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The District Ledger May 2, 1914

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The Official Organ of District No. 18, U. M. W. of A.
'"-   ^Political Unity is Victory
-v»
$ No. 36, Vol. VH.
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, MAV 2, 1914.
$1.00 A YEAR
the Coal Creek
Murder Case
-s
I
Tho -preMnvlnary -bearing of the' case
Rex vs. Ida Green was conducted in
the lower court room of the provincial
building 'before Magistrate Whlm&ter.
Sherwood Herchmer -represented Mrs.
Green, while Mr. Steadman prosecuted.
Provincial Constable lloardmau, of
Ooal Creek, was first witness called
and described tbe condition of tho deceased when found, also detailing the
disorderly atate of the room. Atter
several questions had been answered
■satisfactorily, the witness was allowed
to etaiwl down.
Mr. tMurphy, chief engineer for tiie
Crow's Neat Pass Coal -Co., next pro-
'duoed a plan of houses 145 and 146,
which was explained to -tbe satisfaction of all concerned.
James ,E. English, company weigh-
man,-then gave evidence corroborating
tiie evidence of P. C. Boaidman, describing in detaill ail *hat be knew of
the case from.first receiving the call
for assistance and repeating the con-
versatioo he bad with iMrs. Green la
ithe .train whilst, being conveyed to
Fernie ea -reported last week.
.Mike Mlcbeluk, on being cabled, began to describe In detail what he had
done bimseit from afternoon and what
bis wife bad said. This drew -remarks
from' Sherwood Herchmer that iDhis
man's evidence wes ail hearsay and
that (Mrs. IMlcheluk should have been
caltod as a witness.
iThe court tben adjourned until 11 a.
.m. Tuesday morning.
On resumption Dr. Anderson gave
■result of the autopsy, describing lo
medical terms the condition* of deceased.
Chief Weteby then gave evidence as
to wihat took place after receiving the
phone message from Coal Creek on
the night of April 19th, .producing various e-xfcdbiita
)Mra. .Miobeluk was next called and
through en interpreter gave tbe const
what she kniew of the case. She said:
"I beard noises coming from the direction of Green's house, -but as I bad
never been to their bouse nor mixed
with tbem in any, way, I did not go
across. I saw Aire. Green leaning out
of the window calling for help. I then
went into nvyt house, and Mrs. Green
came and knock-ad at my door ano
asked it she could coma In. I let her
in and noticed her face smeared with
9-* » J »-       , *  , .  Id.	
I saw IMrs. Green take a knife from
the wali .Mr. Green then took the
knife from her. Mrs. rare-en then went
toto the bed-room and I went out, leaving Green in' the kitchen. 1 never
saw anything else after."
.Tihis was all tbe evidence called.
The accused woman was then called
and charged .with, tiie murder ot her
husband, Arthur Green, and committed tor trial to tiie assises, which com.
mence in Fernie on -May 8th.
The witnesses were then called in
and bound to appear in a bond of $100
each.
I
trouble. ■Mm Green made a statement
to her and stayed until a doctor came.
Wlttifeee stated she had never heard
them quarrel beforo. -
Tony Murphy, the next witness celled, attar describing tbe relative position of his house to the one formerly
occupied by Green, said: "I was in
my -house on the sight of April 190b,
whon IMr, Green came over to my
. house and after a while sent me for
bin wife. I brought her over and then
Mr. Green went home, and after a
■Utile timo had passed Mrs. Green left
my house to eo home. About 15 minutes after .Mrs, Green came back and
said iMr. Groan wanted to whip her.
I and Steve iMorria went over to see
what was the trouble, and Green said
'It's all right now.' He then asked for
his rifle, -but dMn't say what for. Mrs.
Greon wouh) not let him have lt, and
then commenced to scrap. I saw
Green push bis wife across the table;
ADJOURNED ENQUIRY ON GREEN
That groat Interest was displayed in
the recent .murder enacted up here
was evidenced by tbe large number of
people, who assembled in the Club
Hall on Thursday afternoon, April
23rd, when the adjourned enquiry
touching the death of Arthur Green
was conducted before Coroner Wilkes
(Fernie) aod a jury. Sherwood Herchmer watched' the proceedings on behalf of the accused.
The first witness' was Camlie Ga-
martcl, who diescrlbed what took
place. Some of the statements made
by this witness drew certain remarks
from the coroner, and the witness was
warned -to be careful, at the same
time asking the jury not to attach too
much importance to what witness said
on .the previous occasion.
Tony (Murphy, tiie next witness, on
being asked what he knew, practically
repeated the evidence given on .the
former enquiry, and on being asked
why tbey went away, stated tbat
Greeni bad threatened them If tbey
did not go away. This statement drew
questions as to what tbey thought of
t'liemselves bo go away and leave the
bouse under the existing conditions.
The coroner then read the result of
tbe post mortem conducted by Dr. An-
denson*, ot Fernie, describing the
wounds, etc.
'Mike Broslo, who resided next door
to the Greens, stated that on bearing
the row and Mrs. Green calling for
help, he went from hie .house towards
Che <house of Dan Oliver, asking for
Dan, wbo, -bow-Wor, was not at borne.
He went back towards his own house,
-but the woihan was still calling. He
«fiw Mra. Green leaning out of the window and tben she" fell out into the
May 1st Celebration
If the weather condition of today are indicative of what we may expect tomorrow,
then we shall see the biggest crowd collepted within the boundaries and history of this
city.
An energetic committee of Gladstone Local has completed its arrangements for the
sports, and there is not the slightest doubt that contestants East and West will flock
into town tomorrow to engage in the sports.
•The program will start immediately a$er the arrival of the 10.30 train, when
Parker Williams and John Loughran will deliver addresses.
The sports program will start in the new municipal park at 1 p. m. sharp, and the
last event is scheduled for 5.15. After supper, there will be lots to entertain the crowd.
A relay race in the main street; a social and dance in the Socialist Hall, for which the
modest sum of 75 cents gents, and 25 cents ladies, will be charged; a big dance in the
Victoria Hall, and the big boxing contest between Sailor Jones and Uvanni is booked
for 8.30.
The picture theatres have also got special features booked and it is expected that
three shows will be running on that night.
Come and celebrate at Fernie!
The Situation
in Colorado
WYOMING  DIGGERS  READY
Telegrams From Border Report Comrades Equipping for Service—Women Await Wilson's Decision Regarding Regulars.
ganlen. 'Mrs. Green tben came into
his bouse and asked tor some rag to
bandage ber band-, She was covered
with blood. She asked for water and
he supplied her with what she required. Then .Mrs, Green went to the
house of .Mrs. IMlcheluk. The witness
said In answer to, question: "I have
known, ttoa „. Greens since September
last."'! heard a row somewhere around
Janua-ry- We did not want to mix up,
os I was afraid ot Green."
iMttce Micheluk was next called and
stated what 'Mrs. Green said to him
when be got home and found her in
his house.
The jury then deliberated In private
and rendered the verdict as follows:
"That Arthur Green met his death on
the night of the 19th inst, from knife
wound which silt the brachial artery,
causing loss of Mood, aald wound being inflicted by Ida Green in self defence."
Fernie Items
Air. Harry Oldlands, of Waldo district, was a Fernie visitor this week.
Nels Krohn, of the Cljub Cigar Store,
is on the sick list this week. Is the
strawberry season responsible?
Dr. Simmons, L. D. S., D. D. S., Dentist; Bank of Hamilton Bldg., opposite
Trites-Wpod Co.   Vancouver Prices.
J. R. Torrance, of Calgary, and T. J.
Griffith^ of Fernie, left on Monday
over the G. N. The will bold I. C. S.
displays te different towns In Xorah-
era Montana.
.N. E. Suddaby is busily engaged in
removing bis stock to his new quarters and expects to have business following its normal tenor on Monday,
May 4th.
From present indications there will
be a goodly number of candidates for
the examinations tor mining certificates to be held In Fernie. .May 19th.
Those who have not already forwarded their applications should not forget
ttl^L. Ihtw 'Tgftll   tint   hfe fyMyataaraA  im.
and Saturday, when the same subjects I pleased with the wonderful and de-
£? ^^"i51^ 1^:E^mle' P0?1161^ book-J liclous 'things provided.
On the plate of each guest a napkin
was supplied artistically embossed
with the emblems, etc, of tbe order.
Over two hundred guests sat at tbe
tableB. Cake, fruit and ice cream was
served as dessert and continually provided throughout the .remainder of
the evening. Past Grand Mrs. Robert
Duthie and NoWe Grand Miss Patience
Letcher of .the Rebekahs admirably
superintended this difficult work.
Noble Grand H. E. Barnes, chief
officers for the team of the Fernie
lodge, was present acting In bis capacity. Grand iMaster Robert Dudley
representing tihe Grand Lodge ot B. C,
was made conspicuous by his white
rosette, which bore the words Grand
Master. Mayor Gates of the city graced tbe hail! room with bis presence.
Comrade R. Goodwin spoke at the
Socialist Hall on Sunday evening. Taking as his subject "The Soda! Prob-
iem and Its Solution.," he said: The
greatest problem of modern society is
food, clothes and shelter.    .Manv
Two Hundred
Miners Perish
B001438. W. Va., April 28.—All
hope tor the rescue alive ot 203 miners entombed by an explosion today
in mines 6 and 6 of the New River
Collieries company was abandoned
lato tonight. Rescuers were unable
to force their way Into Ut« burning
•baft*. Fflty-nine men, all burned severely, wero rescued alive trom No. 6
mine and are receiving medical attention.
The disaster, the second largest la
the mining history bt West Virginia,
was caused by a gas explosion tn the
W-Moot tevol of mint No. "*>. It was
followed five minutes later by a second explosion, which completely
w railed UUs miue and partially demolished mino No, «. a connecting op-
•rstioa Ono hundred and ninety men
were at work tn mir* Xo. R end not
ano of them reaohed the surface.
Rsseus Attempt* Futile
The mine at ooe* caught fire aad
attempts at rescue were futile. Lste
toalukt aH hope of getting the miners
out of mine No, S was given ap and
ed with theft, received two months'
hard. Ho I* spending his holidays at
Ntalson,
Dominie Gnsti, for Indulging In reckless am) furious driving through the
streets ot the city, was fined six dollars or ten daya.
SOCIALIST  PARTY  OF CANADA
All workingmen and women are re
quested to take notice that a propa-
trnndo meeting will bn held In th# Ho-
rtailst Hall. Pettatt Avenue, on Bun-
day evening at 7.4 &, when an old timer
of Pemle, J«*ck Harrington, will nd-
dress Mie meeting. Don't forget the
big social and dance on May 1st;
goat* 76c; ladles, 25c.
THI ORPHEUM
less received in Victoria ■before May
9-tih.
The Fernie -brickyard, which, haa
been lying dormant for some time
past, tins resumed operations under
the management of (Mr. Thorne, and
as an evidence of their determination
to make things bum one hundred thousand br*cks will >be delivered to one
customer by May 15th. Some thirty
men have already been given employment and it is expected that the staff
will be considerably enlarged in the
near futtide, In addition to a high
quality brick, tiling for sewer work
and other purposes will be mannfao
tuned.
Tbe mines will be closed down from
Friday night shift, 11 p. m.. until (Monday afternoon, 3 o'clock.
Dr. X, S. Simmons, dentist, of Vancouver, Is In Fernie and has decided
to locate here. His office will be In
the Bank ot Hamilton Building.
A meeting of the Football Commit-
tee,iwtll be held oh 8uuday, May 3rd,
1911. All committee men are requested to attend.  Time, 4 p. m.
The usual monthly meeting of the
Ladles' Benevolent Society will be
held at tlie home of Mrs. Law*, on
Saturday, at 3.30.
Pob Wlnstnnlry loft laat'week for
Bnskatoon. 8ask„ where he has taken
a position a« timekeeper for Jkn Bro-
ley, who is engaged In contract work
near that place.
Th© marring* of Mr. Sidney Ward
to Miss Ethel Cartlldge took place on
Monday afternoon, April 37th, at the
home of Mr. Edwin Rutledge. The
Itev. D. M. Perley performed the ceremony. Tho young couple left the same
evening for a week's visit to Spokane.
A passenger coach will be bandied
hot noon Fernie and Cranbrook on the
way freight, east hound leaving Cren-
hrofllf, .Itrmtffl/y**, W»dti#si!iays and FW-
days; west bound leaving Fernie,
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
This takes effect at or.ee.
Tbe Crow's Nest. Business College
has opened a branch In Hosmer threw
nlght» each week, Tuesday, Thursday
keeping, stenography and typewriting,
will be taught The school trustees of
Hosmer, realising tbe advantages of
such an institution, -have very kindly
donated the use of the public school
for the purpose.
For auld lang syne! Quite a large
number of the inhabitants of Fernie
and Cool Creek leCt on Saturday and
Sunday evenings for Uie Old Country*.
The C. P. R. depot was crowded witb
people who were wishing their relatives and friends farewell and a ban
voyage.' Tbls is one of the privileges
that the wage earner enjoys under
capitalism. After many months and
years of deprivation, euphemistically
known as "thrift." practising whioh
they are able to muster sufficient to
enable tbem to travel from one country to another to again dispose of
tlhelr commodity—labor power. The
economic ey»teni under which tbe
workers live and die is of an International charaoter, hence they cannot
escape sucb a condition. But they
ns8y~ree&iTr6'vm»*questioiraS)Ie-benente"
DENVER, April 28. — Governor
Amnions today received 800 women,
who protested against further Woodshed in the coal strike zone.
They forced Ammons tonight to
telegraph directly to President Wilson for federal troops. The women
marched on tbe State House at 10
a. m. Two -hundred of thein remained
In the capital tonight awaiting the
President's reply. They declared they
would stay there until they hear from
the nation's chief executive, if lt took
all night.
A telegram from Washington to
Amnions announcing that the Congressional committee, which investigated strike conditions a few weeks
ago, would be rushed here immediate
ly to take charge of the situation, did
not deter the women in their mission.
They absolutely forced the Governor
to send a direct request for federal
soldiers to "prevent the further murder of women and babes."
Situation Unsettled
While footto the mllltla and tlie
strikers in the war-ridden Ludlow
district were resting on their arms in
response to the truce, tbe situation
was unsettled today.
One thousand rifles have been
shipped Into tbe strike tone by tiie
labor unions of Denver and Pueblo
during tbe last twenty-four hours.
■More than $20,000 has been subscribed by strike sympathizers at tbe
State capital for the purchase ot
more arms and ammunition.
In addition, word comes from
Wyoming that 3,500 miners of that
State bad been mobilized to march
into Colorado to the relief of their
harassed'   brethren   in  the   Ludlow
ers put their men to a test last night
iby asking t-heni if they would be willing to give up their arms and ammunition.
"We will give up our lives, but not
our arms," was the reply of the strikers, wbo are determined at any co6t
to protect their homes and families
from further onslaughts of the gunmen, thugs and barrelhouse bums
brought into the strike district by tiie
big operators to harass and murder
the strikers and their families and to
destroy ttoeir homes.—Trinidad Free
Press.
LINDERFELT ORDERED
MASSACRE SAYS ALARID
IN AFFIDAVIT
State ot Colorado,
Las Animas County.
, Tbe Orpheum bas re-opened, and
the management ts ss determined aa
._.   .._. -    __ „       ever to make this one of the best and
rescue parties ver* driven back hy smartest picture houses between Cal-
tba tatenee heat.
Ttwt state totmmor end blah offt-
etols of tite company, together with
gove-rnateai and atate mine experts.
wen* m th* »(«#« r*-fl4«">tttf all th*
Ttoww W Httta etttteasfAt.   ***n*n
tary and Vatusouver. 80 far as safety
is eoneerotd, Mr. Johnston hts spared
nekfaer peine Mr expense to swore aa
absolutely fireproof operating room.
!» fs**t, » Hte *ooH r»g* ta hi* *p*rat*
tag room nod barn Haetf out without
-ht* sndfemv i»«tng aware of same. It
of a more congenial climate. .We
wish all and sundry a very pleasant
journey to the land of hedge rows and
pastures green.
On Sunday evening the local Jodge
of the Independent Order of Oddfellows paraied from Pytiilas Hall to
the English, gburch tor Divine service. It Is caktomary with tbe abovo
order to visit the various Churches
from time to time. Irrespective of
creed. It was the largest parade recorded, over one hundred members
being present: tbls includes the members of tbe Rebekab Lodge.
The regalia of tbe order added
much to the plctnresqueness of the
procenston, which attracted the atten-
tion of the spectators; who aire so accustomed to tbe duM drab life of the
citizens of Fernie.
The following iMoaday evening, the
same order held their first annual
ball In'the Victoria Hall. The ballroom was tastefuMy "decorated with
the Imperial colors, deftly blended by
t9ie hand of tbe decorators. The emblems of the order were conspicuous
on every hand, which produced a feast
of coloro. The ha*!! soon bechme
crowded with the "fellows" and their
friends, who were pleasure-seeking
bent. Tbe dnw-m, beautifully attired
In the rich and varegated colors of
modern fashion, largely added to the
gaiety of the scene. The subdued but
sweetly toned music of Carrie's ot<
chestra made dancing Irresistible.
Tbo committee In charge wore red
streamers and were acting under the
ln*trum ions of Past Grand J, W. Quinney, chairman of the various committees.
The providing of refreshments and
the setting of the tables came under
the jurisdiction of the Rebekah Lodge.
They sure excelled -themselves In the
art of table decorating. Tlie tables
wt-ro spr-MUl witli white IHien ohnlts
and a Wntreplwe of rod. flowers and
green plants weire amply supplied',
whlhst the mellow candle light from
many sliver candeMiro* was some-
thing unique ami fairylike. The most
delicate appetite  was  tempted  and
tempts have been made to solve the
evil and the present social inequality.
Tbe trade union movement all over
the American continent has signally
failed to wrest more of the products of
their toll from the employing class,
and has consequently outlived its usefulness In tbls respect. AH these
schemes, movements and propositions
bave failed, and tne only solution is
tbe one advocated by the Socialist
party, and that is. tho overthrow of
capitalism. The Socialist movement
is the intellectual vanguard illuminating the pathway of progress. Comrade Goodwin was much appreciated
for his able address. He left on Monday morning for Kimberley and Nelson.
We observe that the Trites-Wood
Co. are repainting and decorating their
shop windows. Shop window commodity -display Is approaching an art in
modern commercial life. Competition
is so keen that it compels th© disposer
of the various commodities to adorn
and beautify them in order to fascinate and beguile the would-be consumer. We congratulate those who are
responsible for such beautiful displays, for a "thing of beauty is a Joy
for ever." Agreed, but to1 consume
the pineapple ls much better. When
thoso dreamers of modern society,
who wish to supplant competition with
co-operation and production for use in-
atead of for profit, we shall verily realize the golden dream ot tiie ages.
Get busy, yo dreamers!
FOOTBALL
Notice
fields. Finding that organized laborl
was ready to take up arms against
the mllitla--gunmen of the Rockefeller Interests—the military, authorities
backed down and signed a trtice.
At tbe same time the State Government began preparations today to
rush 800 more troops to the civil war
zone. The situation Is plainly fraught
^«tir^orribiB~posBHJHitieBrjrhe~strikers have sent their womenfolk and
children back Into tbe foothills in
evident readiness for any further
move that may be made against thom.
Telegrams trom Rock Springs.
Hanna. Cambria and other towns
along the southern edge of Wyoming
say that the miners of that State are
equipping themselves for war service
qb fast as tbey can procure arms. A
renewal of fighting. It is recognized,
will draw thousands of armed men to
the aid of the strikers.
Open air services were held for the
fourteen men. women and children
who wero murdered bv the militia-
gunmen at Ludlow, in Trinidad City,
yesterday. A machine gun, manned
bv a detachment of mllltla, frowned
down upon the mourners from the
rnof of the First National Bank of
Trinidad 'building throughout tlie cere-
mony.
CANON" CITY, Colo., April 28,—A
flRbt 'between mine guards and strikebreakers qjx one side and (strikers on
the other was ragin at 2 o'clock this
afternoon at Chandler, seven miles
southwest of here,
TH-ephone advices from th»» camp
where'the Victor American Fuel Company mine la located wore that tiie
KtrlkPTS nMaoked in fom» c-nrly iota v.
The guards brought rifles and three
machine guns Into action.
The strikers were stationed on a
hill above the town and endeavored
to pick off at long range the "guards"
around the machine guns,
The "guards" escaped injury, as did
u1im> all Hut town'* people, but It ih be-
)
)   ss.  Affidavit
)
Victor Alarld, being first duly
sworn, on oath deposes and says, that
on April 20th, 1914. between nhe hour
ot four and five o'clock p. ra.. he, with
i. Ryan and Hall, a chauffeur, were
returning to Trinidad from Tabasco,
where they had been to get a young
daughter of Ryan and bring her to
Trinidad to a place of safety; that
nearly In front of the Ramey .Mine tipple the automobile was stopped by
Lieut. E. K. Linderfelt and a number
of gunmen; that Linderfelt and E. J.
Welch asked Ryan where the shooting
was at that time: that Linderfelt ordered all but Ryan out of the automobile and mounted in it a machine gun
with ammunition, and tool; the gun
about a.half mile north, where it could
command the Ludlow tent colony;
that be (Alarld) helped lift the machine gun ammunition Into the automobile from a steel coal car; tbat
while this was being done he heard
Lieut. Linderfelt order his gunmen to
"fire at everything you see, and ae
noon as you get to the tents set fire
to them"; tbat he recognized among
the gunmen George Titsworth. Sr., and
George Titswortb, Jr.; and that the
older Tlteworth asked Linderfelt, "do
you want u« to set fire to the tents?"
and that Linderfelt replied. "Yes,
whenever you get to thom"; that tbe
automobile party was allowed to take
Ms car and come to Trinidad, and ttiat
the affiant told at least one man l_n_
Trinidad that tbe" tent colony was to
be burned tbat niirht before news of
the fire was brought to town.
Further affiant sayeth not.
VICTOR ALARID,
Subscribed and sworn to liefore mo
this 24tb day of April. A. D. 11114.
LEON' V. GRISWOLD.
.,   . Notary Public
My commission expires September
10, 1917.
J. O. HARRINGTON AT FERNIE
It Is with pleasure we announce Um
fact that J- D. will speak at the Socialist Hall on Sunday evening, May Hnl.
Needless to sny, J. D. Is one of Mie
most genuinely uncompromising Socialists of the west. Jlls knowledge
of ..Marxian economics and the Socialist movement lu general In thorough,
and his sincerity in the search for
truth has marked bim as the most
painstaking of students. A (-earlier
of teachers Is Jack. To the uninitiated he Is simple nnd plain, and to tbe
advanced, student he is a sure'-help.
IxiokliiK bacl: over the Fertile riding
electoral campaigns of th« past, none
will deny that be was tlie nio*t zealous
Htamlard bearer in chnmploninK the
cause of the Socialist Party, Ho play-
eti no political irame* to secure for
himself political honors, but faithfully
stood for the educntlmwl value of such
eamrmiRns and disdainfully rejected1
tho faint cut idea of political trading.
Kven In this age of democracy, the
«wiul and economic eoud-llkm* that
ilm-ed that two of1 the 'Strikers wero I have* a tendency to crush the autocra-
wounded. Most of th*» women and i cy and lay low the aeceadoney of In-
children  were taken  from Chandler jdtvlduallsin  there  are,  nevarthelims.
All clubs desiring of entering the yesterday and Thursday to places of j men   and^ women   who   attract   u*
Junior competition are requested to|««'*•*>*• "       '   " '~       *"~"
notify the secretary without delay.       ]
Rpft-TP-Mi will kindly 'aV.r* rmtl*"*
they aro to bo governed by the official schedule and take up their duties
accordingly, without waiting for further instructions.
A. J. CARTER, Set.
Strikers Retain Arms—Bolton, McLennan,  Drown and  Diamond Strike
Leadtrs See Chsse
through their unobtrusive personalities. Pl-rasc. comrades ani friends,
do not fail to heor J. ll. Harrington.
?-A.: :',   :,".   '■•;'*.;'   fr'.' !,■! ;   '.*!', '   * '*.'' V '   ''>
bim -the "«lad hand.'*
THC ISIS THEATRE
OFFICIAL NOTICE
mmtdty attendin* tmeb disasters are'ki Impossible ta Imagine anything
lsrfctng. Relatives of th* miners, con-1 safer than the tmem* operating
vtae-ad tbet* ts IHtiw hope td th*;room-, wkh iron ports and witrnnatt-e
recovery allvt ot their loved oass,! dosing door that taw been installed.
irau*M tftwil'tf 1mmu## mily ta till* alii-M.ilai aiMUto-tt to till*, ssvcrail Us*'. «x-
leaving oaly ttwta crows at tha | tlniBlshwa kataftssa introdaced into
To the District Executive Hoard, I)i*trlrt IS. IT. M. AV. of A.
\\>, ymir «Hily apjwtitited teller*, nft«>r lul,it)nl'ui% »h»- vote ,*n*d m the cWtinn for th'U'Kiitt*.
to the Trade* and Labor i'oiigrn**. nt ('anada, find thtt v«l*e:~-
In r<'»|H)ti»». tu au upikkiI from tieii.-
ernl Chase-, in command of the Run-
men-mtlltitt, a conference regarding al _. . . ,„,'., _, . ., # .
iniw. Is brins held Thl* nfternoon at The lm* will be the rtnd««\ou* for
Ludlow. Chase asked for tho trw*!i'»«*«J«* »<'**™ ««' *'**> «,i*,,,t, *
thl* morning when h« knew that th« ,■ *!»•"«'«♦» thr^twl f»*turo of a thrill-
ttrikor* could not lw held In mnrtii'"* ««'.><>' /nim,lU^Tri'',t "i *tl
{longer and that ihey had the upper. Al|« »u!1 be shown.   This film ia pro-
l-intul dnced  by a greai   Kngllsh  firm, who
'.    iWtrkt No. ir. la roprosente,) r.t Hie »'»»"-*« r.-i«it!tMjm for Wining .»nm«_or
! conference by Robert llolten. flii-nncjiil
! (vcretnry of the district: John Mct^-n-
* im»h.   -state   piwldwf   of  tho   l'ni«"l
' Mine Workers of Am*rt«4*,
Wllllnm Diamond, who I* In charge
111*.    Iili«*«!    t"t'|ii«'    ff.lt■HIV*   Of   tilM   |tl«>
-»nr*» vtorld    On 8-ttimlsy. *h««re I* 1*
li-. ■*. ilr.ujj.1 entitled "Tho K-ciiuJe ut
:\,»    H-liei ■)«•»,"    til    trtil    l-t.*'it,.       lil     1hi«
Ml** \V-ntwr places -before us Ib a w-
•t-,t *ht, *»H.fer- <n »h* V.vi'iw-n f^An'-i  r'"* *'r fiM'!v |!,":V'UI' <'"'-"t*"*--
fe-rm-HV
..9..ii9*   **tr
**Wt4,       991.9tt. Jit.
..49.4   ^194 41* 411.   m-*v tttd.ttti.'i.m
COMMIRCIAL* OIT  IU»V
. .. . '•>■ 1
i%*  ammt   W*o**ms   id   Wa^.-pUaal
IHmw tuts fees* stewed, and for to-
{Right a two-part UMa f«au|r», "Tke
Htm IWMMrtac tt tbo ttMMap Iter tftm»! %f*» tnm ttm Wes*,.* H wtinedtofied
Trttev-W-ood Cok's team ii the match Afc» t^ipM versos Womsa'a Rights."
betweam Crow's Sent Trading Oa. aad a plcturo cctml in Uie shadow of
tbetnetl-tH* tm Msv -Stb. Kttb-tdt at'Wsrsirt's temtbm ewt wn»H«. no IM-
Aptte.  - - - M*»y « Mii-rm Hwumi la ttiroo r**t%
John toady, gosl: J. Rasa aai Al- entfM "A Modern Jekell aad Hvde.
tirnhatn ......
MurUn	
r,*4
<»in
Ot\*\
ben ttp^arn, backs; R. Ilailey, Hop-
wood aod X. Mofeandro. half-back*;
Wstmoush, M. Olddlngs. Quinney.
Itsalagton and Refers, forwards.
Crow's ,V#**t  Trading Co.:    Osrea,-
gnsi: Jcbosfon nnd Wlistieit. hacks;
lm***   jMnalV.    **if.V»t.'«'ioil«K   mn)   I'Mli}',
Ulm; Tally. Cody. Hunttsb)*, Ptmr-
.:,*,n      4 9    t     ?!..,- .*.»>,• |     f..r.;.,4ir.j,
CITY POLICt MlWt
Rocky Mountain Association fV.nv-fiitioii:—
JWNUS      O0noo*o*o*ee*****4**'****  *#*  •  * ^**•
Winer     Wli
^jmhH   nnitols      t •-
Mi*Lea 11 .,.
UritEK*	
ft**w*tn«4***
Wilde  ....
Ort-mirf-T  .
1 ***** .... •
mil isi-
IniitresUng   s<>ne»,  tmt   wo-
iii.-*.,  ,«■).'■  .<   •;•»..!     ',*,*'.     An,,...,,.  .,..4
Mine  ,hw r"J"'r n  ""'1  "g'x*'l"  «"««»«ii*  a*»t
;develop*   th***  typm  »'!tli   r<*tti*>,rk-sb.t.»
iii»igti;.    ,•.•>.!    t'ti;u*,u'j«-r.    X    ,actum
rt»d mi»m oibw iatwestlag films,
will le* shown. On Rstunlsr* Uwro
wm bo a*Tb« 'math WaUAt," aa I*
mho two-part, ft-sturo.   The msnsaf*-
mmt atittotitw* at eoming * LaMn
sp-M-ial tent aro In *Ik rem*. mtVited
llu* i,irt'ji t*wx xn* Mops-fi.'
On Tn««Mhir. ,U«y Ub. Thomas Kl-
rv.cr*; tx. h^ ti".:;; ..cyixSL lis. t
Utty 'Is &m> of llitm- ««t*rt*Uii»g ge-i
nltmm who «»«Wi»* sll tbo a-rcoai-i
1 ,?il<*«*«i#t,t* of -k-awft-t"!**. *fi*«t. Iwd-sr j
<«.«•>
.........
