BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The District Ledger Sep 5, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
disledfer-1.0308958.pdf
Metadata
JSON: disledfer-1.0308958.json
JSON-LD: disledfer-1.0308958-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): disledfer-1.0308958-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: disledfer-1.0308958-rdf.json
Turtle: disledfer-1.0308958-turtle.txt
N-Triples: disledfer-1.0308958-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: disledfer-1.0308958-source.json
Full Text
disledfer-1.0308958-fulltext.txt
Citation
disledfer-1.0308958.ris

Full Text

Array of
■■Ss*
ft
Industrial Unity Is Strength
No. 1, Vol vin.
The Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M, W, of A.
,<*r-J
o
'->u
dlS
"? -
~.,""'Political, Unity Is Victory
X
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
-%:
Hillcrest Situatic
Ex
The mines at Hillcrest,, have been
idle since the 10th of August.   The In-
t
spector of Mines, acting in accordance with the Mines Regulation Act,
pronounced certain parts of t|ie mine
unsafe for blasting. The reasons
given for prohibiting shooting or
blasting coal iu these specified parts
wns that they were dangerously dry
and dusty. Tlie men claim that since
tho inspector, by placing this embargo
upon this particular district of tbe
mine, denied them the privilege of
blasting, it produced a new condition
or system of working, which would
naturally come under the heading of
"new work." The prices of mining
coal being based upon blasting and
not a pick-mining basis. To revert
back to a system of mining which
simply, means putting all physical
force of the miner against the mechanical forces of modern invention.
Hence it will be manifest to even the
superficial observer, that a new condition has arisen, which in common
justice calls for a readjustment of
prices. The local Secretary and president interviewed! the management,
and it was jointly agreed that the
men who worked in the places affected should work on the day wage, as
specified in the "Xew Work" clause of
the agreement. In the meantime tbe
management forwarded a telegram to
the general operator, Mr, Brown, informing him that the men claimed the
agreement was abrogated and desired
his immediate return to negotiate a
new agreement. A notice was duly
posted at the mine-head, informing
the miners that they were working
under, the day.wage system, pending
the securing of a new price. The
management, after consulting with the
commissioner of the Western Coal
Operators' Association, went back up-
2-./
\
■YeJ
on thelrTpromlse to pay»the men tbe
day wage, and in a sinister manner
confused the minds of the miners as to
the conditions under which they were
to be paid. This produced much Irritation and dissatisfaction among the
miners.
On Saturday, August 9th, lt was decided ln an exceptionally large meeting, to appoint a committee to inform the management that it was
their unanimous Intention to work on
condition that tbey were paid the
day wage, as per agreement,
The officials flatly refused to ae-
ceede to the request   of   the   men,
hence the present condition. Several
interviews with the management to
affect a settlement have proved unavailing. It seems strange to the uninitiated that the company and the
government inspectors spared no effort to prove that this particular mine
was no drier or dustier than other
mines of the Pass, when giving evidence before the Inquiry Commissioner, who was appointed to investigate
into the cause of the recent explosion,
yet, within a couple .of -weeks pronounce it dangerously dry and dusty
for blasting purposes.' Blasting in a
coal mine is dangerous at all times,
and it Is the Indisputable cause of
many explosions and should be legally abolished.   •
But it must be conceded by all fair,
minded men that by abolishing such
a dangerous means. of coal-getting,
it limits the wage-earning capacity of
the miner, and logically calls for a
re-adjustment of prices. It Is a long
established custom in the older countries that when a condition arises
that curtails the miners' privileges in
the getting of coal, such, for instance, as by the enforced introduc-
tipn of safety, lamps, etc., a consiedra-
tion was and is invariably allowed.
On the other hand, when a company
introduced coal-cutting machines,
which facilitated the production of
the miner, a differential was allowed
for the same. In the present agreement we find a clause which reads as
follows:
System of Working: Whenever any
new system Is inaugurated or radical
change in the present system Is
made in any mine where there is a
contract price fixed thereon, the
company or the employes may ask
for a price to be fixed on all work as
"new work," as, for example, a change
fr"_ "long"™!?* t? "p?!!sr Td gt°lV-
or vice versa, shall be considered "new
work."
in the Coleman section of the agreement tbe prices fixed for Xo. 4 seam
are on the condition that "no powder"
be allowed.
Under the Hillcrest section of the
agreement lt says: "The above prices
are based upon the present methods
of working."
Whilst the trouble lasts at Hlllcrest
nnd until the present,misunderstanding
and malinterpretation of the agreement be straightened 'out, we would
advise all men to govern themselves
accordingly.
HILLCREST    RELIF    FUND
Amount previously received
or promised  $5,733.55
Georgetown Local Union .... 16.25
J. McDermott, Coalhurst  5.00
Lethbridge Trades and Labor
'Council  264.80
Hdllcreat dance, per Ed. Royal C.20
Knights  of  Pythias,   per A.
Shllland .......:...  25.00
Ail remittances for this fund should
be sent to A. J. Carter, Secretary-
Treasurer District No. 18, U. M. W. cf
A., Fernie, B. C.
They approached noncombatants always with a gun in their hand. 'Again
and again I have been told the same
story of 'Belgian shopkeepers and pro.
prletors of hotels of cafes.
Like Bandits—Not Sollders
"They put a gun at my head," they
said. "Why?" I asked, and the Belgian would shrug his shoulders. "Because they wanted eggs or a note
changed or a bed. Why shoot me for
so small a a mater as couple of
eggs?"'
My own experience was the .same.
They never demanded papers without
first sticking an automatic in my face.
Once when I was seated by the road
engaged in eating a sandwich five of
theni rushed from the rear, each waving an automatic. They seems to
me like men on the verge of hysteria,
officers and privates alike. When I
was prisoner with them one of their
aeroplanes passed over us. They
thougt it an English airship and
Count von Schwerin, commanding the
Seventh division and. all his staff at
the same time began shrieking commands, some to shoot, others not to
shoot.
They were like men flown suddenly
crazy, it was a most pitiable exhibition. Their conduct throughout: can
be explained in only one way; they
ar; men who know they are in the
wrong, that their cause is unlawful.
And like the man who enters a house
No Parallel for
Inhuman Butchery
"Art   Military   Mad."    Leaders   Not
Representative   of   Peace-Loving
People ■■ Known in America
By Richard Harding Davis
LONDON, Sept. 1.—I have not seen
the text of the letter addressed by
President Wilson to Americans urging
them to preserve toward this war the
mental attitude of neutrals, but I have
seen the wsr, snd I feel very deeply
that if I did not earnestly try to convince Americans that they should not
be neutral I would be uhlrtln responsibility.
Were the conflict In Belgium n fair
fifbt on equal terms between man snd
mtn. then, without question, the duty
of Americans would be to keep to the
tide lines and preserve open minds.
Out It Is not a fair fight, Uermany Is
fighting foully, She Is defying not
only the rales ot war, but all the rules
of humsnJty, and If public opinion Is
to help In the prevention of further
outrages by her forces snd in hastening thit unspeakable conflict to • close,
It should bo directed against those
who offend.
War en Military Arltteereey
If we ere convinced tbat na oppon-
ent Is fighting honestly sad that his
adversely la striking below tbe belt,
gouging snd biting, tben lw a* to
■m-Moi-Mf*! i f*HM*i»e*t •♦♦l-M-tito t*t ***** ta
law to the  free speech of our town
meetings.
"High-tow" Butchers
Kvery belief of these high-born
butchers Is opposed to every principle
that to tis Is most dear. If they win
they will make of Kurope an armed
L.uuii. They will control commerce ou
the seas. They will either deatroy
our commerce with Kurope or dictate
as to what goods they will admit, or
admit them on their own terms. Meanwhile, they nre destroying Belgium, a
country with which they had no nunr-
rel, The land thoy devastated was not
land spnwcly nettled and uninhabited.
It was the oldest and most closely
built up countryside in Europe.
Villages, towns and cities touch
with their skirts the skirts of tbe
next adjoining. They run as close together as tbe Bronx, Urchraont, Ryo
and New Rochelle, New York. Tho
cities they destroyed with bombs and
fire are cities like Rochester, IU*ra
and Troy.  These cities were not forti-
"as- a unrgiar tliey do "not hesitate at
murder. '
In no other way can you oxplain
their casting floating mines among innocent fishermen, their dropping
bombs from airships upon Bleeping
women, their wrecking churches, universities and libraries, their execution
of noncombatants.
Belgian Humanity
lu comparison, let me relate un in.
cldent to Illustrate how the plucky
Belgian wages war. When our secretary of ihe legation at Belgium, Hugh
Gibson, returned from Brussels to
Antwerp, on the day after the Zeppelin hud hurled hof bombs into tliat
city, the-Belgiau government gave Mm
a package to be delivered to the German governor from Brussels. It did
not ask Gibson to carry an Infernal
machine, but letters of Oerman prisoners in "Antwerp which the Belgians
were forwarding for them to their
wives aud children,
Belgians did not wage war on women, nor do their allies. Hetween them
aud the Germans oue who has aeeu
what I bave seen at Louvain, Tlrle-
inom and Liege, finds It hard to preserve an attitude of mind correctly
neutral.—-Spokesman-Review.
B. G. FEDERATION
OF LABOR
Report of the meeting of the coast
members of the executive of the B. C.
P, of L., held on Tuesday, August IS.
1914: Owing to the vote on the general strike, President "Watchman called the members of tbe executive resident on the coast to a meeting on the
18th instant, to decide what should be
done, and to hear the result of the voting. Members present: 11. Knudson,
J. H. iMcVety, B. Simmons, W. P.
Dunn, President Watchman ami Secretary-Treasurer   Wells.
Secretary Treasurer Wells reported
i the result of tlie vote, also the amount
which had been donated by the different bodies, for tbe purpose of carrying out the wishes of the special conv
vention.
The following was decided: That In
the view of this executive, it is not
advisable to call a general strike, and
that the result of the vote be not published, until the next convention, and
that the result of the vote be given to
the executive officers of the Island
miners, District 28.
it was also decided that the expense of the executive meetings In
connection with this matter be paid
from the special fund raised and tbat
the secretary be -paid the sum of $30
for his services and that any money
paid out by the Federation be refunded from special fuud.
In view of the fire at South Wellington, in which many miners lost their
home, it was decided that the secretary, be Instructed to write the Feder-
ationist. asking them to open a fund
for the relief of those affected.
The question of the compensation
Act for this Province was also dealt
with, but as this question is in the
hands of a * special committee, suggestions were offered, but left to the
committee for action.
 -A_R   U'OI .1 .a
Secretary-Treasurer.
FERNIE   CITIZENS   READY
FERNIE JOTTINGS
J. W. Bennett returned on Saturday
from a three-weeks' trip to Kamloops
and the coast cities.
F. H. Smith, route agent of the Dominion Express Company, ls registered at the Fernie.
J. G. Bruce, school inspector, was in
the city on Thursday on his regular
tour of inspection.
Harry Miard, an official at the Coal
Creek mines, left on Wednesday for
France, in answer to the reservist
call.
M, Decastro, Italian consul, was in
Fernie the latter part of last week,
in connection" with a medical examination of all Italian reservists.
J. C. Sesser, superintendent of   the
Kalispell division of the G.  N.  Ry.,,
spent Friday and Saturday in the city
on official busiuess.
S. F. Butzer, manager of the local
commercial office of the Canadian Pacific Railway Telegraph, has been
promoted to manager of the city office at Saskatoon.
We regret to report, that Intel-nation-
al Board Member Dave Rees has been
confined to the house, suffering ;with
a rather severe cold. We trust to see
him around again soon.
Two, patients for the Westminister
Asylum, were taken from Cranbrook
and Fernie in charge of Provincial
Constables ^McDonald "and English,
Wednesday morning.
The regular monthly tea of the
Ladies' Guild of Christ Church will be
held at the home, of Mrs. P.*E. Alex-
ander, Howland avenue, on Wednesday, September 9th, from 3:30 p. m.
to 6 p. m.
Inspector Pennlfather,, and Surgeon
Fraser of the R. .N; W. M. P., .Macleod, Alberta, were in Fernie this
week, enlisting recruits for that
force, and have been very successful
in getting many good men.
Volunteers and
Reservists Leave
For the next generation, and then
on the Citizens of Fernie will recall
the 'ovation given the volunteers of
East and West Kootenay when they
departed on Friday evening last It
was inspiring to see the, enthusiasm
displayed, and yet*'beyoud the thoughtful could see the trials, dangers and
sufferings that would be experienced
by maiiiy of those who left us so light-
heartedly. Everyone was enthusiastic
about the departure of the contingent,'
aud spoke brave words of encourage,
jnieht, but even the flags and tbe
cheering did not conceal the siuister-
ness and real ness of the whole affair.
The contingent traveled in their civilian attire and, no "baggage was heeded; for this will be supplied by the
military authorities at Valcartler.
As early as 5 o'clock the people began to assemble on* the streets in
knots, while the first band to appear
on the scene was the Pipers' band.
Shortly after this the Fernie-Cpal
Creek Excelsior band appeared and
marched to the skating rink, followed
by the Civilian Rifle Club. At the
rinlc the Veterans were assembled and
paraded to the depot, headed by Lieut.
Col. O'Brien, Col. Mackay, Lieut. Col.
Ashley Cooper and Dr. Anderson, all in
full dress uniform. The Vets made a
brave showing and one could not help
but notice the enthusiasm that every
one of theni displayed.
Fully three thousand five hundred
people must have been crowded on the
depot, coke cars and side streets, in
fact, so great was the crowd that tliey
overflowed onto the track and as the
special train approached it was
thought that an accident was unavoidable. The engineer, however, approached very slowly and several people assisted the police to clear the
'track iiud—thereby pre v ented wifilf
might have been a series of fatal accidents.
"Marseillaise"
King."
and   "God   Save   the
On Tuesday the farewell send-off
was tendered the departing reservists,
who left oh the eastbound C. P. R. passenger. A procession was formed at
the Drill .Hall, under command of Lt.
Col. Mackay. The parade was headed by the Union -lac!;, and the Belgian
and * French colore, then followed the
Fernfe Italian band. The Army and
Navy Veterans Association, under the
command of Lt. Col. O'iSrien acted as
the'guard.of honor. The following
French reservists, in charge of Corporal Leon Taitrop, brought up the
van of the procession: Andre Laf-
fond, Henri Dumoiitier. Gustave De-
loche, Desire Chapuis. Clement Hy-
gonet, Emile Dumas, Auguste Bryman-
con.'Marius Copgnw, Emll Philip, Al-'
bert Coulon, Celestlii Huel and Henri
■Millard.
The, Imperial Order of the Daugh-
ers of the Empire presented the departing reservists with large hampers
to sustain them on their long journey.
Presentation to Harry E. Miard
An interesting gathering took place
In the'superintendent's office on Tuesday evening, the opportunity being
taken to present Harry E. Miard, pit
boss Xo. 3 mine wilh a 21 jewel Vanguard Waltham watch, subscribed for
by the officials of the Crow's Xest
Pass Coal Company and friends, qs a
token of respect and admiration, on
Harry's leaving as a volunteer to t:-ke
part in the present crisis. Superintendent Caufield In a neat speech
made the presentation in his own inimitable style.
i.Mr.   Miard     feelingly    responded,
touching on the duty call which forced
"And everybody praised tho Duke
Who thia great great fight did win.'
"Rut what good came of It at last?"
Quoth little Peterkln:—
"Why, lhat I cannot tell," said, he,
"Hut "twas n famous victory."
—Robert Southey.
M'LEAN'S  PIANO  COMPETITION
On another page will be found an
announcement of this competition,
which has recently been started by
the McLean Drug snd Hook Store, The
Instrument to be given sway Is
a handsome upright grand piano
In mahogany finished case, Seen
lit   thn   store   the   Instrument   pre-
That there is not wanting ln Fernie a spirit of patriotism, was evidenced on Sunday last, when men
of-every shadJ*f«!'->relisious belief as.
sembled in the City Hall to discuss
the present very serious situation occasioned by the war in Europe.
The chief business was a resolution
moved by S. Herchmer and seconded
by A. J. Fisher: "That His .Worship
the Mayor , nominate a committee of
three to wait on C<»1. Mackay and with
him to place before the Militia Department the desire ot a great number
of Citizens of Fernie and the district
to form a Civilian Association for the
purpose of prepnring Its men for
active service or otherwise, as may be
necessary: same to be furnished with
necessary rifles and ammunition."
The c6m-mlttee was given power to
act along practical lines as It may
deem necessary under prevailing conditions.
The committee appointed consisted
of 8, Herchmer, Dr, Bonnell and T.
Will!.
It wan titer, decided to call a meet ins
of citizens at some future date to
discus** matters pertaining to ejills-tt-
ment, etc.
Kvery member present was impressed with the »-»rlousui.-tii ot the situation, and nil a result never;*) ytimm
men occupying responsible positions
in town have already offered thHr
services n» Volunteers.
The Italian band, the Fernie-Coal
Creek band and the Plners' band all
save patriotic selections and the train
departed with the friends and relatives
cheering and striving to get a last
grip of hands. We saw the beat side
of the war, but we knew that the
contingent departing were going to
do something more than shout and
cheer—ihey were going to experience
all the realities of war.
A word of praise is certainly due
Col. Jos Mackay, who, when he learned that no arrangements' had been
made for sleeping accommodation,
traveled to the Summit with the train
and wired ' the Calgary authorities
with u view to securing a supply of
blankets, etc.
sent* a very most striking ap-
fted. They wm Industrial centres, L^n^ tn4 ttt«r« Is not ths slight-
and besides, possessed treasures ot art | Mt ^a}it ,hg, tll#f# wM h<, eonsider
and artblteetura tbat belonged notjsW(1, coop-Mlllon to teeore this vsi
alone to nelflam, but to tbe world. mm pHM, AlrM4y W()W, „„„.
Deeds Meat Wanton
I havo seen tbe Germane at work.
Por a time I waa a prisoner and forced
to march with then and tbe destroc-
1 tli-m  tt**** ar-mntitXit m*** tt** tttt* t-niwi**
petltors have reached tbe five
figure mark, but as the competition
will run for several months, there 1s
an opportunity tor »H who care   to
nwwwthv snd the attitude td n eow.\tknt wnr alwsvt hffnw.- fn ehr oths-tj^w-W'ta tk* IS.W-t W*-* ot eWV;
ard. When a mad dot runs amuck In
a village lt tit tha duty of every farmer
to get bla pm and daatory It, not te
look hhnaelf Indoors and preserve to.
weed tk* kor nett tfmte wim tare Mm
a neutral mind.
Thia Is not a war a-filnet Oermaes
ta wt know Oeraaas la Amerka—
ettiaeaa who ara aawog ear aaaeat,
moat Industrious and meat raaponttbtt
fellow eooatrymtn. Tt ia • war, aa
Winston Churchill la his interview Mist
Rtmdsy explained, against the ntStKary
aristocracy ot Germany: men who see
IM yesr* behind tht flat* who, to
preserve their tbm against democracy,
bare perverted ertrj ftvat Invention
of modern tiatee to usee ef warfare, to
destruction of lira.  They ait military
wire all I have seen that was out-j thst fan be bought al tbe Here snd
rageous wsa aot ao terrtWe, ao un-1 exchanged ter goods. Pnithaaars of
neceassry, eo Waaton, aa tbe outrages j cheek hooka aft crtdtttd with H.W0
of tho German army In tbo abort dls-jvotte.   By thtt means a eonteatant
*?nr» between ftrmrttf* **k ifeff.       ' .*..», •»„♦ mtitr, ? ,.,a^,.i
The allies asked of tha Belgians to
hold back tht Invaders only for two
days. Thty held tbem beek tor fifteen. It ta for that they art being
punished, not because townaptople
art firing upon Oermsns. No one who
haa been In Belgium this last month
believes Oat charge.
f paaaed on Hoot through many til-
ta|to and la all read pfodamatloaa
issued hy tht burgomaster eonmaad-
tag tht people hi torn over to htm
every tlratrm hi their poisaaatan. And
tht data of taeh et Mt proelematloas
...r.    r*ri*    rtttllr,
....    if. .,     % * .  .
nad. Thitr idea et government ta ss j sntedstad ths entry of tho Germans,
far opposed to otrr own s» fe -martlet!   Tbo Oenwrns were ttm kttmeem.
MtTHOOItT   CHUHCH-hUNOAY,
ttPTIMBIR fTH
At tho charehta ohterve thia day
aa Labor Sunday, the pastor wit apeak
cm tbe following stsbJNwts.
tl a, m.--rh* ObftKtttone of cm-
■unship"
T:W p. m.—Tbe Chartb and the
Wego-Worktr."
At 3 p. m., Bible elaat and Sanday
tehool wtll bt bold-
Tho aaaon! banket picnic of ttt*
Buaday school wm be h«14 an I«bor
tbtf tn the GKt Wr*.
Notice To Workers
Rossland, It, €., Aug. l», lit! I.
To all l.*M*al Unions of the Western
Federation of Miners:
W«t. the undersigned Kxwutlvo
Board of Rimimd Miners' I'nlon
U, W. F. of M., desire to warn al!
men from outside r»'B',>s not to
eoxxxe tn Rossland at tht* prew-nt
lime.
Tht Consolidated Company la tbe
only comrmny working here at, the
premnl.
The lUe Roi 1 has closed down
Tbt* f,om*,'ti\(iii1*ft f*nTnji^Ti," :irt
no! at present Increasing their
force*, ao thott lid men cannot
flad work and there era also a large
number of outside mtn bare, mak-
i, ,. >,  . ii .... - nntl     ...» i.
...„      ..    *.*■       . *    . .     m  >   '     *.'   . .,      ,   , .    jt,     -. :, M,
and ao prospect st   ibe   present
time of getting work.
We advise all men to keep away
from Rossland while thtet conditions prevail
Signed hy the Bttentlve Board
KoMUnd Minora' Union.
bptv stoi't,
President,
W. 8. Bonner.
Vice President,
ORO. FHNOWAU.
Secretary,
r,. rAW!W!f.T„
P. ftHAD.
"There will be a meeting of the
Veterans' Association on Sunday
night in the basement of the Eng.
lish church. All ex-service men are
earnestly requested to attend, as mnt-
ters of vital Importance will be discussed.
Word has just. been, received from
Honolulu "that J. C Turner arrived
there, after a very pleasant trip, on
his way to Australia, without meeting
or seeius any German cruisers. Reports ail well, after an attack of the
malady common to ocean travelers, .
Kansak 'Murato (Japanese), charged
with the murder of a fellow countryman by the name of Susmer Sasamoto,
at Cranbrook, on August, 8th, was
committed for trial at the Fail Assizes
at Fernie by Stipendiary Magistrate
Arnold at Cranbrook on Monday.
A party of twelve Russians called
on Lt. Col. JOs. Mackay, Recruiting
Officer, on Wednesday, all of whom
were anxious to enlist tor nciivu aerv-
ice in tho Canadian socond overseas
contingent.   The Colonel was unable
to accept them at the present tlmo and
regretted wry much that he could uot
do so, as they were fine specimens of
physical fitness and   *pok<>   Bnglish
fluently.
Aiken (JunUfsou, t,'iupio>ed at this
C. P. It. lumber camps, Hull Illver,
was accidentally  killed on Saturday
last, while engaged in felllns a tree.
The   tree   which   Guatafson   felled
brought down three other iretm, thu
fourth onp Idlllne him Inimintlr ns bt*
stood near the stump of the tree he
had cut down himself,   This is   the
second accident of a similar nature at
the' Hull Illver camps within   three
month*.   Coroner Wllke* held au Inquest on  Monday and the Coroner*
Jury brought In a verdict of accidental death,
tl. Tlsdsle of Cranbrook, wbo has
been In charge of tin- recruiting for
the overseas contlnitent at that point,     ""al far Crahan eup *ill be played
waa In Fernie the la*! f*w d»y», ar- *« Hlllcrest on Saturday, September
On Monday evening fifteen French
reservists were entertained at a,
smoking concert held In Aiello's Hall.
Many   nf  Hie  pro'mltient   Ferule   e|t|-
ntnT TO~iaKe the step, and was loudly-
cheered.
W. S. Gre-e-nhill (master mechanic)
next spoke a few words on the sterling
qualities of Harry. This speaker was
followed in turn by Dr. Workman, R.
Johnstone, W. MoPegan. Mr. John
Coomber and W. II, Puckey, who all
spoke of th* good feeling an4 fellowship existing between themselves1 and
the recipient. After a few more words
from 'Mr. .Miard, tlio company sang
lustily, "'For lie's n Jolly Good Fellow." Souks and recitations were
Klven by W. R. Puckey. J. Worthing-
ton, H. UillHhorougli and t'armlrhael
Mc.N'ay anil (leorm Finlayson. The
company wero rcgnled with cigars of
the best quality and the meeting broke
up after two hours ot conviviality,
everyone voting it n sood time.
Colonel Muc.kay wishes  to   convey
his slncerest   thanks  to all  who  so
Kenerotisly and  ably contributed  towards the departure and comfort of
the volunteer   and  reservist   continents  which   loft  on   Friday  nf Inst
zeiiB (mended  and gave encouraging \ v.-eek   nnd   Tuesday   of   thii   week.
epctches.    A, suitable program    was j Among  tho.*:  who liioc  contributed
arranged,  among  th» number  being  and assisted are \V, It. Wilson,   <,on-
Home very excellent cornet solos by .I. j trlbutor of pipe and  pouch  to each
Pasta, while   M,   1'Jestobel   rendered | volunteer  and  rowirvlui-s;   Daughters
h anion
for
some very suitable csleetlons on the; of the ISmpIro, for limine
violin, In addition to which .patriotic; pern of eatable* to be -coiimimiicI
sonts were sung by all those present, | Journey,    Alt   Kl^i-lrh-  ''onipui},
Mr. W. It. Wilson, general manager
of the Crow's Xest i'nss Coal Company, prest-utcd <;,kU of the fifteen rv-
aervistt. with a handaome pipe and tobacco pouch The hall decorations
were -contributed by the Daughters of
the fcmplre. t'»eiu'i-tm» *|UHiiMt.i*eo »!
refreshment** amr* provided and the J any way
contwrt closed with the sin«ltiK of the ties.
si-gnal "ash lamps: dipt <"• (!. Mof.
fitt, who has not spared himself in ur-
muxlng detail.-, of u,ii.i.,.*.i;u.;uu .»u.l
organisation: Aid. Itobichaud, for loan
of rink; the Italian band, Fernie-Coal
Creek Kxeelsior band, and the Pipers'
Iiuin!: nt'-i.i .ul who have uR-iisied hi
in helping military authorl-
FOOTBALL
ranging for the recruiting of the second overseas contingent and the new
Bast Kootenay regiment.   We understand that there sre eighty -eligible
recruits   who have banded in  their
name at Craubr^ok for aenla-, Th<r«
bas also been ji list or fifty names for
warded from tioldeu for enrollment, as
well ** tvr*Miiv-ihr*« et Mlchw!    V*r-
jnit alao has s list of some two hun.|1,w,r** ul ,'*"a>
dred mon who wish io be enrolled,)"""'"""'
and  Id. Col. Mackay, Recruiting Ut]
tmt for the Kooieiuy, Is now only j
•waiting Instructions from headqusr-j
»*m te ytrotaad  with «h» ■w»H*tm#'nt»
of (beat men. t
5.   Klckoff at J:45.  Teams: Frank vs,
Corbin.   Admission, ?S centi,
— — ".'.  I"""   * j    *          * **■-**   -.UJ
meed of limine ami »■«• ftould remind
the members of the band that others
luve made hnneai and sincere efforts
mi ihelr bebiilf ami mi<> il»er<*(or« en-
tit fed to u III,.'* portion 'A thank*.
Liphardt Cup Pmal
The fin.'t! Up for the J'Hilor football
league took place on Victoria park on
TtiMfJiy   ;»ff*»i'nnn[i,     r*i«   contMtrwt*
being Coal Creek Juniors vs. Kernle*
Junior*.    After « hard and fiiM, g-ame,
t'oal Creek -proved victors by i goal*
_ u> '»    Tit***' cup    *'&•*    jjiMhwiit.f'l    by
Coleman, tbe whistle  wm placed In jnt,,¥W ua)\ j„ „   Ilf,at   uniu   w****b.
hum..* «*•   * »«'■"*-• jairtrr enieh tb» t*am walked down to
Iuv* -...m miU tlepuMUstl Un* tup til  lllf
<»i'*W' j tiUi« *hnr* it bui Ih**ii renting for
Stitil Final  Crahan  Cup—Coal  Creek
vs. Corbin
Thl* jf!im«» took place rm Victoria
park on sklunUi) .iflt ii«ooi»,' 0*ing
to   the   iioii-itppc;ir.'in<*e   nt  Moore,   of
•ed.. belief  football  ;h«n   their
Mnt*    OwtBff tn tho    nbwBi-"**'     Hf''x\tt- s^j*
♦ NOTICI
♦ Miners, stay a*ay fr«nn Ts
m b*r, a. th* m-ttt** 'in- tm* work
♦ log and oo prospect» of ^ori,
♦ Hundreds of m»»n Idle,
♦ A. UATBMAX,
m Vte*. lAKtl WL
♦ XIXX PATRRSOV,
^ Oa^n»*t9y.Tr*^aer*r
8swyer (goal* and Mrt*gehle ibsukt.
the fonl Creek tenm hnd to b*   re-
AUAMWMi.    V-«»U»» U4w UMt Ut*. w.   ****■
piny throughout, Cflt! Crw*k iacblng
Judgment in placing the ball. Interval
arrived by Corbin leading, 3 toul* to (t.
The second hslf was a repetition of
ibi> flnt. Coal Creek m«n»i«*d to
firt'f fhe net, tmm Ynt**. iftrrfne 'b*
cloning minutest, The whittle t.!<»
iiCh f'..'r'.'i   i r<mt   f'ri.A f*r.-*rfr '
♦ ,    J«§»{ H«.«k * trtbut* *>'** paid tu .,
♦ !<-ertsln »W*-r«i8n of lh# city cotin-ftl
)•»•»:
M.
t. O. 0.
I bin *mt*r win nwwt pent Mondny,
Heptemb-rr Tib. *t t p. m, at tbe K. I*
If nil, ln»t»-«i! td flsptember 11th. The
sltcratlon of daU Is occasioned by
tke member* srantiup tbe lx>>*l Orange IMe* the Islter dat* to out on
• jt.Ay *'.4*rk -hWAi, t**'.»•.** t-j th* er-
rival of th« orgenlrer. ennnot be post-
,.„..«.:.     it   .» h,»ij*4 *»<*•*!>   "I'tHiiwi   *lii
mske nn effort to attend, as business
it impwVitit* will be dtsntsaed. Tb**
^jfor his *tterta on behalf ef th* Per. \**er*tnrr wilt be In ntttnnVince from
dh|nlod>ml Creek Kveflator band.   While i; p m to twelve dues.
♦ J ire hav* s» desire t» belittle !h*» ef '
♦ ♦♦
fnrf* of *if.f I'-'.TfuiFi, f t* rttifj fnir t'i t    \  if.ionrf? ha* MturnoT fraai j, t'*o
eiteed to othetw wbo have supported t weeka* motor tour et tho Provinco ot
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦'tbo band  a  aware deal and their!Albert*. ,^r,,.'----*-^i--.t-
PAGS TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER,. FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5. 1914.
y\  7    ■■
\
Movement of Migratory
Unskilled Labor in
California
By Austin Lewis
The migratory laborer in California
has come- under the public notice of
late by reason of the Wheatland hop
iiickers casesr .The events at Wheatland, California, consisted in a revolt
ofthe unskilled labor engaged in hop
picking on the ranch of the Durst
Brothers, and culminated in the killing
of four men, among them the district
attorney of Yuba comity and a deputy
sheriff. The other two were unknown
hop pickers—one of them a .Porto
Kican and the other an English boy
of about 18 years. A trial resulted in
the conviction and sentence to life
imprisonment of two leaders of the
strike, Richard Ford and Herman
Suhr. The whole matter has been
much discussed and Dr. Carleton H.
Parker, of the University of California, and secretary of the State commission of immigration and housing,
his issued reports on the matter to the
Federal commission on industrial relations, as well as to the Government
of the! State of California,
•The people who constitued -the
crowd consisted of some twenty-seven
. nationalities, unskilled laborers, alien's
aud Americans, Of the latter Dr. Parker says:
The Americans Were in the main a
■casual-working migratory class, with
au indifferent standard of life and
cleanliness. They were recruited in
part from the improvident population
of nearby cities, in part from the poor
of the country towns and in part from
the impoverished ranches and mining
camps of the Sierra foothills. A small
but essentially important fraction were
American hoboes.
-Leaving aside the conditions on the j
Durst ranch, which were admittedly
atrocious and which can be best
learned from Dr. Parker's report to
the 'Federal commission on industrial
relations, we are brought to the
question why organization was so ira-
-mediately achieved by this hordes of
migratory laborers made up of so
. many diverse elements.
•The work on the ranch began on
Thursday evening and by Saturday
evening the hop pickers, embracing
•the entire working force of the ranch,
amounting to some two thousand four
conceive of any one man being able to
infuse into that crowd of mixed nationalities such a spirit of lawabiding
solidarity in their strike. Ford and
Suhr were unquestionably leaders of
the strike, but to contend-that they
could have brought it into being and
eould have controlled it when it occurred is absurd on the face of it.
