie, on th* tlth day of Jaa-
uary. WH. at twelve o'cloH boob
(Coast time), one o'clock pm (local
time! for the purpose of •to-ctHi* per-
suns to rvtMVMvai ibem tn uie Htmi-
y.y,~'. Couiull at Mayor and AM*i.«.«n
and In the School Hoard ** $< *■*'*
Trustees.
Th« mode of Rotnlnntto-ti of ruxti
date* shall be as follows:—
Th* taft-iMaU* ahalt to aomiiut- '
In writlna;  the wrttlnr •halt ho «'.'.
'4r,t      #l$M9Ml       I 44... ,.94 •
... ..*..,- .....  ..... . .*«■»»«. ( MwlM-d by two voters ot ths Muni.■
■t,.i   ,*f\t.,i;,*,.l*   *,,t f»4 1  ■,,.....99        ,,,    , . ,,.
> •...     .9—.9        .9. A I '        •-''"■'       '■'■■'•       -•'*■ '-•"   i   *"*'".     **     l>i»->*W*»n     <**»"*    ••(-*> UUtrlWI.    4U-.
ftWIfwr with PreaMen' Mover nim ar- \ owt of a -wore ©r more witm-mae* u »ti , nha.l U> delkeMNf lo m* at nu) u»»<-
rangwd to ewfer with him st a hotel) fled befor* a coroner'a jury today tha» ' l,*4te***-ti the date of the im»Uc# *m
Itt Hancock, tttn man wbo <au»*<t the Christmas j two p.m. tt'osst timet, thre* pn  U<*
of hmwalty. They demand** tlut b*
retract statements credited to him.
■eying the ery of "HreH which »tart
•4 the paaie waa raised by a m<-mi*r ■ that
Tht session there wss warm    Thr }•«• <n«srt*r wero a white button Ilk* | *a! tlm.n of tlw day of nomination;
Citizens' Alliance told Ibe uuUm that   l»t#  bad** of tb-* vnift-n*'   AIM*«■*•» ■ "»* «•*'<* nH'^r miv *,,. »., ■»»>■   *,,.„
moo «ftM»»k *>i s»ui>M| itnmimmtotr titer tlw adjourewent of numherwl S In the Schedule Of this
th# Jury, O the IVm*r ** J Act   (Municipal  Hed loo.   JUrO, aad
tornejr in charte of the Weai«-rn Fwrt j shall slate the names, residence and
nation of Miners' l««al Interests, said t oerupaHon or d«n«-riptlon of each prr
..,.,„        „        , , torthft   development   of   tnm j son proposed. In tuck manner as ml
!fJ5 ."J?*' *tom; **     rw'jP,MI,p  *  «*•   »«"I»"y   *««^ »»# at-j flclently to Identify Mch candMate:
meet to make retraction satisfactory j tempted tomorrow. land In th# e-renl of a pell h#lr>* n**
r,<i the tttltoae-a uieuAlwv*. \ »Uuvi tUw., >»o%)ri« pin .ires which had been , cessary such -poJl will he ssssnl oj*
tattr he Mi Joha Taa»er. of Callfmr- j taken of yesterday's big funeral pmtv} tm !6th da? of .fannsrr. 1*14, at xh**
oh. nn orgtintinr tot llv: talcuiion.^Mij *iU u*»*» U» enUiU,***-.!,. ilsf ***** ,» minHM namtier. *tM|- Halt Vi-m:**, M
«w* «h*erv«« m * ««*t ear colM Uralor reported (hat hi* room la • j which every persoa Is hereby tvqiiirtd
frOBS lltnetwl to llonthton. lest torn! hotel had W*a Itroken lnt» %n-i l fo take. Botlc* a»4 tmrrm fcl»*»?f **•-■
wm* tlm ittUm cwaamlag th« two J th* filaus «toten. Th# eas* waa foand j cwillit*»v
lowas and dtstswt ahoat tm t**n front t -wtsrat htoeka away from th* hotel in j QwaMtcatfewt f*r Mayee
th* slnictor*, la th* depot of ib« th* middle ef a *tr**t, hwl heywMI thl*! A»f pntm *h« t« a w»'* ?h«tH,\
Cooptr iiMft rsilnwd. Them It was {-Hwumttanc* th* local police aald fb«r f **ab|e*t of tb* fall at* of twmfr*****
ttttUfc«*l_aukt Um»t atU hU «ttaaiNMkU>», i»d no rtw* to th* rffwatm w rh«» r««»-! y»^rs. not Jlt*iaal!n«d under m. Um.
far CilMW-1 huy. I aad ha* tor »h* sit month* next pre-
wiling '"■■•*' duy of nomination beeu Uie
n Kl*', i • .1 oMiiir. Itt tiie l/ind Iteitia
try Off tee. of land or real prop«rty in
the rit» of the aises*etl value, on tn.»
last .Mntitcipal assen«nient roll, of one
thou- u 1  dwilars  or  more ov«r  mul
abm-e   «)•   reaUtt-red   )u(tfw«nt   or
chant*    and  who in othevwixe dub
qtialifl. i as a Municipal toter.
OuaMfieatt** tor Aftftrman
An*   ..WIMIII  *h<i ia « maie llnii»i,
mihjfi** of th* full as* of twent) oi;e i
yeart mh dlanualifleil under any law.'
and bn* tor to** nit month* rtt*tt pre
J c*dlns th* day of nomination h**n t!>*
l r*a'»tet. Jl o*n«r. In the Itmtut ltem»tr» '.
' Offte*  «f limit f*** r«»it n*m*»rtv- li iH*^ I
i «*ity of th* asa*aaed valtM*. on th* laat >
.    ..n.i* . ,>A, tttii*. 9*11,1,HI. IVill, UV l.-iv   ll-lll    ,
t    •* i  ■! ,')iitim ut  iuult- uirj   *tt4 **)«He
I i:> *■   r#-ir1t**ri».}l   |N»dewi*»'   ^r   ..■%,'*»*«>.'
i'i la «! her* me duly qoallf»*d |
i! inlriftal vtiter
tl*.*,.   r^     I9.9     a*.»,«-*l     ?»..,!#,
.•erton who Is a RrEillsb sub* ?
an .J
** a
n
A?.'
and S
next \",
th*   •-* .-
R*t?atr.
*%• In ' ■
tt.94 *,.   .
Uttttt'J
1.1*4    ■ .
t!**tere !
Ml. Albert AlUn ....**« *iln ui,,
Warren, who are well t.mtwn throimh
the I*«*i, Idew In camp th,* wi-eK from
the North country !<>«ktn« 'ht* fHifirf
of health
Mr. Ouriard. oui Sm..il i>i,,-j.i, mu»
ter, I* f>|«tidtiiK <'hrti«tniaa and New
Vear'* day wilh hl« »iti   .»»1 f4«iii>
Miaa Kr*w upefit t'nrn*tiut*ia tuth lier
parents la Ml( hei
V.;, H*.*i*,i ¥4)4*1* ■»!*,*.» xSiitf*,.,119**.
In »*or»,tn vt*itt!«K Mr **.■! Mr-/  tM-c.-»
Ur» Hubert t)**wart, ol l-Vrftie,
•■a* vlstting her sinter. Mrs. Welsh, a
la*. t\tt-,9 '!,.« »<*vk.
Mr. «rnl Mr* Owen »i»ent t'briifnu*
tm l\i*-'t i*i.tt, at i'i,niv>
Mr Uihft liari/el, »« «»*>•■•«•!<*•>i» * f<-*
tl*** vintii,*.' lm tltug'Art*, Mra, lUtl
*n*i    .»lk*.  Kl ■■*• I,
1
1    u*  h*a«i   *
'^'hv'.t'iitifi'ii'i im*.
turkey a were
♦ COAL CREEK NOTES        ♦
♦ ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
The Christmas dinner served in the
Methodist Church on Tuesday evening
was a fine success. The viands were
the very best and the attendance
large. Nearly all who held tickets
were on hand. A very cordial vote of
appreciation and thanks was extended to Mr. W. It. Wilson for his
thoughtful kluduetts In Klvluu the dinner. Tho address of the pastor on
"Waterloo" was one of the best that
has been given In the Church.
Rev. Mr. l'lillp will preach in behalf
of Mlsftlona In the Methodist Church
on Sunday evening and will taki» the
j annual offering in behalf of the Missionary fund.
, The local t Do.., Iiuh now settled into
j it* new sH'tfon, the carpenter b<Mng
jbuay putting two additional rooms in.
}    Thf .Wli of December was the an-
,il\ ,."i"|i"'   flf   tl)..   /Hie*|u*'*"i>||»     I'lli'lut'itu
, up here ln*t year.
]    The   women   1111.I   children   of   the
icamp attended  the  various church-en 11»»»« i»«* «<»' the **n
on Tuesday evcnlna. the occasion tie-1 WHi^i Limit™
In* the dinner front Ajv- confint-Atioti
lurid.    Kv*r>ttutie  *-,**.  voted  of the
(Too lute for last week. I
Christmas with its attendant festivities Is now a thing of the past. Pleaded to report on the sobriety of the
camp In general. Tlie usual family
gatherings took place when the various Johnnies wer« much In evidence.
The concert held in the Grand Theatre for tho prize distribution was well
patronized hy Creekites. The efforts
of th© Amateur Dramatic Society was
well appreciated. Pity was not ti
larger audience.
The children of the ramp up to 12
years of age were again the guests of
Father Christmas nt the Club Hall on
tho afternoon of Christmas eve, aud
received at hi* hands seaaonabl-c pre-
iieiit*. The committee In charxe de
serve credit for the splendid arrange-
ment8 mnde,
We heard «»f u troupe of would b*-
carol singer* who. not hflng uatlsfletl
with what they got, csme later sintt
took the hreail and butter. We won
der who*   T<m» bad   llllly, boy*'
We also heard of one of i»tir dear
fi-'. •■*'*..   *i.»v   ..r.    si.-'AS  .•.,   *'  ' ■  '   '"
■lamp Ini-mhitf and thirikiiiK tie vim it.
'the mine, railed tn hi* \uttttu r t.» tt*lr»
!»i-l  hi* tlve tu
el,(»   -r
*w*,l rf**i-
*^W ^Wl      -Wr      W^ *lw*^P       *^VwWH
'i* fall **t* ot t«*aty-«»* js**rs
ing h-t***n tor th* sis months
^"dlnsi th* dat* of nomination
.stcrwl owner, in  the  I-sftt
offt-w, of land or r*al ptop#r-
r*»mf* SirfMwl IH*»rt*» of thf
. .Ai-if. oa li,* U.'. Mn«i«i|Ml
► '.* r«Xt. of fife luitidred dn!-
*• i*'*  nv.*r *rd .'■m** m-}  r*-
jadirm*»t «• r.hurt*. »»4 to*-
«* *f   q<ISllfl«4  »*i   '*^,*  nt   h*<
of Jtrh>W| Trnste*. * fn the t'i r*
..-! ii'".frt*t.
■«?■ <*.*t 1 Wif IttJd kt T*-fAt, 1%'it-
r*t .tttnimrf. »<*f*
0. w. mm,
Retwnilng Offlv*r.
tine   tuifcey   aitiMit   tin
»*: t|i)iM. H't'A iHtiff* Tfc.w.i"
shot  for.  which  wer*
won by   Me-Mir**   nrnhsm,  Matt  and
*•-'■* ■-''.--     ' ' ■  ■
ttianibK tl*- sH-- IxH um*. Jim
Th« stork iS»Iti-<J the home «»f Mr
aud Mr*** Jack Johnson, o« It**. *."*.
i*a»i«a a fue mm.   vi,.!j»«-r arid <htid
w*||.
fk la ilfl  smll** *h»-«*
doing
days.
i i.i-!.-    * ,<» ■ ,  ...    .
Vj* on friBdav *hr.<  iftrmn* hav!r.«
*...   *     ,41,       .,4 I, -   * * -. * -
Mr  **..   Hr«  1
a aftor* vi*'.* '<* •■,•
skortMtt. th.-* *«*'ii
Ill's'.
The liM'al nt«»r»* nf Trite**W«<)d r«»*
Hilled the ihlldrttt of the eamp w)tl«
■h«l timial Se* Year < utt'llen and
■ H'dliSea  *>n   Ne»   \e;»l'»   iliiifuHitf.   tin-
manaaer   and   lti»   ;iH»l*t,.ii;t«   h;<\lnte
i|iill«> 1* im»> iimi-
Tl»«< •ItilMiai Hie«»tl!iK .i'l.l »•),*»!;..(, ,,f
uffiier*   of   the   Cliil*   tfwk   p'ne   on
.*#.*. 9.1 .4 **   '        ......      I* „ ■ ■*   *.■.*,...,     .*.'      * ,*'
w.'n.,.*ri    it,i*    r.n.trn ,- ■,-,. t    f,,i    *h,
i»flo:l»   «»f!tie»   \>*    !«*• li   (III   th.lt   ««
!ia»jn«» arid th»' ba!l«« f'.rm* lm i*#t|rd
■1   nit'Uiti. j*    rfii.l   tii..'    ."...iv   :,.►•
j.t-tia* nn  iN'r   2*     The   remit  ot the
!i..i.li«:)t,   >i'*i*»   a,-   fi,illn*i«     l,*'n»'»M.-t!t.   W
i McPeaan: vice pr*al«fe»^ J. K. Smith;
**«l IfHti.l,     -1* .    HU,    I ul »'J ,     i*. M-ftl.t
'ttyttiili    Tt't'',,'i".-tTr;    'I'l.lt'.if*     *fi».*»
!Crsljh* and  Vaton:   !w»rd  nwmhera
, M**ar*.   I»r.   Workman.   M-*   iwlihtwir-
otitth,   J.   M*MHtan,   I    Harrison.   I
Jfe-»i**r..'>   ♦<    Vt. t".-r»'i    I    Vl'«rthi».ri"..
»   \tuii>'irn
I*   Mtmeriuitt'— Wortbto-fto*
Fi -»f'«"'Innate r- *•• *- Sniw-i- ft ■■ 1"
»i.-,   Wlt.;«     **\. ,   •'.*'.   I*.      '.'■
M:.*..'ri l.ll)   ll;i!l  ,tii-l   lo>ej,||l»e   V.*.
*:t*ll     t-'l     ll'illiK     lli:      (ill.-,-     *!lll     |,|IC
them heltillritin .iltd •■n/ibted tin tii ti>
■»!ii em Ii 1'iiu.ihl.- |.f!,«iii in «»*ur !t<'»i'.
irtfr 1 i>nt|»tltlon
The jif'cri.iiiiii shift did r.tit wor'* on
the  '.M'tl.   mil !■* tl..'  '..:'..Vstt,K  *'.,.    !**.
» it*' iil»(, tiSlj.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ ♦
♦ HORMIR NOTtS ♦
Tite  ninth  jtfiti'U.i!   ttiawiM*.-rad».  t»nH
held in th* *»|M>ra lf<tn»e   \«.« Vi-ar'*•
♦ re. unit, r ik,* .Tii-spv/.s ,.f th,-- Hnirh'*--
«.f |vythia*.  |irr»ii'«i trt '.<■  1*  crvat  #*tc-
♦ *■»•,  *lw<-*is   H*t  ltn»J;4e»   b*m?i«   »»   t|»f*.
fl#*fie     Tht* i-t*9**it***-'9    *.-hilt* .i*t***ti%- nin
to   th*  standard   «»f   iirnioM-*   :>«ir».
*»i.i»! k,t«i,*j mi), ■*,..-■* i.rt«- wmfcea,
.U*»-iinu(»,   toil*.   iSttlUUi* is   tUtitl   l.tl**..-*:K,
hid um .tnt-t-nri* *tm*ti*r ih*< »f«» ft *****
wbo w*r* a* fnllows: ll*at dr*»*s*d
sent, S K Kendall rapeit-nt #;fn»#.k *»!«
i',r>i's IbalM ptrli null (Mt'tiDf.
Mr    U    WH'i    laaMfi-  on   -f'anMdtan
|!,.t\)i      €■»■ *(» r*     ■Ant*^:     ot     T-fOtSot*
1 .1
lKl»     Al#«i <»ur <i«.»r   •-•:.
■« ** k>l'»if hr 'h"- **• *■■* . I.'
iv
-       I*  *,'.-*   4 ,4      _
t\,',s*ii*r  Mr* It
f'Sl*^ '♦      frt 9fi'
'. D«H4«.«   itt.    llv
Waff.     Time
-»» *-. f
k r
T»*>   t il"-'-    .' IT   ';
V*»i» t * ■*-   lm« !
It.-    ' •   1 ■
1 ?',iin
Vi ft* re ;<*r'»i,'
5 *-,' •« <•*.„   » / *•
\     >>■♦»*. nn'i   9, *
sr**
V,
I   ram. ti,!,- :
and bM'her, C01'
• ♦ ,* mor*
•    -ft**
„.1f.9*.
■£   fa'!.'..
«'r**tr
%ttf      Ms-     t'i,,-    X\
«,<r«,   tt 'It,   and
T*i.| T -1,     !»>%■ n«
*.** k- , t  ,\p till
(•eir ,t, :t.-   'enrti ««
th- m<i*t<    M-tttf
\ t\*l***i     *.-.'     ,  * ,.9
\     .',:■'.:'.,.,
.      ... . ... ;, ..*.«d
.   ,,.»,,   .- ,.,  *,,.», «fc.    ^-S!.*-<.   i"«iT»-
 I ",    '1 >-.         U'l
-i'ttl*,   l T '*■  *    *    *   'fl
i..'   '*,      '..,    •
'.•u'rsis.'t '   •»»•
...         i       1.   .    ,,.
r*. ii-,", i 1. *
•(,    ., rr   -i*  t   '"»*m
"•■•   hi •   i"    M *   1
»*tf.e-    *•"*   *%m*t
*-        *.,..*          r
• »,   y.    *• -.    *»■*
1'*    ;-,   '      f.f     J^*^w'>».   |
.- ,*  iif.*-ii #-  tj*.
,    *'   "   "    ,.'.   V
* 'S   A- . •■-   "!s
S*»fl a» ■* fr,*rtit,f, f*!-,t**   1 '. i-i*** PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGES, - FERN^^C., JANUARY 3, 1914.
J^^P^^^^^^^^^fS*-*^^^^8^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Farm   Life
and  Health
Manx" ftirmers never send for a doctor from one year's end to another.
But this is not a sure indication that
they'and their families are perfectly
healthy.
Tou—for instance—may not have had
the doctor for years, ret it is safe to
say that you DON'T always feol fit
and ■well. Many days in the year you
don't feel like working. You tnay not
have to stay in bed but you DON'T
feel just "right."
That miserable feeling is usually
cau.sed by Indigestion, Dyspepsia, or
Biliousness.
You would welcome relief if you
could set it—wouldn't you'.' Well, you
can get .fi-Uiff—any time you need it —
quick and positive relief. Take 15 drops
of Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup —
the great English remedy for ALL,
stomach disorders. It will set your
stomach 1UOHT and KEIOP It right.
It's almost purely herbal—Nature's own
remedy for sick stomachs. It has been
used in England for ov.er 40 years.
There it ls the Standard remedy for
weak digestions.
Get Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup.
Take .it regularly. Thea 'note the im»
provement in your health.
Price, $1.00.   Trial size, 50c.
For sale by I
MoLEAN DRUG AND BOOK CO.
FERNIE, B. C.
Causes of the High Cost
of Living-A Farmer's View
It avails little to overthrow a king
so long as capitalism exercises more
power than the king.
The department of justice has investigated and finds there is no cold
storgd trust. Then it is time for the
whole people to create one, so the
price of meat, eggs and'sfruits may be
reduced by cutting out profits.
By a Kansas Farmer
The causes for the high cost of living are not confined to one particular
thing, but to several, some of which
are purposely hidden from the common people by those who are responsible directly or indirectly for conditions. Some of these conditions are
beyond the •control of man, but are
subject to conditions of nature over
which human beings have no control.
Other causes are artificial and are
under the control of men individually
or collectively. '
Sir Wilfrid Laurier, of Canada,
called Ihe attention of his people thc i
other day to the fact that within the "
past ten years the cost of living in
Canada had increased 51 per cent,.
whereas in England it had increased
only 7 por cont, He referred to their
tariffs on grain, but did not see why
that should have any bearing, as the
grain and live stock was being exported to England and the United States
in large quantities, and the United
States had now put these same products on the free list.
He concluded by saying there must
be something "rotten iu Denmark-
Canada." .
He also spoke of trusts in Canada.
An English Ambassa dor came out to
Kansas three years ago and delivered
an address to the students of the Kansas State University, in which he said
there were no trusts in England. There
are no tariffs In Eingland. England
three years ago enacted a tariff revenue system in India, a colony or subject nation.
The people of India objected. .The
ultimate'effect of a tariff In a nation
is to increase prices and destroy competition and thus open a door for
commerce. By this scheme England
can get up. a trade with her colonies
as well as other agricultural countries
and 'obtain her necessary raw materials such as cotton, wool and silk, to
supply her looms as well as grain
and meat to feed her people.
Wheat today in Kansas Is worth 80
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Statement of the result of the business of the Bank
for the year ending 29th November, 1913
Balance at credit of Profit and Loss
^-i-^eeeaBtTferought-fofvi^-rdHfroai-Iast—-j- , ■—
year......... ...........,,$    771,578 88
Net Profits for the year ending 29th n
November, after providing for all
bad and doubtful debts...........
2,992,931 10
$ 3,764,529 98
This has been appropriated as follows:
Dividends _Nos. 104, 105, 106 and
107, at tin per cent, per annum $ 1,500,000 00
Bonus of one percent, payable 1st
June. ,        150,000 00
Bonus of one per cent, payable lst
December        150,000 00
Written off Bank Premises        500,000 00
Transferred to Pension Fund (annual contribution)  80,000 00
Transferred to Rett Account.....     1,000,000 00
Balance carried forward        384,529 98
$  3,764,529 98
GENERAL STATEMENT
29th November. 1913
LIABILITIES
Notes ofthe Bank in circulation .... $15,642,923 18
Deposit* not bearing
interest $52,798,205 84
Deposit k bearing interest, Including interest accrued to date140,015,509 40 192,813,715 24
* '■■■ ■ ■	
Balances due to other Ranks in Canada     633,237 12
Balances due to Hank* and Banking'
C»>irc*s|H)iiik'iiW elsewhere lhat, in
Canada    10,071,316 73
IlilU payable      9.SI5.787 65
Acceptance* under Letters of Credit    1,941,544 19
$230,618,524 ll
Dividends unpaid  2,666 44
Dividend No, 107 and bonus payable
1st I),-, ember , ,.        525,000 00
Capital paid up $15,000,000 00
K«***t    13,500,000 00
Ualwtce .if Profit am!
Los** Account earned forward        3H4.529 9K   28,884,529 9(1
t> 266,030,720 57
,-tSSFTS- '
Ciiin-ni Ciiin and Nullum  * 0,571,173 (tb
v.V-,i*w_» Vi.fVi.MVtM'i 16
IVl,lii;'..«|, NVtvs
H.ll.tll. • hlt'll1 111 It.itik*
i»ml lUnkiiiKt'orri-k-
pointful*   lK,-wl.rl|.
Own in I'ntiad.i...,  S-fi.-WMA'ti *.|
ItiiUnrrs dim by oilier
H,ink*, ii) ( .ui.iiU  ,. JJ.IJJ X7
N ■.(,-■» „( ..tluf H.-iiik*     3,106,230 <*>
-ThrniH'MMiinln-rHan-k*  MI-MM tt   ti.,431,4V) 44
t .ill .md Slim I.  l.iuun mi I'.uiaila ,Mi
»i.-,.N, H.*t»,*iil.|t«--»li!Mt Miifkl .   *      '>.«iiO,.VV» m
(.'ill .mil Sli.in j.i>;t ,i i»Ki-i*vtn-n> lh;tn
in i   n..„i,, .    tt,,l.U,M*l liX
Dimiaii.xt nml i'oitiiii i.»lt,<>u»r«itiriit
s,*. nut,,-,  ...     3,-M4,<M,it i)o
ii,..,.,i. r „,...,, ,,,,*) i „i1„.,.ii Put.i.i
Srt'uii«i.-*» .uii t *,ii«ili.in Municipal
s,-,*i,»*iti...i ... ,\ *,»(,'mi'l it
Knitwnv   iti.it  other  |l..ii,l*>.   Ivtien-
line* t*n*l Sini-U      l*,<sm,ii*t Ot
,IVf».'-.t   Willi   III,-    MmiMrf   (nr    lfo#
purpo*** of th«> ( in iiUtiuii hurnl.
|Ui
J.tH.AUO OU
,lt»N,l|f,  14
Other Current  l.i>*n» .m.l Dttt'ounl*
*V*H«»r (■•lrr.**i**>   t    .',,..    l'..\    WtttrrvttSl*
eHewhrre than in t .in.nU U*r»* rebate ot inlrieMJ       l*),t<JX,tJt$ li
(ViMwtW IVti** KimImumiAii"--.! ton* f#-
*M#dfor>,  4S7.1W 72
Ri»al Kttate (includinir  ths  un»n)tl
■h*t*w«*» «rf ti*rm*r fwaite. **f ih#
teewwm |»wn»hip» Itwin)    . j.<,.,-•»«
Mortg-egw on RmI E»Ute noM by
ths Bank        4l»/#»7 .'2
Butk Premites     *,»\,m m
Other Assets  )*,*" r-i
liabilities of cuntomers under ttt*
ter* of Credit, at per ceotr*.  J!i*t,'M.,J..'.'
I
I
1
I
I
5
I
1
I
i
-W
i
I
A
M
i
cents. Corn is worth more. Cattle
and hogs are scarce and high. Hay
was $15 to ?1S a ton in September.
Wheat was a pretty good crop. It
was the dryest year since 1870, and
the lowest corn crop. Thus you see a
cause, for high prices in all meats?- including eggs. The natural material
of -production which is not. under
man's control is lacking.
Xow I will refer to some artificial
causes that contribute to the high
cost of living that come under the
control of man. A tariff law is simply a code specifying the amount the
Rovernment charges you for your
privilege to get from another country
an article you may need that you
could not get here. Commerce or
trade belongs to individuals, not to
government.
The effect of a tariff is to raise the
price to you of this foreign commodity.
The manufacturer here of the
same kihd raises his price to you of
the same commodity to the same
level.
According to a late Republican
platform he ls also entitled to a reasonable profit. This he makes to suit
his wishes by forming trustB.
In different States of our nation
laws are made regulating and limiting
the amount of interest one citizen
may charge another.
In the matter of tariff protected
trusts legislation does, not dictate
profits and the beneficiaries ot the
system may reason that if 6 per cent
profit is good protection 60 per cent
may he better, and since most all the
good people stand for this good policy
theyi have no Inherent right to squeal.
This is one cause, but back of this is
the universal idea that when a man
Intrusts t'o your care $100 of his
money for a year you are In duty-
bound to return him $100' and C, 8 or
10 of your earned dollars. In this
way you feed many0who .produce no
wealth or means of subsistence and
thus agree to a burden on yourself.
Again, when you rent a house you are
required to pay this Interest on the improvements, and when the city taxes
increase your landlord increases your
rents. iThis again adds a burden to
life.
I wiil give you a more practical Illustration. In October, 1912, I slopped
at a fruit stand in Denver, Colo. The
dealer had some grapes from-California. I asked him his price. He said 10
cents a pound. I said I had just
c'ome from California and the grape
raisers crated those grapes and sold
them at 1 cent a pound to dealers.
He said it cost 3 cents to get them
to Denver. I said "Why must you
have 6 cent's for selling them?" He
said: "Four years ago I paid $36 for
this room.   Now I pay $125."
-JMa^yana.sayai-l'he-JariftJn-ereaaea
the price of the manufactured article,
also the profits of the manufacturers.
The consumer of those grapes was
to pay all cost of those grapes, including rents and profits. The user of any
manufactured article is supposed to
pay all costs, wages, profits and tariff
protection rents as costs entering into
the production of the article.
We talk of the cheap labor of Europe and the pauper labor of Europe,
but somehow those -people can live
while they work. I have been reading lately a volume written by Percy
Ashley, an Englishman, on tariffs In
Germany, France and the United
States from 1790 to 1910.
The tariffs of Germany and France
are protective, of course, Yet we
Americans have been taught tb talk
of pauper labor and cheap labor In
these countries.
Does not this look like as if there
wus something rotten in Denmark-
United States? David Starr Jordan1'
says: Indirect taxes—i.e., tariff taxes
and deferred payments, bonds, mortgages, etc—are the two great Instruments of national slavery.
But what Is slavery? One roan
fca-dluy another who ought to labor
to feed himself,
He also says: Just so long as we
are roollt.li enough to believe that
our right, to labor and to trade must
be obtained by paying tribute to a
banking class instead of to our own
Inherent power we are as completely
•Mislaved and far less certain ot our
living ti» though we sold the bodies
of ottrnclvr's and our children to a literal muster.
To sum it up.
Tlt<« high cost of living Is:
1. Iu some things under protection
and cont of transportation.
•:. Profits demanded hy tariff produced mistw. j
"     Th"  «h!ft!t"*.r nf ttiyi>q nf tin  In
thieves. He said: I am the way, the
truth and the life. Pilate asked:
What is truth? The same question
confronts us today. But instead the
heathen of today ask what is Christianity? ■■■,.■■
I listened one Sunday afternoon in
your city recently to a Socialist speaker explain the fundamental principles
of Socialism. He never mentioned
Christ, but what he said appeared to
me to be the ethics of Christianity
applied to government.
Government in itself is a business
proposition. It is not temperance,
theology or physiology. The prohibitionist is right in his contentions
about the evils of the liquor traffic.
Hut every Republican and Democratic
ballot is against him. The saloon
system is their revenue system.
Mayor Lunn said the other day he
would like to close every saloon in
Schenectady, but he dare not. This
saloon is only a Republican and Democratic custom house. The Socialist
would take the profit from the business by taking off the tax to the government.
In this they are right, and why not
declare -for free trade and free whisky? This 1 do to the astonishment
of the Prohlbs and the chagrin of
the Republican^. (
I back these thing-? with truths
that are natural and incontrovertible.
Let us liken the two old parties to
the Pharisees and Sadducees. The
Sadducees did not believe in a resurrection and often argued this matter,
but fundamentally they were agreed
as1 to government.
So with the Republicans and Democrats. They have been teaching unjust and oppressive theories so long
that the common people have been
deceived Into the crucifying of truth
by delusiv-e theories until truth is being, crucified between thieves.
•Amongst the Pharisees were the
scribes wh'o were the writers of the
law. In our day a great scribe arose
who wanted to write a law limiting
the precentage of the trusts and placing them under the protection of the
flag to continue their plunder of the
people in a more temperate form.
This has only caused a division in the
ranks of the apostles of greed and
graft. The breach may be healed by
compromise, but truth and right need
no reforming. They are eternal principles. Compromise, and reform are
only applicable to things of doubtful
utility or' unjust elements of society.
On my way East last June to the
Gettysburg celebration I met an old
neighbor that I had not seen since
the Civil War. He had been living in
Nebraska about sixty miles from my
place in Kansas. He had entered the
army wrhen only a month past sixteen
years. (He was a prisoner in Ander-
sonville seven months. He said among
other things that It we want to leant
we must get SocjaMslLllterature.   Qui
the expense of the people who work
for a living..
In all ages freedom from slavery
has been hard to attain.
Professor Rauschenhusb says when
Christianity pervaded the Roman Empire the slaves became restless and
contributed to its downfall.
I repeat. Christianity does not stand
for slavery.
What sort of Christians would Socialists .be if thoy stood for the same
conditions Republicans and Democrats stand for?
If Christianity were slavery then
I'll none of it. It is not an overproduction of Christianity that is oppressing
us, but rather a lack 'of it.
By the sweat ..of his *ace shall man
eat bread.
Not by the swat of his dollars.
It does not occur to those who have
saved some dollars or who have inherited some that they could use them
and reduce their pile as necessity demanded.   Now, this is the situation:
If you live off the interest of your
money or rents you are being fed
by individual citizens. If you live
by being fed at an almshouse or penitentiary you are fed by a community
or county or State and are thus socially fed. If you are fed by getting
interest on rauicipal, State or government bonds you are socially fed. When
you vote in a Republic you are exercising a socialistic privilege. Better
be a Socialist. It will save asking so
many questions as to what Socialists1
will do. Just go along and help to do
things right.   See?
How would Socialists build a Wool-
worth building—for Instance? Perhaps we would not need one. Perhaps
there would be ro'om on the face of
the earth to build houses without infringing on tbe rights of tbe folrds to
the air. How would we farm under
Socialism? Give us all the fool questions you wish, but let us have also
the same privilege of asking questions,
for it ls written: "Though a -man be
a fool he can ask more questions than
ten wise men can answer,"-—New
York Call.
Associated Press only gives truth by
chance. This man owns two farms.
That means he is not a dependent for
labor on a factory. He has been a
paralytic for twenty years. He does
.tome insurance business in a town
and walks with great difficulty- All
over this land I find the old guardians
of liberty In arms wit.t the Socialists
m defense of tbe liberties proclaimed
by the Declaration of Independence.
Thomas .Paine, the great agitator
In revolutionary times, says "trade
flourishes best when it is free, and lt
is a weak policy t'o ,try to fetter it."