2**>
*if
V,»9
	
	
:t!7
I'M*
......
l*»,*rt>
11. XI
diliXT.
WM
IIII-TnS*.
.1011X
W. M.\KI
N,
i fiflit, »«d   lohii   nro*n.  li»f«'!*n»»ti,x«i!
-y.mi^tt-r ot 'h" \'r*.'< ) V!»s<- \Vi(ri*->*i*«
I represent    <h«    lntm-nnMon.il
I Workprs I"n««n
I     rh"i«t#>. Hrvm-rorjf nrnt tin** >>r *ttti n"h
r-r «fffc#'.r* of Om- gimnH-n.militia. m*r** * Vk"rl,,*/V,;"»-,   ""   ' »«'■*"'«>• >»»>  •'"'■
UJ>,«    I.f    IV.-ti  -, H    |ii>:.'!l,ll'    l.'I'.l'.        • ,-',, ft,
"Th*' |VK'-3»i»*«-fs." in three r*.*-*',*., wrJH
*     *.»«-,**..     i», i    *■■      .* ....it',.,..  i-..-..,.,
In.rkt'lf4 In tli* •"•t.,mf«M,*"*.i.'<\
!    Tin'*  rnlted  Mlm  Workers"  rei,re-
'  .,,,.1    *tM1^.>.»,>.t.»,*»»^   *<*,.„,.„    *n-|.r,   -.,**,*..,,    91
' apma^itX   for   ih«»   l^ntlow   miin)*-r!t
,   »UHHi«V     «IM|    itii     ,!Ulltl.lt!     *tli»    imlf
*..**.*#^n  ttrn-9't   |i^»*,*^ th*.  -t*9^Vit, fr*'^t* *>*■   **.^.
Ithua (urMMCjr. for tli<* npivntor*.. h* <!Si-
inrmei! ?ifi<! drlvon out of tbt* Alter*ft.
! nw-m-t-flii  ea  mnrti   a*  »k»»i«ihi«» «*m»
', ■Kt»t.tf,*(i»» w>f»sr*'SiM».. for ib-i-t i* ht--,n-"*
1 »»*•!*'. f»r »!t«« »iur»ii nma *»v>r^ ft *•■.*
P'lii.'ii-n m»d«-r n»»(pli«r f.!i>-lerf,.' .  '!>
' M,»Ir  -.MiV-k  i'fi   »»...   IMS *.»*   ■. .-(   , ***'
'fir,),", b" niie'le nnd tb« H'.iil"*  <-"*■-* U*
thill  tttkna us -baek to «h*» oiit ssr««h-
„., ..*,,.if,     ....    ,■     ...        -. 1       ttt...     * .nu.,'.
'  Jt'U. ..    U,,::   J..,   I*   ■'.'.,    „:,.',   VS.,   V.,, ,!d,
raiitsli* ot blootltltlmty ri».**« of mOn-
k-t*«s*. »-|>r«-*i*Mi i*ff»or oi< u,v i.-mb «*«•.
An e»tr;i f.HcU! feature, for ttiuw-
M.
•!i.
■<'!:.
X .    t.   tit-rtK:   •*.»■<!   Jt   : t ;
,*.!   '.fipiAiA*  ot   If,*.-!.*:,
f.-mr
nit* j?
At*.
A ftr nils hrokwri Into m tb* fl, S..\*t. rompofer. Int^rtottsfor. arttel nttdi
tmtk. A t'-tmm «t»4 s Ml of b»«tt*r ^wor in prfv*** lilt- tm* tlttde bim\
m*:m. »«•****.*., **mftm^*lmt i» ***i* ttt *%**>;af* »** thlir-m- ti *•%• d+tttblttd *ohfttiMi*,
torn* et f*».«r» Th* ptdU-e nre oa tb* ».»«»■»».»«», "Tfc* Mi**oor| MmI*." wblebf
Mot'* ««»■ *•*•• ,t»^. , •%»••*   iMit  •»•■ am*tti -*.t* r*m***i*n ■*  ltt*k*i •
fttttnt 8pe*r*»r. ot Cosl Ctmk. charr Jar a **«*h in entry tlm j
V ??--Tn nrrhln,* tt *b - r-,-.A ■-,,</■-<   *'.-■ ri*"i>.>e<f«ti|v n-.-t*.- to tint ,'.i«fti* fit.-. f;r*-> .•'
Ms; th*n Ihf low mnn wa* dr<»i*i*'-d *«»■*<' hi-* v««t«i» tn»i»afi-rTNl t*x the -candidate* !«.»r!-;
•-lioii-e un i»M6 haihut ; then tiif :n-V   :-;--m:    h  ' •■"■ -»ih»-  ut.uint-r, nii.t   I in- m-xt.  instil   iv.
Thtn the third, fourth and f:f4?' eli.,},** wer, mtimt-Hl, l^nvfitit t«tnl a* oUrixf.
Tliif%l cliotcea for ll«.-*k\   .»i   u- ■   < -iiul^d. <*> xutu.<•<<-»•• ry.
prim**
<<»   "iij->
'!«-
ti.l
9     ^t^fT.*^
frtf    *ljr;r
-U'litvl'tt
ARMS POP, HfERTA HELD UP
■■■■-. iin. rt 4    tt    T'*>»    rt    t* tn rui * ,t'■ tin
iftj,itit-i%   lot   Antwerp
K
,1  »*
•»»«,< *«|MD-**l,
'.J.
.■I -j.nl M..
• '.in
«*** ■-.*.■ ;.S3£s;;
^^^||ii^#;%'
PAGE TWO
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, MAY % 1914.
Workmen's Insurance
T
By Moses Oppenheimer
Insurance against accidents to wage! The main lines for action aside
workers as attempted in the newly' from methods of prevention, would
enacted Compensation Law is only ■ have to provide adequate medical
one step toward the creation of a I care for the sick worker and support
comprehensive scheme of workmen's | .for those dependent on his earnings
insurance. The complete scheme includes also insurance against sickness, against bid age, invalidity and
death, and against unemployment.
There are two main reasons why
this subject now. forces itself to the
iront in our country.
One is the growing dissatisfaction
in thp ranks of labor, ihe so-called un-
claim to the pension is forfeited. It
is a fine, invisible club to hold over
the head of agitators within the ranks
of the service.
A national system of old age pensions, established to include all the
wage workers, native and foreign
boru, is the   only   rational  solution,
the active labor army may he decent- j must be met with armed force. You
ly maintained- by the State as a recognized reserve force, just as the State
maintains soldiers .'and sailors umtil
such time whsen it'.may call for their
activities.    .",
hi the United States more than in
any other part of th* civilized world
there are great opportunities for constructive work by the State, such as
read building', including bridges; irrigation systems; regulation of our
great rivers and harbors; reclamation
of vast deserts;' -the replanting and
cannot afford: to. bare your breasts to
the cold ■ steel of -the hired thug in
making a peaceful; fight for justice.
-An unequal fight; is no fight at'all*
All the -beatings,'; insults and bloodshed, all -the -lives rcrushed out -in the
Italian hall disa-steV'where some half
hundred' inmjocent little children were
trampled and smothered .to death can-
mot be laid vait the door of the striking
miners. The victory" you have wirest-
,ed from the hands of organized greed
ii? lathed "in the blood of .those of
As the last link of a comprehensive
; -ehemo of workmen's insurance the
| prthlem of unemployment has to be
. tal;<?n mi. ruder capitalism ihe-re
i exists always great masses of able-
bodied, willing workers who can find
during the whole period of sickness
and convalescence. For a worker
may  'be   declared   cured,   as   far  as
medical expeits judge, and yet be un-1 -The' difficulties to ibe overcome are
able to work during convalescence, | enormous. But we are living in a
that is during the time necessary to I period of fast-moving events.- The
regain,'his entire physical strength. I btone is set a-rolling. It is high time
Whether the burden of sick relief'for tlio working class to take this
be divided between the employers and ■ ;)rcblcni up thoughtfully and earnest-
n-s: and social discontent. It mani-|tjie employees, with a possible con-.lv so ns to obtain the best possible
1'oks itself in so many ways that it {tribntion bv the Stato, or whether the solution from their own points of in-
c:in no lonnt-r be ten ore .1 or denied, j g;.l!e should assume the total expense terest. If the shaping of .the scheme
Kvcn in rhe most conservative cir-: _....*. h th!s offers a debatable problem.'::-, left lo the tribe of capitalist, phil-
cles of capitalist society insistent 'ie-, One proposition, how over, may be set anthroiilsts, the results bid fair (to-be
niand-s aro mud? thai something must; ^vn as'the minimum demand of the'.i disai>;ioiuuneut.
b;> djno to bring about a IVc-ling of; workins class, Thorough and satis-'
ceinenuneiu and good-will among the J f.u.lnrv protection against the eco-
workers. That explains why lloose-, nomic" side of sickness must be crevel: and his 'progressive" following iated. And the stigma of pauperism,
:ido':»;i'd  a  mniber of demands here-; now s0 stingingly felt hy the victims*
to fore   formulated   and   aaltated   for | niust be removed.    Poverty as the re    o
many years by the Socialists. The in-; suit of disease is noi tho individual I no place in* which to work steadily
-ftvurlty cf the life of sh" workers: r.-*n 11 of the watte worker. It is one^pi,^. nre the reserve army of labor
has become a source of grave social i0f ;]„, )n0st glaring defects of the evjf)3m which recruits are taken when
dar.ger. Thc> -should he cared for t« ; latins system of wapp lu-bor that Keeps , utcletl. That army always hangs on
siuls ar. i-\;eiit at leas: as the iniel-1 the worker down on the levei of exist-! H),, flunks 0f the employed force,
iit-ent. far-i-igliU-d farim-r can's ior j encp even when !;e enjoys pood
his   caulo.    a   system  of   insurance, i10alfh.
along such lints Is expected to e>uab- All0,he.r pressing problem concerns
ii.-h peace and contentment. .' V" . the fjuestion of old age, invalidity and
much is looked for 1» the *a:>it:Uist, prematuro death. In all of those
mouthpieces. leases, labor .power, ihe only commod-
Tbe second and no less potent rea-  jtv wl|Ich  thf, wage worker has for
son   why  this   reform   comes  to  the s.;1(?i ceages [Q ,J(, a f,icl0r In pr0Cl,r.
ing the means of life.
In modern industry the wage worker is eliminated when he Is no longer
able to keep up with the established
speed and with the intensity of work.
He is replaced by a younger and more
vigorous wage slave. Under chattel
slavery the owner of the slave was
expected to maintain the superannuated chattle in some way until death.
In wage slavery no such obligation
exists.   The  old  and   inefficient  are
front is the breakdown of our system
of charity and public relief in the
face of the tremendous burdens created by our industrial system.
Under modern industrialism the
working class have become nomads
drifting from place to place like the*
shifting sands of the desert. The great
migration flows unremittingly. In ail
our industrial centres the mass of the
working population consists of people
tor., nwiy from their birthplaces,
tossed about, shaken up constantly.
The older systems of charity and
public relief fitted at least to some
extent a stationary element, rooted t.o
the soil. The family relations, their
circumstances, their characters and
tlieir history were fairly well known.
Their   needs   could   be   looked   into,
"ap'.'alisls turn to it to obtain the
strlkebrmkers and the other evil
avtncles it uses to (-rush the spirit
rf the rt,hill!oiis wage slaves. '
How large the percentage of unemployment is nobody can say with anything approaching accuracy. We are
groping in the dark, left to guesswork. Our labor statistics relating to
this subject are even less systematic
rnd reliable than the rest of labor statistics. Yet painful experience from
everyday facts of life forces even upon the most callous observer the admission lhat. unemployment is a regular and ever-present factor dn our
economic life. We Socialists know
that this factor will ultimately disappear only when the capitalist system
of economic chaos will I be superseded
,..,„ . .. ,..„ „„ „„, ,,*;i,'~ «-j ; your class whose lives were needless-
nursing of torera on our hills and noOH-zed upon the gory altar of
mountains denuded of their trees by   t* r  L T]\s fl h,  *,r ^m^
our greedy and short-s ghted capital-:     ' .g Mfl       ,       and
by the State sovereignty obstacle «»»*,* .intellect, and a de'er-
W5f «,^f. irtaiS """^ *<™ * desperation. Can
f'V' nSe?iSLia«„i fnr ?L mv a'•>•«« m **«> requirements? Can you
tion pf useful work lor the army of, '■„,,... in tv,*p-full stature of in-
the "^Ployed can only-he RatineJ | ^X^M*1 ct?'w£tS.
and   executed   along  broad,   national 11^ ,prejudice> nationality and re-
lmes- ,        I l'iglous 'bondage to the four winds and
Similarly, relief for these not placed ; g^i out a ciean-cut workingman.
with the active force should be or-; dass conscious and with every drop of
sanized by -the nation instead of .thelvour ,bi*ccd> g.;^ ,the baUie <>£ )our
States. Ou,r working population is ; ;*.Irtgs Heroin lies your only hope, and
constantly shifting and drifting from ;,tb,e ]l01,e ot- .t}je world,
place to place, from State to State, j
oar State laws of settlement as a con- j What You Have Won
tll'tion of public relief turn out as ob-! Had it not been for the work of the
t-'tacles in any great crisis. The State: Western Federation of Miners since
of Xew York declines to care for the ; coming into the district*, you would
needy with a legal settlement in any, still be working from eleven to thir-
other State, like N'ew Jersey, Connec- i.teen hours in super-heated dungeons
ticut or Pennsylvania. All the other t tx mile below the surface of the eanth.
States, of course, follow the same pol-1 You would -still be getting starvation
icv. The worker in desperate need j wages, and working under the most
Kinds himself driven from pillar to deplorable conditions existing for the
post. The game of shuttlecock and l-yaic half century, with no Joy and no
bnttler'ore is played against him. The I hope -beyond yonr dally toll. You can
need of a national system of public ] now .return to work with the feeling
relief embracing the whole Union j that the fight you have made, was not
looms up more Impressively in every j made in vain. The demand thai you
grf-ai! economic crisis. .made for better pay, shorter hours
Solemn duty requires of Socialists and more humane working conditions
to give to the whole problem of work-1 has been granted, although far from
men's insurance the most careful at- being juat, but was all  you asked
thrown upon the scrap heap to shift by a rational order of society based
for themselves.    Some of them may
succeed in procuring a precarious liv*
on the organisation of production and
distribution for the good of the whole
ing  as   housekeeper,  'watchman   audi society,
the like.   Some fall back for support     Meanwhile we try to grapple with
upon tlieir children or'other relatives.  lbe ^peotre of unemployment the best
way wo can. We urge the organization-of work through the State in undertakings of great public improvements,  nnd   we   further   insist  that
A small number obtain old age bene-
tliPir merits and demerits weighed fits from their trac,° organizations.
S luH The burden were dlvld- Solne drift imo the l)itiab,e *"•«»»««
ed somewL' evenlv Ever cL nun-l:>»(' 'f»™ish »'aterial for sensational
,t) took caie or its own in a iasnion. ^ nnd ,piaywrightSr wl,hout any immediate 'benefit to themselves. Thej
bulk are supposed to *be taken care of
by our charities and public relief institutions. But neither the woodyard
of the Charity Organization Society
nor the iMunicipil Loding Houses and
Old .Men and Women's Houses offer
a satisfactory solution.
There is likewise the problem of
Invalidity, of premature inability to
perform labor. Within our industrial
system there are occupations that destroy the  workers'  health  inevitably
lAIore ma-
tentlon, to formulate the just demands
of   the   wage   workers   unflinchingly
Whiie you were wresting these few
concessions  from  the  mine ownera,
But. under industrialism helplessness and suffering appear in masses
and as great plague spois side by
side with the factory chimneys and
the mansions and palaces of our modern capitalist princes. Strangers to
the upper stratum of society, strangers even often to their fellow workers, the sufferers and their needs
have become a tremendous puzzle, bewildering, appalling.
This situation finds expression from
time to time in frantic outbursts bewailing the fact that our almshouses,
penitentiaries  and  prisons  are  over-
S°«V^ii^» ,~^fiiriL2il|lepit «-Idowand the orphans remain living,
These   aliens'  are the driftwood cast .v.„    ,,„ „,,    „,'   t,,„   K.«„,i.„<n„D»
upon the shore by the waves of mod-
At a meeting cf tbe District Union
held Wednesday, April' 8th, in which
every local of the Federation in this
district was represented, it was decided that if the strike was. tobejeofli.
,..,.,.,.     at an early stage of life _._ .—   v.«vu ■«.«.. .,-c *>,.mC ««»
our hosimajs^our_cliantableJnst!tu-;Vt£E^^
ttonar-otn—hhsutiB-asytums;_eveinim turn€,i out without compunction. to <be reduced  and that ac
mcltantlapiac    anil    .nrfenne    aTA    nvpr. . ... .     ,,.       .-»,« - ...
Many workers die in early life. The
without offering anv compromise. It I organized labor through the Western
is cur 'business to find out the needs {Federation of Miners fed and clothed
of the workers and to speak out cour-: you and your families. Almost a half
ngeously in their liehalf. Full well j million dollars was poured into the
do we know that what the ruling class j copper country for your .benefit, be-
concedes will be grar.ted reluctantly, j sides a .train load of clothing. This
grudgingly, that it will fall far below j great amount of wealth was donated
the standards we set up. I by workers from all parts of the coun-
But the fact- should not mislead I try, and not a dollar In oash, nor a
us nor weaken the energv of our i stitch of clothing was .donated by plu-
work. We must do our full duty as i tooracy—-remember that. Capitalism
we understand it. throwing the full j has never lent a helping band when
responsibility of all the shortcomings ■ you were In trouble, and if you ever
upon the ruling class and its political ■ aid cap.Valism again in electing its
.tools. 1 representatives ttr office, you deserve
Only by such a manly poWcy cnn-the yoke with which it will adorn your
we maintain our glorious position as j callous neck—Miners' Bulletin.
the  fighting  vanguard  cf   the   great • 	
Tiny   of  labor  in   .the   struggle   for'       GIVING AWAY YOUR LAND
emancipation   from   the. sysitem   of; -       	
j Colorado is a mountain state. But
j the business clubs of Colorado are
j bringing out some points that Illustrate that private ownership of land
I must result in the dispossession of
j many.
It is pointed out that there are in
, the state only 4,302,101 acres of farm
.land In actual cultivation. At tbe
''■ same time "there still remains 9,000,-
! 000 acres of privately owned farm land
heroism and sacrifice unparalleled dn, in the state that have never'been
the history of the world, From Potts-' plowed." In other words, the private
ville to Cahrmet the stony roadway of ownership of land Is deliberately hold-
labor  Is  strewn   with  the bones  of .Ing from usgjwice^asjnuch land a.g_lL
Ljw1=3VA-n>-^M—it--h*ri=T¥7.f,=f=fe—KT^ttttil Ti-—,, o iner        %St    t\ta   annua   -Hm-a
Families Are Buying
"Sunkist" Oranges
by the Box or Half-Box
Enjoy the rich, delicious meat and sweet, tangy juice of
ruddy, thin-skinned, seedless "Sunkist" oranges.
Have this golden fruit for breakfast, dessert and
"between meals." Cleanest of all fruits—never touched
by bare hands. All the pickers
and packers of "Sunkist"
oranges and lemons wear
clean, white cotton gloves.
"Sunkist" oranges are the finest, juiciest oranges in the world.
Tree-ripened, fiberless. Not a seed
in "Sunkist" Buy them by the box
or half-box.   That is cheaper than buying by the dozen.   They keep for weeks.
\Ask for "Sunkist" lemons — so full of juice
that they go farther than other lemons. Try "Sunkist" lemonade—hot or cold. Lemons add flavor
to fish, meats and salads.
Rogers Silver with "Sunkist" Wrappers
Cut the trademarks from "Sunkist" orange and
lemon wrappers and send them tous. We offer27dif-
ferent premiums, all Rogers A-l Standard Guaranteed Silverware.  Exclusive "Sunkist" design.
For this orange spoon send 12 "Sunkist" Orange or
Lemon Wrappers and 12 cents. "Red Ball" orange and
lemon wrappers count same as "Sunkist."
In remitting, send amounts of 20 cents or over by Postal
Note, Post OfSce or Express Money Order.
Buy "Sunkist" Oranges and Lemons
at Your Dealer's
Send your name and full address for
free premium sheet aud Premium Club
Plan, Address all orders tor premiums
and all inquiries to (ion
California Fruit Growers Exchange
105 Kinf St, Eut, Cm. Ctardk       Torwto, Ort.
#
those for whom no place be found in wase slavery,—TlSe Xew^York Call
Copper Strike Declared Off
by Referendum Vote
.but deprived of the breadwinner.
They, too. often go to Increase the
size of the scrap heap. For this latter class of victims an agitation is
uow under way to provide mothers'
, pensions. That is really a misnomer,
When approaching the problem of for tho reJief B0Ught Is not so much
ern industrialism. They are the waste
of our Mreat industrial army that ls
steadily recruited from all corners of
tho earth.
insurance against sickness iu the
I'liited States we are confronted by
chaos.    Highly developed as our In
for the members as for the dependent
children. They should not be permitted to go to waste.   They should be
dustriesare In regard to production, .brought  11-p in  health and  vigor ad
materIa] for recruits in the army of
wage labor. In the times of chattel
slavery every new-born colored baby
represented a dMInct cash value, similar to the calf, the colt and the lamb,
•Modern Industrialism begins to look
upon tbe babes of the wage workers
in much th* same light.   Hence, tbe
the protection of the workers as to
their health Is still In Its Infancy.
Many kinds of occupational diseases
visit the workers, notably the so-
called white plague, the much-dreaded consumption, which stalks through
our factories and tenements. So far
we   have   accomplished   very   little,
either ln prevention or cure.   A noted rap|d   headway   which   the   cry   for
physician. Dr. William J. Robinson,
discussing the needs of a normal life,
requires the following: 1, plenty of
good food: 2, abundance of fresh air:
.'!. physical exercise In the open air:
4. a substantial annual vacation; 5.
peace of mind; 6, Intellectual work:
7. proper distribution between city
nnd country life; S, congenial occupation: 9, normal sexual life; 10, good
medical enre.
A fine list indt'wl, excellent medical
artvjcr! How much of that advice
cnn in* taken by the Jivt-ragw work-
*rs? Is not this list In Itself an Indictment of our system of society
which shuts out the tua*** of the workers from the enjoyment of permanent
' hwlth?
KxjM'r.lcnce lsa« shown that the sy*
ould have
accommodations would have to be furnished for
6-3ve."al liundred  families  now  living
JJi*asBJier.o4<M«ei*R-&B4l^«raeir^whTrta Aki the same time
.the courage to do and dare—for -labor, there are millions who. due to the fact
Lnbor leaders have faced calumny, 09-;thnt private ownership of land calls
(racism, starvation. Mis, prisons, the for a big investment now before any-
gallows and death, but the spirit of lone can use the land, are unable to
Established April 1899
W. A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail    TobaCCOnist
BARBER   SHOP
mothers' pensions la making.
.Meanwhile the human scarp heaip
continues Its heartrending appeals.
The demand for old age pensions will
not be silenced. We have pension
systems for soldiers, for poMcemen,
for firemen, for teachers, for civil employees In the service of the State
nnd the mtinlcl-pallty. Capitalism Vlll
find dt inevitable In tbe long run to
prrMe old ago pensions for its waffle
shvps. Any such syctem, to <be useful, must cover all the victims, lt
will never do, for Instance, to establish fine distinctions based on a capl-
tnHai code of morality, or on the quality of political citizenship. Tho worker* who have -given -thft best years of
their lives to tbe work of society have
n Jncl claim for decent and honorable
in company houses. After thoroughly ilrr-ejom cannot be imprisoned, nor get the land and employ themselves,
debating the subject lt was decided j strangled upon the gibbet. John, The situation is repeated ln all the
to piw. tlio matter before the men on j Brown was hung, Elijah 1-ovejoy was states. Not half or even a third of
strike. .Meetings were arranged for
the Ahmeek and Calumet locals on
Friday nml the Hancock and South
Range on Saturday when the strikers
were Informed of the proposed reduction In kneflts, and of other obstacles cortfronttng them. Tw:o propositions woro put to the men, viz; To
either moke further sacrifices regarding benefits, or return to work, which
was put lo a referendum vote, on Sunday „ with the result that the men
decided on the latter. At the meetings held prior to taking a referendum on tlio proposition, the question
was thoroughly discussed, tho men
realizing llmi all concessions asked at
the time of the calling of tlie strike
bad been granted by tbo mining companies Willi th-* exception of recognition of tlio union, tbey felt as though
<his demand mdght be waived, and
that they could return to work with
iho feeling that the strike had been
priictlcally Iron.   If the refusal of the
murdered, and OarrlBon mobbed be- the available farm land of America Is
cnuse of tlieir heroic work in freeing in any sense farmed. Private owner-
the chattel slave whose final emanol-, ship of. land is keeping it from the
pation cosit the nation the flower cf plow.
Its young manhood, and untold suffer- The remedy proposed for this sltua-
ing. The battel clouds of the exter-i tion by the master class ls always the
ralnat-lon of wag« slavery are fast)distribution to individuals of the lands
gathering, but whether ft must be! still remaining In public lands. (They
fought with bullets or ballots depends! gloat over the fact that there are 'more
alone with you. Indifference, preju- than 7,000,000 acres of cultlvatable
dice and Ignorance will bring about public lands in Colorado. If this land
the former—education the latter. The!should be turned Into private handB.
battle is yours, and you must fight It. jus the cormorants ask, then, accord-
The chains of wage slavery must be Ing to the records of land already pri-
ftrlcken from the limbs of labor el- j vately owned, 3.500,000 will be placed
tber by peaceful means or by force, beyond the power of the people to
there is no alternative. You men of reach it and will not be cultivated,
the copper country  rebelled a«alnst     if, on the other hand, these 7,000,000
Baths and Shoe Shine
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
Our Coffee is Good?
acres were held In a body as public
property, and cultivated by tbe public
for the public's good, It would Immediately give Colorado.nearly twice as
unbearable   conditions   and   brought
about a strike of your own volition
without the sanction of the official
head pf your organisation.   Your a^p-     ...
peal for financial and moral aid was j much more farmed land as It bas now
-Immediately responded to -by the par- and   would   nrford   employment   for
ent organiisatlon who appealed to or-' every Idle man In the united States
mining companies to recognUe the I ganlzed labor of America to open th-slr j for years to come.
Western Federation of Miners does ln| purses for your financial nsslntence. |   This  would not  "take  away
Him of voluntary ri-lief i* mIow In miir.'m.ince during c'd age. To ex
■extending and never extends far]elude the vast army ot alien worlc-
■unough. jers  waiiljl  not only 'be monstrously
It l» not onlv inefficient, but It j unjust, but n vital defect of tlio whole
also inline, ton big « »hnre of the 1»!»!«« of old nm pensions.
burden upon the wage working rliisn. 1 For some tlm* «renf rnilr-fwds nnd
TVs.'t* .1 a/z'tiui t'i t.-iji*tti*i\»itit uiKiir- j01 her large and powerful corporations
»n<(- liniHt bo c'sinbllslicd, as a'duty I have rrenled so-called old age pen-
of orgiiiftixed society. At leant until Utnn -aystero* for tbolr own employee.
lli*i« iim* .when the wliolf* problem of|'rii*e workers themselves have no
health In all its phases Ix recognized voice In those system, nor any Influ-
nnd dealt with as a public function'euro over the rules of their orgnniza-
ns ftimlnmeninl  tt* onr puhlie fitne- tions and administration,   That Is nil
Hon In the realm of education
• Tlilt* c:ui be brought ntrout only by
the strong arm of the State and Its
power over our matchless resource*,
fflie Stale I18* often enough used Its
Imposed from above. Those systems
nro deigned to keep the wage slaves
more firmly bound to Ihelr Job, lo
fost-er 0 spirit of meek and mute «ub«
mission.   Tlio futur*» tieneflls are dan^
machinery In   aiding   business   Inter-jRlct) liefore ihelr ey*i* a* a great boon
est*, Industry and commerce.    Why | which  ihey  may low* in est* of n
not une It also In -aiding *1»»- workers
mralr.*!    »b*4r   ilr#*ndcd   i»nemy,   dH
»#«**?    When our workers l-wim to
use their jiolltlcal power wisely for
the
tViie result, you well know. Their Ifarm" ot those who already own land
moral aid resulted In the crucifixion privately: It would only use the pub-
of the monied oligargy of Michigan j He land In a more efficient manner
eop'per before the grent bar of the and save the public* heritage and the
American people. The refnlt of the, power of the people to do things for
Congressional Investigation -ennnot be, themselves.—Appeal to Reason.
computed in dolJsrs.   Its effect will '•	
ho lasting, und tho benefit to organ-j ANTHRACITE COAL OUST
Ixed labor greater than possibly many i NOT EXPLOSIVE
cf you appreolate at the present Mme. j —-—
The strike with Its attendant priva-i A series of Important tests to deter-
tions, suffering and sacrifice, the de- mine whether Pennsylvania anthracite
termination and valor displayed by coal dust Is explosive In the presence
the men and women iu the rank* his, nf mine gas hss Just been concluded
In ;r clansci Is forcing Itself upon us'been a stimulus to organised labor by tbe United Slates Huresti of Mines
more dsy by dnv. nnd It Ano* not In- tbronirbout »h# nation, and k.s;uul ul.u, iu Jvilttburg experimental station,
velve on llm Calumet tt Helen, The .a defeat, It Is one of the most glcrl-iand the experiments! mine of the Da-
llomcstflkc, nor any corporation to ous victories evor achieved by the reau near Bruceton. Pa. The tetts
stiy the wheels of progress. The worker*. You have gained ground * pnved conclusively that anthracite
complete organisation of the workers that will never be retaken. The Wost- j coal dust will not explode, whether or
Is but a mutter of a few years, and cm Federation of Miners and organ-1 not gas Is present. Tbe tests showed
when they tio organise, tt will be into lzed labor everywhere yet consider (that the coal dust tends to lessen tbe
one comimcl political and Industrial you striking copper miners as a psrt.! length of flame when the mine c*s
organisation which will stand for all of the great army fighting for the, Ignites.
time to come. To the strlkln* min- liberty of the working clans. Youri "The tests have been of tremendous
<*rs we sny: Return to your work with sacrifices and indomitable courage in Interest to all those engaged in min-
1 firm deiormlnatlon to do your full tbls fight, your tnivatlons during tbe | Ing anthracite," says George 8. Rice,
nny meawiw prove'*balm to their
wounded IfPllngs. 'nud give them a
sense of lnvlng retained their dignity
<o the em!, well may It bo cherished
In their bosoms. Their only demand
is tho* oil union men returning to
work mint surrender of his member-
ship card, Itut whether the fires of
unionism which find a home ln Ms
■bwist can be quenched by forcing a
mm to renounce his organisation re.
mains to lm seen. The turning of the
pages of time will only toll The
need of ormwlznt-ion among the work.