Dr. Parker finds the co-ordinating
force-in a body of about thirty men
who constituted a camp local of the
Industrial Workers of the World. He
says, "It is a deeply suggestive fact
that these thirty men through their
energy/technique and skill in organization unified and dominated an un-
homogeneous mass of two thousand
eight hundred unskilled laborers with-
ito two days." He says that there were"
about seven or eight hundred hoboes
of whom some four hundred knew
roughly the tenets of the I. W, W. and
could sing Its songs, and that of
these more than one hundred had been
actual fighting members of that organization at one time and had served
in the jails in free speech fights. When
the fracas with the sheriff's posse
occurred the crowd was singing an I,
W. W. song called "Mr. Block,"
which it is obvious a large number
must have known; This knowledge of
I. W. AV. songs, says Dr. Parker, is
widespread among the hoboes and migratory laborers of "the State and is
a new phenomenon, certainly not
more than three years old.
We now arrive at a more satisfactory solution of the question of the
rapidity and power of the organization on the Durst ranch.    It was not
the streets for the propaganda of their
doctrines. To this the citizens objected and hence arose a conflict between the. nomadic agitators and the
municipal government, such as had
formerly occurred at Spokane.
The same tactics were employed at
both places—a policy of sullen non-
resistence on the part of the Industrial Workers and a wholesale jailing
by the authorities. The latter were
cruel and on one occasion the fire
hose was brought into requisition and
the men in jail were swamped under
heavy streams of water. The campaign went on for some months and
ended in a sort of a compromise by
which the Industrial Workers retained
to a limited degree the right of free
speech and the authorities prevented
street speaking on the scale on which
it had formerly been practiced.
But from the point of view of the
migratory workers the Freson free
speech fight was a distinct gain.
Large numbers of men had flocked into the town from all parts of the country. The attention of tlie State had
been strongly aroused. Sympathy
with the men began to appear even in
the ranks of the American Federation
of Labor, which was and Is bitterly
opposed to the propaganda of the
Industrial Workers, and the Fresno
local organization grew in power and
importance. Moreover, large numbers
were brought into contact with the
propaganda of the Industrial Workers,
and their songs and ideas became
widely known throughout the rural
districts of the'State. Also, from this
conflict developed another* which,
though little known, has been a very
important factor in the development
of the movement. This was the Big
Creek strike in Freson county, which
occurred In 1913 and to which reference is made later.
Following the 'Fresno free speech
fight, came that ln San Diego. Superficially there was not the same Inducement to risk imprisonment and
ill usage in a contest at San Diego,
as at Fresno. --San Diego is not the
center of any great farming or   in-
ac-
Ralph
hundred people, were in ppen revolt.
Tbey had held a great mass meeting
at which they had listened to speeches
in seven languages and had in
cordance with the request of
Durst appointed a committee to present their demands. These demands
they made through their committee on
Sunday morning and at 5 o'clock on
Sunday evening occurred the collision
with the sheriff's forces which resulted
as stated.
This is the first instance In the
•Slate of California of any such spontaneous in tion on the part of the migratory unskilled. In fact It would
he very difficult to find « parallel
case. It must be remembered that"
thero was no rioting, that crowd, on
the testimony of tbe sheriff, was orderly when he arrived, that such disorder as occurred was subsequent to
the coming of the posse, and that up
to ." o'elock on Sunday evening this
hotrouene.nl-- miiss of strikers was
nn organized body capable of acting
in unison.
The proBiM-ntion declared that all
this wa* due to tbe energy and organization ability of Ford and Suhr, but
a contention eannot be seriously re-
gardod, Ford and Suhr were Ameri-
ram and dtd not know any language
ether than English. Of the two. Ford
was the speaker.   It is impossible to
an isolated phenomenon; it belonged
to a chain of events in the history of'      ± , , it lt ,.    .    A      .    .*.
.   ..       . .,        .     .       ,   |dustrial activity, lt  stands  at    the
organization of the migratory la-      . ., ...,„..
the organization of the migratory
borer in the State of California.
These migratory laborers are of tremendous, indeed, of surpassing importance in the economic growth of
the State. They are seasonal workers
who, starting in the south, pick the
fruit and reap the harvest. Without
them California could uot maintain its
existence. They are in the lumber and
construction camps; they build the
roads, they perform that multiplicity
of tasks by which California is being
gradually transformed* from the land
of great ranches and large expanses
of desert into a settled and prosperous
modern community, filled-with great
cities. But these migratory laborers
work under the most disadvantageous
conditions. Their pay ls small and insecure. They are ill protected against
the risks of their calling, for although
the law has recently Improved conditions, the ignorance of these workers
and their distance from the State
agencies are impediments to their taking advantage of the law.
lt ia, as Dr. Parker says, about three
years since the agitation among the
migratory workers began. The first
signs of auch a movement arose in
connection with the free epeech
fights which broke out at Freson und
later nt San Diego.
The position ot Fresno rendered the
town a strategic point in the agitation
of the unskilled. It ls situated at the
southern end of the San Joaquin Valley and ia the centre of a rich farming
country, where there are also great
vineyards which supply tho lurgost
part of the raisin crop of the State,
These vineyards are the typical working places of the seasonal migratory
workers. The heat is intense there In
the summer months, and thu camp
conditions have been and still are be-
yound description bad. The migratory
workers began an agitation and used
CSBB"
DAVIDSON'S
Cash Meat Market
«
(In Suddaby's Old Storo)
Beck Block, Fernie
extreme southern end of the State and
is dominated largely by Los Angeles,
so that even American Federation of
Labor unionism has had hard work to
establish a footing. There was some
construction . work going on, but not
of sufficient importance to warrant
the starting of a fight. Moreover, San
Diego's limitation on free speech in
the street was confined to a comparatively small district.
But San Diego Is the winter resort of
large numbers of migratory laborers,
ization of migratory workers. The
excesses of the vigilantes caused a
feeling of indignation, throughout the
whole coast, and the unions of the
American -Federation of Labor were
drawn more closely into sympathy
with the struggling organization. .This
led not only to the actual donation of
money for carrying on the fight, but
also provoked much individual interest in its tenets. At least the effect
has been that while the official element in the American federation of
Labor is opposed as much as ever to
the Industrial Workers, the sympathy
of a, great portion of the rank and
file bas caused the unions to be liberal
of their support when the organization is actually engaged In conflict. An
additional impetus in the same direction arose from the fact that the
State Federation of Labor was itself
endeavoring to organize unskilled and
migratory labor, and while not practically successful itself had nevertheless done much to prove Its necessity to the mind of the average union
member.
The results of the San .Diego free
speech fight were apparently entirely
to the disadvantage of the migratory
workers. The restriction on street
speaking was maintained by the authorities; many men had been beaten
and cruelly used; many had been confined to jail for months; well-to-do supporters of the movement were arrested and sent to prison' for conspiracy to violate the ordinance, and
the whole movement would seem to
have collapsed ignominiously.
iThis conclusion does not, however,
appear to be sustained when we come
to consider the actual significance of
these free speech fights. They were
but incidental to a much more important and broader campaign looking
towards the organization ot unskilled
and migratory labor throughout the
State. As such they cannot be overestimated. It is very problematical 'f
an organization could have been effected in any other way, and they
were, in all probability, a necessary
precursor to the unskilled campaign.
At all events they had the effect of
acquainting large bodies of men with
the idea of the organization of the unskilled. They showed that the men
had the grit to stand up against the
worst sort of treatment and that they
could preserve an organization in face
of the most terrible odds.
With the close of the San Diego
free speech campaign that particular
phase of the organization activity
ceased- in California,   Organization on
the_job_su£eeededjnd_hencefGrth_ihe4
organizers made every effort to get
Has Now Smarted and we want you
to Watch This Space Every Week
NOW IS THE TIME-START WORKING
The Piano will be won by the hustler
Manufacturer's Dlscrip-
tion of Piano
We make on our own premises all
Sausages, Bologna & Hamburger from
tlie Choicest and Freshest meat. Atrial
is sure to secure a repeat order
M. K Davidson
Sole Propraetor
Wlio" rdmenrrom_rhT7lmpeMr^ralTey
and from many other sections of the
southern country. So that the fight
was precipjtated and on this occasion
the Industrial Workers were supported
by their two great enemies—the Socialist -Party and the local orginzatlons
of the American Federation of Labor.
The resulting contest was one of the
most bitter and brutal In the history
of such troubles. Each side employed
tbe same tactics as formerly. The
Industrial Workers who took the
brunt of jail going followed the tactics
of passive resistance, went to jail.
Bang songs in jail, "made battleships"
(which means that they beat upon the
bars of their cells with tin cups), snd
In many ways made themselves a
nuisance to the authorities. The jails
filled up and the expense to the city
mounted. On the other hand, a number of cltlsens organized themselves
into vigilantes. These vigilante*
treated the prisoners with the utmost
brutality. They took them out of the
jails with the connivance of the city
authorities and subjected them to the
most barbarous punishment. /They
beat them severely, stripped them of
their clothes, and violated their per-
torn in various disgusting snd unspeakable ways. The scandal grew so
great that the Governor of the State
appointed a special commissioner,
Harris Weinstock, at present com-
mlssioner of the Industrial accident
bonrd or California to report on the
itnte or affairs In San Diego, Mr.
Mut-riv mnde ix lengthy nnd compl-ftt
report tit which he denounced the acu
of the vigilante* and st the nam* -tlmi'
attacked vigorously the tenets of the
Industrial Workers. He found. In-
cMwally, that none of the nun lm
prisoned had been charged with dmnk-
iiilinns or a breach Of the peact*.
Here Is one of tbo Interentlnu facts
In connection with alt this agitation.
The partii Ipautt in the violation uf
municipal ordinance* vlto go to
\ prison for ihelr off#n*e« ar.d who,
when driven out of town and heaten
tn the vlgtlnntes. return again and
Di-aln lo subject them»tv#» to the
si me" treatment. »re not criminal* or
inebriate*; on tbe contrary, they
»eim to bo excMMltuMty manly tyft#*.
The Mime thing wai observable during
tbe course ol tbe   trial   ot tbe bop
t^ebmnt *t Xttrv.vlltt*   X tttt*** n*
|1    W
ITUpv were about eighty
During the whole of the thro* **eb*|rr* to b*ve » rents raise, from t!.«
unity of action and co-operation tn the
actual course of employment. This
was by no means an easy task, for
the elements which were brought together ln this'fight were not accustomed to united action. To convert
the migratory laborer Into ,a fighting
unit was and still ls a most arduous
undertaking.
. But the Inside history ot the Ubt
year or two shows that many of theae
migratory laborers had taken the
lessons of organization to heart and
were putting them Into effect Little
groups of two and three organised for
better conditions on the Individual
ranches. They began to complain of
the food, to resent the uncleanlltiess
of their surroundings; and tn a multitude of ways let it be known tbat they
were engaged In Improving ihelr conditions. This action was by no means
without Its effects, which soon began
to be -manifest throughout the agricultural districts.
The first bold attempt, however, to
eome into actual economic conflict was
st the Dig Creek, where one of the
largest electric power plants in tbe
west was being Installed. The strike
was not well timed, being In the winter, and was lost after a struggle. It
resulted, however, in coslderable Improvement In the camps of the Stone
and Webster Company, tbe employing
firm. This strike Is notable from the J
fact that thl* #as the first time the
mt pi-rat or? laboiwr* formulated th*lr
demands for a change In camp conditions. Then* demands wer** ns follows*.
1. Reinstatement without discrimination of all m#n discharged for psr-
tlclpatlng In expelling the cook fio.n
f'ump N'o. 3.
3. Abolishment or employment offices on works, men to bave tbe right
to ru»tle their own Job In any «nni!»
they may desire.
Ii, Iiriitly an eight-hour day f»»r
all tunnel work, no overtime,
l,   \Y*»I< i«tHi»*» with bath i«<ieti«u.
»ui.pli«Ht with but and cold eater night i
and day.
r.. Improvement of conditions of
iiunk house*, such as light* In front
of emk, ami no twemowddttK.
*    Wurtnf-mttfc* ted t*etntt*a t**** *n
The dimensions of the
above Piano are as follows: Height, 4 feet 9 in.;
length, 5 feet 2 inches;
depth, 2 feet 4 inches;
weighs boxed ready, for
shipment about 800 lbs.,
and the material and
workmanship are of the
best. The cases are fin-
ished in Mahogany or.
Oak, x double veneered inside and out to prevent
warping or splitting The
Piano has 71-3 octaves,
repeating action, three
pedals, full iron frame
covering wrest plank and
built up pin block of five
different layers of hard
maple, direction of grain
. ^_   1L _ altering in successive lav-
ers to prevent to the greatest extent possible the Piano getting out pf tune.
The three strings in unison with over strung bass, splendidly pitched scale and excellent
sounding board, produces the rich, deep, even tone peculiar to this Piano, ahd so much
striven for by manufacturers of high class instruments.   The brackets, pedal guards ham
mer rail, and continuous hinges are all heavily nickel plated.   The casi> itself is higfiy pol
ished, making a first-class, artistic instrument in finish, appearance and tone.
By comparison thaTiano will be found better, heavier, and more artistic than most
Pianos on the market today.
 . ._ __ MANUFACTURER'S WARRANTY     '—£	
•i'4
Remember, it is ABSOLUTELY FREE
to the Winner
MCLEAN'S DRUG STORE
Victoria ave.   ■:-   fernie, b. c.
tor In attendance at each hospital.
13. Xo discrimination to be made
against men presenting these requests.
Prom this time forward the campaign for better camp conditions nas
proceeded until at last the State authorities are awake to tbe Importance
of tbls movement Tbe commission
of Immigration and bousing bas bo-
gun to issue it* notices that tbe camps
must be cleaned up.
Ur. Parker says in thl* respect:
The employers must be shown tbat
It Is essential ihat living conditions
among their employes be Improved not
only In their fulfillment of tbelr obligations to society iu leuentl, but also
to protect snd promote their own welfare,
And with respect to tbe employes, be
declares:
On the other band, the migratory
laborers must be shown that revolt*
anompsnlt'd by force In scattered and
Isolated totalities, not only Involve serious breach** of law and lead to
crime, but tbat tbey accomplish no
lasting constrtiHIve results In advancing tbelr cans*,
Considering the foregoing, It is not
surprising thai when tbe people at
tbe Durst ranch found tbeweelvM
confronted by the conditions wbleb
tktro eslsted. they arose ia rovott.
Th***   eoeiWt-kwi*    #«■»    *t*ttt**i*Ai*
W«   ram* i* watrit ♦*• Wet lk«"» »« *'*** *•■»»•   vmttieA   thttllHttr In th# Mir***   Tbw wet eel
were about eighty tn „wmb*r| sharpen all *t«el used on shift.   Met|».|t««i«lrteney of dHnktur water   thet
toilets rem disgusting and tow it
•amber, -dysentery had already glade
It* appearance, and tbe menace of ty-
fAttttn we* to tbi* *h*rb*ermr>P tor VM*
latter disease afterwards manifest.**
Itwtr In tbt famine* trbleb bal beta
oa tbe Durst ranch. Yet the strike
was orderly. There w*s ao vleteae*
until tbe first shot of th* sheriff's
pess* precipitated trouble.
Therefore, if the or*a«U*tiea et tm
Home dank*Canada
Head Office and Nine Branches in Toronto
SRANCHSt ANO CONNECTIONS THROUGHOUT CANADA
There art many hundred* of substantial saving* account* with
the Home Bank that* wtrt atartttf year* at* with a d*po«lt ef
ont dollar, Your dollar I* alway* waletmt, full compound
(nttrtat paid
Je Fe MAODONALD, Managat
VICTORIA AV*, -«- t- FIRNII   B, ©.
Imperial Bank of Canada
MlAOOFPICt, TORONTO
Capita! Paid Up. .|7,000.000      Siwti fund ... .$7,000,000
O, R. WILKIt, Prntltnox HON. HOST dAMRAV. Vl**#r**
. ...  .:   .  m   •"**«"■• w ■a'™** COiUMRIA
Arrowhead, Cranbrotk, Pernie, Oetdsn, Kamlttpa. Mlthaf. N*t*«w..
■ iwttiittiwi vansewtf me Vltttrie.
•AVINOt M»ARTMINT
latere* alltwtd m dnponttn et mtmtd tele trom eete et «*t*n.
F1RN1KBBAK0H A, M. OWWT KM^fir
•put b.v i hitm in the town not one of
tbem went Into * saloon, and the If.
I brm M MsTT«-H!!r- irn« httit **r.*t>t in
meet their demands for books.
It may be mentioned fn tmsulng
that the Industrial WorMer*. In spile
of the atrictuiws of Mr. Weinstock upon thmselve*. yet considered bim so
fair and impartial *n investigator tbst
ihej it«*ir«-d hi* appointment hy u»c
■flev»>fn«r to Investigate the WHt«tltf*wt
ani* otrutrenet** tt Wtt#**lan4
Tbe San Diego ttm speech fight
arwiMxd general aticattoa lo tlw &r-$*b-
to p per day.
T.   Reading
room furnished,   witb
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SMfo/foGmv
mmnvt ereon   _
mutn mt r»<.aar ino tutto*. *§
ttttwwm,
euste
»   fhanjfo of cooks to bt
when the majority of tbe men *o io*
nupst. five days* notice of sack ro»
*l«f*t to be given.
ti   An Innvsse el V* cent* a day
fnr mnl* ablttear*    ftt    th"    fnnn*ft,
from fS.&o to 1*17* a day, tame   at, „..-,-,.. ^. ....    . ^. .
.   ., ietitWted and tbelr *fe*dv ftrommntln
'IUi""a"' \m -behalf of Aoernt rmmp rendition*
tk   Kach iadtvldaal to be smpptf-d
*P'n bis e*a rabbet -htm*.
tt, Strictly eight hour* for eit nt*n
working outaid*. ao reduction la
•age*,
t:   A general hospital ai tbe lUslajUwlr admirable bebarloi aad disc*-!
snd a hotptM! st f »Hip Xo. t,   A i»oe»{pfriit,-*1*lsr RWtfew
HAS MST ALLtl>
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES.
LODGSTOUft
waa rtepoaatbt* for tbe Hsfag, Itort
f* littJ* dmbu tbst IMr capacity for
ergntttatlee antntrett through m*ay
aahtfal naemtntmen la tb* lest thro*
vcart wae aleo the aula i-eeami for
Witb, tide D««dt. Mortgage*, htmtmem Potickt
*r othtr nhiiblet In on* of th«M boras
P.B,
•oth ttmtwmbtmetmntbmtm mttvtitt
Powter, MartRffor        rtrnla Branah w.
THE DISTRICT UBD^EB, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
B\
Foe of War
• BY ALLAN L. BENSON
(This   is"   a -chapter
ri
Truth About Socialism," a book
of 188 pages, published by *B. W. Hue-
hsch, New York.) .
Ask.the first man you meet if he is
favor war and he will tell you that he
Is Aot. Mr. Wilson is opposed to war.
The Czar Qf Russia is opposed to war.
The Emperor of Austria is opposed
to war. Every King^ and Emperor in
the world is opposed to war. Mr.
Roosevelt, .Mr. Bryan, Mr. Morgan, Mr.
Carnegie, iMr. Tatt—everybody, everywhere, is oposed to war,
Yet, Mr. Taft, not so many years
ago, flung an army in the face of Mexico, and dispatched powerful warships
to the coast, of Cuba.   The King of
Italy, not so many years ago, by land
and sea, attacked the people of Turkey.   Mr. Bryan and Mr. Roosevelt, a
little longer ago, enlisted in the war
against Spain.    The hanking firm of
Morgan, only a few years ago, helped
to furnish the sinews   of   war   with
with which Japan fought Russia.   Mr.
Wilson, last spring, atacked 'Mexico.
And, at this moment, Europe is in a
death grapple that   constitutes    the
greatest calamity that has ever befallen the human race.   The Emperor of
Austria hated war—but he declared
war against Servia and Russia.   The
Emperor of Germany hated war—but
he    declared    war    against    Russia,
Prance and Great Britain.
Plainly, here is something mystifying—a world that wants to stop fighting and cannot. Why cannot it stop
fighting? iMr. Wilson cannot tell you.
Mr. Morgan will not tell you, Mr.
Roosevelt has not told you. Mr.
Bryan and Mr. Carnegie seem not to
know. Xo one . who . should know
seems to know. ~ Yet, they must know.
Common sense says so. The men who
make wars know why they make
them. Wars do not happen, they are
made. Somebody says: "Bring out
the guns." Somebody says: "Begin
shooting." Somebody knows what
the shooting is about'
What Is It about? Be careful, now.
Don't answer tooqulckly.   Don't say
from   ".The  lie in the mare with "no sunken ship
"tho   ftntr"   ling   honti    InciilfnA
But the blood of the workers will
drench every 'battlefield, and their
skeletons will march with the tides
on the floor of the sea.
Good Christian gentlemen who abhor war hold out no hope that war will
soon cease. Good Christian gentlemen who abhor war pretend not to
know why, In a world that is weary
of war, war still persists. Or, if they
do pretend to know, they account for
the persistence of war by slandering
tbe human race. Tlie say the race is
bad. Its brain is full of greed. Its
heart is full of murder.
'The mind of the race is not, nor ever
has been filled with the greed that
kills.      '
The heart of tho race is not, nor
ever has been, filled with the black
blood of murder.
It is only a few whose minds and
hearts have been thus poisoned by
greed for gain and lust for power.
Probably we Bhould all have been
thus poisoned if we had been great
capitalists. But most of us, lacking
the capitalist's instinct for profits,
never chanced to see the easy loot and
the waiting . dagger lying side by
side. The gentlemen who have seen
them are making our wars, today and
preparing others for the future.
We .Socialists make this charge
flatly. We smear the monstrous
crime of war over the face of the capitalist class, We mince no words.
We say to the capitalist class:
"Your pockets are filled with gold,
thit -your hands are covered with
blood. You kill men to get money.
You don't kill them, yourselves. As a
claBs, you are too careful of your
sleek bodies, You might be killed if
you were less careful. But you cause
other men to kill.
"And you do it in the meanest way.
You do it by appealing to their patriotism.
"You say, it Is sweet to die for
one's country.'
"You don't dare say: 'It ls sweet to
die for Havemeyer,' as many Ameri-
national may see a'great opportunity
for personal profit in transferring to
their own nation the sovereignty that
another nation holds over a certain
territory. That was why Great Britain made war against the Boers. Certain rich English gentlemen believed
they could make more money if tbe
British flag wave* over the diamond
and gold fields of the Transvaal. For
no more nearly valid reason, the capitalist class of Japan made war against
the capitalist class of Russia. Russia
had stolen Korea and Japan wanted
it. Korea belonged to the Koreans,
but that made no difference. Two
thieves struggled for it and one of
them lias it.
Tbe moment that the capitalist class
of one nation determines to rob the
capitalist class of another nation, the
machinery for inflaming the public
mind is set in motion. This machinery
consists of tongues and' printing
presses. .Tongues and printing presses
immediately begin to foment hatred.
Every man in each country is made
wrote it, and he   wrote   splendidly,
though the Declaration, as it stands,
is not as he first wrote it.   Jefferson
was so afire with the idea of liberty
that his associates upon the committee    that    drafted    the    Declaration
shrauk from the light.   They compelled him to tone down his words.   But
the   Declaration   as   it   stands   spells
Liberty with a big "L."   And, Liberty
with a big "L" can be nothing but a
republic in which the people, through
their representatives, absolutely  rule:
The people, through their representatives, have never ruled this country
and do not rule it today.   The Constitution of the United States will, not let
them.    l£ will not let them vote   directly  for  President.    In  the hegin-
ning, the people did not even choose
the electors who elected the President.
State   legislature  chose  them.      No
man except a legislator ever voted for
the electors  who  chose Washington,
Ad-ams, Jefferson, Madison and others.
To tliis day the Constitution denies
the right of the    people    to    choose
United  States  Senator and Justices
of the United States Supreme Court.
In a few States where the people practically choose United States Senators
they do so only by "going around the
end" of the Constitution.   Tliey    exact a promise from legislative candidates to elect the Senators for whom
tlie people have expressed a preference.   Btu this is wholly extra-constitutional.   If   the   legislators were   to
break     their   promise,  -the    United
States Supreme Court would be com-
PAGE THREE
loutgrowth of the iMexican war."
Do you get that? Two wars caused
•by slavery. Seven hundred thousand
men killed. Twenty billion dollars'
worth of wealth either destroyed outright or consumed for interest upon
the public debt or paid for subsequent
pensions.
And for what?
•To settle the question of salvery.
To settle the question of slaveri
that the men who framed the Constitution, most of whom were slaveholders, permitted to exist.
To settle the question of slavery,
which, never for one moment, during
all of those Intervening years, was
anything but a curse even to the
white working class.
And, what is chattel slavery? Merely a method of appropriating the products of the labor of otliers. Who
were interested in maintaining it?
Certainly not the working class, no
member of which ever owned a slave.
The capitalist class of the south was
interested in it, because its holdings
were agricultural, and slavo labor was
well adapted to agricultural undertakings. . The capitalist class of the north
wus
that wrecked the Maine.
We also forget to watch what Wall
street was doing at the time. Read
some paragraphs from the New York
Tribune of April, 1, 6, 9 and 20, 1S98:
"Mr. Guerra, of thc Cuban Junta,
was asked ahout the Spanish bonds
against the revenues of the Island. He
replied that he did not know their
amount, which report fixed at $400,-
000,000.   .   .   ."
"These bonds are payable in gold,
at G per cent interest, ten years after
the war with Spain had ended.   .  .  ."
"The disposition of the bonds   of
the Cuban Republic has been a qeus-
tion discussed in certain quarters during the last few days, and the grave
charge has been made that the bonds
have been given away indicriminately
in the United States to people of   influence  who would therefore become
interested in  seeing the Republic nf
Cuba on such terms with the United
States as would make the bonds valuable pieces   of properly."     (Kindly
note that the bonds would be worth
nothing unless Spain were driven nut
I 0** Cuba.)    " Mtn of business, newrpr.-
i ptrs. nnd evvii public   offichls.   havo
t
receive-
„   , "    * .""     T    i pelled to sustain them in their consti
to feel that every man  In. the otherL...,     ...
country is his personal enemy. But
that is stating it too mildly. Every
man ln each country-is made to feel
that every man in the other country
is as much worse than a personal enemy as a nation is greater than an in-
ddvidual. Fervent appeals are made
to "patriotism." "The flag" Is waved.
It is riot "sweet to die" for Cecil
Rhodes, for Rothschild or any one else
—"It is sweet to die for one's country." And thousands of men take the
bait.v
.>"
say "the national honor" has been Im
pugned. These are old reasons, but
they may not he true reasons. We
Socialist are willing to stake everything on the statement that tbey are
not tjhe true reasons. If we are right,
we are worth listening tp. War Is hell.
During the 132 years that we have
been a nation, we have had war hell
at intervals ot 22 years. We are already preparing for our nest war,
We are arming to the teeth. It may
not last as long we the civil war, but
it will be bloodier. We have all of
the most improved machinery for
making It bloodier.
On the sea, we are armed as Farra-
gut never arntad. Any of our dreadnaughts could sink all of the ships,
for which and against which Farragtit
ever fought. And on land we are
armed as Grant never was armed,
Grant drummed out his victories with
musxle loading rifles. N'o rifle could
ho londed rapidly." Xo bullet could
kill morn than one man, nor any man
milesa that man were near, But the
modern rifle can be fired twenty-five',
time* a minute, and It will kill at
four mile*.   More than that, a single'
-^wa-v^eans-uied-iluring~thBnsugar"i'Fiast"^ar
to
'free Cuba,1
"You don't say: 'It Is sweet to die for
Guggenheim or Morgan,' as many
Americana.'would have died if Taft's
army had crossed the Rio Grauje
"You don't say: 'It Is sweot to die
for the Tobacco and other trusts,' as
many Americans died dirln; the war
with the Philippines.
"You don't dare to say any of these
thing, because you know, If you did,
you would not get a recruit. Yuu
know you would be more likely tc get
tho boot."
We Socialism who mak-? these
charge* know they are aerlous. They
are as serious as we know how to
make them, If they lack any of the
seriousness they should, have. It ts
because we lack of the vocabulary we
should have, Tbe fact* upon which
the charges are made an serious
eiiough to justify the full use of nn"
vccabulary ever made. Tho facts are
the facts of collosal murder for gain.
And they aire as old as history.
He small rich class lhat '.Ivvti lm
luxury from the labor of the great
poor class has a reason for clinging to
the control of government.  That rea
The bid farewell to their homes.
They embark upon transports. They
sail strange seas. They disembark
upon strange' shores. They see strange
men. Men against whom they have no
possible sort of grudge. .Men who
never harmed them. Men whom they
never harmed. Common workingmen,
like themselves.
But they shoot these men and are
shot by these men. They spill each
other's blood. They break each other's
boness__ThflX^rcalLjJieJiaar*te_Af--^as^h.
bullet from a modern rifle will kill ev-Un la not far to eeek.   Without the
ery man In Its path, lt will shoot
through slaty inches of pine. It will"
string men like a needle strings
beads. It will literally mske a sieve of
a solider. Seventy bullet holes and
more were found in 'he body of a man
who fell on the plain* of Manchuria.
Toward *uch a war—or wor**—we
are vpeedtng. indeed, it will be hell.
Hut I* will be hell for tbe men who
make It. It will he Ifell for the men
wbo fight it The men who make It
will stay at heme. Tbelr blood will
drench ao battlefield. Their bone* will
control of government, tbe small, rich
class would not be rich. Government,
tbe hands of the rich. Is a sort of two*
handed claw with which golden ch**%
nuts are pulled out of the fire? (Hie
claw is the governmental power to
make and enforce laws. Tbe other
claw I* the power to grub by force
that which cannot be grabbed by law*.
One nation cannot make law* for
another nation, Rut the capitalist*
of one nation may posse** property
tbat Is wanted by tbe capital!*!* of another nation. Or the capitalists of on*
other's families. And, when one array
or the other has heen cripples beyond
further fighting there is peace, The
peace of the sword! The peace of
death! the peace that leaves the working class of both countries poorer and
the capitalist class of only one country
richer.
Was it not a great victory?   Yes.
dt was a great victory for the capitalists of the world who lent money
to hoth belligerents. (But it was not
a greet victory for the workingmen
of both countries, who, through
weary, weary years, will be shorn of
part of their earnings to pay the Interest upon the war bonds.)
it was a great victory for the capitalist group who plunged for punder
and got it, (Hut It was not a great
victory for the capitalist group that
lost Its plunder.) ,
It was a great victory for the gen-i
erals, who, from a safe distance, directed thp fighting,
tutional right to do so
Xow, here is the point. Granted
that the American Revolution was of
value to the American working class.
Granted that the ills that followed
from American rule were not so grievous as- the ills inflicted by the ruling
class of English. Grant all this and
more. Still, is it not true that if it
had not been for the ruling class of
England, there would have been no
occasion for the war? Is it not true
that the English people, If they had
been in control of their own government, never would have harmed the
people of America? When did the
English people, or any other people,
ever harm anybody? When did a
thievish, murderous ruiing class neglect to harm any people whose plunder seemed possible and profitable?
The Idea that the people of one
country, if left to themselves, would
ever become embittered against the
people of another country. iR absurd,
Testjhis^tat^ment by your_nwi!-feel
■ t-etu men'', no-; as   having
not   Interested   in   maintaining., th(Jge „ondg pg a B,ft ,
chattel   slavery,   because  the   invest-!    ,..   ,, .....
,       ., .. „ , A Congressman said 1:1 tin; house
ments of northern    capitalists   were I      „,    ,     ..   . ,    .,..„„,,
,,.,.,,..,       .   . ,,        ,    jon Monday that he had > 0,000 worth
chiefly in industrial undertakings, for I   ,  _ .       ..,..,
..,.,., , . .      „ (Of Cuban bonds in his pocket, white
which black slaves labor was not well L.   .,   „ . ,     ,   , .V,    , , ,
...„.„ ., ,      ,     «■ H. Kohlsaat, Iu an editoria   in one
suited.   Yet, the north never seriously    „.,„..
,,..., ,     ,,      ,„    pf the Chicago papers,   charges    the
objected to slavery as such.   Men-like   .    ,      ...    „   .  '      ' ,„,,,.,
ii.    j.,  n-u.i.-     X.    a, i    ii   .    .    Junta with offering a bribe or ROno.
Wendell Phillips, who did object    to  .  ,     ,   . .        ,     .     ,
, . ..   . ,    ..     0i/0   of   Cuban   bonds   to a   Chicago
slavery, as such, were mobbed In the . . .   , ., ...    ,      .-
it      .... .,    ,.,     ,. .,    man to use his influence with the ad-
north,    if the north, like the south,  „..,.,«.,
ministration for the recognition of Uie
Mrs. Kelly Advises all Women
fo Take "Fruit-a-Tives"
HAGBRSV11.1.E, Ont., Aug. a6tb. '4913.
"I can highly recommend "Fruit-a-
tives" because they did me an awful
lot of good and I cannot speak too
highly about them.   About four years
ago, I commenced taking "Fruit-a-
tives" for a general break-down and
they did me a world of good.   We
bought a good many dollar's worth,
but it was money well spent because
they did all that you claim for them.