This is what my books are Intended
to explain. I only offer apologies for
my effort.
Socialists should know that tbls
protective policy only insures profits
to capital. It lt stopped at profits we
might prolong our existence longer,
but when profits become plunder by
wholesale it Is time for us to reason
why. When I said to a young preacher
in Kansas last spring that interest,
usury, bonds, mortgages, securities
and endowments were only synonyms
for slavery, he did not dispute my proposition. When I said the same thing
to a college professor, he look exception to the endowment proposition.
This endowment proposition is but another system of Indirect taiatlon for
the support of these colleges, -Some
of these funds might bet loaned to ft
private citizen and he tn turn would
pay interest—a tax to the Institution.
If loaned to tx manufacturing plant It
Is charged to thp user of tbe goods, if
loaned to a town or municipality It Is
paid In ditwt taxes, and so we have It
In an ever Increasing ratio.
Out in Kansas where my bett
friend Hi k burled and other friends
and where I want my final resting
plac* to be, there was a proposition
to raise $10,000—to put out ns an endowment to furnish a perpetual fund
for the en re bf the cemetery.   Those
"COMRADE" LARRY
By Maud Davis Walker
.Larry was eleven years old—a
splendid age for thinking. And Larry
had begun to think, too: There had
been so many things happen in his
short life to make him think. iFlrst
of all, he had got too well acquainted
with. Poverty, that giant who strides
over the world torturing the many and
sparing the few! And for some time
Larry had been trying to figure out
some way by which this giant might
be got rid of; but It was a puzzle for
a boy of eleven.  ;
Christmas (just past) had also
brought him subject for much thought,
for it had brought its usual disappointments to the children of his class—the
class commonly called "The Poor."
And now the New Year, so full of promise for the limited Rich, and so full
of threat for the numerous Poor, was
almost at hand. As the show thickened and the Ice widened the price ot
coal advanced and food became scarcer, which troubled Larry considerably*,
for he heard his father and mother
talk of these things a very great deal.
One afternoon as Larry was hurry-
'direct nature upon us little people!»t the head of the proposition was
i wliti work ,h*' president of the bank In tbe town.
.     I.   Tlu- wtpiw'.lsl who Uvi* by in   »n ls<w '»' w»« bresWnjr prairie with
j limit Increases his interest. The mail  *» f* t«m;   But bow be became a
who rents Increases bl* rents. banker I will not here explain.
! Thine classes are f«d and mighty I «* and his friends proposed to put
I little they give to charity, tor u j lu Mu. It was proposed that I give
' would be an unpnTdnnitiile sin If th-ey I ««*", I very quietly remarked that per-
lever diminished tlieir once aculred \ lm* *»•<*• .Socialist* would get hold ot
! capital to livi'. It must be transmit- j »J»'« country and we would not have
j ted to tin Ir imntiritt.   »w? I «,,l» *»tt ot money.  Tbe conversation
I    Morph mood fnr luetlci*. \nt "'<' o»*>« tellow I will not. r<>eord
I    <'tirUt utiwu! for truth ■ ,,,;''*''    •N('* abolitionists did not  be-
I'tmrmiil libi-rtv n» do a wrong Is! "«vp •« chattel slavery, althotmh lt
Ing down the cold street, shivering in
his thin coat, the voice of an old man
fell upon his ears. "Comrades!" rang
the voice. And Larry, full of curiosity,
stopped to listen. The aged street-
speaker stood on a box at the corner.
His" figure was 111-clad and bent; but
Larry saw that bis eyes were full of
hope and kindliness. "Comrades," went
on the speaker, "how long will It be
ere we have learned the lesson of brotherly love? The kinship of all men?
/That's It, the kinship—tbe comradeship! When true comradeship prevails we shall banish poverty, and
tpereby suffering. Comrades, bestir
yourselves! How many of tis are
starving for food and suffering for
shelter? How many?" His voice fell
to a whisper, and his bright eyes
roamed the small group of people who
listened to him; then they tell upon
Larry's thin pale faco. "And our little children," said the aged man, his
voice full of tears, "our little boyt
and girls! What are we doing fpr
them? While the handful of millionaires ot this town are feeding tbe best
of meat to their pet dogs our little
comrades starve! Ob, comrades, the
shnmc is ours!"
Thc word "comrades" made Larry's
heart leap tn his underfed body. II»
half whispered It. Then he turned and
beheld a young fellow watching eagerly the speaker. "Comrade," he murmured to,hlm, touching his hand, "you
look cold."
The young fellow turned fo him.
'^Comrade." he said hack, "t am cold
In the body, but warm In the heart. 1
am working for the big cause, and
even though my body freese my heart
stays warm. Are you one of ue? But
of w,r.»? io« arc. ,-'or,r.y, for you Just
now called me comrade. Ah, my young
comrade, when even little children like
you have lo carry a big share of the
burdens of life upon ihelr tender backs
It l» time for the world-wide flgbt!
Yes, the fight for justice!" He paused
a ml held his naked hands over hit
mouth, so that he might smother hit
coughing. Then he turned to find
shelter In a doorway, for the cold had
wot Into hi» blond. As Lurry walked
past him, sorrowing for him, he said
FIRE! MM   Close the Year Right
iBy seeing that Ute fjre insurance you have been talking about is placed with our companies. We control a few of the strongest companies
in the world.
Companies
That have made good.
That pay all just claims promptly
That exact no discounts.
That use no red ink variations.
ANU ARE STRICTLY BOARD   COMPANIES*.
See us before you place your Fire Insurance; also your Accident
and Sickness Insurance, as the OCEAN is the LARGEST Accident
•Company in the WORLD and our policies are guaranteed by assets
of over THIRTEEN   MILLION DOLLARS.
The Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corporation
LIMITED, pf London, £nfiTla.nd '
A. B. CAMPBELL   ' District Agent
MINERS' UNION HALL BLOCK City Office:—65 Victoria Ave.
Established April 1899
W. A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail   TobCiCCOflist
BARBER   SHOP
Baths and Shoe Shine
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
r
Our Coffee is Good
=j
Great Northern
Train going South leaves Fernie 9:53 a.m. daily
except Sunday, making direct connections at Hex-
ford for the "West and with the ORIENTAL LIMITED East bound, THE CRACK train of the North-
west.
Train from the South arrives Fernie 7:30 p.m.,
makes direct connections at Rexford from East and
JWest^	
Sp^ialToun-OKip^
Atlantic Sea Ports in connection with Ocean tickets now in effect.
R. J. MALONEY
B»!fi
Agent
Pernie, B. 0.
m
9m
W*.
"IEM.ESMTE some UP?'
The question U niked. We
Answered: "Look around you
and see.
Investigation Dlselostt That
Rsal Estate Prlcss Art Advancing ,.  ..
Aro you alive to the situation?  If you are we can sbow
you a placo you can make a
big profit on.
As compared to later on.
Just Now, Housst   Here   Are
Dirt Cheap.
VL% A. KASTNER
ALEX BKCK BLOCK,
FKRNIC'B. C.
X
not. impiu-d tit tiu'«.«. iMoiM»«imoiis. i'"*r"" ™"h Ji the enw or tne inflow, i softly: "The world for the man, the
HUcjj (iinst Kan (.' ><•«!> old hy »on»e j H<«!,Hi*t»t do not believe I« »n.v ort j WOm«n um! th*« child. Fljtht for thnt,
unknown n»-aii* ll« sot into » «onv,»r. of tlafery. «i*mw1ih.* mU* «w«4«»    Tbo world for tbe
w..,i|W., with Hit^S**, m,.r, «««lf*'«hrw      'J- *• D' "'" "   " *!» "**£* ?2' «»»  *** *»«*■ a"* •«•«• HltUV
dsy»h« |il cdtlwm with qawtliHM <wti» *t'•«*»«« Ji">  •• [?' '      . «f V'f1      \*****i  ******   Wam»*>mI   th.   -num.
t»i«. U>«t»i»iur« (ttiim within ou« *»«t#,comrades   words  fllllnjs  bl#   heart.
Thk Is ibo onlv dm* II* w«it to*j«* msWtif Virginia « into gist*?.
(mImm.I iii*. |,t,t..t,u r*»t»ttked Him. ut, * Hod«fl*f writer lh rommptitlng
Uo mum abide HU titn# und fulfill i *H>*m tlil» fact accounts for it Urns:
Un» U«\ ubk'lt .wu* tlmtno oii.« should Mnrlnto was fh# mrmf nnioornUe
truth until ll*  wss 3ft,    ll» Is *«!►!<»*   »"   »*•   «<olonl«8.   betas   mostly
*«1thi»'«»n wars ns ft
r * i*
■nstvmxor.
,v .;„ 'n-«n#rf br sw-m of noWltr-r,
after I    "ft"? *no* °'
"Cowrad-fs," b* said softly under his
br<»«th. "Comradftsf The world for th*
man, Uie woman and th*«-€WUV
Thon hf« honrl warmod his IhlnlycMtl,
] shivering body. And he ran as fast as
,  ,tfr*^wi^-^£^c*--,i£-
mu»ktti *>( tirti-M Ulug (h« aosMl t« itt« <*<""r«l «f money and -rntUrnl of labor tno thltigw m mow won fust
sk**    Thi*  nwltltttdMi  of common i »jr control of wag«s,   — —— —•■*    —
vootilt, heard Hint gladly.                   , Jf*«V* "V*,*"*^*
Hut th*s* wls# guys of th» tm* I?!*!! ,. L"K.
the WALDORF
Mrs. S. Jennings, Prop.
L, A. Mills, Manager
Excellent Cuisine — American and
European Plan — Electric Light —
Hot & Cold Water—Sample Rooms
Phones—Special Rates by the month
Baropttt Plan Room Rate*
Amerteaiflan latM
60c aad Upwarti 12.00 pur D*j
Tbt Amtrlean
il** «are ttt Mf
this at fTMt*r
right.-
tut know
-Appeal to Reason.
and I
"MOW»t TMISt
t. t WALKER
CALASH
,*1t1!*f,tVW'»  ' •Ut.'!*
UtNll huimi
t><\
^W'lM, yv*:»^i^^|y^^pr^|^i^t
could nm torttv* Htm.    itta iwummia
I did not suit them.   But  when  they
* i ould  not  have lilm condemned h*-
tut* a h*M!h»in  ruler on nv* ciunt of
'lliu r«'Hal»»«i   thpy   nmtscd   Iflin  of
'tuvi!tK   tin-   »ron«   »ort   of   jK»Hti<"*.
Tlifii   iht*  heath**!*   klnjt   *;i*)iwl   hli
' 'i.itid* !r> inno-r-H)*."** »n«l Kave lilm o\**r
'•   uivf' ii-arn-iM nn-t.,   *.... ., ,,\  ,i.:„
< mi SNc.Ji at the instigation *tt nn >.<*
..uii..' iiiub. tli-. tir*.f-'.' *■.' •':■   ••   .
., ttji'U, and Iff was tiull-i-d Unarm ran
8/r/MfoGim
! tantrlbnte (o this endownimt tood
fftoelattst doctrine or faaatieienT   f
! have not found It necessary tbns rar
* in life for some 'one to work for me
< wnd feed me to keep ma s!ir«.   Why
nhnuld 1 want »otne on* to wor* for
me after I was dead when I newd-i-d
".. c,iri* when  <-rnrlff»r* trt*rt* nn tb+r
tt*. no*   »ill)...it  iioatas or tammwi
<-imtftTt#  snd  h'tr«1*n» *>»'*h jear ht-
Wo offer One Hundred Dollars Reward fbr any case of Catarrh lhat
eannot be cored by Hall's Catarrh
Cure.
v. j. ciiknkv * ea. t«i«4«. «.
W#. th« -and-tratpm**. ba-vt heeww Jt.
J. «?»i*fi*v fnr th* fiint ts yemrw. an4 t*«
U-"!'i titm p-...f.*-ii*r i\.,„.,rnM,, tn .il!
i»uitn#*« ir«n»»fit«»» an4 rinanelally
»W» ti* perry on, uny nblteettofta m«.t«
•wwaiv »T»ra •mmm. tvmo mn,
MAM IMS THKOAT «KO * UN-3*. It CUt»
foming hftsniM? «     .      7
j    There I. « t»roposlUtm in tb* Statei   KatiWai. v.skk wcomrew"F.
}«»f \sw York to raise *MM»fitomis  „t!J> r„,r 7«™,»,,,;
j nn endowu#at fund t« peaatoa t«0- acting *at+*-.-UT «p«s <**• m«44 *m ss*.
I »-rs    Thl» in bnt another sly way to[-Mat *urft»<(* ,,t n,« tv*ttni.   tvt-Hroo.
g«t the MmntmA tncreBitnt of thf *.**»•"%« *^.. «^"^*»►•'**«•
J. J. HIXON
(Late of Hixon and Ferguson)
0*11 up phon« Noe 07 for repairs to burst pipes and all
plumbing troubles    :     :     :
Shop - Pellat Ave*
Hear Hospital     •     Vmrnlm, WU C f'll'-fi.-   -
-, ■&■'*
lts^*-Wi\i '     ***_:
XA-A-W, *"
r«%'
THE PISTRIOT LEDGER, PERNIE, B. 0., JANUARY 3, 1914.
PAGE THREE*
i
Local Union Directory, Dist. 18,U.M.W.A
GLADSTONE LOCAL
No. 2314
Meet first and third Fridays,
Miners' Hall, Fernie; second and
fourth Fridays. Club Hall. Coal
Creek.   Sick Benefit attached.
T. Uphill, Sec.
Fernie, B. C.
TlOSMER LOCAL
No. 2497
Meet every Tuesday evening in
the.Athletic Hall at 7.30.'   Sick
Benefit Society in'connection.
W. Balderstone, Sec.
Box 63. Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334
Meet every Sunday afternoon
at 2 o'clock in 'Crahan's Hail.
Sick Benefit Society attached.
H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet every Sunday. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached. '
Michael Warren, Sec.
Canmore, Alto.
HILLCREST LOCAL"
No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
in month. Sick and Benefit Society attached.
J, Gorton, Sec.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.
J. Mitchell, Sec.
Box 105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Me,et every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock ln the Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.
Frank Wheatley, Fin. Sec.
Bankhead. Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet every Sundny afternoon
in Miners' Hall. 2,30.
Frank Barrlngham, Sec.
Box 112. Coalhurst P. O.
LOCAL No. 3026
Max  Hutter,  Secretary.
Georgetown, Canmore, Alto
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2683
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.
J. Johnstone, Sec.
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. 2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak Hall. Sick Benefit Society attached,
"  Thos. G. Harries, Seel
Passburg, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.
in School House, Burmis. Ko Sick
Society.
Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. in
Union Hall, Maplo Leaf. No Sick
Society.
Thos. G. Harrle*. Sec.
Passhurg, Alta.'
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Wednesday,evening
at 7.30 in Miners' Hall, 12th Avenue North.
L. Moore, Sec.-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
in the Socialist Hall.
James Burke, Sec.
Box 36, Bellevue, Alta.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every Sunday at 3 o'clock
p.m.
John Loughran, Sec.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock in the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.
John Jones, Sec.
Corbin, B. C.
msm^s^m^^sss^smmmw^m^^s^m^ssm^s^^s^*^^^
am
We Handle All the Good
s You See Advertised in
the Big Magazines.
Thing
THIS store is headquarters.   You
will always find here everything
you would expect to find in a
similar store—and many things more.
We tpecialize on articles of genuine merit Articles
we have tested and tried ourselves and we can recommend and indorse.
You will find here all of the good—the best—the pick—
of the standard household articles advertised in magazines.
We add ourown guarantee to that of the manufacturer's.
We call yotu eipeekl attention to the O-Ccdsr P«li»h Mop,
thtfnatest boon to cteamr and better housekeeping we know ot.
With k vou an dust, dtan and pollih • hardwood floor with*
out sitting down on your hands and kneei. You can dutt the tops
of doort, the molding, the tops of high furniture without .standing
on chain. You can dtat and clean the itair «ep» and haninen in
bait tbe tine it lausBy take*.
You can dutt under the bed, and under heavy furniture without
moving It, and w> on throughout the hmne—wherever there li dint-
Ing to do. You can do It -quicker, eadef and better with the
0%-tdir Pollih Mon,
Unlike other duatlnc mope the 0*Cedar PolUh Mop can he
wtihed when wiled, and than tenawed bv adding a lew drops of
O-Ctdar Mi*.
We are io confident thai wu will be dt%hted with the
O^Cedar FoU-rti Mop that we will deliver one to your home nn two
deyt* trial If it U not subfactocy in every respect we do not es.
■act you to keep it, and will imtamty return your 11 •.. The
«fce<4theO.C»U»rP(>lUhMop,c«iBpltte,U#l.ja. Ututiead
j-mom M trial.
J. D. QUAIL, .    Fernie, B.C.
An Open Letter to
A. Juggins,
Esq.
On the Daily Mail Capitalist and His
Millions
By R. B. Suthers
(Editor's Xote.—Mr. R. B. Suthers
is one of the most famous writers on
the Clarion of London, and as hts remarks to the British Juggins are as
perfectly applicable to the species on
this side of the Atlantic they are here
reproduced, with the hope that Jugginses of all nationalities may profit
by them.)
Dear Mr. Juggins—I received., your
note inclosing a cutting from the
Daily Mail. I read the article on
"The Capitalist and His Millions: A
Working Man's Delusion." by "A. Labor .Mau," and dropped it in my waste
basket. Then I read your note, with
its challenge, and I picked the article
up again. You say, "I don't suppose
you'll have the decency or the pluck
to refer to this crushing indictment
of Socialism In the Clarion."
I assure you, ou my honor, Mr.
Juggins, that it was not the question
of pluck which impelled me to cast
the cutting Into the waste basket. It
was rather a question of decency, I
know the Dally Mail rates the intelligence of Its readers very low, but even
I was amused at the insolence of its
editor In offeriug his readers such a
farrago of flapdoodle as the article you
sent me.
Flapdoodle, Mr. Juggins, is the stuff
they feed fools on.
I did not at first, think it worth
notice. Hbwever, as you seem to have
risen to the bait, I will' accept your
challenge and try to show you that
the Indictment you think so crushing
Is merely piffle.   •<
The Daily .Mail, Mr, Juggins, is a
capitalist organ, whose object is to
keep the great family of workers ignorant, to the end that the great family of workers will continue contentedly to produce wealth for the small
family of the exploiters of labor.
Now the great family of workers
has recently begun to show symptoms
of revolt against this arrangement.
The great family of workers is beginning to ask for more of the wealth it
creates, and the small family of capitalist exploiters is beginning to get
alarmed.
What is causing this outburst ol
rebellion- against the exploiters? The
revolters, Mr. Juggins, have somehow
got into their heads the idea that Ihe
exploiters are taking an unfair share
tions of the original   £1,000 go to
make up the profits or incomes of
these people, ami are reviewed by
the revenue officers.   .   .   .   baDor
sees the total, ami jumps to the con*.
elusion that the whole lot has beeu
got out of its industry.
Now how do' these' facts prove that
the national wealth is not increasing
by  leaps  ahd hounds,  Mr.  Juggins?
Do you  understand how they prove
it? You don't. I don't. "A Labor Man"
doesn't   The paragraph is flapdoodle.
It*is perfectly true that some profits
are taxed more than once, maybe a
hundred, times. But that doesn't touch
the argument.    It Isn't a   new  fact.
It has always been so, Mr, Juggins.
It was just the same thirty years ago,
wheu the total income assessed for
income taxe was  C:!00,00fl,0<)0.   If you
are going to deduct certain amounts
from the total income because they
are taxed more than once, you must
do it for every year, and not alone
for the year when the total is £1,200,-
000.000. ■ ■   „
Again, Mr. Juggins, I wonder of it
occurred to you to ask yourself why
the Daily -Mall genius didn't' go on
to .prove that the £600,000,000 supposed to be received by labor must
really be much less than that sum?
When John Smith receives 'tis 30
shillings he immediately passes it on
to shopkeepers, eoal agents, doctprs
and other persons, many of whom do
not pay income tax.
Consequently, the incomes of these
shopkeepers and others who do not
pay income tax are counted over and
over again in the £ 600,000,000. ana
if "A Labor Man" owent into these
figures with the same dash he might
discover that labor's income is next
to nothing at all. .
Let us take another example of "A
Labor Man's" legerdemain. He says
labor forms all sorts of wrong
opinions about profits, and gives the
following illustration:
Sir Coalowner dies, leaving a fortune (in figures) of £500,000, La-
■bor leaders at ouce begin to count
up how many poor miners have slaved all their lives to make that half
million for that bloated capitalist.
It never occurs to these poor fools
concerns/professions, employments
and certain interests. The total is
£415,585,571.    .
.That is quite enough to flatten out
the flapdoodle figures, but schedule
D does not tell us all the story.
If you get the Inland Revenue Report, Mr. Juggins, and work out the
figures for yourself, you will find that
the capitalist class take in rent and
interest at least £700,000,000 of 'he
total national income. This is aU
sheer robbery.
The government" returns show income tax assessments of £1,20.0,000,-
000. The Daily Mail conjurer shows
that the capitalists only get £120,000,-
.000.
It is no mitigation of the robbery,
.Mr. Juggins, to argue that the rich
"pass on" a good deal of the wealth to
shopkeepers, doctors, dancers, motor
car manufacturers and others. How-
does that benefit the labor that has to
produce j-)xo food, the clothes, the
houses and the coal for all these hangers-on of the rich? Some of them do
useful work.   Many don't.
■Professor Marshall, not a Socialist,
estimated a few years ago that the
rich wasted at least £500,000,000 a,
year. Labor produces the wealth they
waste, not "pure speculation."
The Socialists' -ease against the present system does not rest wholly on
the unequal distribution of.the wealth
now produced.
It is not so much that the system
robs the producers of two-thirds or
three-quarters or seven-eights of the
wealth they create. It is that the present system prevents the people from
producing wealth in much greater
quantities.
Has it ever occurred to you, Mr.
Juggins, that it is an extraordinary
thing that a skilled workingman rarely earns £2 a week? After a century
of inventions, with all that science
and organization have done, don't you
think it a paltry result that £2 a,week,
(you know what that means in food,
clothing and hoveling) should be the
reward of*the'aristocrats.of labor?
""' And think of the, millions at £ 1 a
week, and the women and girls at 8
shillings and less, Mr. 'Juggins,
Xo. The unrest is not caused en-
that probably the major portion of j tirely by the question of whether the
the fortune is in plant and machin-j capitalists and landlords steal one-
<?ry, without which the miners could | third or two-thirds. There are two
not. work, and that very likely the! kinds of robbery. I can be robbed of
foundation of the fortune—the capj-j what I have got, and I can be robbed
tal that enabled the mine to be i of what I could get If I were free',
opened   and  equipped—was got  by      The  capitalist   system   is  a  rotten
<x
A Massachusetts judge has decided
that a blacklist is not a boycott and
is, therefore, legal. In other words,
after capitalism has assumed the job
of employing the people,-it has a right
to combine io_ refuse employment
wherever it likes and thus starve it3
victim to death. What does that lack
of being the most atrocious murders
upheld by the courts?
MEN WANTED
FURS to
JohnHallam
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prices and express charges, charge no com*
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Millions of dollars are jatiil Uap>
«
prs each )tar.     Deal with a leliame hous<
To Lean; the Auto Business and Take
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You can make from $18 to $50 a
week driving, selling or repairing cars.
Wa will teach you in a few weeks in
your own home to be an expert automobile man, and get you an agency
for a high grade car. We have been
established five years, and have over
6,000 successful gradiiares. Write at
once for free booklet, which gives full
information.
ROCHESTER AUTO SCHOOL j
CHURCH ST., ROCHESTER, N. Y. j
■A'e are the. largest ia 6ur line in Canada.
HALLAM'S TRAPPERS GUIDE
Irrm-h ttud EugUnh.
A t-ouk ct <>6 pug*-*, iul'y illustrated. Came
I-sn'a rrwvd to tinn-—tell* y<m how, uht-n
odd wh-rfe tn trap, l.ait and trap* to *u*>t-S and
many other vslu**Sie faat cuu^crnirtg the
J[aw for j}*t*hj>.!!y, aW> our " lip-to-lf).**.
miuut** " -for ou--iuti<.i^. *rr.t AHSOtXTE-
LV  FUCK ini the a*ltnig.     W:ue W-daj—
«««*• JOHN IIALLAM, Limited
Mail IVJ.U'JSS
111 l-rij-ul St. Kast,
TORONTO
A LEDGER AD IS A GOOD INVESTMENT
II
Return Limit
3 Months
Stopovers
East of
Fort William
VIA THE
Canadian.
Pacific
A.aiiway
First-class round trip fares from Fernie to
$7110
TORONTO, HAMILTON,
SARNIA, WINDSOR
MONTREAL, OTTAWA,
BELLEVILLE, KINGSTON
ST. JOHN, MONCTON
HALIFAX
Trains leave Fernie
17.30 daily and at
9.29 daily except
Sunday.   Inquire
regarding Sleeping
Cars.
$76.10
$90.40
$94.55
Corresponding fares from other points and
to all stations in ,.
ONTARIO,     QUEBEC     AND     MARITIME
PROVINCES
For booklet of information
and full particulars, apply to
any agent of the Canadian Pacific railway.
R. READING,   Agent     FERNIE
JJur£.^MSillaUMj_J2Lirooi_l«B?_for-
hicoonition or thi union
a labor union thst he will not r*cog-
  ul*** the union, and h« eveu goes «t
_.    .. .w   . .        .«...   ^t I f"r "*t0 fe" h,« •mplojw* 'i»«t unless
In nearly all iho tote conflict* owl thpy wa|f# |fc# rtf„t w WoBf f0 ,
'irf  Irt.-.'-i'** '-   ""'    '■",*,'•,'•   ',*",    M«'1.,*.,.»   I49.nn*9*99,tl . „   t*,,,
■ m#nt for fhMn
1* I*     ■ 94,91*1.,.
iL<,).Afj; thi- srrttt hnrrtfr tHnt •#*w«
to rttM> tip. U tti« "wcoptHlon of th*
vntoft." Tb* "captain of Indoairr," tf
tetonM* thtt alttti-ftUoB wiib mm ol
bl« efau» would not bt recognised
w««M bowl ttlth lo<UfJwtlon ami de-
maud ft? what auinomy •*»-» »»w**»m
wan -danlad htm. Ita would Inattt tbat
tba fMMdon to ratar an association of
omployara aball aot ho abridged, and
bla attitad* qadar tb« prtaant indot-
trial ayatam ttonld not be qnatttoitad
or ebaUsagad by man of lnt*lllg»ne«.
iini lba rtabt mUtW the eot»tayev ap
tn th* «tftt« of iMtrhtgnn tb* rnmwr
•baron* hare doctored their witlingnoM
lo cotttedo tba atgbt-faotir d*> anil th*
minimum wago of f3.M, trat In grant-
In* tboao conce«»loni which have been
IUt«vU )f«MN MMM* UMW-Witt  UM *W<*«i
of organlied labor, thar declare tbat
tbo Western Federation ttt Minera
aball not bo reeognlwd and tbat aver?
strik«r wbo was one* a tormor employee most renonneo hia allogtane*
te tbat organisation, are bo shall ba
■^wtttt-U'-i to ruUun to the mttu".!.   ttt
ppopriawa to bittntlf and which Is np-1 tbo stato ef Colorado tbo coal barons
UM bif tlu: law. he dcnl-'s to th-1* tnnt* h&r(* •siinttkA Wr trlW.ng^*-M to
wbo ta dependent on a Job. Tht' ew- gimM ttmct-mttm* to the mrlkiuu tml
ployer batengn to an organisation of I miners, bnt refoaa to rwognlio tb*
bla class, bat this samo «np]o)*r wbo, Unlt«4 Min* Wetftera of Amtim.
Ima nwrtressad his interest* behind tb* The -workers may b* tamperartly dt.
hnl walks of an employers' association, | feat«d In tbelr struggle* and battles
a mino operators' association or a j to rwieb m bigber plane oi ett(iinttoa.
mm«lsrtttr«iT» iiaao«ittU«>*^, uli» UU, Ui. kk» UUv wttuuli^UiM, l'ik*t ***
slavo tbat dopsttds npon * Job. tbot be | tmrn ef economto storery will lire
mnsl eome to bim as an individual, if until ibe tost bnted vestige ot the pro-
fee iH any frievwMOs to lw adjoatod. f flt evatam Is iantohed from tbe face
Be teUa Mt off^oyeoa wbo beleog to of tbo eertb.—Miners' Magasla*.
Is increasing by leaps apd bounds in
the hands of the few, while the many
are still poor, or poorer than before.
Some of them are actually talking
about a bloody revolution in order to
Obtain their rights.
The exploiters are alarmed. They
do not wish to lose their plunder, any
of it. Something must be done.
What?
A brilliant genius in the Daily Mall
office comes to the rescue. "Show
the people that these ideas about capital robbing labor are delusions. Give
them the true facts and figures. You
can do anything with figures. '-Let
the stuff be written by an alleged
Labor Man, bne of their own class.
Then they will swallow it."
Now let us look at this antidote to
labor unrest. Mr. Juggins. The Labor
Man says that "our national wealth
js not increasing by leaps and bounds,
the profits and salaries of the lncom»
tax paying portion of the community
aro not growing by hundreds of ml!
lions, nnd greedy capitalists are not
robbing the workers of two-thirds of
the product of their labor, or anything like It."
I Now, Hi'rordliig to estimates made
; by various experts, the national In-
j come has Increased as follows:
I    1904     .CUHMKKMWO
I    1913     C 2.200.000,000
j    The Dally Mall mnn *nys It hasn't
i Increased   by   "leaps   and   bounds."
j Well, Mr, Juggins, are you getting 93
j per cent more in U*n than you did In
11104?   if you wert» you would think It
leaping and bounding, wouldn't you?
But atop.   Does the Daily Mall man
rIvm any ovldencu t'o prove that the
national wealth  Itt not leaping and
bounding?
Ye*. What tlot** lie say? He says,
flr»it. that "th*- growth of th<» check
system has accelerated the circulation
of money."
Do yon understand how lhat fact
proves that th* national wealth has;
not leaped and bounded, Mr. Juggins? I
You don't. I don't. The wrltor Of j
th* article doesn't. II* put that ln|
for tli* Juggins family. It dc»*n"e do
anything but fill up spac*. j
Secondly, h* stales that "iu<>om*a
sr* mor* carefully reviewed" bv the j
Income Tax Commisslonere i.vu* f«r-j
m*rly.
»Vf(tr« ««• "formerly"?   Tlw  !v.Uy
Mail doesn't say    As a fsct tit** In-'
♦ ami's bar* been carefully revj. %fd )
ror the last seven years,  to that can'i
account for tbo lucres** In tbe flgun * \
Now  w# come to his third proof \
Mr.  Jaggitis.    I   sua,   suim   t.LiU   m:l
mlshtlly Impressed yon.   It to so sun
«4 tor the Jtuwins ia(*mi*gvu«e.
.1 Uw .i,1..,1. ^u-.A.i.-:
"Look," says the Socifltlst. "ih* '
amount assessed for income tax baa j
grown by hundreds of mtlllona. and i
now  approaebos   Cl.ioo.wo.ooo a|
r*«r   wbtl* w»«re« Ao  no.  **+**4
abont half tbat snm,"
Then "A Labor Man" shows bow tb*
foot Socialist Is mistaken.   Tbe Incomes ef Income tai payers amount to
CI,:<».o<W.0OO.   Yoa, aaya "A Labor
Men." "bat tlguree aro not always
feet!*"
Tbe; are not, Mr. Juggins.
"Many a pound ef tbo tncom* tax
ts count*-*! »«v*rsl  t»m*M» u-n-t. -**!••*>
taied aoveral times over within  *
yoar.**  Haye "A L*ber Man":
An *mploy*r. fer tnatanc*. may
make £1.<M» pMM. Tbat ts duly
«*w>«.*wHI, t**i«-4 and reetHM Mo«»
of tbe money le iaesaadlsMv pass«Ht
on ro tttmm* Dt idintif i*r», w«r-
chants, snpp'.lare bf virions mil**
rials,  a*rv«nf.*, ag*nt«.    Mnny oi
tunate capitalists and not from labor
at all,
That is crushing. Isn't it, Mr. Juggins? Just think. We poor fools believe that all wealth is made by work,
but the Daily Mail genius tells us that
wealth can be made by "pure speculation."
What is "pure speculation," Mr.
Juggins? Have you ever seen any
wealth that was made by "pure
speculation"? You haven't. I haven't
The Daily Mall flapdoodle hasn't,
But he thinks you are such a Juggins
that you will believe lt when he
says It.
Where did the £500,000 worth of
plant and machinery come from?
Didn't men delve for the iron, and
work it up into machinery? Working men. How otherwise could :t
come Into the mine, Mr. Juggins?
And how did one man come to own
£500,000 worth of plant and machinery, Mr. Juggins? The wages ot iron-
wbrkers and machinists are, say, C2
a week. To make £500,000 worth
would then tako ono man 2R0.O00
weeks- over 4,800 years. How did one
man come to own tho rosult of so
much labor?
Certainly not by liis own work, Mr.
Juggins. Was it by "pure speculation"?   Oi by robbery, shall we say?