CASH MEAT MARKET
Z~*msamsmmmmmam*^mmammimBssmmapmmmmmam*imam*memm.
We Handle only Fresh Killed
Alberta Meats .
A trial order will convince you that they are the best and
our prices the lowest
21bs Creamery Butter 65 Cents
Prompt Delivery to Any Part
DAVIDSON,
Turner Block, Wood St.
Phone 52
imMMBW
m
duty Jo your employer, nn honest
dav's work for tin' comiienmtlon
asreed turn   ftlva him full vain* of
strike or if dismissal    For'lb" rules; m'Tyi**' hwAo "ot ""mm fowmton
benefit 10 the faithful who hav* been j "• ••Jr"Jf ™™m$™?*  m*,J*E
continually  In  service for no t.*u„iA nelhre ol vottr children.    BducaAe
•h-W-'lV"!'.   'h*')'    t'i"*,   SJWke   ll.U   ti.*'
cMn#rv of the State th*ir servant In
this re*pct't„a* well as in otlwrs.
manv
past nine months is -proof positive of
your agreement and pledge to the
lirlnclples of united action which you
are now vailed upon to repudiate <!od
Chief Mining Engineer of the Dureau
of (Mines, "Since there are targe
amounts of anthracite dust unavoidably made in mining, If the dusts were
knows it wss barely possible for * Inflsmmsble It would be a very serious |
man with a family to subsist on tbe problem, almost Impossible to over 1
meagre  benefits  furnished   hy  ywit, tttxtt, j
jmumeHes thai  you may be better .brother worker, but he who so freely!   "The British experimenters In their
tH
iiX»t«. tKehiddor <nu.J  onr^ iL^'wrcd to aid In th* great tattle gave of his small wage made almost experimental gallery have indieated
l.luftui^ thi»<»»*t IssooMobeloimhUor yonr own as much sacrifice as you hare trndo, tliat the Welsh anthracite Is Inflamma-
uiimntmy  01 mtwe ne nrown tne lfn,Momi „ ,,„,„,-,  tU< w,„  require| n«. furnished •obslntenee wWIe yon ble. end anthracite dust was not In-
  ...■«.,.'.".!."."j""" ■ '*.      1' 'our scrvb* In  tlm front ranks, a fought al the front.    Von or* eom-!n«mmflble when fire damp was not
J hat t li- from wit kb ->ou oannot escape* nsdes, brothers, and an Injury to one! -present,   and  this   ti wakened   some
1 »f«m<<m»icr ili.!s:   If you nre to ever Ih the ■•onwn of all,   As tttdivtduftls. j doubt whether the Pennsylvania an-
get relief from tbe deplorable condi- there Is no hope for a betterment ofHhraelte dust mlttit he fnnsmwsWe
llnm   tli-M rr*<v    «nrrr>**i**    «•«•■'     "»''"" ,...■. *ut ■ ■       •_ i ,wv*»..* *v«,«
mmt  iitbt snd
THE
Bellevue Hotel
OOMMBRCIAL   HOU81
■est Aecemmedstlen In ttt* Pass.—
Up-to-DaU — tvsry   Convsnlsnee.-*
Ixcellfnt Culslns.
SUITABLI  FOR  LADtll AND ttlNTLIMlN
il. A. OAIXAN, Prop.
BILLWUI, AltA.
SALf
mttrmn***    %•»**     *'r,i*'*-r,tt,. ,...-*ui..       ._ i,wv*»..* vt 91 m'tl-v **v g<-eat Uellght Of all Who Wlt-i
k««p fighting—ro«rtbor or-ooMtlcsl ewmtr*»ln« wx-tk ib»»'Ttc»*t'J' llu- ii-, i;*- \\w ^jji.AMAu W**;,
i ,,;,„,   ,* ,i, j»Mi u*u MAiiU*.)i*«*4uir«!ti. spirit ol class eonsctoosness.! not only proved nonenploslve without]
fv.,p> iroigitif that vour t".u>mU-» are] et ery h-t-p* is h«Jd out to you, but i»- j HwMlamii being present, Jhu In »n
eolnu to frw yon.   Their Interests He j member, a rard mam «*«*« nm* wseee-
A BETTER REMEDY
'   thw mvs salts ;
pocket tin botes; toe, tt,*, titte,
Yw cnn bur Resnll Orderlies only
at The Rexall Stores, nnd In this town
vm.# vt ea.   *•*. ,.b, ouauMO), uruggist,
"IHnrln A'-^tir, frrnb, Tv T.
Nature** Purifier
EVfRYONE it M iim* tMwtai ft *•
iwumtr ot hnaOtma Im •»».. »*»•» W
1 **in*t. m d
dAtd, tahae *..,- .
• lull mi'iu.flot
r ttt bfcom* *n«c|i—. -, —, --,-
irr r orttnc* of ■ ml* Mid MWCtivt (MWiUriMS •«•*» "
bftndttttit
TSo'. ''Ttait imb" taaa tt* nMf tdtma at tmt
tm.t l.» r"*ti.K «»i <ii.i, tm tha ntt-trn**** m mmaa*
and tba mntrtmtim at btdtk kt eaettttaima
ammUtn.
Oi»U, • l*ni. I o-UAY itam raaa bad*.
f¥t--fmra4 miy tf
J.C.ENO, Ltd., "Fniit Salt"
Works, London, Euflnnd
Aeam I* Cunrtai MtmaWf.NM* *
C*..UmM«A. »ni»aC*at»t.Taaaane.
.JytHE***--*^-^'
Pew people like to take physic, es*
 ,w „., ,      ^"^«ra^^^f^
iu k«'«piua ih« eholna of wsge slavery j iwrily mean a union man.   ton most 1 flammable, and (tinn tended to Im*w» I ?5^D!l5V«tn« >h!Tv mmm   n«*»ii
.•.bout your limbs.   Vou and vour e'asalRorourh deeper than paying voor does (the length ot flam.. «>f an explosive IJ-SS.™" V»^
«r- 'b'- r-nlvntirs that vou shrttM ron* I uiul a!t-»'iwllna  mf**>ln*a.    Yem  mom P.rrdnter* mHntr,, "r,",p ..-■■-.»
Tli* worker in skinned every d»r.
and npende bin time In nursing tb*
•oro place* no there will be more cuticle for tho grafters.
,V"iX
' ••    ,•:,..    :;,..     ...    .*»« ,...„, «M »,»«> mm.   Von nnst tn-t   -«Htf Rodertck. of the State IV. *^^ "!S*II^L^8lB,t ^SasS
mliihty goal raw* of hia.   Tbe lrss>ns j form yourstlf both on the political | partmeut of Jllne*. belletred that the 2!^ JKLSb S!Z£SI
»'♦! bave \>tm lantht yon In M« t*r-!»nd fndwstrtal field.   Xo great mat*} matter was of mt-rh treat Importance! E?.?!; . "1°1V;«   iL». »h«  ^«J5i
iu.     .tv tfttwiit  MHiiw   mom 1   "■» *t*   9*1* 11 * 1 thi  iim|>ui inn-, r-. -   |.   . .    /ttism    tua
rifle •»nuitl« of the past nine months! rial  benefit  will come to yon until to  the sntbrfirlte  Industry  that  he!"" •"  *?. "."J 'ri,'™
■   e your own class In brougbt four of tak inspectors frftmi»<^ «'J^B »«rort'
leave the bowels
Machinery was destined to be men's
friend. Under mpltalltt ownership
of nit the machinery of production, it
ts his downfall. He most own tbe
machinery of the world to lighten his
labors and those of his fellow work*
ers.
f*OS_
A *ivi< bwn n trmt educator and *bm,-Ayot learn to place ,„... „„„ ,,_._ .... „_. .,-.  _ -.^ _   «_,«.,,^. ».«„. «•.«. K»«.t.
it*ver It* forgotten.   It win. m At**m, iwwer.   You must haive politic**! con- j Luseroe and Schuyklll < onntles, which     Retail orderlies move tne noweis
'•'"'■♦*r fit wit for the fntwrc.   Wi»?| tml if you ever expe« to win on the j contain   perhaps  tbe   moat   fmseons;; Wompjjly,      ...... ,    .
m.nv  m«) ranslder ..fcfeat  f^-r  tb«Hmftistrfsl field.   Compare the strike?mlnea  In the  wM    ftn *x,m<vvi ttmntthnn    the   'nf«ttnal   muaclM, *^7aZtlimZZ~»*A m« «*
!,-'»,"t- ronncr totr.r-*   r*.  ,u ,*,',,  ,y *„..' •!.,,, „{,-,-,\f,*--<*\ *<>rk«-»r» at acbenw-1 Himself a* being crwtiy pieaswl with slaving tbem' healthy and reguUr In t   \\mln I^esidwit Wilson nnd Wn po*
tm* In Hit battle between **xtY.\',inXy wbcfw tb* rltv w^s contwIW by I the conclusive d*mnnstrstl»n. liVhlle' action. They taste like enntv. nnd Htlc»j tttmlly nnt giving t.x.r uu^mJ-
•ind hbnr which moat «sw um-1 o-'-fh- t^tfitUfa   to 'iv   iilrikca uf IU ,'lw nul *.*U*- * >».|HH-turs and avmtarntthe movement they cause l« as easy ltd at4«u!a« U;• itrespccilve Wftt
-ivtitr ,-it imr »mn m-nv,* m <.-hmi;.», tt Mmt, U*nil. TrlttidJi«J aud CnUiflK**, j ef the nntktndu-. di«tri«t have been; "rid nnwral as tn<m$k 1W bowoinijmtoi,* t0ti w_» In progress In
low tbt» talnrkt of capltaii.w whl«h where the offlwrs of the tew worlwd { fery iwsitlve from rcsolta of ta*ny'»«™ «» !»««*« "•*»>» •»«/•■, ™™r Co,«^,*S? ,0 w*,*h tfc*y mTt> m**
}-At into ««i »redi«<'c**«r« cf <iM't^'!!'i coaianctton with the moisted Inter-!years* oxperietw. thnt the hithwrto 1 h*« u» wke *nl vnynenm *n'X*,'\no tmomtm,	
i.ainxtrx: ovttom *f»d Mirtfl!#-i «» tn>i**'« trampHng law and order Mo thefcottld not nssen that It might not •*|!»J##J» ^LI*^, •» TSrihL'^fShI    in.n«,  mt^ktnmmm» .M «^ih.#
•mrt-d tonm fn thc pnol lle»*ra*»id».,'.. working shonMer to .honliler f tend the tlamc of a fire-damp «*pto- »•» ***} »« "»•/«» ^uKS^uH *M?SL^2£KSlM^i<t!S
'Hve followed victories. *ad v c'"-t*«t with Imimrterf A*ap*m*km, am«| lo ^«n. Sow ifcf-y tblnlc that It ta* boon i lbe_ 8»d*r*w»dlng that, tf they do not (tired of demsmllng joirlee an! being
Xfiri,,\\w mnt* fctbor waged ttn «hc wh and with foil antbwtty toi shown beyond on*etlon thnt ttt pres- strfsfT jwr fn^^^M^W^jJ*^
<„,.. h,.„„ ,„r,fr(„- »;ur, ,:y.,, uuju.^ *»i wm ax i*t*er*, » etttb nt**** renits to limit rather than to i» M^ bflj^wmmmMk u» tell lion ttat rmta' »» wtbteg MdIsn-
\t, iuul vwtei the Am*H*nn isbor condition «» nwiW tn the ewppM- tend the namc."«-Cenl and Poke Op-jwt We honeftlr hellete them to he'Wral million or them ar* gating r^dy
f mewment ore frawrftf w^th ttccrl* nfj«:dUc ts to be cnntlnn* A, mmeft ffWceiMOtor.
iihe best bowel remedy miulc   In vest to veto for what tbey »*w. *;
THE DIS'iTCICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, MAY 2, 1914.
PAGE THREE
Local Onion Directory, Dist. 18,D.M.W.A
V
\
HBSg3BHHH^*W^iUtM^^
GLADSTONE LOCAL.
No.' 2314
Mjet first and third Fridays,
Mlr.ers' Hall, Fernie; second and
foi.rth Fridays, Club Hall, Coal
Creek. Sick Benefit attached.—T.
Uphill, Sec, Fernie, B. C.
HOSMER LOCAL
No. 2497
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 in K.
P. Hall. Main, Street. Sick Benefit Society attached.—W. Balderstone,; Sec., Box 63, Hosmer, B. C.
MICHEL LOCAL -
No. 2334
Meet  every  Sunday   afternoon
at   2   o'clock   in   Crahan's   Hall.
Sick Benefit" Society attached.—
H. Elmer, See,
PARK LOCAL
No. 1387
Meet  every Sunday.   SicV and
Accident Benefit' Society attached.—Michael, Warren,  Sec,  Can-
more, Alia. f
HILLCREST LOCAL
No. 1058
Meet second and fourth Sunday
In mouth.   Sick and Benefit SocU
ety attached.—J. Gorton, Sec.
CARBONDALE LOCAL
No. 2227
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30   p.m.   lh   the   Opera   House,
Coleman.—J.  Mitchell,  Sec,  Bos
105, Coleman.
BANKHEAD LOCAL
No. 29
Meet every Tuesday evening at
7 o'clock in thc Bankhead Hall.
Sick and Accident Benefit Fund
att&ched.—Frank Wheatley, Fin.
Sec, Bankhead, Alta.
•	
COALHURST LOCAL
No. 1189
Meet every Friday evening at
7,30 in Miners' Hall. Sick and
Accident Benefit Society attached.—Frank Barringham, Sec, Box
112, Coalhurst P. O. *»
BEAVER CREEK LOCAL
No. 481
Meet every first and third Sunday at Lyric Hall, 3 p.m.—John
Loughran, Sec.
COLEMAN LOCAL
S No. 2633
Meet every alternate Sunday at
2.30 p.m. in the Opera House,
Coleman.—J. Johnstone, Sec.
PASSBURG LOCAL
No. 2352
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
ih Slovak Hall. Sick Benefit Society attached;—Thos. G. Harries,
Sec. Passburg, Alta.
BURMIS LOCAL
No. 949
Meet every second and fourth
Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.
in Scliool House, Burmis. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec,
Passburg, Alta.
MAPLE LEAF LOCAL
No. 2829
Meet every first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m. ln
Union Hall, Maple Leaf. No Sick
Society.—Thos. G. Harries, Sec.
Passburg, Alta.
LETHBRIDGE LOCAL
No. 574
Meet every Wednesday evening
at 7.30 In Miners' HaU. 12th Avenue North.—L. Moore, Sec-Treas.
BELLEVUE LOCAL
No. 431
Meet every Sunday at 2.30 p.m.
in the Socialist Hall. — Jamos
Burke, Sec, Box 30, Bellevue,
Alta.-
CORBIN LOCAL
No. 2877
Meet overy second Sunday at 2
o'clock in the Club Hall, Sick
Benefit Society attached.—Geo.
Kims, Sec, Corbin. B. C. ■
GEORGETOWN LOCAL
No. 3026
Meet every Sunday afternoon,
2.30, at Boarding House. Sick
and Accident Fund attached.—
Max Hutter^ Sec.
**»* yyyyyvyY »*»AMHHt»;f **»»*».» » y v » r * »*»»»AM(.»j|nmnnm*»» ¥»»■¥¥ »4^^MM^¥^M^»»»^»»»»¥;»'tMMtl»
The South African Deportations -- Glasgow Protest
irtrk*ic*'kit'kleirkirkirkirHri(irkirkirk ^t*********THHt************   *•*•••*•••**•*•***•*•**•**
Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corp, Ltd. ot London Eng.
A. B. CAMPBELL, Dist Agent
Miners' Union Hall Block       -       Fernie, B.C.
On Monday, 23rd March, a meeting
to welcome the deported South African leaders and to protest against
"Bothaism," was held in St.-Andrew's
Hall, Glasgow. The chair was occupied >by .Mr. Robert Smillie, President
of the Miners' Federation of Great
Britain. It cannot be said that the
meeting was a great success from any
point of view but that of enthusiasm.
The attendance was not anything like
what it should have been, and that
may te partly due to the Joint Board
in London being obsessed with the
importance of having the highest legal opinion on the deportations. I
don't mean that conscientious objection to that kept the general public
from attending. What I mean is that
a huge sum of money being required
for that purpose, the need for -economy In advertising asserted itself,
with the result that the meeting was
not advertised as it might have been.
•Mr. Smillie, in opening the meeting,
referred to tho growing brutality of
the ruling class In every part of the
.British dominions in dealing 'With0 labor troubles, and asserted that it was
high time Labor got its house lu order, politically and Industrially, to
wage the class war that was undoubtedly raging in society,
iBaillle Alston moved and John McLean of the B. S. P. seconded the resolution. Q   . ■'
Both made good enough speeches so
fnr as fighting spirit went, but there
was lacking in all the speeches of the
evening any suggestion of definite
at'tfen to be taken.
The three South African leaders,
Watson, Crawford and McKerrell, confined themselves to statements of the
facts in South Africa and comments
on the same.
Watson, who  spoke first, detailed
the circumstances leading up to the
shooting of last July, and stated that
when a conference was arranged between the Union representatives and
Botha and Smuts, the. men's leaders
refused to discuss any terms of set-
i tlement until they  got a guarantee
; from the Government that the widows
and dependents of men killed would
■be provided for.   Smuts admitted that
.the Government was in a hole, and
,.pleaded with the leaders not to insist
, on a written statement.    "Take my
word as Premier, that they will he
looked after.   It is the Government's
intention that the workers of South
Africa shall be made to forget that
jday."
j    Tha   leaders   agreed—and   Smuts
broke his word.
After a fortnight without anything
being done, the Federation reminded
him of his promise, but still nothing
was done.
The_^^aaiiQn_llifin-staEted~to-re'
Africa had learned some things which
they will never go back on. Amongst
these was the futility of sectional action. . They believed in solidarity, and
believed and practised that "an injury
to one is an injury to all." He, too.
is going back to South Africa "without, conditions."
■McKerrell spoke last, and made one
or two telling points in his recital of
affairs in the Transvaal. He stated
that there was one incident in the July
dispute which the Rand workers would
never forget and which the British
workers should know.   During the ne-
Like the others, McKerrell is determined on going back to South Africa.
His speech was the last of the evening.
The net result of the meeting is that
we all know a few more details of the
South African situation.
Only one suggested line of action
was made by McKerrell, viz., that
each worker should send a post card
Jfr'M
How   About   Your
be sent back to South Africa on one
of our biggest Dreadnoughts with
power to laud,
gotiations .for a settlement it was i As ons ite™ in a l,la" of campaign
agreed on the part of the strikers that!this mi8lu lje ver*V sood, but how fu-
there would be no demonstrations and ti,e of itself.
on the part of the Government that     In their relationship to the British
there would be no movement of troops.  La*or   Movement   the  deportees   are
A draft agreement  was' drawn  up lo° modest, which in present circum
and submitted to the strikers and ac- stances is almost criminal.   If they do
to his local M. P. and the Prime Min ..      ---.       .........
ister demanding that the nine leaders  ?,,u".f?ts "hose faculties are often less
arranged and suitable lesson for today
may be unsuitable five years hence.
Our teaching must bring out what.' _T *,   _
is best in the student, and must ain>j HnnCPWnrkr
at cultivating understanding.   A writ-* llU.uaovuiA.
er has said that "stupidity may be di-! 	
rectly   cultivated   by   making   a   full! =--j==
memory of facts the one thing needful
in school, and it may be cultivated
nearly as readily by calling for no real
effort on the part of the student."
The students themselves should
•take a great part in the lesson. All of!
them have had experience of some
kind, and by working from such experience interest may ne aroused and
understanding result. When student's
are adults a well-arranged class discussion is of great value.
The value of experiments in the
tea Mi ing of mining science can hardlv
be over-estimated; a prior discussion
of the problem to be dealt with and
the method to be employed wilt arouse
interest   and  eagerness.    With  adult
cepted
The Federation officials returned
to the Carlton Hotel to have it signed by both parties.
Naturally the crowds gathered.there
to await any declaration of settlement.
While the officials were engaged
with Bptha and Smuts a noise was
heard outside.
On one of their number going to the
window he saw armed troops moving
up. He immediately concluded that
they had been tra-pped, and said so.
They all went to the window, and
it seemed apparebt to them that murder was meant.
Without the slightest hesitation
Watson and 'Bain drew revolvers, covered Smuts and Botha, and informed
them that if one,, shot was fired outside they, would drop dfead. The order was at once given to the troops
to wlthdrajw.
McKerrell   said   that   but  for  the
not lay down what in their opinion are
the best methods to get them 'back to
South Africa, then they are certain to
see the agitation fizzle out ami find
themselves forgotten. ■  ' '.  "
The Labor .Party have acted the
coward .part on this question, and have
practically, "thrown up their hand."
There is a chance for them yet
At the present time the Government
are in a worse condition than ever
they have been, over the Home Ruie
crisis.
The Labor Party have sold their
soul confessedly for the safe -passage
of the Home Rule Bill. While the
principle of local self-government, may
be democratic, yet. to a RBAL labor
Party the principle of working class
rights and interests are of first importance. IThe attitude of a REAL Labor Party when a controversial measure like the Home Rule Bill barred
the wav to maintaining working class
flexible than those of youngsters, the
more nearly the form of experiment
comes within the range of. their experience the better tliey will appreciate
and understand it.      ° .
The influence of tlie teacher should
extend beyond the class-room. True
education should mould the life ..of the
student. Associations of mining students are being formed in connection
with some centres. The influence of
teachers will be felt in these, and thehiuickly
usefulness of the1 movement will de-'
pend largely on the 'teachers' work—:
The Science and Art of Mining
Noted doctors have said that housework is the best form of physical
exercise for women—for it not only
DEVELOPS but BEAUTIFIES.
The healthy woman ENJOYS her
housework—she takes pleasure in ke-vp-
ing thing-s spick and span—and it costs
her practically no effort to do so—because slie is HEALTHY.
Are you healthy? Do you find your
housework pleasant and invigorating?
Or do you dread it because yuu don't
feel "jltst right"? That "don't feel
just right" sensation may NOT be
•vorth seeing a doctor a,bout—but it ■:'»
a pretty certain lndio.-u:on tliat you
arc suffering  from   Indigestion,   Con
stipation, Biliousness or Dyspepsia.
Next time you dun'I iw\ "jj.-i K?ht"
just try 15 drops of Mother Soigel'a
Curative   Syrup.  You'll    got    relief—
nromnt action-of hia'two rolleneiiPB   interests-   would ■ be—so    much    the
prompt action or nis two colleagues, worge for %h& jjome Ru]e mi
hundreds of lives would have been lost
that day; /Thunderous, applause greeted his dramatic recital of this incident.
He had read in the newspapers of
the 'scoundrelly character of the deported nine. '
Since coming to this country he
had, for the first time, paid a visit to
the "mother of Parliaments." Sitting
in the Strangers' Gallery he looked
down on-'tho'(Ministerial Benches.
He looked at Asqulth and thought of
Featherstone.
He saw Lloyd-George and thought
of the raising of tlie Pllmsoll load line.
He thought of the police atrocities
in Dublin when he looked at Birrell.
The "Cat and Mouse" Act at once
came to his mind when McKenna was
pointed out to him.
He looked at Burns and thought of
the Great Betrayal of the working
class.       . --
lleve cases themselves, and paid out
about C300 in thafway. Their funds
running low and hearing of a particularly sad case of a woman about to
become a mother and without a scrap
of food in the house, they notified the
Government and received a reply that
"the Government Is not going to
spoon-feed any of those who suffered
ns the result of the July proceedings."
This shows tho utter dishonesty and
j brutality of the South African Government.
1 Meantime terms of settlement had
been drawn up and agreed to. Again,
Watson stated, the Government violated them all.
When they decided to "retrench,"
hy dispensing with the services of a
thousand railwaymen, thc »rnllwaymen
!as & body offered to go on short time
to prevent any being thrown Idle.
This did not suit, the Government,
however, who would havo had to find
somo other means of victimisation.
1 Watson thinks this offef of the railwaymen Is one which might be adopted with b'eneflt by the workers every-
He wondered if the nine leaders
were such scoundrels as those on
whom he was looking.
In referring to their arrest, he stated that some of their wives went to
the police official and asked to be arrested also; He wished to know why
they wanted to be arrested. The women informed him that they wanted
to he with their husbands. "Oh! we'll
soon find you substitutes." was the re-
ply.
That official will have to give an
account of himself when the exiles get
back to South Africa.
If the
labor Party are men at all. they
should take advantage of the present
Cabinet crisis to force the Government
to send back the deportees.
If their views are the same as Ramsay iMacdonald's, viz., safeguarding the
rights of self-governing. Colonies, then
why don't they be logical and insist
that such Colonies deal with their own
"undesirables," instead of dumping
them down on the "mother" country?
To me they are not undesirables, but,
judging by their action in Parliament,
that would seem to be the Labor Party view. Either that, or they are
afraid. __
No self-governing Colony has rights
sufficiently sacred to justify us in refraining from the most drastic action
to vindicate the paramount rights of
Labor. From a .working class point of
,yiew. Labor's rights and Interests are
far above those of any capitalist self-
g-ovsrniBg-Cohmyr—  ~'
The Labor Party should be kicked
Into action or thrown aside altogether.
The Labor i.Movement might do
something In the nature of a gigantic
protest if the Trade Union Movement
could be got to celebrate May Bay on
the FIRST of (May this year, that is
to say, if they nre riot prepared to
make such a protest earlier.
The Conference which Is to be held
on 7th April can do good work if it
will rise to the occasion. Will lt do
so? Time and the conscious activity
of the rank and Hie alone will tell.—
J. W. Muir in The Socialist.
HOW'S THIS?
, We offer One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case of Catarrh that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure.
F. .T. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, O.
. ^.e- ""- underpinned, have known F.
.1. Cheney for the last 15 yenrs. and believe him perfectly honorable In all
business .-transactions arid financially
able to carry out any obligations made
by his firm.
NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE,
''« Toledo, t.i.
Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken internally, acting directly upon the blood and
mucous surfaces, of the system. Testimonials sent free. -.-Price 75 .Rents per
bottle.    Sold by all PriiRglsts.
Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. -.:■■•,
England has TESTED and PROVEN,
for over 40 yeaj-s, its worth. Tier.' it
is recognized as a standard remoi'y.
it is almost .purely herbal—Nature's
own  remedy tor disordered stomach.
Price $1.00.   Trial size 50c.
You can set Mother Seigel's Cura-
:ive Syrup at
McLEAN DRUG AND BOOK CO.
FERNIE, B. C.
The workers of the workers don't
want to lose their jo'bs. They don't
mind .the worker's loss of a job, ns
he is sure to Jose what he produces
anyhow.
H0>
HERE IS A SQUARE DEAL
and peaceful security as well.
With a policy in our old litie
company, you can go off on your
vacation or visit the ends of tho
eOrtii and you know you're secure.   The best in
FIRE INSURANCE
is always cheapos*. and especially so when it doesn't cost
higher./ Don't delay about tha.t
renewal or about that extra insurance you want but come right
in at once and hare it attended
to.
M. A. KASTNER
SOLE AGENT FOR FERNIE
ALEX BECK BLOCK,
»
FERNIE, B. C.
The Teaching of
Mining Science
At a recent meeting of. the Mining i    Over 1.000.000 men and  boys are
Section of the West Yorkshire Branch I nmv employed In the mines of this
country, pits arc becoming deeper nnd
Realty Co.
INSURANCE  AGENTS
whero when depression causes t»nem-of  tho  Aviation   of  Teachers  In
ployment. . .    _      Technical Institutions, (Mr. George A. I
In dealing with tho troublo of Jan-\]M     M< Inijt- M> B   Qt mlb>i imtl\
uar>-thU year, he gave a graphic do*     „*)er on ..Tho Teaeltiln* of Mining
rrlplon  of lie  surrounding of the,gf.}e*w» m (,„gtrac, of whkh ,8 U)J
Trades* Hall hy the military- and tli*',,,,,,,!,,,!.
arrest of tke Federation leaders, I'   ,uu
Mi- said he was proud to look backj   Coal has been known in this conn-f
on tin- fift.en minute* given them in try since the time tf the Homnns. and j
which to surrender, and to know that probably lb* nrltons.   In 12r.fi. Henry
■tho   proposition   debated   hy   them, I HI. enntei! a charter to the freemen
.calmly and dispassionately, was not;of Newcastle for digging "cole";  In.
one of their own personal safety.   It 11306, Kdward I. forbade the ti*e of coal j
. w«*:— "Is It  better for the workers',on itnuuui ol" the dirt •<* d smoke pro- j
j of South Africa and of the world that I duced.   Tho Industry appears to havn!
we *hould surrender nov and endeav-1 become fairly well established during i
or to carry on the fight?" |tho  tTtlt  century.    The  methods of(
1   They decided to wrrender, and up working  »'*r*» crude and the condI-|
; till that time tho proudest moment he I tions uuptairant and aometlmoa cruel, i
'Intd in his life wa* when he walked In r.otne ;nrt.; of the vuautiy iiiltiem
out of the Trades Hal! with his col- were ttouKht and sold with the mine;
, loiBiies  ttltuflnK' "The  Red   Pb\«"  t'i! "■„..,,.n v-<l yV,   y,(.;<: tUiAa,*,.. uitiVt
receive n military escort 5,000 strong JIMII.   tn Scotland they were "putters"
■ *"a far totter e#cort than the Uuko.ar   ' trammer*,"    They   carried   fht
•ef t'eneaiiRht  jret  when he <amt  to*coal u,, iin, »U,iit in u Imnket which
iRouth Africa," j was fastened to n leather strap that
He finished l»y sarin* that he waa passed round the forehead; the lamp
toUw hack to South Africa "without *m.i« nlso »!t.i<h»'>I to thl« strap The
i'ondUluiu, nud Sui»»t* ba* *sot to hoar;load tain often balancml by luree
•his m««tera' voice,' that 1*. you llrlt-.lmnp* of coal hun« round their neeks.