Their action is so pleasant, compared
with other laxatives, that I found only
pleasure, as well ai health, in taking
them.     They seemed  to  me to be
particularly   suited   to   women,   oa
account of their mild and gentle action,
and I trust that some other women
may start taking "Fruit-a-tives" after
reading my letter, and if they do, I am   .
satisfied the results will be the same
as in my own case".
MRS. W. N. KELLY
"Fruit-a-tives" are sold by all
dealers at 50c. a box, 6 for $2.50, trial
size, 25c, or sent postpaid on receipt of
price by Fruit-a-tives Limited, Ottawa,
ings. Are you so angry at some Japanese peasant who Is now patiently
tolling his little hillside in Japan,
that ^you would like to go to Japan
and kill him? Is there any person In
Germany whom you never saw that
you want to kill?
Of courso not, but if you are a
"patriotic" American citizen, you may
some day cross a sea to kill somebody.
If you believe In "following the flag,"
the flag may some day lead you into
the hell of war. If you believe "it 's
sweet to die for one's country." you
may some day be shot to pieces. But
If so, you will not die for your country. Your country wants you to live,
You will die for the tilling classes of
your country. If you should expire
from gunshot wounds In.-Mexico, you
might die for Mr, Guggenheim, or
some other noble citizen who will br-
far from the firing lino. Wherever you
may die from war-wounds*, you will
die to put moro   monoy   Into   some-
had been, so far as the great capital
ists were concerned, an agricultural
country, there is no reason whatever
to suppose that the north would not
have -been in favor of chattel slavery.
What the north most objected to was
the effort of the south to extend slavery into new States, as they were admitted. The southern aristocracy, in
this manner, sought to prevent the
loss of its hold upon the government.
When the addition of new free States
stripped the south of its political supremacy, the south went to war. The
Xorth resisted the attack to save the
Union.
Remember,  that is  why the north
went to war—to    save    the    Union,
which had been attacked.   It was not
to free the slaves and end slavery. We
have this upon the authority of no
less a man   than   Lincoln.     Lincoln
once sent word to the south that if.
It would permit him to 'put one word !
into a peace treaty, he would let the i,
soutfijauO!jiU_jhe_oihfirg^
Cuban government."
"Mr. Guerra made the somewhat
startling statement that a man representing certain individuals at Wash-, „,,„„
ington lias sought to coerce tbe Junta j peopl
into selling $10,000,000 worth of
bonds at 20 cents on the dollar. 'This
man practically threatened us that unless we let him have the bonds at the
price quoted, Cuba would never receive recognition. He said he was prepared to pay on the spot $2,000,000 in
American money for $10,000,000 of
bonds, but his offer was refused."
You probably do not remember
these items. Perhaps, at that time,
like many other citizens, you were
too busy "remembering the iMaine."
If so, what do you think of these items
now ? Do they mean anything to you ?
Do they offer any explanation as to
why this   government,   after   having
paid little or no attention to six re-
I hellions iu Cuba during a fifty-year
: period, suddenly determined to "free
Cuba"?
In
ever
any event, remember that what-
Spain did to Cuba was done by
the ruling class and not by the people
of Spain.   The ruling class was bent
I upon tlie robbery of the Cubans.   The
e of Spain did  not profit from
i the  robbery.    Nor  was  the   working
class of the I'nited States helped by
the expulsion of Spain    from    Cuba.
American interests were helped,    but
the American working class was not.
The working class had only the pleasure of doing the fighting, the dying
and the bill-paying.
The American working class profited no more from the war with the
Philippines, which was fought solely
to provide a new field for the dollar-
activities    of* American    capitalists.
<4'»u«luii«-<t (iu  I'nirr SU)
attttt
Mm
.fflw.wsBMae ,mL™
^tiiuEMSj^niif,
Appeals to Everybody.
. e^TP^li^^aB 1, * m^^^*m^kw^Wm - wewm^et^"^**t*Wt ■ **^^m^w ■ m^^^w^^^^^-^^mmK^m- ^mw ^^^m^^nw^
^^^^Mj^^^^m ^^J^^^^^^^a^^^J^^m^mi WJI fhl^^At m^m^^mndmm medium ^t_m_t_^_^t_M Ak^nt, t^^oSKt
w^^ww^^** ^^^p vtBi m^^^miw^m/p    -*ttde ttm^m -p^w p^^^sw -w^^^^m ■^^em^me^^ tme emeemt
rn* wen nov efejete. ■ tte warns 110 wj. tte mn mw
WN^fc ftAMHHMk 4MHHMb thrift IbSflMtt        <UClMUH%JMtWMraKMMUW Xtt  ti^ttA
st*w ■ei^mw^^im *ee wm^ememe tmw mtmmmett      w^pw^^p" ^^^^^w **^^^^^b eee ^mmee*
ttt fMMV' tMMB hmf ii. WWIfM* O-f fl pOMtwH it
w^^Bpttp ^^^^e^^m me^^^w *mmw^mt*^*-et woibmmm em e^^nwej fmt*t-^H^H-^p -w^ir
a pk km tetM be enehonpti to eAwomom e
A^teAll    ^^Je^^^^9^j^%4^i^^^9999^^^9^^    __ek    &^^^m    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^    -^^ttawn    dmi^m ■
_, T^wtwPWv . i^^w w ^pv -p^^^^p^^^^p-pw-jp'   tw   -pMiv   etme^^e^Amttu^^eta    ^^emo*-  mmab^
1 ^^^^^mt^e^ 'ml_m__, sMj^Jta^jt*__t_ i_n_u_^_t_,__b '
Ntariy tmybody cm wm Om *lverti*«if coJ-
41^**^^^^^'   jMLuk   ob^||^uujayb|g>,jHu^   Ufcdh   umaaL/utmn/mm   mJ^Mtn.m      _^_n_.Jt   __^__^_^_m_,  ^fc^t^fc
■warn  aa__\  «M§t bW-TOOtUne:  tht  ittB II 1—tllPtll *
tl^mem     a^ mmm ■ W*w ■*m**wr    as* ■    ^ ^^^■^^^^'■^■p     m*^wo    mmme» mm* »*^w^»wnpapw»»<*r
tmQttmtf.
(But It was not», ,
great victory for the workingmen who, b0<"'" P°ck*"'
•t close quarters, fell before th* guns' « tin* always been so, Why did we
and wer« buried where they fell.1 jw t0 war agslnst England In 1812?
It was no sort of a victory for the j'!*«»«•• the English psople had
working clast of either country, At! wronged us? The English, left to
least, any victory that came to the \ theawelre* never wronged anybody,
working class of either country was j We went to war with England In Hi2
merely Ineldentnl. (Irctit nrltnfn ; br,ra,",n ,hp <',,JIn* ,,,0»-» of Rugluud.
whlppisd the Boers, but the Ilritlsh j «»n deep In Napoleonic wars, were
peopl* did not m the gold mines *t*pi\-heWtnt np American ships upon the
the diamond mines. The Japanese»high sess to tsbi« off alleged British
whipped the nu**lans, but (lie Japan-1 wbjects and Jam them into the
et* wnrklnfm<>n did not get au> of!"'5*1**1 uav>-
the plunder for which the war was) Such fiction, of fours,", w;i« h-j.rm.f-ii
iuukki. Tiiw Japanese capitalists got j to American pride, but really It did not
sll of the plunder. Tbe common tmt- '-■ deeply concern the Anurlcan -tork*
;*}f of Japa;t seiv so poor, after tbey 1 Ing class. Most of thn workers lived
had fought a "successful" war against and died without evt>r having seen a
Itusila, ihat, within six months of thej ship. ,Vev*rth«»l«»i«*, th<» American
termination of th* war, the Mikado I working c!r.»s wa* summoned to th-«
urged  the stern«'«t  --•••—■' -
word Lincoln said he wanted to put |
into it was "union."   Lincoln was ap-1
posed to slavery, but he was not so i
much opposed to it that he wanted to;
fight for it.    It  was only after the!
south had tought Lincoln almost to a ''
standstill that he rose above the Constitution and destroyed an Institution
that was not even mentioned In   the
Constitution—much less prohibited by ,
That wus what the civil war was'
ubouL—chuliel slavery.
Something thut would not have existed if men had not first existed who
.wished to ride upon the backs ot
others.
Something that would not havo existed if the representatives of the rilling class1 who drafted the Constitution
bad not heen eager that it should persist.
buuicthlnti that never for a moment
ij. uuliei the workiiig ciuss,
"nt, the working dues touts la thej
ROYAL
HOTEL
FERNIE
to preserve slavery
war—ou oue s!dt,
ior the benefit ot others; on the uthu
skit: ui maintain a I'nlon undor wliich
Ah.a ..»• li ami biJLK 11;. » alike arts ai-
ways Ujion the brink of poverty,
Seven hundred  iltoufctud  iiiuh  fol-
lo.veil the -Stufa and St ripen aujl tne
iln
Stars and llar«--to bloody graves, j
Not out- of thom would have been kill- '-
ed In war if tho common people cf •,
each sectiou bad ruled each section, j
The common people never owned j
sUvtw. Tito did *dt it they owned i
themsehm '
And now t,*'. come to tho Spauhh-j
Amerl'-an war. VV'<« bdleve It wan'
(outiht to 'free Cuba." We believe It]
was fought to ".i-eiifc* tbe Maine' '
Ihtni' take too mu* ii (or uraiiti-rt Kv< n '
81 wt tor Nelson of ,\i!iiu«-i*o: j declared i
Bar Unexcelled
AH White Heln
Everything
Up-to-date
Gall in and
see us once
I
JOHN PQDBJEUNCIK. Prop.
: . ■ -ay. TTT-Z'/./
*   I m-ilmlmtt-fk'      **'/
We Are Ready to Scratch
off you* bill any item of lumber not
found Just as we represented. Then
is no hocus pociis In
'      This Lumber Business
Wheu you cant spruce we do not
send you hemlock. When you buy
first-class lumber we don't slip in a
lot of culls. Those wbo buy once from
us always eome again. Those wbo
have not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't encounter If tbey bought tbelr lumber
here.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealer* In —
Lumfcer,   Lath,   Shingle*.  8**h  ant
Doors.    SPECIALTIES-Mouldlngs.
Turning*, Brackets, and Detail Work
OFFICE AND YARD-McPhenon ave.
j    Opposite 0. N. Depot.   P.O. Bex 22,
i    Phone S3.
Into
honor
the
him
belief Ihat tbe war with i»pwlit was to
ni* nted by Americans a iio held larg«
Imwti* In ("iiIm.    lie nho declarnd
Steam Heated Throughout
EI*ttrK l.icht*d
self-denial upon j slaughter.    My paternal great-grand. I !u U" Vuim iitaU** *M"U*'" ms m
tbem a* the only means of saving the father, a humble farmer In tbe lhi'un
country    from     bankruptcy.    And, River valley, #as   drafts!
notwithstanding the victory of   th«»< ranks, nml to thl*
lirliisb over the Boers, tbe common 1 because he would not ko without bri-xn I Ui» **"*' tkm lh* a°*-,r Tr"« Wf«*
people of Bngland were never befow ] drafted, Aud. mbmi tke *»r *»* onii**1'*1** ta fttmmnt •««•'"** r*w>iatt»w
•0 poor s* they are tod*,*. 1M, the worklug ciaa* of America was I ***r '** wn*»*o ot bringing about an j
wor*# off ihan It wa* before. I »*»«*• •»"> »»>«»« rlddlna iiwif of ib* »
An *m» t««r eorilKi claw of ^ig.}** »*r «*« ""W «*» »* mw levfrfl 1
land,    dttntf were ik'Sd   **em*'  were  "««« Aroertrsn Sttgsr. ;
shattered In health.   Tbt- IHiag Hied     But there i* mow to tb* *i<in,   T'oj
let* wpH bnwjiis* «hi*i had t« pu) thel'^" «'*»). thetu .* un proof tk»(    tfc<-
*o»i «»f h#»ll,   The Imprwasment of al- '*•**»« »«s destroyed   by   Jtiianiard*.'
|i»m>d ilritlsh. subject* »po<* th* Utb I ft'iathatt*. &t ««*»■* «M»t*M* of ber,
!**** «»«t*d olily bmrntf «r**>t *nni. I tmrt**tt ***** >*>*> «?*i**-»*»•».-"*• -»
** tt* mem w^nm timm to eml It     The   treaty   off t?nit*d that** dtd *«» ***m tt* m-m** m'-f
-jX*,** aJ*».> ^*»*i.w *vw*».**tiMMi mt   supiiatiON   that I me*.   The Maine. *nh th* borei of*
•he nbmM ead it.   Tha* teased thi* «-* w 3«« workJagsttn
»fftajj*ii^f  *!'*|f'}*1   rjir, mbkJb ootot\ »** pmratftted
wmtt bar*   begun
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C
The Leading Commercial Hotel of the City
Rate* $2.50 per day
With Ptrnt* Bath |3.W
Fire ptoef Sample
Rooms in Cmuttetion
What i* th* use of blinking tb«*e
teeta* Tk»f are tnttn. N'otod) c*»
disprove them They stand. Th*y
stand ever la the fare ot the further
fact that som* war* have helped the
working etna* The American rivolu
tion helped the working Has* of
ABMrtev.   Dat tha Amertaw working
JMp tt the tfnr11?fti luiifl
who ratal the British wtrnmoM had
•Wmmr   *MRMI   mmtmm      %mm      ffWw IfrPHPWHW    Hn*
th* people wt
Kor)
wmJHtfmeme
-*.***4 A*m *«***- m
* ^ W,-ttkAtHM^ii idUtmtttltmmeLitd
tt t^^j  ttmt^etrt^mt  itimm^^mm^m   we^^^t^^^mw ^^w-w-w^p - w*m^*emeeee etwme^m *
•teem
««tr. tal m tem at ttt Aawrfeaa
mo. no mmmm people ar Aoier
J» gslaed mtkfat fro. the w*
»• bin* grafts *ettb*r m
mtmtmmmm wero prtmtamf
»*»d tk. owtoiattat td tmomeemm
awl «aa what tw ***** promt***.
mm tm OomrtttnUwi et tte fried
Mat** and *m wh*t Ibev w«*« gj^,
■*•••■ »*• Derail*. «r HUoptmd-
tore nnd tu Commam m ib*
uattad mntoo tb*te tn ett tbo difTw-
mm imt oxmto bmtwtmt Mttttic .-.»«»
ngbt aai gala nmalUtL So timer
^^ tm wa* ew «Natl*4 t»to «<**«
■■■Ithaa ttet .hkhaapaataia thp D*h,
If tha  people of
Euiilaad   lniile*d at n tumit r»Mnr
*■***•, aaa ns** taeir own ront ry.
The w*r with M-wteo waa aa m.
ttnm* that General Orant, who fought
la it, *twmoettd ft In the strtmgeat
toasaage at Ma eaaiMaad. latheM<v
and ehapttr of the flrat roiea* of Ma
"Itimofn," n tttt cfc*fMU»tal*g the
M*ift»a war a* "eahaty * he mre
aboard her,!
w m tn th* mud of j
Itavaaa harbor «rb»re *h* sank. Aa-tJ
whs* the ttM   ■*■■**  t-i.nttf  ,.,-■*
nobody was able to **y that the *hlp[
waa aot d*ttm*d by the esptontoa of |
her own magacJee* Xow, the bull of
th* old ship la dome ia the ocean,
with ao hope that the tnH* wlii he
known.
Hu, toe interests that wanted m*t\
'        td  the   farts   In IP** !
THE WALDORF
Mrt. S. Jennings, Prop. t. A. UiWe, Mattager
Excellent Cu«ftir»<* A^frkan and
European Plan Electric tight -
Hot & Cold Water .Sample Rooms
Phonei-Special Rates by the month
AMVUnPlMlBta
ttOOpwDiy
Hu
KtttiJitmuit
'Tm ui:culuUott, e*pa>at(M aaO an- j 'tlmr aewtpa^rt ttnrnde
Mutio* i.tf T*s**i war* -fiwH tho la-
e+pttem ol the —aveawat ta ft* tie*]
rwntmmmntbm, n rostpfrsey to **>
■n't* ttmnotf ent et whteh *****
mm m%0tt be termed lot tha JU*er-
[*'iu t'atua. Cuwu U U*« mmammmimt
bnm mm m teetmoi. th* mommr to
«hleh tbe tubwxnoeai ear mnn tomtit
Mmw      -^Mmttmtmb     ■**■** -"* -w^
•mthera  reheiflea was  larg^y   tbe
red tbe-r tin-
mp *»ery day.   The Main* had been
Aietoneoi b* ■BimwrnM*':      We mats,
•n*mtmb*r the mm*a   \v< m to}.
asaahar th* Maiae, tm we tmtm war. i
W* fhfwet to h* store ■** a*no >
Awl, trea If ■*<> *«rr«. right,'
that fhe   hflMng ef a t«x
thousand   *f   *4*»i„>i,   t*«Kkiagi»**4
«OJ*i tm be fit twaitftaseat tot th*
*tmm et the   Apme.dk   rain*   rlat*
THE
Bellevue Hotel
COMMtRCUL   HOUSK
l*a iii tho
OM**et* — tvery   CenvialeiiM^
tUtTABU  POA tAQttl Atttb MENTltMIM
tt* A. OALLAN, t*n>p.
WaXMwVE, tkHm, , .-vy-isr, '^n^r ts^i •*. "•.; ~^&hfe'.s^'-^r.
■" it-, j:*yjTX*i4?---}t*j*'-    ,'-t
-■-■-*•.      I..,'*:*'',     .
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FEENIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914,
•Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year in advance. An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
LABEL',
OUR PERSPECTIVE OF  THE WAR
Wi* in Canada clo not reali-ste what war is; wo
do not realize its hatcfulnuss, its agonies, its sufi'ei-
ings, its sacrifices. True, we have sent men away,
but what has been the part we have played? So
far it has consisted of eiieering and attending
smoking concerts, drinking and smoking, listening
tn patriotic songs and speeches, waving flags at
the departing troops,and,yes! wishing theni a safe
return! We have so far seen the nice, patriotic
side of the conflict. There is also a feverish desire to hear news, but we want to hear of victories.
The bulletins arc studied and if we*read of i-etrcat
and defeat our faces speedily betray oui1 .disappointment. We want to be fed with the news of
glorious victories—victories that we have in no
possible way contributed to—an-d if we do not hear
of thom then we must criticize those who are doing
the fighting. We never care to criticize ourselves.
This state of affairs is not peculiar to war times,
it is the intense selfishness of human nature that
will permit all and sundry to make sacrifices, but"
not the individual who criticises. This same thing
is happening every day in fhe rank's of organized
labor. The leaders are no good—after they are
elected—because they fail to accomplish miracles.
Yes. Mr. Reader, the war critic of today—the armchair critic—is a striking example of what we have
happening every day in the labor world. A strike
ir-, on and the rank and file are .receiving rations or
relief: their every want is cared for. so thy
take an holiday, refusing even to utilize Use leisure
time in improving their education. "The officers
have charge of the strike, and it is no business of
ours.'' Practically every conflict, whether it be
011 the battlefield or the industrial field, has beeh
lost through the supreme egotism or apathy of the
people engaged. They have never realized the seriousness of the fight; they have never realized
what this means to*the other fellow, and the result has been flisgracejmd. defeat. The armchair
cri-tir is as useful to an army as lie is to a union,
and the sooner men realize that. actions have al-
ulways secured results and not words, the sooner
will the worker come*into his own.
These were ou their way to be shot, and the better
to point the moral, an officer halted both processions and, climbing to a cart, explained why the
men were to die. He warned others not to bring
down upon themselves a like vengeance.
"'As those being led to spend the night in the
fields looked across to those marked for death they
saw old friends, neighbors of long standing and
men of their own household. The officer, bellowing
at them from the cart, was illuminated by the headlights of an automobile. He looked like an actor,
held in the spotlight on a darkened stage.
"'It was all like a scene upon the stage, unreal
and inhuman. You felt it could not be true and
that the curtain of fire purring and crackling and
sending up hot sparks to meet the kind, calm stars
was only a painted back drop; that the reports
of rifles from the dark rooms came from blank
cartridges and that these 'trembling shopkeepers
and peasants, ringed in by bayonets, would not in
a few minutes really (lie. but that they themselves
aud their homes would be restored to their wives
and children.
"You felt it was only a nightmare. And then'
you remembered that the German Emperor had
told us what to expect,  It is his holy wari"
It is unreal when we realize tbat the same officer upon whose instructions those noncomba-
tants were ruthlessly slaughtered may himself be
a father who hopes to fondle his children when he
returns from the wnr. And yet in the heat of the
blood lust he has no thought for the orphans and
widows that he is creating. The sobs and entreaties of the Belgian mother and wif-j do net affect hini. He commands that these men be shot
as an example for others. They may not havo
been guilty of any crime beyond a lovo of the;r
native land'and a desire to see Belgium freed of
the enemy. They are taken -out. stood against a
wall; a light is provided to ensure accuracy of aim
for the firing squad; the word of command is
given and for a moment their bodies tremble and
quiver under the shock of bullets—and then tlieir
Knees sag and tremble and they collapse—a bleeding, gasping, quivering mass of flesh; the blood
welling out of their wounds in great streams—dead
or dying. And if there be any who show signs of
life under the glare of the electric torch—if there
should be one or two shot through the lungs with
the blood slowly asphyxiating the poor wretches—
11 soldier will be instructed to "finish" them. And
then this bleed mass of once viril flesh, warm and
sticky with blood, will be hurled into shallow
trenches—unmarked with, stone, to be trampled
Ayer next day! In our enlightened age we have
men who do this because it is THEIR DUTY! In
the heat of battle liien arc as wild beasts, boiling
FRANK NOTES
We have before us a copy of "The American
Socialist. " No. 3 War Issue. The first two sentences read: "America can stop the, war. War iu
Kurope <-an continue only .if fed by America."
Al first sight is would seem thnt our comrades
across the line had made a great 'discovery and
that a cessation of hostilities might be hourly looked for. "Starve thc war and feed America." Do
you starve the war? Certainly not. ! Yon
.-.fa'rve ihe poor unfortunates who are not faking
part in the war. The armies will take what they
want, but the workers will starve. The proposition would lie ridiculous ilid it not savor id'
U-iigeily, If .von liiai- uot lieen able lo feed America in time of plenty, how do you expect the cap-
italics to forego an opporttnity of getting wealthy
at the expense of Kurope? Tell the renting farm-
el- of Kurope thai he shall not sell his when! to
Kurope at *1.2'», but musi sell it lo Americans ul
75 ei'iiU per bushel, and see how long you will
last. Imagine the farmer who has been used to
receiving from 70 to 80 centa per bushel refusing
to Midi at iH.2>*i! Try to explain cconomicx to
him 11'lonp th'm line- "Tlint with n reduction in
wheal we ahull see u com-Mpoiuliiig reduction ill
oilier e.iiiunoditir.s," and you will find yourself up
againsi a pretty stiff proposition. No. sir-e-e. nothing doing; thi* is otir opportunity lo get buck al
Kurope. Oh! il'* a peiieh of a Miggestioii. Wn
Imve not the Mlightest he*ilntitin in s;i v i ii wr Unit
even farmer** of llu- mo*t revohitrotiiir.v type would
laugh nt the idea. Of eotirw, if you imagine thnt
you are strung enough to take the wheal, take it,
by all iiichiir, mtd U-ed slur*, mu American* or Chi'
iiesif. Imt to talk about taking wheat to feed sttirv-
ing Y'.i«"i''.'Mt<. and -xlsirv iiiv Kurope xiigueHlx the
tjiitsti'u.: Why liuvv y<>u wnit*-«| until war tinn*
to conceive tNi** brilliant Murgentioii* The idea
is iinalugHth of an i-xprrw-timi that lia* ofleii lu-i-ti
made: "Wait until Ihe Koeiiilittts in (leriimiiy gel
ntwrf-wl/'   We are expecting tin* liciiiiaii Socuih*!*
lin-hani Harding Davis hn* been producing miiiic
very teiiiiiig ur.ril pietun-n for tlie m*>wi»p»j»»;fi*» of
tlii*  with*,     lie   Iiiih  been  showing  the  (nullity  *ide
t      .       • r . •   1     ■
i.t    ..,**.     *.*,.*.   ..,-,.     *'■*,#.   .,*.',.    ■■■ii.tii     1*  .    *. * ■■ ■*
pet-tally when we wnv«» 11 farewell lo those who ar«
leaving for the front. Ill* '"story" of Ihe burning of
loMivuin U t-rloo-itly. und yet he doe* not tell tw all.
Iii* p.-u. brilliant a* it tn. foil* far short of what
i«i ri-»»ti»Hv tftk\ti*r fdaee in Kumrte todny. The fol
k-w hib however, lakt u from an exehange. give* one
•    rtti  «*i«*rt <»t   lie" t OtiltfiwtiH'iw Willi  <AUi«l*l  (<••    1 ».»<■». J   *«•
IiimI in carrying on the wnr in Helgium:
""Iltltfci.lt-   tbr   aUliltU   Hi   th*'   public   KwjlMIT   Jb-e
-   I«t»|il«- of !.<o. :ttii *,<;»-.h*'.I ttt ttiicridttig priH-t Mioti,
women 'mn-hi'ittU^ mi*} wet-ji'mg ktx,\ *«>■-! -nxrrrm?
.   in*- t ,,,'„\,.,,. ,*i»'„.(.. ,,,, vUvii j>U>*uUI*.t..   Alt .'.av
•  limine* I in l»v a ahadowy army of fray wolves.
Oii.c tiny w«rt- baited ami ainoiig tli. us ui.u'clii 1!
w line of iixnv, thry we\\ knew, their fellow tntviinmeri,
with passion and animated with a desire to kill
but when they arc called to do murder, cold-blooded and deliberate, surely if this is DUTY, then it
is the duty of hell! Tt is an obedience that, hell and
its demons alone could demand.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Must Refuse Cards of Butte City Dual Union
All Local Unions nre hereby notified to refuse
to accept transfer curds issued by the seceding
branch of the .Butte...Miners Local of the Western
Federation of Miners, None but bona fide cards
bearing the stamp of Local Union No. 1 of the
Western Federation of Miners and the signature of
Patrick Lee; secretary, should be accepted in accordance with tho provision of our International
law.
(Contiuued from Pave Five)
During the week many of our townspeople have been moving from one
house "to another. Mr. Hamilton, to
the house lately vacated by Mrs.
Wilcox, iMr. Tom Davis to house at
the south side of the track, Mr. Bob
Dicken to the house where Mr. Turner lived, and Mr. Howe to the house
on the corner opposite the Co-operative store.
Among the Macleod contingent who
left for the war last week are the
names or three men well known in
Frank: S. J. Ronton, R. Rafferty and
B. Young. All of them were working
here iu the past year as brakeman for
the C. P. R.
■a
Harry, Lon and Joe Mcllago, who
have beeu working for the C. P. R.
here, left on Tuesday morning to
defend the mother country. Hugh
Robinson, an engineer with tbe same
company expects to leave ln a day or
two,
Inspector Junkett, while in town on
Monday, succeeded in getting a new
recruit for R. N. W. M. P., jn the person of Tom Sanderson. Tom should
make an excellent policeman and
succeed in bringing the natives tq order. It caused some anxiety at first
among his friends when they heard
"the police got him," but an explanation settled everything. After all,the
war is coming real close to us.
A petition has been circuited among
some of the ratepayers protesting
against the high taxes, and the councillors have called a meeting of all
ratepayers, to be held in the school
house at 8. p. ni., September 8th.
The Ladies' Basketball team of
Frank are to meet the Blairmore
ladies' tea^t in deadly combat in
Frank on Wednesday afternoon at 3
o'clock. It is expected that all the
sports of Frank will be there to
shout.
A tennis tournament was held in
Blairmore on Saturday last, when
players from .Hlllcrest, Frank, -Bellevue and Coleman took part. The
Indies served a tennis tea.
The school boys .living in Frank
have formed a basketball team, and
on Saturday last went to Blairmore to
play a team of boys about three times
as big as themselves-. Naturally the
game was a little one-sided, under the
circumstances, 29 to 3, in favor of
■Blairmore, who knew the game well.
This week the game will be played in
_Frahk^_Called_nt   9.   -nVlnplr   nn   fintiir.
day. .The public should take an interest in the eforis of the school principal to give the boys clean amusement.
IMr. Geo. Pattison, Mr. Blols, Alva
and Harold Blais spent several days
at North Fork fishing and returned
heavily laden with fish.
The marriage took place at Blair,
more on Tuesday night of -Mlsa B.
Evans to Mr. T. Morgan.
Frank Is every day getting to be a
little more like what It used to be a
few years ago. It ls fast regaining
its old reputation of being "the best
town in the Pass," This week a
butchersliop, called the "Frank ..Meat
Market" -Is to be opened in the front
of the building previously occupied'by
Blais' store. The shop will open on
Thursday, with Mr. D. Howe as proprietor,
where he was engaged in a hotel. The
work was all right, Jack says, -but the
altitude was too high for the -family,
none of them enjoying good' health;
while up there.
R. €lark, who was section boss in
Nq. 6, before going home to Scotland
for a three 'months' holiday, returned
on Friday morning and started as superintendent at the mine rescue station Tuesday, September lst.
A. J. Carter was in town the latter
pare of last week, on business with"
the District lawyer.
COALHURST NOTES
The mine was idle the first two days
of this week.
Fred Adamson has secured an engi.
neer's position at Lethbridge. He left
Coalhurst on Wednesday.
Quite a number of young people
from Coalhurst paid a visit to iMon-
arch last week, and enjoyed their visit
in dancing; refreshments were served.
Labor Day should be a big day ln
little 'Coalhurst. A committee has been
hard at work the past week and a good
program has been drawn up, and as
we have the talent all right, everything Bhould go off fine and dandy.
J. H, Watson is away at iBanff, giving hia bones a rest. Mr. 'Fuller,1 of
Kipp is looking after the business until the return of his lordship.
The guy who plays tbe violin in the
Wigwam every night would do well
to get Borne pork fat for his A string,
or else Tony Cancellier may raise the
rent of his flat.
The addition to the bedbug incubator is just about done and those who
have not already gotten lockers may
be ablo to secure one if they get right
after lt thia week.
Danny MoAllister has again taken
up his residence in Coalhurst.
Danny'-McMillan started to work
here this week, caging at the bottom
of the shaft. ,
The fellow who sings "I'm Longing
to Be Single Again," may be seen
these nice evening washing his pots
and puns with Jack Thornhill assisting with the wiping.
Charlie Hume quite the mine at the
end of August, the position whatever
it is, ts now filled by Daniel Quigley.
John Nash and family were visitors
to Coalhurst from Coleman on Saturday, returning Tuesday.
Pete Chiest and Harry Asallna
killed a ratle snake, coming home
from Diamond City ou Tuesday.. The
reptile was over five feet long   arid
Cards of Association of Steam Shovelmen to Be
Accepted
By direction of the International Executive
Board curds issued by the As-sueialioii of Steam
Shoveiiiien will be accepted by our, Local UnioiiH
having jurisdiction over strip mining where steam
shovels are used. These cards-to he accepted in accordance with Section 18, Article 15 of.the international constitution.
JOHN P. WIHTK, President,
FRANK J. HAYES, Vice Pros.
WM, GREEN. Sec.-Trc«s
LETHBRIDGE  N0TE8
INTERNATIONAL BXBOUTIV1!   BOARD
OKIES "WAR"
OS.
Imliflimpolu, Ind., Aug. 22,1!H4,
Al a meeting of the International Executive
Hoard of the Tinted Mine WorketH of America,
held iu llie city of Indiimapolk ind., during the
week of August 17, Ihe fnlhnv'ng resolution wiih
adopted:
Whereat*, The war whieti in now going on among
ili<   leiidiuu nations of Europe i* greiitly to b<< de
phm»d    The dent ruction of property. io*« of lifi»
and fhe i-iiiioiiitf of Iiiiim.-mi mUery which are Imimd
!«> result titer, from nre ,,wfn! to mint**mplute; ani
Whereim. Evil effect* el war .tHay* lay il* <i
Ht met ive   hand*   lliiwl   heavily   upon   the   toiliiiu
untune* who conHtilutc a very large percentage ol
the eiti*eii*hlp of every nation; ihereforu h» il
There was i» slight improvement at
the mined last week, five days being
worked. Ilotb mines are at capacity
and several old timers were told to
come bncli In a week's time.
The King'* Hotel opens Ita doors to
the public Thun day. September 3rd,
and It in reported that there will toe
free drinks for all on the opening
day. If w, It will bn the flrtt for many,
.is few have had the price.
It lias been •Digested that a patriotic relief fund bo formed In the
city, to'provide (or the famlliuH of
those who have gone lo the war, ami
alxo for those families whose breadwinners have Imen unable to find work
during the summer. The idea is to form
a committee of l)ii»ln«s» men, retail
clerks, t«amsters, miners, etc, and to
collect two bit*, fifty cents or a dollar,
as the Individual feci* inclined, on w
<*:.y, unit put it into u geuerul fund to
bit supervised by Mayor Hardie sud
Chief of Police Thore.   If ml npoln® nt
Jmm-w Mi-si* »u«iil tm s f-tMts-idiir.iltile
.uiiKuiti in the fuiitl wror«« the winter
miiiilhs arrive. VV« nr* mre no ore
would grudge the   fim«   «|i«nl   uoor
I buelt a .vertli). objm t. und hojw :o hear
it'loi-c of till** n ro Monition in I, lie lunar
! future. ■
whose appointments and salaries are
controlled by the local companies,
have exercised a system of espoinage
and have resorted to arWtary powers
of police control, acting in the capacity of judge and jury and passing
the sentence, 'Down the canyon for
you,' upon miners who had incurred
the enmity of the superintendent or
pit boss for having complained of real
grievances, or for other cause. These,
taken with brutal assaults by camp
marshals upon miners, have produced
general dissatisfaction among the
latter."