Every penny of that C500,000 (In
plant urn) machinery.) except what
was saved by Hie owner out of the
amount really and actually created by
his own labor was «tol«n from thc
workers, Mr. Juggins,
MS,temi..not only .because, it robs tho
worker of much he does produce"but
because it stands in the way of the
production of the much greater wealth
which, under Socialism, would provide
plenty for the rational wants of the
whole people.
Wc are really a verv roor natio'i.
We are really a very poor nation,
not a rich nation. Jlr. Juggins, and It
ls tbe object of the present bwners of
land and capital to keep the bulk of
us poor. «
The Dally Mall is anxious to make
you believe that we are all brothers
in poverty. The poor capitalist! Didn't
you weep when you read "A Labor
Man's" final example, Mr, Juggins?
.Writing of the coal Industry, he
said, "Capital only gets a net profit of
sixpence per ton. In other words, labor gets out of this Industry a shilling
for every penny taken by capital."
Think ot lt! Labor getting twelve
times as much as poor capital. As if,
Mr. Juggins, labor were one man and
capital one man.
But when you know that there are a
million In the labor army and only a
few hundred in the army of capitalists,
the division does not seem so remarkably equitable.
Arid tloptt capital only «teal sixpence
u ton, Mr. Juggln>»?
How Is It. then. Mr. Juggins, Hint
capital pays Income tax riti £40,000,000
coal profits, whereas if the Dally Mail
conjurer were correct, tliey would only
pay on £«,5iMt,uoii''
Really. Mr, .tiiseliM. I think I li'tve
been  perhaps  too con.-iderate  itt  as-
Working mens
Now Open Under New Management
Four First Class
Pool & Billiard
*=^ Tables =^
REFRESHMENT   BUFFET   ATTACHED
No fee charged to use Club, which is open to all.
B. Rawson
Manager
Legall)? Oh, yes. legally atolen. 1 ■,"",»* rhl,t "»«' ,mlH" W,,K written
We do all our big stealing legally.! *»' -* cl*vor juggler. Kit* h piffle could
What hi- lawynrs in Parliament lor? , 0"'>' l>uvf' h,i'"" *"""«*■»• ''V-n iuiwlm«.
Sim!! I tfo on?   Yes. there are one
or two more gems ot logic nnd arith-;
inctlc '.v'ik'h will perhaps repay atten- j
lion.
Here A ii knockout blow. "A Labor Man" says:
If n u.ll (he Su'. i.l!.M» ».<)  .Uoi tie'
wnrkirt- n think were Irttc—If It w«*re ;
corr'*et that labor only get* about j
one third  of  what   It   produces-—It [
wou'd follow that on the averag* the )
workman with .Ht nhillinjt* a week in
wirnlfiH £3 for somebody *l»c   Hut
wim! I* the fact*   Taking Hrttlsh In
du»ir> throiigh,  it   n-tjulrcs i,n}iital
•equal to   tl'.O to employ a skilled
wwrliBiin for a v»»(ir     ,\* the dlvl-
dend**!  do  not   **uit*ti   ,*.   per  cent
sprctd over bad  a*  w«!l  as  jtrmd
tlmeg, it will bf; (wen thst cspltsl
g*t» no more than labor,  CT UH   i
yttsr fur cinli man -raipkiycd.   Yet,
If we aceept tlm gospel of Soclalltnt,
wv shell b*l|ev* thst capital tabes
*  • • , t ..■%,        n.i,9*i-
«hn*r»>
Vrtw, Mr. Juggins, Jnst pntl your Intellect together and try to follow mc
in a Miiiall snm In arithmetic
The number of manual workers Is
atom .'..000,000. Ut ua say Jg.000,.
mm to m en ta* rignt siaw.
The Daily Mall expert aaya that
capital makes £7 Ida. ner oeroon employed Multiply £7 10t. by l«.«WO,000
and wp z*H £110.000,000. That Is lb*
snm wV"-ti tbe Dally Mali telta yon.
Mr. Jnsgins, Is (he whnl* robbery of
lnhor-
Now 'urn to tb* Oally Mall Year-
U«,k .... ".yl". Mr. .hin'A.v.'. f.tS,-' "1n
Ves. •;■•• Dally Mail YfttiUouk, nol the
Clsrlon Yesrbook.
Voi mil (ini (ber* portMars of
liH'ora-1'*. dclwdnla I». from  bu*ln«i»
SfUMiOM
tb#t* *r» tncoDf^tt gtyvrr. m pur- »7?'*-. -■ I*' •--*■. e> cmm»
-New York Call. !
HE  LIKED THE SAMPLE !
"ll is tilt* funniest thitin," remarked ]
a father In (llrard the other day. "I f
haie been very careful that my bov <
should not loaf on the strict. The j
other evening he didn't -.now up until j
dark. I asked him win r. he had been. I
Intending to be very m vere «n htm* j
Hut when he replied. A« the school j
bonne working on a cu.arit ti»r t'liiUt- \
mitt*,' t couldn't xay :i wurd. You «ee j
that I* the wault of Inmiiilltig iiiHtiuul *
training ln the (iirnrd n. huol»* All j
day Thanksgiving he wnn at the school I
tioiine, ptsiiiiiK ainl • iniM-iiiiii,, «.;;..!..►!, .
ml..,ul Aa» not tn scsiloii. It in the ,
first time I »>ver knew children tn this
town to go lo ttchool when they didn't
tmve tn Anil the*, tell me (list all tb#
boy* *r*> jtmt »* much Interested a«
( HI)   00>'|U."
The ll««en«r   who wss a Hoclallst.
repl|«K|:   if tin* mm. sociaostic les
t ilil* *ui *..-*■ 9* »   *.*  .. ■«  *...»»•'.. *.v...   *   ...
Itm* tosti, it i» i." tkt.f.tltt iico'A-f nre
J afraid «oelsti«m itiielf will completely
J upset society."
'    "It looks that way." smiled th* par
t.n*       "\r-it   tt-.'    t(M||.   pffl   t*    lt*nl    »*
' much Interesti**\ In «fomcitlc nclene*
|Sbo not only a'tendu *v*ry class, but
: sh« also tinkers ahout the kitchen all
• her spsr»- time, and Is learning to do
j wondarful cooklnsr.'*
\    "%mm* to be inclined to break up
the home, *hf"
,    Tlwre nits uu ais.^'cr    Aiu>»-ni u>,,
• Reason, I
I    A class wm in prowess In Indian-j
' M-tHtiit, thitti M-hyUTi :.,',   '.t-M'-f ViA gOftU ;
will"—lh* empiiutuit tin.* tetmlriK to'
ultti this wotki-r- * ryi-ixii »*f their own j
lpr*adtMi «*» *■■***-■■■ .'.'« *i. '■■ ->•' ■h-t-i-'M .
hi. Tl...'.' .-.*'• ' ' "" f-X'i^'in f*T*
pesee on *nrtn *■>» M-us ** •***> Portion i
*of Wkn'n pr.i.lu. * '• -tfhhfM frftm labor, i
%
HIGH CLASS
Ladies' and Gent's
=TAILORS=
Dress Suits From
$45 to $55
Fur Coats Etc.
Made To Order
DeBurle & Birkbeck
Next Calgnry Mra! Marktt
P. O. Box 54-! Form* PC
C. E. L YONS
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on first cass Business and Residential property
■_%> m
|A t«^
., tk    •      -f 1 -Jj -7*j*,f-".'~
. J:Cr \": i
v-  •■- s ;•'
' ^•^^'^£-i'-f-.d - ^*u"* "■2^'**''"
PAGE FOUE
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, Et C:, JANUARY 3, 1914.
Published every Saturday morning at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. 0. Subscription $iiOO
per year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager
Telephone No. 48      Post Office Box No. 380
WHAT YOU WANT AND WHAT YOU GET!
The following is an extract i'roin a speech by Sir
"Wilfrid Laurier delivered at a banquet at Hamilton. Out, recently:
"1 told you at the beginning: that new problems are continually arising. There are latent
forces which, unnoticed, silent aud unforeseen,
work out problems which were never dreamed
of. . .
"The question which is discussed at tliis moment is nol the price ol' dreadnoughts. It is the
problem of making ends meet as between expenditures and income.
"A table of .statistics lately compiled by ihe
British board of trade, which is known for its
accuracy, has stated that the cost of living had
increased seven per cent in Great Britain during
the last decade and in Canada 51 per cent. Now
just one point here. Reflect that Canada produces yearly 200,0110.00.0 bushels of wheat, while
ihe consumption is only 50,000,000 and the surplus has to find a market abroad. Up to this
time practically the only market lias been the
market of Great Britain. If then we reflect that
Great Britain has to import all' the wheat which
she consumes and .if we reflect further that the
price of the wheat and the price of bread is
••heaper in Great Britain than iu Canada, then
you would have to agree with me that there must
be something rotten in the state of Denmark.
Canada."
Having read the above, a visitor from Mars (presuming, of coursQie were unacquainted''"with the
ed'? Just long enough to tell them that they were
the most impossible of possible solutions to the present conditions that prevail. ,
"The reason you have never gotten what you
"want "is because you have never known how to get
it,' but once remove from the mind the fusty, moldy
hypocritical teachings of capitalism and the worker will KNOW—for he cannot do otherwise.
THE NEW YEAR
News of the District Camps
(Continued from Page 5)
TABER  NOTES
methods of politicians on this sphere) Avould immediately arrive' at the conclusion that the British
Isles was the one and only spot on earth and that
free trade tlie only logical solution to the problems
that beset this glorious and wide domain.     And,
of course, this is so, according to Sir "Wilfrid, so he
and the man from Mars might agree.   But should
the latter extend his trip and visit the older country that* has embraced and retained Sir Wilfrid's
panacea for the present evil, what, reader, do you
think would be the state of that individual's mind,
•devoid as it would be of all political prejudice?
After the astronomic visitor had seen the throngs
leaving tlie British Isles, after he had visited the
slums, seen the female chain workers, the pit brow
girls, the unemployed, the discontent nnd poverty
prevailing there, would he credit the leader of Liberalism with being ignorant or insane?   Or would
lie tell him that it did uot seem to make one iota of
difference whether food stuff had increased seven
l»er cent or seven hundred, there was just as much
want, just as much discontent aud just as much
cause for di-'corileiil !
As .i mailer of fact, he would not have to go to
the Hid Country, thanks to the press, he might
read llie i'ejMit'1. uf Sir Wilfrid's oration itt one portion and then turn to another column of llie .same
pa„'.  am! find the following:
MANV SLTTLKHS FliuM GKRMANY
OTTAWA, out     Dr, li. W. Schuvihs. nf tier-
many, is in the .-ity niakiny arrangements for
llu* e-laiilislunu'   ot   a   cuinp,ni\   Willi   s,*. tit 10.lit lil
..,,, i ,!  ,. I,: .1    .   It!   I   .        *'   *   '• ,   * '       ■■■-.,
■>'■■• ...**,,.. , -tiMl     I.f.     fl ,,,{,
•■nt .mi nf O'l-niiait f,iiii!i|..«i ii im (!.'*i|v **, cuu.*
1     ...!... -Mij.j'i.v ii»ui iin-in  witn i.>ii*i and  i.iriu
S*ii,'!> ..... I*! -    ".■.be||    tliey    [.'et     i|e|V    ,|||.l    ,| I'I'.111 Lfi 11 L*
t i,,li     i lie    i   . "Hiie-.    s».!| V    t mj,.'. bef.
Tile   e.tlH I ... 'e.    i*\|l,•!-!*,  j,,   I,H!|'/  ullt   '.l.'lll   f:lt*i:!iev
I*.",!    -*!.e. Iilf.
bi iii'.:. i a' -•"•" f.imiiie**, ;., ■,  .•.matey  wliriv
l.",ii t'Iin nnd •,,..f.. l-u-i.. ',-, ,,( <,!,,.,:   il,-,.,
■•uiMln.e ami ■»• tier,- jiri* .--, i,.i •
l!    W il It:.I   tit.-   t'.sf    In
Another year has been logged and we are now
entering the year of 1914, with, it is presumed, the
usual resolutions. There was a time when we told
these good resolutions to our friends and impressed
upon them our determination to "stay with 'em."
But as we,advanced in years and wisdom ?) Ave
became more reticent about our intentions and
possibly the fact that our paving contracts with the
nether regions had been a little too heavy may
account for this reticence. Resolutions arc fine
things, but the trouble is that the man who waits
for the New Year lo make up his mind is invariably
in the same, position as the man who is waiting for
tomorrow—he wails.
In this town alone there are a number of tradesmen who carry union-made goods and there are a
number who do NOT carry union-made goods. Let
it be thoroughly understood iu the first place that
we thorbttghly appreciate the economic side of this
question, and realize that union goods cost more
than goods made in sweat shops where unfair conditions prevail.   In this town, however, there are
more union men, in proportion to its population,
than in most towns of its size.   Here, if anywhere,
there should prevail a strong feeling in favor of
union-made goods, and yet, strange to say, rarely
if ever do you see the tradesmen advertise the
union label.   Aud,,why?   Because you never ask
for it!   You inner troubled a, tinker's damn whether your shoes were union made or non-union
made.   And starting at your shoes we fininsh at
your hat—all scab made.   Your excuses are many
—the favorite one beiug that you can't afford
union made clothes or boots; or that you don't
think it "cuts any ice" whether you ask for the
union label or not, the other fellow don't seem to
care, so why should you?    Excellent logic.    You
never stop to think how ridiculous your-position
is; you never seem to realize that independent of
the other fellow you must do your share.   Oh, no!
You prefer to fall back upon the threadbare economic argument—you can't afford to.   And while
you are in this state of mind you never will afford
it.   By insisting on the union label you are accomplishing some very useful propaganda work.   The
tradesman   who   is   being   repeatedly, asked   for
^tOTTr~iTiadff*"MTrtn very qTOiny"^^!!^"!!^!?
has to lay in a stock of union goods if he wishes'
to retain 'your patronage.    He buys more than
enough to satisfy your demands because he realizes
that there may be others demanding the same. Aud
if you stop to think the position of a retailer becomes patent.   He will 'always get what his patrons
want—if he wishes to stay in business.   Now you
have not WANTED union made goods or the local
tradesmen would have them on sale.
Here, then, is a New Year's resolution for you:
Ask for the union label and see you get it! There
is another way whereby you can help your paper,
and this at no great trouble or additional expense.
And that is by watching the advertising columns
of the Ledger and supporting those who seo fit to
use the columns of your paper. This will not cost
you any extra aud will help us a whole lot. When,
yon purchase any article you have seen advertised
in the Lodger, tell the tradesman; by so doing you
are helping both us aud the tradesman. The cost
to you is nil.
There arc in this district a number of people
who never advertise in Ihis paper, but who handle
a considerable amount of the mine workers' money.
Now, "reciprocity" is a nice thing, and it is our
iiileiilion to boost those firms who see fit to uso
these eolumns, and by ;i little thought on your part
I you can help a whole lot. You fun make this anoth-
! er \ew Year resolution; I'atrotiize those tradesmen
1 who use the Ledger to advertise tlieir wares.
j     Ji!-.! one more; What about lhat dollar Mllwcrip-
i tinn '    Imi'i  it iifiiclv time you paid it"   This w;ll
j alsn help 1-on^ii.lerably. Now. wli-'lher volt wi'l make
I tbe*.).  .'..uii   ]v<ii,l!i!b*tix  ;l!;d  keep  them  Wc  do   in-'
I know, bul if vou make a slain we will most ,;>r-
! tii::n'y take up where yu,! leave off and keep tlm
' ball rolliiur tm<U 1!.M5.    Willi bent wihh.s for the
;  IUVm ll!    \ rill'.
The new year promises to start iu
with a very inauspicious beginning
for the miners of this camp, as the
Canada West mine will be idle until
Monday. This company has so far
this season had the greatest run of its
history. There has; not been an idle
day since early In July and the output
per day has far exceeded any previous
year.
Pres. Smith and Board Member Rees
were visitors to Taber a few days ago
and attended a special meeting of
Local 102. This was the first time ive
had th© pleasure of hearing Pies.
Smith address a meeting of our local,
and, while the meeting was not as
well attended as we would have iikeu
to see, a very appreciative audience
listened to the speakers. To say tlie
least, Pres. Smith without any attempt at oratory, created a very good
impression and made lots of friends.
Bro, Rees addressed the nieeing In nis I
usual style and gave a very interesting nccount of the affairs of the organization In different district. Under the
present regime Taber has at least no
reason to complain from inattention
on the part of the district officers, as
during the last six months we have
been visited more often than In the
four previous years to our knowledge.
Tlie hospital question is at present
engaging the attention of the miners
of this vicinity. Tho municipality of
Taber has erected a hospital, but has
not provided funds to furnish it, consequently the building is standing
smpty.. The Canada West Coal Co.
has offered to furnish a ward of four
beds, and to supply coal and light at
cost, The ladies of the town have
raised $250 in aid of the furnishings,
and a tag day ou pay day realized
over $100. It will take at least $1,000
to put the hospital in readiness for
operation.   The miners have made a
Air. Tom Moody occupied the chair
and in his usual genial style introduced the artistes. Several of the
artistes deserve special notice, but
experience has taught the scribe that
this would be unwise, for the following reasons. In the early part of last
year Beaver 'Mines could boast of an
Amateur Orchestral Society second to
none in this part of the Dominion;
they gave several concerts, for which
they received unstinted praise, and all
went merry as a marriage bell until a
favorable report appeared in the Ledger and a few of the performers had
nice things said about them. This
was the beginning of the end. The
performers that got noticed considered themselves superior fo those who
did not, and were forever shaking the
Ledger in the faces of the others.
Then like school girls squabbling, and
refusing to play if they can't be the
mother, they squabbled and eventually the society became a wreck. As S.
C. John Loughran was voted a success. After the concert the floor was
cleared for dancing, which was carried on to the wee sma' oors.
Look out in next week's Ledger for
an up-to-date recitation on the Sen-
vvhenydd disaster, S. W, England.
lot at the eheckweigh election. Just
at the time our Local Union notes
came tb hand several contract miners
brought jn a protest about the scrutineers using words of intimidation while
taking the ballot..' ■ A' special contract
miners' meeting will be held next Sunday and the charge against the scrutineers will be thrashed out. If there
has been any unfair means of getting
certain men in let us have it brought
to light.
President Smith was in camp on
Tuesday visiting ' the new (so-called)
No. S seam. Let us hope to hear of a
speedy settlement as to what seam it
really is. All the men up the mountain want to know what the result will
be. We don't want to be over-reaching in what we ask of the coal company, but anything fair and in accordance with the agreement is all we ask.
Our secretary wonders himself, sometimes "shall we ever be able to settle
matter (we may say, in blunt words,
'grievances') with the company's officials?" We claim that we are sufficiently intelligent to understand the
agreement, although plenty of bluff
seems to 'be prevalent.
HOW'S THIS?
We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case of Catarrh that
cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh
Cure. ■■'■"•
F. -J, CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O.
We, the undersigned, have known F.
Douglas McDowell had the misfor- j •/,- Cheney for the last 15 years, and be-
.  . .    ..     .     ,, ",,   .     ! lieve   him   perfectly  honorable   in  all
tune to sprain his shoulders on Christ-   business   transactions  and   financially
mas day.   lie was medically attended   ?bl<; ,to P.*™? out any obligations made
by Dr. Deleney. The doctor does not
consider the injury serious and thinks
he will be all right again in a few
weeks.
Leslie McDowell was down from
Calgary last week spending the holidays at the home of his parents. He
has almost gj-own out of ken since he
left the mine here two years ago.
Joe Kubasic buried his baby boy,
six months old, at Pincher Creek on
Xmas eve. The child died from pneumonia at Pincher Creek hospital the
day previous.
A public meeting was held in the
Presbyterian Church, Beaver, on Monday evening, for the purpose of forming a new school district. At present
the Beaver Mines township is almost
by his firm.
NATIONAL BANK OP COMMERCE,
Toledo, O.
Hairs Catarrh Cure la taken Internally,
actlnpr directly upon the blood and mucous surfaces ot. the system. Testimonials sent free. Price 75 cents per-bottle.    Sold by all Druggists.
Take Hall's Family Pills for constl-
I WONDERFUL DISCOVERY
An eminent scientist, the other day,
gave his opinion that the.most wonderful discovery of recent years was
the discovery of Zam-Buk. Just
think! As soon as a single- thin iayer
of Zam-Buk is applied to a wound or
a sore, such Injury is insured against
blood poison! Not one species ot
microbe has been found that Zam-Buk
does not kill!
Then again. As soon as Zam-Buk
is applied to a sore, or a cut, or to
skin disease, it stops the smarting.
That is why children are such friends
of Zam-Buk. They care nothing for
the science of the thing. All they
know is that Zam-Buk stops their
pain Mothers should never forget
this.
Again. As soon as Zam*J3uk is applied to a 'wound or to a diseased
part, the cells beneath the skin's Bur-
face are so stimulated that new
healthy tissue is quickly formed. This
forming of fresh healthy tissue from
below is Zam-Buk's secret of healing.
The tissue thus formed is worked up
to the surface and literally casts off
the diseased tissue above it This is
why Zam-Buk cures are permanent.
Only the other day Mr. Marsh, of
101 Delorimler Ave., Montreal, called
upon the Zam-Buk Co. and told them
that for over twenty-five years he
had heen a martyr to eepma. His
hands were at one time bo covered
with sores that he had to sleep in
gloves. Four years ago Zam-Buk was
introduced,to him, and. to",a few
months it cured him. To-day—over
three years after his cure of a disease
he bad for twenty-five years—he ls
still cured, and has had no trace of
any return of the eczema!
All druggists sell Zam-Buk at BOc.
box, or we will send free trial box if
you send this advertisement and a lc.
stamp (to pay return postage). Address Zam-Buk Co., Toronto.
■proposition to the directors that they I equally divided between the Gladstone J
would donate one dollar per man immediately to buy equipment, providing
that they would sign an agreement to
furnish hospital attendance to them
and their families for a levy of fifty
cents per month. No answer has yet
been returned, but it seems that the
directors do not think this enough.
They claim that the miners represent
about three-fifths of the population,
and according to their own figures at
one dollar per month the miners
would pay seven eighths of the cost
of operation of the hospital, and they
have been generous enough to give
us joneistxth'bf "the renreSPntattnn nn
the board'of directors.
Something new was introduced into
the social life of the eaihp this season
in the shape of a Christmas tree for
the children. A collection was taken
on pay day with this object in view
and the money expended iu buying
toys and useful articles for the youngsters, A nice program was drawn up
and the hall decorated for the occasion, The arrangements were in
charge of an able committee as follows: A. McRoberts, J. Mclvor^ H,
Brooks, W. Black, G, Verral and R.
Jones, After the toys were distributed, tea and cake was passed around
and n very enjoyable time was had.
On Christmas Day the baud visited
sevoral places In town and played
music appropriate to the occasion.
Arrangements have been made for
the reopening of the Canada West
llbrilry. This formerly used to bo carried on at tlio mine, but allHhe property has been moved to the .Miners'
Hall, and will bc run in connection
with the local union. The commltteo
lu eliurgo am making arrangements
to lun'c nil thij principal labor papers
of tint world ftirttiiilic-n to the members
and to nink-H the hull a place or social
resort,
Wlint nppears to have been aTob-
bcry of tlio mail took place hero on
Tuesday tnoniltiK. A mail bag cut
open-and" the mail strewn In all directions wuh found on the sou tit side
un Tuesday moruliii* by some chll-
' ilrttii, who brmijiiit some of the letters
home to their parents, who immediately phoned for the police. It ««emn
that tin- has w,,** tlu'owtt off uh *sa*l-
bound train to bt- transferred to a
.wai tuna,li t,Uf, ,tu«i in tiiti interval
Wil
It  tiiilll  found  it.   the  moniliijr     No
trace hat) been lmind so far of the
Valley school district and the Coal j
Fields school district, but as both
schools are over two miles from the
townsite, young children could not
make the journey, especially in bad
weather. The meeting, though not
very large, was fairly representative.
'Mr. Tom Moore and Mr. Norman Morrison, who have been moving in the
matter previously, were appointed
president and secretary respectively.
After touching upon the great inconvenience caused to parents.and children o.wififc to the school being so far
away, and pointing out bow important
It. Ir thnt  a   ai>tinnl  ritgtrtrl gta*a;iJj_W
formed for the town immediately, the
chairman called upon Mr, 'Mprrbon,
secretary, to read the correspondence,
which passed between him and government officials on the matter. Alter
several questions had been answeied
and matters in connection with the
correspondence discussed, it was moved by J..Loughran and seconded by
H. Prior that the government be asked
to grant immediate powers to form
a school district in the town of Beav-
er Mines. This was unanimously
agreed t'o, and a committee, consisting
of John Loughran, Harry Prior and
Harry Drew to act in conjunction with
the chairman and secretary, were appointed.
t
t
MICHEL NOTES
Sorry to announce William Porter
met with an accident whilst following
his employment ln Xew Michel, although hi* Injury (Iopb not appear ».-?•
Hour. We wish him nlso a speedy recovery. , I
We uro sorry to announce Joe Hal-1
still Is sick. A hp-sejy recovery we all j
wish. Also. Mrs. T. A. Murphy, who j
haw been uiiablc to leave the house for j
over ii weeli, We wish lit>r a!»o a I
speedy recovery.
Just a won! about New Michel, If i
you will allow me, please. I must!
congratulate the New Michel people!
who lmvo done well In ranking the
sidewalk. Don't forjtet they want help
for the lighting nf th* tn*\n. I mt'tl-1
Honed in a previous Isiuc Old Town '
Mitt*-- h.->.i.  r   t'-'y. Tiiiixu.:, i*.*A\tj',
l'tt di \
Ui.'V .■„..
li-.i'N    e,|!i
S<
J''
if
\ . i \v.
..'!*''
•I
el,,*;,
.I,),.'
..(■■ il.'ll
.:..   tit.
the
1  < .
T.
, , , , ,  the benefit***, uf New Town  no let iim
<i..|e„ and tuning wan known of j wl„rofBt,    ,;,|l(,trlp „„„,'  «J*J*
i walks U jimt what we want and we
•mllty piirtlos. | "U,S!  hny* ,h"'"'
iu,,, ,..,,, '    'i'l**'   ll;""l   was  out   on   rtu-igt'iri;!
.-"wKX?»'?-^«!sl:"V;^•M,surr",o'.,',,,:
■ ii.,,        ,        ,       ... ,,    i»eut'H.    \\e aro coin tie ; of a gtw
del Iiiih leased a mine nt (IrnsiO Lake. I .„...., ,,,;, v ,„ «■«,,.- *,.„ .
titey will operatu for the nestt
•y\o yenrs.
ii,hi   If
• ii.
M.u
.in..!  .
(li'.nii*
mini
1.1.»!!.•;■   s'n   |*1<-t!lifii!
. lh,;t  '<>■ ii..iiii   ami tfUii'.i.ii**, i.ii.. |v,i |,:ir-
ty were   ti [,<,wer, uhile here iii t'liniula llie wiHo.l
l»«'i.t ...nl T..rieH i-fitrn tiiipreme;    Sli.itl.--, .il' Sat'.mt!
 mil,   ,ii, iif|/m#i ,1 ,<nt*    *>(»>. .Hv iiiii,    i >M|HI
,. **       . .)• .,*.,.       1 1,11    I MlltllMMll    til*    till'    ill,III     ll'lllll
Mar* ii"\v Ititiuj tin you tlniik, rciuler, wntiiii iMiher
**i iin*** u*t*.i'h    l.iH'nitisiii ami Torvi-»m    t>e tnlet'itt
lo the Citizens of
Fernie
At the request of a number of thc ratepayer and
i.itizens, I offer myself as a candidate for re-elec-'
port th. in better and good ruiitlu wil'
follow, .ve are sure.
BEAVER MINES NOTES
Hi
!>,,:,*i
M. ...
vmrtt nurprist-J to hear the rival t
•Iti't-cr the tUlllie ct !'*l*-|.y  Jusn .»* i
Hand.    Tin.- iii..;iu>in..|iii»   <%.!ie,
T^.^^^-^-^JI Ttt.» Wood musical toy*.   The 4001IJ
^ * ''I.'. t- helped al.uif <iul'e a he     The '
Tin* Christmas   tree <'iitertant!iu»nt ! dl-Jdies txto all layiutt "We'll beat lilm j
ie-iil 1111   Xma* eve -it   !i,*tv»'r   Mint's. ■■''•'  y*nr."
was a urem   mc< I'** fnnn  til!   \bw-,    ru*i   Invitation   tj-.uit.-e   iu Cnthaii'ii j
iHiliim,  The faet th a* --lose upon |120;h,,ii was fairly   .sell ivpicieuted out,,
.„ .      ,,, ., .„ .        ,,  ..   , "'"""i "r   iu't ■. ti'-t   •■y.ir*   dUi.i.uW'il , ..ji'  wnilo e* ery thing waa going well I
tion as Mayor.  A puulie meeting will be called to ; „„,„„«„, ,h„ *„ r,,»idrwi under t: be-1   *i,iW Pie„». •   qmu a mvVn*r, »i- ■
discuM municipal Usuei.  You will all be in posses- j »<"'•?'•■« «> -snu camp wn* in  ;tm»lf i mom a nhock,  <;«t your dollar* r»miy I
r r: '  *    ,   , •   -       ■< -">•">'     - I "»«"•■      '■■   •  '    ■'     ' "     '   „ ' 	
      „i      .1.1.     i^iii   .ji.jniii:   . ** j
,h" '     i',  1 ■       r ■
*',,      I ,* I- .... . ■ ' *' •' "    "   I ***** *•"'>» mJlKlit*.    I
,«•»•»« i«a b«*n wormnn thort «im«.  x<sWmil]) %,n %itlimt {(t «.MjWjt N-
itaiAj* mil *»» packed to over-low-   Y«r'» •ro. kMbk the Corbin pwpl*'
m. promrw  nml the mirth and fan
srew fnftf  and  fnrlmu  until  !» p.ai.,
,i      . .-■■
•••*.»•»     ..UV.-fek-*    tlii'ii
iLj'
J. L. Gates]
MAtl-kMUM**   CUM HAN V
GRANT   MENS   DEMANDS
j with the nupr»m« court oft ho United j basement to .lUtrlbute tha long looked
(Htaten. »1ll depend  whether Samuel  f,***^ pmerit* aniomw tlie yoiingrters.
woill-ii fie r^iietjed
The rmti otiic of the confer«'l)e».* thUH
fu   ni:.\   t...  Kinum.irii.eil  nn follow-*: j Clomper*. pre»ide*nt of tli» Americittt |
Tti.> ii»li..**iii eiiiiiininv \i.tn '*nr**'<\ u, j Federation of Libor, must *o to |«tl j * —   •■■--- :   --^
'..*..>• u ti.-.t%t' increase, l<ut not to the ! for contempt of tho District of Tolum- U^'tncll, and Frank Morrison, s«er«-
lo per tent 3iH'w*'tt«*» nsk,.il   by   thts | Wa Supremft Court.   Tho brief *'•• fit.. tarj of the Araerlcsn Indention of Ittf
urtevanre *nn»mltt*-e, ■*! hf Alton B. Psrkor, Jscltson II. Kai-1 bor, to » $r,no tint* onrh     Oni .trm-
ite- raiiriMij .•omi.;itty n.is tiuret d lo . t*tun uml William li. HlCharUswn
fmor of" HaHra^r ToVrnpher*" will 1 •»* ovirrtlmc but no. double overtime
moet.  the  ref.'ti*' r».  of  the    r«tlr<»a<f' '  * " *     "~  "*
■gatn tomorrow in an attempt to reach I CAN THEV PUT SAM (.our: agaJnut boycotting   «b*   Buekn
an nutrfitx-nt. ( COMPiRS INTO JAIL? Store and RAttgt C©mi»ny.    Tlie dl*-
toMturont+n th*' Vr-in tl,|g morn-1 u   ZT7Z      .   - 'rt'"r r""rt ot a»'»«afl1 redtited tite **m-
ta* mnntiwii   wilh one lnterm»»»loti, I Endeavor to b# Brlsf Filtd in Supreme , tenee Imposed hf the Wal cwtrt from
«ntlt 1-*v 'W.% ^en'ftf. nnd -when ni- ?     Ca*"t ** U" *'"" r*r Ctmitimpt        ,,;.,. _*,,,„* to *■(, $;i}t,     |t 3.|w redund
.fmimment  wsi-f Mk«-n tor th« olttht. ' — - ' *!'" «<>"*""t,-*** Impost*** npon Afhn 1ft*
HT!   UH1H,   Mo     it.
Will Ih* no strike *>: •:.
09 the  Al.  I^ul» *.!*■!