Uh people." 'The   «rtrl*i   cMmlMsd   up   ladder*   the
Crawford spoke next, and dealt with j whole depth of the .shaft, which «f«»» t'1" iii'HIIirenee.
tho conditions of work more difficult
and dangerous, therefore moro Intelligence and scientific knowledge aro re-
Oiiired for nafe working.    At iirewettt
the death rate ls nearly 1.5 per thou-!
suitd, and thin figure Is hardly differ-1
ent from the recurd l<» years ago, In j
splto of the great Increase In leglsla- j
tion for safety.   Mining accident* may '
he    divided    into    i!t    i:U»Btrop!He«
whereby many men are klllod st on'»(
time;  ii') m.iuii' .icUdeut* cutisud by j
falls of roof, hanlaae accidents, etc. ■
The latter clan* contain* the greater]
number of dtntlis. and li timet \n* tt- j
mcttilitrel that iln re are many acei- j
dents that arc not fatal,  but cause'
1 irreat **iff««r!ng a::;! ausncLlttw* uiuitU- *
tion.
Vl'v:    •,.,',!   Uul,,    t.i, in. I   ,t    m'Ulllitt**   ff ■
dutioti In Incidental aeeltJ. nt«* hy e«|u-
ntting the miner tn the fmhlects re-
litiiiiK to *ii(ety mi initi'K. There are
thousands of miners ignor.-int of the
elementary principle* ef xifety, an.!
the miner nwlne '•"> 'he <vti'<'-i'A "--t>X!
tioti* of working it Hlhlecl to Ies»
unpen ImIoii than km> «<*lu-r worker
llent'i'   Hie  «eee#»Sty   for   r-:.s!i *v.«*'v)f{
HIGH CLASS
Ladies'and Gent's
==TAILORS==
I
SUITS FROM
$30.00 up
Made to Measure &
order on the premises
DeBurle & Company
Next Calgary Meat Market
P. O. Box 544     -      Fernie, E.C.
TELEPHONE NO  |96
ithe history of -South Africa from tVojexceeded 100 >«rd«: if a »!W» brok-e
|discovery of told and diamonds Iti or a limu> <>f cn-!»l fell, the niiiwii*■'tie-
j lSil!i. He M|M»ke ot the growth Of the e* were li-kcty to be serious to the
j mlnlnif companies, and answered the' Hearer* below,
jusrt.il statement of apologisW for tlm, ,, %.,Xii t,, ,.;,, * ,}l s y.t. * *t-,.,,n(j»,
■mlr.e ojwrv that *>iil>  a lew ."Mie»j(|oJ| ,,; '|K'n f'hVf 'ch!« nVa'u^f 'tttt»«s
mm in it   the :
.'. f-   ,,. Ji.f  it. :t-
*'A\i-niUm
•«; '*' " f *. -.   e
ipald one lnindr«d"tter cent dividend. ^j^J,,;,
AlabsitlMtl
lOttmMBCtM Water
tSntmi
Xow ig  tlie time
for protection
Vou eannot nffbrcl
can protect  yon
s hv aaylnir thiit !t wni more nfteu twn
\Ui*<; and «»«« lour ami tite hundred
t»'.'r c«n.l.
llw «»i>laMted th-n nature of miners*
plilblil* tta dfseasfi csuserl by Inbal-
Ing d?ist, ithlch. as 1: settled in tU»
hliu;*- funi.ed tt fcttiiie **ai), and, ar-
•ctimttlft'lne, tessen-fd the air space until  It bet nm* almost  Imposslblo to
bf»*i»tl»e      Tt*t*   mint**.   **.%,-   ..-..»»■* -■    «
tinn ifi*«as« lued on an averse" four
re^S'*.
■ tllH   tt-*
J. D. QUAIL
Hardware. PaJnta and If tmm
Cleaning Utensils
FERNIE      x
AfWMt for Whrtf
Go.   M««blMO ot it
doy.
Ill   »ho«e   olden   dnv*'
ni- pi tit vnt* vtiti-iyenliy .
*«rte itliu****! !•» work la er 11 h«Htr« ■
dlti!) ill tlie ibjk pits. c(l>>|».rt to eruel ■
. -il!<! f.i'i! nht)?f
j    I'tider such circumstances the (It-;
'1»«i.  only   w.mi'.I   sttrvl'*e.  Inn   t!t*-»!.-
| were men who, *ho«*h |w<rhit>« barren .
'       '     ■' "    ""    ,     ...   ,     .     ......     -9.9.t„
iln   th<*   t*ti>*   wl*htm*    fli**rX**..<9    '■■'■•*
.'.,*' . u-.-.*. (tttounti *»j»u*tnit li>UI«> ot sctenee were
' dnw- retrjile Jn this lonnltj iul*Uii)ti *Uh- to nmntl* witto tke «««•**« of
think that lh« minors www well |i*M! nsttire »f»» win tto tr*o*mt* »# tml
U m.*'t*)m 4.1 lo Kim. pet day, but land iron. We may picture tb» miner
k* contMHfwl they wer« irowily under- of \be early i!»tb c»nt»ry. ■ n»«n
pnlrf, He wonld only work la a mlno'stmaa In b'^1'* ,,r»*'*- *"** **lt-»*n*o*
" "      -   •   -. •    ■■ Al4%4  mhtiwimi.  wiimhmh*   tm*n*r*nr*
In   f''i« early  days  of
H'e-A-r.r.w or m:in;n;*'r» we:
p'tnieti,  wiih  little or no
«.*»■»>,tl '!i*:il Ktt'-I'eil hv
Ms'?.'.' "''i'' ti.""!-!' Aji'.i ''■ '.;
fisimrs H*»mlr*fttlons of cnJliers
ttv-frti we'e Iinflfllted tf! IfcTJ.    A!
.',,   .        ., i .       .. i,,    > ieiiieiHd* *,
tf»t«.*^   •.   few   lri,' '1*1 v   tn   <*•'• !'•(;,:!
<i»',i.,»<i*i/i-'i.i   i'i*>:i»   llie.   tiiltafi'-   *
'icM-j'f   :•■ ■■)■    'ij'fii lent   far   t*;
Tfj"   **f'i- -■• •    '/ll   *    V"*   llep-U *!.**.'' '
?].•;. I  !ji"! ';■:: • -..-'■ '::V,fi\i.i iit   \ X,
m**% the Wi-*- ut'iiHK ftimtv v
mU%i't* ii  S'*.e   **ii.ti»m   ni   local
i t-nttraen. srel  !neti»'te<t  ttttthtt***
-   *.tf.t lifi, t    'til it-iil'i-    .1 .tt,   tile    I
)li:jif*
fnr
it."1'
l<-     rt9,t
ft     Hi
UiiU  mkm* tmtkiewty  lo itnktrw
* bit latent mm! awdiiiwry it iritlat
mk   f*. I him to the watt and causing bim to
o, I*. I laibor btrdcr.
1**1 \   tttrtr   rlffi.-'H--J   «'e<-f>   •***> <v.-|. *t   ',..*
«l» Kinrfents, nu.«'lv worVina mlttets.
Il: V'""^ '-% V.l'i.". '■ > *"* **.*»*-* hi .•-*•■-
Ing for tnti In the j»ft« were forme-! «it
ftetley.   In 1*12 1' be-"-Ante rftmtw'*'1'''-
t«,9 ft,,,,,.'-. ,.,**■•
.    ..,„,.   u.k, .mw    Nwi-r.™-    „.~9r9,„.m    .„...,.„..  tm* Of WOl* Of ik* tbrr"* *llbl*'t'tn   -e.i*
ffmut* bad cbargod Ib* VedemIon badly.   IVrbap* knnnwno td then* f|«»«<   'estln^ bearlnf and *lr me*tiirem«-n»
with dynamite outran**.   Ite <Craw'itlei, and the  wniomtortibio randll* i- Forty-*!*'bl thotisand  seven  hnmtwd
ford!  admitted thtt  eiploslons htditlofii flf bl* «orb, ho. In som# cases, snd **v*ntyth* eandldat** presented
ttkta   place, btt. cnriontly enonfb.finive wn\- to eitcetses Bnd gained an themselves in 1912
witkottt doing damatff to *pr«w»ny or !nacnviable reputation.    Mmy of o«r     Tb#r« I* m Amb> a $*mtlttt* .teidr*
injarinir nnyme,   Tho Podtrttlon badJmlnltiK stulewt* today nre ^lenreododito Improre ib* education of tb* min
sbfolmelr nothing to do Willi tfimn.lfmm men of this trp# an^l nmwisr,    * telmtWr afar,*'.** m ennMe
fn nne en** In wbti»h a mau '**** *i-'■ iVn w a.*****^ ««".«>»''•"-». but in tbe major-, him to a»4er*t*an4 *ii*l meHiwi- ««e
totted n* O dynnmttntd. It tmt proved j It) of »»«♦* "I* tree trom their btd ilsnters of bf* rnime U tt* *ir**. rfc
in th* mtihmemrt td ttmtb ttrt'A j.r.<,     rr.,-,/•*■   -nn-fit'-nt-   ,irr   -.^rllu-ii
liiat the OyoamUe area plsfy-il on hls'wU.rr* i,i$..ui'*d in the pit Surlnit Ike
person by a OoTvmwMt tpfr. (day,   Tb*f k*mn tktdr iabora tt IS
fHsposlnr of tb# eteoae totA* for or tl x*-*r* nt »**. eemetlm-m «b*r
tb« Hotmrtmittt t brttal teprtnalon h*r* ntt*nA*tt ewnfnt «»»tlntt*tlo»
that they Imd to it*tt with «• attompt-lrU^s. bot mt** ettnm tbey bnt* tn*
«4 WTotatton. be. nittumtb n tmdio- United *» • **r#.«" m n "mod Mas*"*
tkmnty totWlat, dmUd ttm, it thfc#r, until r*tcbitr 1* or t« years Tbey
Snnwnr* or ,tntf Ha if ttuj iUwmUiaic iW*** »tl*U* »i»tU.»t-», »*<» ateattemtb
of itWevIag » rsvolntkm. T%t flabt jbo#«» to «et tMa irtttt ef tktegt a«w
«M fon^tl on th#w, tml tkdhn andfe!. but. one of the *urewt ways of *m-
Smuts were fh#mae|v«f doing murb to!tit* bold ot tbe boya ia lb* tmom M
baste* tbe reroltiioti   Tfc*y it 8o«tb '*. «-m hM nt 'k*tt taxkern now.
C. E. LYONS
Insurance, Real Estate
and Loans
Money to Loan on first class Busi-
nessatiH Residential property
viMttMUl, itnil at tttr «:iwe rnnf *r»me- >
tbltf akoeiA lie done in !.r<> >-(■»•»_ bin :<
M«s and #nlarte hit tntrrenf* K*e«»
ih* 4*31 one* «lKHibi t#e e»i.#-r*e4 for. i
ttnteeno In ««iificatlnr »|*»w«<|« '> *;
twwt tuttmi on tbt" teach' r tt wt i
*w tn br Itirtttnt-ltiiL,) *■}■"<f*t!ii «*•,
tmsf ba* era* trrlrir tt* letnmrf "Te'
ntetbott* tml oar nat!er*ti:i*ttn« ot onr'
•ts4*«t« Oot l-wiehin* wW *»* eltt* f
and cr»at# Interest, resfce n rao-honri
bmwn omm to inst «a!r on* how *f*»*[
wmbndn must be tmnir-t o»*s: a well-
Grand Union Hotel
COLEMAN, Alta.
Best of Accommodation
We cater kt Um workingman's trade
G. A. CLAW >: Proprietor \
..»,.. miiwj
A Ledger Ad. will do it ■ '. -?"i §?-*■!'^£*^*'" ,.*  ,''*
i.fii^'i.V
PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDQER, FERNIE, B. 0., MAT 2, 1914.
a
top M&lrwi febgsr
B
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year in advance. An excellent. advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48        Post Office Box No. 380
■fUJ^ONbwTLABEL'.'*<
MAY DAY
May Day i.s tin- most salient and significant of
all days selected by man for the purpose of eele-'
lu-itl'ion from the beginning of time.
Christmas, is c-.cleln-.ilt'd upon different days, in
different lands, and Nov Year's at different times,
Imt May Day is as international and universal as
the elass conscious toiler.
,JJt, is May Day" that bespeaks the international
character'of the worker's hopes and proclaims his
inter-racial solidarity.
On this day the Universal Workers raise their
standard and in unity MARCH ON with a purpose
to be realized—the revolutionizing of the world's
process of production, that there may mature a
race in the glow of creation, blinding to those who
find existence tolerable only in the shadows of this
civilization of capitalist tyrants.
TTay Day, of all days, summarizes the best of
all achievements and enshrines the great racial aspirations of all times.-—Seymour Stedman.
EXPECTANT PATRIOTISM
The Vancouver Suu neatly hits off the situation
between the United States and Mexico by meajis
of a cartoon entitled "Expectant Patriotism." The
out depicts "John D." as an idiotic, but crafty
looking old gent in cheek pants, one hand cupped
to ear listening to the strife across the boundary
line (which is raging around Mexican oil fields)
and the other holding the "Standard Oil Can."
The wording beneath the cut is as follows:—
"John D. (waiting"to, replenish his oil can):
What a glorious thing it is to see young, men die
for their country."
This is the same John D. who is responsible for
and when one is acquainted with his method of conducting the strike in that region, we are not surprised that even the Vancouver Sun should have
occasion to caricature John's patriotism (!).   '.« .*
This week the press contains the following item:
APPEALS TO ROCKEFELLER
"Washington, April 27.—President Wilson has
made a personal appeal to John D. Rockefeller to
bring about a settlement of the Colorado coal
strike nud end the viblence which lias cost n sjcore
of lives and large property losses."
Why must the president of this great United
States, the Land of Freedom (!) which constitutionally declares all men equal, appeal to John D.?
llecnuso the latter's wealth places him above the
law. Ue can kill, maim men, Women and children,
and he can call upon the authorities to help him.
The crimes committed in Colorado nre the foulest
blot upon justice and civilization ever perpetrated.
On Monday, April 20th, a number of gunmen, coal
company guards, with machine guns, fired upon
the tent eolony at County Ludlow, Colorado, with
deadly effect, killing, it is estimated, 25 men,
women aud children. What a sturdy resistance
eanvnK walls must have offered! Imagine the
brave and fearless company thugs rutdiing this
eolony protoeterl by fabric walls! Ami ihe ruins
ot thoKC tents burned und consumed the dead and
dying.   The flume* helped obliterate Ihe foul dew!
of shame—they were more merciful than those
human vampires. Innocent little children', who
hmghed and cooed, and their mothers caught aud
entangled in the ruins, possibly shot and dying,
■pait a merciful death by suffocation! Can yon
wonder lhat cool, level-headed men like John P.
White. Frank Hayes and Wm. Green protest ?
Could you wonder if'they lent every assistafiee to
the strikers? No- If they did? not they would be
worse than the foul, filthy creature who prates
Christianity and endows churches while he permits
the murder of women and children. No wonder
even the Sun sneers at this creature and ridicules
his patriotism. 'Tis sweet to die for one's country,
but a,crime" to die protecting your family and home
—thus docs'a" present day society interpret "Patriotism"!
The latest news to hand is that all parties are
to be disarmed and the Federal troops take possession. This means nothing so far as the striker is
concerned. How'can it when the President himself is helpless and has to '"appeal" to '"John IX"
to settle this strike? The worker will gel nothing
but what he', takes himself.'. He gave up his rifle
before and lie has been rewarded .with promises
and—lead; he can give it up again, and will receive tlie same generous treatment.
LIST   OF    REGISTERED    PLAYERS
IN CROW'S NEST PASS FOOTBALL
LEAGUE
COAL CREEK
Pate of
Registration Name of Player
21st April
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA
Indianapolis, Ind., April 25, 1914.
To the Officers and .Members of the United Mine
Workers   of America:
Brothers—The climax .to outrages perpetrated
upon thc striking mine workers and their families
in Colorado was reached on.last Monday, April 20.
On that date a number of gunmen and coal company guards with several machine guns fired upon
the miners' tent colony at Ludlow. Col, with deadly effect.
As a result more than twenty-five were killed,
two-thirds of whom were women and children. The
tents were set on fire and the whole colony'.waft
completely wiped out. The bodies of many of
those killed were burned in the ruins. No darker
crime or fouler defed was ever recorded in history.
The rules of civilized warfare protect women and
children, but in this instance it seems inhuman
monsters operating deadly machine guns, with
fiendish glee. Slaughtered the innocents.
It is a horrible crime. As the shocking details
become known, we wonder how such a thing is
possible. This blot upon thc State of Colorado can
never be wiped out. We have appealed to the
President of the United States, the Governor of
Colorado and the members of Congress. We ask
you to do likewise.   Hold protest meetings; adopt
resolutions, not only requesting your congressmen
and senators from your respective states to do
that which will stop these awful crimes, but de-
mand that they act immediately. We will do all
within our power to protect the right* of our members'in Colorado and if possible bring about the
termination of these wrongs and the punishment
of those who are guilty thereof.
The situation'is critical. The best service you
can render iR with your money. We urge local
unions who are in arrears for assessment to send
the same to our office promptly. The Colorado
strikers and their families need your help, especially at this time. Their homes are burned; their
wives and children killed. What greater sacrifice
can human beings make? Will you help them by
sending in your assessment, so we can rebuild their
homes, bury the dead and feed the men, women
and children who still remain!
Cnll meetings as early as possible, adopt resolutions of protent, send them to your congressmen,
the President of the United States and the senat-
om from your respeetive states, demandiug that
your fellow workers in Colorado be proteeted from
the eoal company assassins who sre killing them.
Fraternally yours,
JOHN P. WHITE, President.
FRANK J. HAYES, Vice-President.
WM, GREEN. Secretary-Trcasurer.
THI WA»TI OF WAR ANO RfNT     Thin I» the I.Ith coat ot living and 1 subjection and protect the few, who
»h« f..n.t»m„„,_i ««.,.« „t 41.. »«»!>«»• -colled Ui» rent tor tke um* of the
he fundamental caune ot tlie worker* \mnh >|M, lJw W|MW ,h«.rBOf<_The
'mjwreeMvm-Wit the wtvr'.-d ow. Her*- (;uiUiyk AUwuluf.
lu ue find the auawer to the pimle
By W. t. O.
in** inolieit-l l>4Ute*iut'» ui Ufirt)
eu«t upwi-ml** uf ten million dolla rn
m>|eee. a#Id« from   maintenance.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9'
10
31
12
13
14
15
16
17
IS
19
20
21
22
23
24
2f>
George Harvey
George Young
Jas. Yates
R. Jones
Thomas Luxniore
Joseph Harper
Mark Norman
W. W. Para ell
Peter Armstrong
D. Atherton
Bert Davis
F. iTownslieiril
Thos. Bann
Thomas Walker
John Manning
John '.McLetchie
Thomas Martin
Harry France
Thomas Burns
Aaron Blackey
R. Johnstone
J. D. Machin
J. Myers
W. McFegan
Wm. Grai?t
"        5 Jas. War-drop
6 Andrew Sinclair
"        7 Harry Hutson
8 George 'McQueen.
9 Clifford Moore
10 J. Clarke
11 John iBurk
12 D. Brownrigg
13 John Burlinson
14 Hugh Lynch
15 Ernest Watt,
" .    16 Allien Penman
17 W. Balderstone
18 .Wm. White
20 Alec McKelvle
21 Robinson Bamshaw
22 Andrew McGovern
CITY BASEBALL LEAGUE
Date of
Registration
21st April
FERNIE
Name of Player
William Gregory
Joseph Shannon
Peter Joiason
W. Reilly
John Maclean
Benjamin Smith
Ernest Watson
Thos. Thornton
William McOonnell
James Lamb
Hugh Brown
Philip H. Bayley
Harry Islierwood   ,
.Alexander Altken
Thos. Oakley
16 John W. Skilllng
17 John Hirst
18 fy Hartwell
19 Robt D. WdnBtanley
Thos. Shields
C. L. Cameron
J. Gormley
Allan J. Smith
J. T. Atkinson
George Booth
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
20
21
22
23
24
25
Date of
Registration
21st April
HILLCREST
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Name of Player
1 Harry Jep&on
2 A. Padget
3 iR. Dugdale
4 J. Moorehouse
Matthew Dickson
P. M.Bostock
William Geo. Miller
,W. N. Rochester
Andrew Ralsbeck
T. Dugdale
George Jackson
James S. Leigh
Jack Grineshaw
Dan Culllnan
John Clark
William Murray
Robert Murray
MICHEL
Date of
Registration-
21st April
"Name orTiayer
1 Joe Littler
2 Harry CbalWnor
3 W. Holmes
4 W. Whltehouse
5 Bd. Partridge
6 James Moore*
7 Alec. Waddlngton
8 Alf. Ball
9 Joseph Travis
10 Simeon .Weaver
11 William Jenkins
12 Harry Brown
13 F. Robert*
14 R. Sudworth
15 Samuel Hampton
16 A. Moores
17 J. P. Brisco©
18 John W. Bones
19 James Murray
20 J. Hardman
COLEMAN
Date of
Resist ration
21M April    1
..      ..       2
Name of Player
William Fines
Fred Odger
3 San Moore*
4 Stephen H. MacDonald
6 Wm. Roughead
«   Henry Holmes
7 James Kellock
8 Joho Hunter
'.i   J, Bmtnwson
10 John MeAulay
11 Jas. Muir
15 J. Bateman
13 Wm. Bunks
14 Frederick Heddintfon
16 Mltcbf.ll-McLean
18   Walter Pleasant
17 Thos. Jackson
The basebaJlers wall hold a tag day
on Wednesday. April 6th, "this -beiug
the first half-holiday granted the store
clerks. There will be sports in the
City. Pnrk in .the afternoon and In the
evening a smoking concert with boxing exhibition will be held in the Fernie Athletic Club hall (over Ingram's).
The single anen composing the staff
of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. have
challenged ithe married men of the
same company to a game of ball to be
played at the .park April 30th, at 4.30
p. in., weather permitting. Needless
■to say, this game will prove a very fast
and exciting one, as reference to the
line-up will Indicate men of major
league standings:
Married: R. Wilson, lb; J. Irvine,
rf; R. Black, 3<b; H. Wilson, ss; A.
K-lauer, 2b; W. R. Wilson, p; C. J.
Murphy, If; White, c.
Single: J. Clode, ss; J. H. 'Marshall,
lb; R. Cotton, c; Hewett, cf; Jas. McLean, 2b; E. Kirkpatrick, p; R. Dob-
inson, oh; P. Lancaster, If; J. Oliver,
rf.
Crow's Nest Business College
AND ACADEMY OF.LANGUAGES
J.   W. Bennett '-Principal
While President Wiilson and his political family are giving their undivided attention to a prospective war with
Mexico, a real war Is In progress in
Colorado aod to which they are giving
no attention.
American workingmen are getting
tired of demanding justice and 'being
handed a "congressional Investigation" that results in nothing and several million of them are getting ready
to vote for what they want.
Why We Guarantee
This Stomach Remedy
If there are one hundred people ln
tbls town who suffer from Indigestion,
dyspepsia, or any other form of ston?
ach complaint, we believe we can suggest a remedy that will relieve at least
ninety-eight of them, and perhaps every one of the hundred. We'll do more
than suggest the remedy—we'll promise to give back the money to each and
every one of the hundred' that are not
relieved. That's how much faith we
have in Rexall Dyspepsia Tablets.
Containing Pepsin and Bismuth, two
ofthe greatest digestive aids known to
medical science, as well as other ne^
oessary lngt^jents,^ejcalLD>'8pgP8la
Tablets soothe the Inflamed stomach
lining, aid the secretion of gastric
juice, check distress and heartburn,
■promote regular bowel action and
make lt possible for you to eat what
you like end as much as you like without fear bf con-sequences.
Don't suffer any longer from dyspepsia or Indigestion, Use Rexall Dyspepsia tablets, an-d you will be just as
enthusiastic about them aa we are and
just as ready to urge them on your
friends. Sold only at the Rexall
Stores, and ln this town only by us,
Three sixes, 25c, 50c and $1.00. N. B,
8uddaby, Druggist, Victoria Avenue,
Fernie, S, C.
■ILLIVUI
Date of
Reeietretkra
Slat April
1 wa* trying to point out to tt follow
JJZ-Klil^.^^.1T^ ,ki- r«iV rauWl,,W **« »*«• «* Productions
worker ibe wastefulness of this world-1 a lholMgBdfok,f M ,„ |,k; mio j,*,
•poverty increased.
that Jim it* we have i>m*T#«««l and ! IGNORANT OF CONDITIONS I
OR INSINCERE i
wide military  niadnesit     "Hut," nwlil
Appearing before th* Congressional i
(lmestlgattng eommlttee on ihe Colo-.
he,-think of U>«-work K glv«# to tiwi-     ....      .......        ^       ..,     -. -     -■•**          - —
wads ot men   there jUnl Jobs tmmb     tth«», >«" *»1* *»»»» «*■* »M»»i«  rado rtr|n#t j0t,„ n. Rockefeller. Jr.,|
now to w around, nnd if wn were to\x[> i"*l»»'' ''sf mntorily do not iak«  „-«*«»  that  the  polley adopted  b> i
*t<Hi thi* *»r bunin*** and paid off ,h#* *'w^ ih}n* in    « >«« motion  ,hof|k ,n ^g^ »f hl» Interests In!
thn armSe%    and  be thw»w  up  hla!'*nVt, *impi?', m**"* *b*t "W V** I Colorailo wa» Intended to aafegnard
hJiii.j* o* be *ltmpii**l the magnHod* *nf/    . d   .   n^: ,f ')WI mmt*°*- *•«• the fndlvldwal HlM»nle« of the mnfiloy-
«if   tlw   Hnemi'lov»-l    iiroblem   utirter « '* *'»"«! ""*> have to pay dlreetly.   Wfk of ,h^ -rompsnv,
.urfc condition. lb» W,™V*X invtAw* *» •" ,h»>:       Hi aakl. "that  while hi. oth#r 1^
"i'',;f*   j'l^t   Un*
tuntjj;,    ttfi:.       jji'
MewjKiitit   ol   the
I Atf *  th
.!«.  .hey   fell  to   *ee      The,   do   f.*   .   "» "Se^Kd^^ iSlr^ 1
.vin aud xm <»IX*te.| m the busim** *,pfi  h* M ,*'t n mh* »«**»*« |B *
33lKl
Name of Player
I James Cardie
i Jas. Flatter
a A. Yftrtejr
4 Alfred 8hein
ft Kdward Hoaely
« 11. Varley
T J. Long worth
8 J. Radforth
« K. Jordrn
10 W. Miller
1! Wm. Collins
12 l»atriek Morrivon
13 Krmwt fisher
14 Kl. Hughe*
IK A. Tristram
18 Walter Pleasants
No More Eggs for Sale
A Fow larly Hatehod
Oookorolo for talo
lator
Satlsfaetien or Manay Bake
Wm.ANTROBUS
Coleman    -   Alberta
■*itrk in a nutiein men. tmt »Iim, »r»» duirifi* «# nur titttm  u  ..1ti„.»i..i. -tke aitttatlon mere, and approrM of     t_9t»_t
.!.-»   e„,-..,     wh-t   or.  the,e   m,*„-  %*£ &™' 4bt- ^uf^rt^t   ^ «?.•»*<*. ntlopitd   hy   Ms   ^.r*-1 ^"ffj,
CRANK
*»ia» the)  par for the Ree*»»*rleg of   ■***"*••**■*
fit* i* thl* wnr ten. Isnd t*ot enA divt-       "* **»*> **'''
dend» on watered Industrial tfoeki.
xi\ ■rrot-er p»\* Mati *pt*r mm'h for
M- Inrntlnn  whlrb he mri-nt ndd to the
iMt td th*» troe»rtMi;  but  yon asjr,
,. .    .     , ^ .9*. "This lie 4Ui*4'» uy, u-immimc *k muxv
It i» eu i wwrti boid** »l-f^»f Mro»» that It nmmtdn to \*n HUl*.**
if«t* rr  *, 'I|«hi» eollfftet tewtr f»r  ,„ ".' V..."'*.. .""'A 7    «m»..." ".,.,,771 ZX*
it* ,**.*,.,-*-.4,.u-* ... *.*** -mum*-*** *i4vt»  Hmci^r   )Wh»-r   e.^vhier,  e»e„ nl! mv
»(*<r l».)t.t-o   .hi ttiiuir*-  Mt.
lit r..' rs.' *: ''-''. * • ■«rk'r t'n* ..''
iIiib.m. ut.uiiu*. 'ii iioiiitrn iiiH«t lii *»t
i,t+\*4ir-i'ti:,-.    *li.<lt   )o.i   ihlii*.   are
ht'lpisii: )'n -*'t *•.' 'it ltii.il«l> !i.,n|<
1., it,. 1 ;.,'*. t»l, ■ .„• 1 ut 1 *•..»**-it 1 n.%i oi
li'lnir
ilat  M per rent ot'
were   non untott   from >
Ion
Slat April
ti.