This is one of the dangerous gases
that has been coating the minds of
the miners with explosive dust for
thirty years.
And then let us take the matter of
weights. Witnesses appearing before
the Congressional investigating committee testified that they had always
been robbed of from 700 to 1,400
pounds of coal on every ear mined.
When they complained to the superintendent they were either discharged
or told that "lt was orders,"
Coal miners have learned from
long experience that the only way
they can secure the just weight to
which they are entitled Is by employing one of their number as a check-
weighmtin. The right of the men to have
this check-welghman has been a
State law of Colorado tor seventeen
years, but whenever the men asked
for this legal right, they told the
committee, they were discharged.
A law forbidding the paying of men
with scrip in lieu of lawful money,
making it illegal to compel men to
trade at the company stores or live at
company hoarding bouses was passed
in 1899. Company men testified 'he-
fore the Congressional committee that
scrip is being used by the operators
today. Men who refused to trade at
the company store or live at the company boarding house were either discharged or given such a poor place
in the mine that they were forced to
leave on account of not being able to
make a living.
Another gas that added force to the
explosion of discontent and ended in
the present strike.
Tn that same year, 1S99, another law
was passed making it unlawful for an
employer to prohibit his employe from
joining a labor organization.' When
the strike of 1904 was called off, six
thousand miners who belonged to
the United >Mine Workers -were black-:
listed. iMany of , these - men hav©
never been able to obtain a joh. It is
common knowledge that whenever a
miner was found to have- joined the
union or to even. sympathize with its
purposes, he ,was not only sent
"down, the cafayon" hut blacklisted,
which meant that he could not obtain work in any coal mine in Colorado.
In 1.901, the semi-monthly "pay-day
was passed by the State legislature.-
The Colorado -Fuel and Iron Company
started the semi-monthly pay-day February' 1, 1913, or thirteen years later,
according to the testimony of the
president of this company:
More gas and more dangerous dust.
Since 1901 the eight-hour question
has <been demanded by the miners and
other citizens of the State. By referring bills and introducing "fake"
measures, the coal corporations prevented an eight-hour law until 1913,
when the supreme court cleared up
the matter.
/These and many other things created the gas and dust in the minds of
the 11.232 coal miners, which the "ag-
itators" Ignited Into the greatest ex.
plosion of industrial discontent in the
history of labor organizations.
had seventeen rattles.
AGITAT0R8 AND THE COLORADO
8TRIKE
J 'J.'!.'
X.'.i
I
M'i\e«, «» u|f(iiii»i mu in any form, We «re ior
pi-ii., ..ml no a pi 'iii't't id Mtl nl i<ui of M dhtputcft
itritsing airioitfr nations without rn-tortiiitr lo arms:
-.-■*,.      ... ,■..,.,, .
lltv.K.-d. That weronintend the President of ih**
■Tniled Statin* for hi* efforts in helmlf of p.m c
Ilia offer of the .service* of mir fJoveiiitnent to the
wnrrlnjr nations of Kurope ns a mediator touched
n resportMVi" ehord in the h»»iirls of all |M»»Vf'lov-
int? |M»ople,    In tike mnniier the tactful, wt*e mui
p,ili'ioii<:   ....ll.u.i    iu   ultii'll   It**:   *-.'"!•.* Ill'- It <!   ..Cl'Ail**.
so as to prevent onr Uovemment from Incoming
invoh'i-il in ,i \vnr with Mr**!** ought l« W *pju>-,■'-..
ak'd h> every I rite Aiiterictttt citizen.
WKRVATIOVAI, KXKWTIVK Wl.\WH
v. jf- v;, or a.
.lOlIX P. WIHTK. I'r.-.,.l'-m
m.KSK tl. HAVKM. Vi..,. iv,
WM ORKKX. *w..Tw.»».
Airs. 4ui*u 1*41*011 sun immii M«te
i*U  <**)i..D.* \*i  **»*.  im,*
ou   n farm   Ih
the
sister, tt'he is
ir*smi»»jr.
Mr* t\ (|. eiandor has undergone
-Much has 'been said about the activity of "agitators" and tbelr responsU
billty (or the Colorado coal strike.
Jt lias been said that these "agitators" called the convention of miners
held in Trinidad, Colorado, September
16, 1!)13, and demanded a strike.
Let ub admit that the "agitators"
did cnll tiie convention.
Speaking of this phase of the strike,
Peter Clarke Macfarlane, iu Collier's
WoeKly, Issue of   June 6, Bays:
"Xo scientist has ever been able
to agitate a vacuum..
"Xow for our Illustration: Let us
take ii single instance of one of those
mine explosions. Its cause was undetermined. One theory was that a
Japanese miner, 'sntiakitig a smoke,'
struck the match that fired the gaa
that exploded the mine and slew some
score* pf men, tearing mnny bodies
so fnr from human semblance that
tbey were scarcely recognizable a<
such. Now, in tint hypothesis, the
irau-li of the Jap waa the mouth of the
agitator. But If there had been no
Eras or dust, there would have been on
explosion."
Thi tame la true ot the present
strlko, Aa Mactorlans aaya: "If there
had been no long-continued, no high-
heapnd series of wrongs, rent or fan-
tied, flcwtins In the minds ol the
Colorado miners like gas, coating
memory thickly with explosiv* dust
ihat flam! np with the fiery words of
the agitator, tbere would have bean
no strike."
Vin xteettl not took far for the gas
and dust,
Ut us take, first, the political oppression of the miners. For years lha
Colorado Fuel nud Iron ■Compsiiy and
other large corporate Interest! have
nhsolntely demlnated the politics of
I Huerfano and Us Animas counties.
1 Thsae Interests hs»e placed In of-
flee whom they thought would serve
Ihsiii best. They bave Influenced the
court* and legislatures. Thay hav*
made )u»tlc« unknown lo litin who
did ttot belong to their political gang.
/The Colorado Ku*| and Iron Com-
,^»*,i 1.4,1* *A«t ♦%,»».»«. fnn*!. X*niX -H-tn 'HOW.
et to *t*t\*a1t nr ennvfet, te aeoA Us *n.l
emlM to th» p-snlumtlary or   to   let
Ita frlsnds go free.
Htraonal political frtedom bas bono
A  CHINAMAN  ON  OPIUM
In the American Magazine appears
an article entitled "A Modern Opium
Eater," written by a newspape'inun
who had 'become a victim.of the habit
and Is now a convict In a penitentiary.'
In the course of the article the au-
thoi quotes as follows what a Chinese
den keeper said to him about the power of the drug to hold Its victims:
"You no quit. Every man allee
time say he quit. Every man allee-
samee you. Smoke one time, smoke
two time, smoke tlee time, then smoke
alleetlme. Chlneman, wliltem-&n,
chokquay (negro), alleesamee. No
can quit. Bimeby you die you quit.
Bimeby maybe you bloke—no more
money, no more fiend bollow money,
no can stealem money, maybe you
quit, one .two days. Bimeby maybee
you go Jail, no get fiend bling you hop,
no got money giem policeman catchem
hop, you quit. You got monoy. you
no go jail, you no quit, I heap sabe.
Bimeby you see."
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater to the workingman's trade
C A. CLAIR .•-.' .Proprietor
i"'>ji»"r *,*ixjm&:.^
39129
HERE IS It SQUARE DEAL
and* pea«etul security aa well.
With a policy In our oM Une
company, you can go off on your
vacation or visit Uie ends of the
earth and you know you're secure.   The best In
FIRE IN8URANCE
ia always cheapo*, and especially ao when it doesn't cost
higher. I>ont delay about tlmt
renewal or about that extra insurance you want but come right
in nit once and have it attended
to.
M. A. KASTNER
SOLE AGENT FOR FERNIE
ALKX BECK BLOCK* U FKRNIK, B. C
GOOD SOLID SMOKES
go with our cigars. Smokes
that soothe and satisfy every
time. Step In and try one. You
will be surprised at bow much
extra elgnr goodness you'll got
for the samo priee you bave
been paying. You'll find our
cigars Just the ones you long
have sought.
W.A.Ingram, Fernie
OUR COFFEE  IS GOOD
■WWllBIMIOTOTMi^^
ISIS THEATRE
Fernie's Leading Picture Theatre
pnp
nwsM
BWt
,    _. ,   .     „ ., unknown In thes* counties since   as
si uliKhi operation at the* State hospital j,,,, f|1^, ^ t4tf
i ana «» i»rwKrm»H»i tnvo-m-siy.
'   ,l. Cooper. *lf*» and family have ro-
ttirnwl to the   Hty   from   Bsnfchead.
^S58SHSSK5SRS.^^J
Judge lease Ci. Xorthcutt, of Trinidad, than whom there la probably
Is none better acquainted with lha
conditions in Huerfano and Lai Animas counties. n"i who Is now gen-
eral coun»*l ror tn* coal operators of
j Colorado, told in a npceeh at Lamar, j
HAPPY MOTHERHOOD _
,w^^tt^S^i^^l^»n»««o. in wt hew tbe political!
| titn t-*|w»1 to Iht cm,-.-.., wWle ht-r timM-if.-*
i *kxt*x*Jt neglect* tttt tmn tmtltlt.
It i* « duty td taUts-nd nr l-rirwt to see
! thst *b* fpitt thf pore trtf-dirinai wmrbdf
: i.in« in sk«a'» KtiHttiimi, which i* not
* drae or •tintnlitnt hot tmtmr*'* row
rrntntnloil-fiaat tonic tn curicfe and ee*
, I '....u'i.- t-.'.iA-.l^U.-.kitllwlAUw.ttvUmAUnt
i M t li« ipp«t!M>. I%«a»n« •vttyn.hwra
|-pm-^ff *;«*!•« r?-nttl«tnn far o*m'
|m*ik   *  iv.Tvm-H, Utu.1 -women; (l bitiMt
{   Ck* fkxxt'** -* ywtr aaMfw* drag -mtn.
t»airtli>s wild nwmlnst* ne man unless >
be were acceptable to the officials of
the Co-torad'O Tml a»d Iron Company,
tta ftenotmml th* polities! domination
nf ibis con»i«nv and told now tba
n!n«rs iter* driven to tht polls Wto!
so many tb**p t
A Federal irnnd Jwr nttthig H»f
Fuablo, Colorado, found. December t,|
Illl,   tbat     Manr   cawp   «ars»slsj
Kvery Friday
L*UdX*X*£   LOVEf
THE Omit OF MYSTERY
Friday, September 4th., Series Number Three
Saturday Matinee and Evening
A U¥t«i -Uirtwwi Spatial Ftaturf*
The Merchant of Venice
Itt four parta. A fltm rendition of Shafceapearo's Immortal man-
terptaea by Lola Weber. A BmalJey maaterplec*, with Lois Weber
n* Portitt, nnd Phillips ffmaltaf » Bbylork.   Ko advance In prions.
ijtnMfij^vu¥irii*<*i'*i'*ri*iii*iii* * -i-i" * *' '* " "'■"-■*■»'-'-n- «««««««*■«
wr(OM Xr-JL*«
Martt Walaamp an« Wm. Clifford In a 101 Bltnn Pirate Drnmt
Cast Adrift in the South Seas
One of tbo atria* taken In th* Universal Around tbo World
fmr lo Monololo. tl. I. Ricti la pietaraaw* atmosphere, dranatte
inddwu and hlslorlra) romance.
•tt WtONHOAV't ANO THURgOAri SPtCIAL
i    i9-9Bf-*ibt*t*ti, 'tilil-lr. .-,  ..
toJ&t     -
wn*Wkmw'm«, ■a &■*■"? ^,' ''*>«- -^-
"•.**..*. , -t i*      ( * ^»   i^'
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
PAGE FIVE   *
A
A
News  of The  District Camps
:w
♦ COAL CREEK NOTES
•The mines up here were Idle from
3 p. ni. Saturday until 3 p. m. .Monday;
also from 3 s. m. Tuesday until 3
j). m.' Wednesday.
The local 6 p/m. train was filled
to overflowing with Creekites journeying to' town to give a handshake and
Godspeed to the departing volunteers
on Friday evening.
Apropos of the public meeting called
edi Saturday last, re the school board
business: We regret the apathetic
feeling prevailing. Owing to the few
Attending, it was decided to postpone
the meeting until Wednesday, September 9th. AVe hope to see a large attendance on this occasion.
We regret being unable to give a
verbatim report of the speech delivered by our. old friend W. S. G. at the
recent wedding celebration.
Charlie Buhrer brought in some more
monsters of the deep, us a result of his
Where
prowess with the rod and line,
ii Vour cache?
'Miss Robinson of Victoria has taken
uP her duties as teacher in the pri-
n^ry department of the school here.
•John -McLetchie arrived back in
cfH-Up on Tuesday evening, having
b-sea sem back to await further instructions from the military authorities,
l^he Italian 'fmternity of this
c^p celebrated some of their home-
luncl festivities Sunday.
Tom Wilson, one of the .reservists,
who answered his country's call, returned to camp on Sunday, to await
further instructions.
Representatives of the Coal Creek
RtfSby football team were sent down
to meet representatives of Fernie to
jointly meet the committee ot the
C0*1 CreelcFernle band*, respecting an
apPeal from the band. It was decided
to hold a Rugby football game in the
city park, on Saturday, September
10th, kick-off at 5 o'clock. Tickets
for admission, 25 cents. Support a
gflOfl cause.
These are the days when evety man's loyalty to his
country is being tested. The mothe* land calls, aud the sons of
the Empire are rallying to her
t
Ready, Willing, Eager
to assist her.   From all the corned of the earth they hasten,
to stand shoulder to shoulder in he* defense,
ATTENTION!
There is in your midst (some °f you forget it) an institution founded for your benefit and protection. That institution
requires your ^whole-hearted support.
The Co-operative Store
relies on you for its existence. Be true to your own. On Saturday the 5th inst., give evidence of your loyalty and sperJt
your dollars at you own store.
The   Store   That   Belongs
to the People
Western Can, Co-Operative
TRADING 00. LIMITED
COLEMAN ALBERTA
'Mrs. John Manning returned, home
from hospital on Wednesday, feeling
much better, after treatment received.
A number of Frenchmen employed
up here have drawn their time, they
having volunteer for service in Europe.
The gymnasium pharaphernalia at
the club is receiving marked attention
from some of the members.
Mr. and iMrs. J. English and family
have left camp, to take up- their res.
idence in Fernie.
■Born—At the Nursing Home, Fernie,
on Tuesday morning, a daughter to
Mr. and IMrs. Robert Fairclough of
the Teepee boarding house.
Mrs. Townsend of Coyote street
was removed to Fernie hospital on
Sunday evening, to undergo medical
treatment.
Coal Creek Methodist Church
Sundfcy, September 6—2:30 p. m.',
Sunday school and Bible class; 3:30
P. m„ choir practice: 7:30 p. m. Gospel service. Subject, "Labor Conditions, Its Problems and Solutions."
Don't forget the Sunday school picnic to 'Morrissey on Monday next.
Time and prices will be published' on
depot notice board later.
The funeral of the 6-months-old baby
of IMr. and 'Mrs. G. Byron took
place on IMonday afternoon; Rev, Mr.
Stoodley officiating. The pallbrearers
were chosen from the Sunday school.
Our sympathies go to the parents,.
Mr. and iMrs. Towers, of Walla
Walla, Washington, were in camp last
week end, attending the wedding of
of 'Mr. and Mrs. J. Hall.
Owing to -Monday, September 7th,
being a general holiday, the monthly
examination for coal miners will be
held on Tuesday, September 8th, at
2:30, at the,-usual place, "No, 9 office."
All prospective candidates .please
note. -Application should be made to
Charlie O'Brien, secretary to boardi of
examiners, Coal Creek.
Wedding at Coal Creek
A very pretty wedding took place on
Riverside avenue on Thursday after-
noon, August 27th, at the home of Mr.
and Mrs*. Koppenhoeffer. The contracting parties were Mr. James Hall
of -Coyote street, and Miss Annie
Elizabeth Koi>_Benheoiter^_-T.he -Ijav...
■Perley of Fernie tied the nuptial
knot, assisted by Rev. Stoodley of
Coal Creek.   The happy couple   were
tablecloth; (Mrs. Young; bed spread
and china plates; iMr. and Mrs. Flattery, table cover; Mr. it. Sloan and
Miss J. Simpson, silver fruit bowl;
•Mr. J. Graham, silver fruit bowl; Mr.
and :Mrs. (McFegan, silver butter dish;
Mr. G. Glover, silver celery bowl; Mr.
and Mrs. iMcClury, cake plate and
cheese dish; iMr. and Mrs. Thornton,
MICHEL NOTES
The mines have only worked one
day since the notes were sent in last
week.
A dance was held in Crahan Hall
cut glass jug and sugar bowl; Mr. <ind*on Frl(ia->' la«t- in honor of John Cas
>Mrs. Hugale, sugar bowl and cream
jug, spoon holder and butter dish;
•Mrs. \V. .Richardson, trinket set; Mr.
and IMrs. France and Martha -H.
France, hand painted china and table
centres; M. F. Nee, bedspread; Mr.
and Mrs. Manson, silver butter dish;
Mr. and -Mrs. E. Moon, fruit bowl, wa.
ter jug and half dozen glasses; Mr.
J. O'Brien, rocking chair; IMr. aud
Mrs. Buchanan, lady's and gentleman's
rockers; IMrs. Worthington, table
cover.
A grand reception was held in the
Club Hall on Thursday evening, August 27th, when Mr. and Mrs. Hall
gave a grand dance to the invited
guests. The music for dancing was
supplied by Mr. A. Morrison, Mr. H.
Hewitt, /Mr. Cecil Coran.
Refreshments were supplied during
the evening. The festivities were kept
up until the small hours of the morning.
BELLEVUE   NOTES
INVICTUS SHOES
•/**'*.
Thii cut shows the exact style
of the Auto last, which U made
up in Box Calf and Oun Metal
Calf.
We al»o carry a Velour Calf
made up on the BIO BBN last,
which it a little wider than the
Auto, and ii made with a wid*,
low heel.
Tho ORESTO is a Buttoned
Kid, like the Auto last, in Oun
Metal Calf. AU these are the
latwt in men's fine shoos, and
will be mailed to any address in
Albert on receipt of price, 16.00
Ladies' & Children's Coats
For The Fall
WE HAVE OPENED OUT iHZ NEW PALL C0/VT8
The (all coats are now on view and are limply ch*rraing.
Tbey are from the Canada Cloak Company of Toronto, which
is a guarantee that they aro Uie last word in coat*.
&Mue *u mm me tk«ui.
II
W. L OUIMETTE
Coloman        .        Alberta |
assisted by iMlss Lily Hall as brides
maid, and Ceorge Young, as grooms-'.
man.   The ceremony terminated with
the time honored custom of confetti
throwing and the usual parental blessings.    After the wedding ceremony,
the Invited   guests,   who   numbered
200, sat down in relays to participate
In the consumption of the good things
provided for the inher   man,   which
were excellently served by a capable
staff of ladles.   Several speeches on
the welfare of the happy pair were delivered, and In the opinion of those
presont the,parents certainly spared
no pains or expense to give the people
a Rood   time,     The   newlyweds   received a large number of valuable and
useful presents, a list of which follows:    Mr. and Mrs. Koppenhoeffer,
cheque; Mr. and Mrs. Hall, oak side,
board;  Mr, and Mrs, Forsyth {Bank-
head), bedding; .Mr. and Mrs. Towers
(Walla Walla, Wash.), sliver knives,
forks and spoons; Mrs. Wilson, rocking chair; Mrs. Wm. Hall, pillow slips
and towels; -Mr, 0, Young and Mini L,
Hall, silver sugnr bowl and chert y
set; 'Miss 'Maggie Hall, silk sideboard
cover; Mr. J. Hewitt and Miss Tulloy,
oak table;  Mrs, II. Hewitt, heater:
Mr. and Mrs. Caufield, band embroidered bed spread ond pillow covers;
Miss M. Armstrong, silver cake stand;
.Mr. Syd. Saunders, silver butter tiitb:
Mr Walter Stevens,'silver knives ind
toxin: Mr. D. McGregor, table cloth;
Mm  Kd. Foster, bedspread;  Mr. and
Mrs. Morrison, silver sugar bowl and
im;  Mr, Walter Rldyard. comfo»ter
on J table cover; iMr. and Mrs. Mark
la ph. bedspread:   Mr.   and   Mrs.   I!,
Iilllabnroushi table   linen:   Mr,   nnd
Mm, K. J. Smith, tu-dtproart; Mr. mi.l
Mrs. G. Fearon. rug;    Mrs. Appleby,
sideboard eover;    Messrs.   Davidson
ami   Luxmore,   hand   painted   fruit
bowl; Mr. and Mrs. Parkell, clisr Jar;
'Mr. and Mrs. Knall**), enkn tlMv, Mr,
and Mrs. Dixon, bed linen;  Mr. and
'Mrs. Puckey, bod sheeta: Mr snd'Mr*
^T, Reed, water lots Mr.   and   Mrs.
Hughea, bed spreads; Mr, Jos. Pear*
eon, bedspread; Miss   D.   Newberry,
dolle.va and teaspoons;  Mr. and Mrs.
Joyce,' biscuit bowl;   Mr.   W.   .tones,
crockery;    M. C. llouhrer,   dressing
■mWo-   -Ovi-I     r»lr>|r     ti**tt     Tnm      "Ml-. •<•*>■>■
\bPlr*n exiA tork*'. Mr* Mltetietl, »nw-
els; (Mr. nnd Mr*, .T. Wldyard, plrnt
pot balder; M. S. Shaw, silver knives
and forks; Mr. M. 8. Oreenblll, orna-
me.ifal flower and frti't atnndt    Mr
1*   fYWrlen    fsnrv   r-wVo-M"   Mr    11
11 torn, towels and teaspoons; Mr. II.
.tones, wicker chair; Miss M, Series,
table requisites; Mr. II. Cartmell. ts-
bl* requisites; Mrs. M. Cartmell, table
cows; Miss A. Cartmtlt, pair of curtains;  Mr. and Mra. MnlKrew. rake
' It is with pleasure that we record
the following among the successful
candidates in the recent mining exam,
lnations: Edward iCoupIand and Jack
Roberts for pit boss; James Stevenson
fo superintendent.   Well done, boys.
..Mr. D. Roberts and1 'Mr. J. Shone
have gone on. a shooting expedition,
with the opening of the shooting season.
IMr. Boutry, of Burmis, is getting
out the foundation for a boarding
house between Mr. T. M. Burnett's
store and the Bellevue Hotel.
.Tickets for the Sunday school picnic
will be on hand at the depot on the
morning of the excursion.
—TheTievraTfrCook"ancl .MrTWTScbtt
reported the finny tribe very plentiful
on their .return from Daisy Creek.
I.Mr. Edgar Cole and a friend are out
visiting his brother's ranch at the
South Pork.
The regular meeting of the Local,
Xo. 431, was held on Sunday, with the
president in the chair, supported1 by
only, a moderate crowd.
Correspondence was received from'
A. J. Carter in reply to ours re certain
itenls of expenditure ln the last financial statement. .The explanation of
same was accepted as satisfactory,
A further circular was received
from the same source, stating tbat a
reliable bonding company had been secured which would handle bonds for
our officers, and as we have been waiting for some time to get our Local officers bonded, the executive were Instructed to get In., touch with said
bonding company as soon as possible.
The pit committee reported having
done no business ot an alarming character with the superintendent during
the lawt two weeks.
Owing to have no check-measuring
committee around this tlmo, much dissatisfaction was heard.
The meeting ended by Instructing
the pit committee to take up « Tew
trivial matters with the management.
Owing to a large quantity of rubbish collecting around the Local
union property, the secretary was Instructed to see about getting It fenced
off.
All employ* h of the Wii-st Canadian
sidy of the Trites-Wood store. John
boarded the westbound train on Saturday night, en route for Spokane, to
join his parents. We wish him prosperity wherever he goes.
Quite a number are indulging In
hunting, and a black bear was brought
in last week weighing nearly 300
pounds.
Bill Branch and Harry Ferryman are
out hunting. Bill says "I'm not comin'
back till I get something!"
John lllgginson aud Frank Pollitt
boarded the passenger on Thursday to
join their families at the -fruit lands,
Creston.
Several men, we understand, are
volunteering for service at the front,
but we are unable to give the exact
number and names until the next issue.
When the passenger train drew Into
the depot on Tuesday with French reservists aboard, patriotic airs were
rendered by the boys who were responding to their nation's call for"
duty. A good, hearty cheer was given
them as the train moved eastward.
The Agricultural Show committee
are very busy in making every preparation for the show on Monday. Although the season has been very dry,
there Is every probability of a large
number of splendid exhibits. We are
informed that a great unmber from
east and west are competing. The
tents, which have been provided by
the government, will be very accommodating, and everything .points to a
good show.
A dance and supper will be held in
Martin's Hall on Monday night.
;The sports will be held on .Monday
and Tuesday.
A baseball match took place on
Tuesday between Seniors and Juniors,
and a good game ended in favorof the
hospital with rheumatism is able to
leave that institution.
.There was milled in holy bonds of
matrimony on Saturday, August 29th,
in Blairmore, by the Rev. ,.\ir. Hunter,
Miss Annie /McLeod to Mr. John Mc-
Auly, both of Colemaii.
.Mrs. Pietso underwent an operation
in the Miners' hospital on Friday, the
2Sth.   She is progressing very nicely.
BEAVER MINES NOTES
On Tuesday of last week a very enjoyable evening was spent at the Lyric
Hall, .Beaver Mines, when what might
be termed a surprise party met to
make presentation to Mr. and Mrs.
Norman ..Morrison, who are about
to sever their connections witli this locality and return east. Mr.,Tom Moore,
merchant, occupied the chair, and in a
very appropriate speech remided those
present that they had met that night
to entertain as their guests Mr. and
Mrs. .Morrison, who ,were about to
leave them. During^'the three years
they had live-d'fy/dils locality they
were looked UjiM'-as valuable friends
and good citizens; all were sorry they
were leaving, but he hoped they would
soon return to live in our midst again.
Had it been generally known that the
presentation was about to be made,
the subscription list would have -been
much greater, but they preferred to
confine it to few friends. After other
speaker had added their testimony as
to the respect In which the guests of
the evening were held by all who
knew them, and expression of regrets
that they were leaving, the whole audience joined in wishing theni Godspeed.
The chair then handed over the
presents, which consisted of a Queen
Ann silver teapot and a set of gentleman's silver.mounted ebony brushes.
Mr. IMorrison suitably thanked tho audience on behalf of himself and wife.
He declared that the kindness shown
to them was much greater than they
deserved. They simply did their duty
as citizens  and tliey  both  regretted
Juniors by 21 to 5.
COLEMAN NOTES
■le>iyjng^ag_durm*g_tiieir-marrtpjl ik-qb j rii-agaiHg the—->?4s©
ihey had never lived in a place they
liked better than Beaver M-lnes, and
the handsome presents they had received that evening would always remind them of the many friends they
were leaving behind. A whist drive
next claimed the attention of the
company, and after an hour's friendly
combat, -Mrs.'-Xewhouse of the Beaver
Hotel, was declared the winner. The
floor was then cleared for dancing and
the merry party frisked the light fan.
tastic until 2 o'clock next morning.
During intervals, Harry Drew entertained the company with a few popular songs. .Mrs. Cameron ably presided at the pianu.
Mrs. Xewhouse, of the hotel, and
family are spending a few weeks' holiday visiting their relatives in Edmonton.
Mrs. Jim Loughran of Pincher Creek
and Mrs. Graham, Coleman, spent
most of last week at Beaver, as the
guests of IMr. and Mrs. Harry Drew.
The hotel changed porters last week
end, when Andrew started to. work
for Dominie Cyre, of the livery barn
on Monday, while Elmer Huff took his
place In the hotel as knight of the
boomsbank.
Jim McGuiness, an oldllmer here,
visited .Beaver last week, and we were
all pleased to see him looking so
well. In addition to renewing old acquaintances, Jim succeeded in making
at least one new friend. He left on
Monday for burmis. on his return'
trip to Drumheller, where he Is employed as engineer. We hope to see
you here again soon, Jim.
if a farmer has five daughters of
marriageable age, he can generally rely
upon getting some free help in bay
time. Lust week some of the boys, including Ed Joice, Jack MrDonald, Ed
•Moore and others gave free exhibitions
of their skill in the art of hay making
on a ranch not far from Beaver. The
competition between the Eds was very
keen, but the referee has not yet decided' who won.
The regular meeting of this Local
will take place in the Lyric Hall next
Sunday, the 6th inst., at 3 p. m. As
some of the District officials are ex.
pec-ted. all members are requested to
attend.
(Continued 00 I*affc Pour)
The judge was summing up.
"The evidence," he explained.
ad-
"too-«air~
"shows that you threw a brick at the
complainant."
"And his face shows more than that,
yer honor." interrupted the prisoner.
"It shows that I 'it 'imi"
In consequence of two ot Coleman's
town councillors resigning and 1 being
disqualified, a bye-election was necessitated, which will take place on September 4th. The following gentlemen
have been nominated to fill the positions: Mr, Toney Pondellck, Steve
Leosld, .Mr. George Ritchie, Mr. Harry
Clark, IMr. William Evane^ Mr. Michael
Brennen and air. H, C. McBurney.
The stork paid a visit to the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Angelo and left a
son. .Mother and child both doing
well.
After the meeting on Wednesday of
the Coleman Local Orange Order, N'o.
18!),1. was finished, the retiring \V. M„
the Hev. Watkins Jones, who is leaving Colomnn In n few days for McLeod, was presented with 11 handsome
present from the members of the order. Arter the presentation, a pleas- j
ant little social took place, nnd 11 very I
enjoyable evening was spent.
During the time the Hev. Jones has
beon In Coleman he bus made quite a
host of frlonds In the town. The
members of his congregation and the
members of tlm order with which he *
ls associated roKi-et his departure j
rrom among them, j
On Saturday, tho 20th. Frank and
Coloman football teams met In the *
t'nilun cujj coiupi-iiUoii, Ahun -,'oU,-,
Cottipany who are called or volunteer j man were defeated by 'hn scorn of j
lo go to the front are assured thnt on j« to 1. From tin* outset F^nli tonh j
their return they will be given a Job Ithe game In hand. Tin- cup holders
equal to the one they left, and lliati were not playing up to th» iihiiii! st.-Mil* I
during their absence their wives will iard, tmpeclally their ««*l k-A-in-,\
be allowed to live rent free, and will | iMrusnnt, who should Imve smc-l   at;
Tiie j
only'
w#»re
Stephen T.  Humble
Furniture, Hardware, China,
Stationery, etc.
OLD COUNTRY PERIODICALS
BELLEVUE
Alberta
H. C. GOODBYE CO. Ltd.
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnish your house from cellar to garret and at bottom prices. Call, write, phone or wire,   All orders given
prompt attention.
If you nrt satisfied, tall othara.   If not satisfied, tall ua.
Coleman
Alberta
IfiitMt four of th* nix    aeiired.
j bucks mid lialf.backa were   very
(.ti'iuly, and of the forward*
j Muir, Kellock nml itcdtliugtou
, ,il.ty:.iu  tli<lr   iuuiiI   kiiih>     Till*  tie-
'fat  -a 11! <!o ("uii iii;iji ,i   -A bul.   lot  of
'u-sni) nml ulll create s Ilttli' wliniilu*
uiti'itifr tin- rluliJ  In Mtn fiii-i1 fnr t'i***
be supplied with an ttbundiuioi   or
fuel.   It is pleniuint to note that   nt
li'iint out' company    will   contrlbuti*
tlioir quota uiul not eudt'Mvor to fatten
on the need* of thc worker*.
This mlnf In working fairly «t«<a«ly,
and many new f»c«m itr*» to be ween
11 round.
I    The officliiU iiinl the hiiiilimf crewM'beautlftil trophy.
J of this iitlue arc   fuelitijj   »mu<-what',    o.ieimni fontlmli club eiigagf    Un*
proud    of    tlHiiUK«lve«    *Uif*>    they ;«||.roiu|itt*riiiK <'»ll|e« of t*thbrid»e 011
a-t'lileved   tile   distinction   ot   Ke-ting j httbor ittty iv I.ethhHdRe In it friendly
over H.iMie torn* of an output In one j jrume,   Coleninn will have to net Into
da), which, we believe, will roiinUtiiteiioniAwtiat belter Htui|te lo make nny
<i wennl tttr t-hn fiB-r '   , ''    ' '
Mr Kd LltWland, who b** tifen ott'
work for nomo months, and had mart
!&
F. M. THOMPSON CO.
'•Th* Qusuity Store"
Phone 25 Blairmore, Alta.