Railroad, nftordfrii' tn
niftht.     Tno *ir;*U:
.      .."'    There ;
'    '*■ l-t'ist'lipbers ,
.••j!;   KrunrhM-o i
!!lil!rritii»f!.«l   1ft, ■
U,.ti-t'«t   of   tile
their muaieal talent.     '
A trwtlna to Old and New Mlehel: I
S ■MfiTv,.- Vi..,- v,*.i-     m   -   '• \. -
good cheer, in the motiuuinou* air, |
we all have oar »hare, although we
muit say the weather Is io gay. m«ke* j j
everyone happy on this bright New 'j j
Year's day.  A Happy aad iopful New i
Vear to aU,
j :in i.:.- *jm u> I'.*, validity of ail the s«n-j
Tlio contempt sefltenee urone o it of' -"nf"* *'" *** «sde Surmnrv T, •
u-tjwV.Ho of ihe dl*trl«t sapreme j    on" ^ «h* paints relied on by tke
I it»,r leiulera It that contempt of court
Is a erlme. and that s<ro*eeutloa« there
n( un- limited to three years in th« dis-
trtet,
James W, hutli, tliairaan of tlu  re-
*noiv*n «ald he thowaftt an aareement
\VA»!IIXr.TQ.V. Uf... 2t.-On    the
atntngth laff«?y of u brief fH«>d tiA.u
, tltoH. former membtr of the Am«rlt;*4i(
i Federation of Labor, of the e«aeutfve
i
U>i, i k.,mei tne Moo** ttnetat tm*i
Hunt** tin Monday noil tn tho K. P.
H:ill.    Time 7.45,
Michal Local Union Notts
♦ *
♦i
THE
Bellevue Hotel
COMMERCIAL    HOUSE
Best Accommodation In the Pass.—
Up-to-Date — Every Convenience-
Excellent Cuisine,
SUITABLE   FOR   LADIES   AND  GENTLEMEN
J. A. CALLAN, Prop.
BELLEVUE, Alta.
Stephen T. Humble
For Skates, Hockey Sticks, Heaters
Ranges, Furniture, Stationery etc
BELLEVUE
Alberta
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnish your bouse from cellar to garret and at bottom prices.   Cal), write, phone'or wire,   AU orders given
prompt attention.
If you are satisfied, tell others.    If not satlified, tell us.
Coleman
Alberta
A. I. BLAIS
Grocer
We have a complete new
stock of
Groceries & Canned Goods
Also  several   Salvage lines away below cost
Frank, Alia*
TWO
STORES
Bellevue, Alta
Grand Theatre
JANUARY 3rd
The Food Choppers War
8«Ufl Cotm-if Ontttto
Vampire of the Desert
Vitagraph In Two RmIs
The Infamous Don Miguel
Kslsm
The Hard up Family
Path* Comedy
A contract tnia«r»' meeting watt
hel'l on Bandar i«*l In -f'raluin « Hall. I
After the twretary md out the rain-'
aim ot itto prcvHwa m»*tln*s nweral J
rsmsrks wont »•<!#. stoat tk« aerotln-1
*er» In th# mnnut-r they took th« hnl-1 QgOBSM
I
IO Jfe 15ct«« ss nmUmmmm « 4k 10ct«
BiiM«llMllWilimi^^
i , "* Xf^^S^syA-Sy %'XtSxy''
'      '   A- "J*"- •'*    '- >-',*£'<
fpt'-'i-', .\  r-,    X^*-*' "-* °    '    ^
•H3 •
' X, -o*. *¥•
-1-  3 ' •'
3i ', S- ■* ■•
N
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, PERNIE, B. 0., JANUARY 3, 1914.
PAGE FIVE
■i.WMMMMMMMHMHMMHhlr****^
»»»y»»<n
t SNrdHHHUrtrTnor «
of The  District Camps
kA A&A---V
■tVVyyyvyy*»VV»y»»AMM^<MM^^MMUM^»»^^
^»-tM^*»»»*»-»-»»»»»»»»*»-»»*¥»¥»V^
ft
♦ BELLEVUE NOTES
Bijlie Christie, bf Calgary, Is in
camp spending his Xmas holidays
•with his parents. He will -be returning to Calgary on Jaii1,, 2.
uMiss Ruby, who was visiting her
brother, Rev. W. Irwin, left Sunday
night for her home in Calgary.
.Mr. Notole and .Hector McDonald
left camp on Saturday evening for
Moose Jaw, where tbey were called
in connection with the death of their
brother, who, it is understood, was
killed in a railroad wreck last. week.
.The people of Bellevue extend to the
McDonald brothers their slncerest
sympathy.
The Bellevue hockey team had a
good practice game on Sunday, when
the Hillcrest boys set them a good
pace. ' , " -
Rev, Ebert Curry, of Michel, spent
Christmas day in Bellevue.
An orchestra from the. Bellevue
Band played at the children's service
held in Hillcrest Methodist Church on
Sunday night.
The new rink is open for business.
Season tickets may be had from the
committee.
Mr. Charles Emmerson, former superintendent of Bellevue mine, is up
on a visit from Peru.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wolstenholme
entertained some of their friends pn
Christmas night.
Mr. Isaac Hutton spent Christmas
in Fernie visiting some friends.
Rev. T. \V, Young, of Frank, spent
Christmas day in camp, the guest of
Mr. and Mrs. W. Scott.
The committee in charge of the
Sunday School Christmas tree wish
to publish the following report:
Receipts
Dr. McKenzie, $10; J. R. McDonald,
?5; J. A. Callan, So; J. II. Xaylor, $5;
41 Market Co., $5; Jas, Radford, $4;
Mr. Pearson, ?2; Harman Varley, $2;
Albert Hall worth, $2; Joe Stephenson,
$2; W. IL Chappell, $1;. Joe Robinson,
$1; W. Raynor, fl; Geo. Knowles, fl;
Cyr & Smith, $1; E. Williams, ft; E.
Sutherland, $1; Fred Padgett, $1; Archie Burcey, $1; James Lindsay, $1;
Tom Bradley, ft; Dave Hutton, ?1;
Sam,,Paton, $1; Hugh Hutton, $1;
Fred Smart, $1; George Goodwin, $1;
John Mills, $1; Mr. Jordan, fl; Stephen Humble, $9; Jct.8. Grafton, $5J; A.
was decided that our agreement cov,
ered the matter fully and that it be
aahered to.
Recently it was drawn to the attention of the Local that when a man received a time check for shortage, the
bank charged commission on it. Xow,
as the company's staff were responsible for the mistake, it was hardly a
fair proposition to tax-the miner with
it. This will be remedied ih future.
The next item was one which concerns the people of B-elleviie collectively—the question of a cemetery.
Some few months' ago a committee
was formed tb see the local, management, with the result that a site was
chosen for a cemetery, but the difficulty then arose, whom did the cemetery belong to? This is as near possession of a cemetery, asvthe people
of Bellevue have got. Now as we, the
people of Bellevue, are not immune
from death, and the nearest cemetery
is three miles away, 'much inconvenience, especially when the weather is
not favorable, is caused. There is lots
of land available for such a purpose.
The above is a part of the case presented to .Mr, Charbonnier by the committee, and it will receive his immediate attention.    •
Xext in order, or rather out of order, was a request renewed -for the
providing of proper ambulances. Our
committee pointed out thit those at
present in use were a disgrace to the
community, as they only consisted of
two iby fours and brattice. The committee also pointed out the necessity
of a suitable conveyance for use be-
tween the wash house and the hospital, that owing to the nature o'f the
roads a man suffering with a broken
limb wanted to be made as comfortable as possible during transit, : The
committee was given the assurance
that money would not be considered
in, the matter,, and that a catalogue
was already on its way from which to
select.
The next matter drawn to their attention was the 'one of lockers. Now,
as the new wash house for No. 2 mine
Is nearing completion, we did not want
it to be supplied with small lockers,
similar to some in use in our present
wash house. Our committee pain-ted
out the fact that they were far too
small for the men's convenience, there
being no room for the hanging up of
damp or wet clothes. But, if they did
intend to use that kind of loeker, that
Expenditure
T. Eaton   $417.75
■Money Orders  l. io
Freight  19.90
Haulage from Depot 50
Geo. Cruickshank  4.40
Co-Operatke Store  28.70
rise themselves.
The death occurred on Friday last
,..,,, ,.    I of Mr. Horatio Nelson Wolstenholme,
The rifle competition held at Police Lged  64  years.    Ml.   Wolstenholme,
Flats, which had about   twenty-ifive
total  $472.35
Receipts
Collection received in mine... 325.25
Frank J. Smith  2.0C
Hillcrest Collieries, Ltd. .... 25.00
Joseph McMullin   5.00
S. Lowder  . 1.00
W. Legg  5.00
Arnold Martell '..'..<  5.00
Jno. Grinshaw  l. 00
J. S. BOmie  2.00
J. Gorton  1.00
James Leigh  2.00
Chas. Fuches . — ......,'... 10,00
R. Cherrie  1.00
Joe Brehler  2.00
A. Moorhead  1.00
John Brown   5.00
Chas. Carlson  2.00
L. Allander  2.00
John May „..'.. 2.00
J, H. P. Daman ............. 1.00
H. Ryan  2.00
John Passfieid  1.00
James Grant  2.on
\Vm. Mason  2.00
Geo. Cruickshank, three cases
of apples and pne of oranges
Fred C. Long ... 	
Frank Pearson . ".	
A. Warrlner  	
Sam Charlton	
Ed. Royle	
Dr. Allan Ross	
Bill Foster	
entries, was won iby' Dick Beard, who
gave the boys a fair idea of how to
shoot
There were quite a few visitors here
at Passburg during the Christmas holidays from the various camps. It is
not known whether the sights and amusements of Passburg held them liere
so long or not. Let. us hope that the
few ladies we have in our midst have
not been captivated or Passburg will
die a natural death, sure.
It has been reported that a couple
of the Passhurg boys went to Lethbridge during tbe holidays, and it is
whispered that one of them returned
to Passburg a married man.
2.00
1..00
1.00
3.00
"L.C-1
5.00
1.00
I t< •*\rtr,Artr,tS     *£ .      \tt.a      t
each man be given two instead nf janpy.^*iUk
Windsor, $5; Mrs. Christie, $3; Wal-
ter Scott, ?2; George Suaray, $2; J.
Sutherland, $2: Mr. Randall. $2; A
Friend, $1; J. D. McDonald, fl; Robert Evans, fl; Luther Goodwin, fl;
Thos. Taylor, fl; Mrs. Eccleston, $1;
IVMrs. Riddle, fl; J. Musslan, fl; Robt.
Cummins, fl; Walter Miller, fl; Mr.
•Bardsley, fl; K, Hawkins, fl; AJgy
Watson, fl; Charles Hammond, fl;
Tom Stephenson, fl; James Turner,
fl; Walter Goodwin, fl; Andrew
i Goodwin, fl; Wm. Galllmore, fl;
small amounts, $7.(
Expenditure
For   toys,   $100;   candles,   $14.50;
freight, and cartage, $4;  total $118.
[l|{rJalance  placed   in   regular  Sunday
School funds, $8.80.   Number of presents given, 160.
WM, H. IRWIN, Sec.-Treas.
Total  ........ fl*;I.:?
Mr John Brown,   general
Deficit	
of the Hillcrest Collieries, was suddenly taken ill on Friday last. He
was taken to Calgary on Monday
where he is to undergo un operation.
His many friends hope to see him
around again in the near future.
Ah: and Mrs.. Chas. Beaver wish to
thank the people of Hillcrest for the
kindness extended to Uiem through
the recent benefit concert, also the
Kev. Mr. Irwin and others from Bellevue, who took interest in this event.
The stork visited the home of Jlr.
and Mrs. D. J. Walker a few days ago
and left a bouncing baby hoy. Mother
and child doing well.    Jack wearinga
1914 got a great reception in Frank,
the mine whistle and C, P. R. engines
making a great fuss about it.
The Bohemian dance on Xniias night
was a great success ana everything
passed off nicely, barring a few English speaking fellows who again made
fools of themselves.
Xmas was celebrated in an Italian
shack in town in high style. Beer
was the chief entertainer and friendship turned to hate and two of them
had a fight. One used a razor freely
on the face of the other, almost severing his nose from his body, and the
results might have heen worse were
it uot for the timely intervention of
Mr. Simpson, who effected the arrest
of the one till the Blairmore police
manager arrived. As a result of their excessive
51.10* Joy one lies suffering from cuts and
the other lies ih jail.
Married, at Frank on Xmas Day, by
Rev. W. T. Young, Frank Komer to
-Mrs. Bertha Schubert, both of Bluir-
more,
Miss McGow was hostess at a dance
givsn at the old Miners' Hall here on
Wednesday night.
The school is to r,e-open  here on
Monday   next.     The   staff  is   to   be
changed somewhat.
Miss Watt, has been secured to take
the intermediate room.   Up to time of j emj of t)je W€elc
. writing uo principal has 'been found, ,1 if
but Rev. W. T. Young has agreed to j    *ra™ct rvsr
take it_Jgzj_ds^xsB^A^~-*-~ H-L-J--4J-WW*'
 —— . residence to
years.
who was one of the most respected
old timers of the Pass, had for some
years past conducted a ranch near
Burmis and'until recently had been
in the best of health, but. of late haa
suffered from lung trouble, which resulted in his death. The funeral took
place on Sunday at one o'clock. Interment took place in Blairmore cemetery. Mr. Wolstenholme leaves a
wife and four sons, to whom we extend our deepest sympathy.
Large crowds from Blairmore attended the hockey match at Coleman
on Christmas afternoon.
Constable Hancock was called to
Frank on Thusrday last, when two
Italians, after celebrating Christmas
by imbibing too much whisky, got to
fighting with drawn knives.
"The Missouri Girl" was played at
the Opera House on Tuesday night,
before a very large audience. "Zeke"
and "Daisy" proved a great attraction.
On Christmas day the horse owned
by Valentine Romeo became suddenly
frightened while crossing Lyon Creek
bridge, and before the driver could get
controlit dashed down the bank Into
the river and up the opposite side,
during which time the man lost one of
the lines.   The horse iand buggy continued .its mad course through Victoria   Street   and   on   to   the   mine,
where it struck an empty car which
was stationed there.   The driver was
thrown out, but was not injured except for a gbod  shaking and   upon
reaching the barn found the horse already there hut the buggy was minus j
several   parts,   which   were   strewn)
along the road on the homeward run. I
The Blairmore skating rink was the!
scene of a fast hockey game on Mon- j
day Right between the Macleod and |
Blairmore teams.    Blairmore was in j
fine form and led by two goals in toe 1
first twenty minutes,    fn the second I
twenty Macleod scored two, thus even-1
ing the score.   Blairmore put in some j
fine play in i,he last lap and came out j
winners to the tune of 4-2, !
R. II. Dayton, who has just completed one of the most successful bargain
, sales for the F. M. Thompson..Co.,-has
A lady teacher, {r(,turae(i   jo   Edmonton.    We   under-
i stand the sale will go ou until the
night 29th ult.,, in the Coleman Opera
House. The tree was loaded with
toys of all description and the children
were overjoyed at sight of them. After the distribution of the toys the children were treated to a picture show.
After .the picture show the children
gave a pert'omanee of the operetta,
"Round the World with Santa Claus,"
in which they gave a splendid account,
of themselves. The Opera House was
crowded on this occasion. A dance wa3
held after the children had concluded
their performance, and a goodly number of couples took part.
The delegates of the North West
Association of Stationary Kngitx-.-rs
paid a visit to the plant o£ the International Coal and Coke Company, and
were shown over the works by .Mr. G.
Scott, master mechanic. The delegates were highly plasetl with tlie bath
house, which is in charge of Mr. John
Chalmers. The delegates opened their
grand lodge convention iu Frank on
Vonday. The members of the party
visited all the plants east and west of
Frand and were pleased with the couv
tesy shown them by all. _ Many engineers from the Pass were in attendance.   The delegates elected their of
ficers for the ensuing year and made
a presentation to iii'. J. A. Stewart,
who was re-elected. During the course
of the sojurn a. paper on turbines was
read by Mr. James Donnelly, and a
grand banquet at the Sanatorium concluded their visit.
LY RIC
THEATRE
Bsllevue
A a.
• With new secuery being
painted, watch for the first
announcement of our coming
vaii.U-vilIts.show.
Realty Co.
INSURANCE   AGENTS
Now is  the time
for protection
You cannot afford
to lose when we
can   protect   you
Bellevue Local Union Notes
(Omitted last week,)
"</Jur regular meeting convened as
il with Uie president* In the cliu'r
fore a good crowd, tho minute* of
» previous meeting being adopted as
d.   Tin* only piece of correspond-
Jno was the International Convention
ill.  which  was accepted, and  Uro.
vett.  wiih the  unanimous selection
r delep.'tto to attend convention.
Iho following committee, were ap-
l**.nted  to draw  up  resolutions for
th > convontlon:   Uros. Barwlck. Bute-
mun, Burrow*, lltirke, Brooks, Livett
uid McDonald.
Reports of Committees
The niMsurttiif fonimtttiXn penny.-**
ixitti nitn»»« wen- adopted,
Tho next Item of interetii marked a
iew <-po li In thu itujunUiiK of our lit-
tie trouble*.   Our pit committer, four
tTTTsmine clothes and the other
for his home clothes, the answer to
that question being as follows: Should
tliey happen to be small lockers they
would endeavor to do as our committee suggested, as it was tjjeir desire
to see their employees as comfortable
and contented as possible. •
We also drew their attention to the
desirability of having the road from
No. 2 mine down to No. i sufficiently
lighted. It, was promised attention
and a guarantee given that there
would be lights from the miue to the
wash house anyhow. 0
Last, but not the leaBt, came the
choelt-off.  Our secretary desired them
to have it handled at Bellevue instead
of Blairmore, as they were In possession of his book too long for his
convenience.    The manager pleaded
ignorance of the length of* time, hut
promised that In future he would have
his book back in two or three days.
That closed a lengthy conference
and the commltteo appreciated the
manner In wliich they were received, I
and should all the promluen given be j
fulfilled, It will have been a day well |
.«pent. j
At this time Uio regular order of j
business wn* suspended to penult of!
the Initiation of a candidate,
He It known that In future when the j
whistle blows for no work contract.
miners are to remain at home If not I
engaged on development work, Tfoow* I
falling to comply will be dealt with ns j
per our rules am! by-laws. j
The lost* of tools Ik becoming a }
ehronlc complaint here and the Local 1
Is determined to stop It If possible, j
With this object ln vl«nv, 11 committee I
was appointed to go Into the mlnr-1
"•iKiiivir ia».> jiinj u convenient!
thonwelven and unknown to us. The !
following were appointed: Iim*. K\u-t
B*lon. Harwick, McDonald and Me- j
(iiilre, I
visited  tlit
house of
"TnsrT
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fuches, of the
Union Hotel, gave a champagne dinner to a large number" of friends and
acquaintances on Christmas Day. Not
being familiar with this costly beverage, a large .number remained in alienee nursing a big head the next day.
C. Carlson returned from Taber,
where he has been spending Christ
mas, aud also shaking hands with his
old friends.
The Masons held a banquet in their
new hall on Monday night.
At the meeting of the Local on Sunday a member made a motion to the
effect that we should do away with the
secretary, Mr. Gorton on the grounds
that the amount of work to be done
did not justify the Local In paying the
secretary's salary.   However, the mat
ter was not taken seriously, but it Is
to he regretted that the members do
not acquaint themselves the mass of
detail work that devolves upon the
secretary, If this were done possibly
they would form another opinion,   .
On Friday, December 2tith, a special
I meeting o( the Hlllcrest Co-operative
I Society Ltd. was held   In   the Union
I Hall,     Th-' meeting was tin; result of
j a petltUm signed   by   twenty share-
j holder* for the purpose oi investi-gut-
Ing tbe relations of tho iiijiiiager with
I three omployeos. who recently resign-
j ed their positions together, after having given six day*' noth-e only.   The
J only mi.-uni for this drastic actionot
J theirs, no it was ascertained, wa^s the
! failure of tlie management to give one
j of   tbem   an   li-ereas.* In salary, not-
1 withstanding that they were all ia re-
j eelpt of Mtutidnrd wiiise*.    The v- ;-.ult.
j of the meeting was that tlio manag< r's J
;i."f.ie w:im *••!*>■. ; ,.-.,,.A,iiti)Ui*i>   by 1
the shareholders, who were fully nrt'U-
f<ed as to tho ability of the roiinacer tr>;
look alter the Society's business, *i*td!
tlio whole of the directors support."! |
his action -
;We are talking hockey these days,
and Xmas day saw the opening game
of the Frank team, when they met
Blairmore on the home ice. Blairmore have a great team this year.
We have heard several say "the best
the Pass has seen heretofore," but be
that as it may, they got beaten on
Xmas day; in fact, the whole story of
the game Is told this way: "Blairmore
got licked." The final score was 9-3
In favor of Frank.   The line-up was:
be quarantined.
I    Miss Bausmer, of Cowley, is visiting
I her sister, Mrs. McNeil, of the tele-
j phone office here.
Miss Murdoch, of Cowley, has been
secured for the teaching staff of the
Blairmore school.
We
make
again.
show   pictures   that
you  want   to   come
jmmiiE-co.-
C: W JOHNSTON, Manager
Agents   for   Oliver   Typewriter
Co.    Machines at 17 cents per
day.
Carbondale Local Union Notes
Frank Blairmore
Dunlop goal Brisco
Mclntyre point Boyd
Ford cover point       Gardiner
McDonald       right wing Turkltt
Fitzsimnions   left wing Turner
McKay rover Grace
Hurd centre Goddard
Blairmore protested the game on the
ground that one of the players who
was on the team was not registered
the required length of time, That
samo man was in town the required
time, hut the executive here forgot
his name when giving the list; furthermore Blairmore proi.'s*«U against one
man and Frank took him off. They
never mentioned the other because
they thought they ould win.
The executive er >Vi> hockey club
met Tuesday night l-'ratik lost out
on the protest. Tin*, vote was n He
and Chairman Lyons !.* Id (!.<• <\i«iing
vote, It was a lively meeting by all
accounts and broke up ;.i a Lurry. Ui: j
understand that a few of the officers '
have resigned liicir t-.'ition !
Mr. Palmer moved \S» family trom j
Frank to his lumber .imp two miles j
south bf Blairmore.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦*
♦ ♦!
♦ BLAIRMOHE NOTES ♦'
SJSJSJSEWSlSMSiSIM^
BRISCO S
The regular meeting of the Carbondale Local 2232, was held on Sunday
28th ult. Glad to report that the meetings are getting better attended,
The minutes of the previous meeting |
were read and adopted.     The corres-i-t
poiidence wus also read and passed for
discussion.
The regular business of the local being done.t he Sick and Accident Committee submitted tlieir rules and constitution, which were adopted by tin: j ii
local. j {tj '
It  was* moved   and   seconded  that jS
each member of the Local pay the mini ib
of -tl.oO as an entrance fee.  tnd that lj|
the assessment W paid at the rato of; ja
■t*t". t>< r mont.li. flfi
For
ix r
It '.va* moved and seoHw.-.i .'hat no
benefit be paid for t'.vn im».'i-.** trom
date of Itilfntluii.
Brother Jiiniet Hilling .van appointed chairman of the board <>>* ..i., *• ,*■.
vi tliu iSu-k and .Yceldeu! tletn-fit I'ns-.'i.
Brother J. Loiutii?..! ry ■.v.t:, el.. « d
H.'-retary-treasurer of ihe ,«*>:,-k and
Accident Benefit  Fund
The President, dames (1
was sppednted as dtd-t^.*-.
11 uul convention,     Hoiu." <*
,!       ,'. ,'    .,,.',.ft.   ,i,9tt   ie,:,',*,.
In thu billiard truirti ine
Grand l"n!oti Milt'■(<"• l".'' •■
filial  and   tiit.ils  were  j>!,i-.
I'lll'IstllKti   iv.e.
M
.1
I.umH.
ue in.-
Sa
sA
,B
•33
'Si
i-f..
■■■J
New Year Shopping
Nothing is more appreciule-J  lliun a M-nsi-Mc present,
sonii'tliinjf of some use.    Our stock is eniiiplelo in
Sweaters, Ties, Underwear, Shirts,
Shoes, Rubbers, Clothing, Caps
im-hI Xmas uil'U, iiti.l
uiul inaiiV
Krtiii-liileT
nti<l   niaiiv
other articles that lu.iUr
.uir v"""!s 11 t'i' .still   iiinliT tli
(itllef    JlHt.-i.-*     ')'.•!■'      t'lahe
liuiiiiiicr ami
L'.. ..|    Xaia*-,
Open every night also, Wednesday afternoon,
Christmas.
prices
Htl'U.
until
Known this month as the Bargain Store
BLAIRMORE        -        ALTA.
A, Allison and famtl
lay morning's flyer fie
III number, went to the head offices, j ' j Wash., where they
left ,.ji
Medical
reside
It,
I'llalrmorp, and got through wuu« eon-
jJJ'lerttblo btiHirifiw, which will tend 10
filgliten our troubles In  future.    Tne
[first Item  was  tilt! old   i|uestieii  of
iiatometit*.  Now io thotw not familiar
nit-h fMlevu«\ let m«» say our Mate
^11 ills  are   very   vutjuc.   there  lelim
Ither the number of tin* pltici* nor
!« dimensions driven eoufaln-cd tliire*
1 .   It is just expressed In cubic yards
6*0 cent* per yard, and In our di-
d.(ioii«t,  uivr**  lit an  Item  "store,"
li'.ch    incliidti.   tfliuoat    anything
iwd-^r,   detonations,   tools,   IubiIk-t,
vy, etc.   This lends one tb wonder,
tat h* is pnylrtp far In tlio amount 1
ducted,   lit future, ss soon an pos-
>l* after niMStiring day, tlwe will j
f". jitmtt-A In  »i  fn**fii,"i"<.-'  *y
0*:k  measuring  nhoot   as W'««.
.*.,t v***.*) «ui» nt.**) it txjittract nsm-
i, thu distance driven In feet, width
d height, aim **tpr***t?4 Is low,, the
mb»r of mnn worWnf on that con-
ict will bo d«»lKnftti*1 nnd thi? num-
.»ppiures on that contract will also
lli • lt«»ls«d. The above cbangits vill
|b» vory w«lcome.
.V«i»t griwvantv was that of miners'
\. mat* conl. Miners not llvim on oom-
|p iny'» property w«re paying more for
tl e lia»llng thiin fh«M trhrt Ifve«f or
|c..n,pany'» property, «v«n wh*n the
|»!»»t8n<r*« to torno ot Iho pompnny'a
ir-.ousM »« th« giNMtfr. The gpneral
[j ipprlntendent aqgt«at«l to tht com-
jr Ittw* that th#jr proi*Q<_ a rtwigh draw-
If iff of th** area aa travsllsd by th*
It «mst*>r« whilo hauling coal, m In
It .to gex^nl tnjitrlnleodanVi opinion
fino*? *w»M -M wpWcif f»» h.tti! cml 4
jug Ulatanco for tho aamo prtet* tut *
llo»mr dl»f«tM». "font part of th* com.
•nlttee's roport was not ftrjr UronMr
««e(feit, m aftor mow dloevMlon It
1 ti <•,,
t
t
HILLCRB8T NOTES
PA888URG NOTES
1
A sad accident occurrod In the llill-i
crest mined on Friday, Itecctnhcr mtb,;
which resulted hi iln! d-tatii ui Frank :
Hose.     The ileeeaiied was omployed
as a miner In No. J entry, nml th,   .,
• itii-iit was naised by a fall of n»•»<
»!■■
J their
I nl be..
j kooiI '
♦><Jli«ct
In full
Hialrtiiore !kh : •
rlrst leaRijn sw. •
mm evenlnp,    T'i
.-■ers (tw*>ml»i>' I
•• A-.f ttaujc and ;
*y M«e an Infi-.
mt when the
•:,', the KrntiI
,-„ iiii 1 ito I ue
Mir.
!*...)»..,
In  fa
d
utniicduiit
The y.iturtiiiiiMe man was
removed to the surface, but expired ■■
before reach Ine tin. M'tndiliotise.     In.
Hm<- was in rhe t;.'i.|ii'. but Hit- ea»e ,'
was hopeless.     Interment took place '
at .* p.m. on Holiday undt.r the •inspires
of tht* xtiit***if* *•*'•*    ■r    ' ' ',   ;,   „
ceased was a mi»teher     T*o dree     .*
*#* ,.1 yeari ot age and l»«-ri*»s a wlfo,
a ttunlier, one brother and ono slstor
(Mrt nnber. Hard) all lUittg, Su Hillcrest,     Mtirh sympathy Is egtetided
tn hi* hnnaved mlfe and family,
... .-ji, **• :»•' n in ihe Union Hall for tho b*n***'t 0! Chps.
n«i»*r was a gr-pat »«rres.i, « lotal of
$:',".S bolng raised. Tlili ts a credit to
t^(l esmp,
Tho Christmas tre« held under the
auspices of th© llitlcroa; lot-ai «■«'• i
*t."'.*.,'<d ».ti<-KSi>      Mr   J. ti   ijui«l«> j
presided, and consldeiiRg that h« wss |
. ie'fly    .-.*   '    !,;.!.   :',e   ;■
aad illl.'' t    imt  wlae|>
of the Xii-iu I'irkey.    (!■
ull. tltev  i* ■■   H'> ,1 wi t
r\ Vi". Il..',i!.t   ot the  \
lu» puri'ti.,*'  '•  ■* *s*  -,'
"t I*ttugblln cir  •••*<»  «•»* •
1 ■ i/uiifct'dotl  Wile *ue liver)
Tlie shooting match at P.isubui-K, for
Which  there   wcr<' t»((.»v-flve entries,
was cum in* *n« ed «>ti t'ltrtistiiiJis Day aud
fiiil-fihed on tin* ."t'tli, w1h»ii    William
K ••■".'   ■*,.,     *',,,,.,n,j   lie:*   dinner.       II*)
IJUldi'' SfiTiie STe.t» ;-.*„.li.!.^, hrt*.|ll« ;i pos
i*',ltin i*> iiln credit.
Will lilllman and friend. 1 Hunt
■Aei-e vieltor* here ,-it piisstnti'n dui'in-ii
< lirii»tHi»i» Day. and left nt nkfit. «cl(
naiist'M a Uh th» .ittraetions of Pass*
burg.     Waieh if« <"•»■>••
Tlw mines her*  w't'i '>"• *-'•-   •'■■ '     "',.    ,.,„.,„   .,. ,,   *.
k,» Vint iiumu)  intn'rvals, ar»» mnn I ti 1*1' ti.'vnsltt   U n*.,. *. -.
\i*iy »i*)nti).    It is Hiotigitt that with j slcltnosa of tH<> h»e
tbo nt*t*t f^-tr-.-*,*:-*  t.Vj..'.t'il Iixhi*  llm 1 ipvcr.
C. P. It. roeently there will be uo fur-j    I* V, (hituti. of th
tb*r laek of cars. . i',*,mnirn'   '•■*'    •   '"
,'"' T *'"1 *        •-.. ••iMtt>Mi«'it*v)<mt t ness trip to LeMibri
hore. who has been fe«-ltng ill for somo i    lir   McKay, of Vr
tlmo bas taken a vacation for an In-j llUlrmor- mmt* time
definite pt*rk»l and Is reenntlng   his
health at th*  sulphur springs. Frank
Tbo mine is now under ih# charg* of
.Vat Howells
'     Had the Indfrbfii-il m}\* .-wi*,*,*;   ij»*l-
laud ' Uiiiald's quarter of boof considered that   he   w.<i«   f.nlf'ng *.j;m;tliU»i
t-eain |»!ay
nt  Fratik  on
HMI-.li   cf.,',*!■!
■ the rink io
«* U'f !«'*. *,   ■■
tek (.'Of  volli-,-
'•'.llli   H' *i'!li«'if
-nd n:»f» could
I If,.•!'.'      .nr i.
■ll    Mo    •-**■.•»>?]'
,'    tii   r,:«..   et
< true
■ liera l,.'wr'.'.
jisecirer   M'-
A ver, in,-.
itiittl, \ uu-*'
l.iiwraiuc ii
'i"li«. winner
kej ,   neeain!
For the ;>.;
till*    *"!l,.'llii>!
Hyslop 1 :* bo
A bi..\ ,.f j
-, ».;iiii)*
IU!i.ll«
tlie ,,
t**-i it: fi,
|jru>', ,1
n .<>   *.•*
o'  ■
•  Th*
1 in
:i:l).
if I
-UJS ji'l!  MI.  ■
tiiiitiiug o\
n ;•'-•   Of    tOif   '
-.I , :.'.„' I.ira*
,1  !;U'i.*e gOO»e.
■*'■     * *l     'A ill*     t(e l'<
»   i   ni   jioititx
ticir*
.-..■■<1   I.i   Arc.
■fitk
.XUil^&fiAti'tWj'AfA'A •> V
•ii*. ,"-,>. "1
?.W
mm
«. ouid
ete
lie
■1  lii i.t** in-w 1      .\ir.
vising to tli'*   friends
,. i*fi*** 1. - ■■ **y 1 -
Jul  Of tie
tr,
:^
F. M. Thompson Co.
•Th«r Qi.illty Store"
Groceries, Dry Goods, Crockery
& Evervthiner in Boot*; Rr Sfm^c-
rtn Tr.id'dii,'
rti.'ifi.
111 (Mlvtnau  -.ri   Fr*' r
• '•■■t.i tii  (t,uic t imu  Mr.it! >  to i
follbTlos,
MI-.H U,;.i  il'id*,, *-.... ,,■ ,* * .