1   t.t   ihi*
tm'A m, W.llton* of
■i.ii  j-i'i'i
t'»e»r r»tit ihrwu-tii me. ainl thai Irni't
.ttf it*** «iH..!«"i«i. m „ m, ».n»on« m'^p ^ pV, MMU-,, ,.«.,# i«*^„*> %m,4
iw*»ilar* of *4*u>red mmk. »t*o wnpped ^;)Wlt. T!,(. *h«l. **Ier«. ako In twm
•MO, <t>. "»';(w!'-*i«l -..utter^nd ,„wU   ,hm mim(aHn1Trf   mhn nf
* *-? 1       -      .♦. t & *,•..   11^ $ti ^   .t . h^,^ .%,   W|,     \*9   %,^rt*i
......*   ...   ►        ...*.      ,\49,   .*■*.-    i»»,rt  f,;( •(!*>•*»• »nn tar «.*«'»»er«tl«r» fitlwt
it.i.e,'    i»*'!    i-   '•* lw*!'   *-  •'"*'  «•»«■'*•••■      * -    - "-
th-e    mtneM
rbtdee,"
Dow, Mr   Itot-kefelli f ktio*  tlint itt
llie  l;i»l   l»*rl»l»   )e»|» **\*t)  «|l*« tk*h .,
voente of uiilniilum hni been driven1
(ron the minet  hy   the   m«n«Ker«*
*».•,(.■     *• ft    *'*.,i,r,      ,*l,*^*    4,9    n     *f%tnvfm**l*9*t.*l*
nimott *%*ty "Atn*tienn" miner hat *
ll.ti*    ,.l    i» -.,.      k,,*-    l*'.*k,,> 1     •*J,»<iUt*    tu,,   j
i.u.;ii',ii   hi   1-iciltJti   \titi'.   lii"iri»t>  In'
«t»er»t«*»*
il*  »,t)» *i,- pu«H.) td iu*- tiM-n|»tt) 1
I* In the intortat of the free Amer'i an
■ai r'«*   the method* nf liH matmsiir»
10
It
13
II
ir.
Name of flayer
Thot. Sloan
l»..«e HultOli
Jack Graham
Robtit Petri*
Win, Lova
Thos. Jackson
J0I111 II. V«4.nl»
Robert I). Oriffttkf
***•       .   * t   *-,     Vb'*, -ti *-eke. Aw*
fMnnMm t*m*m
a*>inv iu«H<uNlauii»
<;. A. Mnttdtn
Kreil lHirker
T  Marsli
J.im*ea Wataon
SOCIAL &
DANCE
Under Auspices Local 17
S P of C
Socialist Hall, May 1
4 piece Orchestra
Gents 75c   Ladies 25c
A |»rofiatfflinl« niefting, Httn-
dny, ,\ln.v Hnl, in the Hwial*
i»i Unli, nt 7.4f»,    Hpenkfr
J. Harrington
Everybody Invited
Free Competition
- Two non-transferable Scholarships, each for Three Months'
Free Tuition, wiU be awarded for the best two papers explaining reasons
"WHY YOU SHOULD TAKE A COURSE IN THE OBOW&
NEST BUSINESS COLLEGE"
YOU have equally as good a chance as anybody else. Because you are a poor scholar do not let that pVevent you from
trying.
It is NOT by the literary style but by the originality of the
ideas expressed that the papers will be adjudged.
This competition will close May 1st. ,
For further particulars write to the College.
P. O. Box 574
Fernie, B. C.
glSnMiiij^iig^^
J. T.   GIDDINGS
T. W.  DAVIES
Funeral   Director
and    Embalmer
Headstones Supplied and Set up
COLEMAN    "•"•■'Sgrar- »*»    ALBERTA
WELL HEATED
WELL VENTILATED
ORPHEUM
Under New
Management
High Class
Photo Plays
TONIOHT-THUR8DAY
The Man from the West
Lubln Two-Pftrt FVatura—W«gt«rn Drama
Cupid ve. Women's Rights
/ Vtttffreph.  A picture acted in tlie rtuulow* of tbe HtfpUan Tombs
■od Ancient Ruins
The Kid Sheriff
BuMnay Perte Comedy
Kenton's Heir
Petite
9^9.* •k«...«i1 «... iWBiwii titet si p»r et
*V» 4 it *» j#r <#»ll ot bl* -mitfoy***
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r. ty t^,  thmueti  i».»- i«»-t»|»*1i tltei SI P»r **** ol tn*m et-rrt*
fit a    i- i .* t.M-l *>\  Me hia^t^m > ™.     ,    *" #   ^ td lo eome tmt em atrlk*?   !l«u <<<»*■•
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2 tlevM fto»
z Arthur Amdtow Pmetl
t rttm WMitl*
tu ■
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i'i uviipinV-t .in*' *h 1 rrmeetxmiw**,
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ms I,tfvttn lu foltm*Ao **r* two t« mm
a« rwBpawMi t*p,o t»nt*nii*0 tkmtunn.
Mr. tt*erh*t#iN>r peotm •* « oki-ion-
■Hroj,',*-! \V. mmU *ak ht«e t« vMt
tht- rami* trom wkkm hi* twtwraee
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Iti «» <|* iMWlNMi. oho twit ea tow* le wmd ta awiatalstoe ntwden *mdlt*r*M*, *wl wbtm *wnt!t*d br %%■* Ut*'kl*m   morel   twtarfimL—*rMte<l »mt
tm »•* tetef.                                       JMKH io h«**l  at ia  i*-«f*»r* -atd  ialMnt* 1»4 *«*K op*»tF i!*>!jh*4 hy Wetbat* imtml.
MILL WOOD
From Elk Lumber Co. mill
FOR SALE
BIO LOADS
Usual Prioos
McSUOREY Bras.
f|    Be Ce
OfTlee: Uclntyre'e
FRIDAY
A Modern Jekyll and Hyde
Kelem Feeture In Three Ree|e
The Idler
VH*ft»ph
Viugraph Split Reel
Sleuth Unawa^s and Low Caste Burmese
SATURDAY
The Death Weight
Vluir*ph Spin Iteel
Heeenr Two-Pert Feeture.  A thrHlin* md eeneettonel lletodnuM
COMING-COMINO-COMINO
The Lion & the Mouse
LuWn »pecl»l feature, In 6 reels
Matinee Saturday at 2,30—«c aad 10c
Prices, 10 & 20c. -:• ORPHEUM ORCHESTRA
ip unit   imtb  vktiuitiii  hAau
iHillMMIllilPI
TINOINI
•raawi Anttts ttrliool will lw cotnM-
•red by the #thool Treat***. Pbrttwr
iwrtlcutara awl »|m mi-atton may be
Otitalned frmn O. (I. Htotiernm, t^bntr-
men of the Ontnl.
AU ttMer* meat to* tn ter May Mt,
awl eha-aM he eeeM end tmttmted to
, ti. U1CRHN.
' deft to ih* Ihmri.
Cily ll-ttl. Tcruit, U. C.
mmm
Gltstillifl Ads.- Geet iWenl
WCirCI,B fOU aStM~-Prnei»oo\\y
m*i "Pnrtner meke; e bartaln.
JM»PI>, IMnnt mt-e.
POR «AU>-(:bf>ap. T.<» Pool ittbton
«ed tar© BowHef KHlem (ltnee«1fli.
nelket.   Applr not f, v*tal H p,
m
m.mmm^!mit.m:
Waman. tlnkwtm-SwmUt
Fat Iwaushm*w
j£x££Z!tt3X&aJB^£*aMa*__m'~mm*^^
raosPttOKOL rw mer. :rr:
tea torttil dru* tuaaa. et bf awil nn fwvt-pt
* tjfawm. toa tuaatu. mmtso,an. <i i in i itoia,
■aumUt.
r«r eete et ltie>*i<re Orof tftire
*V'i>K dM,kr-h*>» ttkoo the tm: le^-
m nbtxon l»t#nutk»«l <*oM Mie
lee Cor. Weteoa r« Waah i eoe
mim Mabo-ltiemt mtbbm €3efw
■etier Co. Mahe Tonm. Atwty
ttorttwMer, e, O. IMlror thia p^ar.
tst
PteetarHHooao w fctff tot,  j^f
i, HwtH»«, n llndmy AteTTll
I
»«*«»■ ■™«Wlh*' "*.. -,'..; '*■»;,8' st *.*• jiu a-
■« -X * :j     * .
Mem
-^49-
,—--,-—,—T-r^-r—r-rr
li
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C, MAY 2, 1914.
PAGE FITS
I /
)
ii
]l
V
News  of Thc  District Camps
COLEMAN   NOTES
Oa" Wednesday morning Mr, John
Chalmers, caretaker af'the bath -house
of the International Coal Co.'s miue,
was token to the Miners' Hospital
very ill. Laiest reports Jlr. Chalmera
was doing well.
Tommy Jackson, who left Coleman a
short -time ago, has returned and started work in the McGillivray mine.
The^lusical SMrleys occupied the
•Ooleman Opera House on Wednesday
night before a crowded house:
Charles Smith was removed to the
Hospital oa Friday night, April 24th,
suffering from acute rheumatism. He
is doing very well at present.
On Sunday, about midday, a party
of young ladies were out enjoying the
fine weather. Somehow or other one
of tne party loosened ao».ie rock which
they.w-ere going over, a ;jiece coming
down and striking Miss Paul, school
teacher, above the eye, Inflicting a
raich-er nasty wound; which necessitated sovoral stitches being put in by
Dr. Robs. 'Miss Paul.cwlll be absent
from school tor a short time.
'Mr. R. M. Morgan left Ooleman on
Sunday night's passenger to attend
a court case in Macleod. .
Jack Johnson was also a passenger
on Sunday night, ae was also Thomas
Hay-nee, tor (Macleod.
IMlss tMcOonnack, nurse ln the -Min-
ers\ Hospital, wae also -summoned to
attend a oourt case In Macleod on
Monday, April 27th.
Dr. R. <T. Ross, of Coleman, was a
passenger on Sunday night for Macleod. Or. R, T. Roes ie sued for the
sum of 126,000.00 -by .Mm. Jonathan
Graham, widow of the late Jonathan
on Saturday to see the Colemah-Fraaik
game.
IMr. Walter North is now occupying
the house lately vacated by Fied Beal.
'Bob Deoan's family moved to Frank
•this week.
Stephen 'McDonald Is renewing
friends in camp this week.
Tom Burnett's new auto arrived in
oamp this week and .is 'being kept
busy.
■Mr. Elias Litherland was taken to
the hospital on Thursday. He injured
■his back some time ago.
..Miss Bradley was a Coleman visitor
on Sunday,
IMrs. Archie Burcey was in Coleman
on Saturday.
'Mr. Ed. Litherland is occupying
George Snarey.'s .house.
Mrs. Wellburg has moved out to her
ranch cai the prairie.
•Grahfijn. for alleged neglect of ber
husband.
'Miss Alary iMalsack underwent aa
operation -for appendicitis in the .Minora' Hospital on Thursday, April 23rd,
under Or. R. T. Ross. Mtee 'Malaack
is, we ore glad to report, doing well.
iMtes Charlotte Baeton left on Monday moratag for the Coast to epend a
well earned -holiday.
•Mlsa Louise Brennen Is visiting her
aunt, Mre. R. Whltelaw, in LeOhbridge
On Saturday, April 2&th, the Coleman football team Journeyed to Frank
and enjoyed the local chib ln a friend*-
Sy game in which eome very good foot*
About the year 190G a bunch of Fernie guys were looking tor easy money
and under tbe name of the Elk Valley
Development Co. placed Hosmer town-
site on tlie market. We remember the
government having an auction sale
and raking in a few thousand bucks
as thedr'quota of this inflation of Hand
values. Tbe government also have a
river running through their townsite
whose action from season to season
is rather erratic. Of course, we bave
no information to lead us to think the
■government put the river there, but
ithey seem to 'be In a measure respon-
though it be through the-medium of1
free "Peewa." It would make a cow
reel with merriment to hear the question asked by this guy, "Where were
you yesterday, drunk?"
■The return of Bob Alderson and his
■bnue was made ithe occasion of a
much-needed practice by Hosmer's juvenile can and .bucket band, who worthily earned theiT price of silence.
(The motorman on 2 North B leveil,
while replenishing Ms dinky forgot to
u a hatch before backing away. Naturally this brought bis sweet reverie to
a rather surprising and premature
close.
We hear that our beloved and revered ulisciple of General Sir Bathing
Towel had his bodyguard of four or
jflve "boy sprouts" drawn up iu battle
array the other night. They were
fully armed witfli "scout knives" and
penny broomsticks, and dressed up In
tootlnll knickers, cowboy hats and colored neckerchiefs. Guess he was em*
mating King Carson, holding a review. On the approach of a few of
Hosmer's unthinking class he executed a few brilliant strageticai movements which finally landed him and
his troop behind dome wild gooseberry
bushes and .beyond the reach of the
enemy.
We, the undersigned merchants of
Hosmer, do hereby agree to close our
respective places of business at the
hour of seven o'clock *p. m. on and
after .Monday, May ith, excepting Sat-
urday mights, day ibefore legal holiday,
ano .Monday night after pay day, and
we further agree -that the following
■merchants stall be ailowed .to sell oar*,
lain article after this hour, viz., John
eible for lbs actions, for a few years Wylle (druge only), T. A. Cornett and
ago this White  B.  C. outfit,  which 1 K>. *'• Raihal lice cream, candies and
masquerades under the name of gov<
ernme-nt, drove some piling to protect
the property of an Oriental cabbage
raiser and ipig rancher. This season
thoy -have cunningly arranged some
piling which, by turning tbe water up
the creek, will make an island of John
Beadesu's place. Soon John will have
an island all his own, the government
will have to ibulW another bridge and
Messrs. Jaebec end Rankin will have
to gather up the .remnants of the Elk
Valley Development Do. -property
Somewhere down by Blkmouth or
Bonner's Ferry and thle paternal government will lay back and smile. With
regard to the building of a new bridge
this Is 0. mere nothing, and it wilt only
provide employment for a few heelers,
but where will (Messrs. Beaudeau, Jae-
<bec and Rankin come In? For all the
good the piling driven will do It might
boll was played toy tooth eldee. After a -   „,., *,,-„, r ._ „„. __ ,„„,,., Un_
very fast and exciting game of ninety as well *ave 4>e4n put on 'Mount Hoe-
£i*„££r ZSsL. AiaI jJSi -~J«Ji Ani 'Wer. AVe have an aglomeratlon of ge-
. minutes, each aide had -scored two 1 _j„„_ «,_—. -.hM*. *k,. tit*.,,^**,,,**^.*,
s? jas •■JTmirssi ■srasasa twrssfss
\er.  gooo learns ana as une Ben-sou rrtt.„i„>„ «™i^k»o*^i /«,+  o.i*h«.,t h^iM
advances they will give a good ac
—csitfit-vf^h-woWvee^inTbotB" .League"
and Cup ties. J. Klllock ecored (both
of Coleman's goals.    .
iM-re. Den 'McKinnon pulled.out on
Monday night's paeeenger on an extended vteit to her home In Inverneee
County. Nova Scotia.
A progreaelve whlet drive ia at -pree-
Twain's celebrated cat, without being
f-TOrT»eftti."lrtair1)e»"ftpiwoached
on' numerous accaslons with regard to
enlisting the government offices lo
■the matter of protecting the aforementioned property. However, the
Hon. W. R. R. quickly stampedes them
by telling tbem it 1* not a government
functioo to protoct property which
ent taking place In the hail adjoining 2S^JESHB* YfoSTS
%"SS ft» ?«»*. horn. "Uttl^tAS^P"
ot .Mm GrnaTvltoot Corporal Gnwt. 9CTSX&StLS!AShffSrLet
It N. W. jTp., on Wednesday, April **• H**** «*«*«*• M * moot-
22nd, and left a bonnle woo fcuwto.
•Mother and child are well,
On Sunday, April 26th, a party ot
between thirty and forty of tbe Ooleman Lodge. I. 0. O. F., aeeeonbled td
tbe EkMClea* Hall, Coleman, and drove
to Blairmore on the invitation of Iho
Blairmore Lodge, I. 0. O. F„ to ceto-
brnte tho anniversary of the openin*
of tbelr bodge. A moet enjoyable day
wae apart by tit who attended. Ao
excellent lunch wm provided and tlw
Coleman representative* are loud in
their praloe ot the treatment accorded
them.
•Mre. E. Wliliame. wbo lately arrived
from Rmnyemlg, Sooth Welee, wVFl on
Sunday, May 3rd, render • eolo to ttm
Aufllean Church. Mm. WlHiarae io
voonottmtl of a beautiful voloe and
winga with a tine Welsh voloe, which
le «oft and mellow, for which -the
principality le famed for good -gtot-Mv,
.Mies Catherine Dleney will vender *
violin eolo. accompanying <Mt» WH-
liane.
W. U Oulnett*. our enterprielnt
mercliaul. le now exhibiting * high
grade bicycle, which It to be glren
away free on Saturday, June «tb. Some
lucky purcbeeer will eport a wheel
thle summer. Will It toe you? It
nothing to try yoar luck.
tobacco), and we further agyee to
•subscribe .the amount, of one dollar
each to cover cost of advertising.
A. iMi'Ms and Son; Bennett Bros.; P.
Burns and Oo.; J. Wylle; J. Bosalo;
M. Boaesaly; iT. Pallcek & N. Kury-
luk; E. F. Rahal; G. H. Marlatt; Hosmer Induetriflil Aasodation, Ltd.; L
Zissleman; International Produce Co.;
T. A. Cornett; 41 Meat Alarket Co.
are building and living in hopes of
good times ahead.
The local order of I, 0, O. F. turned
out in full strength on. Sunday afternoon and .paraded ,to Church. The
fact -that It was the first public appearance of any order turning but in
Coalhurst was, no doubt, the reason
so many turned out to see the march.
Hiram Fife, the driver boss, has
joined in with Tommy Hatton and Secured a fine touring car, The pair
say they inteud to see Some of the
Sunny Southern part of Alberta .that
the Lethbridge people keep boosting
about.
Nominations were called for April
22nd for the position of councillor to
till the vacancy caused by the non-
residence of George H. Benson, who
left some time ago for Red Deer. Isaac
Whitefieid and George Oshaskl being
the ones chosen by.the ratepayers to
run for the honors, the election, wiil
take place on the 29th. The old picture 'ha31 has been chosen for the polling booth. Quite a lot of interest is
being shown and both candidates are
anxious to gain a seat on the Council.
A keen contest is being fought toy
both parties.
A ratepayers' meeting of the Bridgend School District was hell} in the
School on Wednesday, April 22nd, to
read the annual report and also .to appoint new trustees for the year. The
annual report was read and adopted
as satisfactory. IMr. Finlay (McDonald,
Mr. Percival and Mr. Sam Grosso
were elected as trustees for the year.
IMr. Alfred Mclnnes returned home
last week from Edmonton, where he
has just finished a term in the Alberta
College. (He Intends to -go out on a
survey party up north in the near
future.
left here Saturday last en route for the
Old Country.-' Bon voyage we wish
them.
PASSBURG AND Y'CINITY
By Observer,
Th$ Davenport, Coal Company intends to open uii their mine about
(May lst. They started about twenty
miners- and a policeman oil Monday
last. Our Local Union secretary was
down here the first thing on Monday
morning before tlie men went to work,
carrying with him a number of grievances presented by the former employees of the above company. However, before these .grievances could be
discussed civilly and in accordance
with the existing contract between the
United Mine Workers of America and
'the Western Coal Operators' Association, Mr. Dougal, the general manager,
topped our secretary on the shoulder
and informed him that he could no
longer do business on the Black Jack
Coal Company's property and ordered
him off tihe property. But our secretary replied that he had some business
to do and that he intended to do it
before leaving, and asked the management for an interview, which was
granted, but as far as doing any 'business was concerned It was entirely out
of the question. We had time enough
to present one grievance In connection
with the employment of new men in
preference to old employees, end the
contention of Mr. Dougal on this question was that there were no old 'banda
Men with families living at Burmis
who have only worked five days this
year are -refused work toy this philanthropist. He poseeesed no desire to
reason or even attempt to use a little
common sense; simply force and ignorance to supervise over a body of
intelligent working men, and ordering
their representative off the coal
■hunchena' property and also instructing a green official to stop the men
who were looking for work from hanging around the mine mouth. It sounds
like Trinidad, Colorado, around Burmis. Only one English speaking miner
Tool stealing and looting lockers has
been very fashionable here fore some
time .past, but from information to
hand this practice is likely to become
very unpopular if the guilty parties
receive their just dues. Both the
management and the organization in-
teii'd to make an*example of this case.
A dance will'be held in the Union
Hall on Thursday night, AprU 30th,
under the auspices of the Local Union.
A good program will be provided and
admission will be $1.50. Who said we
were not 'prosperous?
Examinations- for fire boss will take
place in Frank, 011 .May 11th, and for
first and second class papers oil the
23rd to 25th-of same month.
BLAIRMORE
The F. Ai. Thompson store of Blairmore announce that tlieir cash registered tickets will be worth five per
cent ■-cash .whenever presented from
'.May lst until further notice. '3 The
store is carrying a special line of fresh
strawberries and pineapples for Saturday.
■ILLEVUI NOTM
Oue Wtttoun !> operating toe picture machine at tbe Lyrie Theeftm
Mr. 0, W. Jahneton te now occupy-
Ing tke bmto o*«ed by tite Wilburg
boye.  Ho hae it leeeed for two yeare.
The BeHevu# Bend were at Blairmore oa Sander pleylng for tito Odd*
reitowe' celebration.
PreeMent ), K. Smith end ite.'
Tree* A. St. Cotter were In tbe ffttnp
(ble week on buelneea
the 0fHe*vtt» football team went to
llllkreet «• Ratarday to btoy * Meed*
ing 00 Frtday raiaUve to the advisability of having a weekly halt holiday.
Let ue live onedtt where credit it due.
Bvery merchant* irlth the exception of
a peanut peddler, waa In favor of the
proposed holiday. Of courae, if a die-
peneer or toenanee and Ice cream can
dictate to the merchant* what they
ebotdd end ebouM not da I am afraid
U'e hot eayhtf much tot the etabillty
of tbe bunch. After much wrangling
and iwsfHng obey finally compromised
00 doelng at T p. tn.
Organiser Good win, of the Boctalitt
party of Oenada, held e, propaganda
meeting In tbe Queen'e Hotel dining
room, kindly tent for (he oceeelon by
iMr. and Mrs. Morgan. Ooodwlo'e tub'
led wae the "Evolution ot Society."
end Wt InteHtfent diecoureo wae appreciably followed by the rebel* of
Hoemer.
The Oddfeilowe held their annual
parade end Church eervloe on Sunday
end made quite a brave ebowlng.
Hoemer end RenKe played a friendly, or what wa* euppoeed to he a
friendly, game of football before a
fair crowd of •pertatore. who wnto
anstoue to get a lhie on the team** in
vlow of the approaching opening of
the league. Tbe encounter proved to
be a feet and determined one, both
tcame trying all they knew, Hoemer,
however, proved eltgbUr the better
'cum and nou h. the ouly goal ot «be
ganw, ecored by niehaide after thirty
mltmtee' ptay Yale* *h» ehot high
over tbe bar front e penary agalnet
Pernio. Pow got tbe ball Itt the net
on another oecaeion for Hoamer, but
wa« adjudged offilde—rather a charitable decieion. Fernie tried hard In
the djing momenu to pull tiie game
out of the fire, but, thank* to a cool
and calculating defence, Hoemer**
goal never looked to be In danger,
Hoemer** team, which bed no leee
then eereo new faces, contieted of—
fiotd, W. BtlderetoD*; tw(k», A. Praett
aod J. Wartrop: balv-wa  1  Vatee, O.
forwaiMe, J,
The projeoted football game between representatives of 1 Eaart and B
North mines did not take place as ad-
vertizedi Was Jimmy afraid to meet
the B North representatives?
Jim Sharpies and: wife and family,
Billy Crompton and Mrs. J. Blgrigg
and -family left camp for the old home
lands on -Saturday.   Bon voyage.
Owing to thejwn-appe«miice.oLJl-fir..
Tiie-1acroBseiteiam,The advertized practice game billed for Sunday last did
not take place.
The mines up here were idle from
Saturday 3 p. m. until 7 a.m. Monday.
We were pleased to -see Jack Bell
out of hospital, where he had 'been
undergoing an operation for rupture.
Dick Ftoirclougb came home (from
tooepltai on Saturday. He reports feeling fine.   "
Bora, at Feroie boepital, on Wednesday evening, April 22nd, a fine bouncing boy, to Wr. and Mre. A. E. Bern-
tham, of iMorrleeey Cottage*. (Mother
and toatoy dohig well.
tTom Emery, wee admitted to hospital again on Satunday for further
treatment.
Tbe dance committee wound up the
eeemn with a eocial and dance to the
Club Hell on Thursday evening, AprU
23rd. A good crowd aicembled. Re-
freehment* were served during the
evening.
The new grand stand on Victoria
Park la now completed, and reflects
creditably to Weeera. CartmeN and
.McDonald, who erected aame.
Mra. WHeon and family, of 8u^«le^
land, county Durham, England, arriv-
ed in camp on Friday and bave mode
their home with Mr. and Mra. John
Poteraon, of Riverside Avenue, Hoelab
!• very bmy ehtming the sight* of
this burg.
The coat of coal tor one of our real-
dent* will be lnoreated for the present month, owing to tbo nocturnal
visit* made by aome one to hi* ooal
ehed. Unfortunately, the marauder
left the ehovei behind on the kwt
visit, which, we ore Informed, win be
returned to the owner on application
for aame.
Knthwriast* of the football gnme
will be able to bolter to their hearts
content on Saturday, when the looal
leather chanws will entertain Pernie
loot bah club ln the opening game of
the league for this season. Come one,
ranw all.   Kick-off at .1.30 p. m.
Tom France came home from hospital on (Monday. We hope for a
•pMdy recovery. Tom.
On Thursday, April 23rd, a public
meeting was held in the Presbyterian
Church, Beaver 'Mines, for the purpose
of considering the formation of a new
School DIetrlct, As previously reported, the nearest school to Beaver ie ■■_,-■„. -_, „ - „ 3 ,
two miles off and therefore the school *** d™? **>« privilege of donning
question was an important one to par- b|* ^rkzf j5St''¥<^?ft3L* ^9^'
ents and others interested in the education of children. As the meeting
was publicly advertised for the IS
days previous a fair muster of ratepayers, parents and others were ln attendance. iMr, Tom Moore, merchant,
who acted ae temporary chairman
since inauguration of the new district
movement, was elected chairman,
whilst N. '.Morrison, who attended to
4be-secretarial-dutles"*from—the commencement,   wae   elected   secretary
Out of the 24 resident ratepayers who
signed the declaration affirming that
at present they were living within the
area proposed to form the new district
and <that they have been in possession
of taxable property for the past two
month*, 22 voted in favor and two
against forming a school district. The
meeting then proceeded to elect three
trustees to deal with matters connected with the nw school, etc., and the
following were nominated;1 Tom
Moore. W, A. Sherwood and John
Prentice. As no further nominations
were received within the prescribed
thirty minutes, the chairman declared
the three named candidates to be duly
elected. Arrangements have been
made to utilise the Church ae a temporary eehool and as school equipment
la already arranged for we expect the
new -school will be opened within the
next few weeks. .
The mine worked five days last
week, but eo far thi* week all is quiet
at the time of going to mall. Lest
week we promised to advise readers
as to prospect* of obtaining work at
Beaver, but from what we can learn
tbe order secured is scarcely large
enough to give regular employment to
the men already ln the camp. However, -joe manai*m«M hope to secure
sufficient orders to employ more men
in a abort time, and tf so the matter
will be made known through these
In addition to the $187.50 acknowledged last week, our secretary received a cheque, value 150.00, from
Bankhead Local, per Prank Wheatley,
secretary, making a grand total of
1237.60, for which we are truly thankful to all who were instrumental in assisting us to that extent.
MICHEL NOTES
The Michel Football Club are opening the eeaeon playing their first
League match exalnet Hoemer on Sat-
A special train was requisitioned on i»n»sy next. The players leave Michel
Monday noon to convey India Wodjr- Hotel at 12.30 p. m. In rigs, Following
ga to Fertile hospital suffering from is the team to oppose Hosmer: J.
bruised hip*, sustained whilst follow- Moores. goal; Ham Hampton and K.
panied with a promised fire boee job.
We shall be grateful to all Local secretaries in District 18 to have their
men in each of their respective campa
well posted with regardajto the oondl-
tione at this particular colliery, •because the law Is only accommodating
the salesman of the Black Jack outfit
So beware and keep away until the
breadwinner^ of^ the _WOTnenjjnjUdUl-.
drao--hav-y-neen gfvMi employment per-
manently.
Air. JoBeph Derbyshire, of Mountain
Park, is back at Burmis renewing old
acquaintance*. He expects to go
back soon where miners are 'being
treated white.
Mrs. Harold Smith, of Burmis, was
visiting at Bellevue on Sunday laat,
returning In the evening.
On Monday, laat there was a shoal
of out-of-works at the mine In search
of a Job black jacking, but unfortunately could not be accommodated,
claiming that orders are too email,
amounting to one shot a day, we guess.
A grand wedding will take place on
July 1st between Mr. Harold Houghton, of Passburg. and Mies Daisy
Smith, of London, England.
Passburg le the place that put the
go ia tango. A dance will be held in
Slovak Hall on Saturday night, May
2nd—pay day In other camps. Cteme
one, come all.
We are glad to see that one prise
from tho Michel Football Club drawing, which took plaoe on AprU 20th,
came to Passburg In the form of a
gold bracelet.
The Passburg colliery Is working
every day. but there Is only a small
number of men employed Just at present. We hope that the month of May
will bring ln further development*.
A dance was held In 8Iovak Hall on
Saturday night under the auspices of
the Dancing Committee of Passburg,
which proved In no way a success,
owing to non-patronage. The music
wa* supplied by Plcton Tieriselni
orchestra.