T. W. DAVIES
■     ■>!>.   -^i
Funeral Director
and    Imfr aimer
Headstones 8uppMed and Set up
COLIMAN    wapwtJBflST %«    ALB1RTA
ed to work sunlit at a light Job, tin-
toruiiiHml) hod to mve it up axain. be-
inif totally unfit for any kind of work,*
•».- ,i„*i <*itn.1,iv l» T.-ihf.p 8iin.t.n
throughout the whole of llie Method-
itt -rh-ur-f-h, the Rev. Mr, Cook wlshea
It io be hiiiio.uk < .1 thnt lie will, to
the best of li** Mbllity, preach hii up.
preprint•• sermon, »n<t sugReit* llul
n» he in naw Ih our midit, it will he
.in opportune time tor Hie workers ol
■ \-ltt   Xnbl*. Xl'ftt, 1,1   *■;.. ,.1,**tit,i.t \\*    tit
tit the In*!  rejrutiir iiKW'ttnjt of t.neii|
Itoynl Oranae Lodge In pluee of Itev.
Jones, who la leaving the district.
XI. .1, Seott, mn»ter meehaiile at tbt*i
1,    I       ... U      .        ! ... .*.<.,.'
d»> iiiKht for Parry Hound, Mr. *H|-olt j
left on reettipt nf a meftMiie »utlti|t,
thnt Mrs. Scott bad met with a xlitht |
As reported in la*t «eek'» Ledifer. |
the Order of Owln" evmnilon to the !
I'm*** Seat l«k«' <»n l«.ilwi Hay. Hei*-.
• tember Tth, wtll tnki i.l>re A ernMd''
S program hat- Vcn ;irr,i'ii'<-.l   '!-•• f<>! :
* lowing la a list of evem*.    Hoi's r»>»
tunder 7 yearn t
and »Mr», Workman, rut rIsi* vase;»" hi .\'er.d to m ties K>m«? priviie >« '■,■*<■*; hoya* Iwi-fc
Mr. and Mra, W. Ha-sd. cushion: Mr. <»« <li»i bi* iired«ee«*-f.r.   Thirl* mi .rneo, nnttnr 1 y**'
i. Aieeie, surety raior aot: Mrs.   II i me*, however, will be ton nhori f-»H raw: ttrln* hue).
■Altani, taM* wntra; Mr. tnd Mrs. J.;«- to »n a rniwt -anrti'Mandinu of;Hed l»dk»* rao.
tome, ««Mot totr-Mr. mt Mn, Albor*  ! !- rmimittmi of Idtwr, Wind ttoia rate:
ton, table cow; Mr. F, Young, pillow ,    (Mlfbratlous mete tlie order of the glrla* slrtppltm event
illpe; Mr. JT. CotftiM and MIm Nee, day In one nomok of this borf on ton fa tl coat*.
romfortar: <Mr. snd  Mw. 3. Wood, ianday Blffct. t   Mr. IS. Bwotl, who waa confined to
Just to hand 200 cases oj
PRESERVING FRUIT
of Cxtra Oholo* Quality
l'aliun Prune/* |»ei lx»v 81.Ml. Peiielie* *jht Imix 81.10
|Vni>» per Ih»\ 8-.*»". < uokinj,.' Apple* |iei' Itox 81 ,"><»
Clioiee Kiitinji Apple* per l>n\ -#1..*i0
jdi»h;  Mr. and Mrs. Wawon, pair ufi
]blankets* Mr. and Mra, HoWey. water' 'h'* town to torn* and tiear'hltn pn
ott', «Mr. and Mr* farhhlll, teapot;; n-m H
-Mr. and Mra. Parker, eight-day elork; j Lnhor
Mr. and Mra. Leland. Wtopwad; Tlr., n-- <■•'■••>
view* f».i ihe «r"«l iw*'!<M',,i
We et re* wl»h ,• m, ssid have <
i ;h«(   on   *lii»   urrnaUiu    '.te',
inn
...     i
H.t (■'•■■'■
iemi>.'d
*   n.i
i-k
!'»«•»■.
sir!*'
V'*1
■'*,." i
rlir-r-e-
•**et.M
!,       U
ft*.
r.u-e
:   nur-
Ui;
:f *■■!*
,.!ul
Kent*'
'15'**
' ^nieker
rare;
I
Tii.-
return iiii*
DRY GOODS
Before Iniying ft Sweater Coat *ee om- raiiye of
MenV IjicHnK'uwl f1iiMn»tV>ilhv<»M!MnH'trf*h Knit.
Priei-* iu Mint till ptn>»>.*..
Ul**!   to   luill'l   n   i-iaipiiifiil
Wool t'ntlerwfvir in *liiH* ami
*nit».      Mm n full rwij»*...( K.-iilie*.
UwltM'wenr.
"I Sianlie|«l>  | hi re
ilrawen* mnl union
find Children'*
We pay 5 p.c. discount in cash on all purchases
Tlie Store That SAVES You Money "■^•iit1^ jt. -y la'gfiB-W^gi
* '"* --     '.-*.-■'•' ^ ** '-?jfl-*S--A:*lAi*-i(S ^t-y S^ijW'Jif:i)--.ri*%*'-i'"' .*"•>
3S!K3p«SS»&»i
^^¥^ff^!W^Mmm^XW:
/
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B, C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
Local Union Directory, Dist; 18,0.M.W.A
A
n
i
GLADSTONE LOCAL
• No. 2314
Maet first and third Frldajs,
Miners' HaU, Fernie; second and
fourth Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
Cieek. Sick Benefit attached,—T.
Uphill. Sec, Fernie, B. C.
HOSMER LOCAL
No. 2497
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 In K.
P. Hall, Main Street.    Sick Benefit Society attached.—W. Balderstone, Sec, Box €3, Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334''
Meet every Sunday afternoon
at 2 o'clock in Crahan's Hall.
Sick Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer, Sec.
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet  every Sunday.   Sick and
Accident  Benefit Society attached.—Michael   Warren,  Sec,  Can-
more, Alta.
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
Meet second ana fourth Sunday
in month. Sick and Benefit Society attached.—Thos. Thompson.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 j).m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Mitchell, Sec, Box
105, Coleman.
BANK-HEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock in the Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
'Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
COLEMAN LOCAL
.No, 2633
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 Sj.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec.
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. 2352 ^
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak HaU. Stck Benefit Society attached,—Thos. G. Harries,
Sec, Passburg, Alta.
Socialist" Advocate
■
oj Plutocracy
By William English Walling
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
.Meet every second and fourth
Sunday oOeach month at 10 a.m.
in School House, Burmis. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet avevy Friday evening at
7.30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barringham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. in
Union Hall. Maple Leaf. Xo Sick
Society.—Thos.  G.  Harries,  Sec.
PaR.sburg, Alta.
 i
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' Hall, 12th Avenue North.—h, Moore, Sec-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
in the Socialist Hall. — James
Burke, Sec, Box 30, Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sunday at 2
o'clock In the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Kims, Sec, Corbin, B, C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter, Sec.
FRANK LOCAL
No. 1263
Meet Sundays, after each pay
day, at -Miners Hall.   Sick and
•Benefit    Society    attached.—B
Morgan, Secretary.
■*\tii\tii-\tra'itfatffi?^iffi
EljMSiaiHIS^
Cash Meat Market
■H. G. Wells' latest book is .published
under two titles. In America it is called "Social Forces in England and
America," in Great Britain "An Englishman Looks at His World." The
American title describes the subject;
the English title, the point of view.
There is no other Englishman that
could"be so well trusted to give us an
interpretation of English progressiva
ism; for no one else holds the balance
so even between Socialism and the
New Liberalism. Wells still calls himself a Socialist, though in several passages he definitely takes his stand
with the Xew Liberalism, As to bbth
movements, he speaks at once as a
sympathetic insider and as a thoroughly Independent critic.
■Bold but careful generalization—
this is the quality that attracts t so
many serious readers to Wells. Some
of the generalities of the new book are
to the highest degree stimulating and
valuable. For example, it is generally agreed that one of the greatest
curses of our times is over-specialization. Weils'points out that, after all,
our greatest achievements are not due
to the mere specialist:
The trained man, the specialized
man, is the most unfortunate of men;
the world leaves him behind, and be
has lost his power of overtaking it.
Change of function, arrest of specialization by innovations in method and
appliance, progress by the infringement of professional boundaries and
the defiances of rule; these are the
commonplaces of our time.
Ours is undoubtedly an age, Wells
agrees, where everything makes for*.
"wider and wider co-operation." iThls,
however, does not mean that the people are being more specialized to do
one particular thing, but only that they
must bring a highly developed,intelligence to each special problem. The
work must be specialized but not the
person. The revolutionary effect of
this principle on all our thinking and
living can hardly be stated in a few
words, and Wells, as usual, makes no
attempt to give us its full significance,
but leaves the fruitful suggestion no1
work itself out in other minds.
It seems that Wells' is, iirone sense,
a thorough revolutionary.   Inspired ob-
PUSASE REMEMBER
That our prices have not changed. Everything of
the best. Fresh awl smoked Fish always on hand.
Our Bologna, Weenies and Sausages are made on
our premises.     A Trial solicited.
"fa
I
Opposite the Post Office
Phone 52, R Northwood Mgr.
To Sports Committees
The Fernie Coal Creek Excelsior Band is now
open for engagements.  Satisfaction guaranteed
For Terras Etc!. Apply
THOS. BIGGS, Secretary,   Fernie, B. C.
mLtmssmrnmimmwi
A few weeks1 rest from Business at
Glacier Park or the Coast
will glvo you a new hue of life, or to those whose time in llm-
nud, wko quUikbui, mule t<a*»i nr w«»t, via the (iron Northern
Railway Co.
23 Hours Fernie to Seattle
26 Hours to Victoria
29 Hours to Vancouver
Direct connection! at Rexford for Eatt & Weit
You will enjoy ell the comfort of moat modern railroad equip*
ment. Courteous and effluent employe* will make your trip
pleasant,
•tiers pureheslng steamship tlekste, Itt ut talk It ovtr.
fnr further information apply to
J. A. MANN, AGENT
FERNIE, B.C,      Pkan*-In, 191
&£
*i\
P. O. Bmi 4tl
«f?
vl6usly^5FTCeTTgTBlnITTliarafe~done"
In our time, he believes that no social
change that is physically practicable is
too big for us to undertake. He regrets that "no community has ever
yet had the will and the imagination
| to recast and radically alter its social
methods as a whole." For "some
things there are that cannot be done
by small adjustments. , . . You
have to decide upon a certain course
on such occasions and maintain a
continuous movement."
The revolution that Wells has In
mind is not the Socialist revolution,
not the abolition of classes; but one
that Is to put society on a basis ot
maximum efficiency. We are to determine "under what conditions a
man works best, does most work,
works more happily." Xo doubt this
revolution also would untimately re-
ijulro the complete -abolition of
classes. Hut Wells givea us no rea-
son why we should not work consciously towards this larger goal, at
tho same time that we are aiming at
efficiency.
it is true that Wells attache* Importance to revolutionary movements
in the ordinary sense of the terra,
that Is, to movements from below, but
he seems to give far greater weight
to more or less ..philanthropic movements from above:
"Contemporary events, phenomena
of recent strike*, the phenomena of
sabotage carry out the suggestion
that in a community where nearly ever)'out fw.idi t-XUli*-,u,*^,. U'^liiU
about, sees the charm and variety In
th" !'vi * of |»rosjH»ra<M mid lii'-snrely
people, no class Is going to submit permanently to modern labor condition*
without extreme resUunce, ci«u after
the most elaborate labor conciliation
schemes nnd social minima «re estab-
imbued with this spirit could fail to
bring us backNjto something of value
from his imaginary incursions into the
future.
.Wells conception of Sociology is
equally inspired, and by sociology he
really means che science of Socialism
—in so far as Socialism can be made
a science;
"Sociology must be neither art simply, nor science in the narrow meaning
of the word at all, but knowledge
rendered imaginatively, and with an
element of personality; that is to say,
in theh ighest sense of the term, literature.
"The writing of great history (or sociology) is entirely analogous to fine
portraiture, in which fact is indeed
material, but material entirely- subordinate to vision. . . . There is
no such thing in sociology as dispassionately considering what is,
without considering what Is Intended
to be. In sociology, beyond any possibility of evasion, ideas are facte."
The last sentence does not seem accurately lo express Wells' point. His
use of the word "ideas" seems to carry
us back to the pre-seientific "ideology"; but It is clear from the passage
that what he means is that intentions
are facts. Indeed he leaves no doubt
as to this, when, a few lines below, he
points out that the important thing ls
for us to systematize our intentions:
I think, in fact, that the creation of
Utopias—and their exhaustive criticism—is the' proper and distinctive
method of sociology.
Equally valuable with Wells' constructive suggestions are his criticisms
of English politics. Though long a
member of the Fabian Society, he entirely disagrees with its passion for
social reconstruction and "efficiency"
without any adequate consideration of
what kind of society is really most to
be desired. iHis criticisms of Fabianism In "The New Machiavelli" and
elsewhere are well known; his anayl-
sis in the new book is even masterly,
and it applies to Socialistic reformers
all over the world:
"Oife hears nowadays a vast amount
of chatter about efficiency—that magic
word—and social organization, and
there is no doubt a huge expenditure
\ of energy upon these things and a
widespread desire to rush ahnut_and
"I have never -believed that a Socialist party could hope to form a government in this country in my lifetime; I
believe it less now than ever I. did. I
don't kiiow if any of my Fabian coll
leagues entertain so remarkable a
hope. But if they do not, then they
must contemplate a working political
combination' between the Socialist
members in Parliament and just that
non-capitalist section of the .Liberal
Party for which Chesterton and Belloc
speak. Perpetual opposition is a dishonorable aim in politics.'*- ' •
.Possibly the Socialists may not be
able to form a Government in Great
Britain within the twenty, years of
active life that probably remain to
Wells, but It does not follow that they
may not be able to do a far more
constructive and creative piece of
work -by remaining in opposition.
What Wells does in this paragraph, is
practically to abandon organized opposition to the present form of society, although he expresses a radical
disbelief iu it. Yet history is full of
examples where a militant, yet intelligent, and fairminded opposition has
accomplished far inore than any participation in government could possibly
have done.
Having abandoned the hope of effective political opposition, Wells proceeds to abandon other fundamental
points of the Socialist position. If
mere opposition is undesirable, then
a class war is Indeed "irreparable,"
and a revolution from below would
mean "social destruction." So Wells
concludes, and then proceeds to adopt
the whole ruling-class view. Ho
writes:
The workingman of the new generation is full of distrust, the most demoralizing of social influences.
"There is only one w^ay in Which nur
present drift toward revolution or
revolutionary disorder can be arrested, and that ls by restoring the
confidence of these alienated millions,
who visibly now are chafing from
loyalty to the Crown, from a simple
patriotism, from habitual industry."   .
At this point we might be reading
any Tory reaictionary or Imperialist,
tholigh It Is certain that Wells is neither the one nor the other.
Far from advocating a class struggle, Wells definitely places all his
hopes in the ruling classes, and a
larger part of his hopes in the millionaire philanthropists:
"What we prosperous people, who
have nearly all the good things of life
and most of the opportunity, liave to
do now is to justify ourselves.
m
Lone Foe of War
make showy and startling changes. But
It does not follow that this involves
progress if the enterprise itself is
dully conceived, and most of it does
seem to me to be dully conceived, in
the absence of penetrating criticism,
any impudent industrious person may
set as an "expert," organize and- direct the confused good intentions at
large, and muddle disastrously with
the problem ln hand. The "expert"
quack nnd the bureaucratic Intriguer
increase and multiply in a dull-minded,
uncritical, strenuous period as disease
germs multiply in darkness and
heat."
Having annihilated the very foundations of Fabianism, Wells proceeds to
an equally destructive criticism of Its
anti-revolutionary methods;
"The Fabians, appalled at the oh-
vlous difficulties of honest confiscation and an open transfer from private to public hands, conceived the
extraordinary Idea of filching property for the State,"
His Illustrations nre both apt and
iimiiHlne;
"What to dD with tho pariah dogs of
Constantinople, what to do with the
tramps who sleep in the London parks,
how to orgnnlio a soup kitchen or a
Bible toffee van, how to prevent Ignorant people, who have nothing else to
do, Retting drunk In beer homes, are
no doubt serious question for the prac
Hen! administrator, question* of primary Importance to the politician; but
they have no more to do with sociology
limn Uie erection of a temporary hospital after the collision of two trains
has tu do -Allii railway tuigineerilig."
As n further illustration of the
VMbi method*, Wells points to tbelr
tnd Ich on the question of mothers'
pensions or th» endowment of mother-
hood,   In the first place he accuses
j Halted.   Things   w>   altogether   too! the Fabians of havlnir failed to make
| stimulating to the Imagination nowa- any b\e imaginative appeal for this
j,!tty"" i»»•* Idea, and or presenting It "with a
*    It Is the better  intellectual    and M>n of mlntmlsina fnrtlveneai as   a
' physical communication of our time \ mtm little extension of outdoor   re-
that Is the b,x*h ot   such   faith as tier." liut worse still, the Fabians am I **** *" ,he,r ,,VN *° th» P'nch <* •»«»
Wells li»« In Hie popular   mnvtmeut •■,i/*fn oppoPtd, WV5U points out, to this? """•wplatlag a -wisI reorganisation
[The treat levellers, as he point* out,hyp* of reform:
are ihe newspapere and schools. andj   'Theendowment of motherhood does
*~fWilere~and~owner8 must be prepared
to make themselves and display themselves wise, capable and heroic—beyond any aristocratic precedent. The
alternative, 'if it is an alternative, >b
resignation—to the Social Democracy.
"Social Democracy is thus the last
of all horrors."'
"We" must put an end to any "social Indiscipline," "we" must "restore
class confidence." The new generation
of workers must be taught to believe
in "the ability and good faith of the
property owning, ruling and directing
class." The cry, he boldly states,
must be not so much "Wake up England," as "Wake up Gentlemen." Class
consciousness of labor ts a very bad
thing, but "class consciousness of the
aristocracy of wealth" Is indispensable:
"It Is to the Independent people of
some leisure and resource In the community that one has at last to appeal
for such large efforts and understandings as our present situation demands,"
The most frightful alternative that
Wells can think of, "the end of all
things" to use -an expression used by
Lord Kosebery In the SRme connection,
would be—Socialism.
"If we. who have at least some experience of affairs, who own property,
manage business, and discuss and Influence public organisation, It we are
uot prepared to undertake this work of
discipline and adaptation' for ourselves, then a time ts not far distant
ivht-u la»uim*Uouiu>' loadwu, «alilii§
themselves Socialists ot Syndicalists,
or what not, mon with none of our ex-
pertence, little of our knowledge and
tar less hope of success, will take the
rhk out of our hand*."
And In order to secure the benevolent Intervention ot the ruling classes,
the labor thinker "haa to realise
rather more generously than he haa
done so far, the enormous moral difficulty there Is In bringing people who
have been prosperous and at an advaa-
(Continued from Page Three)
There is no American workingman
who now finds is easier to -make7 a
living because of -the generally improved conditions brought about by
| the war with the Philippines, General
conditions have not been improved.
They have been made worse to the extent that the cost of the war ds a'
burden on industry. If the working
class interests had been consulted, the
war never would have been waged.
No working class interest was involved. The workers, had everything to
lose, including life, by going to the
front and nothing to gain. But they
"followed the flag"—and slme of them
never caftie back. They stayed—six
feet under ground—that the Tobacco
Trust, the Timber Trust, and many
other great capitalist' interests might
stay on the islands above ground. '
Look wherever you wdll, you cannot find a working class interest that
should or could cause workingmen to
slaughter each other. Nor is the
situation new, It Is as old as war
itself. It Is a fact that men of sense
and honesty have always recognized
what Tacitus said:
"Gold and power are the chief
causes of war."
Dryden, the poet, said: "War seldom
enters but where wealth allures."
Aud Carlyle, In this striking fashion,
showed the utter absence of working
class Interest in war.
"To my own knowledge, for example, there dwell and toil in the British
village of Dumrudge, usually some five
hundred souls. From these, by certain 'natural enemies' of the French,
there are successively selected .during
the French war, say, thirty able-
bodied men. Dumrudge, at her own
expense, has suckled aud nursed them.
She has not, without difficulty and
sorrow, fed them up to manhood and
even trained them up "to crafts, so
that one can weave, another hammer,
and the weakest can stand under some
thirty stone, avoirdupois.
"Nevertheless, amid much weeping
aud swearing, they are selected, all
dressed In red and shipped away, at
public expense, some two thousand
miles, or say, only to the south of
Spain, and fed there till wanted.
—^tid-nowrto^he-^aTnBTpoT'fffTn'e'
They lived far enough apart; ware thc*-
entir-est stranger; nay,,in so wide a
universe, there was even, unconsciously, by commerce .some mutual helpfulness 'between them.,
"How, then?   ,, • ..   \
"Sjmpleton! Their Governors had
fallen out, -and, instead of shootingion^
another) had these poor blockheads.
shoot."
That is the cause of war between nations—"the Governors fall out." And.
who are the Governors? Nobody but
the representatives of the ruling class,
wh9 clash in their race for plunder
and deceive workingmen into doing,
their fighting for them.
Now, let us go back a bit, You may
recall that I said that the ruling capitalist class uses government as a t\vo-
handed claw with which to pull golden
chestnuts ou-l ot the fire. One hand
to this claw is the power to make and
enforce laws. The other hand—the
■liower to wage war—is used to grab
what cannot be grabbed with Iuw>-.
Wars between nations illustrate one
not give. Here is another:
form of effort to get what laws ean-
The United States is dotted with
;forts, arsenals and armories. Far in
the interior, where, by the widest
stretch of> imagination, no foreign
army could come, we see, these grim
reminders and prognosticates of war.
Under the Dick Military Law, the,
Presideot of the United States, without further legislation, can compel every man in the United States between*
the ages of 18 and 45 years, to enlist
labile militia of his States and serve
under the orders of the 'President of
the United States. The President,
therefore, has it iu his power at any
time to raise an army of about 12,-
000,000 men and place them in the
field.
What for? To fight a foreign foe?"
Not much. The Constitution of the
United States forbids the President,
to make war against a foreign nation
without tiie explicit authorization of
Congress. But the Dick Law authorizes the President to raise this enormous army and to oommani it.
Here is the question. At whom is
this enormous potential army aimed?
Why is the land strewn with arsenals
and armories that could be of little
south of Spain, are sent thirty similar
French artisans—ln like manner wending their ways, till at fength, after infinite effort, the two parties como into actual juxtaposition, and thirty
stand facing thirty, oach with a* guiv
in his hand. Straightway the order
'Fire!" is given, and thoy blow the
souls out of one another; and, in the
place of sixty brisk, useful craftsmen,
the world has sixty dead carcasses,
which it must bury and anew ahed
tears for.
"Had these men uny quarrel?  Busy
as the devil is.   not   the   smallest!
oFnb servieeln~a"Tbreigii war? ~~—
-To quote a word from Carlyl*^T"Slm-
pleton," do you not know that all of
these arrangements are made to shoot
you if the capitalst class should ever
decide that you should be shot? Nor;
have you never noticed against whom
the State militia* is invariably used?
If you have noticed none of these
things, perhaps It would be well for
you to wake up. The militia of the
States is practically never used except to beat down workingmen who
have revolted against the outrageous
wrongs heaped upon thom by their
employers.
KING'S HOTEL
Bar supplied witli tbo beet Winea,
Liquor* and Cigar*
DININO ROOM  IN COKNRCnON
<    The
not attract the hureaueralle type of
reformer twenune it offers a minimum
ehanee of meddlesome Interference
with people's llvw.  Then woald Mi
the fact ihat even the common la!K>r»r
move* fr-ffly mbmit the -enrth the«#»
days,
liesidet having n certain measure of
tr,*tt,     »„     »*»...      ^ir.rttr       *tf, ** ,.' * *
     , „.   „ . .    .  ev1de«r,.«  *tmt  }**  1*  nnmen.fflMe'nitA  r^.V*!,^    Vv.-.1.aOu'J    IvjJ    *J'J.w   f*>w
no** «*» fattH..fat tofeJ . »«iJ«.I! *<H,"l,,«t "'• m«r* met**?, whleh he compulsions oc th* streiifth of It."
none ent bn>««bt before a magistrate,ciIIi tht Qrml Bttttf .„ Mm« „(   IMm(|   |f ^ Umtf M1m ^
| State at all." jPabUa opposition to thlf reform tbat
Ing an officer. !
that may minimise or destroy their
precedent*," An "enormous moral
difficulty." lodeedt
And when Wells speaks of rwllni
ekiasas, he does not mean the professions! middle classes, "tbo social aen-
DO you ever consider
the importance of
oo the use of stationery
that is in harmony with
the nature of your business ? In many cases
your letterhead is considered as an index of
your business character,
hence the necessity of a
good printer.
00
in
W.illU,
fm
Civilisation U a great derelver, A
year ago it bad Moralists organfattg
boy eewsta wHter xm «Maa tint tbey
mote tal • war ted?, ttew thoy arw
btfgf cited In wnr tartlet,
ehtrgc-d. «lth the crime of Smiwraonat*\state at all"
For the   work   of   Utoplabulldlngj Welta lately resigned from the society.
I WVHl    l"ie       1    ■«'>»*n*"it       r.«r..»l....-    I.1-... .
. ..        . .     -....' • ' '" '"-•*    •" ***** at* mttmm*** -wwkMM-tfw-*-** worn*
and It must be admitted that he staHai»i«r. whether Wtlta himself Is • 9b*
.iv* **. am, ,   fertMMk Um
magistrate
"1 am Innocent," replied the man.
"Wbat did he do?" asked the mug.
Itt rate.
ont on this bail to the right spirit, aad
at flrat gtret ererr promise that he
will  reach big conelnttona   Por et-
j ample. In writing or the future  of
"What did he dor exclaimed   the' **• *»*•'• he dlaplays tbe very attltode
cUlltt. Hit attltede of eymiMthy tor
the New Uberellsm Is In Itself oom-
prehemlble   and   rstlonsl.   but   kt
doom* Poriellam rm ttm emrnt thit
policeman, hatghtUj*-, who had k^ttlf "to4J,*ll'apte!'Itat J* moti «**«H»t tttttro eo prenyl potter tor W
m* xtt a wntim wouW uot U oJ,»£J^]£*?*?* " 'T'i   "''
ed, Why. bt tape* tbm time, .tl! 9otW^' ** ** IWw* «"""»«• X4bemlism~4d«««,«f «o«t«t.lwftr
■Tl^Tli    \!T 1Um*«\*eeefo.«tretmtttm te  w«W  of to a w way to the imHUetl pwty whltfc
tne <Jqot oi a peb m say tmst, and ] wasted opportaalUet ard latent bean, makee tbla profsaelon li etawtialfy
when the landlord ekoratf the bear owl t ttot trattl a ttwasasd mw ways of tw. aaU-U-adiUotaitaej; itt tetdtney It It
thnrncb (be half etotM dew be xooik \'»« •»*■ lo *•■ •** **»*»■ We art csnmMI tor total any toetlttfle* «r belt *mi tinn* ft, Tftatl wUt U Ml" S!LlM7tJL ^LSLT!!!. *1* '!** "? '**' * hf"n**f *"nw ,f   n *
ihU ttm, WMmwm .m tmm^^mm t^ ^ mtma tm nt cwiom, against  the tbe Matter tad aatamitt of tM tbt
AmM m men et Urgbi.r tkt cut mnbttebod,   tbe  dimmed, and  df ««MMits « tis tw*
wnn dt.tult.ed.~Ex. ftMirt."  It it hard tt stt ho- own
- - # >  » * .  ■» ;mmtt *****  «* 0-■*#*»*-tiX-g tmt I
wbtm thfrt* v*i^ Iif  trmrY  tn;™     '
hope, bnt the capitalists themselves,
Oorcrament offietalt. and aetMl nU
tn.   Ht tvtn plaeet sptclal eotfl.
dttet in  tht raultl-mllltonalre:   "A
*rv*t«    bfitxi'   *«♦.■•**■    tut*-..**     ■ ** *    .< .  *
a      ■   *-  •    ',4   ><#* **■■**■    *dk.*   tb-Wdp  %mbt*
tkt lather of • dtfilsttlo*." Now
tkt Caruegles and Rockefellers are
the rsalariatoerata, A few years ago.
It will bt recalled, Wells' chief kept
seems it carry It to t point of tban-1fw America toy to * benevolent pit-
f tocraey under Rooeerelt  Ht says:
j   "Tbe mot* kop-efti tad pfobtMt Itot
J Of development >■ me In wblch a em-
a-rtets and powerf*1, if Informal, arts-
toway will play a large party,    ft
auy, Itdetd, new ktvt aay of tkt
ttftwart forms of triatoctMy at aay
deftaHe    psMIe   iwcoctttftaa.     Tit
Aaeerleaae are as ebnrr et the emmet
{•Id lit kaowa arletoeraUe UUtt nn
Ibe ffcrnmns were or tke word King.
tbe
fixed tad ancient valatt aad hanr*
If you want really high
class printing-the kind
we always produce-try
us with your next order
ss
Its District Ledger
"QUALlfY" PRINTERS
Phone 48a    x    Fernie, B. C.
mMM*-*-*-*---------------*----**-----------^^ hMnHMMSsm
i !
f&*i,t\&m*tni« emm^
^^jgs^ygg|j£j
J^yjL PffypM ■'2. sL7*V ^"l:'*"'!-3liIl-,.3
ft-'-
/01
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
Tlie
Original
and
Only
Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
Minards
Liniment
Passburg
Hotel
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Feniie-Fort Steele
Brewing Co,, Ltd.
Beer
and
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross Brothers EE2M
StraSne re'Ci se godijo v Evropi.
Dvajset do petindvajset' millonov mo2
—mladih, v najlepSi dobi in zadravih
—strelja drug na drugega, zaletava Be,
;drug v drugega in preii, kako bi drug
drugega ubil, predrl,' zakSal—spr&vil
ob Sivljenje. s
■ Evropski, proletariat,' -cvet mos-
kega prebiv-atetva, kateri bi'imel zap-
loditi in zaroditi novo, Cvrsto in
zdravo generacijo—skrbeti za kruh,
polnlti Jitnice, produciratr ostale pot-
rebStine -in graditt napredek eiovestva
—drvl v smrt—ne prostovoljno—-tem-
ve2 gnan od CloveSasti, CloveSkih
poSasti, Clov-eSfcih zveri, ki so vsemu
Cloveitvu. v neureSo in proklestvo!
Brzojavke 'poroxajo, da je bila reka
Meuse rde-Sa od krvi . . . da je
bilo pod- zidovjem HeSke trdnjave cele
.kupe CloveSkih teles in Ces te kupe
gorkib, krvavlh in razmesarjenih tru-
pel drle so nove irtve mamonu v irelo.
Bartjarska krvolitja v iMeksiki in
drugih krajlh', kjer—pravijo—NI OIV-
ILI-ZACIJB, so angeljSka dela proti
temu, kar se zdaj godi v Evropi; in
tlstl, ki so se pred gratkim zgraiall
nad barbarsko iMekaiko, se danes
zaganjajo kakor stekli psi drug v drug-
VISOK€      OIVIUZIR'AJMI
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. McDougall, Mgi
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
For our Foreign Brothers
VELEHUDODELSTVO
Brisbane,   glavni
Full lupply of following
for an appetising meal to
chooae from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge Saua-
agea for tomorrow's break.
l«at.
■■■■■■" amammmaimommmtmw
Ct'.L OR PHONI
Calgary Cattle Co.
Phono M Wood StMft
PIRNII, •. C,
P, Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
Dry Qooda, Orocorloa, Doota and
Shoot. Genu' FurnlthlnM
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT HOSMER,  B.C.
THE THINO THAT FRAZZLE!
If lba worker bad nothing to do but
make a living (or blmaalf tad family
be would have a clncb. Il'l making
* fortune for the boaa and bit family
tbat keepi bin trawled.
■tmwiwEmismmmmummn
wmtmmmmmm
mm
AUSTRALIAN   HOTEL
Morrissey Junction
An ideal week end retort, wilh bett ftth*
Ing snd hunting in the district First
clan accorarao.iation. The only hotel
in the district.
ega     v
EVROPI!
Prav Pise Atthur
Hearstov ureknik:
"Vsi narodi v Evropi, ki so v voyjni,
molijo enega Boga In zdaj vsi prositjo
taiatega Boga, da naj enemu prej kot
drugemu blagoslovi krvavo oroije in
enemu prej kot ddugemu pomore
ubitl dimvee nasprotnikov. Cudne
nazore imajo ti ljundje o Bogu in
Cudne misli mora imeti Bog, ko zre na
te divjake.. CIV1HZA.CIJ-A V EVROPI JE SAMA SEBI NAPOVBDALA
VOJNO."
Da—lainjiva clvilizacija je sama
sebi napovedala vojno— sama Bebe
je obsodila na smrt. Taka clvilizacija, kakorsno je razvil kapitalizem
lu monarhizem s krSCan stvom vred*,
dokazuje zdaj, da ne zasluzi svojega
obstanka; dokazuje, da ni sposobna
razvijatl CloveStva in zato mora sama
sebe uniCiti. Sistem monarhizma in
militarizma temljeC na kapitalizum In
sistem kapitalizma temeljeC na militar-
Izrau, je zdaj pokazal, zakaj eksistira
In kaj zamore CloveStvo prldakov-ati od
takega dru2abnega sistema.