...... ~* tmMt,- omei   m   tn»*   *'
Hotrt,     Itlnyt mv   \f mamait
T;i«- ii*ildr**n atti-ndlng th»-
•
<*:e!ll.1f>
,     )„.!.'.*
H>i!id'*y
III,!
fn fhe tuidx .it ui.**.- ,',im kiddies, wnoj from s msn a* bailly ia tn'tti n$ liim-
wero all very annlous to rocoiro their' «oIf. ho might htrc token a chunk and
presidents, ho maintained. r*Hnsrkab!o ] left a Utile for Donsld. Jfat no; ho
order.   Mrs. Howard and Miss Thomas   wai s **wfco!« hoggor."
wore alio present and sprat much tlmo
ln docoratlng tho school Wn
Thomas waa roapOBatbla for tho pro-
^..tiAui* ol tho -school children and tho
concort which la oortalnlr tho h»*»
oyer shown In Hlllcresf, Tho following fa an aetoant of tho rooelp's .tui
eipeadltnraa:
Tho aoclaf and dance hold on tho
•Ith at the Passbiirg 8fou.li Mali was
11 horo hwivm, fr. fact iL.it U«4 hold
this season. Jt goes to show that only
hy gwml management on tho part ot
the bo>s running this danco httw la
•oceoaa aaturaC    Ksop it tip. boya;
i! n.*'tir
r tii'%1 \* ».«-k *-iutol of tho Roman ("athatir ChunA*
■ t.iti'ly \* ' hfld their annua! <*hrf»tni»R tree A.
ni Victoria j the Plsony Hall »n«lor tn« ladles of th*-
■A that Dr, 'i Mlitr »ociity. A goodlr numt«-r <*'
•1 th* 'CT' ■ v--*) i,<il cjiUvli-- 1* ■•* en* niven, tlie It*- -
•I n-itbln »*l^ith*er- I'lo   Lo*tro dlstrifeitfitfng 'h*
ntsts -.vhirli j    Albert W'ikl* »as brought* uj» t««-ft..r**»
Chnreh on j A. M. Morrison. J, P., for »py,A- v.d
*,.m,'-! fej*»t««il, j wa* Jiuoii $2.vo and coot*.
hy s-pocfal re*jiie*«t. In fh«- fipera Uous*- f    -IMlI H*Wor|e «iad« hU o^^tisraMr*. »«
oft Honday night last, and «'»'-i a great j Ihe same e«urt aod hsd to fork w --
•weeoft ant) <5!*p!s^f.1 .'i'*- abniiy hf{
thoso who t«w»»r "*»**     T>,,>  *™' "''
and will occupy tt,1
cstcd hy Mrs, W  .»
Street Ho'i'ti*    Tli<«  I;"*;;
MoKsy U havlnir h'i ■'
towasltf will Ik* <v»oi[>1*
fow days.
ibe sacred fhrP'mi* •■■
waa given In 'be RtjiM*
Docfmhcr ':inA  •%.**•   ■*•;**
MbUAy
-Ifr),-,:
wont toward! the <'*'3ntJ*r«*h f*»o4.
Tho ooncort gltrcn In the Opera
ffo'ise mi funday aft-i-ruooi. by the
Brass Ban-i was UjkhIj A:>ri4*-«l
Rot. tt  Iteis  retamod  to I^otfc*
proporty eondaotod dances wit! sdror* brtdgo on Satarday laat.
Othor |,«.00 srel costs fnr a*-iisM
IU*. V. 'IkMHuo* on-n nrrirt-i *..-.'\ lu
Coleman aftor a holiday In WV*-«
wh*ri» sbe ha* ivtii for th* U-: ):;:.*•
months
Tho children atfoadlng tho rjior* •>. j
ol England gtittda} Hcbool hold their j
nana! Christmas   tret*   on   MowUt j
191* is  Now  Here
nud so «it» wi? with a mow <lo-
teriiiiiietl mnolv<\ him! hvttvr
equipped tn tfivf you the Im*hI
iii vnlues mill the best in *erviee
mmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmimmmmm^^^iimmmmtmHimummmm,,   111 ii-   11  1  111	
Fo MU THOMPSON CO.
THB ITOtl THAT SAVtt TOO MONEY
Phone 25      Victona St       Blairmore, AlU. ' * ^w
' >' V-s> S-O 7 Xy "'
'- <i.   t',v?./-      "3s:'.*«r.,-*f.-
-V *- '|,^,      x;       „_ - •■ Vn-'ri'
v t,      4*,     *   '-,
"   "*   - if'
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JANUARY 3, 1914.
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
CONCERNING   THE
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at S o'clock In K. P.
Hall. *
Xoble Grand, A. Prentice.
Secretary, .1. B. Meiklejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello's Hall second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie,  Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 8
p.m. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, G Barton.
K. of R. S., Chas. Buhrer.
M. of F., Robt. Dudley.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meet  every  Monday  at  8
p.m. in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, T. Uphill.
, Secretary, W. F. Vance.
.Slt^AtaNTMATi^T^Tj^T/^r^ttvT^TlW/.AT/^T^Itl**!
1
US
M
U
to'
•nt
it
%
*?■
f
it
GREATEST FALLACY
BY  ALLAN   L.   BENSON   IN   PEARSON'S  MAGAZINE
Aaron Burr once undertook to define judge-made law. "The law," lie
said, "is whatever is boldly asserted
and plausibly maintained."
Burr might have gone much farther
and still been "Within the facts.    He
might have  said that public  opinion
| is   whatever   is   boldly   asserted   and
j plausibly, maintained by most of the
| newspapers and magazines.
|     Nobody has ever come within gun-
\ shot,   of   adequately   estimating   the
; power of printer's ink.   it is a power
; so  great  that,   in   comparison,  every
other power in a republic seems puny.
We hear much of the money power.
but money without ink has no power.
Money   is   powerful  only   because   it
, .an buy ink.   (live me ai! the ink and
i Rockefeller all the money and 1 will
undertake to create a public opinion
! that will  render Rockefeller's money
j as  sterile   as  a   stone.    That  public
j opinion is so often monstrously wrong
is because the little class that owns
most of the money also owns most of
the Ink.
It. may be pleasing to the rising
generation to know how this game
is worked. It may beguile the mind
of youtl^ to see the stuff of which our
greatest political heroes are made and
to behold the manner in which the
blackest lies are, palmed off as whit
and to what extent the new, tariff law i Market Basket" brigade he hardly
would ease and simplify the common |. moved. He said the new law would
people'Problem of keeping alive. H, reduce the.cost of living "a good deal."
knew that, in this respect, the Demo- fl asked bim what he meantby a good
cratic platform upon which Mr...Wil- I deal. He did not care to say. I did care
Mp. J. Cartlidge
Teacher of Piano
and Organ
Specialist in  Tuning
& Pianola Works
Vocal Training
Apply for terms to
BOX 538
or House No. 21, Wood St.
sou was elected ahd to which Mr. Underwood subscribed, had promised
much. That platform had bitterly upbraided the Republican party for its
"attempts to escape responsibility for
present conditions by denying that
they are due to a protective tariff."
My particular mission to Mr. Underwood was to ascertain fiom so eminent an authority exactly wherein
If the Republican tariff were the
cause of the high cost of living, or
much of it, it therefore seemed a fair
conclusion that the destruction of the
Republican tariff would do away with
the high cost of living, or much of it.
But, before we enter the actual presence of the gentleman who should be
known from one end of the country to
the "other as the overestimated Mr.
Underwood, let us indulge in certain
reflections • that may give us brief
nourishment. A number of years ago,
when Mr. Roosevelt was officiating as
chairman of the Hell Raisers' Union,
his proposals did not always meet
with unanimous endorsement, even
among radicals. Some radicals believed that Mr. Roosevelt did hot go far
enough; others believed he went too
far. But both kinds of radicals heartily united In an appreciation that took
substantially this form: "Well, thank
est truth.    If so, let us give heed to  God, we have at least progressed to
w„«i,i,*,„»„„   f„„ ■„ s„ ,-.„„ +v,„, „„„   the   point   where   a   politician   who
Washington, for it Is there that our        ■  » ,        w,     * t t„lk
heroes are spawned, Washington, always politically pregnant, never lis
without a new hero in process of gestation. Great uncertainty usually exists as to who shall be born next.
Great rivalry always exists as to who
shall be next born. A beautiful fairy
story was once written about the competitive eagerness with which the
little children in Baby-land strive to be
wafted into this world. I always thlnk-
ot this story when I am in Washington. In the days when William Sulzer
—"the same old Bill"-—was a Tammany congressman, it was a gorgeous
sight to see William soothing himself
with the belief that he was about to
be born into the hero class. In those
days, i* was Sulzer's pleasing custom
to promenade down "Peacock Alley,"
j at the New Willard, at the precise
j after-diiiner moment when he believed
j most eyes would be upon him. Being
i 227   miles  from  his  poverty-stricken
KING'S  HOTEL
wants to win public favor must talk
about something else than the tariff."
In other words, these simple radicals
believed that the fraudulent old tariff
issue had finally been put on the
shelf.
Kindly observe, now, how the power
to determine just what use shall be
made of printer's ink also determines
what people shall think about.  After
the defeat of Bryan in 1908, certain
great Democratic newspapers began a
concerted campaign to bring the tariff
question  t'o life.    In  this campaign,
the New York World took the lead.
First, there were brief editorials of
regret that the good old days of Graver Cleveland were past, coupled with
the expression of the fervent belief
that if any good Democrat of national
reputation would go to thfe front on
j the tariff issue, the people would rally
j to his support and restore the Democratic „ party  to   power.   What  good
j ever came to tite common people as
I the result of the  Democratic party
! coming into power, the World did not
pause to explain;• newspapers that are
;I,New York constituents, ot course he ■ ^gaged hi a ^campaign of education'
e froupie lo-ieiiTHc-pco*
wore evening areas, including a veivpti never Take
waistcoat.   Naturally, also, he.walked ! pie anything new that is true.
slowly,  as  great men  should.    And. |    At.any rate, the World continued to
having navigated the "Alley," it -was -harp on the tariff-until'it broke forth
i his custom to take up a position iin *• series of masterly cartoons enti-
i against one of the imitation '.marble I }}*$' 'J1'6. Empty   Market   Basket."
Bar
smuilied with   the
Litjuors and Ci^iii?
DINING   ROOM   IN -CONNECTION.
■    '     I columns in the lobby, to be greeted
j by whomsoever should see fit.   It. was
best Wines, I indeed an inspiring sight to see him
' Basing  solemnly at  the floor  while
gentlemen having the wit of kittens
begged his indulgence as if he were a
king.   It was Indeed a grand sight—
but it is no more, for William has
gone from Washington, and other Imitation heroes are leaning against the
imitation marble columns at the Willard.
Yet
■ i seldom or never go to the \Vlllard,
i The Hon. Oscar W. Underwood l» one
j "of these.    The Honorable Oscar, as
the father of a tariff law that bears
his name, Iiiih become a little too ex
| elusive to mingle with the cheap em-
| biyo heroes that swarm around tav-
j erns.  Gentlemen who wish to see hia
j will have to go where he la—he will
(«.J II...A «il IiIiImh. T»J«i raeet  *hem  at   n<>   half-way   house.
send Name and Address Today ^Heaieu vh?/u,u, *« «■»»>»» »-ni
' ' al*o have considerable trouble to find
: lilm, for Mr. Underwood has become
W. MILLS,
Prapi
"The Empty Market Basket" was an
attempt to visualize the twin horrors
of American life—the high cost of living and the Payne tariff law. The
aforesaid visualization was brought
about by presenting a picture of a
woman carrying a market basket. The
woman of course wore 'tx shawl ov&r
her head, was tagged by two or three
half-starved children, and her bashat
was empty. If I remember correctly,
a brace of pupa labeled "High Tariff"
and "High Cost of Living" were presented in the act of wrestling on the
some of the imitation heroes grass with a couple of pounds of ham
$3,50  RECIPE FREE,
For Weak Men
You Can Hans it Free and
Ba Strong and Vigorous
Wc  i.ftvi-  In   «nir  yon nc union  a  pi-v-
ri-rfptl. n 'i.r ni-rvi'in*! <t,t,l!lty, lark nf
vigor, wtnk'-ticil muiilKHMi, tutiintc iik-ih-
ut'V (uul turn., back, lnuu|ihl ••!» l.y **\.
i'tift.t**, iiimattiiikj iiiaii,n, ur '.tic f'ltlka
of v.*i'!> H,ui I,su. i ni,-I i'i. n.aiiv vvntn
unit i!i*iv...(K tin-it rltrlil In iln-li' own
Ixiiiii ■*-.■•* vt it limit m>y tiil'.ilttt.i*,tl li«-l(> '>r
nii'itulM t l.iit w think I'Vi-ry man
wim wi-'H t<> '.-atiln l:i- mniity imwr
mnl vi«ii
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and a bologna sausage that they had
hooked from the baaJtet, At any rate,
the changes were wrung, day after
day, upon Home such scenery as this,
while editorials ln adjoining columns
blared and bleated about the tariff
being a "tax upon poverty." If we
could only get rid of this terrible tariff, we should be all right. The cost
of living would come down, a poor
man could look his grocer In Mto eye
without fainting away, and life for the
average mortal would take on a rosier
line-..
Ink finally wrought its miracle.
That which the radicals of a fow yearn
before believed could never take place
iiiinin onco more became a reality. Old
.Man Tariff, the hero o'f a hundred
wars (all fakes) was back on the
ntHHo doing his ancient, monologue.
Close observers could »e« ihat hli
<li-p*ki were as hollow an hi* promises, that his eyi-s \xtT<> sunken In he
AUSTRALIAN OIL
stops mmm
mo rich in Ink-made rei.own that, lu at
least one respect, he resembles jsentl-t"
iiK'ii who aro money-rich- h<> has
many abiding places. As a mere congressman, he has a right to un office
In «h«* sr»*at marble llotist* Offkv
lluildlng, but Uh the chairman of the
Wrijs and Mentis Committee, he <!*•*»*
not -wrciite It, As the chulrniaii of
the Ways uii Means Coinml'ti", he
ha» a rl«lit to ,m offhe in that f.ili'ti-
tliil ■rommltti•<• wim In whlrh so many
«tii|M>iidous steals have been engineer-
«"l"  but. uh the Sf-fftlir of the I.k»mo-
• ratlc nialor'.tv ln the House, he does
twit ,i\pr<A<*i* \t Anvo'ie who wishes
tn find  M". t'ndi'rwf/O-t  will ttue t«
;i'**k   illlf'f'i'lTW   im   h*' 'r.-iniifif   tw   ttitltid
••   f'.]-, - 1 f •*!,. 'Xn-i.-f .(*..i*t'i,,*,.,( ,,ffj,.. I ohsnlutf power of a low
i". nor in his name upon th»« Rlass of
any door   Anyone who asks questions
"mi! hi tif|i"y l,„ itifurtii*'-.! that tin'
ni,]!'* * ',ii J.i» »> ,>n t, is.,.,. :,.« f.»ii:..l 41:1!)
tiv f.it1n-*int! ,1 i),irf<i*' Iml'wsv, whlrh
hkirth 'lit- *M! side of the chnmber In
wh'i-b   th*'  hoiisi*   of   *,tit*  r«'|»ri«*entjt.
ttlf*    »ltK
Thi*  .iili-wiy. whu'h  i** tmundeil on
niii- i*fn) tn ,1 «(»ti|f* of Tltotitiis Jftfci'-
.*ufi. \t !»,iiii!'!i-<! on *!h« fHin-f \i\ ;t liv«
i»«'tir.»    Thi* i.i-Kru. ujujii rii|Ue*t. will
lill"   tt|l>    jtilllt'lllMI :.lil   1i,.,f,     Mf.   1   tul* r*
wooit's off|r»» is insld*' the unmarked
•tmif iii*-.ii|»- Min I'lfViitor »hsfl; and.
<|sii'-»» itl«iy, the negro *ill mp oo llie
t><l**.»**d    KtHKO    rti.ll    .ll'.i.m    I'.l    lilt*   d(Wf
Mr t'tnl«T*sroo«rs serrHary. s woman
of ability and amiability.   Aad, i* •
* !;t<i*. iitum uu utf.*:r tiiiiu many «
l'n»rr«r'» parinr, i«T"it «f n\i ili< «ti-
nii'.iitsloii'i   nnd   uorgeotM   upholstery
! that Httl" kbmi rwjnir* *o tottk* tbMn
1    ,   *. ...     ... t..9*,--4*,.   rin*
to have him say. I pressed him to he
more nearly definite. He said he could
not be more nearly definite—that he
could not speak in terms-of money because one family might save one sum
and another family a different sum,
depending', upon their respective manners of living. I sought to sweep away
this defense by asking him to estimate
in dollars the amount that would be
saved annually'by the average* American wage-worker's family, whose income 1-s about $500 a year.
Mr. Underwood would not answer.
He would like to answer ine—he assured ine so. But he eould uot even
approximately answer such a question
unless he were to make a careful calculation covering the amounts of food
and the kinds of food, the amounts of
clothing and the kinds of clothing that
are consumed by average American
families, and then figuring up the
saving on the basis of the new law in
Comparison with the old. I told him
that I did not seek exact figures,
which nobody could give after any
amount of calculation, but approximate figures. I sought to help him along
by asking what would be the annual
saving on $375 a year spent for food
and clothing, that being about the sum
that $500 a year families have after
paying their house rent. Still he sat,
iu his chair and gave me the wise
statesman look combined with silence.
Then I tried him with a different
hook. Tasked him if he believed an
annual saving, of $25 would seem "a
good deal" to a family in receipt of
$500 a year. He said he did. I then
asked him, in asserting that the new
tariff would reduce the cost of living
"a good deal," it would be just to understand him as meaning a saving of
approximately $25 a year. But he said
he did hot itfant'to be quoted at all in
terms of money. I should have been
glad to carry the grand news that having won a great victory at the polls in
1912, each poor American family
might expect to have the cost of living reduced almost 50 cents a week,
but T could get no Underwood authority for it.
So I passed on to other phases' of
the same subject. I asked him upon
what articles this possible saving of
50 cents a week might be, expected.
I shall never forget his answer. He
said: "The cost of vegetables along
the Canadian frontier wm he considerably reduced." '■.:■,
'Now, anybody who knows anything
"Sural tu*e"Cau.iiIiau frontier and
sparse Canadian population that fringes,the edge of Canada, knows exactly
what this promise holds forth. Anybody who knows anything about the
export vegetable product of Canada
knows that free importation of Canadian garden truck would have about
the same effect upon the prices of
similar products in the United States
that a squlrtgun full of water would
have upon the temperature of hell. In
parliamentary phrase. 1 called Mr. Underwood's attention to this fact which,
in substance, he readily admitted. He
conceded my contention that Canadian
products could not penetrate more
than twenty or thirty miles Into the
interior, as he also admitted that the
quantity would be Insufficient to supply more than a tew families close to
the border.
"But," said Mr. Underwood, "we
may get some potatoes from Ireland.
We have long Imported Bermuda onions into this country, and I should not
wonder If wo should get quite a lot ot
stuff from Bermuda and, as I said,
from Ireland." '      ,1
Don't laugh*—go on. Hear what the
gentleman said.
'The cheaper grades of cotton will
be reduced a third, the cost of woolen
goods, including men's clothing, will
tie substantially reduced, and I expect
the price of sugar'to be reduced almost tf not quite one-half. But sugar
will not reach the bottom price for
three years, and the reductions In cotton and woolen goods will hardly be
left before nest summer."
".Mr. Underwood," said I, "I believe
ihe Democratic party has made an
honest reduction of the tariff, As a
nsiilt, the cost of living may or ituy
words, Mr. Bryan, in campaigning for
Wilson in 1912, asked that his party be
given power to destroy the high prices
that iu 1S96 he said were desirable.
And the irony of fate gave Mr. Bryan
u.s greatest political ottice for the
part he took in 1912 in trying to restore the low prices against which he
protested so bitterly in 189C.
"Suppose your new law," said 1 to
Mr. Underwood, "were to make the
cost of living as low as it was in 1896.
The people were desperate in 189*5.
Does your law contain anything that
would make them happier now?"
We had come somewhere near the
nub of the question. The people are
never prosperous whether the cost of
living is high or low. As a mass, their
wages are just enough to cover the
cost of living and no more. Mr. Underwood, as a mas of affairs, may be
presumed to know these facts. Apparently he did know them, because
he ran from them like a deer.
"I have not time to go into this matter," he said. "1 am very busy now.
Here are copies of two speeches that
I made on the tariff question. They
set forth my views in full. You may
have them, if you like."
"Do these speeches answer my question?" I asked as I reached for the
copies of the Congressional Record
that he handed to me.
"Xo," he replied.
"Well, don't you care to answer it?"
I asked. "It would seem to be worth
answering. Low prices made only
misery in 1896. If your law contains
something that will not make low
prices mean misery" now, it will take
you but a moment to say what that
something is. It will take even less
time for you to say that that 'something' is in your law without describing it."
"I am very busy," repeated Mr. Underwood.   "I could not go into that J
matter without more time."
■ Now,  we, may  as  well  clear the
decks and get into action.   There is
no answer to the question that I asked  Mr.   Underwood.   He  would  not
have had time to answer it if I had
had the power to give him a thousand
years and had given them tb him.   As
a matter of fact, as soon as I shifted
to a less pestiferous phase of the subject, i.Mr; Underwood continued to talk ;
to me for half an hour.   But no Den»> 1
crat has any time to talk when he is ]
asked why the great .mass of the people are able to get only a bare living j
whether the cost of living be high or j
low,-, *.'. -   ■■' j
In an article entitled "What the|u_
Tariff Fight Does Mean to You." ig
which was printed in the .lime (1911)
Our Treat
AH Week!
Luscious
"Sunkist" Oranges
at Special Prices,
at Your Dealer's!
The best part of breakfast is a
juicy, thin-skinned, seedless "Sunkist"
orange. .' 'Surikist" oranges are the
finest, juiciest, most delicious oranges
grown in the: world.
Buy them by the bos or half-box—they are most economical
rind keep for weeks.
Carefully picked and packed by gloved hands.
The cleanest of fruits.   Tree-ripened.
Use "Sunkist" lemons on meats, fish, poultry and salads.
Thin-skinned.   The juiciest, finest lemons grown.
Rogers Silverware Premiums for
"Sunkist" Trademarks
Cut the trademarks from; "Sunkist" orange
and lemon wrappers, and send them to us.
We offer 27 different silverware premiums
—all Rogers A-1 guaranteed Standard silver plate     ~
"Sunkist"
design.
Thl*
elegant
Rogers Oraflgs
Actual
Spoon sent to yoa tor
12 "Sunkist1' trademark!
ahd 12 cents.    "Red Ball"
orange andlemon"wra?piirii count
same ns "Sunkist"
'In rewittine. send amounts ot 20 ccnls or
over by postal note, postoQcc or Mpreai
money order.
Send your name and full
-address for oar complete
free premium circular and
club plan.
Address all orders for premium
silverware and all correspondence to
California Fruit Growers Exchange
105 King Street, Eut,cor. Church   (182)   Toronto, Ont.
;\
pglgjiajiiinajiij^^
CASH MEAT MARKET
Fresh Killed Meat at
Market Prices
liad__the j|i
•ran** there  were  no liralnn behind j not be materially reduced, depending
iilMin whether the trusts. Jobber*, re-
taller* and other gentlemen ar« able
;.*» abwirb the reductions or whe»h*-r
rhev ar»» «om]Mll*'l to t»at* them along
ft .Ul.  ,,W.t..     V.',l'„ l.^'W**-- ".'I* "...
reduction* will he panned nlotijr am!
that the con' of llvlnr will ho mat«-
iLilly re-Um-fd. mil juti liliii* :i«
uHerein the people will bo helped?"
Mr. t'nder* ood looked uj> from hits
i-'..«pe<! htind-* In antonlnhmeiit.
"Itn't the high eott of living wtiat
them to keei> th-ftn in jilace, and tliat
to *etiil ilitu old faker to do battle with
the hiBh eoni of living Aould W to invite tln> teod* to order thi- who!" !«>:>
tlint hiii tiiio itiiut .»►,» Mii*t.». i... ,,.i: ...',.
pom kept up their <-lamor about the
r Tariff to r<-
dliee the cost of Iivhik. and the tm*.*
were kind 'o the tariff faker*. Th*
fate* Wf*re kind t.»-f;i'j»e thev riitimi!
Mr, IMo-sm^I' '.,- break w!th Mr Tap
and thu* dhid«- into two group* those
who biH.-vi'd in « prow-five tariff
Throueh thi* breach Ihe jt»'iii!i"m».tj
who Isjid w».[«? %o eopl!Hj#lj Into "The
Kntpty lUn-Af**.*" -rr»pt to power—and
ruluced Site tariff
We are no* pr<>p»r*4 to listen to
Mr. I'lidiT'.-nio.! with underMnndtnis
Tin* i.i kmj i.ti.i. ni. ;h*«' uulM'^n-iJ d'icr.
The M-cre-mry open* It. \\> *nttr.
XX*. do not nt first
Ht-jwJi wonaer.
so far as It .pertained to workingmen,
wasv a fraud.   The facts remain the
same as I then stated them.   The tariff Issue Is of importance only to the
members of the capitalist class, With
them it is a very real Issue.   It is a j
real Issue, because, the tariff, or tha!
lack of it. determines which of the |
capitalist class shall obtain the lion's :
share of what the working class pro- \
duces. !
Here Is the situation: The working '
class of the United States annually
produces a certain amount of wealth,
Part of this wealth goes back to the
workers In the form of wages. The
scramble ot capitalists, whioh they
seek to dignify with the name of "business," Ss to get tbe money that the
workers have received. This money
can be obtained 'only by Belling the
workers' goods. The more the goods
can he sold for, the greater the profit
that can be obtained. If the goods of*
fered by a certali?,class of manufactur-
em come in competition with foreign
goods, a protective tariff keeps prices
and profits high by excluding the foreign wares. Such capitalists Are naturally tn favor of a high protective
tariff. As mere business men, they
would be fools if they were not.
Hut there are many American bust-
iitfc* men whose goods do hot ccrme In
competition with foreign wares. These
men are placed In a most uncomfortable predicament by a high tariff,   It
is easy to see why. The working class
has only a certain amount of wages
with which io buy goods,   tt a few
protected Interests, dealing In the ne- J
cessltles of life, are enabled hy the;
tariff to charge extortionate prices, i
tlm working class has only a small j
«um with which to buy the products j
of the gentlemen jvho cannot use a
tariff In their business. Men who havo |
but little ean pay but little and huy,
but little, no the unprotected Internal>* 1
are for-nv-wr mho*Hit* thuli «uw»* 4^
on a poverty-stricken market '
Such business men would be fools s
If tbey were not In favor of a low tariff. A low tariff would mean that their;
cu*fomers would have more money!
with whkh to huy snd could therefore
OUR SAUSAGES
The Talk ofthe Town Try'emt 5c Ib
Our Meiit comes direct from the Ranch to you and
is not Frozen or Preserved
M.K. DAVIDSON   namxw
Next door to DeBurle & Blrkbeck, Tailors
A. a LIPHARDT
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
FERNIE       ::        ::        ::
B.C.
I
Wp^ple'iuv"crying out Main-tr he I«» wmpeil.d  to pay Higher prices.
Will not tbey be ben. fited If j Tl,r>'  wm,M ha™ m(m" ,mm   whh
which to buy because they would not
| httvo been so much depleted by the
hlith tariff gentlemen.
,      The tjut'stlon of tariff or no tariff Is
titked.
the eowt of living be reduced .*'
I admlKed the obHou* f»«   ti,»t the
people   were opposed  to hiirh living •
cotts and tn favor of lover ones. J of n0 f,lt)<Itmtnt<ll importance to th«
also ass#.rt«l 'hat the p.-..pi.. did not w k( , bMtgH waKet „,wayt
know what cswdthei* misery and , n^ >» M} wHh ,„„ „,„ of „vln|t
therefore did not kno*   what would m6 wkrtb»r this cost ho high or low,
worker.
.... « ..««.,.  ..Ate* »r.si tae e*v»* of Hvln*
In l%n. tht* cost «f living w.s \ w<rr7!o».*ilf( th,*?!* Wi, the Am-
*e 1'ndorwood. ] cure It. I offered In pr oof the NCVtJjtr j nwhlnf ,„ ,#ft f„r th# wmv ,
lie l» over !e »h*- ror* J flryan    •-•'•** **■ _»••-«—«.. • 	
"Oiwxf »ln» need* im» h«*h" snd re- j w» brtna sbottt a «r»at rwiactioa in ta*
AitJ*   IM**''   »4«"U   MtUll   UU,   tlU*. IW.IVI   jOJMi    tl,    m,,.*.       ,'    „..*.'     ...-•  A.       I.
is  tm-tu-* "tit-iui^inth"   Ut- Ve  < i't,>i>t*A ; *«<},, thing from 'any r»'»prmslWe p«*>r-
———— ,i|, in a mn- tAMi-t*.   It lan't demo- j mm. bat I simply thought  f  would
OMiTril BBtlraljrBrMtlMllAW«jr    rati<    tw   * _•##!»•  to.  »»*   »(.-i1thro* mil Xtt* i*m M64 *>?*  Um  '.hi
Willi* PMttaBt
A msnafaetortag chmUt tm ths
Pacific coast »a* p*rfected a etm-
pound from tha leaf of the a*s-
traliaa Encalyptns tree, menthol and
othw wellkBown tlterapentle sgeats.
wrfcleh Is provlag a wondarful socc«-it
ta the treatniMit of catarrh.
Tbe remedy l* tm*\A <ii»«l»»f '.lw a.*'.v. •
ttt Mentholyjrtaa aad U ts breathed
from Umi grvM remits »e hi>ie
mm *«i Ms«itl»alrr>tt» f *»» *»
mm tbat It wHl  M» tlRK»«t  anr
tnm «f catarrh, eatd fn tt« *■»•*. or  f»wir»allt#r wh»a Mr t'-sderwood Mt
hay ttmr, tliat ww wm fl»* f<wr
mmn to«* If H «wi 9* h#fM»it
pm w a tnm mmm.
Wa lite mm** «mi «*****.•*..
»iwr for Mwtkalfitw «» «.«
fawillfr «fi4 ww art ptvtti to tatr<^
4we» m» iwrty
N. E* Suddaby
FINNIt I        •.€,
«u-*m*  to UkuaUy  m   so far sk tht
itrt'Mt u>'*** iX iiii- public U cojirertii'd
A-l     49     9*99-,-.*..      W.      .4V**.      ■...'..       ,f     .,,-*.
!h* "trea'" tot • t'.mplM'*j" l« ae^erf
anytliir.c *■*' * '«■'>** K***1* aa el*- *
phar,» !'K(k«> Urr«-f Se « hencoop than !
',* >•*»« i \f*4«*»Aft fWiiiar* *t;»rd«-t» '
»)i'«- *, t* '>■«•#. »l i» tmrli b+ U*w Sn ■
•b • 'ur'.n V.. ",9. <j ipi- noticeatde j
«Ur, !♦ iifmb* >«o a *atar hoal.
v*Ml>Hun. i»art!v Wsiisa fate may j
jii.    ,..,,*,.«,   \ „,   «„»„  ,■*„  ^|,j»ft!
!',      t       • *,       **<     *,<* -.4   M b\*i p*f*\
fc*»n«t nn*::>,->«   t »!imtt>I «*r that t*h#
• , %r..+,. 4.. w ■>, j»,*J,1n ««*•» » treat ]
Uv-u led hint j,
*•- »* • \9ftt*H-rl_  saal-i(
•  •: Si '■#«».   K'Ms «
. -  "..    ,A\ a-., uiin-.f
•M * tUtutMttikM.  Hi* I
: i" ■* "' «»imiM ht',f
\: .' ;.*('»'< K-ly the i
si* ** •**»*■. latklag |
*»-»«   i*,.. thinaght;
- •• <r,.r.d that tb* mt« 1
~Ti.ru alrt-M
ll(»». i»f iuUsr.. __
tier twiand * de«* tbat •* in prrfwt j m to* that Mr. Bryan urged tb» pe»- j e"rt^B'VorWBgclass' wontdhsTe been
onl*r Mr. t"nd*r*oo»l Is alac in par pi* to tarn tht* ©wintry orer t»bl« in 10Ta-jJ«^| |f fj <>o*ald hav* ballSTsd
tw:t order. I mu*l •»> agitlri ihat a j order that, wftfi free *||*r#r, ba wilKht | (i^^i -n „ fftW »Mn wages wonld ha
l**.u«*r t»»rb«ir»Hl u.itu utiV-M pointed Uw j lucrett«o tlie mat of sll -ffMnwodltlea.'       " ' .        .
«;iv to Hie silk counter including labor.   The paopl* d«Un«d,
I ftrat told Mr   t'nderwood tbat 11 hat tha tt*av* and -twhev agstt«le* -w-
..„,.,,9.t9inA *••*•*** ***• nt** ttrtfflaw wss ( moved tha low prlcea of which Mr.
iir>«a   t*«a^»artMim.     • »v   - -
.'n i,. ... (,ti,- *»•»!■*•• •♦»«♦ nn ve«»lte of
*h»w wna len. Tba? nmovotk torn
prices so eompletnly tbat Mr. Bryan
a'b*. Wi* j.47«' bavtaf t«ns»#ftf *omibt
pow#r io ln« r«as* prtcwk soaght pow
er in tft2 tn liavtr thaw
When you are buying don't forget that
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
Is Economical and Efficient
Thn viiltmhlt! coii|Hmft nro valuable for valuablo
prcmUimo
The Royal Crown Soaps, Limited
Calgary Alberta
be would go with It. He did not go far.