Mr, Robert Gray, who ha* been In
the employment of the Lekch Coal
Company for some time post, ha* severed hi* connection with that company and ha* decided to return home
to hi* family in Nova Scotia.
If Passburg has been able In the
post to boost about KenluMw, ah* mn
do ao totUy, Ik-h/huh**- me can observe
now that horses can be worked without heme** or even h «tall halter A
man hauling logs here the other day
was seen to tie twelve-foot log* to the
number of fire to the horse'* tall. This
«aves the expense of buying or borrowing, We are bwomlri* more "Hi-
rlSh'' every dsy.
CONSTIPATION RELIEVED
ENTIRELY^ OUR RISK
Unless Rexall Orderlies relieve your
bowel troubles and make you feel like
coming back to thank us for telling
you about them, then come back anyway, and ask us to give you back your
money. This Is just as strong as we
can make this guarantee, and we want
to make It strong, because we believe
that Rexall Orderlies are the best
bowel remedy made.
Soothing and easy In action, they
cleanse the bowels, thoroughly tondng
and strengthening them, and make you
feel great. They promote easy and
regular bowel action, help to relieve
constipation and overcome its cause.
In these things they differ from old-
fashioned, harsh, disagreeable salts
and other physics which usually give
only temporary relief and often leave
the bowels in worse condition than
ever. They taste like candy and even
children like them. They are partic-
ularly good for children and for deli/
oate and aged people. In vest pocket
tin boxes; 10c, 25c, 50c.
You can buy Rexall Orderlies only
at The Rexall Stora*. and in thia town
only of ue. N, E. Suddaby.'--Victoria
Avenue, Fernie. B. C.
Open or E ngagements
for
Dances
Concerts
Etc,
UP-TO-DATE MUSIC
C.V.EDWARDS, SECRETARY
HILLCREST ALBERTA
Phone 74, ring 2
B.PMcEwen
Jeweller & Optician
This Is the sliop where you
oan leave your watch and
rest! assured thut it will be
repaired with expert skill.
Jewelry neatly Repaired
Eyesight tested and
glasses fitted
#
Coleman :: Alberta
CLEANING
Always means more work, make it as light as
possible by using some of these aids to hard work
LYE
BON AMI
SAPOLXO
OLD DUTCH
PANSHINE
AMMONIA
LUX
PEARLINE
OOLD DUBT
SNAP
BOEAX
SAL SODA
Chloride of Lime, Brooms and Brushes
A. I. BLAIS, Grocer
Frank, Alta.  .IZ. Bellevue, Alta.
Ing hi* employment aa rope rider in 1
South mine.
A nueekxl train in blllwl to leave
Coal <**ek for Fernla at 10 a. m. Pri-
dny, May lot, for tbe convonicnoe of j man  and thuttt. reoervra
Umm* detiritis to attend the tporta. igaroe in exp#ctt«4.
Part-ridgo, barka; 8. Weaver, ,1. Travia
and V. Robert*, half buck*; .1. Kirk,
o. Murray, It. Butfwortb. W. Hoi mi*.
H. Cballwior, forwanls; llrowit. Hard-
A   food
HILLCREST NOTES
. 6. GOODEVE GO. Ltd.
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnlib your house from cellar to sarrat and at bot.
torn prlcea.  Call, write, phone or wire.   All order* given
prompt attention.
If you are tatlifltd, till ath»rt,   tf not MtUfied. tali tie.
Coleman
Alberta
The rough state of the roada waa
rtvponftlbk* for bruited elbow, altoul*
At-t and bawl. «lw> injiirtea to toot,
.McQueen and W. WMt«:
_        fbtrttt, T. Rkboide, D. Pow. J. Raw
ly asm* of ball   The *•>*♦ *nd*d tn ■***' •** *- MfOoma. ,
favor of tbe Hitlerott bom f   **■ Uny wfafcw to annouo-r* that ta' otutalned by J  K. Smith whilst hur-
How* of tb# t*nm» worn, to Trntdt «'»""* »«»iay boapHal hoora will be;r?i»« to catch tb* train on Monday
from 9 ». m. to I0JA a. m. onlv*   Itiaftf-tmoon.
la to bo btw*d tbat twtlent* wilt *or-     The mite mid family of Itllly WUnon
en tlMHRft-riv** mv-oriMnfly.   The he+lhtx tump on Tuowlay. leaving on th#
I'ru*i-iiT.:.v   bit*   Millie   a   Utmnfi-r
•mil" ilium tilli-croat, and tbe :»!.tv.<*
LYRIC
THEATRE
(oral ttt rotitft for Lixtlysiniih. II, C*
ehern tbey intend to atay for ootno
tlm*.
Bellevue
Alta.
Motion Pteturtt n*4 Va«*vtil«
tATURDAV, MAV t
A vory powerful dranutk two-
reel flellg feature
TMt   tmOOt  OP tHAOOWi
Malliteo aod tvtntnf
WOWOAY, MAY «
•#OM6lfO tlLLV OIT»
f, -1HHHWM Ke«wjtt> ttdAOto
wfe«r«4*a ftraocbo ttttty «W. M.
Andommi, after Mag detuned
am owttttat, htttntwo" tbo baro.
Truly a W«M«fa euwy w»tb dnt-
tmitf and tkrUMMt iawMeoMa.
IUttal ataff. from tbt doctor down, nre
ll/lltif tliie nf«i ot ttt, maty bi*man. and
jappnN-lote a little foot oooo a waek.
*. ***** Tr*t,...4ii„9, v. ietmrn. em to-
1 fl*Mn<n*«r •et'B**i'<r -tm** tm rnrnt'ttluti
I with eat«bH«b*>n« a braneb of hfa tro* ltmm at Dm? Crwk.   Jl« i^porta
|1r*m colle**, aad fram all ieeovm«;<blng»protty rougb to that duartw.
ibaa • ttdt mmber et ftrnfertih* *':'.»'   flillf fliwigau and Waltor Wrkott
identa In vl*w. ! arrived bark In camp tm Wedneaday
[   At tho loot moetliMi of tb* Lo«l Ob*'morntnt looking pretty touifb after ir:«o
!l«dl*'*W»el wh« bnw»«w tt* h*M rt*o"fht#* nt**,**,*,..*,*;
•Mr. W. R, W11«oii. general manager.Jar„ onN, mm, enjovlng th^ i.|.-».h-.«
wna in wtm»» Vr'Aiy m btrtneiw. (0, mtmtK lm,kt. »nd dlrtbegrlmwl fea-
Wo are t»l«»»»l io nnnmnr* fhat the' {urf)., i<0; w,, imU, -n,^-^ ft„f Anv
<«al eomiwnv Mv* T^T".^.1 'hl!tfor hi* |ta»t a*v*n daya, and th«> pow.
week l»«MJ«rtnK <^fof th* building of U, ,}iat ln« t*omta# oa n roiiHnusriw
tbo new TiMet-wood «tor*. .,,(|a|H,r fot. ,},„ jmunj.   u i» ahtfi't-**iy
Th* i.*w itlt'Utrt, mter*. N.itnl. waa Uoj>nd, ln.».n.r. Oi«i Hi* V. I*. It. will
th* *<**««- of n algfct accident oaf nor run .'vniiw!<in« for tli« fn n* fii of
Tltiitwliiy nlgbf.   WWbt. pvwrlitjK f«*f |tb« uwrnvtoyoi to till* burf.   W* «r*
tho ahow mme twnolln* ^xplodfl and!nn» ^.n^ > i '•■*•   •
*_•••••   ' .    '....*.«.»  •*>  .9f> •.«*.,t1l„ potgji^y um.   in tm*t m* un* '«■»••
Jtttmy Hnntor Mow back into camnll^rtmmteiv h»« lni«rv ««• Mt vt-?*'
Mwi'Lj alu* J.** *A-,*»hy*» aimwo-jiMfrKiH-Hk  *v|uu* * rrowd waiting to tak*
-   "■  ■ * jM (j4l, »jWi»   »fiv dia»|>tio<Rt<Ml wft*«
tb* ae*M««t oeeurred.
We er* oorry to antoan«** tha «l*«th
t,t Mr*. llfAtV.iii. on   th* wife of .Mr
lU'dAlw.ttti,  x*ko awmmb*d tn
,.... t   ttttti*.*-
Tbuuiiin     VV.-t*.    .»'..• otuti*ui*il    k)
Mmnr*.   Hoiwruft,   «•-»*♦  1»   Hillrr»«i«
li,*i,»i aivfc anU otmtt ,* U>* Anya *eoJO>''|
Ing tit*' Aljiliu- *ii'u»rv oj th«'«* part*.
Tlif.v  luivi'  iK.m   rr''i;'!i>'!   '.»   Ui'-li*-1.
i,|*».****#»*
>
U« .     UliHW*
u«  iM*Oay   mmm   iM-HnytmiU,   j^^u,,,,.  ji^.   ,}.,,   »t«;rfiMittiiy
The fun
bwn Hi w'kw
**ri*i tftofe !i".:i«-«* or, Tueaday laat. Th*
**rv|ee  *a» ronl lifted  1»>   *b«   Rev.
•iMMiHMt ot uwkeepw at tb* Hoamer J try.   -.Votblnt doing" U iim cry.
;mh»f» cam* in fer eoooWenihl* erttl»|   If tMi obotrtd moot tb* #y* of Wil
(elan and It waa plainly *vld*nt irom ttom Hlmpaon. formarly of Cool -Creek. .,...-,.„„,
Itbe ftpr»wMiJo«a of tbo m*tnb*r»hi|»|will b« tdcoae oomnnidcat* with M.jt'wrry. \l**tmd««f mlnlater, of MIcM.ii^n^tM.    *r^
that they hod had about enough of bto BlHaborougb, Coal Crtwk. as there I* A ebon aervic*- r.«« held »t,the hon» * ji^.-^it af„| ,-v   , „.,„,, ,, „,„. , „,....,.
lord high  etwutloner attltud*.   W*fa letter watttot for him and h« will awl afterwardu  ih*  funwal tortegw; „h{nv mA tn, m t*u> uyt ttt „„ ,r fttrm,
bav* *»d* op o«r mloda to fcaro no | lit tr notnethlng to bin advantage. wtndH i** way to tb* <*tnei«»ry nt)   T?,„ r,., ..,,.. ,*    .,    ,
ommw of Ma -goff."   H totdn nothlw'    t*<wf fm»lr h w^r'ng  u, u>j,-m Ut, *...••■  ,.   ....    '•'..'.,„...  i;,t-,\.;,v',n,  -miA itoHoninu a«sx»iiat nf iiro  II   i-'us.-f*
'*'ii-njitM'A th*!r eoi-mrti.
I^w'mI "hl<l*« tbfttit'r*"
vnn«iuUh->:4 th* rtrnt-sh*
a«>r«>
I'adgi
ht-rr in. :  and
■   miri*"*!   from
VIS*     '.ttlil.       t*.
ii^Ul'ttf 1   tit* J*'
LYRIC THEATRE CO.
COALHUMtT NOTM
rh* family, nloo a^erof fHendi. »ook J^rfl^T" lloio^r.  ih**t*-
part,    nrtettd*   •■*'«*«r*wk««;,,«!»* a number et m.-*
Ufc*  tn ettnvfv  ikt*i" tomtit**'.   *****' \i%  l#,r.   mmh        ,h„
fonrhv   »»   Mr   ti*o.  H**ffo«*oi»  andlwAt„-   *v:,TmH ,s   n
'I, ... .U*»t **»<! *Www»»aaamii. * f,f  jj,^  AA,
d.^a o, at, 'laiaf^.
i pr »fpp ttwtttaa,
Tio tool timpani bov* In their em*
ptoywiewt, to • varail offlflal *«|ia*f1ty.
tm todtvMoM woo iww ba b* wrti
.iwick lUmtatkaaa to tWat moral
i-A^^ftJk^b Mmtk ^tm^mOmtW O^^to^fe^^jL^gA -^itttSdMIMtodK
H*wiw an artaw antmtnwt*^*. wImj^wp.
fgont i«*ma to It* *ar«Mtlngly r»n»bl«Mtlay or eo « week,   Still «v*ry<in» w!m»!(''.i
In the art of <l*aaif)log drwnko. Tb«»»U'«l nrioato* In tb* nmp tmme to rf*»«l '''-*•■ ateofi ■•«» •*■+•-*• »m.
U mt* AmM ttmt m bottom* n drank |b* dotng nomething.   Them* wbo kar* I
•MMoc-thMbr mo «hm    ' -*w»i|ti|tli*ir own kmxm aro bogy Mbf'JL-l"-   A     —7,^"n! *m,fr w*|« "»TW .  -   *   *
awtra' .iAl*..*, .*. •.••*'*»i am* wH»uw.m. ■ (tf   jj.^,   j^-**
twrr**-*   Admen* «Hj*«Htfon* aUil mwvtM toi   The Mirbet Hand hav* o-wwed an-1%t«tMn* rti*n#
Thl. CoaHwrwt, Mw mine hm wwtrfnff a other immbon* \ihv*r from th* nu ™™* "™*
F. M. THOMPSON CO.
♦•Th* QtaKllty Store"
Phone 25 Blairmore, Alta
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, CROCKERY
nnd tht> RJjfif Thins j« Show
Our Grocery stock is complete with only the
choicest brands,   A full line of Fresh Fruits
and Vegetable* nlwnv** nn h?*«rf
Fresh   Strawberries   and
Pineapples for   Saturday
Oiarlra Th^mAarjo. 'a)K»ar.'
ktv-r   hod    ettwte   es
Atto.
^pMNI^Rtlrv
m-m'
(tow.
Th>* mir.*** b">- ■"*<**' «%-»-«*.).•.»|,»«
. **   .. '!*r.tonre nre, tor tb** j *a thl
Tfcty ki»»w. heeauo* tlf*y ?»»■?»" Feral*.' B. C
Sole Agent for 'invictus"  "Regal" and
make Fine Shoes
*QtWT rOH LCOKirS MINI SHOtS
It
K"
li*•*•■]* ytur
,ir." M-ni it
«-»»jiiii»f.ii>,i,,i
•»-MfU tr»>t»«
\\t-v ••••nt  .
g M«y l»t.
i
THE UTORB .TT**'
BELLEVUE
tv-j-tHer,    Tf,t**y
1,-M-r  }»r«'*i-ii!«'*l
woffEY
Alberta PAGE FOUR
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. 0., MAT 2, 1914.
a
^ye Mzivwt £tb$xz
a
Published every Thursday evening at its office,
Pellatt Avenue, Fernie, B. C. Subscription $1.00
per year in advance, An excellent advertising
medium. Largest circulation in the District. Advertising rates on application. Up-to-date facilities
for the execution of all kinds of book, job and
color work. Mail orders receive special attention.
Address all communications to the District Ledger.
F. H. NEWNHAM, Editor-Manager.
Telephone No. 48       Post Office Box No. 380
MAY DAY
May Dny is tlu> most salient iiiid significant of
all days m-Icc-Vi! liy man for the jiurposi' of celo-
liration from the beginning of time.
Christmas is relelnvited upon different dnys. in
different lands, and New Year's at different limes,
liut May Day is as international and universal as
the class conscious toiler.
"It is May Day*' that bespeaks the international
eharai'ter of tlie worker's hopes and proclaims his
inter-racial solidarity.
On this day tlie Universal Workers raise tlieir
standard and in unity MARCH OX with a purpose
to be realized—the revolutionizing of the world's
process of production, that there may mature a
race in tlie glow of creation, blinding to those who
find existence tolerable only in the shadows of this
civilization of capitalist tyrants.
May Day, of all days, summarizes the best of
all achievements and enshrines the great racial as.
pirations of all times.—Seymour Stedman.
EXPECTANT PATRIOTISM
The Vancouver Sun neatly hits off the situation
between the United States and Mexico by means
of a cartoon entitled "Expectant Patriotism." The
cut depicts "John D." as an idiotic, but crafty
looking old gent in check pants, one hand cupped
to ear listening to the strife across the boundary
line (which is raging around Mexican oil fields)
and the other holding "the "Standard Oil Can."
The wording beneath the cut is as follows:—
"John D. (waiting to replenish his oil can):
What a glorious thing it is to see young men die
for their country."
Tliis is the same John D. who is responsible for
-4h*9~prosent*-4)loodshed -in-the—Colorado^coal-fields,,
and when one is acquainted wifh his method of conducting the strike in that region, we are not surprised that even the Vancouver Sun should have
occasion to caricature John's patriotism (?).
This week the press contains the following item:
APPEALS TO ROCKEFELLER
"Washington, April 27.—President Wilson has
made a personal appeal to Jrthn D. Rockefeller to
bring about « settlement of the Colorado coal
strike and end the violence which has cost a wore
of lives and large property losses."
Why must tlie president of this great United
States, the Land of Freedom (?) which constitutionally declares nl) men equal, appeal to John D.?
Because the latter's wealth places him above the
law. He oan kill, maim men, women and children,
and ho can call upon the authorities to help him.
The crimes committed in Colorado arc the foulest
blot upon justice and civilization over perpetrated.
On Monday, April 20th, a number of gunmen, coal
company guards, with machine guns, fired upon
the tent colony at County Ludlow, Colorado, with
deadly effect, killing, it is cstiiualod, 25 men.
women and children. What a sturdy .resistance
canvas walls must have offered! Imagine the
brave and fearless company thugs rushing this
colony protected by fabric walls! And the ruins
of those tents bni'iied uiul consumed the dead and
dying.   Tlie flames helped obliterate the foul deed
of shame—they were more merciful than those
human vampires. Innocent little children) who
1'iughed and cooed, and their mothers caught ancl
entangled in the ruins, possibly shot and dying,
met a merciful death by suffocation! Can you
wonder lhat cool, level-headed men like John P.
"White. Frank Hayes and Wm. Green protest?
Could yen wonder if they lent every assistance to
tlie strikers? Xo! Tf they did? not. they would be.
worse than the foul, filthy creature who prates
Christianity and endows churches while he permits
the murder of women and children. Xo wonder
even the Sun sneers at this creature and ridicules
his patriotism. 'Tis sweet to die for one's country,
but a crime to die protecting your family and Lome
—thus does a present d.iy society interpret ''Patriotism"!
The latest news to hand is that all parties are
to be disarmed and the Federal troops take possession. This means nothing so far as the striker is
concerned. How can it when the President himself i.s helpless and has to ''appeal'' to "John D."
to settle this strike? The worker will get nothing
but what lie' takes himself. lie gave up his rifle
before and lie has been rewarded with promises
and—load; he can give it up again, and will receive the same generous treatment.
LIST OF REGISTERED PLAYERS
IN CROW'S NEST PASS FOOTBALL
LEAGUE
Date of
Registration
21st April
COAL CREEK
UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA
Indianapolis. Ind.. April 25, 1914.
To the Officers and Members of the United Mine
Workers    of America :
Brothers—The climax .to outrages perpetrated
upon the striking mine workers and their families
in Colorado was reached on last Monday. April 20.
On that date a number of gunmen and coal company guards with several machine guns fired upon
the miners' tent colony at Ludlow. Col., wit|i deadly effect.
As a result more than twenty-five were killed,
two-thirds of whom were women and children. The
tents were set on fire and the whole colony wa's
completely wiped out. The bodies of many of
those killed were burned in the ruins. No darker
crime or fouler deed was ever recorded in history.
The rules of civilized warfare protect women and
children, but in this instance it seems inhuman
monsters operating deadly machine guns, with
fiendish glee, slaughtered the innocents.
It is a horrible crime. As the shocking details
become known, we wonder how such a thing is
possible. This blot upon the State of Colorado can
never be wiped out. We have appealed to the
President of the United States, the Governor of
Colorado aud the members of Congress. We ask
you to do likewise. Hold protest meetings; adopt
'fi^lntinnsrnot^nlyT'eipirating^onrTsoiigressnreff
and senators from your respective states to do
that which will stop these awful crimes, but demand that they act immediately. We will do all
within our power to protect the rights of our members in Colorado and if possible bring about the
termination of these wrongs and the punishment
of those who arc guilty thereof.
The situation is critical. The best service you
can render is with your money, We urge local
unions who are in arrears for assessment to send
the same to our office promptly. The Colorado
strikers and their families need your help, especially at this time. Their homes are burned; tlieir
wives and ehildren killed. What greater sacrifice
oan human beings make? Will you help them by
sending in your assessment, so we can rebuild their
homes, bury the dead and feed the men, women
and children who still remain f
Call meetings as early as possible, adopt resolutions of protest, send them to your congressmen,
the President of the United States and the senators from your respective states, demanding that
yonr fellow workers in Colorado bc protected from
the ooal company assassins who are killing them.
Fraternnlly yours,
JOHN I\ WHITE, President.
FRANK J. TTAYRR, Vice-President.
WM. GREEN1. Secretary-Treasurer.
THE WASTE OF WAR ANO RENT
By W. E, O.
Tli" mon*»*>r f»"iftl»»s»fitn« nf tn.luy
cont upward* of ten million dalkira
apiece. a«jd* from maintenance
I »»« SrjiiJK la voliA out to a follow* J
wiwker tho wastefulnete ot thin world-
wide military  madness*,    "liut." said (
he, "think uf tt..' Aork R slvaa to thou-,
ititnilii td men, th«*rt» aint job* enough
now to ro around, nnd It we *w to
*lop ihi*-.  war hull!)*** aii<l |m!(I off
tint nrml**"   and   be threw  up  his
bawl* at* ba aHmjmwl tin* mamtltiiile
of   di<«   unemployed   prnhlem   under
with «rot»Htion«
"Tliat"*  just  the   vlewputikt  of  th*
This la the high rout of thin* and I subjection and protect tbe few. who
. I collect the rent for the use of the
eo-rth and the fullness thereof.—The
Mlnwi Mnmtine.
(he fuiuhtiimntal cauae of the workers'
impoverishment the world over, Here*
in we find the answer to the puzzle
thut Just iu we have |>ro*rei**wl and
multiplied 'he means of productions
n thoiimndfot<l, so in lik« ratio ha*
pov-prty Increased.
IGNORANT OF CONDITIONS
OR  INSINCERE
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
IS
10
20
21
22
23
24
25
Name ot Player
George Harvey
George Young
Jas. Yates
R. Jones
Thomas Luxmore
Joseph Harper
Mark Norman
AV..W. Parnell
Peter Armstrong
D. Atherton
Bert Davis
F. Town si! end
Thos. Bann
Thomas Walker
John Xlaiwiiug
John 'McLelchie
Thomas Martin
Harry France
Thomas Burns
Aaron Ulackey
R. Johnston*
J. D. XI aril in
J. Myers
W. McFegan
Wm. (.irant
Date of
Registration
21st April
FERNIE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Name of Player
William Gregory
Joseph Shannon
Peter Jolnson
W. Reilly
John Maclean
Benjamin Smith
Ernest Watson
Thos. Thornton
William 'MtOonnell
James Lamb
Hugh Brown
PMllp H. Bayley
Harry Isherwood
Alexander Altken
Thos. Oakley
John W. Skllllng
John Hirst
B. Hartwell
Robt. D. Wlnstanley
Thos. Shields
C. L. Cameron
J. Gormley
Allan J. Smith
J. T. Atkinson
George Booth
Date ot
Registration
21st April
HILLCREST
Name of Player
1 Harry Jepson
2 A. Padget
3 R. Dugdalle
4 J. Moorehouse
5 Matthew Dickson
6 F. M. Bostock
7 William Geo. Miller
8 iW. N. Rochester
9 Andrew Ralsbeck
10 T. Dugdale
11 George Jackson
12 James S. L-eigh
13 Jack Grlneshaw
14 Dan Cullinan
15 John Clark
16 Wdlllam Murray
17 Robert Murray
Date of
.nA-ariflfnaiflAn-
21st April
MICHEL
—Natae-of~-i*!ayer-
1 Joe Littler
2 Harry Challloor
3 W. Holmes
4 W. Whltehouee
5 Ed. Partridge
6 James .Moores
7 Alec. Waddlngton
8 Alf. Ball
9 Joaeph Travis
10 Simeon .Weaver
11 William Jenkins
12 Harry Brown
13 F. Roberts
14 R. Sudwotth
15 Samuel Hampton
16 A, Moores
17 J. F. -Briscoe
18 John W. Barnes
19 James Murray
20 J. Hardman
Date of
Registration
21et April    I
"      "       2
"      "       3
4* »l |
5
-,.*.«        6
1
"      "        fi
"      "        9
JO
"      "      11
12
18
H
* .    15
18
"       17
COLEMAN
Name ot Flayer
William Fines
Fred Odger
Bam Moores
Stephen H. WaeDonald
Wm. Roughead
Henry Holmes
James Kellock
John Hunter
J. Brnmeraon
John McAulay
Jo*. Muk
J. Bateman
Wm. 'Bttnks
Frederick Beddlngton
Mitchell iMoLean
Walter Pleasant
Thos, Jackson
BELLEVUE
Date of
Registration
aiet April
Appearing before, the Congressional
.... . „    ,        . ,,      i Investigating committee on the Colo-
When you talk about these things   ra,,0 ^t^t Jollll n, Koclwfollw, Jr.,
to people,   he majority do not take  „***, tlmt  the  policy adopted by
ih». whole, thing in.   If you mention  ibme tn oh«r«» of bis Interests In
rent. It simply menn* whnt they W Colorado wss Intendwl to safeguard
-iilil   I;    "ti  <!<»•■  KJv»<
for Ui-tSr dwi'lllnr. if you mention tax.
Mt I* what they Imve to pav directly,
jTlif n.'tn nml tux involved In nil they
i use they fall to nee. They do not
; know   -thai   tb*  «»m»rii»on»  iiRsrewito
ovenn* nan.    wi  ..   ; »*»«»" M, mA tux enltetted In the tai!m<
^ki*.*,?i!'^^:JBi*^*r!4lsirlrts of otir Htlw  )« ultimately
iw-td by them.    Tho Rreotcr pnrt of
they et'i>-4',tm.   whftf are them* moo
kf*.r tj'.w'c.   'in-!   -mnl"-.  fi*.'*"
l*U*>nn*mb*»r fallow-worker, that all
tf-j,.«f. tnitt'tin . iii litt'l'trt nm*! in war
)iiM>|M*rat,twi«'. whh-h you think ar*
Mplne you. yon en* ultimately ntnd**11
ti» in*   tiiro'ith  • h*  tii»-r*,'i#'t-<f r*m1  ttt
living.
tl  i* at, i-iiuniMiVi* *l'»af*«l*tv Ul*»L  tlw?
world nf -workera, thl* wntHt* of linn-
ititiiif i.tiii*
'IIMJ
1
*u** »;»»-/ |..i> *uj .ht* i(*!»«*»-»fit*« tit
Ufa (• th!« war ts*, land twit Btid tllvl-
.IiihIh ou ArtU-r.-it ! rut um rial stink*.
■My nr»<<*r p«»* tfi<Mi j»r mouth lor
hi- hu-iitloii. which h<« niu>t add to tin-
■mnt of thi* nrtM't<rle*; but >ou twy,
"Th!« he iJlvh!'1* up miiHixr *n ninny
patrons that It amount* io very little."
te*itt*   pn-iMit-H    l»   tir>   <-eim.fi   •■'xt   nmtt*
« . j<»«.)( jui* lOI)„  j,,,, !I)V, Biim, tit*%ier, itaixr man.
•o'tn-M.
•tlttif    tttiA  ndrt**d  to thin
1T  ri-tlt   tli!•:..■
tn<: id i'l tlj.i
i**t j
tlie Individual llbcrtlen of the em-ploy
**m ot the company,
He aald, "that while lilt other In-
tereats precluded pernowal wipeni-
•Ion, lm had takHi ucllve tutereet In
ih if -situation thi'if, and approval of
the method* adopts by
*entnllv«M**i"
He aluo miifl "lhat ?M> p«>r c*<n» ol'
th*'   mIto»ri   wetv   nonunloti   from;
choice."
Ik**'* Mr Itoeltffaller know that tn '
rhe but »,nr<niv y^ara f»very oft*v ad' '
nx-ait- of uiiionitm ha* been driven \
frutu tlu1 mlni'i Uy thf nmnugn'ra*;
Ik»e» he know that as a conMHiuence;
it,Ult,9,      4   ,,tg 4%.t4t, I .t.4.4. *,,.-.,.-(. ,       ....it
*f,l*      «.*,      .,-,..(.      »»*f,      ^(««r*l,.<      •l**l,,>^,,      ^^!  t
iTtmonnv he hold* va»?  Int-fwat* In i
i'intl
Date ol
Name of Player
1 James Cardie
2 Jas. fisher
3 A. Varley
4 Alfred tihein
r. Edward Bosely
« H. Varley
7 J. Longworth
8 l. Iladforth
9 R. Joi-den
10 W. Miller
11 Wm. Collins
12 Patrick iMorriion
13 Krneat Fisher
H K J. Hughes
18 a. Tristram
16 Walter Pleasants
FRANK
5 Jas. Wardrop
6 Andrew Sin-claiir
7 Harry H-utson
8 George McQueen
9 Clifford Moore
10 J. Clarke
11 John iBurk
12 D. Brown-rigg
13 John Burlinson
"       14 Hugh Lynch
15 Ernest Watt
16 All-^ai Penman
17 W. Balderstone   .
IS Wm, White
20 Alec MoKelvie
21 Robinson Rams'ha'W
22 Andrew McGovern
CITY BASEBALL LEAGUE
The baseball-era wall hold a tag day
on Wednesday, April 6th, "this 'being
t'he first half-holiday granted the store
clerks. There will be sports in the
City. Park in .the afternoon and In the
evening a smoking concert with boxing exhibition will be held in the Fernie Athletic Club hall (over Ingram's)
Ills  repre- j ttn|ril-,tmtton
are th* dfvl«!..!,d» twld on MtHotM ot]M of thi„ ,,;;,,,;,, Tmt' ^^  „ d  otiernlm'!
a''.utx ^sti^x^r^^T!:!,i«-.^». i«* ^.....■*.,..*t». *<w», turn,,.vsr^m^L?.!
npply   the  manufacturera,  who  pay
brirt* f!n»1!y •Vr!*»t"li  nie    Yt-t 1>:h*k
tiji tr* '!)*• «:»•»* of our hW'td. S»«t**»r and'
■«ttfi.*i!-.