Kaj poreCejo zdaj tlstl, kl vedno
JjagOKarja-jo—danaSnji—sistetn—in—kr
vedno pravijo, da je najboljfie, da "vse
tako ostane, kakor je?" Alt je res
liajboljfie, da tako ostane * za vse
ve*Sne Case naprej, KAKOR JE
DANES V EVROPI? All tak aiatetn, kl
omogoCl tako atraSno hudodelstvo,
kakorfinega fie ne pomnl svet, zasluil,
da eklslstira fie naprej? All je tak
sistem po boijl voJJI?
Klevetnlkl CloveCanstva. t prave
svobode In napredka neprestano toUljo'
socialiste, da hofiejo spravtti cioveSko
drulbo na kant; toll jo nas da hofierao
unieitl vero, dom ln druga "bolanaka
prava." All xdaj vladajo v Rvropl so.
claltatl? All ao socialisti apravlll
Kvropo na kant in 20 millonov ljudl
pod mesarskl noz? i
Kdo zdaj ruftl bo*e hlfie v oble-
sanlh meatlh? Kdo zdaj profanlra
Boga z ostudnlml molitvami za
"are-Cno smago," za "areCno? krvolitjo,
klanje, ubljanje, pollganje? AU so
tega krivl socialisti?
Kdo zdaj unlfujo dorn? Kdo unlCuje
mllione In mllione areCnlh domov—
trua naranen moHn od %exte, ofetn od
otrok, alna od matere In oCeta—gonl
prev smrt I v naroCJe in pui&i sadnje v
obiipu, joku inatoku, da bl ae omehCal
kamen? Kdo Kdo? lu takaj? ZAKAJ? All ao tega krlvl aoclallatl?
Klevetnlkl! All Imnto Be knj |iog-
uma, lomltl kopja aa hudodeltkl kapl-
talliem In dollltl soclallate uIo*lnov.
katerlh a o krlvl edlnole kapltallatl,
monarhl In tlranl na Celu vladajoClh
•lojev?
NeiatllUnl iloCIn livrten nad mir
ntm in iakoriMantm delavatvom r
Evropi. na am* oatatl broa pravlCne
kaiul. V*»le»IoCiu vaeb velezlotlnov.
kar jlh pomnl krvava, timla agodo-
visa  *lovf«tva—    krvava    sramota
javke svoje krvi, kronane parazite in
izkorisCevalce; s tem bi storili konec
vojni 9a' vselej. NaCelno smo sicer
proti temu—AL CE JE 'BOZJA
VOLJA,' DA DELAVCI MO RAJO
UBIJiAiTI iPRlOTI SVOJI VOLJI, KA-
XOR SE "TO DANES VRSI V CELI
EVROPI, POTEM NAJ OBIJAJO
TISTE, KI SO Jlil .YAJBOLJ XEVA-
RNI IN KI JIH JE NAJiMA'N'J SKODA
Eden delavec-je veC vreden, kakor pa
sto generalov, kraljev, carjev in drugih izkorisCevalcev, ki niso za drugo
no svetu, kakor da fino 2rejo na
stroSke narodov in jih v nesreCo.
Ce bi bili delavci k veCini zavedni,
kakor je socialistifina manjSina—v
treh dneh bilo bi konec straSnega
klanja in obenem bilo bi konec tistih,
ki so milione ljudl obsodili na klanje!
Roparska in ubijalska gnjezda v
Berllnu, Londonu, Petrogradu, Parizu,
Ritnu, Dunaju, 'Belgradu ltd., moral
bl evropski proletari|at lzrebitl is po-
vrSja zemlje in enkrat za vselej glavo
militaristiCnemu imperijalizmu, kakor
strupnemu gadii! In ua razvallnah
razbitih tronov ima zrasti SOCIAL-
ISTEONA REPUBLIKA all federacija
republik*, kollkor je narodov v Europl,
z eno centralno upravo.
Kt> bi delavci enkrat l to dosegli;
potem bl moralo blti njibovo prvo
delo, da naloZijo vse kanone in puske
in sploh. vsako morilno orodje na
bojne okopnjaCe, zapeljejo na morje in
z dinamitom po Jen-ejo vse skupaj
najprvo v zrak, potem pa na morsko
dno.
Dokler se to ne zgodl, viselo bo vedno nad CloveStvom prokletstvo vojne
in satanskih posledic SreCa in blag-
ostanje CloveStva zahteva, da mora
biti konec izkoriSCujoCega kapitalizma,
tiranskega monarhizma in provokator-
iCnega militarizma!
SreCa in blagostanje Clovestva
zahteva, da mora biti konec barbar-
skega klanja millonov ijudi na povelje
dveh oseb. V Rusiji je milione ijudi
in samo eden car; v XISO VRBDX.I,
1>A BI V -XAiDA samo eden cesar._
Toda, ker car in cesar hoCeta, morajo
ruaki milioni moriti nem£ke milione
in obratno. Aii nl to prokletstvo za
ruske iii nemSke delavce?
SreCa in blagostanje CloveStva zahteva, da mora biti knoec oboroievanja,
konec morllnih sredstev, Vellke so
sicer 2rtve, toda za CloveStvo bi bila
prava sreCa, da se danes potopljo vse
bojne ladije, dredqatke in torpedovke,
"Kaf~jlh~je—ii*T^ve!u""in" kl so poirle
miliarde delavskih 2uljev, tisCe £love-
Sklh aivljenj. Prava sreCa bl bila, da
jlh poire morje vse v enem dnevu!
Dol z drednatkaml!
VLADAj.TOOI SLOJI SO POKAZAU,
DA N-ISOO SPOSOBNJ IX iN'DOO
VREDNI. DA BI V N'ADAUB VODIIJ
XARODE. KAJTI XAMBSTO DA OI
JIH BR'AXIM POGU-BE. JIH PBHAJO
V KaTAaTROPOIN PROPASTT.
ZATO PA: DOL % XJIMI! DOL S
KLAVCI XARODOV, DEaAVSKIH
SLOJEV!
"But Things Like that
You Know Must be
at Every Famous
Victory."
They had .been fighting before Liege
for two days. The dea^ were strewn
and piled thick over many acres. The
sun was beating down on the upturned
faces of many wounded, and so bullets passed and troops on the charge,
trampling the dead, sent clouds of
dust into the air, thousands, of wounded j
gasped for breath and pleaded for water. Tlie German troops ceased firing. A flag of truce moved toward! the
Belgiau lines. The messenger" approached the Belgian general and delivered his message.
"The Germans ask a truce of twelve
hours so we may bury our dead and
care for the wounded."
"You merely ask -for \ rest so that
you may get your lines into better
shape.   The truce is deniedt"
This message was taken back to the
German linos and fighting was resumed, yet bitterer than before, because
anger was behind it now. A general
volley was fired and then the Germans charged, trampling on the
wounded, staggering from weariness,
into streams of lead that, knocked
them from their feet and cast those
who had been paragons of physical
rtianhood as wrecks -iton a stream of
blood.
*   *   *
"Vive la France, vive la Prance!"
screamed a score of Danish school
children.
They were on the way home from a
German school after hostilities had
■begun, and with the unwise abandon"
of youth dared to express thedr views
611 the enemies* territory. The shout
was renewed and floated out of the
car windows.
"Hold the train," shouted a German
officer who overheard, as the engine
wus about to move.
He and a score of soldiers boarded
the train. A moment later they drag,
ged the boys perhaps a dozen In all, to
tllie platform of the station. The officer lined them up before him. He
eyed them in silence a moment, and
then, marching down the Une tapped
four on the breast.
"Forward, the four," he shouted'.
Without a word they stepped four
paces forward.
_JJnt-n t|ift-nflr-wlth-theH;t-hers."	
to lay in necessities. Do
not forget tl. at injuries,
skin disease?, children's
wounds, piJes, and sim-
i'sir trouble5 are best
provided against; and
most quickly curpd by
applying
/eU4-,?mY&zsri2
:   -vl'     ,
PRICE
B
IS NOT RAISED
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
Qk&kMMimM- JSBfflM'^MMJ'lLgRgy
Several soldiers closed around thero
and wHh .fixed bayonets forced them
aboard. Tbe four were mart-hod away.
A moment later the train started forward. As it was pulling from the station a volley of musketry rang out.
The studentB bad been lined up
against a well and shot
•   •   •
A big dirigible arose from the German lines and slowly swung over the
French rifle pits. A French officer and
an aviator spoke for a moment. Thon
a light monoplane launched *from tbe
earth and began climbing the air spiral flight. They In the dirigible saw
him and txa he aroae to their height,
trained on bim their guns and fired,
lie was wounded In the breast, hut
he did not hesitate   for   a   moment.
love, so backed up to the wall and*
compelled to show who is her master,
lt was a perfect Incident, symbolic of
an era.
Indeed, as I observe tho doubts and
divisions of churchdom in the present
controversy, I am dniven to think it
was a little too perfect. The position
of the church is not so unqualified as
that. Institutions do not live up so
beautifully to their "economic interpretation." Their ideologies are never
quite broken through. For instance,
only five out of the eight churches in
Trinidad are openly against the
strikers, and one of these is still saying a little about justice and mercy.
One of the national organs of the
Episcopal chruch recently published
an article explaining, If not indeed defending, the principle of sabotage. I
am disposed to look, then, for some
special reason, beside the economic
one, why -Tanenbaum's army created
such a panic among the godly.
"You can kill me before I will let
you desecrate this house!" was the
shriek of two prelates, a Protestant
and a Catholic, to that boy's unusually-
gentle and tentative request; and the
shriek we re-echoed upon the editorial page of every capitalist newspaper
in Xew York, and almost every one
throughout the country. There was
hate in the ink. Even the news columns were venemoua. The -whole
community seemed to be indulging in
a debauch of devout indignation, and
the crime of Tenenbaum's conviction
was only an  inevitable culmination of
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock ln K. P.
Hall.
Xoble Grand, J. T. Puckey.
Secretary, J. B. Melklejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF
FORESTERS
Meet at Aielio's Hall second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
CC, T. Ratcllffe.
K. of S...D. J. Black.
M. of F.,Maa. Madlaon.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meets every other Monday
at 8 p. m., In K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, F. H. Xewnham.
Secretary, G. Mosea.
(    140 Howland Ave.
LOYAL TRUE BLUE ASSOCIATION
Lady   Terrace Lodge,   No.
224, meets ln the K. P. Hall
second and fourth Friday of
each month at 8 p. ra.
,    iM'RS. J. BROOKS, W. iM.
\\\ ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet
at the K. P. Hall first and
third Fridav evening of each
month at 7:30. Visiting brethren cordially invited.
R. ORIOHTOX, W. 'M.
J. SKILLIXG, Rec. Sec.
a<t,**lia\*t*\*f*\*i'»\V»\ii*\tr»il.*Tti\Ttt<it.\Xm\,i.y,
A. Macnell S. Banwell
MACNEIL & BANWELL
Barristers,  Sollcltore,   Notarlea,   Etc
Of/icea:   Ground Floor, Bank of
Hamilton   Building Fernie, B. C.
WAB!
By Herbert Kaufman
Once more Mars haa wrenched the
pen from the -fingers of Civilization,
and dipping hia blade into the heart
of Europe, Ik writing history with the
aword iwlnt. War la waging. Reason
Um mangled under the Iron heel,
Mankind, on the threshold of Hu-
mnnlty's mightiest epoch. Is furled
aatde from the hlghwaya to Progreaa,
and flnHghtonment and tbe universe
an* forced to mark time, while n continent »\ye*i$ Un- ancient hales.
Imagination la for once Impotent toe-
fore fact.
The earth reels dizzily at the Impact of mountain load* of tend nnd
steel.
We aball wear the nenn ot thl* dl«-
»t\nr n hunded yeam. but out of the
appalling woo mlihtler and Mronger
raeisa will trntrpe, and auggerluR for j of fire. tb«u crumpled und fell, while
an Inatant beneath the load or grief and!» dotm men tumblwl from the far »»»-
the burden   of   loan, will turn aalde j low. turning over aa lb**, dem-ond-wl lo
from the pathway* of the Caisaar* and j 'ho <«rtb.
tttek Ike roada lo iru« pow«*r. j      •««' the aviator la *af*»!"
Meanwhile, our  aoiiU  ar* nteeped |    The wounded man managed lo j»ull
!» teara. ;a«fay from the wrvchfd <llr!i*l.il« and.
God guidea our deatlny, and In hl«! rtminn hia Maht t-raft, wa» uow tut 11
Of course, rising of the unemployed,
boiling up from the very bottom, la an
exceptionally dire thing to the powers.
The unemployed are hungry, and yet
they are free. They bave nothing to
lose, not even their chains. Yet, even
I suppose thnt the church would have
carried forth her pretense of brother-
dom, the press would have been more
amused than angry, even the courts
might have been content with ordinary
injustice, had lt not been that this
rising occurred under the banner of
the LW.W, And the church, the preeu,,
the host of the people in this country, hate the I. W, W., and they rejoice In every occasion when they can
sjilt upon It. They hate It with a
hatred beyond all proportion to Its
menace against privilege, or analnst
P. C. La-wt
Alex. I. Fiaher
LAWE A FISHER
ATTORNEYS
Fernie, B. C.
Blood was streaming down his gjde,! ">r0"ert>v or aKa,n,t ,aw and ordor.-
yet he scorned to uie the gun with j Sbw ttevlew-   "^^	
which his monoplane   was   equipped, j ——  -*~-■-**..,*—■*——-—
•Perhaps Iip thought of the Ilelglan av- j
lator wlio a few days before had ram- j
med 11 dirlulbie of the Germans and 1
in hl» dentti lind tnken twonty-fivo of!
tbe enemy to .k»afb, and determined tu
emulate tlie example.   At any rate he
charge*. (The none of the monoplane
pierced tbe bin gaa( bag.   Hoth   the
French and tho Gorman   llnea   were
Hatching the i!(»i-|M'rat.(! uii«uuutur.
J. STEVENS
w
Proprietor
List of Locals District 18
Toawrro*   *r  shall  mcar.!*  *iui»*
10
thf mn-H'rhiimaiibowl whlrh *»v.*d«'i.
while d-emiot MiutiltlonH wear th* <'u»»*
Of Vain.  •RoynoMt'.
•7
29
411
411
it«t
tli"
lilt
ttm
ttv*
tm
tan
?!tt
•4»?
lul
\tm
tm
I3S1
Ifl*
*om not. om -p. tt.
Vi'U: i Xiii Mm Wm, Aimnb. 'i'aim,
ttobitimA  J?,WknnUey,
Beaver Crook,,.........h lewebtke, H****rVmb, t% ftbtket. Ute.
Doltetot ......,,Jnmonmrke, 9m M, BeJloroo. Alta,
Blairmore W. C. Cbrtftopbora. DlaJriDora. AM*.
m ***-*»*<*• «*->•*#*•»#*»•*«»•* tbp %0# $\tott$yu^e ##IIPMi» Mmmm
ENO
1WIIT
wt?
C-ftrtWMttlt, 1....J. MMebea, Can-boedete.
C-eoaaore.,.,,.<,....... MlefeMi Woireti, Oubmi,
ityomm,.*,! J. jmnoton. CbUemm. Aim.
Corbiii.........>• Ooo. Jmeo, veme,Jt* C,
i%innk MImm... Jut. Home, CblBOok. na W«m<»* at/, AJU.
Fernie , .Tto* Vtmt, Wetttb, M. ft
rrnnb ttrtb lUtwua, tfituaA, A&*>.
tto&eet...,,*,*%•-»»*«•» w» neivep^MMR, tieptom, m. i*.*
11-tUr***  ThQi. TUom*,**nL, lUiUt■***,, kVm.
hnibbrHlet.*  1* Mooro, ISM tmm mtteme, tt.
iMMirUfe Collltttoe .. JTretM B*TTl»t*«a. OoellMwal AHa,
Maple M»f T. O. Hnrrtam, VmUbett, tUOL
jUMlffiMPi * •. »»*  ****** ptep I f. nfffUflff JnlCW-fft wf* Xt*
1*iHMli«*nl. * ,...T. 0. Wifiloi,
Tnb*r ,.. .A* rttitterwo,tUtiiur,Aft*.
<j€w-n*to**i vHMifi. .meet: mmm. veetteempbt
toateut Mint* Mem MtHteem, ttmbem* vte *«*r ttemb
x'       atw Hove*. Alberta
dvajaetega stoletja!   more bltl ndnjl
-aamo te hofe delavatvo Kirope!        '»«»«• vlnion re«t» all.
lielavitor Kttrope Ima dattta orolje w* <*tnBoi ***** th* n,*,f,'r ^'•",
v .voljlh rokah! NJ*» do lawl aaml *w «°"M *»»* cblldiwi In tbe w!Mi»r-
nHjell ta orotle: nollenlll «o llm aa v «*•*■ "»' «»>« »«rtjrr» of the .oil-euro,
role njlhovl tlmtil, UmovaM labor- !fl0r J««n»* "I'Arr.
IW«v»lel-ld|av^ njlhove krvi --ao; »'» w'< hrHI '•» '^ wom" f,f ,how
•Jail n«*k« #laxc«itii v robe, dall ao| ti*T**1it<keH pntl*, can iooU adunn
Um topove a po»elJew. da m itajilh« v»«*» ^ *•*«***• *"* ** iM
*mm* **«» »«M. bxHt*k» 4teg[ei%k telit mtii to im
-Atngeg* Mmo aato, k*r tm oomt' fo-morro* *r *
\>ltm~ »te*el wa-roabl ear, krall«*•»»»««««« «"«» wtaw mt nearer
JeiJ In predaednlk trapUallettrt* re-
imblllti* nc Bion?ju »i>i»r»«ui»*tl, <la
II bl bilo dobro. da KR.OVA.VJ RAZ-
IKUNIK  v  Avrroui  8VOW»1»XO
I fUim .VA HALKANO AU N K
ttotnrrt t Krrapi l««l» ototoje   r.
rokab t nanoenom. da at koUejo modi
nebol.     IJttavri    trlijo   veHkaatkl
stoein!   In ilVln je lollko ve*|l. ker*
duteaol e* r*do rnttnt* ** kmtWt* «.m
tnboi   ManJIIna ve la Io aa ao aoelal-'
tall,   *to«leo*e aodalUtWnlb delavce*
Je v vojni In tudi oni ae morajo—
klali mid »eboj: All ni to taloeteo?
Detovet Imajo v rokab—jrrotl avojl,
»e m ftvwH IrtvML   to aloWe ktrnjat
bi bil ve-ttbo manj-tl, ako bl dtlavtl
numxiu imiuiBJW ororik mrm
wmm, kj mt mtmo v tmm
tS V  DIOR  SVOJHI  R\RftRr>\lH
MUTOV!
SocMllatienl delavci v vaeb armadah
%i vuxoll tAe, Mat!   w   to,   amj
tjcuitjn u*»u*,»ki.   •tmUeltk,   tram-MM,»
•vatrlMi l» meet mtntet bn MMeein,
do bl morll) Anin drngurp, naradtll bl
rellfce iue|»l iftofie, ft pokntlfin pt-
A ''Socialist" Advocate
of Plutocracy
If'wMllniiril frnni I'm-r K|*)
j OcUviuit,    for    that    reaiioii,    never)
{railed hlmaelf King nor Italy tx king-J
!dom.   He waa Ju*t the caesar of thej
j republic, and the Kiiiplre had been ea. J
' talillsli for in.iiiy   yam*   before   thej
"The dlrlgiUIc haa exploded." wBs!»<»m»«>« telly realited that Ihey taadj
the ery.   "Ood help tbem, they ur* all' ™W™*** 1° monarchy.
done for," '"H-9 fomwon voter, the small Indi- j
The big gas bag thot out a flam* j vl4tt»!i»i. haa leaa i-onatrurtlve ImasM
nation   l»  more Inilivlduaitatlc.  that)
la, than tb** bfir indlvldunll**"
The   univeriiltlea   of America   nre!
lauded becaime thfj- nr»» "making    »I
conatently mort> aoild hauls of common (
uniii-r»t(iin)liiB ujwn whl'-b Ihe newer]
generalion of  iiluiorrMt*  may  mcel"'
At tbe tanii* lime American Moclaltftm <
li condemned' aa aiian■blallc, li«t-iiua«v \
It haa l»«*ii   littlu morn ihan a revo-
Intlonary iiiov. innit of Ihe wage earn-
Iiib rlBnti n«iiln*i thi' jirojuTty ouiiwr,"
And finally Well* i«kei up that moit
ri';i<tjuiu»ij   of   .til  r-HM«'tionary   5<'»«*
SHOOTING SEASON
BEGINS SEPT. 1st
■	
Call and see us before
setting out for your
fall hunting trip
Hia lownnl the field from which !u<
bad linen. X moment later he allKii'i i
'ii aafety. A won- rtuhml toward bim.
He aro** from bin aem, Muggcn-d
forward and dropped dend In tb«< armor hi* i num di m    Appeal to U**m,t,
   iii«na, worm than Ibe mere adt*»<.-*o-
TMt   GREAT   AMERICAN   SCAPE- of arlntoeraey. the prenrhing *»f »rt ,.r*
OOAT j **'.** r«<r>  «t  OhKid.     Tbe trouble in
* Aifit-rii'4  I* thai   "nnry  an  *>%tr* friflj
Oy Ma* Eattman I smsi! proportlun <*t it* bluud no** ba* k
Tlm prettem eo«irmeri»» c«H«-t»rtilt'.! ■ ,„*,.« «., ih«m> *h<i fniitht Un {nviluui
. l(4M-k*efe||4>r n* n i'hrl*t|in  r.-i :ilj« lu   u, the 4«>» of ii»«r«»- \V»«b!ii«t«n.
my mind Vrnnk Tntierihintm mnl Mh lit-      "Aaitlnm  Mw m^Iis et siUt*. Mii-
tl* morality play of laat «leler.   How   m*}*. mine* und indoatriat *«*i»ih at***
,,1-9*,.„t *,.        ; ■ ,* I    *
fbnr*bitt*im x*t*r*f\*. i ■*  ut
idar wben a few bundred*
-*••»   •*. t tm American iraiiliiitn hae to wet the
" ' -. ,,..,*• ut ,.*t an.***,*.i) miUt«»> nail«e
uf the "*.'*■*fy 't-fiu*t*n* m-vo never -foupil «im*« to get
and the heavy-laden earae and aaJr*dl * hm*«- .»«.:! '*ki-.>M: ph,n t* kit* urn* »,
tbe Cborrb itt Cbflat for brwid. and; j*.* tilM bj alii n adbataute* Uio*
tbe Church of Cbrlat, l« perww of m\ lojjlfalJv -^-akln*. ibu u m*t t,t *, ***
'"fit" "t.ft,*i ■• - » : ,;,it (> v-v .*v*„j. ,*mpm lur me Ametlran tradition, ft
door aud •ummoitH tbe iwtire* Tr.*i , n, kowerer, very rlentty m mttmiiie ot
*«k«i, Rone too b«wbl», I hone »« be S the Imteniw Idlvldnallsm of that tr*.
alloweil to aleep on the pew*. 'ko**eUit^m t'nAt-r th^ i>*»> ot ibal it ba*
clean, new ptatb end reltel «i*tii«.««bmnt h» Wut1. iu ty, farom.* tn keep
oontemted to tbe ptott* If aaemolent i up •te»mS"
bottomaof Ihe lerda of tbe lArxf* Tk>'>*.-'    r'-'t-i   -iv    *'    x,,:     ■*,,•,..<* ,■.,,
of thai.   It mon, ot tonne, an oaivae j ■%&* m\ !ir»iui. o* %%y that th* rtlit««
tn fare td wbleb iv t*-**,** •>••♦ ., ^, t„   „, „„, %mr,„a,, «,mi!,.»
fell atie-rty down, «'» omuut   -ti.''«»»{tnmam  the faUinir  bifih<r*t»  t*t    jtll
p*ope«y.   Atdl thei* »«» utiteth l>n xht* ka-tt t'tmret* ■".  ib* »"*•.'.
1 ••pf***. In eome iwiwa heart* «o *»* t   Tht»*« WVIht ippran .is u#i m   hi*
tbla pw*t meratrty. of  bl*»f>   ■*!ib»ir»w ertlor*   He <aar>i< .t m-«
all her anerad pleaMit* **•* l»'r"i" '"*' tt,, :.*xnuiten ttt i*Hi, kt* **«!• t-*t
Wr h*tc tbe Urgest As*
tortment of Rifles, Shot-
guns, Ammunition t Camp-
ing outfits in the pass
J. D. QUAIL
Phone 37
FERNIt    .     B* Ce
-flwiallt'm," It it ooaiea la Koglaad,"
nri>S>!*"'.i«l**il lliUlr.- ll»-!fcw: • f**n rtm**
mtt*t. mm proMMy torn mt to be
nothin* mere nor l#*« than another ef
Ihe Inflate ami perpetually re«e»eil
tod*** td «he KnalHh ar!»t«erm'*."
-N«>4  fiMtow.
H-llM '* 1 HI*
W<     ■*••* txt\*. »»i*j"»t/»« f*v.)«*,r. j{,
maris ',***. ri*., «f r*i«r*fli 1b»l twe
not t» rw**-l by Hair* t'tfarrb i"*or*.
1     '■   «*M|-Sfr\  4   ftt   t»'..|..  tt
V,'.    ii <     • I.i»i|in4   t.**r known ty.
t,  tt,.,,,-   •   i   >' •**  l".  t.*jf*   nm.! t*#fh»f#
lUfft pti:..*.,*  i.,>not»M« ttt mit tMrt*tn#M»
luliopaVy .tranwK «»■> t *   -*-».•>   iiit<»n<»H   *m*   «
""""' • iitmiftht, mil, liy iim
Shfhh'A Cure
ed,
'lu
..■,y.X. 9.J.■+*.*.» tU*k -*» ttt- imiriii.
provliM it dorn tm im*rt*rf* witk
inil-,; rit*   »Hi| p-tiwir of tilt'  piu
"*<ti i
ttnm.
,   N.VU-
y
t.,%.99.     ...
"»»«I1TlfKI*tJ*H»S
i TTibtjWlliM. *fb
J    lleir* t'****tb t*m*a i* -Mlffi ln1tSr*1^*,"
lv     *. Hi*   .lit* '»'.,    I||»»ft    I*.     !.»...«»
jm«i<»n»  *.i»u«*» «i  iim» .t.i.m.
tnrrtrx     tht.    n.'.«    Wm.«/«.»•*      ,,,.»«   'tlm.*m»t*',  ,**<,* 1,9*      t*tpt>  » *
tnt*t-t. iw  n**m   n*t*<a**at.   timw-^nrnttt*.    jir.*4 ».» *i» I'tttamf*
nt*, nt \n**t%tr* I   T**v n»»'"« P****'** ft.i* .
•patios sM&m^mMsm
sBsssmimii^^ssis^mmss^s^ms^^^^^^^^^s^ma^^.
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
Local Union Directory, Dist. 18,U.M.W.A
IJ;
ii i
GLADSTONE LOCAL
• No. 2314
Meet first and third FHdajs,
Miners' Hall, Fernie; second and
fourth Fridays, Club Hall. Coal
Cieek. Sick Benefit attached.—T.
Uphill, Sec,. Fernie, B. C.
HOSMER LOCAL
No. 2497
Meet every Surday at 2.30 in K.
P. Hall, Main Street   Sick Benefit Society attached.—W. Balderstone, Sec., Box 63, Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL
No. 2334'
Meet   every   Sunday   afternoon
at   2   o'clock   in   Crahan's   Hall.
Sick- Benefit Society attached.—
H. Elmer. Sec,
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet  every  Sunday.   Sick and
Accident  Benefit Society attached.—Michael   Warren,  Sec,  Can-
more, Alia.
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
In month.   Sick and Benefit Society attached.—Thos. Thompson.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30   p.m.   In   the   Opera   House,
Coleman.—J.  Mitchell,  Sec,  Box
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tueaday evening at
7 o'clock in the Bankhead Hall,
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
attached.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meei svery Friday evening at
7.30 In Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barrlngham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O.
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first nnd third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Lough ran, Sec.
COLEMAN LOCAL
No. 2633
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2,30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman,—J. Johnstone, Sec.
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. 2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
in Slovak Hall. Sick Benefit Society attached.—Thos. G. Harries,
Sec, Passburg, Alta.
A "Socialist" Advocate
qf Plutocracy
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
.Meet every second and fourth
Sunday ok each month at 10 a.m.
tn School House, Burmis. No Sick
Society.—Thos. Q. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hall, Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society,—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
rasstmrg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' Hall. 12th Avenue North.—Ii. Moore, Sec-Treas,
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
ln   the   Socialist   Hall. — James
Burke,   Sec,   Box   36,   Bellevue,
Alta.
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet every second Sundny at 2
o'clock In the Club Hall. Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo,
Elms, Sec, Corbin. B. C.
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter. Sec.
FRANK LOCAL
No. 1263
■Meet Sundays, after each -pay
day, at Miners Hall.   Sick and
-Benefit    Society    attached.—B
Morgan, Secretary,
«:r;»tt7*f»T?»\T?i\f?.^r^
Cash Meat Market
By William English Walling
H. G. Wells' latest book is .published
under two titles. In America it is called "Social Forces in England and
America," in Great Britain "An Englishman Looks at His World." The
American title describes the subject;
the English title, the point of view.
.There is no other Englishman that
could be so well trusted to give us an
interpretation of English progress!v>
ism; for no one else holds the balance
so even between Socialism and the
N'ew Liberalism. Wells still calls him-
self a Socialist, though in several passages he definitely takes his stand
with the N'ew Liberalism. As to both
movements, he speaks at once as a
sympathetic insider and as a thoroughly independent critic.
•Bold but careful generalization—
this is the quality that attracts , so
many serious readers to Wells. Some
of the generalities of the new book aro
to the highest degree stimulating and
valuable. For example, it is generally agreed that one of the greatest
curses of our times is over-specialization. Wells points out that, after all,
our greatest achievements are not due
to the mere specialist:
The trained man, the specialized
man, is the most unfortunate of men;
the world leaves him behind, and he
has lost his power of overtaking it,
Change of function, arrest of specialization by innovations in method and
appliance, progress by the Infringement of professional boundaries and
the defiances of rule; these are the
commonplaces of our time.
Ours is undoubtedly an age, Wells
agrees, where everything makes for*!
"wider and wider co-operation." (This,
however, does not mean that the people are being more specialized to clo
one particular thing, but only that they
must bring a highly developed intelligence to each special problem. The
work must be specialized but not the
person. The revolutionary effect of
this principle on all our thinking and
living can hardly be stated in a few
words, and Wells, as usual, makes no
attempt to give us its full significance,
but leaves the fruitful suggestion to
work itself out in other minds.
lt seems that Wellif is, in*one sense,
J
PLEASE REMEMBER
Tliat our prices havo not changed. Everything of
the best. Fresh and smoked Fish always on hand.
Our Bologna, Weenies and Sausages are made on
our premises.     A Trial solicited.
n thorough revolutionary.   In-antrad oh. [
imbued with this spirit could fail to
bring us backMo something of value
from his imaginary incursions into the
future.
iWells conception of Sociology is
equally inspired, and by sociology he
really means the science of Socialism
—in so far as Socialism can be maide
a science;
"Sociology must be neither art simply, nor science in the narrow meaning
of the word at all, but knowledge
rendered imaginatively, and with an
element of personality; that is to say,
in theh ighest sense of the term, literature.
"The writing of great history (or so-
ciology) is entirely 'analogous to fine
portraiture, in which fact is indeed
material, but material entirely subordinate to vision. . . . There is
no such thing in sociology as dispassionately considering what is,
without considering what is intended
to be. In sociology, beyond any possibility of evasion, ideas are facts."
The last sentence does not seem accurately to express Wells' point. His
use of the word "ideas" seems to carry
us back to the pre-sclentlflc "ideology"; but it is clear from the passage
that what he means is that intentions
are facts. Indeed he leaves no doubt
as to this, when, a few lines below, he
points out that the important thing is
for us to systematize our intentions:
I think, in fact, that the creation of
Utopias—and their exhaustive criticism—is the proper and distinctive
method of sociology.
Equally valuable with Wells* constructive suggestions are his criticisms
of English politics. Though long a
member of the Fabian Society, he entirely disagrees with its passion for
social reconstruction and "efficiency"
without any adequate consideration of
what kind of society is really most to
be desired. His criticisms of Fabianism ln "The Xew Machlavelli" and
elsewhere are well known: his anayl-
sis in the new book is even masterly,
and It applies to Socialistic reformers
all over the world:
"One hears nowadays a vast amount
of chatter about efficiency—that magic
word—and social organization, and
there is no doubt a huge expenditure
of energy upon   these • things   and a
Opposite the Post Office
Phone 52, H. Northwood Mgr.