A*   toropnnd   wiib   ihe   old   "Kmpiy
PRICES
1AM
.*?  rt»*t
*l,*%   tuftll" * *
,iy   \(***)     i
,.W       J9mS,4.    .     .
*«ftfMea( *t
■ t*r U ' i '
At, md*- *
, raj*f * *■
ititt or. i  -
*aa alwa*.»
j(, ,mt*t4, ),
«w-#f a* »b* rear of «ts# ttar*"
Baking Powder
Reoeivea tne tugnest awaiu
at Chicago World's Fair
us high as they sr« now. Hot the
working -cists ls not now overjoyad
bacavsft tba cost ot living has so la-
evwaaad tbat nothing Is left of tha
btgb wage*. i(tr •«.».«* *vl-». .-
Vi jirtrjitrrm* ■^rl," W^w wtres *«d
the eost bf llttng aro far span—whan j
tb* cost of llTtng t* far balow wsgss
—jt't mtt-Stt Ibe -tapttsltst arMcss. tb*
i. .-tu.,, i *»«•• of «l» vNmtf «ae at* ftiad
in o«i»rjhy m ..Mt of ht, j|TlBt »nd neT«r
ft Is not dtfflcolt to swi why this ts
so   rapltallsts bay labor ss thty buy
anything «ls*—for st tittle as thay
can.  They even tnlk about the 'labor
market,'" as they talk about tbe trig
Iron market or tha lumbar nurktU
Worklmrmen art offarod as little as
rrtrrftsffafit  h^?fer» fh#r wfll aewaot.
WorklagMoa ar* always so much mors j
n«mern-i« than lobs tbat laborer* sr*
atwaya  enmitall-Mi   to   *t,«»t-.-n*%iU   t-hlx
each oth#r for Jobs. Workicgnieu ««bo
are out of Job« ara always willing to I
worl; for what tt twit a to Uv« aa tb* ,
low«!*t seal* they will consent to five. I
ft is hsttar to wwt for a \mr tataf i
than Jl Is T» bat* no 11*!**.  Tba* tb*
rn mi wbn ht* nn work fit** th* wars I
of Une taaa who f» at wwrlr.  Tt»* maw
wbo is at work wast agree to work for
wages ibst repreaent only a bar* Uv-
lac. or the ma* oot ot wort will tak*
his Job. 	
fTo b* coatia**d>
The   Misses   Alien
Sail Dreifet
COIaSKAlf
Speciality
__M .tt^ttt* MMtC* A
Grand Union Hotel
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater to the workingman's trade
C. A. CLA/K >t Proprietor
mm
A LEDGER AD  WILL PAY | THE DISTRICT LEDGER, PEBNIE, ;B. C, JANUARY 3, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
ii
tj*
The Hotel
DALLAS
One of the
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Passburg
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Clean Rooms, Best of
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THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
DryCoods, Groceris, Boots and Shoes
Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT  HOSMER,  B.C.
;i
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
The
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Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
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Minard's
Liniment
Feinie-Fort Steele
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Beer
and
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Bottled Goods a Specialty
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross & Mackay £»
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Full supply of following
for sn appetizing meal to
choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge •aue>
•gee fer tomorrow's break.
feet.
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CALL OR PHONE
Cattle Co.
Phone N Wood Street
PtftNII, ■. C.
Calgary
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDougall, Mgt
wmmsBmsaeammmmmmmmmmmm
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Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
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Send us your orders
FROM THE ISLAND
No union man of any breadth of experience would for one moment expect to get a favorable decision relative to the question of a strike from
the report of a labor commissioner,
for as a representative bf the interests of the particular party of the government to which he may belong does
not encourage him to such a decision,
and this stands out most clearly in the
latter part of the recent report of
Commissioner Price dealing with the
strike going on in British Columbia.
In speaking of the grievances of the
men as a reason for entering upon the
strike he says: "I am not disposed to
think -that there were not some grievances that needed remedying, yet on
close examination, many of those alleged do not appear to be well founded." And again, he continues: "At;
tempt at negotiations was made in a*
way which could only have been expected to defeat its own purpose, viz.:
in a way that involved recognition.*'
An underestimation of the real and
many grievances of the men working
in the mines of this country seems to
be-the easiest way out of the matter
ifor the Commissioner, and a disapproval of the demand of the men for
recognition of their union.0 The wishes of the employer, of course, as a
party to the deal, must in every iu-
stance have the preference; no matter
how unjust such a preference may be
to the emplbyee. Why should the employer dictate to the employee as to
whether he shall or shall not do and
care for Ms own interests in a collective way? And why should an
employer determine that because the
employee seeks to treat with him in
such a relation ?he will not therefore
recognize him? . The Commissioner
must really be aware that to talk of
redress of any grievance that an employee might have, apart from such
collective Ideas, is simply false philosophy. At the present seeking to
transact business for and in the interest of a body of workers by way of
an employees'committee, is always a
fatal process for the workers, and
cannot at any time be satisfactory to
him. There is only one hope for him
on the industrial field, and that is
found in organization duly recognized
by the employer. In almost every instance of course the second pany
(whom we may term the employee)
to an industrial enterprise is politely
called upon, to surrender ^his rights in
the matter so that iho Industry may
continue to exist.
The day Is here when labor in the
majority is satisfied that all means of
redress outside of a recognized process of collective bargaining with the
employer; are absolutely valueless and
therefore   not   worth   consideration.
Again, the worker does not strike
•because he enjoys doing so, but as a
rule because he finds it is the last
resort; the only thing possible left to
be done to secure the recognition of
"EliTunion and thereby the proper .protection industrially of his interest.
The Commissioner tells us further
that the employers on Vancouver Island are not so much opposed to unionism itself aa they are opposed to the
United .Mine Workers of America in
particular. This may sound good to
those who do not know better and it
Is agreed that they have mighty little
regard for the union at present help
Ing the men. Also, it is alike true that
they do not relish the thought of a
union, no matter what its name or
origin, among the men. For a period
of twenty years attempts to organize
on this Island have been made again
and again, but without permanent success so far. ..'Every time an attempt
has heen made, the employers have
victimized the leaders and, on some
occasions, have victimize^ the rank
and file forming the union. This has
been a commbn method pursued for
many years and still further the Commissioner persists in advising, the
public that dt is possible that the employers are not absolutely opposed to
all forms of trades unionism.
The Knights of Labor has had its
day, the Mine and .Mine Laborers' Protective Association, the Western Federation of Miners, and the present attempt is the second effort made hy the
United. iMine AVorkers of America to
gain recognition and establish trades
unionism on this Island, so that these
facts prove beyond dispute that if
recognition of a union Is to be had it
will only be gained by a continued
struggle, until the employers are ready
to grant same. It was stated in Nanaimo quite freely when the strike began by a number of the workers that
if the companies upon the Island were
approached, they would endorse an Island union, but that they would never
recognize the U. M. W. of A. However, this statement was proven to be
false and especially is this true con-
corning the Western Fuel Company.
At the early stage of the game a letter
was drawn up asking Mr. Stockett if
he would he willing tq recognize such
a local if the other companies on the
Island would dp so. This was presented, we understand, to Mr. Stockett,
who is alleged to have replied that his
company would close down for six
months and that he could not entertain anyi such matter. The fact remains in the last case, as in all previous ones: There has never been a
time when these employers showed
the inclination to the thought of recognizing a union among their men,
no matter of what name or brand, unless it was to destroy it, as instanced
in the case of the Western Federation
of^ Miners some few years ago. Every
conceivable method has been employed by the operators on this Island for
many years to defeat the attempts of
the workers to organize; discrimination, blacklisting and systems of spying by private,detectives and others
have constituted the means used. The
worker Is at the mercy absolutely bf
the employer, if he has no union, then
how illegal and unfair in the extreme
Is the position of any party or government that yould advise him to continue his attempt of redress in these
matters without a union. Why does
the medical faculty, the dentist, the
ana even
necessary to organize? Because the
interest o-f each can be better conserved! Then why should not the
miner be privileged to thus care for
his Interest? It is time the govern
ments took a tumble in facing these
Issues and treated both parties to any
dispute alike.
PRESS COMMITTEE,
Local 2155, Nanaimo, B. C.
tion or the confiscation ot _ .*>erty by
an outraged people, t^e subsidized organs controlled and pledged to the interests of capitalism, cannot say that
such statements are, but the mouthings
of an anarchist, but must admit that
they are the expressed convictions of
a man who has reached the summit of
wealth and affluence.
When men of the financial standing
of Spreckels send out a warning, it is
about time for the ordinary citizen to
put on the armor to protect himself
from the storm that is * predicted.—
Miners' Magazine.
Murderers Rampant
in Copper Country
' The most vicious crime of the campaign of outlawry which has accompanied the importation of thugs and
gunmen by the mining companies, for
the purpose of intimidating striking
miners was perpetrated about 2
o'clock Sunday morning at Palnesdale.
For some weeks much promiscuous
shooting has occurred during nightime,
many of the houses of strike breakers
being shot into but without fatalities
until Sunday morning when Arthur
Jane, aged 22, and'his brother Harry,
aged 25, and Thomas Dally, aged 43,
were shot to death while asleep in
their beds in the Dally boarding house.
Mary Nicholson, aged 13, who lives
with her parents in a part of this
house, was shot in the shoulder while
she slept in her bed. Reports state
that at least twelve shots were emptied into the house from close range.
Jlrs. Dally, who was sitting by the
stove reading, harely missed being
struck by one of the first bullets fired.
She ran to the room in which her hus-
-band was sleeping and found that he
had been shot through the head. (Mr.
Dally died Sunday evening at five
o'clock. One of the Jane boys, was
shot through the head and the other
through the lungs and heart, both being killed instantly. The alarm was
soon sounded and armed deputies
searched in vain for the murderers,
who, it is ibelleved, were three in number, as three different-sized bullets
were fired into the house. The Daily
(Mining Gazette, in its extra of lion-
day morning, prints the following regarding the search made for the assassins:
"The perpetrators of this awful murder fired into the home from a prominence of ground not more than fifty
yards away. A deputy hurrying down
the street saw the fire fjash from their
rifles as they did their deadly work.
He ran toward them firing his revolver in their direction as he ran. An
alarm was quickly spread and brought
a score of deputies to the scene, but
there was no trace of themurderers.
The wooda adjoining the hoarding
house were searched in vain. Three
kinls of bullets were found In the
walls of .the boarding bouse, indicat-
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He Sounds a Warning
A "Ledger" adv. Is an
Investment.
List of Locals District 18
No.
17
m
421
sia
Nt
nrt
Wit
nrt
um
tin
nu
12*3
MOT
lOi*
*?«
JUS
N«m« |«c tmt p. o. Addrttt
White Aah Mine  Wm \t •**•'** *«■*- .- t<.
Jiaakftead... .....tf. Wheatley, Ranlfcesd, kiln
lk*t*i Csttnk J. Loughran, Bearer Crook, Tis Pincher, Alt*
UeJlevse Jimii nark*, Box SI, Bellertra, Alta.
BI.Trmore ...v. I. Brum, DUIncoi*. Alia.
Bonnie T. 0. Harriet, Paetburg, Alu.
CarboB-talo J. Mitchell. Carbondale. Coleman, Alta.
**nnmnf» , ;;:..!*%; ;v*u*si4, wmium* AM*
Coloman $. Johattone, Coleman. Alu.
CorMa 1. Jooea, Corbin, tt C.
Chinook Mine* Jas. Home. Chinook, via Diamond City, Alta.
DlanoRd City J. E. Thorn li III, Diamond City. Utfcbridfe.
ffcrnlo Thoe. Uphill, rwnti*. b. C.
Freak Bran Morgan, Frank, Alta.
Ileaner  w. WrtM«rtfotirt, ff«:«ttwr. D. C.
Hillcrest. Jar, Gorton. Illllrrtit, Alta.
Lethbffdfft L. Moor*, irt) firth ,tr-»n«c. N. Lc:!i!)rU*e.
ImthktUim ConiortM..Prank flatringbaai. CoaJhurit, Alt*.
SSSf..M*N# Leaf T. 0. Harriet. Paattmrg, Alta.
M31   MMm...... ..11, Winer, Michel, B. C
mt  t%u*m T. a Harriet, Passbntf; Alt*.
IMI  Royal View Geo. Jordan, Royal Collieries, lethbridge. Alta.
1-K  Tiber.. A. PtUertos, Taker, Alts,
nm thmnpttmn, fanttwr*. Jfcue ttuttuir. G**om*i«.*h, castor*. Attn.
Rudolph Spreckles, tho sugar king
and one of the leading hankers of the
country, has made some startling
statements tbat should cause some
people to sit up and take notice.
Spreckles has been In New York and
Washington, and declares trom "inside
information" that the giants of finance
are liable to plunge this country into
the greatest panic of American history. In an Interview Spreckles ls
QuoWid us follows;
"Somo of the mor<? powerful financiers are blind enough to hope for
just such a contingency, In the hope
that a disastrous panic brought about
by ill-advised legislation would result
ln a general revolt against all reform
legislation and leave the special privilege Interests free,again to dominate
our Bovornment," says Spreckles.
"The influence of environment," ne
explains, "has made nearly all rich
men blind io the fact that a vast majority of our people are beginning to
feel the sting of poverty and that they
resent the widespread oppression due
to unfair concnntrnflon of w^nlth !n
the hands of a few.
"Thoy do not realise how deep-root.
■nil la il«u ii*fuuii<:iit against the present order, and that the people are
ready at a moment's notice to rise
In revolution against organized greoil."
Heated In his sumptuous offlco In
the heart of Ban Francisco's financial
district, surrounded by every token of
affluence and ea*»\ th« word "revolution" fell with strange*. imprei»»|venei***
from this rich man's lips.
Mlllfonaire, president of the First
Nations! Hank hen--, and financier of
big projects, Rudolph Spreckles has a
thorough knowledge of tho financial
j mtuation.  Ami as backer of the local
i graft proMHUiions nnil tun-icer of the
! big sugar trust, he hss felt the sinister
j power of orgsnI*«l p«»lf.
I    'Thero nro men with largo financial
| power," he continued, "who believe
I ihat a violent panic that could be
I charted to thi* iMttiltt^'f  •*•*,**!•*•   ■**
-errnra even the paper seller, findJtTr6^        1,       .     \  ,, ^
In the murderers' party."
The Gazette, ln Its Sunday morning
issue, which came out shortly after
the tragedy occurred, unhesitatingly
places the bleme for this atrocious
murder^ upon the shoulders of the
Western Federation of Miners with
the deliberate intention of Inciting tbe
public to acts of violence and blood
shed if possible against the officials
and organizers of this body. The Ga.
zette put out a very inflammable "ex
tra" yesterday morning and If anarchy
and murder is not the result of this
screaming appeal to bloodshed, the
Dally Mining Gazette is not to blame.
The Gazette In Us frantic efforts to
please Its master places tbe blame of
this horror upon the Federation even
before officers of the law bad had a
chance to look over the ground, and
make an examination. This action of
the Gazette will but weaken Its cause,
and ub sensible man will be swept off
his feet by the anarchy of the "extra"
of yesterday morning. The Bulletin
hns far better grounds In accusing the
gunmen of tills deed tlmn does the Gazette ln accusing the Federation.
It Is stated upon good authority thnt
Superintendent \V. F. Denton of the
Coppor Range Consolidated mines,
openly asserted that in his opinion
tlio gunmen were responsible for the
tragedy of Sunday morning. It is a
well-known fact that many acta of violence havo taken placo within territory absolutely dominated by tho deputies within the past few weeks, Houkps
havo been shot up, dynamite planted,
houses blasted and <?xplostonn pulled
off right under thc noses of dozens of
hired deputies. It seems very queer
thnt nutsld-ers enn conimt*1 'V-n"
crimes and no one Is ever caukIh, nor
tho least clew Is ever found to inipll
er sought by the administration over
money and credit would prove aa great
a menace to the people and Independent effort as is the present method
control.
"By the election of ita onw president, organized capital could ultimately dominate this country completely,
if the present financial bill becomes
a law.
"Specifically,'" asserts Spreckles,
"the proposed regional hanks would
be dominated by the majority vote of
the banks in each district. They would
namo six of the nine directors. Aad
If Dig Business ever secured control
bf the federal renerye board, the control of money and credit would be absolutely under the domination ot special privilege.
"Nothing shor of revolution then
would restore freedom to the people,
"Consider the control now exercised
over our Industrial and financial undertakings, Two hundred big corporations now havo a»»ot* of over 122,000,.
000,000. with a bi'osm liioomo three
limes greater than that of the national
ROVAL
HOTEL
FERNIE
Bar Unexcelled
All White Help
Everything
Up-to-date
■' » •■ '
Call in and
see us once
JOHN PODBIELANGJK, Prop.
We Are Ready to Scratch
off your bill any item of lumber aot
found just as we represented. Then
Is no hocus pocus in
This Lumber Business
When you caat spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip in a
lot of culls. Those wbo buy once from
us always come again. Those who
have not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't encounter if they bought their lumber
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealers In —
Lumber,   Lath,   Shingles,  Bath  and
Doors.    SPECIALTIES—Mouldings,
Turnings, Bracket*, and Detail Work
OFFICE AND YARP—McPhertonjiyo.
Opposite G. N. Depot P.O. Box 22,
Phone 23.
Steam Heated Throughout
Electric Lighted
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
Rates $2.50 per day
With Private Bath $3.00
Fire Proof Sample
Rooms in Connection
Imperial Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO
$10,000,000      Capital Paid Up       6,925,000
Total Atttta      72,000,000
Capital Authorised ..
Reserve and Undivided Profits        8,100,000
O. R. WILKIE, President HON. ROBT JAFFRAY, Vlee-Pret.
BRANCHES  IM  BRITISH COLUMBIA
Arrowhead, Cranbrook, Fernie, Golden,   Kamloops,   Michel.   Nelson,..
Revelstokt, Vancouver and Victoria.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
IMerttt allowed on depoiltt at currant rate from date of deposit.
FERNIE BRANCH A. M. OWEN, Manager
government,
"A uroup of lh*. Wall Sire.* bank- ™k' ali> om.'  •_ uthif dinm-it «li':'«*
Ing houses are directly affiliated with
and hold directorships in corporations
bavin* assets bf about *l".ooo,QtiO,000.
"That Is a real menace to Independent capital and the peace of the nation.
"Everyone i»ow**'»»;»is prop«riy, **•«•
rn'c'lully, It vitally lnfi-rcstPil ln seeing
UiIh tremendous jn*w«<r of ih« fnw llm-
it»'l. otherwise
"The pendulum nil) ahorily mviiiji to
Uu* other eatM-nte and all property
will bo eonfl»f;i'i<l by au ini'miml
pwjiile."
Thi. above tta'-ments made by a
man who Is recontilsed as one of the
mljrhiy potentates* In Industry ami fi-
rt-auu , .ui' wonU> of serious UiouHht
and (•<in"l.f(*mtl<i!i.
8pr»! k<U cannot be classed as a
tho present administration would r#.ibHnr rnmHwuil or lmnn»tt«vi« In t»v
*ut<. iu tiiitory tor tae reactionary
toetstm at » future election, Tbey are
blind to th* roHKmon of each a panic.
That is why I feel It Imperative to
tound this warning,
"Tht, **tnt»u*9.,*i,:-   ..*;.,•;»  „;w ^
welt to avoid making political espe-
dleney the basis of currency legltla
ing aipn'Skion to hit convictions, !fi»
ia a close otMM»rver and a cold-blooded
flnafttkr- HU ,%".»!eai«;nts are ba»t»d
on observation, and aa ho hat hit finger on the* piil**i «>ri trade and finance.
'...   «»«.  ji* *.*     *   • .<-«*.i. twt   »I*U*i)UiK
what be is talk ik about.
When Sjiretkt^ *peaba of revolu-
Don't merely smother your cough
411 Hill   flW        Maihfcn'a Synip ot Tar aad Cod l»ver Oil not oaly
I I lit r.   I I promptly trmtt roni-hine  V-»t Uunkt to it* tonic and
Willi   M M, ttrengthtntng prop«Tti*M It Mp* !!»*   *»t*m to throw off
Uie eoid and thut effects a permanent core.   It la thto quality which bas won few
It tbe largest tale of anv cough aad cold rem**); in Cantda
jjf, fargf bottlet fwryttKrrt.
i.U MATHUUCA*Pr**,SfllWMO-OKE. ro.
tr fwr mU i. t-wtm. )MMw'« Mnrtwi tMMff*.•*» ■»*»«»■.•■< <,'*ivU'«i9. «3
mmtkftt. 4»*»l tlW  t9*tt MM  <**•<•  M*  p."   ■"•"■"•   ^*»f     '"'""     ' ' Cl-H
»»**»«■*,. rrt,
t
labor  trouble   has  onsued,  tlctmties
have  caught  r«d-handi'd  committing
<Tlnif« finally as horrible a* ;]«• oiu-i.
Sunday morning nnd It in not util!l;"'v ;
that, such crimes have been perjwtrated In this district by hired assassins.
The Independence depot horror of
Colorado   In   which   isixti-cn    xtrlke
; hrenk<>M lost their lives, Is ttlll fresh
] lu tho memory of manv,   Thi« whole-
sain  mtiriler  was coinmlUe.l  for t.U ,
: name purpose tbat the Palnesdnle mur-
•der was committed Sunday inornlnc.
j th«  inciting or  people  to  dei»d« of
blood. *Uh th»- iiltimii!*' <*ini of rtrjvlng
! the workers back Into the mlnea In
: abj«>ct slavery.    Tin'' Colorado horror'
twas confessiwl b)   u iinntlcr uf tin-'
U'ltlnen*' Alliance while wi his rbviMi ;
I bed. !
»    VWtun* n* thit,  tlt-i'int ' ,. *  t '
ito you to enrefollv snd rnimlv lm**-!
I Uiuttt im* iratte.)>'in iuul iu-itt.i*r.«ui>n. *
I without, malice or prejudwe, and not j
I to look at It ibwwirh ''■'"■ -'«•< bf-'
j spattered tpeetartes bf the Iiallv Min-
j Ing Oasette—-Miner*' ftntl'Mti
There are only two i>»rti<-* th*- Ho*
clallst party snd thf ci»pi»a!i*i party.
which divide* In conte*t» fur uffce,
but nnltes to beat PoctalKt*
There are four rul«-* for K'"tii»g
rich. He honeit, h»< indii-'H..•,•.* .'if
hopeful nntl ht* p«tlrtit, Th.-- ml.-i..
when spplle«1 hy you. nre -if. '.. i>i"iUc
ihe older (t>llow  rtcli.
If goclalivm doesn't »w< > n '\.u -.wintry Jike a cyclone In !!*H If "b1'!! he hf*
{»us« those now tn power nee t, t»re»t
»»Kht, «hui ihMflreye*. muk* » ? -j* "-f'A
swallow about half tht* .n-twliii"-"*
| working progrnro.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 REST, $12,500,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Drafta on the principal title* in the following countriea issued without
delay t
Africt
Arabia
Argtntin* Rtpubllc
Arm*ni»
A.ulmiia
Amlri* H.nf-t*/
fwlgmm
Ilwril
nutiirit
C*t>!.a
Chill
Ci.tli*
tl«l»
Cub.
iJi'i.inurk
UtYpt
Vfnltnt
Frititt
0.im.t\y
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Kam
Mtii.o
Sttwrin
New /r»!«n4
Sit-iitli Afrlfa
fit,,9. ity
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Slraitt S«tllani»fi«i
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Syria
Pet» n,1
tirhttr                    g. 7
l'*.*n*.«*!
■Unita-i IlilH
Mtiumtnla
Wni Indin, al*.
These drafta can be drawn in aterlintf, frnnr«, merks, firo, kronen, .yen,
taels, rotiWna, Mr., ncrorillBgfo the monty of thc country in whith Ihey
are payable. Thin enable* the payee to obtain the exact amount intended.
L. A. f. UACK, Manager. FIRNIf  8HANCH
HTHE     M± a   SS»^1864
ie dank* Canada
r<»r in she beKlnnlnv of the y,..ir !» is i vixtosn,,rj with
\Y many persons to open H.ivtlH'f aecotint* in their
own tiamet, thow of their ehildren or their %n,ilt.,
Thi*- Home 1-UnK ii.vtte* m*Ai aei-ountt. Full com-
pound Interexf paid on lavlnna <!»"• •*•.'•<■* a* mit* dol-
inr iMKi upward*.
*N0TORONTOifMrs MAS0N
HftAU OFFICE
NINK BRANCHES IN
■RANCHIt ANO CONNECTIONS
Central Manage.
TMROV&HOUT CANAOA
Us F* MCDONALD, Manaffor
VIOTORIA AVI„ -f •:- PtRNIf,  *■ C <-*\t -y-tiJ,
•'.',' '-.-.-•#;■■
.^iqMyS
,'\ ; ■
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. 0., JANUARY 3, 1914.
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets   every   Wednesday
■evening at S o'clock In K. P.
Hall, ■ *
Noble Grand, A. Prentice,
Secretary, J. B, Meiklejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello's Hall second and third Mondays in
each month,
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
g  KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 8
p.m, in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, G Barton.
K. of R. S., Chas. Buhrer.
M. of F., Robt. Dudley.    ,
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meet every Monday at 8
p.m. in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, T. Uphill,
Secretary,. W. F. Vance.
it/V'TfaWaU/-»-\T*T/»-iT/4U"(»N»rfa^aYrf«\r^\t?*\lIii!
CONCERNING
GREATEST FALLACY
BY  ALLAN   L.   BENSON   IN   PEARSON'S   MAGAZINE
Aaron Burr onee undertook to define ju-jge-made law. "The law," he
said, "is whatever is boldly asserted
and plausibly maintaineii."
■Burr might have gone much farther
and still been -within the facts. He
might have said that public opinion
is whatever is boldly asserted and
plausibly maintained by most of the
newspapers and magazines.
Nobody has ever come within gunshot of adequately estimating the
power of printer's ink. It is a power
so great that, in comparison, every
i other power; in a republic seems puny.
j We hear much of the money power,
; but money without ink has no power.
Money is powerful only because it
ran buy ink. Give me all the ink and
Rockefeller all the money and I will
undertake to create u public opinion
that will render Rockefeller's money
as sterile as a stone. That public
opinion is so often monstrously wrong
is because the little class that, owns
most of the money also owns most of
the ink.
It may be pleasing to' the rising
generation to know how this game
is worked.
Mr. J. Cartlidge
Teacher of Piano
and Organ
Specialist in Tuning:
& Pianola Works
Vocal Training-
Apply for terms to
BOX 538
or House No. 21, Wood St.
and to what extent the new tariff law
would ease a^nd simplify the common
people problem of keeping alive. I
knew that, in this respect, the Democratic platform upon which Mr..Wilson was elected^and to which Mr. Underwood subscribed, had promised
much. That platform had bitterly upbraided, the Republican party for its
"attempts to escape responsibility for
present conditions by. denying that
they are due to a protective tariff."
My particular mission to Jlr. Underwood was to ascertain from so eminent an authority exactly wherein
If tho Republican tariff were the
cause of the high cost of living, or
much of it, it therefore seemed a fair
conclusion that the destruction of the
Republican tariff would do away with'
the high cost of living, or much of it.
But, before we enter the actual presence of the gentleman who should be
known from one end of the country to
the 'other as the overestimated Mr.
Underwood, let us indulge in certain
reflections that may give us brief
nourishment A number of years ago,
when Mr. Roosevelt was officiating as
chairman of the Hell Raisers* Union,
his proposals did not always meet
with   unanimous   endorsement,   even
... * , .... , , among radicals. Some radicals believ-
It may beguile the mind ed that Mr, Roosevelt did not go far
of youth to see the stuff of which our j enough; others believed he went too
greatest political heroes are made and \ far.   But both1 kinds of radicals heart-
to behold the manner in which the
blackest .lies are palmed off as whit-
eat truth. If so, let us give heed to
Washington, for it is there that our
heroes are spawned*. Washington, al-
•ways politically pregnant, never is,
without" a new hero in process of gestation. Great uncertainty usually exists as to who shall be born next.
Great rivalry always exists as to who
shall be next born. A beautiful fairy
story was once written about the competitive eagerness with which the
little children in Banyland strive to be
wafted into this world. I always think-
of this story when I am in Washington. In the days when William Sulzer
—-"•the same old Bill"—was a ;Tam-
many congressman, it was a gorgeous
sight to see AVilliam soothing himself
with the belief that he was about to
be born -Into the hero class. In those
days, it was Sulzer's pleasing custom
fly united in an appreciation that took
substantially this form: "Well, thank
God, we have at least progressed to
tbe point where a politician who
wants to win public favor must talk
about something else than the tariff;"
In other words, these simple radicals
believed that the fraudulent old tariff
issue had finally been put on the
shelf.
Kindly observe, how, how the power
to determine just what use shall be
made of printer's ink also determines
what people shall thlnK about. After
the defeat of Bryan in 1908, certain
great Democratic newspapers began a
concerted campaign to bring the tariff
question t'o life. In this campaign,
the New York World took the lead.
First, .there were brief editorials of
regret that the good old days of Gro-
ver Cleveland were past, coupled with
the expression of the fervent belief
that if any good Democrat of national
reputation would go to the front oh
the tariff issue, the people would rally
to promenade down "Peacock Alley,"   tb his support and restore the Demo
at the New Willard, at the precise
after-dinner moment when he believed
most eyes would be upoii him.. Being
I 227 miles from "his poverty-stricken
r New York constituents, of course he
WBfB^ETBnliigTlressrtnm^hii-a^iTBi
cratlc party to power. What good
ever came to the common people as
the result of the Democratic party
coming into power, the World did not
psiuse to explain; newspapers that are
engaged in a "campaign of.education
RING'S  HOTEL
Bar supplied with  the   best Wines,
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Liquors and Cigars
DINING  ROOM  IN CONNECTION
W. MILLS,
Prop
$3,50  RECIPE  FREE,
For Weak Men
Send Name and Address Today
You Can Have It Free and
Be Strong and Vigorous
Wo liave In our po*»';it»ion ix pro-
Bcrlptlon ttiv lurvouB debility, lack of
vlKor. weakened imuihoud, (uliitiic mum-
ory ami lanut hnck, brnuifht on by «x-
cense*, unnatural drain*, or th* follkit
of yuutli. tliat I,a* cun-d tw mnny worn
ami nerv.MiK nun right Itt Unit' own
Itcini''*-witlutut (iny nditttlonnl lielp tr
tn«.><Ht>lnf--"tlint. wi> think mvry man
wli" wl«)u» to rcttiiln liis mniily i«>wr
nntl virility. i(i.in',*,., itii>l 'lui.'ily. ;*!.<>ul«l
Itavn a i'Dpy. Su wi- Imvu ilt-tituilSH'tl lo
..flil ii cu'iv of ihi' r"".-*«rriritli.->t it,'i, nt
charK<\ In tt i>imti, utiiinuiy «™...i .u-
vttluiH) ut uny iiiun wim will write uh
for li.
Tiii» i.|..'Wil|.ii"ii *•;;.■. ?<,:;-, " !'*>'-
plclnn who In'" '.intuit t* Kjn-clftl wnidy of
mt*,*, ami wi- iim ((Jtyvltiful H l* tlm
(.iii'i'<-t-nrtliij( fitnlilimtiim fur tl.e <Mir<»
nt iiviiriftit Mtiiti!n»i..| *»i,*l via or fallur'!
I'Vfrr fit tuKfUii'i.
W*. tliltik wc «iwf It In (uir fi'llnw
mnn In wml ll.i'Sit it rn|ij' in t;«i!i(t<lt tn'«
ko tMit anv mint iitivwlifi" wim Im wpiik
an<t til"' iHiniis>'il with t.>t...:tl«-tt ftiilurcn
may «tui« iJniKtfliit-r htnixclf wltlt Imrm-
fill imi. nt m<'ili'-lti"» n.itil'f wlnit w«j
ln'lti*vi> in th> iiuUh'-it -nt tltur ri'KHint.
tlv»\ tif.t.utitltfiK Hit»T-T<»r<.'llIX<> rt*m.
i-ilv fx**r ilf-vlm it. suit fo nitre litmn^lf al
lf»nii. titiiftiv nml i|tiir>Mv, .l»»' tlfnp u»
a Hn*.*. Slfec tl'l*' ttitt-fxtritc ltt*nn«<iy <"<»,.
1907 l.tKk l.wllditiK, iitln.lt. MitI',. ami
wn will *<*t»il ywU a *.<*r»V *>t thl* ii>)t*n-
rtlil !<«f!|)i» In n plain ordinary •nv*M<>|>*
Jl»«"  ••{  y.ttS-tHi,      \   V   -■"   **'->**i'  «I<i-fl.ir»
waiiM chars* 13.00 to t!Uio tot m«r**ly
wrtftnjr tml t* fl' *t rlflm Ilk? this —
but wo tend H «»lillr«ty tttee.