!uvr«-1
>      ♦     i*.   -   --■:,-,-,-   VnrV
fr:tiit»r» to the private
«■•» nli  ftr.«,;»2.*«23 la
;i(iit!c ;u''t .j.
owiw-r* '.il! tH**
r^tH.
Fin.', i' v..** j».ii.l by big btiatneiM.
Hhtf ...i.i..I k !*•*> tl." \ntf<* ol what It
h:.»l to >-'•.*. m.A ■»<> on .fowl! the lin«
of dlanrsbutlon-i'iery »e«I«r wrapping
„t, in bt* -r-t'-AifpAlHii* tbtn 'burden *t
i**i.l mnl |...-s..;,« i: *,.). fiajilly to be*
lKii*1 ;hy *b* •itMw.'*»-*' fonsumer.
Ill-   *..-<tji.*.*   „i    f.t-lf    .ttttt*   tliaU   «--U*>
ut -th** iiiuci t*.f  titi« -^iim Und rem.
'•'nimMtrstH'fly ••>* 8,twat.
lit   *iffij..j>   -"*i***fctti*m   **k*«,   torn
with brolc-t'*. |i'r>»tooi,fr» and quackn
of vitrlnuf Unds- tbt*v al«o pay thoir
n»wj tliroiijih m»*
T?»«- lwnr-fjo't«r*«'« of th'.* worfiOTi
WfiiVli til.■«'.,<) t-o'*-*, th*. }HV>p!<-- ar*" f-n-'
ahUd thi r.*\y, >.a control ami liifluwicii*
mo*? i'i-t*r* iiv»nii«» of thought and "it-
ha  r-mwfifittitf.y
■)* In the intereat id the free American j
worker: the methoda of hk msnairfr*'
v,«,v<» Ht-mten'M thrin*-
Aitrt tf no per eent ot hw fntptoyf-rti
were oftpoaed to the union, how did it
happHi that M per eetit of tht*m eb-et. i
td to rome out on atrlke? How ,loe»
it urcord with hia statement thai In \
apifa of at! tbe hardahlpa. ail the out
ntcea jierpetrated by tht. hlmi tr»in-
men. fhe htred Hint** nfflclal«.  tbtjo*1
Name of Player
1 TU*. Sloan
2 Inaae Hutton
.1 Jack Graham
1 Robert Petrie
*> Wm. Love
n Thoa, Jackson
", John !». Vwtnle
h iu.bt.rt it. -UrillUlut
f* Thomas Patteeaon
1*1 fVUIIUCI  I'HIWtl
", T   '.1,
12 K. A.
13 Fred Parker
H T. Mstsb
tr. .laines Wstsoit
The .single men composing the sitaff
of the Crow'si Nest Pass Coal Co. have
challenged ithe married men of the
same company to a game of ball to be
played at the ijrark April 30th, at 4.30
p. in.,' weather permitting. Needless
to say, this game will prove a very fast
and exciting one, as referen-ce to the
line-up will indicate men of major
league standings:
Married: R. Wilson, lb; .1. Irvine,
rf; R. Black, 3-b; II. Wilson, ss; A.
Khmer. 2b; W. R. Wilson, p; C, J.
Murphy, If;  White, c,
Single: J. Clode, ss; J. H. Marshall,
lb; R. Cotton, c; Hewett, ef; Jas. McLean, 2b; K. Kirkpatrick, p; R. Dob-
insoii', .'lb; P. Lancaster, If; J. Oliver,
rf,
While President Wilson and his political family are giving their undivided attention to a prospective war with
Mexico, a real war ie in progress in
Colorado and to which they are giving
no attention.
American workingmen are getting
tired of demanding justice and 'being
handed a "congressional Investigation" .that reeults in nothing and several mi'Uion of them are getting ready
to vote for what ithey want
Why We Guarantee
This Stomach Remedy
If .there are one hundred people ln
this town who -suffer from indigestion,
dyspepsia, or any other form ot stoir
ach complaint, we believe we can -suggest a remedy that will relieve at least
ninety-eight of them, and perhaps every one of the hundred. We'll do more
than suggest the remedy—we'll pronj-
ise to give hack the money to each and
every one of tbe hundred' that are not
relieved-. That's how much faith we
have In Rexall Dyspepsia Tablets.
Containing Pepsin and Bismuth, two
of the greatest digestive aids known to
medical science, as well as other ne-.
cessary Ingredients, Rexall Dyspepsia
-Tablstssoothe-the-iiiflanied-stoinach
lining, aid the secretion of gastric
juice, check distress and heartburn,
■promote regular bowel action and
make It possible for you to eat what
you like and as much as you like (Without tear 'of consequences,
Don't suffer any longer from dyspepsia or indigestion. Use Rexall Dyspepsia tablets, and you will be just as
enthusiastic about them aa we are and
just as ready to urge them on your
friends. Sold 6nly at the Rexall
Stores, and in tliis town only by us.
Three sizes, 25c, 50c and $1.00. N. B.
Suddaby, Druggist, Victoria Avenue,
Pernie, fi. C.
No More Eggs for Sale
A p«w larly Hatched
Cockerels for Salt
latar
Satisfaction or Money Bake
Wm. ANTROBUS
Coleman    -   Alberta
Crow's Nest Business College
AND ACADEMY OF.LANGUAGES
J.  W. Bennett 'Principal
Free Competition
• ■ Two non-transferable Scholarships, eadi for Three Months'
Free Tuition, will be awarded for the best two papers explaining reasons < -
"WHY YOU SHOULD TAKE A COURSE IN THE CROW'S
NEST BUSINESS COLLEGE"
YOU have equally as good a chance as anybody else, because you are a poor scholar do not let that prevent vou from
trying.
It is NOT by the literary style but by the originality of the
ideas expressed that the papers will be adjudged.
.    This competition will close May 1st.
For further particulars write to the" Collesre..
P. O. Box 574
Fernie, B. C.
SISlSlBTcMiMS^
J. T.   GIDDINGS
BUILDER & CONTRACTOR
T. W.  DAVIES
Funeral  Director
and    Embalmer
Headstones Supplied and Set up
COLEMAN    "-""SxW" ,4»    ALBERTA
WELL HEATED
WELL VENTILATED
ORPHEUM
SOCIAL &
DANCE
Under Auspices Local 17
Socialist Hall" May 1
4 piece Orchestra
Gents 75c   Ladies 25c
A propaKMHlii tiu»et»Hg, Suii-
ila,v. .May 3rd. in thu H-mial-
\*l  Hall, nt 7.45.    Spenkt'r
J. Harrington
Everybody Invited
Under New
Management
High Glass
Photo Plays
T0NIQHT-THUB8DAY
The Man from the West
Lubtn Two-Purt *f"e»tur»—W-ertem Dram*
Cupid vs. Women's Rights
VUactwph-.   A plcturo toted in tto atuutowt of tbe Egyptian Tombe
ami Ancient Rulna
The Kid Sheriff
Kacatuy Parce Comedy
Kenton's Heir
Pathe
TV'.el.iirrtnvti
'Mitntio*
',\»i  April   1
HMM»»
Thorn* fllohAnlM
Itavld I»ow
Arthur Andrew Piuott
Thos. \VMUle
tit-btmi.
«   r"ili. '.il'l' '*'  '."."  " ■'"!"   nifcn art' j-till Ktajnluig n.< llrm un tbr
U-turn* th* Mapirt mlndt „„,, »h*y ram# mt*
Zi**™* ""*"w™ ™*wV:tU,m m-' tb/tort''tkrt^*W'«'!«ror ™^;
»m,**r>' of the §t»i* of Colorado, thoot-h rmb
,        , ._      ' * :i «■'«*»*♦• «**  ■"-•'-* :*r"'''-- ' f  nt-   idluit lk*x tht* wpetolut* met* piM-t-t*.
iMti'ti   *w.n   m..iI4   U-   MttmviUnhed -*'<« t*«k*mi ot poat#»t. who «ct* the* ful «noiitth to ouat him from !ns jk,«.
*lf*ft t!i#w. ' fiJ-trmmn *itm«. wbteb. tt -w*'-   '-d* «*«-.»r irnov-wmk*r. At* vmi- tefon. a mtfw» maititti'r of tmm- rmrn'
■i.k,A  in  oH'xri,.'-.'   JrifioalfT. wwnld[****'** ****** ' r-tttrittw*.  wfcwi   *%n*d  Hwf<w   *h*
~ut. #..»,.,i,*,vm#.f.?   ut nt-rr-v  n»«R nod      XXf  a-nrk*** id tbt* wiwiA bmr nil   ante* «MnwHte*», ti*attfi»«d thii* *>xerv
h-uA-l* inivi'V.y fr'im ttt-r* wcttM; prn*-,tii* *,irApna. fm**- ■»■» f*^-,.  rt.pt \t*'*hw tor th* •pntt**ttm *t »>»«• w.-ftrra'
it\A*A, ot rwtro*. tbrnt *t* alto •ettWifWIt*.  t*t**n%':*   It*   lKdM«t*rlwt.   and! Ilree bad -iMN»n lntmd»e*4 !»r »h»f list-
,li+ iitml  nin-ielim     W'Mimt  tbiit,  no' t>iiim^) mh*U> :mA hni,';*,f\ >* *■.»..  ,nv 7ltm    r*iir*a*niulUi-'*:    romA;*t'<A   \,\   to de-reiv* hlmiu>tf Into b^Kovlnf bla]
mnit.fr what atr 4n. w* Oo «o tbe pn* to*-at* H* %»%*$ end r*ntt, pen et whlrh ■ th# manmtM* ol Str. Ro^-'Mrtl^r'* in- * aeltbril toteraMa are baaed on fOM*
fit ot th* Janrtlwd. who nait «» cora-..la need  In  m»fn*ialnlR« armtea  »n«ltter*»ta. and wfcf« *»a-et«l br xh* hn-*hiati   moral   prl»cir«!"l"i^t«l JdlaeI
Im and teinlf. j t>i*\U-* t<» h.-AA «* la ienor»*,f* and S»1st«r*-> bad btoo tx^enly tlniotad by Wmhottf loormt.
th«> fompsin!«>a. and. a* a conaeqaene*.
•:tf i(i-« c»t lil«, in.' jicr<nii*g« td
net ldanta in ("olorwdo were two to out
..*. i.y;.(t;;.t:x*f -Alii itHMUiy-t HattM*.
Mr, Hm-kfti'llrr lionet urn u pklbxti*
throptat. Wn would atk bin to »latt
liic entnto tmm whScb bla retime*
Are diuwn; then vlalt a nn»o« camp
and oompoTO.
W* are totted to beWmo that Mr.
Iloektfellnr twlletea tbat etehialon of
•into-ft* attmM n«i»^rw«nl td* *!*««•••*> *
and, lilm many more of Ma kind.
MILL WOOD
Prwm Elk Lumber Co. mill
FOR SALE
BIO LOADS
Usual Prices
McGLADREY Bros.
Pernie, B. C.
Office: Mclntyre'e
FRIDAY
A Modern Jekyll and Hyde
Kalem Feature In Three Reels
The Idler
VHagraph
Viugraph Split Reel
Sleuth Unawares and Low Caste Burmese
wmmaamwmamaammam^mmmmmaaammammmmemammaaammmmaammmiwmmmmmeam
SATURDAY
The Death Weight
Vttagranb Split Reel
Baaany Two-Part Feature.   A thrttllnt and aenaatUmal Melodranw
COMINO-COMINQ-COMINO
The Lion & the Mouse
LuWn iptelal feature, in 6 reels
Vffetlnee Sikturday et 2.30~0e and lOc
Prices, 10 ft 20c. -:- ORPHEUM ORCHESTRA
Ct?  ?St   fl?.?»tVW HAS!?      '
TINOIRS
'around Anne» School will be ooilitd*
leeed by the School Trnateea. Farther
;i»rtlcukr» end •perlflcetlon may tie
obtained from (I. tt. Ilendereon, rhatr-
man of Mie Heard.
|   AU tendera m»ai lie in tar May »th,
i and should be eealed end Mdreeaed to
fi. DECKK>r.
Ctmrtt to tlie Hoard.
' mt H#n -Pomi** n r
ClmllHlxa- Cut iwtrt
Apply. I*dietr Office.
WLDtVAIfSFMWCH FILLS i,^
tMattetflUlatfttamm. tbmkmmtktmHt
ite  tm at alt t^ntjmra^tt amllae tnaay
nddtmmtmtgj*_e£fmf. toa omntt. tmm
" a>TH« Wor, mJNtuKHnomKH^t f SlHdW^^' ___
PHOSTHOHOl FOUMEK 1«?
F»R SAttK-Cbrnp, Tro Pool Tkbles
Bnlke>.   A^pty Bo« t, NStat, R a
j^^ _^ | M*
l^w *■">*•■ tm uul aw lot. io,
tm mm Wmmii&mi m& mn-
'»• c«v ****** «^. w«m. l.ooo
•haras llalNMffMmm Miaiat Cor,
Meniere*, Idaho TormXA»Iy
ttinkoMer, e. «. Miter this p»per.
lit
nrprfro. niaf*«nii.[.iImrity,,*i.*naUMirla«k
Fer safe st Wese«eir» Ontf Sten
POa SAU4 CW*U*»-4 roomed Mae-
tered Howe ob half lot. Teraa to
"*fwl«w.   Anply i. Retertdge,
,|9 Matey Ava   Also iwo roomed
f mmHao, Tt tdodoof Am^fl
».£-,.,. ""-■""■•f,—~-
—n?*; **-•*—t *,'• '-."y^ '* i u.'i "« ***—
"A ry-'\7x.7 •-'"'>
;   i .'-' '■ ■
1S1-
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FEfiNIE, B. C, MAY 2, 1914.
PAGE FITS
/
News  of The  District Camps
COLEMAN  NOTES
On WedttestJ-ay morning Mr. John
Chalmers, caretaker at'the bath -house
of the Interaabionial Coal Co.'s mine,
was taken to ithe Miners' Hospital
very ill. Latest reports Mr. Chalmers
was doing well.
Tommy Jackson, who left Coleman a
short .time ago, has returned and started work in,the.McGillivray mine.
The' iMuslcai Shlrleys occupied the
•Ooleman Opera House on Wednesday
night before a crowded house.
Charles Smith v-ms removed to the
Hospital on Friday night, April 24th,
suffering from acute rheumatism. He
is doing very well at present.
On Sunday, about midday, a party
of young ladles were out enjoying the
fine weather. Soriiehow or other one
of .the party loosened souie rock which
They were going over, a :ilece coming
down and -striking Miss Paul, school
teacher, above the eye, inflicting a
raJbher nasty wound; which necessitated several stitches -being put in by
Dr. Roes. 'Miss Paul,, will be absent
from school for a short time.
'.Mr. R. 'M. Morgan loft Coleman on
Sunday night's passenger to aititend
a court case in Macleod, .
Jack Johnson was also a passenger
on Sunday nigibt, as was al-ao Thomaa
Hayinee, tor Macleod.
IMlss .McCormack, nurse lu die -Min-
ers*v Hospital,' was also -summoned to
attend a court case In Macleod on
Monday, April 27th.
Br. R. T. Ross, of Coleman, was a
passenger oo Sunday night for Macleod. Dr. R. T. Roes is sued tor tbe
sum of 125,000.00 by Mm Jonathan
Graham, widow of the late Jonathan
Graham, tor alleged neglect of her
husband.
-Miss Maxy iMalsack underwent am
operation tor appendicitis in the JUta-
ere' Hospital on Thursday, April 23rd,
under Dr. R. T. Roes. Miss 'Molsack
is, 'we are glad to report, doing well.
iMtos Charlotte Eaaton left on (Mon-      |
day morning for tho Coast to spend a "alley
well earned holiday.
Miss Louise Brennen Is visiting her
aunt, 'Mre. R. Whltelaw, In Lethbridge
-this woek.
On Saturday, April 25th, the Coleman football .team Journeyed to Frank
and enjoyed tbe local club ln a friendly game in which some very good foot
belli was played by 'both sides. After a
on Saturday to see the Coleman-Frank
game.
IMr. Walter North is now occupying
the house lately vacated by Fred Beal.
■Bob Deoan's family moved to Frank
thia week.
Stephen 'McDonald is renewing
friends in camp this week.
Tom* Burnett's new auto arrived in
camp this week and is 'being kept
•busy.
•Mr. Eliaa Litherland was taken to
the hospital on Thursday. He injured
his back some time ago.
(Miss .Bradley was a Coleman visitor
on Sunday.
IMrs. Archie Burcey was in Coleman
on Saturday.
•Mr. Ed. Litherland is occupying
George Snarey.'s ihouse.
Mrs. Wellburg has moved out to her
ranch cai .the prairie.
About the year 1906 a bunch^of Fer-
nie guys were looking tor easy money
and under the name of tlie Elk Valley
Development Co. placed Hosmer town-
■site on tlie market We remember the
government having an auction sale
and raking in a few thousand bucks
as tbeir'quota of this Inflation of land
values. The government also have a
river running through their townsite
whose action from season to season
is rather erratic. Of course, we have
no information to lead us to think .the
■government put the river thore, but
ithey seem to 'be in a measure respon
though it be through the-medium of
free "Peewa." It would make a cow
reel with merriment to hear the ques-
itjon asked by this guy, "Where 'were
you yesterday, drunk?"
The return of Bob Alderson and his
■brme was made ithe oecaslon of a
much-needed practice by Hosmer's juvenile can and .bucket band, who worthily earned- their price of silence.
(The motoranan on 2 North B level,
while replenishing his dinky forgot to
unhitch before -backing away. Naturally this -brought -his sweet reverie to
a rather surprising and premature
close.
We hear that our beloved and revered -aisciple of General Sir Bathing
Towel had his bodyguard of four or
five "boy sprouts" drawn up in battle
array the other night. They were
fully armed wMi "scout knives" and
penny broomsticks, and dressed up In
lootball knickers, cowboy hats and colored neckerchiefs. Guess he was emulating King Carson, holding a review. Ou tlie approach ot a few of
Hosmer's unthinking class he executed a few .brilliant stragetical movements which finally landed him and
his troop behind «ome wild gooseberry
bushes and ibeyond the reach of the
enemy.
We, the undersigned merchants of
Hosmer, do hereby agree to close our
respective places of business at the
hour of seven o'clock p. m. on and
after iMonday, May 4th, excepting Saturday nights, day ibefore legal holiday,
an-u cMonday night after pay day, and
wo further agree that the following
■merchants shall be allowed to sell certain article after this hour, viz,, John
olble tor M» actions, for a few years Wylie (drugs only), T. A. Cokett and
ago this White B. C. outfit, which
masquerades under the name of government, drove some piling to protect
the property of an Oriental cabbage
raiser end ipig rancher. This season
tbey have oundingly arranged some
piling which, by turning the water up
the creek, will make an island of John
Beadeau'a plane. Soon John will have
an Island all his own, tho government)
will have to 'build another bridge and
'Messrs. Jasbec and Rankin will have
to gather up the .remnants of the Elk
Development Oo. 'property
•Somewhere down by Elkmouth or
Bonner's Ferry and this paternal' government will lay .back and smile. With
regard to the building of a new bridge
'this is a mere nothing, and It will only
provide employment for a few heelers;
but where will (Messrs. Beaudeau, Jas-
■bee and Rankin come in? For all the
good' the piling driven will do It might
-mtautes? eSch side had sco^To ,■»«■'^l^S, J^^Zl^
goals.   Both clubs have got together fej^ £_* ^ESffiEE
ver>' good teams and as the season
advance* tbey will give a good ac
count of themselves _tojbqth_Le*&gsi£,
Kfllock scored tooth
om Cup tree.
of Coleman's goals,
iMrs. Don McKinnon pulled.out on
Monday night's passenger on ani extended visit to her home In Inverness
County, Nova Scotia.
A progressive whist drive Is at pres-
and aggressiveness would equal iMark
Twain's celebrated oat, without being
halt as useful. It has heen approached
onp^uTOB«)us^ccR"siot^^flfi_regard"io"
tbe AtugUoan Church.   Some *aWy
good ganfiftMve-teketL .place already.
Top eoorer la L. C. Brennen.
The etork paid a visit to the home
of .Mm Grant, wife ot Corporal Grant,
R. N. W. AI. P., on Wednesday, April
22od, and left a bonnle wee lassie,
Mother sad child are well.
On Sunday, AprU 26th, a party of
between thirty and forty of the Ooleman Lodge**, I. 0. O. F„ assembled at
the Eagles' HaU, Coleman, and drove
to Blairmore on the dnvttaibloji of th*
Blairmore Lodge, I. O. 0. F„ to eel**
■hrate the anniversary of the opening
of their Lodge. A most enjoyable day
•was spent by all who attended. An
excellent lunch was provided and ttt
Coleman representatives are loud In
their praise of the treatment accorded
them.
•Mrs. B. Williams, who lately anived
rrom Paonyonig, South Wales, wtfl on
Sunday, May 3rd, render a solo In tbo
Anglican Church. Mn. WtWanw Ut
possessed of a beautiful rote* and
•ings with a true Welsh voice*, w-toicto
ts -soft and mellow, for which the
principality ls famed for good stager*.
<Mlss Catherine Disney *U1 vender a
violin solo, accompanying ilfra. WW*
llama
W, L. Ouimette, our enterprising
merchant, -to now exhibiting a high
grade bicycle, which in to be given
away free cm -Saturday. June 6th. Some
lucky purchaser will sport a wheel
this summer. Will it he you? It ooau
nothing to try your Inek,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
«♦ ■ELL.CVUf NOTM +
K. V. hathal (Ice cream, candies and
tobacco), and we further agree to
subscribe the amount, of one dollar
each to cover cost of advertising.
A. .Mills and Son; Bennett Bros.; P.
Burns and Co.; J. Wyile; J. Boseio;
Rl. Boaissaly; T. Pallcek & N. Kury-
luk; £. F. Rahal; G. H. Marlatt; Hosmer IndxietrM Association, Ltd.; L
Z-isslemam; International Produce Co.;
T. A. Cornett; 41 Meat Market Co. -
are -building and living in hopes of
good times ahead.
The .local order of I. O. O. F. turned
out in full strength on Sunday afternoon and (paraded to Church. .The
fact iihait it was the first public appearance of any order turning out in
Coalhurst was, no doubt, the reason
so maaiy turned out to see the march.
Hiram Fife, .the driver boss, has
join-ci in with Tommy Hatton and* secured a fine touring car. The pair
say they intend to see some of the
Sunny Southern part of Alberta''that
the Lethbridge people keep boosting
about.
Nominations were called for April
22nd for the position of. councillor to
fill the vacancy caused by tihe non-
residence of George II. Benson, who
left some time ago for Red Deer. Isaac
WMtefield and George Oshaskl being
the ones chosen by.the ratepayers to
run for the honors, Uie election will
take place on the 29th. The old picture *ha']l has been chosen for the polling booth. Quite a lot of interest is
being shown and both candidates are
anxious to gain a seat on the Council.
A keen contest is being fought by
both parties.
A ratepayers' meeting of the Bridgend School District was held in the
School on Wednesday, April 22nd, to
read the annual report and also .to appoint new trustees for the year. The
annual report was read and adopted
as satisfactory. IMr. Finlay McDonald,
Mr. Percival and Mr. Sam Grosso
were elected as trustees for the year.
IMr. Alfred Mclnnes returned home
last week from Edmonton, where be
has just finished a term in the Alberta
College. Me Intend* to go out on a
survey party up north in the near
future.
left here Saturday last en route for the
Old Country. 'Bon voyage we wish
them.
On Thursday, April 23rd, a -public
meeting was held In the Presbytteitan
Church, Beaver -Mines, for the purpose
of considering the formation of a new
School District, A* previously reported, the nearest school to Beaver is
PASSBURG AND YICINITY
By Observer,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Tho Davenport*. Coal. Company ' intends to open up their mine about
.May 1st. They started about twenty
miners and a ..policeman on .Monday
last. Our Local Union secretary was
down here the first thing on Monday
morning before the men went to work,
carrying with him a number of grievances presented by the former employees of the above company. However, before these grievances could be
discussed civilly and in accordance
with Uie existing contract between tlie
I'nited .Mine Workers of America and
the Western Coal Operators' Association. Mr. Dougal, the general manager,
tapped our secretary on the shoulder
and informed him that he could no
longier do business on the Blade Jack
Coal Company's .property and ordered
him off the property.'''But our secretary replied that he had some business
to do and that he intended to do li
before leaving, and asked the management for an' interview, which was
granted, but os far as doing any 'business was concerned it was entirely out
of the question. We had time enough
to -present one grievance in connection
with the employment of n)ew men in
preference to old employees, and the
contention of Mr. Dougal on this question was that there were no old 'hands.
Men with -families living at Burmis
who .have only worked five days this
year are refused work by this philanthropist: He possessed no desire to
reason or even, attempt to use a little
common sense; simply force and ignorance to supervise over a body td
intelligent working men, and ordering
their representative off the coal
•hunchens' property and also instructing a green official to stop the men
who were looking for work from hanging around' the mine mouth. It sounds
like Trinidad, Colorado, around Burmis. Only one English speaking miner
.Tool stealing and looting lockers has
been very fashionable here fore some
time .past, but from information to
hand this practice is likely to become
very unpopular if the guilty parties
receive their just dues. Both the
management and the organization intend to make an example of this case.
A dance will be held in the Union
Hall on Thursday night, April 30th,
•under the auspices of the Local Union.
A good program will be provided and
admission will he $1.50. Who said we
were not prosperous?
Examinations for lire boss will take
place in Frank, on May nth, and'ifor
first and secou.il class papers on the
2:11x1 to 25th bf same month.
BLAIRMORE
The F. 31. Thompson store of Blairmore announce that their (.-ash registered tickets will be worth five per
cent cash whenever presented from
■May J st until further notice. The
•store is carrying a special line of fresh
strawiberries and'pineapples for Saturday.
enlisting the government offices lo
.the matter of protecting the aforementioned property. However, the
Hon. W. R, R. quickly stampedes them
by telling them it Is not a government
function to protect property  which
«ot taking place ln the 'hall adjoining ffi^JSKTE? TtoSTt
the A^W Chu^    _ A^v Jgg* gm& tor-J8 JgMj
Hon already referred to; lt le called
the Hosmer Board of Trede. Now
somebody It likely to he offended!
The Hoemer merchants had a meeting oo Frinay relative to the advisability or having * weekly half holiday.
Let us give credit where credit it due.
Bvery merchant, with the exception ot
a peanut peddler, was in fayor of the
proposed holiday. Of course, If a dispenser of -banana* aod Ice cream can
dictate to tbo merchants what they
should aod should not do, I am afraid
It's not saying much -for the stability
of tbe bunch, After much wrangling
and Jangling tbey finally compromised
oo closing at 7 p. tn.
Organiser Goodwin, of the Socialist
patty of Canada, held a propaganda
meeting In the Queen's Hotel dining
room, kindly lent for the occasion by
<Mr. and Mrs. Morgan. Goodwin's subject waa the "Evolution of Society,"
and hia Intelligent dtMcounw waa ap-
nrertaWy followed by the rebels of
Hosmer.
The Oddfellows held their annual
parade and Church service on Sunday
end made Quite a brave stowing.
Homier and Pernie played a friend
ly, or what was supposed to he a
friendly, game of football before a
fair crowd of spectators, wbo were
enxtous to get a line on the teams, la
view of tbe approaching opening of
the league. The encounter proved to
be a fast snd determined one, hoth
teams trying all they knew, Hosmer,
•however, proved slightly the -better
team and won by the only goal of the
wai*, -scorod t» RiolMuda alter thirty
minutes' play. Yates also shot high
over the her from a penalty against
Pernio. iPow got the ball lo the net,
on soother occasion for Hosmer, hut
was adjudged offside—nther a chartt-
nhlo decision, Pernie tried hard lo
the dying moment* to pull tht game
out of the ftre, hut, thanks to a coo!
Md calculating defence. Hosmer's
goal never looked to be In danger.
Hosmer's lean, which had no less
than seven new faces, consisted of—
Goal, W. DeMentfone; becks. A. Pntett
ami 3. Wardrop; halves. .1. Yates, 0.
McQueen and W. White: forwards. J.
Ilurke, T. Richards, D. Vow, J. Ram-
Gus Wllhunr !• operating the picture machine at the Lyric Theatre.
Mr. C. W. Johnston Is now occupying the house owned by tbo Wtiborg
boys.  He has tt leased for two yearn
The Beflevue Band woro at Blair-
mors on Bandar playing for the OM'
fellows' celebration.
President .1 K. Smith and Bee.
Treat. A. J. Carter were In tbe camp
rhls week on bvvalneee.
The BeMevae football team went to
.HiHcirest oft Saturday to play a Crisad*  ,. . .   ..,„
If game of tall.  Tha game ended In,*** •«* ^ MoOorsrn
favor of «h* Hllkrest hoya. ** *** ***?• «*a******** »W J»
The projected football game between -representatives of 1 East and B
North mines did not take place as advertized*. Was Jimmy afraid to meet
the B North representatives?
Jim Sharpies and wife and family,
Billy, Crompton and Mrs. J. Blgrigg
and family left camp for the old home
lands on Saturday.   Bon voyage.
Owing to lixe nonappearance of Fernie lacrosse team, the advertized .praic-
^{ee-^ame-bijied^or_SaMa^last~"did
not take place.
The mines up here were Idle from
Saturday 3 p. m. until 7 a. m. Monday.
We were pleased to see Jack Bell
out of hospital, where he had 'been
undergoing an operation for rupture.
.Dick Falrclough came home from
hospital on Saturday. He reports feeling fine.   ■-■
Bora, at Pernie hospital, on Wednesday, evening, April 22nd, a fine -bouncing boy, to Blr. aad Mrs. A. E. Ben-
them, of (Morrissey Cottages. (Mother
aad tahy doing well.
fTom Emery, was admitted to hospital again on Satunday for further
treatment.