To Sports Committees
The Fernie Coal Creek Excelsior Ban4 is now
open for engagements.  Satisfaction guaranteed
' :*l
For Terms Etd Apply
THOS. BIGGS, Secretary,   Fernie, B. C.
viously, by the big things that are done
in our time, he believes that no social
change that is physically practicable Is
too big for us to undertake. He regrets that "no community has over
yet had the will and the imagination
to recast and radically alter its social
methods as a whole." For "some
things there are that cannot bo done
by small adjustments. . . . You
have to decide upon a certain course
on such occasions and maintain a
continuous movement." •
The revolution that Wells has in
mind is not tbe Socialist revolution,
not the abolition of classed but one
that Is to put society on a basis of
maximum efficiency. We are to de-,
termlne "under wbat conditions a
man works best, does most work,
works more happily." No doubt this
revolution also would untlmately require the complete abolition of
classes. Hut Wells gives us no reason why vvo .should not work con-
aclonsly towards this larger goal, at'
th« mime time tbat we are aiming nt!
efficiency, !
Il l«» true lhal Wells attaches lm-,
pomnce io revolutionary movements J
-'■.videtrprjsad-desire~t*C!~Tilsb" •ahoiifTUni"
make showy and startling changes. But
it does not follow that this involves
progress if the enterprise itself is
dully conceived, and most of it does
seem to me to be dully conceived. In
the absence of penetrating criticism,
any impudent industrious person may
set as an "expert," organize an* direct the confused good Intentions at
large, and muddle disastrously with
the problem ln hand. The "expert"
quack and the bureaucratic Intriguer
Increase and multiply in a dull-minded,
uncritical, strenuous period as disease
germs multiply ln darkness and
beat"    „
Having annihilated the very foundations of Fabianism, Wells proceeds to
nn equally destructive criticism of IU
anti-revolutionary methods;
'The Fabians, appalled at th* obvious difficulties of honest confiscation nnd an open transfer from pri-
vato to public hands, conceived the
extraordinary Idea of filching property for tbo 8Uto."
Ills Illustrations uro both apt aud
amusing;
'What to do with the pariah dogs of
Constantinople, what to do with tbe
"I have.tiever-believed that a. Socialist party could hope to form a government in this country in my lifetime; 1
believe.it less now. than ever I did. 1
don't know if any of my Fabian coll
leagues entertain so remarkable a
hope. But if they do not, then they
must contemplate a working political
combination between the Socialist
members in Parliament and just that
non-capitalist section of the Liberal
Party for which Chesterton and .Belloc
speak. Perpetual opposition is a dishonorable aim in politics."-
Possibly the Socialists may not be
able to form a Government in Great
Britain within the twenty years of
active life that probably remain to
Wells, but it does not follow that they
may not be able to do a far more
constructive and creative piece of
work -by remaining in opposition.
What Wells does in this paragraph, is
practically to abandon organized opposition to the present form of society, although he expresses a radical
disbelief in it. Yet history is full of
examples where a militant, yet intelligent and fairminded opposition has
accomplished far more than any participation in government could possibly
have done.
Having abandoned the hope of effective political opposition, Wells proceeds to abandon other fundamental
points of the Socialist position. If
•mere opposition is undesirable, then
a class war is indeed "irreparable,"
and a revolution from below would
mean "social destruction." So Wells
concludes, and then proceeds to adopt
the whole ruling-class view. He
writes:
The workingman of the new generation is full of distrust, the most demoralizing of social influences.
"There is only one way in'which our
present drift toward revolution or
revolutionary disorder can be arrested, and that is by restoring the
confidence of these alienated millions,
who visibly now are chafing from
loyalty to the Crown, from a simple
patriotism, from habitual industry." .
At this point we might be reading
any Tory reactionary or Imperialist,
though it is certain that Wells ls neither the one nor the other.
Far from advocating a class struggle,  Wells definitely  places all    his
hopes in the ruling   classes,   and   a
I larger part of his hopes in the millionaire philanthropists:
"What we prosperous people, who
have nearly all the good tilings of life
and most of the opportunity, have to
do now is to justify ourselves.
Socialism The
_ Lone Foe of War
(Continued from Page Three)
There is no American workingman
who now finds is easier to make' a
living because of the generally improved conditions brought about by
the war with the Philippines. General
conditions, have not been improved.
They have been made worse to the extent that the cost of the war is a'
burden on industry. If the working
class interests had been consulted,, the
war never would have been waged.
No working class interest was involved. The workers, had everything to
lose, including life, by going to the
front and nothing to gain. -But they
•'followed the flag"—and Ame of them
never cable back. They stayed—six
feet under ground—that the Tobacco*
Trust, the Timber Trust, and many
other great capitalist Interests might
stay on the islands above ground.
Look wherever you will, you cannot find a working class interest that
should or could cause workingmen to
slaughter each other. Nor is the
situation new. It is as old aa war
itself. It is a fact that men of sense
and honesty have always recognized
what Tacitus said:
"Gold and power are the chief
causes of war."
DVyden, the poet, said: "War seldom
enters but where wealth allures."
And. Carlyle, in this striking fashion*
showed the utter absence of working
class interest in war.
"To my own knowledge, for example, there dwell and toil in the British
village of Dumrudge, usually some five
hundred souls. From these, by certain 'natural enemies* of the French,
there are successively selected .during
tbe French war, say, thirty able-
bodied men. Dumrudge, at her own
expense, has suckled and nursed them.
She has not, without difficulty and
sorrow, fed them up to manhood and
even trained them up 'to crafts, so
that one can weave, another hammer,
and the weakest can stand under some
thirty stone, avoirdupois.
"Nevertheless, amid much weeping
and swearing, they are selected, all
dressed in red and shipped away, at
public expense, some two thousand
miles, or say, only, to the south of
Spain, and fed there till wanted.
They Jived far enough apart; ware .Oh*
entirest stranger; nay,;in so wide a
universe, there was even,.unconsciously, by commerce ,some mutual helpfulness between them,
A few weeks' rest from Business at
Glacier Park or the Coast
w'lt pit* yon'a. it*w !vi*--> rit llf", or in tho** 'ifl\CJ« *ittt ii Halted, tako quickest route cunt or west, via the Qrt.U Nortberr.
Railway Co,
23 Hours Fernie to Seattle
26 Hours to Victoria
29 Hours to Vancouver
Direct connections at Rexford for East & West
"Rulers and owners must be prepared
to make themselves and display themselves wise, capable and heroic—beyond any aristocratic precedent. The
alternative, if it Is an alternative, is
resignation—to the Social Democracy.
"Social Democracy ts thus the last
of all horrors."
"We" must put an end to any "social Indiscipline," "we" must "restore
class confidence." Tbe new generation
of workers must be taught to believe
in "the ability and good faith of the
property owning, ruling and directing
class." Tbe cry, he boldly states,
must be not so much "Wake up England," as "Wake up Gentlemen." Class
consciousness of labor Is a very bad
thing, bnt "class consciousness of tbe
aristocracy of wealth" Is indispensable:
"It Is to the Independent people of
some leisure and resource In the community tbat one bas at last to appeal
for such large efforts and understandings as our present situation demands,"
Th* moat frightful alternative that
Wells can think of, "the end of all
things" to use <an expression used by
Lord Roaebary in tbe Same connection,
would be—Socialism.
"If wp, who have nt least some experience of affairs, who own property,
manage business, and discuss nnd Influence public organisation, if wt aro
not prepared to undertake this work of
Yo»i will enjoy all tbe comfort of HUM* modern railroad equip-
mont, Courteous and efficient -employ** wtll make your drip
pleasant.
Btftrt purc*atin« steamship tickets. Itt us talk It avtf.
fnr further Information apply to
4. k* MANN, AQINT
P.O. I« III      FERNIE, B.C.     »•»« tto, lil
! In thr ordinary sense of the term, j tramps who sleep In the London park*.
j that in. to movements from below, but j how to organise a soup kitchen or a
•be 91-cnw to give far greater weight niblu toffee vau, how to prevent Ignor-
I to more or less philanthropic move- snt people, who bave nothing else to
! ments from above: ao, getting drunk tn beer bouses, are
I    "Contemporary events,   phenomena no doubt serious question for tbe prac
i of jerent strike*, tbe phenomena of tlcal administrator, questions of pri-
jsabo:age carry out   the    »u**estiouj m»ry importance to the politician; but | dlsclpllac aud   adaptation   for   our-
; lhat in ,i community  where nearly ev-j \b*v hnvo no mor* fn dn witli nodtilmty ■ •*,*«,»" th«n * tlmo Is nol far distant
ioryotio     reads   extensively,   travels! than the erection of a temporary hoa-jw,ien Insurrectionary leaders, calling
|about, se** tbe tbariu and variety injpital after the collision of two trains|lh«»««}v«» Socialists at Syndicalists,
Uh» Ini-a oi prosperous mui iiesurely j has to do with railway engineering."        *""   "" ~"^ 	
I people, no class ts going n. mibmlt per-     As a further   illustration   of   the,
! manently to rood*™ labor conditions'• rnbiht methods. Wells points to thein far '*•• b°P* ** *ttCC«»»' *»" ***• th«
1 without extreme resl§tanc*\ even after) tactics on Ibe question of mothers''-,— ~"* -*—-•*—■•- -
j the most elaborate lnbor conciliation f pensions or the endowment of mother-'    AnA itt epder t0 •eCttrt the *»«»««>•
scheme* and soHsl minima »re estab-Miood,   In tbe first place he accuses
itished.   Things   ari»   altogether   too1 thf Fa bin in of having failed to make,
; stimulating m Ibf imagination nowa-'nny big Imaginative appeal for th!sir*t*,*r more generously than be has
big Idea, and of presenting It "with •
Mirt of inSniiulxliiH furtlveness a»   n
mean little estenslon of outdoor   ft>
Hpf." Hat worse still, the Pablins art
days."
It  Is the  belter  intellectual    and
phyaU-si cumniuiueattoii of our time
that Is ibe btttl* of   such   faith as
W*«i» $«•*> lit ••«  vutMtat    m*i*«utfui,
Thi great '.<*. tellers, m he point* out.
are th* newspapers and «?booU and
the feet*>hat«ve?i ihe common lx'tort't
Imoves fm!>  About tb* ennk U»«»i#
! days.
|   Ittsides baring a certain measure ot
j or what not, men with none of our ex
perience, little of our knowledge, and
! lent Intervention ot the ruling classes,
Ithe  labor thinker "bga  to  rtollse
dono so far, tbe enormous moral dlf
Realty tbere is In bringing people who
hare been prosperous and at no advantage all tbelr lives to tht pinch of even
"Snd now.'to the same spot ln the
south of Spain, are sent thirty similar
French artisans—in like manner wending their ways, till at fengtb, after infinite effort, the two parties come Into actual juxtaposition, and thirty
stand facing thirty, each with a1 gun
In his 'hand. Straightway the order
'Fire!" ls given, and they blow the
souls out of one another; and, in the
place of sixty brisk, useful craftsmen,
the world has sixty dead carcasses,
which it must bury and anew shed
tears for.
"Hnd these men any quarrel? Busy
an the devil Is.   not   tbe   smallest!
"How, then?
"'Simpleton! Their-Governors bad
fallen out, and, instead of shooting on^
another]" had these poor bjockheadi
shcot."
That is the cause of war between nations—"the Governors fall out." And.
wbo are the Governors? 'Nobody but
the representatives of the ruling, class,
wh9 clash in their race for plunder
and deceive workingmen into doing
their fighting for them.
Xow, let us go back a bit.   You may
recall that I said that the ruling capitalist class uses government as a t\vo-
handed claw with which to pull golden
chestnuts out ot. the fire.   One hand
to this claw is the power to make and
enforce laws.    The other hand—the
power to wage war—is used to grab
what cannot be grabbed   with   lawr.
WarB between nations illustrate   one
uot give.   Here Is another:
form of effort to get what laws caii-
The United States is dotted    with,
forts, arsenals and armories.   Far in
the interior, where,   by   the   wldest-
stre'tch   of, imagination,   uo   foreign
army could come, we see these grim
j reminders and prognosttcat-ors of war.
Under tlie IMok  Military' Law,    the
President of tbe United States, without further legislation, can compel ev-
f.ery man in the United States between
the ages of IS and 45 years, to enlist
iu the militia of his States and serve
under the orders of the President ot
the United   States.     The   President,
therefore, has it in his power at any
time to raise an army of about 12,-
000,000 men and place them in the
field.
What for? To fight a foreign foe?*
Not much. The Constitution of the-
United States forbids the President
to make war against a foreign nation
without tlie explicit authorization of
Congress. 'But the Dick Law authorizes the President to raise thle enormous army and to oommand it.
Here ls the question. At whom Is
this enormous potential army aimed?
Why is the land strewn with arsenals
and armories that cnn Id be nf little
or no service in a foreign war?
To quote a word from Carlyle^ "Simpleton," do you not know that all of
these arrangements are made to shoot
you If the capltalst class should ever
decide that you should be shot? Nor,
have you never noticed against whom
the State militia; Is Invariably used?
If you have noticed none of theee
things, perhaps lt would be well for
you to wake up. The mllltla of the
States is practically never used except to beat down workingmen who
have revolted against tbe outrageous
wrongs heaped upon them by their
employers.
mssssm
KINO'S HOTEL
tbtt eupfilled with tlw beet Wlwee,
Lmiwww and Ciftatt
mmm room in mmtwcmmt
tyt** td reform: ;
"The endowment of motherhood Aont!
not attract the bureaucratic type of
reformer because ii offers a minimum
.'li*u,i'if   ot  tmtHltmtm' l*at««llsrs»e«
 .  with people's llvee.   Thew would %•
gu!--j^Ji-,..„. u j,..,.!  .„ja..iip j '*»»« ,u t*>* »«-"«•<*. »*-«* *'*** twfter-jno cbaucw of 'teektng out" eefbedf
I    ka« «Hu«r   doy a mnn with a ruby, ''':"!u" ',,v >Ui **  '* '** "*ette **<-*|■**■* **»IMJ*taft   benevoieui   *»t   grisa
uoa* was brought betem . «..t««t.ig<wUJUJ   m M*n *•**"• mkkk **[<—****• ou the strength of It."
now met orougut uetor* a usglMrste f mm |h> nfm1l mm^ ^ ta4f#J, M    f^ksl. tt na* Uigjety bocs-aa* ot
eftargetf with tbe crime et Impersonal. | state at ull." iPabUb opposition to thit reform thut
l»t an officer <    Tor thp   work   of   I'toplabulldlngj tt'*ll«Ui*lv tenieoed trom tb*«oe4*«y-
-**ut haw vow to say*" asked the' ****** l*-* ■*■*»*«»»   |.iw»i*.iiioi,|   tt mar be oerlo-uttjr fwettww-t, ^"~
UNigtstrat* i m* It most be u«»ttte4 Unit he starts | ever, wbothet Wullu Mmettt tt • •»*-
. out ou this Hub te the right spirit, and
"I am lam*-ni." replied the gun.    at first tltreu oteir ptemtm that he
"What dtd k* dor ntked the mag- *«»  reseb big eonduskmt.  For ex-
iwrete smpk. lu writing of th# mem   ot
r««uivp^'^iit^uis'^ToiMiCMMIa»Utta* * ***** mtwotmttm
that may  minimise or destroy  their
I
precedence." An "enormous moral
difficulty," indeed!
And when Wells apeak* of ruling
ctnssna, he does not mean the professional mtddki classoa, "the social serr-
i«e *.****,   ui   turn   uoeiue   pttiaMi,iJg|
,'..,..*,    >ii.4,\im)   »i»'<W*    -Ut-j    it**    Mwiik   IM i '"'
hope, but Um capitalists themeeltws,
(lo-rernuMttt effteMe, ami nnwnt rot-
era, Nt men placet special coufl-
dtntt  in   the mu!U-millionaire:    "A
Who is Your
Printer?
DO you ever consider
the importance of
oo the use of stationery
that is in harmony with
the nature of your business? In many cases
your letterhead is considered as an index of
your business character,
hence the necessity of a
good printer.
00
W.MUA
*ftt$
ClaMMti** t* n otmt d***trmr   A
aamt mee ft had mwmtllat* etrwanlttmn
Uy nmwtn uudtt tit <Ul» that theij
were not a war bodj.  IHnw tbey art
*Wb*if ,f.f(f ft« -for «s«.«utai«a   tbo'""1 nrtr#f *# ^P*"** th* wr aWi*!**
fmtieetaait. haughtiir, u*» had bomd - ** miw* *** **ftr*t **tt to mm *****
I ttoi men n teemm tmMtttdbe ask- „ ^^^  w ^ m,„ ^^
«d.   Why, ht tapped thrv* timea at i* eeto,«Weem gutnt to writ* ot
the door ol a 'pub* «u my tout, and f wasted oppwiwultleu nrd Intent bean*
wheu th* LMtord sbwre* tb* t*e*r out '*• mm e tlwawd mw wuyt of lit-
■mi mttmt'z   We nr*
delist. Hit attttudt ot symputhy tor
the Xew 14berullsm Is In Itself em'
nrehtnalMe and ruttoual, hut hu
seems to curry It to u potet ot tbmo-
..buti'.* O-avUlUwi. on itm gt-GMAd thifct
tt offers ue prtctkut poHejr Imp em
XiHurn.
"Lib-efwIituH-f do uot. of enuiwo,?*t*tr
in asf «ar ta the pottilca! party wbkb
makes this profesaUm-U eaaeuUally
antitmdltlonallsm; lli tendency It la
thiwugk i km half duued dee* be look ,JJ' tr-pmtommmd mmmm.  'We nml cumuli Itr trial aay toutHuMM ur tm
nemetnnbtt. *uur» turn m ew ■ m^^£ ^uS^mim  m** ** * ****' ***** **  * *
Amid th* room bt .oomt*r m «tujwW||Ww*,   tht  dfeultM, and   dm*
tt tetmi leembow em
the utiiwt uad uiiugwilH ot ttt me
flved aud ancient future «ud Imfft-m-
Um fhthtr ot a HTittsatloo."
tit Carnegtea tud RMkuftHttu aru
tit ront ariiitocrate. A tow yeurs ego,
It Will bt racuOtd, Welle- chief boot
tor America lay to u heuoroltut p*o-
former nnder Koomrntt   tU *ap:
Thuawt hopo-tol aud pfuhuWu Hut
0t 'ftrdopmcat ii aot iu -ililtli ». cuu.-
actowt aud powerful, tf tuft mui, mm
toeray will ploy • large purty. It
UMy, Indeed, nerer mm nny ot tht
duttA«fa**igj    __________*   _m_t   ^^^m^^^^^^^^^_^^   ____,   ^ugb^u
*wi«ii wm oi unifuerwty or uwy
detail* nubile rwctgutttew. 1W
Amerteiins an,! tu cBasji at tta. carnal
aad tht kuowu uimumm jttiaa m
tbe Romans were or the word King.
I
If you want really high
class printing"the kind
we atwayft prod iif e-try
us with your next order
Its District Ledger
"QUALITY* PRINTERS
Phone 48a   :•:   Fernie, RC.
i
■Mm
^«-A4M><*Un<P<-M'^ m
■jfTfL
■m
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, S. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
Tlie
Original
and
Only
Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
Minard s
Liniment
Passburg
Hotel
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN    Passburg
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Fernie-Fort Steele
Brewing Co,, Ltd.
Beer
and
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
Ross Brothers £»
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
McDougall, Mgt
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
For our Foreign Brothers
VELEHUDODELSTVO
\
Pull supply of following
for *n appetising meal te
•choose from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try our Cambridge Sau*
ages fer tomorrow's break*
fast.
O'.U OR PHONI
Calgary Cattle Co.
Phone M Wood Street
PIRNII, ■, 0.
P, Carosella
!
Wholesale Liquor Dealer   j
Dry Qoqds, Groceries, Boot* ead
.Shoes. Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE
BRANCH AT HOSMER,  B.C.
THE THINO THAT PRAZZHS
If the worker bed nothing to do hut
make a living for himself and family
he would have a elncb. It's making
a fortune for the boss and his family
that keeps bim frattted.
mm
AUSTRALIAN   HOTEL
Morrissey Junction
An ideal week end resort, with best fish-
Inf and huntin* in the district. First
class acconimo-iation. The only hotel
In the district.
J. STEVENS
w
Proprietor
List of Locals District 18
A'.
411
m
titn
nam
nn
1*17
mx
nti
tm
mi
tm
IT4
llf*
fttf
tsst
t*S
Ui
9—99m.
vt™
ItW
tiemn Aen. em P. O.
•Ui»i« Am mum *«». Man*, 'laser, AIM.
Uookkeni....... Jf. Wbenxley. flaifcfd, AHa.
Vtmtm Cw*k I. Lotghiaa, tkmm Creek, tin Piacker. AN*.
jkSbmo Jtmm Darts, Bw U. BsUem, Alta.
Jjjftjraiorii  W. C Cbtiekopbote, atntmoto, AHa.
&mim**, .....I..... ,.,,,'t. w, Mcftfea, tetemttt, Alta.
Carbondale v.... J. MkekaA. Corboed^e. Colswse, Alta.
Ceninore... Michael Warren, Utttnor*. AXa.
Vtdtmne. J. tebeetm, Coleman. Alu.
Orwn.... .....o«o. Ehae. CortXn. B. C.
Ct.lnok Mice* Jaa. name, CUoUk, n» tXeemt Oity. Mia.
mrni*..... .......Thoa. 0pWU,FefBle, B. C
Frau'*.... ,Kia« Morgan, Ffcaoi, AMa.
llU-Wi** **-,*>..*..*>•*> *>*>*>»*>• i*»«*- Haempatm, HUlereet, Alta.
-\jt/t9/m^tm^f9 * * * * ******** * I* -WWrf^ 11*1 VtSwl SW^WWii «* w^/EKK/mmmfm
UHAiridp* Ctdltetioa ., .Trot* RarrtnttWM, Ceetbteet.* AHa.
Maple Losf. ..TO. Harriet, Paeektin, Aha.
Mlrtirt  R Elmer, Nickel. &&
Paeefcunr. - T. 0. Harriee*. Paa
TiAU%t » i- > r t » i — - r ------- ***»-  f^MMSWNVf   iWflft  Mmm*
ij««r»»fewa. Caamere...Mai mm. tkmmmtm.
ttrntenn Mines Ham' IMEmmm, Nordegg. ft* Rooky ftCooit.
ela Hees*. Albert*
StraSne r-eSi se godijo v Evropi.
Dvajset do petindvajset millonov' mot
—mladih, v najlepSi dobj in zadravih
—strelja drug na drugega, zaletava e^
,drug v drugega in prefci, kako bi drug
drugega ubil, predrl, zakl-al—spravil
ob iivljenje. x
Evropski, proletariat, *ovet mos-
kega prebivalstva, kateri bi imel zap-
loditi in zaroditi novo, cvrsto in
zdravo generacijo—skrbeti za kruh,
polniti Sitnice, produciratl ostale pot-
rebStine in graditi napredek filovefitva
—drvi v smrt—ne prostovoljno—tem-
vec gnan od filoveSasti, eiove£kih
posasti, CloveSklh zveri, ki ao vsemu
•filoveStvu v nesreCo in proklestvo!
Brzojavke poroxajo, da je bila reka
Meuse rde-Ca od krvi . . . da je
bilo pod zidovjem lle&ke trdnjave cele
kupe -fiioveSkih teles in -Ses te kupe
gorkih, krvavlh in razmesarjenih tru-
pel d*rle bo iiove irtve maraonu v 2relo.
Bartjaraka krvolitja v iMeksiki in
drugih krajlh; kjer—pravijo—NI OIV-
ILI2AICIJE, so angeljsfka dela proti
tem^, kar se zdaj godi v Evropi; in
tlsti, ki so se pred gratkim zgraiali
nad barbarsko IMeksiko, se danes
zaganjajo kakor stekli psi drug v drugega v — VISORO OIVXUZIRiAiNI
EVROPI!
Prav Pise Atthur Brisbane, glavni
Hearstov ureknik:
"Vsi narodi v Evropi, ki so v voyjnl,
molljo enega Boga ln zdaj vsi prositjo
taistega Boga, da naj enemu prej kot
drugemu blagoslovi krvavo oroije.in
enemu prej kot ddugemu pomore
ubiti CimveC nasiprotnikov. Cudne
nazore imajo ti ljundje o Bogu in
Cudne misli mora imeti Bog, ko zre na
te divjake., CIVILIZACIJ'A V EVROPI JE SAiMA SEBr XAPOVEDALA
VOJNO."
Da—lainjiva civillzacija je sama
sebi napovedala vojno— sama sebe
je obsodila na smrt, Taka civillzacija, kakorSno je razvil kapitalizem
in monarhizem s krSCan stvom vred*,
dokiazuje zdaj, da ne zasluzi svojega
obstanka; dokazuje, da ni sposobna
razvijati £lovestva in zato mora sama
sebe uniCiti. Sistem monarhizma in
militarizma temljeC na kapitalizum in
sistem 1-oapltallzma temeljeS na militar-
lzniu, je zdaj pokazal, zakaj eksistira
in kaj zamore CloveStvo prifiakovati od
takega druZabnega sistema.
Kaj poreCejo zdaj tisti, ki vedno
Haagovafjajo—uaTjasnli-sistem in Kl"
vedno pravijo, da je najboljSe, da "vse
tako ostane, kakor je?" AH je res
najboljSe, da tako ostane ' za vse
veSne (ase naprej. KAKOR JE
DANES V EVROPI? AM tak sistem. ki
omogoci tako strafino hudodelstvo,
kakorfinega fie ne pomni svet, zasluii,
da ekislstira fie naprej? All je tak
sistem po boiji vojjl?
Klevetniki CloveCanatva.' prave
svobode in napredka noprestano toiijo'
socialiste, da hofiejo spravltl -ilovefiko
druibo na kant; toil jo nas da hoCemo
uuteiti vero, dom in druga "bofcanska
prava." All xdaj vladajo v Evropi socialisti? All so socialisti spravlli
Kvropo na kant in 20 millonov ljudl
pod mesarskl noz?
Kdo zdaj rufil boie hlfio v oble-
ganih tnestlh? Kdo 0sdaj profanlra
Boga z ostudnlml niolitvaml za
"sreCno zmago," za "srefino" krvolltjo,
klanje, ubijanje, pollKanje? All so
tega krlvl socialist!?
Kdo zduj inUOuJo doiu ? Kdo unlfiuje
milione in mllione sreffhlh domov—
trga nnrazon raolu od ieno, oCota od
otrok, sino od nwtere in oCeta—gont
prev *mrtl v naro«je In puBCa zadnje v
obupu. joku instoku, da bl se omeliCal
kamen? Kdo Kdo? In zakaj? ZAKAJ? All so tega krlvl socialisti?
Klevetniki! AU Imute U kaj pog-
umo, iomltl kopja sa hudodeUkt kapl>
tnlizem In dollltl socialiste slo£lnov,
katerih s o krlvl edlnole kapitalistl,
monarhl In tlranl na -fielu vladajoClh
•lo]ev?
NeMslltanl sloPin lsvr»#n nnd mir-
nlm tn likorlManlm delavatvom v
Bvropl, ne sme ostati bres pravlfine
kesnl. Veleslocln vseh velezloflnov.
kar Jlh pomnl krvava, tunla sgoilo-
vlna eioveltva— krvava uramote
dvajsetega stoletja' more bltl xadnjl
—samo ie ho*»» delavstvo Kvroiw!
I)elsv«tov Kvrop* ima denes orotje
v svoljlh rokah? NJgo d« lawl sami
iirlWt %n oroMi*; potlimlH *o jim «n v
rake njlhovl tlranl. Uiwvskt lakor-
JWovalcl -pljavku njlliove krvi--eo
dull puike ^ilaicem v rok*. dall eo
tlm toimve a poveljem, ds t* naj
»ireljaj«» med eeboj. koijejo drug
drua«g*~ samo t*1o, b*r ** e***r
Viljem- it*k#I ps»~-ru»kl ent, krtl]
Im.| In predeednlk ka|iltnHstl-*Cko re-
publlkf n# morfjo e|>oniiumett. da
11 III liil« doliifo-, dn KHOSAXt UKZ-
IMU.VIK  V av«trmi  nvrttmtwn
j IM>I»A SK MtMkStt Md HV.
Iteltari t Rvnqil imajo on^toje   v
rokah s namenom. da se koijejo med
sM»).     Ilelavrl    triljo   velfkaRskl
sloein!   In ttoCIn je tollko ve«jl, ker
ntitivet »,r vt'/tr. rA-ri;.- 'A- VA-i-i**.*»•*,**
seboj.   Manjllna ve In lo ao eo eodal-
toll.   aioileoCe soelallstMnlb delavcev ?
Je v vojni In tudi oni ae morajo-
klati med eeboj! All nl to tetottno?     J
Delavci Imajo v rokah—protl svojl.l
ne go svojl kiivldl    In tlotie klanja i
bl bil veliko manjfcl, ako M delevcl
nfW-VTii vaiMffvo onn*.iK PflOTI
vwrm, ki mh K)i)uo v tmm
I.V V  I'M OH  AVOJIH  RAZRKrXVlH
WtATOVf
iOdalUUfinl dekvei v vseh anaadah
bi Monfilt sdaj detail   na   to,  4m en
•Otokiio oemm, engtrtilrt. -franroaitl. |
evslrijskt to roekl delevrt tn iwmento.
do bi morltl drug drugega, nesedUi td
javke svoje krvi, kronane parazite in
izkorisdevalce; s tem bl storili konec
vojni ja' vselej. NaSelno smo sicer
proti temu—AL CE JE 'BOZJA
VOLJA/ DA DBLAVXU .MO RAJO
UBIJAfTI iPRlOTI SVOJI VOLJI, KA-
XOR SE TO DANES VRSI V CEU
EVROPI, POTEM NAJ OBIJAJO
TISTE, KI SO JIM NAJBOLJ N'EVA-
RNI IN KI JIH JE NAJ'MANJ SKODA
Eden delavec .je vec vreden, kakor pa
sto generalov.kraljev, carjev iu dru-
gih izkoriSCevalcev, ki niso za drugo
no svetu, kakor da fino irejo na
strofike narodov in jih v nesreCo.
€e bi l)ili delavci k ve£lui zavedni,
kakor je socialistiSna manjfiina—v
treh dneh bilo bi konec stra§nega
klanja in obenem bilo bi konec tlstih,
ki so milione ijudi obsodili na klanje!
Roparska in ubijalska gnjezda v
Berlinu, Londonu, Petrogradu, Parizu,
Rimu, Dunaju, <Belgradu ltd., moral
bi evropski proletariat izrebitl is po-
vrfija zemlje in enkrat za vselej glavo
militaristiCnemu imperijalizmu, kakor
strupnemu gadu! ln na razvalinah
razbltih tronov ima zrasti SOCIAL-
ISTffdNA RBBUBL1KA all federacija
republik1, kolikor je narodov v Europi,
z ens centralno upravo.
Kb bl delavci enkrat j to dosegli;
potem bi moralo biti njihovo prvo
delo, da naioiljo vse kanone in pufike
in sploh. vsako morilno orodje na
bojne okopnja-Ce, zapeljejo na morje in
z dinamitom po zenejo vse skupaj
najprvo v zrak, potem pa na morsko
dno.
Dokler se to ne zgodi, viselo bo vedno nad SloveStvora prokletstvo vojne
in satanskih posledic. SreCa in blag-
ostanje cloveStva zahteva, da mora
biti konec izkorifiCujocega kapitallzma,
tiranskega monarhizma in provokator-
ifinega militarizma!
SreCa in blagostanje Clovestva
zahteva, da mora biti konec barbar-
skega klanja milionov ljudl na povelje
dveh oseb. V Ruslji je milione Ijudi
in samo eden car; v NISO VREIXNI,
DA BI V NADA samo eden cesan
Toda', ker car in cesar hofieta, morajo
ruskl milioni moriti nemfike milione
in obratno. All ni to prokletstvo za
ruske in nemfike delavce?
SreCa in blagostanje CloveStva zahteva, da mora biti knoec oboroievanja,
konec morilnih sredstev. Velike so
sicer Zrtve, toda za CloveStvo bi bila
prava sreCa, da se danes potopijo vse
bojne ladije, dredgatke in torpedovke.
'Kr-jrE"le_na" svetu in kl so poirle
miliarde delavskih 2uljev, tlsCe Clove-
Skih iivljenj. Prava srefa bl bila, da
jlh poire morje vse v enem dnevu!
Dol z drednatkami!
VLADAJOOI SLOJI SO POKAZALI,
DA NISCX) SFOSOBNJ IN 'NHOO
VREDNI, DA BI V NADAUE VODIIJ
NARODE, KAJTI NA'MBSTO DA 'BI
JIH BRANJL-I POGUBE. JIH PEHAJO
V KaTA3T»0F0 IN PROPAST.
ZATO PA: DOL Z N-JUMJ! DOL S
KLAVCI NARODOV, DELAVSKIH
SLOJEV!
WAR!
By Herbert Kaufman
Once more Mars hns wrenched the
pen from the fingers of Civilisation,
and dipping his blade Into the heart
of Europe, i» writing history with the
sword point War is waging. Reason
lies mangled, under the iron heel.
Mankind, on tho threshold of Hu.
inanity's mightiest epo$h, Is Hurled
aside from the highways to Progress
ntid pnMglitenmerit nnd tho universe
are forced to mnrk time, while a continent spews Its ancient hates.
Imagination Is for once Impotent .before fact.
The earth reel* dlsslly at the Impact of mountain loud* of load and
steel.
We shall wear the scars of thl* dl»-
nster a hunded yean, but out of the
"But Things Like that
You Know Must be
at Every Famous
Victory."