.'waistcoat. Xatnrally, also, he walked
| slowly, as great men should. And,
j hftving navigated ih© "Alley," it was
I his custom to take up a position
: against one of the Imitation marhle
j columns in the lobby, to be greeted
; by whomsoever should see fit.1 It was
j indeed au Inspiring sight to see him
i gazing solemnly at the floor .while
| gentlemen having the wit of kittens
b,egged his Indulgence as if he were a
(king. It was Indeed a grand sight—
1 but it is no more, for William has
j gone from Washington, and other im-
j Station heroes are leaning against the
imitation marble columns at the Wil-
laid.
Vet, some of the imitation heroes
seldom or never go to the Willard.
The Hon. Oscar \V. Underwood is one
of 'these. The Honorable Oscar, as
the father of a tariff law that bears
his name, has become tx little too exclusive to mingle with the cheap embryo heroes that swarm around tav-
cms. Gentlemen who wish to see him
will have to go where he Is—he will
meet them at no half-way house.
•Gentlemen who wish to see him will
also have considerable trouble to find
him, Tor Mr. Underwood has become
«o rich in lnlwuude renown thut, ln at
least one respect, he resembles gentlemen who ara money-rich — he has
many abiding places. As a mere congressman, he has a right to mi officii
in the great msrble House ottia*
llulldlng, but as the chairman of the
Ways and Means Committee, he does
not exercise ft. As the chairman of
the Ways ami Means Committee, ho
has a right to un office In that fplen-
diil committee room In which so nwny
stupendous stctulu have been engineered; hut, as tho leader of the Democratic majority In the llouae, he do-es
not exercise It.   Anyone who wishes
IO   lllltl    ,\lr.    i'lllllTttOOli    *!ii    ICIH-    tu
;tsk qui'Htionx ns h»> raniint he found
In eltlu-r of tlie Hforcnifittfotwd offl-f-
es. nor Is his name upon the glass of
any door. Anyone who asks questions
will eventually he Informed that the
nbjct: of hi» s' urt'h may ■-><• !<wsl only
Uy foilowliiK .i narrow hallway, which
nklris the west side of the chamber In
which tho hou»i« of thc representative* sits.
Thl* hallway, which 1* bounded on
mi" oik) by ,t Htalui* tit Thomas Jefferson. 1* bounded on the other hy it live
ui'Uro. Thia negro, upon request, will
8lvi- I'm- Information that Mr, I'ntl'-r
never take the trouble lu i*AA
rile anything new that is true.
"At any rate, the World continued to
harp on the tariff until if broke forth
in a series of masterly cartoons entitled "The Empty Market Basket"
"The Empty Market Basket" was an
attempt to visualize tbe twin horrors
of American life—the high cost of living and the Payne tariff law. The
aforesaid visualization was brought
about by presenting a picture of a
woman carrying a market basket. The
woman of course wore a shawl over
her head, was tagged by two or three
half-starved children, and her basket
was empty. If I remember correctly,
a brace of pups labeled "High Tariff"
and "High Cost of Living" were presented In the act of wrestling on the
grass with a couple of pounds of ham
and a bologna sausage that they had
hooked from the basket. At any rate,
the changes were wrung, day after
day, upon some such scenery as this.
while editorials in adjoining columns
blared and bleated about the tariff
being a "tax upon poverty." If we
could only get rid of this terrible tariff, we should be all right. The cost
bf living would come down, a poor
man could look his grocer In the eye
without fainting away, and life for the
average mortal would take on a rosier
hue.
Ink finally wrought its miracle.
That which the radicals of a few years
before believed could never take place
ngsln once more became a reality. Old
Mau Tariff, the hero o'f a hundred
wars (all fakes) was back on the
stage doing his ancient monologue.
Close observers could see that his
cheeks were as hollow as his promises, that his eyes were sunken in he-
cause there were no brains behind
them to keep them lu place, and that
to send this old faker to do battle with
the liish cost tit living would be to invite the god» to ord«»r the whole pop-
uhtituii '.um itiiui *4.i>'..'.:i..-. V.:;. ',';.(• AA
pots kept, up their clamor about the
absolute pow<r of a U»t\i<r tariff to reduce the cost of livintt, and the frit«»
wero kind to the tariff faker*. Thc
fates were kind because they caused
Mr. KooseveU fo hroak with Mr Taft
and thus divide into two groups those
who lulli'ved in a protective l;ir!ff,
Through this breach th»> gentlemen
who had wept so copiously Into "The
Kmpty Basket" crept to power—and
reduced (he tariff.
We are now prepared to listen to
Mr, Underwood with ttnderstnndlhg.
The jit-wo Mpa on the tinl^ttereil door.
Market Basket" brigade he hardly
moved. He said the new law would
reduce the cost of living "a good deal.'-
I asked him what he meant by a good
deal. He did not care to say. I did care
to have him say. 1 pressed him to be
more nearly definite. He said he could
not be more nearly. definite—that he
could not speak in terms of money because one family might save one sum
and another family a different sum,
depending .upon their respective manners of living. 1 sought to sweep away
this defense by asking him to estimate
in dollars the amount that v«ould be
saved annually by the average American wage-worker's .family, whose income is about $500 'a year.
Mr. Underwood would not answer.
He would like to.' answer me—he assured me so. But he could not even
approximately answer such a question
unless he were to make a careful calculation covering the amounts of food
and the kinds of food, the amounts of
clothing and the kinds of clothing that
are consumed .by average American
families, and then figuring up the
saving on the basis of the new law In
Comparison with the old. 1 told him
that I did not Seek exact figures,
which nobody could give after any
amount of calculation, but approximate figures, I sought to help him along
by asking what would be the annual
saving on $375 a year spent for food
and clothing, that being about the sum
that $500, a year families have after
paying tlieir house rent. Still he sat
in his chair and gave me the wise
statesman l'ook combined with silence.
Then I tried him with a different
hook. Tasked him if he believed an
annual saving of $25 would seem "a
good deal" to a family in receipt of
$500 a year. He said he did. I then
asked'him.," in asserting that the new
tariff would reduce the cost of living
"a good deal," it would be just to understand him as meaning a saving of
approximately $25 a year. But he said
he did not want to be quoted at all in
terms of money. I should have been
glad to carry the grand news that, having won a great victory at the polls in
1912, each poor American family
might expect to have the cost of living reduced almost 50 cents a week,
but I could get no Underwood authority for it. '"'■*'"-,'
So I passed on to other phases' of
the same subject. I asked him upon
what articles this possible saving of
50. cents a. week might be expected.
1 shall never forget his answer. He
said: "The cost of vegetables along
the Canadian frontier wnt De considerably reduced," '. ,'
Now, anybody -who knows anything
iw^peo-4-ateo^rt—tbe—©asa'diaa—fponU«i-and-^lia
sparse Canadian population that fringes the edge of Canada, knows exactly
what this promise holds forth. Anybody who knows anything about the
export vegetable product of Canada
knows thtlt. free importation of Canadian garden truck would have about
the same effect, upon the prices of
similar products in the United States
that a squlrtgun fujl of water would
have upon the temperature of liell. In
parliamentary phrase, I called Mr, Underwood's attention to this fact which,
ln substance, he readily admitted. He
conceded my contention that Canadian
products could not penetrate more
than tyventy or thirty miles Into the
Interior, as he also admitted that the
quantity would be Insufficient to supply more than a few families close to
the border.
"But." said Mr. Underwood, "we
may get some potatoes from Ireland.
We have long Imported Bermuda onions into this country, and I should not
wonder If we should get quite a lot of
stuff from Bermuda and, as I said,
from Ireland." '
Don't laugh—go on. Hear what, the
gentleman said.
'The cheaper grades of cotton will
be reduced a third, the cost of woolen
goods. Including men's clothing, will j
be substantially reduced, and I expect i
the price of sugar to be reduced al-f
most If not quite oue-half.   But sugar i
will not reach tbe bottom price for,
three years, and the reductions In cotton and woolen goods will hardly be
left before next summer." ,
"Mr. Underwood." said 1, "I believe
the Democratic party litis made an ;
honest reduction of the tariff.   As a |
result, the cost of living may or may
words, Mr. Brj an, in campaigning for
Wilson in 1912, asked that his party be
givren power to destroy the high prices
that in 1S96 he said were desirable.
And the irony of fate gave Mr, Bryan
itiS greatest political ollice for the
part he took in 1912 in trying to restore the low prices against which he
protested so bitterly in 1896.  ■
"Suppose your new law," said I to
■Mr. Underwood, "were to make the
cost of living as low as it was in 1896.
The pe'ople were desperate in 1S96.
Does your law contain anything that
would make them happier now?"
We had come somewhere near the
nub of the question. The people are
never prosperous whether tbe cost of
'living is high or low. As a mass, their
wages are just enough to cover the
cost of living and no more. Mr. Underwood, as a mas of affairs, may be
presumed to know these facts. Apparently he did know them, because
he ran from them like a deer.
"I have not time to go into this matter," he said.1 "I am very busy now.
Here are copies of tW'o speeches that
I made on the tariff question. They
set forth my views in full. You may
have them, If you like."        ,
"Do these speeches answer my question?" I asked as I reached for the
copies  of the Congressional  Record
that be handed to me.
."No," he replied.
"Well, don't you care to answer it?"
I asked. "It would seem to be worth
answering. Low prices made only
misery in 1896. If your law contains
something that will not make low
prices mean misery" now, it will take
you but a moment to say what that
something is. it will take even less
time for you to say that that 'some;
thing' is in your law without describing it."
"I am very -busy," repeated Mr. Underwood. "I could not go into that
matter without more time."
Now, we. may as well clear the
decks and get into action. There is
no answer to the question that I asked Mr. Underwood. He would not
have had time to answer it if I had
had the power to give him a thousand
years and.had given them to htm. As
a matter of fact, as soon as I shifted
to a less pestiferous phase of the subject, 'Mr. Underwood continued to talk
to me for half an hour. But no Democrat has any time to talk when he is
asked why the great mass of the people are able to get only a bare living
whether the cost of living be high or
low. ■   *-.   -
In an article entitled "What the
Tariff Fight Does Mean to Vou,"
which-was printed in the June (1911)
number of „ this magazine. I had the
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B5I
fpyjajgijaisii^
CASH MEAT MARKET
Fresh  Killed Meat at
Market Prices
bo far as it .pertained to v/orklngmei,,
was a fn&d. The facts remain the
same as I then stated "them. The tar»
Iff issue is of importance only to the
members of the capitalist class. With
them it is a very real issue. It Is a
real issue, because the tariff, or the
lack of it, determines which of tho
capitalist class shall obtain the lion's
share of what the working class pro-1|
duces. s
Here is the situation: The working
class of the United States annually
produces a certain amount of wealth.
Part of this wealth goes back to the
workers In the form of wages. Tha
scramble of capitalists, which they
seek to dignify with the name of "business," is to get tbe money that tha
workers have received. This money
can be obtained 'only by selling the
workers' goods. The more the goods
can he sold for, the greater the profit
that can be obtained. If the good* of*
fered by a certain class of m&nufactur.
ers come in competition with foreign
goods, a protective tariff keep* prices
and profits high by excluding tke foreign wares. Such capitalists are naturally in favor ot a high protective
tariff. As mere business men. they
would be fools If they were not.
iBut there are many American business men whose good* do not come ln
competition with foreign wares. These
men are placed In a most uncomfortable predicament hy a high tariff. It
Is easy to see why. The working class
has only a certain amount of wages
with which to buy goods, It a few
protected Interests, dealing In tbe necessities ot life, are enabled by Uio
tariff to charge extortionate price
OUR SAUSAGES^
The Talk ofthe Town Try'em 1 5c Ib
Our Meat comes direct from tlie litmch to you anil
is not Frozen or Preserved
M. K. DAVIDSON   proprietor
Next door to DeBurle & Birkbeck, Tailors
A. C. LIPHARDT
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
FERNIE       ::        ::        ::       B.C.
not bo materially reduced, depending}'I'0 wo'*,n*. .cIJ*"f h" °'?ty * •m«"
wood's office ts lnsld# the unmarked Tha secretary opens It.   We enter.
«loor hf-Hlil** tin* I'lf-vator *h«ff; nn<1.1 \\'_  to not at first  we Underwood.
AUSTRALIAN OIL
SKIPS OATMRH
Otfarm Attnly Brwtfliwl Away
White VtMmtmmpu
•Tjtiitw HKeiy, tne n«gro will r«|i on the
fronted «-;.»»» aiui Siring to ih* door
Mr. Underwood's n-wr-MHry. a woman
of ability and amiability.   And, Iff •
t littji' room, no larger titan many a
dtroc-ffr'a parlor, Iwntlt of all the ill-
J tHPtiitlotw nnd Korgeoit* tipholirturr
that little men require to m«k# them
1 nnttm   \i94.n    Mr    t*nrfl*>rwnod   «H«
i   "Good wine needs no hurt" and re-
I J*i*i **«"-■*• "•* i> tt.-.'... „„, *!),-,. *,!!:.•:,,
, U ««.«* "d«nocr»tl<" lo be cooped
I up In a llulw place. It Isn't demo-
icreUc, but it mmm so, and «bai
seems so usually so, so far ts the
1 grpat ma»« of thp public u concerned.
i- ■*.»,,,        , .!,,,,,„   „r
.**    t4.     )****.,*.V»     '9,     .'AV   «      ... . *  . * ■ ,.1,
ihe "*re«t" for "simplicity" is never
anything bat > po»e. Even an elephant look* larger fn s hencoop than
It do-mi in Msdlson ftyuare Garden,
whi!« a mouse that would In" lost In
th«* OanU-n bifomes quite noticeable
'< wh*»n it rtimb* into a sugar bowl.
„„„ . ,         .  . *tr. r'.,*,.!.i".i,.i,',*! r*< \ vfrv ftin»w-"tflnr
Ol MentholypfaS M4 It l» fcr-BMh-wi j guntu-man. partly beranse fate may
ly the -patient whilo ho «Wt><* ,.*(«iiv ,■ -i**,m\. hi™ ir>to th* White
IVom the gr©M resnlts we h»«« : h<v\m.. .n-.t .,*<r'i**- ratine of hi* ?«•
■em with Wentlolrptos we are to ' mmi iu,im..» I «hmii>! **y that the
sure tb»t It will  help slmost any   At-pncvcw. *t<*rt* h'i»inr-n» !o*t a trrwit
 •L-*-"-*       floorwalker when Mr. Underwood s«i
, lil* Um. upi>t. Va* road thst led him
Into polltu-y.   !).. 1* ^ perfectly sanl-i
iry Ir-ofciru- rti.K, <,f ,'..: >#iir«.   When I
.'..u. T.-xlly, l.    ,:   ■ •'•„■■ - ;'t\ m*"i»nr»»tf I
jconfhkbt* trt-.it! of ■* H*m»r*4lk#r. Ills
. h,i*r f« 1-nnAnA in*,* tm it  .bn**l*t he,
jlil* soft  ":-'<•-••  v-fiui   In   precisely fhw
- ;»ro»ji#r way.   Tkfinsih a-* bww Miking
< nritt »n«J  mt-h  thing*.  th,» though!
■, wss always in mv mini that, th* BWtt
' mtrntrA fcf "i;-iV! oy: "Thm- aisles
rtmaii Mii.aei. »!•• i* not ifl tht: dirttt
Sir,*; of Vinson. He U over tn the corner Im;*U»<1 a d**k that it in perfe-ft
order. Mr. I'nderwood Is also In per
feet order. I tnttftt sar again that a
IwUfcr hairb-irwl mau uover pointed thc
wny to the silk roBnter.
upon whether the trusts, Jobbers, re
tellers and other gentlemen are ahle
to absorb the reductions or whether
they are compelled to pass them along
'..> Uv jifople. Tl'tt. riiftimlrnr rlinf the
reductions will he wassed along ontl
tlmt the cost of living will he materially reduced, can you flliow m*
wherein the people will be helpetl?"
sum with which to buy the products
of the gentlemen who cannot use a
tariff in their business. Men who hand
hut little tan pay but little and buy
hut little, so the unprotected Interest*
ni'w fore vol' lujott-lus thuir £«>■•'><-■ «IV '
on a poverty-stricken roarhet. ]
Such business men would be fools
If they were not In favor of a lou tar-,
Mr. Underwood looked up from hi* ] W-A low tsrlff *o»,dtfme»» «hal^';
»«neil hsndK In attonlthment customers would  have more money
•iSrt t!S hlS <*« of Hvli« wlint I "It* **««»• «• *«y »nd eo»!«1 Proton
Ivoi.n are &SAOxTi tnZr he *• «W»W to mjl^rjrIcm
«ed.   "Will not they be benefited if 2ft. ^lli?...^°^.S,-^/-iLh.
the
asked
the cost of living be reduced?
1 admitted the obvious faei tliat the
people were opposed to hlch living
costs and In favor of lower ones. I
also asserted that the people did not
know what caused their misery and
which to -buy because they would not
havo been so much depleted by the
high tariff gentlemen.
The question of tariff or no tariff Is
of no fundamentsl importance to th*
working class, because wages always
rl*u> and fall with the cost of living,
"P.,":.' ?"fr!f A" tV^eS&SS^ n»tW«i «• >•« totyh-t average worker.
I first told Mr. Underwood that I hut the trusts aad other agencies re-
■ttM#rstrtod thst his new tariff Isw wss " """ " '" " -» -   -    »•-
to bring about a great mu-Kuoo to <««
vwAi »•.' l'ii..tji,-    ' •li;i1'  iii.flf.n'ttnifl  Tin
.totitical hi* that hai followed Mr.
Hrjan. In lt*H. thtt coat of living wss
m low that Mr. Brysn urged the people to turn the country over to him In
ortor thst, with free sll-rar. h* might
Incrense the enst of all coMBftodltlea.
including labor.  The people declined,
When wage* and the ro« of living
were low. In the eartr 'M's, the Abi*
ertcaa working class would hsve been
overfoj**4 If U could have b*H*v»4
thst, fn a few yesrs, wages would lw
ss high as they are now. But the
working -elass ia not now overjor-sd
SMeaas* tht coat ot living has so In-
creasad that nothing Is left, of th*
iuch thing from sny responsible per-j them wss left Tfc*r f*sso««tt io*
son. but I simply thought I would prices so complet** thst Mr. Brysn
throw out the line aad **«■ ho« fur j and his psrtr, havtag fomerly sought
he would go with It. He did not go far. power to Inrraaa* yrlCM. sought paw-
As compsred with th* old "Rmptjrler la 1912 to town taws,   w othar
moved th* low pricwrijif which Mr.
*.hfm ,o ewn^rtT »*«« uo vastlft of ^*%*f*£W'mit whmti wa«M aad
When you are buying don't forget that
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Is Economical and Efficient
The vnhialilo coupons aro vnlimhlc for valuablo
pivmiumH
The Royal Crown Soaps, limited
Calgary Atbarta
A maaufaet-arlai chemist oo a*
Pacific watt hss perfected a eom-
pound from thg lwt ot th* Ans-
trtllan Eucalyptus tree, menthol gad
other well-known tttwp*mio agents,
which Is proving A wonderful success
la th* treatment of csUrrh.
The retntsdy Is sold under tw nam.'
(as* of catarrh, cold lw th* head, or
ftar tvnr, that wo will ttv* your
raouey bach If It «oe* aot benefit
ym IS A vm NTOIITB.
W* Itnv* tti*m*A tb* «wUuWc
mmm tor UmUwtyptM fw. tws
foeallfr *n& we ar* proud to Intro-
dae* Uils rrmedy her*
N. E. Suddaby
PRICfS
RIAM
Baking Fowd(
Received the highest award
at Chicago World'  ~ '
th* co*t bf living ar* tar apart—-w haa
th* cost of ItvfBf la far Mow wag*s
—yet wader th* capitalist systaai. tha
wsgss of th* av*rag* msn ara fti*d
by th* coot ef his living tnd a*v*r
t»xr++*\ tt.
It is not dimwit to •*• war tins »
so. Capitalists buy labor as they hay
anything else—for as llttl* as iff
can. They even talk about the "labor
market," a* they talk ahout the pig
Iron sbsrket or th* lumber market.
Worfclngmen sr* offered ss little as
•tttpHttHsr* heller* tbey will acceot.
Workingmen are always so much nor*
nomerom thsn foN tbat Isborers ar*
hi*a>4. kutuitMUutl ta cuiupstc with
eat h otlMr for job*. WorklJismen who
are out of jobs are always willing to
*«rk tor what it costs to live ea th*
loweat wale they wtff consent to five.
It Is better to work for a poor livtaf
■thxn 11 1* to bsv* n* lltrtag. Thws th*
m*» who has no work nie* th* wag*
of the man who t* st wwis. i'tm «m
who is at work must agree to work for
wages that represent only a bare Hv-
In*, or the man oat of work will tak*
his Job. 	
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G, A* CIAIK :•: Proprietor
A LEDGER AD  WILL PAY «*-*■:-:>■* •
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iL
PAGE SBVBIf
FROM THE ISLAND
No union man of any breadth of experience would for one moment expect to get a favorable decision relative to the question of a strike from
the report of a labor commissioner,
for as a representative bf the interests of the particular party of the government to which he may belong does
not encourage him to such a decision,
and this stands out most clearly in the
latter .part of the recent report of
Commissioner Price dealing with the
strike going on in British Columbia.
In speaking of the grievances of the
men as a reason for entering upon the
strike he says: "I am not disposed to
think -that there were not some grievances that needed remedying, yet on
close examination, many of those alleged do not appear to be well founded." And again, he continues: "At-_
tempt at negotiations was made in a"
way which could only have been expected to defeat its own purpose, viz.:
in a way that involved recognition?'
An underestimation of the real and
many grievances of the -men working
in* the mines of this country seems to
be- tbe easiest way out of the matter
.for the Commissioner, and a disapproval of the demand of the men for
recognition of their union. The wishes of the employer, of course, as a
party to the deal, must In every instance have the preference; no matter
how unjust such a preference mayobe
to the empfoyee. Why should the em-,
pdoyer dictate to the employee as to
whether he shall or shall not do and
care for his own interests in a collective way? And why should an
employer determine that because the
employee seeks to treat with him in
such a relation ?he will not therefore
recognize him? ; The Commissioner
must really be aware that to talk of
redress of any grievance that an employee might have, apart from such
collective ideas,,, is simply false philosophy. At the present seeking to
transact business for and in the interest of a body of workers by way of
an employees'"committee, is always a
fatal process for the workers, and
cannot at any time be satisfactory to
him. There is only one hope for him
on the industrial field, and that.is
found in organization duly recognized
by the employer. In almost every instance of course the second pany
(whom we may term the employee)
to an industrial enterprise is politely
called upon to surrender his rights In
the matter so that ihe industry may
continue to exist.
The day is here when labor, in the
majority is satisfied that all means of
redress outside of a recognized process of collective bargaining with the
employer are absolutely valueless and
therefore   not   worth   consideration.
Again, the worker does not strike
because he enjoys doing so, but as a
rule because he finds it ls the last
resort; the only thing possible left io
be done to secure the recognition of
fWsTOHiOBTKfWlfSby the -proper -protection industrially of his interest.
The Commissioner tells us further
that the employers on Vancouver Island are not so much opposed to unionism itself as tbey are opposed to the
United -Mine Workers of America ln
particular. This may sound good to
those who do not know better and it
Is agreed that they have mighty little
regard for the union at present help
ing the men. Also, it is alike true that
they do not relish the thought of a
union, n'o. matter what its name or
origin, among the men. For a period
of twenty years attempts to organize
on this Island have been made again
and again, but 'without permanent success so far. JEvery time an attempt
has ibeen made, the employers have
victimized the leaders and, on some
occasions, have victimized tbe rank
and.file -forming the union. This has
been a commbn method pursued for
many years and still further the Commissioner persists in advising the
public that at is possible that the employers are not absolutely opposed to
ail forms of trades unionism.
The Knights of Labor has had its
day, the Mine and 'Mine Laborers' Protective Association, the Western Federation of Miners, and the present attempt is the second effort made by the
United; Mine Workers of America to
gain recognition and establish trades
unionism on this Island, so that these
facts prove beyond dispute that if
recognition of a union is to be had it
will only be gained by a continued
struggle, until the employers are ready
to grant same. It was stated in Nanaimo quite freely when the strike began by a number of the workers that
If the companies upon the Island were
approached, they would endorse an Island union, but that they would never
recognize the U. ..M. W. of A. However, this statement was proven to be
false and especially is this true concerning the Western Fuel Company.
At the early stage of the game a letter
was drawn up asking Mr. Stockett if
he would be willing to recognize such
a local if the other companies on the
Island would do so. This was presented, we understand, to Mr. Stockett,
who is alleged to have replied that his
•company would close down for six
months and that he could not entertain anyi such matter. The faot remains in, the last case, as in all previous ones: There has never been a
time when these employers showed
the inclination to the thought of recognizing a union among their men,
no matter of what name or brand, unless it was to destroy it, as instanced
in the case of the Western Federation
of Miners some few years ago. Every
conceivable method has been employed by the operators on this Island for
many years to defeat the attempts of
the workers to organize; discrimination, blacklisting and systems of spying by private detectives and others
have constituted the means used. The
worker is at the mercy absolutely bf
the employer, if he has no union, then
how illegal and unfair ln the extreme
is the position of any party or government that would advise him to continue his attempt of redress in these
matters without a union. Why does
the medical faculty, the dentist, the
surveyor, the merchant, the bill post-
err^ffid-^ven-tWiWP«^TSiIK~lInaTr
tion or the confiscation of property by
an outraged people, the subsidized organs controlled and pledged to the interests of capitalism, cannot say that
such statements are-but the mouthings
of an anarchist, but must admit that
they are the expressed convictions of
a man who has reached the summit of
wealth and affluence.
When men of the financial standing
of SprecKtels send out a warning, it is
about time for the ordinary citizen to
put on the armor to protect himself
from the storm 'that is' predicted.—
Miners' Magazine.
Murderers Rampant
in Copper Country
"I Grow Hair, I Do"
Fac-similes of Prof. A. Garlow.
necessary to organize? Because the
interest of each can be better conserved! Then why should not the
miner be privileged to thus care for
his interest? It is time the governments took a tumble in facing these
Issues and treated both parties to any
dispute alike.
PRESS COMMITTEE,
Local 21C5, Nanaimo, B. C.
He Sounds a Warning
A "Ledger" adv. It an
investment.
List of Locals District 18
He,
«
m
481
tin
Mt
ttti
Nam*
White AablllM..
#••*••*••**#«
•so. and P. o. Atfdreta
.V, WtMUoy, Beakbes-l Attn.
.... imttutu. Heater Croolc, via Ptaeher, Alta.
Jsomo Uorfc*, Box U, Bottom* Alta.
.Wn h Eta**, mumm, Alia.
Bwrti* ...T. 0. tfarrtee, Passtrarg, Alta.
Carton<Ule...... 3. Mitchell, Carbondale, Coleman. Alta.
•CSaamor*      •"■'•*%•>»* rr.t.\-.z. *?*,***»,, ■*,
Rudolph Spreckles, the sugar king
and one of the leading bankers of the
country, has made some startling
statements that should cause some
people to sit up and take notice.
Spreckles has been In New York and
Washington, and declares from "Inside
Information" that tbe giants ot finance
are liable to plunge this country into
the greatest panic of American history. In an Interview Spreckles is
quoted as follows:
"Some of the more powerful financiers are blind enough to hope for
Just such a contingency, in tbo hope
that a disastrous panic brought about
by Ill-advised legislation would result
In a general revolt against all reform
legislation and leave the special privilege Interests free.again to dominate
our government," says Spreckles,
"The Influence of environment," he
•explain*, "hss made nearly all rich
men blind to the fact that a vast majority of our people are beginning to
feel the sting of poverty and that they
resent the widespread oppression due
to unfair concentration of wealth In
the hands of a few.
"They do not realize how deep-root-
<-d in the resentment against the pro-
sent order, and that tbe people are
ready at a moment's notice to rise
in revolution a*altiit organised greed,"
Seated In his sumptuous office In
the heart of Han Francisco's financial
district, Murrounded by every token of
affluence and -fate, the word "rovolutlon" fell with strange Impresslveness
from thl* rich man's lips.
MI!lfonair<\ president af tho Firm
National Itank here, snd financier of
big projects, Rudolph Bpreekles haa a
thorough knowledge of the financial
»;u*iioa. Ainl tio backer ot the local
1 graft pro-se-ctrtions and bunker of the
big sugar trust, lie hss felt the sinister
power of organised l»lf.
"Thero or* »e» with large flnsndal
power," ba continued, "who believe
ilu-u a v dole ftt paste tbat covid bo
charted to tho lealslstfr* onttcr nt
The most yicious crime of the campaign of outlawry which has accompanied the importation of thugs and
gunmen by*the mining companies, for
the purpose of intimidating striking
miners was perpetrated about 2
o'clock Sunday morning at Painesdale.
For some weeks much promiscuous
shooting has occurred during nightime,
many of the houses of strike breakers
being shot into but without fatalities
until Sunday morning when Arthur
Jane, aged 22, and bis brother Harry,
aged 25, and Thomas Dally, aged 43,
were shot to death while asleep iu
their beds in the Dally boarding house.
Mary Nicholson, aged 13, who lives
with her parents in a part of this
house, was shot in the shoulder while
she slept in her bed. Reports state
that at least twelve shots were emptied into the house from close range.
Jlrs. Dally, who was sitting by the
stove reading, barely missed being
struck by one of the first bullets fired.
She ran to the room in which her hus-
■band was sleeping and found that he
had been shot through the head. (Mr.
Dally died Sunday evening at five
o'clock. One of the Jane hoi's was
shot through the head and the other
through the lungs and heart, both being killed instantly. The alarm was
soon sounded and armed deputies
searched in vain for the murderers,
who, it is believed, were three in number, as three different-sized bullets
were fired into the house. The Dally
iMining Gazette, In its extra of Monday morning, prints the following regarding the search made for the assassins:
'IThe perpetrators of this awful murder fired into the home from a prominence of ground hot more than fifty
yards away. A deputy hurrying down
the street saw the fire flash from their
rifles as they did their deadly work.
He ran toward them firing his revolver in their direction as he ran. An
alarm was quickly spread and brought
a score of deputies to the scene, but
there was no trace of themurderers.
The woods adjoining the boarding
house were searched In vain. Three
klrids of bullets were found in the
walls of .the boarding house; indicat-
ing^hat-^ere^'et^^HeastthTefr^irf
In the murderers' party."
The Gazette, in its Sunday morning
issue, which came out shortly after
the tragedy occurred, unhesitatingly
places the blame for this atrocious
murder^ upon the shoulders of the
Western Federation of Miners with
the deliberate intention ot Inciting the
public to acts of violence and bloodshed If possible against the officials
and organizers of this body. The Gazette put out a very inflammable "extra" yesterday morning and If anarchy
and murder is not the result of this
screaming appeal to bloodshed, the
Dally Mining Gazette is not to blame.
The Gazette In Its frantic efforts to
please its master places the blame of
this horror upon the Federation even
before officers ot the law had had a
chance to look over the ground, and
make an examination. This action of
tho Gazette will but weaken Its cause,
and n'o sensible man will be swept off
his feet by the anarchy of the "extra"
of yesterday morning. The Bulletin
has far better grounds In accusing the
gunmen of this deed than does the Gazette in accusing the Federation.
It is stated upon goad authority that
Superintendent \\\ F, Denton of the )
Copper Range Consolidated mines, i
opeuly asserted that in his opinion j
the gunmen were resiwnsihlo for the !
tragedy of Sunday morning. It Is a !
well-known fact that many acts of vlo- j
lonee hnvo taltfii p!nn» within tf»rrl- j
tory absolutely dominated by tlxc dopu- j
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Jos. Grafton, Proprietor
er sought by the administration over
money and credit would prove as great
a menace to the people and independent effort as ls the present method
control.
"By the election of its onw president, organized capital could ultimately dominate this country completely,
If the present financial bill becomes
a law.
"Specifically," asserts SprecklcN,
"the proposed regional banks would
be dominated by the majority vote of
the banks In each district. They would
name six of the nine directors. Aad
If Big Business ever secured control
of the federal renerve board, the control of money and credit would be absolutely under th*' domination of special privilege.
"Nothing short ot revolution then
would restore freedom to the people, j ties within the pant fe* wink
"Consider the control now exercised havo been shot up, dynamite planted, 1
over our industrial and financial un-i housos blasted ami explosions imlM j
dertskJngs. Two hundred big corpora- ? ott right under thc noses of dozens ot 1
tions now have assets of ovw *22,0(W,-. hired deputies. It smii» very mit-or \
000,000, with a -gross income three -• that outsiders cnn -mmmlf t)i-*■>•« ■
Uju«* grau4«r Hum Hint 01 the national ; <nme* and no one Is wr caught, nor j
government. Mho leant clew la wor found tu ituitSl-,
"A group of i'.iv Wall Siit.t bauk- * f*}* ^ wf; *» oth« r «'»:»•»:» "»\>" >
Ing houses are dirtily affiliated with [*'l'or trw «• >»»• *»wc<l. duties.
aad hold directorships In corporations hw ««*>»» rod-handed commuting
having aiMta of about f 17 .««V«».0W.  "I"" "I"""? Mi horrid a   '
"That Is a wal mens** to Indepen
dent capital and the jiwe of ihe nation.