They had been fighting before Liege
for awo days. The de«,d were strewn
and piled thick over many acres. The
sun was beating down on the upturned
faces of many wounded, nnd so bullets passed a-nd troops on the charge,
trampling the dead, sent clouds of
dust into the air, thousands of wounded
gasped for breath and pleaded for water. Tlie German troops ceased firing. A flag of truce moved toward the
Belgian lines. The messenger ap-
proaclmd the Belgian general and delivered his message.
"The Germans ask a truce of twelve
hours so we may bury our dead and
care for the wounded."
"You merely ask for a rest so that
you mny get your lines into better
shape.   The truce ls denied/'
This message was taken back to the
German lines and fighting was resumed, yet bitterer than before, because
anger was behind it now. A general
volley was fired and! then the Germans charged, trampling on the
WQunded, staggering from weariness,
into streams of lead that, knocked
them from their feet and cast those
who had been paragons of physical
manhood as wrecks iton a stream of
blood.
* *   *
"Vive la France, vive la France!"
screamed a score of Danish school
children.
They were on the way home from a
German school after ho'stilitles had
-begun, and with tihe unwise abandon*
of youth diared to express theiir views
on the enemies' territory. The shout
was renewed and floated out of the
car windows.
"Hold the train," shouted a German
officer who overheard, as the engine
was about to move.
He and a score of sdldiers boarded
the train. A moment later they dragged the boys perhaps a dozen in ail, to
tihe platform of the station. The officer lined them up before him. He
eyed them In silence a moment, and
then, marching down the line tapped
four on the breast.
"Forward, the four," he shouted'.
Without a word thoy stepped four
paces forward.
—^ntio-the-eat^tt'Itirthe-TBtneTS".*' ~
Several soldiers closed around them
and wkh fixed bayonets forced tbem
aboard. The four were marched away.
A moment later the train started forward. As It was pulling from the station a volley of musketry rang out.
The students had been lined up
against a well and shot. ,
* *   •
A big dirigible arose from the German lines and slowly swung over the
French rifle pits. A French officer and
an aviator spoke for a moment. Then
n light monoplane launched from the
earth and began climbing the air spiral flight. They In the dirigible saw
hi in and us he arose to their height,
trained on him their guns and fired.
He was wounded in the breast, but
he did not hesitate for a moment.
Blood was streaming down his side,
yet he scorned to use the gun with
which his monoplane was equipped.
Perhaps lie thought of the Belgian aviator who u lew days before had rammed a dirigible of the Germans and
in bin dent5i hud tukwi iweiuy-fjve ol
the enemy to ']cnlh, and determined to
emulate the example. At any rate he
charged. The nose of the monoplane
pierced the bin ga«( bag. Both the
French and the German* lines ware
watching the denpiTate encounter,
"The dirigible has exploded,"  was
the cry.
done for,"
The big gas bait shot out a flume
to lay in necessities. Do
not forget that injuries,
skin diseases, children's
wounds, pi!es, and sim-
t'str trotib'er- fire J'est
provided against, and
I w most quickly curpd by
]   implying 1
Age**
PRICE
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
UMMMMMi. M!MMiLM.i.y^-&Bgj
:-i ■j.im"! • *^--«TrTTffr^smiiiif
love, so backed up to the wall au-I
compelled to show who is her master.
It was a perfect Incident, symbolic pf
an era.
Indeed, as I observe the doubts and
divisions of churchdom in the present
controversy, 1 am dciven to think it
was a little too perfect. The position
of tne church is not so unqualified as
that. Institutions do not live up so
beautifully to their "economic inter-
pretation." Their ideologies are never
quite broken tlirough. For instance,
only five out. of the eight churches in
Trinidad are openly against the
strikers, and one of these is still saying a little about justice and mercy.
One of the naflonal organs of the
Episcopal chnich recently published
an article explaining, if not indeed defending, the principle of sabotage. I
am disposed to look, then, for some
special reason, beside the economic
one, why 'Tanenbaum's army created
such a .panic among the godly.
"You can kill me before I will let.
you desecrate this house!" was the
shriek of two prelates, a Protestant
and a Catholic, to that boy's unusually
gentle and tentative request: and the
shriek we re-echoed upou the editorial page of every capitalist newspaper
in New York, and almost every one
throughout the country. There was
hate in the Ink, Even the news columns were venemoua. The whole
community seemed to be indulging in
a debauch ot devout Indignation, and
the crime of Tenenbaum's conviction
was only an  inevitable culmination of
_ t li a t 	
Of course, rising of, the unemployed,
boiling up from the very bottom, is an
exceptionally dire thing to the powers.
The unemployed are hungry, and yet
they are free. They have nothing to
lose, not even their chains. Yet, even
I suppose that the church would have
carried forth her pretense of brother-
dom, the press would have been more
amused than angry,- even the courtB
might have been content with ordinary
Injustice,'had'It not been that this
rising occurred under the banner of
the IAV.W. And the church, the press,
the host of the people in this country, hate the I, W. W., and they rejoice In every occasion when they can
spit upon It'. They hate It with a
hatred beyond nil proportion to ita
menace against privilege, or against
property, or ngalnst law and order.
New Review.
INDEPENDENT OEDEE
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at S o'clock ln K. P.
Hall.
•Voble Grand, J. T. Puokey.
Secretary, J. B. Mciklejohn.
ANCIENT OEDEE OF
FOEESTEES
Meet at Aiello's Hall Second and third Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fern-ie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. in their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, T. Ratcllffe.
K. ot S.. D. J. Bla«k.
M. of F.^Jas. Madlaon.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
■Meets every other Monday
at 8 p. m., in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator. F. H. Newnham.
Secretary, G. Moses.
340 Howland Ave.
LOYAL TRUE BLUE AS-
SOOIATION
Lady Terrace Lodge, No.
224. meets in the K. P. Hall
second and fourth Friday of
each month at 8 p. m.
■MRS. J. BROOKS, W. iM.
W. ORR, Secretary.
LOYAL ORANGEMEN
Terrace Lodge 1713. Meet
at the K. P. Hall first and
third Fridav evening of each
month at 7:30. Visiting breth-
ren cordially invited.
R. ORIOHTOX. W. *M.
J. SKILLIXG. Rec. Sec.
!
A. Macnell S. Banwell
MACNEIL A BANWELL
Barristers,   Solicitors,   Notarlee,   Etc
Offices:   Ground Floor, Bank of
Hamilton   Building Fernie*, B. C.
P. C. Lawe Alex. I. Fishe*
LAWE ft FISHER
ATTORNEY8
Fernie, ft C.
A "Socialist" Advocate
of Plutocracy
SHOOTING SEASON
BEGINS SEPT. 1st
Call and see us before
setting out for- your
fall hunting trip
appalling woe mightier and stronger
racfes will emer»e, and itaimerlwt foriof fir*, then trumpled nnd fell, while
an Instantbenenth theloadof axlef nnd'» do**'1 m*" tnmhM from th* nr b*>-
the burden   of   lou*. will turn naldetlow, tiirnliiR over na thi-y descended to
from the pathways of the Caesar* and i the earth.
seek the roads to true power, i    "»»» the.aviator Is xafc!"
Meanwhile, our souls nre ateeped j The wounded man munawd m pull
In tears. jsiway from ihe wrecked dirl«!*il»> !in*l,
God mildea our deetlny, and In hlel rtRJHin* »>l* Huht craft, was now mm
farther vision rest* nil . '"*
it'iMiiliMiril friim I'amr MUI
Octavlus,   for   thut   reason,   never
cAllml himself King nor Italy n kingdom,   He was Just the enemr ot the j
republic, nml the Kmplre had been es-'
UltlUh for many   years   before   the j
Romans fully r««liM>d that they had j
tlod h.»lp them, they «re till! returned to moinirchy. ,
j "The common voter, tlm mnull indl- j
vldimllat, has lm constructive Imagl- j
nation—is more individualistic, that 1
Is, llinn  ttio bin fii.flvldunlt*' " j
Tho universities of America are)
lauded because lln-y ar»» "making a i
constantly more mild basis of common <
ini(l«ritnndliiB upon wlti<*h the newer]
«»»li«ratlon of piu for rat* may . meet." '
At the name tlmo Ann-limn Hocialium j
toward Hie fluid from ■ which In*''" wwlemncd «« aiitmhUHIc. iwause j
4
We cannot iiense the master plan,: hsd rlmn. \ moment later he al In inH
nor eould the children In the wilder*^'" safety ,\ store ruahediownrd him
iimi*. nor the mnrtj r* of the coil»mim,; 11* «ro*e from IiIh m*»t. ktuKiici'****.!
nor Jeanne d'Are. I forward and dropiwd rf«»ait in »h*p txrm*
»ut wn. hred In the womb of those; «f his couirml«s.   Apiteal to Heamn
fiir«*ti*lckeii   past*.  ««»   look  ndown
I li lm* been "IHlli- mart- than a revo- j
! liitloiiar> nioveniMit of th« wugi* earn-!
| Iim dux* iiiiiiliiM llu> pjuiM'itj t»-*»««r" |
1    Ami finally Wollt» taker up that must
j i*MCtl«»iM»r>   id  nil  r*'tir*iinri«ry   \im\
jtloiin, wane than the merr adtot-ary .
ithe vale* of yesterday, end eee that
, Hull fall* wiil) to rt»e.
! Tomorrow -*••• mIimII mount itKioiti
lebantwed and wiser, and nearer to
ith«» mi|t*nrhiiniaiihood which evades,
j wlilli) ii#»|«»t ambition* w«»ar the iur«'
'Of Ciilu*.- It«»3Holds',
THE   GREAT
AMERICAN
GOAT
Oy Max Eastman I
■The preaent i(mir*n««r*v cmiiertiiiu
j Hork*t*1lf>r ni» :t HirUtl'tn n-ctlU u»
i my mind Kriink T;in*'ii»HiMin nml IiIh lit*
; tie morsllty play of last winter.   I!u«
...        ",44,     tt...     „,.,**, t
tellke mmiM tttMn. ie ptdo/Ueio pf.
•CAPE- «f «rl*toeracy. thc preai-hlna of mi n
i liKN'racy of blond,     Thi* Irouldf in
• America   I* that "miy ,*«  exir« mt=i>
hihiII prot»ortl<iii of it* hlihMl an*'* t»a< k
im* io ib,,*? who ftiuiibt lor Ji>*'dtnn
tu the d«)* of Uwirge Washington.
"Ali-'ilunt   the ii*m-I» id  tili.n   ran
wav*. min** and ln*lii»»H«<i ■*••»■.»♦»> *rn*<
.Hiiixfiv ^(tue American trtirtltton ha* t« •***-« i»w
'•>inrf»ii1'i<i-.  'iuyr.i:x  n.-.    -s.,:  ,..,,,i, {i,u**f ox  iai«end«ixty million  native
dtiy when a few hundred*, of th* nemry ictiuen* »!»<» nevir found lime to get
and th* heavydaden «*nie aud *e^*«t \ hwv, mid ahu««ii*U«« i« i»o* wore w
the Church of Christ ror hread, and {i«M nilnil by ulliu »ubntltntf^     ilio
the <"hureh of tThrlat, In jteraon of an! !«kI**JIv .iwnkini, thi« 1* vm t.t . -n
'   ,. l*x,. mhuii m»». w» *•..»> **■•**■* r umiui for the Anif-riran tradition.   It
door and »iimmoned the police!   Th«>   |«, however, very ttetrly an mutmi ot
•abed, none too humbly, I hope to be I the Intent IdivliHialiNin of that tra-
allowed to aleep on the |iew*. -•h«*e|rttfion.   fndrr tlm sway at lhat It ha*
ele«n, new pln»h and velvet «ii»!iit,ii* burnt it* luture in th* fumnre io keep I
conae«rat«d to the pimt it somnolent|n{t iteam" !...,. ,. 	
bottom* ol Ik* lord* of tbr l*i,tit> T'1,AX    XX ;'.uuu.,»    ,i„„.»i,i      mtcrateur, "" mm'a Till*
of thai,  it «««, of tonne, m oatT.ipe^immt keaitni-v tt* «y thst the fittiltiaf   \v„ ,./,,*, .,,.*„. „-,„.,.■,,,, j^.^
tn tni-t* ttt whleh  the  »>•■■■■'i    ;■•-♦   , * ? .,,,,„.,„,,. ,„ n,-^ ,||tJ .\meri*ran fumiKe* I **r(i ini mn rm.t- ot OauriVlbat
fell utterly down, an <wu*«.- a«.iiu*t j ,mm ihe fallliid
property.   And there wa* unbolt }<»y,' fhe (pit «leBient
I »uppo*e, la aome wean heart* tn ***\    Tti\i* Well* apiiea
thia ptmd mratrti td htatory  •Hh|trui><'olor».  lie «wul* a revoluikmriry Um«M-rti*<.n*
•II her vtend plowm** and Ijhikii^*^ ot rwm*iim:tion of iwMf, lie want* ev. * rfcm '"'" **!
ut, u»U, mktmtm Him mo he matin-',  **'•»••*■"- »*.^»< «"'- r*>MCTCf-0l
Wr have tbe largest Aa*
sortment of Rifles, Shot-
Runs, Ammunition k Camping outfits in the pass
J. D. QUAIL
Phone 37
FERNIE    .    Be C.
"dm lallam/' If it com.-* in Kniland."
(>ro|ih.'«i-^.|  HlUlr.   ly*!Stnr » tf*n*  vete*
aire, "wtll probably mm out to bo
nmhine more nor Je** than another of
the Infinie and perjietually renewed
dortK«* of the 'KnslUh «ri*toeraey,"
• Ve* U«t*iew.
Um.
  -.....-.••.., ..,,„,,,T9 , -■». ■. .*. ,.   ......   «», , kwiin ihii van
im  b>,nb*e*t* ot   »|||»ot be tnml by ffatir* Catarrh t"?«re
■     ,t   ■ j .. I »*   »  I'ttf.'SKV O lf>,T**t,4i,  it.
* if. Jn',- j*i»i«. i    h>, tin- *tt*nt**t*iont*4. ttavo knnare f",
•lieam ^i   »-«»r  m    ni»jh|M ^,f^nv ti„n«r*Me «n all t»i|ir|iie«
x£^!^S*>ZSjq!!S^&
Shlmhh Can
mnax]?.Vf
*«'f<THKI.WWOt
3   tsemtttt
t*
ItieiMi
»«4    fl»»*-r|iil|r    «M#    **
i.:iK*U>.i*.»  m*.lr itf ht*
ei, provided It doea not Inierfere with
lt*ll*» entarrh futf U Mki-n trM<»rfi»!*-
, ... ";**■■ *'-i*t'U ilu.i-ih   n|...i<  tin-  i,i,itt,t jtn.i
tlw |im*i»»-rliy ,im| pemer ot lb* pin- j•»•»«•«»»* •(>«««««•» t*t ih# etatmm.   T**-
tb* ne* k*t*-m.*rf oiumr.i^S^.lt'm^.MJ1Tt.- .^'JX*™* tk*r
totnt-y, tbt ne* hereJStarj
wry of in^nttry. '
(i»*i»»»i. ^ttMjWtW-SttlBtira^
'- - "    ; -'v-—  ■••«  "'''•  : - .    '-"Xt-    A..- : - yXAAX^x.X
",. '/;•;.     : -".  '=   * ft"   ■-v   "   ,,   </"   ■    x   ,.   ,l ■■      ■    - ^, -a-v ;%'-.;",
i-mj&susmmgm&m&sg^mmms
-A\':"-''' , -
i*AGE EIGHT
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, SEPTEMBER 5, 1014:
Ih
U
I*
la
v
*%
Have Yoti Got Your Fall Suit ?
Economy in
Shoe Purchasing
Many people puivliasf low-priced shoos mulct' tlie
impression tliat it is economy to do so. But it is
not economy.- Because low-priced shoes must necessarily be made from low-priced materials—givo but
half the wear of high grade shoes and cost a good
deal more in the end.
INVICTUS SHOES
cost little more than mediocre shoes, yet they are
the highest grade of footwear you can buy.
They give more real service .than two pairs of "popular" priced shoes, plus the comfort and; smart appearance that is only associated with the finest footwear.
Be Economical—Wear
INVICTUS SHOES
Clever Styles for Men and Women
THEY HOLD THEIR SHAPE
Clothes that are just
stitched together on a
machine soon lose their
shape because there
never was any shape
tailored into them. To
achieve clever style effects and shape - retaining qualities calls
for real expert tailoring and thai is what
you get in 20 Century
Brand Clothes. Fall
Styles Ready.
Grocery Specials
For Saturday
Ladies9 Footwear
Our new fall styles of ladies' shoes have arrived.
AVe will be pleased to show you the many new and
different lasts for Ihis season.
Wall Papers & Window Shades
PROM THE FURNITURE DEPT.
Our stock of wall papers is large and well assorted, but to make room for our new fall stock,
we are offering special prices on a number of pa-
terns on hand.
Wall papers and ceiling papers, per double
roll 20c to $1.25
.. Border, per yard .2c to 20o
Ends of patterns, from 2 to 7 rolls in a bundle, at
less than half price.
WINDOW  SHADE  SPECIALS
Cream shades, 3 feet wide, regular 50c aud 65c
value ...' 25c
Green oil shades, from 50c up.
Green oil shades, trimmed with laee or insertion.
75c and up.  Sizes to suit all windows.
Gold Standard Ammonia, pts, 2 or $ .25
Gold Standard Baking Powder, 16 oz'.      .20
Gold Standard Coffee, 1 lb. tins     .40
2 in 1 Shoe Polish, 3 for. 25
Combination Shoe Polish, per bottle, black..... ..15
Combination Shoe Polish, per bottle, tan.. .„...    ,15
Laurentia Milk. 20 oz., 3 for 25
Laurentia Milk, hotel size, 2 for 15
Krinkle Corn Flakes, 4 for 25
Robin Hood Porridge Oats, 2 pkgs. for 25
Robin Hood'Cream of Wheat. 3 for     .25
Kootenay Brand Jam, 5 lb. tins. ..*.*,     .80
Sliced Pineapple, 3 lb. tins, 2 for  35
Little Herring in Sauce. 2 for     .25
Dalley's French Mustard,large size.     .25
Dalley's French Mustard, small size 15
Red Cross Pickles, 18 oz.. per bottle 25
Red Cross Pickles, qt. sealers     .35
Black Knight Shoe Polish. 3 tins     .25
Heinz' Pork and Beans, large size     .25
Van Camp's Pork aud Beans, medium, 2 tins..    .35
Siam Rice, 4 lbs • 25
Iloinz's Tomato, Soup, large tin 25
Washington Onions, 10 lb 25
FRESH SALT WATER FISH
We received many compliments last week on the
quality of our fish.
A fresh supply will be received every Tuesday
and Friday. Place your orders early, as supply is
limited.
NEW STYLES IN MEN'S FELT HATS
We are now showing the last word in men's felt
hats for fall.
We invite you to inspect the new blocks on display in our Men's Department.
Money Sav-
ing Prices
The Store of
 Quality—
\
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL AND COAL CREEK
J
ENGLAND WAR TORN
KAKSDBN, Eng., Aug. 12.—Once
more the war dogs of Kurope have
lipen let loose and our little isle
has to take part In one of the greatest wars known to human, history.
Once more the pen has been wrenched
from the fingers of civilization and
dipping Its sword into the heart of
Kurope, la writing history once more
with the blood of its innocent fcitlzens,
War is raging and reason lies -mangled tinder the mountain loads of lend
nnd -steel. The scar of Its cruel our-
iutge will be ijpon the nations for future generation. But, Mr, Editor,
out, of thiu cruel carnage there will
arise mlKhticr nml stronger races,
which will turn aside from thc pathways of the Caesars nnd seek the
roads to true power. Whilo tho na.
tlou's tears may fall and burn the
throbbing heart, yet   our   souls   will
will fall into life's ranks will take
your places from the present crisis,
chastened and wiser and nearer to the
true Ideal of real brotherhood, while
the ambitious despot will rates away
cursed by cruelty and carnage. .But
now to my observations as I observe
them under military rule. The miines
of our northeast const are only working about two days per week, owing
to the vessels being tied up by the
great fleets which will probably engage in a terrible sea battle.
Mr. Editor, I voice the true sentiment of the Ilritlsh heart today when
I say now thnt the defense of the
weak is. at stake and the British
spirit hns responded nobly and loyally'to the, nation's call, and had It not
beon for'the neutrality of'U&t little
gallant nation Belgium the spirit of
war would not have been so rampant.
Hut now tho heart of Grout "Britain
b solid for its land's call, One grand
Idroi the government has entered Into
at the rlKht moment ia to protect the
people's foodstuffs in order to chock
still rest upon the promise which was
given to a corrupt and vicious people! the greedy desires of certain retail-j
nearly two thousand years ago by He ers as   well  as certain   wholesalers,
who was rejected by the false lead- The government has Issued the fol*
<>rs nnd cruel aristocratic tyrunts of lowine: prlcos that has to be charged:
those past ages.   Yet lie said His law) Flour, Is u d to the maximum of 2s
who,may be charged more than the
prices I have quoted above must Inform the government food depart-
ment and without the cost of postage
stamp, The inspector of that department within the district will see that
the extra charges are refunded and
the shopkeeper properly dealt with.
These prices may vary each week, but
the prices are issued by the government ou Mondays and Fridays of each
week. These conditions are subject
to all dealers who may be engaged In
Iho grocery and provision trade. This
has had a wonderful effect to aid the
poor and unskilled workers; in fact,
I 'limy say to all workers It has come
as a wonderful help, We are now
under military rule and pur northeast
coast here has about H0.000 men of
arms on Its shores. It Is to be hoped
that some unseen force will Intervene
to prevent our coast from witnessing
tho awful carnage of war between
two such civilised nations, but it tt
cannot be avoided, well, Briton must
and will fight for Its home lam'.
HENRY EVANS.
Wt«»   llfiUH  HlHi   HOOil-tt lii   III   Hii   lllttll-
klnd upon this earth, and while we
may not ".huiim." tlio ,m.is:< r plan,
neither could those children in the
wilderness, but as we look throiiKh
the immn ot history we ubservu iium
fall* only to rise again. In the near
future, my young readers, you   who
Fire Sale!
LESSONS WE SHALL FORGET
Things the State May Oo in Time of
War
By Jasper Carew .
lu war time a people learn great Ie*-
sons, which in peace time it promptly
forgets,   A striking <<vample Is being
pound.   Kvery other article Is about! placed before tis now   of   what the
the former price.    Xow, any person j H,ate <,„„ Ao whrt) „ mam lo do ,|f
■ nm.ii.i in ' . * * anil when Its way Is not blocked   by
\ private vested Interests of nil kinds.
i Yet, 1 doubt whether, on our return
i
• io the calmer days of peace, we shall
•ifl   Mlitut)   lii   iuul III ii   ■lUil'.A.j.,   .vu„^.,
:td to 4»(|d maximum per pound; but-J
!< r. ih .'.d to ls 15 d per pound; cheese J
American, B'&d; Cheshire, 9«4d l»er|
pound; lard, American, Td to Sd per
pound; baton. Is '-d ta   Is    Id    per
The ^yhole of our $15,000
stock wiii be offered for
sale at a reduction varying from 25 to 50 per cent
Sale Now on
AUGUST 20th 1914
A. W. BLEASDELL'S
DRUG STORE FERNIE
said, is the work of competition—despite the fact that the rin£s and trusts
have largely dbne'&way with competition.
Tt Is, too, an old proposal, that of
railway nationalization, but it has al-
way been met by the "practical business man" with the answer that how-
over It might look in thoory, ln practice it would prove impossible. Well,
war ls declared, and straightway,
without any fuss, the government
takes control of all the railways, and
appoints a Joint board of managers.
It was a wonderful stroke, but It parsed almost without comment ln the
newspapers. This, of course, is pos-
Miiie- in war time, but not in the piping times of peace. Then look at the
government's action in thc matter of
taking eighty per cent of marine Insurance risks, tt was a great piece
of business, and hss done much to settlo the mind of shippers. (There was
no reason why the Insurance should
not have been 100 per cent, Instead of
80 per cent, and no reason, either, why
the business should only be a war risk
business. But Just try and think of
tbe effect ot such a proposal, say, last
year. What would have been aald by
the very people who now hail thc
Bcia-iu-u -aUii »liuitu ol jo) «Jul tttiUf?
I iow tbe clerks In the offices,   the
RULES OF THE  $400  PIANO  CON-
TEST AT MCLEAN'S DRUG STORE
1. No name of contestant will be
known.
2. Xo names of contesjants will be
published.
3. Every contestant gets 2,000
votes to start with.
4. Kvery contestant get a number.
f>.   Standing  of  contestants'  numbers published weekly,
6. All votes must be brought lh
Wednesday for recording.
7. Votes cannot be solicited in or
a bout the store.
8. Tie votes In packages, with contestants' number und amount ou top
slips only.
ti, Color of certificates will be
changed monthly and muBt he recorded weekly to count,
10. Votes are transferable only before recording.
11. Contestant having largest num-
of votes wins piano,
12. Candidates not bringing In personal votes will be dropped.
Xo member of the firm, employe or
relative, can be a contestant.
SCIENCE AND WAR
m*mcu£cr boy*, and the managers
would have boen transformed into a
"horde of offlela!»"--l believe' that is
tbe term for the men who work in
the Xational Insurance office as distinguished from other insurance offices.
AH of ut who think will be able to
i see many ways in which the govern-
1 ment has taken over the tegular duties
I    For more than a generation militar
ism has been prostituting the best
minds It could enslave to the work of
destruction.
It lias been pointed out that the
most Intricate and marvelous machine
in this age of maclhnes It n modern
battleship. There is nothing olse In
the whole mechanical world combining io many Ingenious contrivances,
sucb gigantic forcea and sucb perfect
, of private firms, and wlietr the mem       w WJH,m„. ,„„.„. ,„„ ,HWl ™r,OUi
j find any gr«i«t gain made from our ex- j „j,y for rm\ business-like organisation j miiy 0f tt,t|on )n m^9\f extended fae-
p*flenc«- ir. '!»•*« trapbtaie time*.  Kt- (ha* i+em-ed to force th»t coum,   Rv
formers have long urged tbat It is the'*'? J***" w« «»»t» millions, because
tor*.
I duty of ihe State to see that every
I Individual should be fed In misfortune
. without n-cmiiin. to the wurkliouse.
"ImposHllile!" snid our orthodox
I friends, "it would sap Independence.
■DiMi*,)    ,niiitiu«Miit>,   aim   «t-ues*ii>
.      .... .in   „.i.,w>< im tn.   .tut,*.      }*, itm.,,
j It aould be tbe tad of aU things.
'    Vet Hmhw*- w* aw, tnrtd wMh » po*.
| nlble shortage* of food, and a certain
• extortion hy the gang of middlemen
•at* tem u«*«h«i«i -*ne *ro*«f eno ta*
eater. What happens? At once tha
State steps ia to reguMIe the food supply and to tnture that prices are not
raised out of reason. It la also Intimated tbat If forthir pressure la
tflt. tft# gawrnmem. trill ub* charg*
I ot all tha food te the msrkets of tha
. *. •j.inUy.   If this cutucii   j.^ h by uu
* means -aallfctly—tb*r« will be tow dis-
\ oetitlMtt votes*. The propte mast he
j protected trom extortion, and the p«o-
t pie imtat t» fed. if it wit* not tir
, tlm*-. th* Mt* of the mxerument pro-
'. wain* iXw, people fratu «*iWtUuw
| woaW to tmgmd ot. That, it is thtn
t
N'o instrument for the production ot
wealth and the building of human beings haa had such concentrated attention of so many human minds aa
the machine gun for tho snuffing out
of human Urea,  !(tilt Mnt tltfU snd
.9...I .u. e*"*"—**""*touete)' onn tomrntton erne oaeo ae-, pneeo.
1  '}. ?"'S* !* "T™*'  ^'^    *«   **^»W*    .W tetiu*i}»-kX
wheat for lltn aa hat &•#» given to]      "
m-ithti*** for   hartiHtlog   tnm   tort
death, tho feeding of tho world woold j
he llttlo more than the pressing of a j
«M*V*vU*». *     |
Militarism bat turned the groat «*r-
rtntt of inrentlra genius away Aram
tho problem of bringing a wero abundant life to mankind Into channels j
where It is concerned with tbo dla-
memherlnf of tk* ttrlni kxmnn bndf
aad strangling tbt breath of llfr-lnj
thnt body.
When aviators, after tbowuada of
years of stadf aod •speriment, at laat
Nfled man shove tbe earth, tb* »ni-
tary caste at once defied tbet
tkeoe »o uplift** eb«M fit*! md tut*.
mr.it, ronfcrn tftemadtret wWi tttmg;
ibotr fellow  ereMnrte   erawttag be-1
our whole system of production and
distribution It hopelessly unsulted   to
the task Ir hns to do. ff this great
conflict, whose beginning we haw
just seen, lasts for any great length
It.    ..Mt. t.    ..at.     -ML..*.-*.
'.nlcrtiTi in (■   -''Il
persons and the "rights" of others
will b* made plain to all men. When
It la all over, there shooM bo a groaf
fund of valuable information as to the
*,. •!.*..   v.   ti**     •*»*»*     ttt*     w**»m*.«.
action oa behalf of tbt eonunoolty.
Ussoas of the hlgheet Importance
should be learend. Rat I am not very
sanguine, either wo shall not tanrn"
them, or it wt do wo shall forget tbem
as ftntclrb' nn iwwuflite,—•RerooMS*,
low.   .Man conquered tho air only to
use It to murder his kind.
Wireless telegraphy, that might
have bound tho world togother in
bonds of co-operation, was seized upon
by war lords lu each nation and
drafted into the service of the armlcB
of destruction rather than enlisted in
the -armies of production.
In European cities railroads were
built, canals dug, tunnels bored and
the whole Intricate mechanism
of the social machine was warped,
twisted and bent to suit tho demands
of militarism.
Science, that should bave been but
the means of an ever greater conquest
by man over hlB environment, became
but an Instrument for the maiming
and murdering of man.
Truth, the foundation, the very
deity of science was necessarily
mocked at since truth and diplomacy,
honesty and military strategy, sincerity and the trade of killing are at
opposite poles.
The schools and the press could not
bo permitted to discuss the truth If
the knowledge of that truth would
make it harder to kill our neighbors
across the national boundary or weaken the grip of the war lord. Tbe In-
♦.prphttnT* of lmowMfj-w, which It n.t
onto the test of Ita truth and the
security of tta advance and dissemination, was Impossible, when knowledge
was sought only that It might be used
in the trade of murder.
To day the two systems are at war;
science,' knowledge, culture, human
progress are arrayed against secret
diplomacy, military tyranny and reaction In all nations and the forces of
reaction are devouring one another.
When they have eaten their fill,
when militarism aball bave devonred
its blood, the culttir* and art and
literature and science and brotherhood
of wan will ba triumphant.—Milwaukee Lttdtr.
Most people eat too much. Cat just
a. fow ounces less every day, and your
health will be better and there will be
no war prices for food.—The Lodge.
We know some people who by word
of mouth would faco a thousand canons in defense of their country, who
have not the courage to pay the editor the small amount they owe for
their paper.—The Ledge.
Classified Ads.-- Gent a Word
POU SALE— Furniture. Apply, 126
McPherson avenue. Fertile. B. V.
231
BOARDERS WANTKD-Uood tihle
board nnd clean rooms, $6.00 per
week, Sta Victoria, aud Wright 8t.
231
!X)R llEXT—fTwo room (unfurnished).
Apply. W. Minton. 8? Mason avenue,
Fornle Annex. 240
Dr. glmmona, U 1>. »., D. U. «., dentist*. Rank of Hamilton Niitldlng* opposite Trites-Wood  Co.   Vancouver
PIAXOS rvsm and repaired. Kor
terms, apply to Thos. nnulshaw.
JI merest Mines, Alberta.
POU SALK--Alrcdalc dog, aged ten
months; broke to gun. Apply to J.
Kngiish, Coal Creek. tU
Romr'A^
Pherson Ave. 33$
FOR BALK—Mora*. I years old, quiet
to ride and drive, and buggy, rubber tired, In splendid condition. A
bargain. Inquire fatdger Office.  IS?
ItOAItriKllM WANTED-One or two
gentlemen; comfortable borne, every modern convenient^, intone
No. m, or call house 103 Howland
avenue. 831
Jeffrey. B. C August I*. I»M.
(Toko Xotiee--*Tbat »y wife, Mary
Hornby, having left my bed and
board, I will not bo .responsible for
ony debts she may contract after
above date,
ft*****-***!. tlAMtnW It-Ul-W-MM.
stmt
TU Uhui' uuioiu alwul-i uke no
tke that the soldiers tn Borope are
working for very email wagos, nnd
some of them are worittng morn tben
eight hours a day, ff tbeto thioge
cnuuoi bt settled by arbitration a gen-
iu-aI   iUtkc   .Uuixltl   he   calloil. "TT>*
ed0Pa§Co%
NOTICE
Bank of Montreal
HOSMER   -B.C.
TH« Bank of Montr**!, Hoomor, announoo
that th«y win b« doting; thoir branch at that
point on Oetobor Itt, 1»14*
Aaft»t24Ui.       Ne F* Kendall, Mgr.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.disledfer.1-0308958/manifest

Comment

Related Items