"Kveryonp po».«*s*it||; property, i>«-
twclally. Is vitally int<r»'»i»'«l in unking
this tremendous power of tin- U*w Urn-
I ted, otberwlM*—-
"Tin* pendulum «|J1 »hon".> *•**>'.!.« tn
th*« irther attrenie and sll property
will bo conflsia;. I In nn ou«ni«fil
people."
Tin* alwvp stn*><men>* mad-" by a
man who is r#coen!s#n! as wi* of th»«
iH:''
fluiiday morning and it is not unllk"Hr
that such <rlmi>« hnvt. b^eti pcriR-irailed in thi* district by hired assatslns.
The Ind»»pe»id*i'ne*» d*>pot horror of
.'(Vrfomdo fn whlrh sixteen strike
hrKik-prs lout th*lr IIv***. In *»'i!I fr*««h
: fn flif iiKitiriry of niau>.   Thi*  *.Uo!«'
■ «il«" murd*»T vrs» cftmn*rt*t*1 f<-r tl-.t
mint* jMirj»ow» thst th*- Palatsdale niur-
■ der waa rommlUfd Rtinday'rnortilnp,
3ii«?  iinitum  t»i  peopi*  to  iiecd* of
1 b!ou.l. *'.'.*. ".!.«'■ !iliii»<«*iii.- 1-rnl 4if <|ttvii<«
the workers hick into the mln*«s in
abj««ct slavery.   Tin* t'otorado horror ;
Wa*    Oflt,tl****ll    ill     tl    m'-TTl'irf    of    f Jlii
t*Hl.
ntli#n« of tht-* AUtrlt*
VI,    *n,tv*^l
Benevat...
maimer*..
tMllflll
■**» **■*•■»»»»
MU omm*,,, J. Johaatoaa, Colaaiaa, Alta.
hit
ntt
tm
»i«
im
tm
nm
t?i
tu-*
tm.
mt
tm
mi
tit
mt
G9tMB,..............,S, Jaaaa. OarMa, Dl C.
Chlaoeli MI»*a........Jaa. Home, Chinook, via DUasoad City, Alta.
DImmnmI City JT. E Thomhlll, Diamond City. Uthbrldge.
IVftla. Tho*. Uphill, rerale, B. C.
Frae*  Kraa Iforgaa, rraak, Alta.
Haaiar  w. AUderafane. fttmnor, ft. C
Hlllcrest Jaa. Gorton. Hllkrett. Alta.
Uthkridge !.. Mnore, 1?S1 glttlt hx-mito V f^hrffg*
Uthh<ridf» CoJ»»rt#s .Knak nsrringhsm, Coslhuwt, Alta.
.Maato Uaf T. 0, Harrtos. Psssharg, Alta.
Mlcial ..H W»«r, Wkkfl. VL C
flMafctrt  T. 0. Rarrtaa, Passburg, Alta.
Royal Vl»w Om. Jordan, ftoyil Collieries. Lsthhrilg*, Alta.
Tsh-ar.:.... A. Tm*ne% Taker, Alta.
Ckenrvta**, *ra»atar#. War Hntt*,, Ceorastawii, CukuuMtt. Atu.
mighty potuntatp* In Industry nti«l ti
natter.. „r, worthy of wrluua thought j<Vtw"Amane# »h»K or. hit. rt^»i,
ami conniderntlon,
8pr«'< k« U cannot fc§ clt*ied »» a
•mtVip.**)   •"*** ft** '»." *■    ''■• ••••  *     '•" ,
.<* P^nt «mt*mmlm wtmltt r+ibeing .motions! or ******* «« H*'" im l° '*mm *** «•-»*•»«•
* .».        ,.■        m*. I,.        i .        ......   Ajif-iftui iMiti*- ui t>!**j4'is.->.>-, aim imi
force* *1 * ttiturt ifocitMt.   Thay ara jla a cios* observer aad « cold-blooded jfe j^^ ^ „ ^^^ ♦»,,» Miwf b***-
bltad to tb* reactioa of saefe a paaie. ffl*swS«'-r    W* *".!;*-*«<?/* *?« bant. -^...^^ ,--*«--i« m ,%.„ ihih 'win.
Tbat is arhf I feel It Imperative to on obaerratlon, nint as he has his ftn if!*'i^.,.    wTl"h,.!( ,i»
•oaN tbls warning wr on \ht* ,Mii..> nn tmde and flnann-.!Int "•««»--"5"«*r* »•     in.
-The MmttiU'rntlfm »mM  -.* **.  »A*--      ,  ', -,    K, ».„,..., .^. „^«.w*      _. .   ,
»eH to a«Hd J«W»« ^Htlcal es^, j what he I. talkie .boat. idalS^KTrt  L» «p;.
dlenry tbe basis of carrenef legl»I»      Whtn Bprnktl* n»eals of revolu
which divide* In contestn *■
bat ttnlte« to best J»oclall*-»«
c So-
.ft'.r.-
R07AL
HOTEL
FERNIE                   '
Bar Unexcelled
All White Help
Everything
Up-to-date
Call in and
see us once
We Are Ready-to Scratch
off your bill any item ot lumber aot
found Just as we represented. There
Is no hocus pocus in
This Lumber Business
When you vraat spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip in a
lot of culls. Those who buy once from
us always come again. Those who
have not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't encounter if they bought their lumber
here.
KENNEDY & MAN6AN
— Dealers In —
Lumber,   Lath,   Shingles,  Sash  and
Doors.    8PECIALTIE8—Mouldings,
Turnings, Brackets, and Detail Work
OFFICE ANO YARD—McPheraon ave.
—OppBiite-^r^Tip5t^»rioxaar
Phone 23.
Steam Heated Throughout
Electric Lighted
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
Rates $2.50 per day
With Private Bath $3.00
Fire Proof Sample
Rooms in Connection
Imperial Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO
$10,000,000      Capital Paid Up       8,025,000
Total Assets      72,000,000
Capital Authorlitd ..
Reserve and Undivided Profits        8,100,000
D. R. WILKIE, President HON. ROBT JAFFRAY, Vlce-Pres.
BRANCHES  tH   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Arrowhead, Cranbrook, Parnla, Golden,  Kamloops,  Michel,  Nelaon...
Revelstoke, Vancouver and Victoria,
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Interest Allowed on deposits at e«»rrent rate from data af deposit.
FERNIE BRANCH A. M. OWEN, Manager
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
CAPITAL, $15,000,000 REST, $12,500,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Drafts oe the principal clliea in tha following countries iaaua-d withoirt
delays
Afttet
Cut>t
M«r*d«nf*
Ambit
llriimiirli
Mi'i«
Atf*<M<n«
Rtfsubll*
V$VT\
• tf'nUti*
Manchuria
Armtiua
ttnttei)
Au.1n.in
forms**
New Zr*1*tii
Amir.. H«imt*ry
tt*t.r*
H-t9,f
it-fifiwm
Otf«i»»|"
t'.n.tti.
HMnl
tltrrtt
(•WMi
flulfirl*
r«i**T*;»
1*,',.* t
5         .... ^. }9,l..l4£.
Chili
ln«li
•"elmi-J
C\,it.%
h-:r
f'ul*n««l
■Ci««
lt,t'9tl
hi..m«Bl*
a* ,■.,*
SiNrtt
ttUKlIt AllH*
Hi-9.II
tumm SMtlMMttM
Turl»ir %.f
Unlit* ■*»«*»•
Wn* l*tttt% Mt.
Thone drafta can be drawn In sterling, franc*, marks. Nre, kronen, ypn,
ttUfit*, roubks, *lv„ m<o«<Haa in the nrnnrr nt the c-ntitirry in * hich thay
are payable. Thia tnabtai lha payc* to obtain tha rxnet amount Infandad.
U A. B. UACK, Manaftr. FBRNir HMANCH
HTHE     W±
OME DANK
ontotMAi 1054
Doo'l merdy smother yonr cough
■W M***^..^..^MM.,.M_HIHUMllHlk V ^-W
CURE IT
UaUdea'a fiymp af Tar aad Cod Utm Oil not only
-pmrntpttf imtti -rmahiat. t«st thsmls lo ftn twite »n«l
Mt«ivftb«niRK pr«|«wti« tt tmlpitto* «y«wn to thnm aB
Hie cold »»4 Oiiu cf «cts a potmomttttwn. ft to this fwritt? »litch has won for
it tha latfMt sale of aay towgh tad cold rttstdy ia Canada.
$jt. ktftksMft ettftywutinr.
s. u mnmma co, pttm* tmiutni pa
HfrnH- t.m tt Utmtt. KtOMK Hmtm tvt+m.m *****«**■ ««•*»•»«»»,«•
pwn **** **» tr*** «m <im m mm umm •*•* wi «*i •■■*•'■   •».-»>«
Th*r* ar*»  four nil**  tm  *<".>■ ji»r
irlah. Ht> honest, ht* Sml-wrM-iK Ut*
: B-M>t>«f-f *»s aciii ti* jatit'iit. Tn* ■-"'• ii*;**.
i whan *t>pti#d hy yw. tr*- *''if»* "■> !?r»k.-
If florlalisH do*-m'% **'•*■ ',• '*■■'■•■ ' ■-> '*-
ir*- tike a tjttmo la l»l« it -**x h*- h—
fiu*« thos* bow la po**!*! *tt* a tt*-*.
Ufhi. «tea« ihelr tnttm. m.k** * ?<■*-* **"?
swallow ahoat half %!.*■ H-.y-Mi*.'1*.
■■*-»•■** | ■mmt*,nt frniyntni.
In tin* heflnnlns «»f '-lv-  :.->•«"
many ]ir<ra*a.fcs to oin>rt mavImj.*
o»a D-iriiff, ffeo*** of th-f-sr < *■* ■■'
Thf Hoini' Jtjiik luxitrn  t,:ix.i
i«mnil lnt^r«t (ts'tt on ** - r,«»
"* "*i,TORONTor.5.,,sr,;
B.O.
BRANCHES ih
ICHE1 ANO CONNICTIOfiS  THROUGHOUT CANADA
4o ft MCDONALD, Manager
MIA AVt„ + -> riftwti. page *m
'Y*
THE DISTRIOT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, JANUARY 8, 1814.
_ - v.
^U. ^-W
#
V
to Start New Year
»*^^Mi--S*^MM8-^&»-SM.^-«^
Boot and Shoe Dept.
WATCH FOR OUR JANUARY SHOE SALE—BIG
REDUCTIONS IN ALL LINES OF FOOTWEAR
A Few Specials in the Ladies' Shoe Department
for Saturday Only-
Ladies' High Cut Koineo Felt. Slippers,, in Bed
only.    Regular price .$2.25,    Special Saturday at  *
$1.65 pair. ■'.-.-
w» v.;s^*ix: .ussx^^^
I
I
I
r&
m
i
n
Start The New Year Right
■i^mmm^^^Mmmmsss^mm
We are Having a great clean uj> of all lines of workingmen s goods, you will find some big bargains here in
Shirts, Sweaters, Gloves and Mitts, you will save money
if you get your requirements now.
Start the New Year by making a substantial saving
on your actual necessities
Grocery Specials
for Saturday
i
«-^*mS*il*.«^
lutrw
MEN'S SOX
Men's Heavy AllWool Grey Sox, worth 50e pair.
Will lie on sale at -i for $1.00.   This is a snap.
MEN'S SOX
Our Medium Weight All Wool Sox, in Grey, will
please you.   They arc worth 35e pair    Our price
5 pairs for $1.00.
I
ih
I
^i««a^«3ffi*sa*^M:-«s^u€*s»«s.s.«
MEN'S SOX
The Black Cashmere Sox values we show are the
best in the country. Our special offering for this
week is 5 pairs for $1.00.
Men's Pullover Sweaters, in Navy Blue only, all
sizes 38 to 44, worth up to $2.00, will be on sale at
$1.00 each.   Get one of these.
Ladies' Bedroom Slippers, with felt top and flexible leather sole. Regtilar price $1.10. Special
Saturday 75c.
Ladies' Moccasin Slippers, iii Brown, Green and
Buck colors.
Regular, $3.00, special Saturday $2.25
Regular $2,25, special Saturday $1.50
Regular $1,75. special .Saturday $1.45
Ladies' Black Felt Romeo Slippers, leather sole
and heel.   Regular $1.75, special Saturday $1.45.
Ladies' Black Felt Boots, high laced. Regular
$2.25, special Saturday $1.65.
Ladies' and Children's Snow Shoes and Moccasins at 20 per cent reduction for Saturday only.
CHILDREN'S 2-1 RIB HOSE
Splendid for school, with double knees, lieels and
toes. Small sizes, 35c; larger sizes, 45c and 50c
pair. o
In Flannelettes we have a large range of different colors.    Prices' from. 12V&C yard to 25c yard.
All Wool Flannel at 45c yard. Thoroughly
shrunk in colors Grey and White, 45c yard.
Bed Sheets, full sizes, splendid qualities, from
$1.50 to $2.50 pair.
Pillow Cases, just the kind you want, made of
good strong cotton. Special for Saturday, 8 for
$1.00.
I
■tS»WMM«i^^^
p
p
I
Men's
Underwear
i
Men's Fleece Underwear, natural or grey.
Good value at 65cts. per
garment. Clearing price
$1.00Smt
Boys Sweaters
Boys' All Wool Sweaters, in Navy, Brown, Green
and other color combinations.   $1.00 values 70c
I
in
I
P
I
I
I
s
i
Mens.
Flannel
Shirts
Pure Wool Flannel
Shirts, in G?een or
Fawn, all sizes, collars
attached. W6rth up to
$1.50, for $1.00 each
Men's Buekskin Gloves, lined with wool. While
tliey last at 85c pair
Men's .Genuine llorsehide Gloves, lined with
wool..   Worth $1.75.   Special $1.25
Men's Wool Mitts, regular 50c (these are hand
made) at 40c pair
I
1
P
I
Mrs, Stewart's Liquid Blue, % pints $ .25
Molasses Snaps •..,.,..,;.. 2 lbs.     .25
National Assorted Sweet .-. 2 lbs.     .25
2 in 1 Black ; 3 tins     .25
Heavy House Brooms regular 65c     .55
Hotel Size Cream per dozen tins   2.55
Bulk Cocoanut per lb.     .25
Braid's Best Coffee, fresh ground .... 2 lbs.     .25
Snidor's Tomato Catsup, pints 30
Silver Label Extracts, assorted, 2 oz. .. 3 for     .25
Lombard Plums, 2 lb. tin .. 2 for     ,25
Crawford Peaches, 2 lb. tins .•*. 2 for     .35
Golden Dates 2 lbs.     .25
Finnan Iladdic 2 lbs.     .25
Haddie Fillets  per lb.     .15
' Compound Jam 5 lb. tins     .50
Swift's Pure Lard 3 lb. tins     .50
Swift's Pure Lard 5 lb. tins     .85
Swift's Empire Ham per lb.     .23
Swift's Premium Hams per lb.     .25
Swift's White Santoy Soap 7 bars     .25
Assorted Toilet Soap, regular 35c and 40c pet-
box  25
Tetley's Special Blend Bulk Tea 4 lbs.   1.00
Turnips  18 lbs.     .25
Nestle's Infant Food per tin     .40
Allenbury's Infant Food 2 large     .80
Scott's Emulsion large size     .85
Lyman's Beef Iron and Wine 45
Lyman's Talcum Powder 2 tins     .35
Dry Goods Dept.
We have a splendid assortment in-Ladies' Neck-
Avear. all the latest styles in Collars, Jabots, Lace
Sets, etc.
LADIES' SCARVES
We have a splendid choice in Silk, Chiffon; also
some beautiful Scarves for evening wear.
LADIES' HOSE
We have splendid lines, made from the best
makes, such as Llama snid All Wool Hose. Price
per pair ; -.. 50c
^Money-Sav*—
ing Prices
The Store of
—Quality—
\
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL   AND COAL CREEK
J
The Corporation oj the
City of Fernie
BY-LA W No. 143
A By-Law to raise the sum of Five
thousand dollars ($5,000.00) for the
purpose of erecting a Storehouse In
tbe City of Fertile, which said Storehouse ls required for Municipal purposes,
WHERHAS a petition bas been presented to the Municipal Council of the
Corporation of the City of Pernie,
signed by tho owners of nt leant one-
tpnth of the value of tho ronl property
in the Municipality of the City of Pernie, a> shown by the last revised assessment roll, requesting them to In
(roduce such a Dy-Ukw;
AMI WUBRRA8 for the purpose
afori'Miid It will bu uecessury tu borrow the sum of Five thousand dollars
($5,000.00) and to Issue debenture* of
the City of Fernie for the purpose of
raising the said sum;
AND VVHKRKA8 tho amount nf the
whole r»t«>al»l« land and Improvements
a n't r**vA. n."*-.*,.'' -r'.v '" *h.. -".'.! t""<< nt
Fernie. ncconlinv; to the lasi revised
said date, In lawful money, at the office of the Home Dank of Canada, In
Fernie aforesaid, or at the office of
the National Park Bank. Xew York
City, United States of America, which
said -places of payment shall be designated by tbe said debentures, and
shall bave attached to them coupons
for the payment of Interest and the
signatures to the Interest coupons
may be either written, stamped, print-
ed or lithographed.
4. The said debentures shall bear
interest at the rate ot Six per cent
<6 p.c.l per annum from tbe date
thereof, which Interest shall be pay.
able annually at the said office of the
Home Batik of Canada, In Fernie aforesaid, 'or at the said office of the National Park Bank, New York City,
Cnlteil States of America, in lawful
money, on the twenty-first day eif January, respectively in each year, during
tin* rurrmnry of the mid rf-eht»n*iire».
nnd St shall be cxpronseil In snid de-
first day of January. A. D. 191-1.
10. This By-Law may be known
and cited for all purposes as the Municipal Storehouse By-La^ 1913.
Bone and passed in open Council on
the Twenty-ninth day of December, A
D. 1913.
TAKK NOTICE that the aboVe Is a
true copy of the proposed By-Law upon which the vote of the Municipality
'will be taken at the Council Chamber.
City Hall, Fernie, Thursday, January
IStb, 1914, between the hours of Ten
o'clock a.m. and Eight o'clock p.m.
Pernie, B. C„ December 30th, 1913.
O. \V. ROSS,
City Clerk.
Communicated
(The editor la not responsible for
opinions expressed by correspondents)
A LEAP PROM LIPE
assessment roll, in Two million, one | bentures and coupons to be so pityubte.
hundred and «!xty-r<in« ttioti*f»ti<l, thr.'*>.
hundred and nUiets-otie doUnr* tfi,-)
W.i,:mM); I
AM> WHKKKAS i( *,),< U r.ijaUUi .'
to mine innualty by r:ne the mm ot■
Seven hundred and sixteen dollar* and *
torty-tive cent* #Tl*5.•-*»# for paying th* i
said debt and Interest; ]
AM» WIIKKKAH this ItyUw shall I
nol be altered or n-jwaled ex-opt with i
the consent of the l,iefin»n»nf<loveni- j
-Mrln-Gouti-t-n.
NOW TIIKRKFORK »!><» Municipal j
rmirieil of th* fVirtuiraMoii of the City !
■at Pernie. in Covnrll assembled, en-1
$,'.'■» a* follows'  j
I.   it shall and msy hi- lawful for!
th* Mayor of the C<>r!»«r«tlo'i of «'ie |
Cily of P-eruie to burro*   upon tbe
credit'of the «,-iM Corporation, by way
ttt <teb»ntur#* hereinafter mentioned.
<>, It •Itati and niii.v In in* mi lur
ihe Mayor of thfe said Corporation to
negotiate and sell the said debenture*
To the Editor,
District Udger.
Dear Sir,—This Is a true story of a
little personal experience of one who
came only a short time ago from the
Old Country with a determination to
enjoy (?) some of the good things that
are open to every IniellUeui, industrious worker who Is willing to tackle
any job that is oliered iimi. i'etOHp*
eome of you who read this may have
heard similar Horif** told by the
smooth emigration agents when lecturing In different parts of the United
The Austrian said, "Me want. Job." The
official asked, "Where are you rrom?
Austria?" Replying In the affirmative
and also stating that he had never
been in the country before, he waB
told to come to work that night. From
others, American and British miners,
I learned that wherever possible they
•were not hired, foreign speaking men
being preferred because of their docility. Would suggest that notices be
posted up around camps such as those
mentioned: No Americans or Britishers need apply.
Glorious lands of. freedom! I do not
make any objection to a foreigner, but
am only quoting facts from my own
experience.
To any worker who has a iteady Job
I would say that the best thing to be
done Is to stay with It, otherwise tt is
very likely tbat he may find out tbat
he can only obtain a duplicate of my
experience for bis pains.
Hoping tbat thia leaf from the book
or life may be reproduced In your
columns.
I am, yours troly,
A WAGE BARKER.
or any of thtm. a! !cx* than par. Vit | Kingdom     Atu-r *» short exiM-riftm*
In no case shall tlie said debenturet,
or any of them, be negotiated or sold
for les* than ninety per cemum 190
*,*<• t ot their value, including the vOJt
of negotiating their »aJe. brokerage,
and all other incidental expense*
In the province of British Columbia,
which wan tiettdfkfal from an experience i*»li.? of view, even though not
much do from a financial standpoint,
decided to see what I could do In thu
land ot the «tsr« and Stripes.    The
fi    There shall he raked and leviej ' firm place where I found employment
In fsch ><'»t during <*■,-.■ -rwrfwv «' * was in Oie roundhouse of Ihe -Ureal
•aid debentures the sum of Thrtw
hundred dollars f $300,001 for payment
of Interest, and tht sum of Pour .vin-
dred and ulife^n dollars and forM-fr-
•rents <H1* »V> for the payment of m«ld
debentures by rate sufficient therefor
on h!I raff-able land and Improvement,*
nnd real property In the until Mtmle-
paltty
♦ *   ***.*,**   -.nit   wn.-  hi,   S*f,1   f„r
■h-ni'te* ffirtwvr*** who ■»»■» he willing ? the said MnnM-pal Ctmnetl to repur-
to advance the same a* a loan, a sum . «■»»*•• any ot iw trim a*i>?auH>» ua
not exceeding the whole sum ot r,*.,.   »tiib terms as nts>  b*  agreed upon
I'L.tt-iiMtUii dft!3*r*   H'A'^'^'A   m."I  's1-   *•*'"*; &<*■ tot-til■*-**-!.f*t ♦Vnf«v<i*f *>Mh*t
.Northern at Wbitefisfc, wage l!» centa
iM.i an hour, but because of slack-
mit* ef «u«a aud tbe f«**f ih*x I k;#U
bwom* sralthy too rapidly, decide**
to (tastures new farther afield. The
next job tackled waa ott a homestead
belonging to Thomas Smith, at Broadview, Montana, who hired ne at the
rale of %'l,w a 4ay an4 bo-tird. No
elsht hoer shift with tbat Individual,
hut -daya worn started at t.A*t a.m.
ati.4  litMit Jut  Jl  v.t-t,.     Ai:.i,.    : I :,.   ',%. ji
cans* afl such sums so rafaed or re-
n-ihed to be pnid Into the bands of'
*i*k*l..     * »fc*******fcie*k    *».    tttritli.    #s«* *.     *    ■< «.	
for the purpose and with ibe obj<H?t
hereinbefore reilted.
:    It shall aad way bt lawful for
'hi-  Mayor to cattiM   any   number of
-debenture* to 'He made.. exe<ctiU****'l or ;
Istued, each for tb* sum of fhte thou-;
.-9..-.-1. •!*,'*tr    i-fisi'itlivii  it ri''t\   *.<*• '•
mitftl   tor  the  purpo*e and  object
>■ ... i   * ■-.* .* v"t*. A'i*r  li/.m ve*-  'h*-
niii,  ot  F.u-   Tf(MJ*-itt.d  Aa'iUr*   .f"
mn.fti*"',, and all *n<-h debentures shall'
to*. *****■*. **'i* tb*' M.-.H1 s,1 A-,'- *"'"/'■*
atlon and *ig«*d by the Mayor aa!
<'lsy Heik thereof
3.   Th# #*44 4*b«.at«r*a slull l» .:
ot fi* imrimt I'oil I bad t-v«-r done
this hoaorable i,i Individual told mt
at th* time of safe, nr any subsequent [ that he bad no farther mo tor my
time or t!m*«, at " ' '-vntnres tmt sewleee, end Instead of $S* he gave
. _ ' » ■ '- ft^^X ■- ■-"< ' -T-t' te »*arilne « Mlsne* ttt l»* t,*m
<^il*-I m--l .U*.'m\i- w^H^^-tnaue f unpaid, and! es I wss not at that time
of «S* '*«■'•' t."-,rt-t m t ^^^^^hall' able to bey legal aid bad to be satiate tna<V .r, (ons*'|tiet, ^^^^^ -t*-'- fled with the treatment aerorded.
purchase ^^^V r. Martin, ef Itroadvtew, was m>
* The f«lio» in* If ^a»^Phere-j next employer, and although the work
by r*«,(*al*d. effcr-;ve ,>n and sifter th* •: •*■*•■* ■*■*■»■? »• »*»«»» of the kind tbat ran
,»*.'.,   tt-wtn   wftre»i   t»tf«  rtr-T^ir shaR ■ be railed "light." I wss paid off in ae-
mrf. A* l» itH,
ymyable la «en  «10*
fTrS' 'f 1 e r*f ?-i >-
shall he made*
year* from t»*
itn-t* ;m*> iiin** .**r.*.i tiki.** »'iit«-«i,—
<*\ TH'-Liw Vnn*ti(*r 1*; being
'**,»*   ('-**   r.f   l't <-i---,■  Jf-.,*r. * rtit-w.   tlv-
!*»*, 1»t2, parsed on the Thirtieth
•S;   f»f *>X--:-    %   1,   l'.!t
fb> 111 t.it S'lrtA,,'!* f*f. heftig
♦he Cttr ot ft-n.'.t- "««rehe«t-»*
%a*-ii*»i'"X Ttt ?.?.», r«*;, ywtw-ij m
*ht* p*r*-' >'f- t--* *r>.   t   ft  tett
'*.      Tht*     R>-l«»'A
fife* and taVe t-f.
A.A,\  tmntk lato
•<•' ftr, tht* Twenty-
; i'OrdaftMr  Willi Un- <..'.ir;tM   t:,*!,-  ,i!,il
: Hk*wta*. 4e**ni|*ji treated.
ttfteg j«<*"'*»'»!i»rn.-*i *.*»! <«.:ii it"«atng
|.made appNcanMi* »e \o. t mm**. Hound*
1 np, ani **» ttX. iv.*** | < m'4 mnV**
■ apfdhnthw b»st w««m ha*e !«»* *»it my
I tttrw*. *» there ». n- **i,»«i«- *h« had
1 hm* waltet f*» *'t *m»m*.h-» Imtt, tet***
\ tw* leatfM t stMMl arotind a corner
| ttht'M afl Atrr.t s;»r,-n«<r»!ftt and
rfrtiMa'' lielp hearing tfc«* cfrnversatlen.
TRITES-WOOD CO. MAKE
THE KIDDIES HAPPY
•Why can't we be kiddles for to-
day aud get our bag of candle*?*' remarked one onlooker,   bordering  on
tlie ItallttJium> Mitf**. la **x. Kt','.-,,
as we stood on the sidewalk outside
the big store on Thursday morning
watching the happy crowd of children
pressing around the doors, eager and
Mtixlous to receive their bag of good
things that the management dispense
to every child w|^o will call at the
stow in the morning and receive same.
We must certainly have looked anxious, for the genial A It. T. immediately produced « bag tram tin- recess
of the store and proffered sane. It
waa received, aad In tlm »ullt.ud4 of
tbe offW ae weighed and examined
sane.. The contents were ■ rerela-
iUm *&4 tie a«l»ht !l <w&"ft aver**-
pelt. Hugar eandlet* rhoeolat* et»-
dies, almond nuts, pea nuts, Sp«aUh
nuts, an orange ud a fin* loadous
apple, this was the contents, and with
the assistance of tame we were able
to wiini ott th<** pang* of hunger until
the evening meal.
lie lives am*, eteuifw-i* mum.*.. ......
j,-, .:ii^ Urn ..:S If Itilr* r-Mtr.i»e «-
carrm one an? a half tefflt «f goodies
are consumed by tb* kftfle* of Pernie
lm New Year* Dey. Wtat dlgestiie
distnrbances mar arts* trom tbe t-on-
vtmtrttfm *H tMe weantlty ot M**ntaa-
aWe fare we do w»t enie «o >»»wr» a
gwesa. Certainly the children appear-
ed to have no dismal foreboding* of
the consequence*.
What a Jolly h*ppf, e*g*r   crowd
they  were; a little exuberance and
hotstertHitae**. bet nothing to annoy.
A-ni ivi'ji io<* t'lty    j»*<an*i   eu*»i**l.Aa
ftpfM--sr«! te tone some of hie -dignity.
•,»»ni iiiw »«-i»i«i->bu«k f*>i*il.4u4 iccaic:f
'< *»*ted apon the yoeag««#rs.     Th«>
*ere tbere te eeewe * feed, and they
wieunt te knee It    t»* <ec*«r -pwees
* i»y **mi 'heetvsia on the* A prefewten-
*f, *S.«e**e,   whtte   tn   tm *****   h*
admits that he tec-ogntf** • few at
whetw nntnt fce he* e*e*ete4.
!    Ta* eeeasten Is otw thet we*M f*
quire the descriptive pen of a Dickens
to accurately depict. I'. Is Interesting to watch the little ones, all of
whom appear to be warmly, ovten If
rouughly clad, One little girl with a
pinch wane face and expression that
should belong to one at least ton years
older, comes out clutching her bug
ant*, casting eager and enquiring *lan
ces around for a younger charge. Hav-
lrt, found him she admonishes him
that he must not eat alt hia candies.
The Innocent cherubic expression on
the small child's face ts amusing. He
does not understand; all he knowi is
that he possesses possibly the greatest
feast he has ever had and he wants
to be left alone to enjoy it. Another
little girl, with cheeks all aglow, and
a flaming red cont that heightens the
<o!or of her pretty hair, comes im*-
'ng out. She rashes up to the motherly little soul and they exchange con
fldences "t:»l sample the contents o'
each others bags. He*j Is true .!«"•
mocracy; tnese children do not heed
clothes; they do not notice tbat ane
wears a shabby coat and tie the other
a smart new garment And the staff
just beam; they enjoy It as much an
the kiddies. For white the former
may bare sacrificed a few hours ut
leisure in preparing and distributing
th« feast. *ntely they sr* amply **e-
paid by the m. It Ing race and the
] knowledge thaj for one cay at least
they have brought many a ray of sunshine into the lives of the little oneB.
■May the firm continue their annual
distribution to the kiddles, for It Is
good.
Mr. Albert Spears and Miss Edith
Lamer were married on New Tear's
day at the home of the bride's parents,
Fernie Annex. He v. D, M. Perley per
formed the ceremony.
Classified Ads.-Gent a Word
SNAP—160 Acres Farm to famous
Pincher Creek distriot with good
cash market for everything. New
house, barn, granary, all fenced and
cross-fenced; 60 acres under -cultivation; splendid water spring; soil,
black clay loam: school same Mellon; post office Vk miles; 8 miles
from town. Cheap, all cash or M00
down, balance to suit purchaser.
Would like to go Bast, Address:
A B. Pennington. Pincher Creek,
Alberta. ISO
WANTED ISfMBmATBMMlood plate
cook.  Apply Mrs. Corsan. Cily.  131
J. W. Bennett was calted home to
Revelstoke suddenly oh account of a
serious accident to his wife. He left
Wednesday on the Flyer. It was hia.
Intention to start a class for foreign*
ers on the 5th of January, but lt may
be postponed because of this accident.
Don't forget the Moose -Social and
Dance on Monday next In the K. >P.
Hall.    Time 7.45.
DR. JOHN  BARBER, DENTIST
Offlcs: Above BlMsdeli's Drug Storw (
Phone 121
RSsldsnes: 21 Victoria Avsnus
FERNIE •      •      B.C.,
ALEXANDER MACNtn.
Barrlatar. Solicitor, Notary, etc.
Offices! Beksttln Building,
Fcmls, $L6
F. C. taw* Al**. I. PW»»
LAWS A FISHER
ATT0RNKT8
F*rnle, B. C
ISIS THEATRE S
PICTURES  CHAHOED  DAILY
ALWAYS
mu
Special Saturday Matinee aad Evening
The Calling of Louis Mona
Two Reel Powers Drama
Uraught up m • monaster. Umf Moe* tm.t$ WU to tht tga»g**t&etw o« *.** oott*r world   Ills sudden
awakening and return to the faith famish t beautiful and Inspiring story.
The Battle or Bull Con.-The Surrender-Universal Weekly
CTreaiest BurlesqueComedy you ever saw. C«ns*dy
j   UPWCtAt. MOIf DAT
CAMPAIGNING WITH CUSTER
t Reel -KM" St*** Military Oram*
Whm the Tide Turned    Ponky'* Houseboat - The Frog and the Ok
V
"Solar Drama
vwrelt* m»«m-*»
*■*■*,•* wUv**
lia
ON WEDNESDAY
DONT MISS
The Signal or Grandmother's Lamp
Bf the Arabrosio Company. Better than alter fifty years
OUR PROGRAMMES COMPRISE THE GREATEST VARIETY
-=«=«*OBTAINABLE*
jp^^-rS'-x'^TrTX
I
IflilgJilH^iti^MMUiUii

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