The dance committee wound up the
season with a social and dance in the
Club Unit on Thursday evening, April
23rd. A good crowd assembled. Refreshments were served during the
eveodhf.
The new grand stand on Victoria
Park is now completed, and reflects
creditahiy to -Meows. CartmeM and
.McDonald, who erected aame.
Mrs, Wilson and family, of Suoder-
land, county Durham, England, arrived in camp on Friday and have made
their home with Mr. and Mm. John
Patenon, of Riverside Avenue. Hoaiah
I* very h\wy showing the sights of
thin burg.
The coat of coal for one of our residents will he increased for the present month, owing to the nocturnal
visits made by some one to his coal
shed. Unfortunately, the marauder
left the shovel behind on the lost
visit, which, we are informed, win he
returned to the owner on application
for same.
(enthusiasts of the football game
will he able to holier to their hearts
content on Saturday, when the tocai
leather chasers will entertain Fornle
football club in the opening frame of
the league for this season, Come one,
route nH.   Kick-off at .1.30 p. m.
Tom France came home from hospital on IMonday. We hope tor a
si»eedy recovery, Tom.
A special train was requisitioned on
Monday noon to convey Ludla Wody-
ga to Perale hospital suffering from
bruised hip*, sustained whilst following bis employment aa rope rider in I
South mine.
A special train Is billed to leave
Coal Creek for Pernio «t 10 u. in. Friday, May 1st. for the convenience of
llioite desiring to attend the sports.
two miles off apri therefore the school WHfl K1^11 the privilege of donning
question wae an important one to nai^ bte working suit last Monday, accom-
-   -■ ...-•«"!-   panted with a promised fire boee job.
We shall be grateful to all Local secretaries in District 18 to have their
men In each of their respective camps
well posited with regards to the conditions at this 'particular colliery, -because the law is only accommodating
the salesman of the Black Jack outfit
So beware and keep away until the
breadwinners of the women and children have been given employment per-
.manently,
ents and others interested in the education of children. As the meeting
was puhH-cly advertised for the 15
days previous a fair muster of ratepayers, parents and others were in a<>
tendance. iMr. Tom Moore, merchant,
who acted as temporary chairman
since Inauguration of the new district
movement, was . elected chairman,
whilst N. 'Morrison, who attended to
the secretarial duties from the com-
mencMieEi^—Jva-s elected—secretary^
Out of the 24 resident ratepayers who
signed the declaration affirming that
at present they were living within the
area proposed to form the new district
and that the}' have been in possession
of taxable property for the past two
months, 22 voted ln favor and two
against forming a school district. The
meeting then proceeded to elect three
trustee* to deal with matters connected with the nw school, etc., and the
following were nominated:1 Tom
Moore. W. A. Sherwood and, John
Prentice. As no further nominations
were received within the prescribed
thirty minutes, the chairman declared
the three named candidates to be duly
elected. Arrangements have been
made to utilise the Church as a temporary school and as school equipment
h already arranged for we expect tbe
new school will be opened within the
next tow weeks. ,
Tlie mine worked five daya last
week, hot «o far this week aH is quiet
at the time of going to mail. Last
week we promised to odrlse readers
as to prospectt of obtaining work at
Beaver, but from what we can learn
the order secured Is scarcely large
enough to give regular employment to
the men already In the camp. However, vne management hope to secure
sufficient orders to employ more men
in a short time, and If so tbe matter
will be made known through these
CONSTIPATION BELIEVED
ENTIRELUT OUR RISK
Unless Rexall Orderlies relieve your
bowel troubles and make you feel like
coming back to, thank us for telling
you about them, then come back any-
way, and ask us to give you back your
money. This is just as strong as we
can make this guarantee, and we want
to make it strong, because we believe
that Rexall Orderlies are the best
bowel remedy made.
Soothing and easy in action, they
cleanse the bowels, thoroughly toning
and strengthening them, and make you
feel great. They promote easy and
regular bowel action, help to relieve
constipation and overcome its cause.
In these things they differ from old-
fashioned, harsh, disagreeable salts
and other physics which usually give
only temporary relief and often leave
the bowels in worse condition than
ever. They taste like candy and even
children like them. They are particularly good for children and for deli,
oate and aged people. In vest pocket
tin boxes; 10c, 26c, 50c.
You can buy Rexall Orderlies only
a.t The Rexall Store* and in this town
only of us. N. E. Suddaby, Victoria
Avenue, Pernie, B. C.
Open or E ngageraents
for
Dances
Concerts
Etc.
UP-TO-DATE MUSIC
CJLEDWAl^SECREfARY
HILLCREST ALBERTA
Phone 74, ring 2
#
B.P.McEwen
Jeweller & Optician
This is the shop .where you
can. leave your watch and
rest assured that it will be
repaired with expert skill.
Jewelry neatly Repaired
Eyesight tested and
glasses fitted
Coleman :: Alberta
In addition to the $187.50 acknowledged laat week, our secretary received a cheque, value $50.00, from
Bankhead Local, tier Prank Wheatley.
secretary, making a grand total of
$237.50. for which we are truly thankful to aH wbo were Instrumental In assisting us to thut extent.
♦ ♦
♦ MICHIL NOTES ♦
responsible for bruised elbow, ehoul
der and band, nlm Injuries to foot,
„... ,.„# *.T_ww — „ „, ._,M»*»uifit4 by J. K. &mtl)t whMst twit*
Bom* of the sports went to fiai* '""N* Sunday hospHal hoars will he rylns to ratfh tho train on Men lay
The Michel Football Club are oj>en-
Ing tbs season playin* their first
Ueague match agalnat Hosmer on Saturday next. The players leave Michel
Hotel at 11.30 t». m in rigs. Following
Is the team to oppose HosmeT: I.
Moores, goal; Ham Hamilton and ft.
Partridge, hacks; 8. Weaver. JT. Travis
and V. Robert*, knit tracks, J, Kirk,
O. Murray. R. Sudworth. W. Holmes,
ll. Challenor. foi'»«rds; Uri>*u. Hard
Mr. Joseph Derbyshire, of Mountain
Pack, Is back at Burmis renewing old
acquaintances. He expects to go
back soon where miners are -being
treated white.
Mrs. Harold Smith, of Burmis, was
visiting at Bellevue on Sunday laat,
returning In the evening.
On 'Monday, laat there was a ehonl
of out-of-works at the mine In search
of a Job black Jacking, but unfortunately could not be accommodated,
claiming that orders are too email,
amounting to one shot a day, we guess.
A grand wedding will take place on
July 1st between Mr. HaroW Hough-
too, of Passburg, and Miss Daisy
Smith, of London, England.
Passhurg Is the place that put the
go in tango. A dance will he held to
Slovak Hall on Saturday night, May
2nd—pay day In other camps. Oome
one, come all.
We are glad to aee tbat one prise
from the ailchel Footfall Club drawing, which took place on April 20th,
came to Passburg tn the form of a
gold bracelet.
Tbe Passburg colliery la working
even1 day, but thare It only a small
number of men employed Just at present. We hope that the month of May
will bring In further developments.
A dance was held In 8lovak Hall on
Saturday night under the auspices of
tbe Dancing Committee of Passburg.
which proved In no way a success,
owing to non-patronage, The music
waa supplied by Plcton Tiorisslnl
orchestra.
•Mr. Robert dray, who has been In
the employment of t'ho boltch Coal
Company for some time past, haa severed hia connection with thst company and has decided to return ho?pe
to hi* family In Nova Scotia.
If Passburg has been able In the
past to boost about tfenlutM-*, she can
do so today, because we ran observe
now thnt horwi ran bt wcrfcivl without hameM or even n stall halter. A
man hauling logs hem the other day
w«« eeen to tie twelve-foot log* to tho
number of five to the horse's tall. This
saves the expense or buylna or borrowing. We are b-womlnn more "HI-
rtetr every dsy.
Always means more work, make, it as light as
possible by using some of these aids to hard work
LYE
BON AMI
SAPOLIO
OLD DUTCH
PANSHINE
AMMONIA
LUX
PEAKUNE
OOLD DUBT
SNAP
BORAX
SAL SODA
Chloride of Lime, Brooms and Brushes
_
A. I. BLAIS, Grocer
Frank, Alta.  .7.T.. Bellevue, Alta.
HILLCMST NOTES
nun  and tine*,   reserve     A  «ood     i»rosp«riiy   haa   »m!M  n   hmiill.
Ifjno I; MPMjt'd. jamtle upon iMHcwst. aad »h*' i»"«v<-*
Tbe rough state of the roads was.   iMr. VI. It. VU1«">. mtt't<il n»«iwg-w.jiPB «,„„, m<irw enjoying the pli-amm-s
. C. GOODEVE CO. Ltd.
The Complete House Furnishers
of the Pass
Hardware Furniture
We will furnish your houne from cellar to garret and at bot-
torn prices.  Call, write, phone or wire.   All orders given
prompt attention.
If you are satisfied, tell othsrs.   If not aatlaflsd, tsll ut.
Coleman
Alberta
I 'iM
te
li.
UA
;.""
X
'•mi
Hi
LYRIC
THEATRE
Bellevue
Alta.
*M*t>-»t> rivkMlM otto vo-weevHM
SATURDAY, MAY t
A very powerful dramatic two-
reel gellg feature
THI tftlDai OP SHADOWS
Matinee nod tveelnf
MONDAY. MAY 4
BRONCHO BILLY OITS
•OUARg
A      Uul'i-ti      KlNMtt*;      trrttiilr-
wkurfin i front ho BiJIy tW. ».
Andewonl. after helm declared
** •Mitis*'. iw-oo-oM** the boro.
Italy a Western story with Are-
omtf »n<t thrtlNng Inrtdtnrt*.
LYRIC THEATRE CO,
C VJ-MMSIVt, Hiaifir
wa; In eamii Friday on baslnsM. iot o.hlnir barks and dlH-bsgrlmed fwi-1
We are pksisH to annottm-p thai the I um.¥ i/}< ,„.. ^,t %m^tli t.,,,,,, 4 (
ami company imve wimmwiwl thte|for »*,,. imn a*v*n Aw, end th-'jmw.t
w«k preparing for the building ofjm ,ho, (». j^mlie ui a «out latum«-,
ths new TrltwfrHood «ws. of labor for «h*> fuivr*. It la shu•«••-♦ -!y
The new picture pirisw. Natal, *«a|hott*^ boetvir th.sr th* r, f». R  will!
tin?  an-'tn'  of  .1  w'lgfct   uctliltnt   m\m*> ri(t, rxttm>mH Mr thc bin* fit of,'
Thursday itlnh!.   WbHai .pmisrinv t<trttbe uwmiiloyf.1 to thin bar*.   W* nr*t
th« nho«^»»mo wisollne (.\|ilo<l#»| and! ttut Brih.jy, tm:. llk*, ^^ my m m,.
biinirA P*rey Almond on the armajWi po*«iWy a<»t.   In im **» nr.. -or-1
■■4.? 4.4.49i9l- i
rti'imni,     Y**'- • ■   • •* ■    *.'. '     V
.. .     . -       ,. ,. i,9**tv*nui*::t  ***u,)A*amni.   Ilowrmrr   it tin  In   HSHriW '
tnesa eolteare, and from all aeeottnts 1 thlnts pretty rouih In that (Juarter,      thf» aci-idrnt occurred. ta-, m,^ and mmtl *, (,.w AnfM «njo>'-l
haa a -tidy number of p-rospe-fti™* sta-i   IMllr Wsnagan Md WaKsr DlrheUl   W* ere mm to anuotmc,*. the death' ^g ,*,», .y.,,?*,,,,. ,.,„*..-.,,*,,,« .j,,/.,. '.^A,. ■
•flirtts Um rl*-*, ,..«H'i*4 iMik 8W camp mi W'ttdnotdWi M 'Air*.,.  »»-.l«1.iii,*.*ii(. ili«  *!l«- *,i  Urif^^ $mtlt mw  ranartiftt to  MlrbtA )
M the last meeting ot the Loesl thejmwiHng looking jw^y tough after Oeo. Itedrtlngtnn. who suecumtMd t«ih(lf ^rtna hpsrd no* nlv.-**.- motion
IndlvMoal who happens to hold tlwjthdr perambulations wrntid th»» eoitii-Jlier llhic?* nn  Hun&iy  laat. havingim<tv   ..,-.»,..   -■,   •♦
•oot^iem td tint*b**ri*T tit tht* tttwrnttr'tr-r    -Kmhttut Uttt*,.,- t- ,1
mxm earn* tn for «msMemt»le erm-i   tt ttdn should -wtttL the eye of WII-IctsI tmk t*»u*-   ..      -	
rtsm aad It was pialtrfr evident trim (flam Hlmpeon. formerly of Coal Orsek,'tenfl«-«» *m fon-ta-rtad hy ih#> R#r
firm n a. m. to 10.30 a. m. onh. Uiaft-Mvoon.
'Ms to Ue hoped that patients will (rov-! The wife and family of Hilly Wilson
ern themselws aecoiwngty. The hos-ilift eamp on Ttie*l«y, living on the
pttsl sitnff, from the doctor down, are j local ui route for Ladysmith, ll. C„
Uke the rest of us, tmly human, snd *h*r* they Intend to *f«y for some
nii-pr-H'.vt*- a little net ones a weeicUiiiie,
j. W. Dennett, of Pemts. was tw 1   JHttm* Hnnter Wew ha««lr Into «iw»
..„»«.*. .Tn.**..**, mutt m -um,tn**.*** ,uu Mommy alter Bi* ex««ma wnperi-j «-r4ou*.  Qu .to » crowd walHtis to take
l*rl<b r***tW*\*'htrii' e hfttnrh of hi?. Im:   «nrr-ji   nt   -ftuu   rj-i-il.    ih   n^wie
ift
mxm twtm tn fer eenahfetahle ertti* \   If this should n<ktL the eye ot Wil-I*****! umk \*iw- <>» Tuesday teat. Th* *   i^,,! .^j,^ ,;*ha»*ri" j,#.w m.t t*n4
tt*i»<i«r»h>«l *N*t» douuli!)   bnni-h   from
IMh'-HM*.     "Ili-c   artirr   *a»   4*iill,     K
tbe etpmnftmn ot th* memberrtlp
thst they Ind had about enough of hit
lord high executioner attitude. We
have made up our minds lo hav* no
mora of Ms "guff." It coats nothing
to he etrtl owe* If o»« bee a **ry filth
mtbttmv ot himself and position.
will he pleas* communicate with It.
Iltllsboroagb, Coal Creek, aa there l»
a letter waiting for bim and b* will
h. ir KMawibtng to his advantage.
t ml Oeek Is entering a team In
the fnothsU f*omftt*t.ltlrm to hi* h»-ff f-i
Kenda, »» May 1st.   Way ap, boy*:
flatonlar. Mir tnd. om tb* opettlnt I1<M look* good th as!
[fit tht' Lc'iKiut toiu'ttci.   llu*mt iw*dl
'MIcIm-j meet at Ho*w#r.  -Vlck-o-ffat
|<.W o. tn. sharp.   Tnm ont am! boost
for the local*.
The coal company have tn their *m-
ptoymwnt. In • small otttebd eapaehy,
a* tadtvWiBsi who n**mt to h* wry
moch tntsrsated hi th* motal tun*
COALHUMT NOTtS
lh* f»m'|v. a\eo ****rn. t-rti-tiA** »«>eV!
part. Kriwid* *»d Mtow w «r*t**r*
wish fn tiinv--v thHr fw^rtfelt «ym-
ikkIi**' i« Mr (i-'o. IledJSingtuii -aiid
tamlt m tltt-ir mA ker*MV*Meat,
•p.*.  *.f--**u-' f».».f tux*,, •■■<. !!"■:! -ri
Had** td wot tmx*WHt*0 -rtttwiw.   Th't«tt!on«imiW, th* mine Jam working elotiM-r u'.»»i'Wi«* pl*>'**»r frw* tlt« <*»S«l
"      "   " "   * "   day «r so a week,  fttlli erefynn* wholCnnn-n" »n t'hmltm Th*mwiwri. who nr
Advfs** emMtttm* wm prerntt in
Citrrv. M'-'hod'vt mlnlat^r. «f Mlrtwl -,
A short artvlr*. w« km nt tb*home j^^;j tt,J "I   ,,rfi,Kl, ,.,„»,., Kr,.„
*,m   raB*"'  f>*,,«*(*niiie mA an- a! Um- ur-uA th*-it (arm
"n /Z™     n   a\    Th« »'-«w*»»*»» fominKtrr. #.i:,mlt tlu*
IJWlIWlf!!* a»n|fftH«*»|Wt neeottn*  -lit Un,   It   V*i-;rr'*>
'■'■'■''■■   i„*iii*i,',-.   limn-*   r«'(«*i|j;»,  IH'.;.:'..   u
mm" I peoditure, illfMi; hatuM »■> f,r» Fi-H-
:■.   IS-X.
A   t.itil   ItmtiUit   tii*   i'V.      -V.<   !»»..»
Wnnt«l," t* <U*pl4y*.r i.:s (.':•• p.* (»«•«
•■A.'V I UlJWt-lW,     !}« ,1     :,, ,ii        1    -if
•titi'c a oilmbt-r of iw •,   ••';»  f-.;»f4
th'*  vitv mnfli  In  th" ?'*"!i'   <■* ?*"
XVttrtrtj  WW* tran   ** •-'.■•      ]*■■••:■■<*■
et  ih* doe,*"  tk»*a   9,[\\  ,,->,.*     ?.*c
N««h«ff dnhtff
md ntt*renrtt* 'h* funeral
w»ml«l Its way
».,*!«i p.  m.    William
,, •-,  r.-f.-i t*,',nr-f *>,..- f r>*."'
Valetmm;   Andrew   Frew   and
,1-i**»)r-» Tbrr*;- v ar.il wife. .TiUTi*--* T>nc»
■in,i •vt*,-*   Itfiti Hf-'ltm't enA w!f*», »";*,»■*'
Wn, em other jtwinaer mnnl#r» of
sent serms 10 ws sswaniniir *ranswii*
.In ihe art of classify Ins dnmhu. Tb*-rt»
|l» no doobt that to hecowe a dnmk
.■"•Jw^iioatar «a* m
thav*   bad
•till remains In th* eamp netme to'rlvf.1 b*n* a hont two wt**kn ;*«o
b# doing *om*t,hloK.   Thorn wfc» bnrei   the mbuoj'    ~
their own
F. H. THOMPSON CO.
"Ths Quality Store"
Phone 25 Blairmore, Alta
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, CROCKERY
and the Right Thing in Shoes
Uur Grocery stock is complete with only thc
choicest brands.    A full line of Fresh Fruits
and Vegetables always on hand,
Fresh   Strawberries   and
Pineapples for   Saturday
Sole Agent for ••Invictus"   "Regal" am!  "K"
make Fine Shoes
*ourr row kictctrs mine shows
K.-.-j. ■*..*■*'.
mn-   *w»,r»»
1*ttlHtt,f'tlt*
>-k»-ti-» tr«nu
, |H.r ».,»Tif   ,*
ttir M«v l»t*
;,A:
r»'imt<-r.
,-rr-f    pf,..,.
.THE ST01 mi--^-*
PAGE SIX
THE DISTRICT LEDGER, FERNIE, B. C., MAY 2, 1914.
The Bombshell That
Henry Ford Fired •
•    9   •
FROM  THE   APRIL    NUMBER OF PEARSON'S MAGAZINE
By Allan L. Benson
Henry Ford has cracked the shell
of hell. He who will may put his eyes
to the crack and look out.    Everyone
crooks. What does Ford say? He lines—those trusts ara in rar better
says he can afford to pay and will position than is Ford to pay high
pay floor sweepers not less than $5 wages.   Ford's business seems an ex-
a day.
What do you think of a nrini-
in the world ,is putting his'eyes to the j '.Crie'n'NVortognSn"' ^ '^^
orack. .though not every one is looking i American   "ortcragman
who receive
ess than ?300 a year, what do you
*    Could jlou
i
out.   The whole world is talking about. . . .     . 41 „„.
Ford.   Wherever men and women toil I,..  or *,'„,,.    y, r .,   t,
most, mere is the talk most earnest. I ''Jf..,1? ™J»™£Z? £t?e,„1C!L™ ^.I
Five dollars a day for floor sweepers
—think   of  it.    Ten  millions  a   year „_„„ .,    .,
given to employees-can we be dream-i  "an  '       'V^'    "°*  ™uU1  you
ing?   And dollv hours cut from nine I llkeht0 ^ °rk,to" Fo'd ?. Would you ac-
to  eight-will  not  somebody   kindly | ^ ,a J«»b >n,hls factory if ne were
■v-ike us un? telegraph you?   Would you suspect
''.... , ... ; his money of being counterfeit?
Nobody can  wake us up.    V\ e are i    „. ,      , ,
not  asleep.    All   that  we  have   read I _ ">*?•. wh»' d,°  >'ou, always  susl)ecl
nbout Ford is true.    The great auro-1 Swiahst 'promises  of  being  counter-
Would your family feel a little more
11 comfortable than it now feels on less
jOO a year?    How would
edition to ordinary industries only because his dividends are so large. Let
me tell you why his dividends are so
large.
. The Ford Automobile Company .in
1913 made profits of ?25,000,000. The
rule among big business men is to
issue as lpuch as stock as the profits
will pay dividends upon. That is the
way business men estimate values.
Darning power is the test.   If a con-
down to an honest basis and capitalists must, be found who will give half
of *th.eilr • profits back to their employees. (The fulfillment of either of
ihe conditions without the other will
net be enough. It is .theoretically
■possible, .though highly improbable,
that the trusts will L>e forced to an
honest oapit-allzanion. But what if
.the trusts were to be forced to an
ho-neat ( capitalization tomorrow?
What good would that do the men
and women who work for the trusts?
That Js a question that is not answered by gentlemen who would settle
everything by squeezing the water
out of stock. Squeezing wator out cr
s:.aek, while a highly meritorious proceeding, does not necessarily amount
u> anything to the employees of stockholders. Squeezing the water out of
stock merely prevents rich men from
g'old-bricking small investors. It does
not compel stockholders to pay wage
workers more wages. Ford's honest
(.a.pitalization dad not amount to anything to Ms employees until he coup
cern can produce profits of SI,000 ailed with it a determination to return
year, the concern must be worth ?25,- j to b'.s employees half of his enormous
000, because $1,000 is 4 per cent of .profits. Without undermining the
$25,000. The advantage of this scheme j very foundations of the capitalist sys'
mobile  manufacturer is  ir-ving  awayi1"""-     (-,an   nothln8   liut   the   actual  is that it gives the insiders an oppor-, tem, what law can be passed to -coni-
money by the million-'not as Rooke-! s.'bM „of .m°!aei'. p?nvince  you?    All! Unity to get their own profits quickly. | ptl capital iste to return half or more
that  Ford has told you in terms of
money   we  Imve  told you  in  v
We have told  you even more.
feller   gives   it,   to   universities   and . . ,, . ,
churches; not as Carnegie gives it, to i ™one>" w« l*Jve told you ln ^n.
found ■ Binaries In his own honor-l^e »»ve told you even more. We
Ford lis giving the mlllons back to uie jhavo ,^d J™ *bat J™ may have ull
men who' hammered them out with ; >'oar.^ Produces if you will but go
their bones. He might have kept "bof, '** in £ senai-Me way to get it.
them all.    For Ford, as a human be-!Pord lms toW h,s employees they may
ing, 1 am strong.   He Is a man.
*l should like now to have you look
have hailf of the additional $25,000,000
I a year thmt Xhey should get.    When
Ford promises to return ten or twelve
through the orack that Ford has puf{nrfllhm8- a year you ^ £,„ 6Xceed;
into the shell cf hell as 1 look through
It—ond then ask yourself whether I
have pointed out anything that is not
there. But to see through this crack
clearly it will be necessary for you
to keep Ford's millions a little away
from your eyes. A silver dollar, held
within half an inch o'f your eye, you
know, will shut off the view of a valley a thousand miles Jong.
■i-l said 1 was strong for Ford. I am.
I am strong for him because he wears
no bristles upon his back. I am
strong for him because he is doing
what, no other man of ■his'income ever
did—giving back to his employees half
ingly seriously. If you are near
enough to his factory, you orowd
around the gates and howl for jobs,
You Woek the streets until the police
They do not wait weary years for divi- j of tlic*lr profits to their employees?
dends. They simply start Uie presses, N'o such law can be passed. Thereto' printing stock. The stock is sold j fere, the squeezing out of wjiter from
to the .public at high prices and bought 'stock is, no remedy for insufficient
.back, in panic times, at low prices, j wages. It te a remedy only for a, cer-
'The insider cannot lose. The outsider j tain class of bad investments,
cannotowln. The insider does not in- vhe only remedy for the miserable
ten'd the outsider shall win. j I'ondjticjis und-er  wliich labor exists
The Ford Automobile Company, as • is Socialism. Ford's plan, splendid as
I have said, produced in 1913 profits\A is in comparison with the 'policies
of $25,000,000. It was known far. and j of other capitalists, is defective, in
wide as a highly prosperous concern, many particulars, of whicn 1 sha.il
According to all the rules of high fi- iii.toioa itwo.   It gives his employees
nance, it should liave been capitalized
at an, enormous sum.    According to
have <to come and  chase you away. aH the rules of high finance, its stock
But when Socialists tell you that you
could just as well have the whole $25,-
000,000 as half of it, j-ou yawn ami
declare you .believe you will vote the
Democratic ticket and keep«the tariff
down or vote some other tieket and
put the tariff up.
Tlve man who perpetually yawns is
exceedingly likely to dislocate his
jaw, but he is not in great danger of
yawning a new suit of clothes upon
of his profits.  :Dut 1 am strongest for|hlB bael   or a ,barrei of flolir toto the
him   because   he   has  .proved   many Mcll        Jt ,   time that
things   that   Socialist   writers   have
been telling you for years. When we
wrote you yawned. You satid we were
dreamers. Some of you said we were
fools. Xo.matter what you said. The
point is, you did not believe us.   We
Won of working men and women; began to give some serious"thought to
the problem of how we may best go
about tt to mako life more nearly
j worth living. If nothing can convince
us except the actual sight of money,
pictured to you a world for which you j,    u; ^ ,fc Qod ^ ,p rf h ;
did not dare to hope.   You did not he-1 He ha8 imt a ^.^ .R the wa,lg ^
even a donkey shoul dbe able to see
lieve a world so much better than this
could exist. But you were wrong.
Ford has proved you were wrong. You
were wrong because you did not dare
to hope enough. The human race
never dares to hope enough. So long
has it been harnessed. to hardship
that it scarcely d&r-es hope at all. A
politician who promises next to nothing—and does uot deliver that;— Is
usually believed. We Socialists who
promise what the earth really holds,
aire set down as idle dreamers or malicious demagogues.
through.
■But wo should ask too much of .Mt.
Ford if we were to require him to pull
us .through the crack. Ford has done
enough for us. We should now do
something for ourselves. He has
shiown us that half of his profits are
enough to enable him to reduce daily
hours from nine to eight and increase
the pay of all men more than 22 years
old to $5 -a day^ We should he abte
to do the rest of the problem our-
t, i   ,im» „.,,., ,,,* ™,.f ^„.., tr. ,K»««e ■ selves.   It is nothing but a problem in
11s ,lj£! J?.°* ,£ H^^J^l ! mental arithmetic.    We have only to
divide the remainder of Ford's profits
by the number of  his employees to
nsccntaiin how much  more Socialism
tacks. .Money talks. Ford's money is
talking. We Socialists told you that
under a just system of industry even
the lowliest worker need pot .lack a [ ^n^sV w*£
""■aecfim, livrng;—rora_nas-n*oirBsia'onsn-=^
ed a just system of Industry, even in
his own factory.   He Is returninR only
half of his profits.   But the lowliest
man who works for Ford receives not
less than $5 a day.   That is $1,565 a
yoar.    Ford Is paying   many   of  his
workingmen more than $2,000 a year.
The   average  annual   wage   of   the
American   workingman  Is  less .than
$500 a year.
The difference between what Ford
The remainder of Ford's profits are
$12,500,000.
The number of his employees is 25,-
000.
Enough profits are left to Increase
by $500 a year the wages of each man,
woman and child who works for Ford,
Tliat would be a little:more than
$2,000 a year for floor sweepers and
will more for others.
, If Ford should say to his employees
Is paying and what tbe others are that he would give each of them $500
paying Indicates part of the robbery more a year, you would believe him.
that tho others age practising upon i you woum believe him because you
their victims, it does not represent; know he has the money. Yet. Ford
nil of the robbery, because Ford is. cannot  divide  $12,500,000  by   25.000
not yet paying hia employees what
■they earn. Ford's -ftmployoes, ilk© all
other employees, earn all that Is produced iln excess of what lq actually
produced by the proprietors themselves.    .Meet Kreat proprietors pro-
more accurately than I oan. I know
what the result Is as well aa he docs.
I know that If Ford's employees, In
common witb all the rest of the people
In the United States, owned the Ford
factory, precisely as they do the par-
duce nothing. Ford Is an exception, j ci*l post, that the employees, Instead
Hfl Is entitled to his just reward. But j-0f.,,.\|Pt Ford and his partners, would
hia just reward Is not what he Is get- ;„«t th*. remaining $12,500,000 a year,
tins, ills plant last year produced j All thin ds bnt the simplest, truth, and
*2.>.000,0ft0 of profits. Ford took moro; the Koner the working class of thc
than half of this sum and his six part- ■ \-auM states awaken to Its truth tho
nera look the rest. Xo man on ea.rth j g(K)n.or W|U "Ford wage*"~iand better
■win earn $12,000,000 or $15,000,000 aj .^be paid to'everybody In the United
>"«■''''•■ ! States.
Xo'man on earth can wiwly mt* so
should have been touted broadcast as
a gireat investment and sold to everybody who could be induced to buy. If
Henry Ford had been*>.he ordinary big
business man, he would have done
these things. Upon the basis of his
$25,000,000 of profits he would have
capitalized his concern at 3fi25.O00,0OO
or thereabouts. Upon a capitalization
of $025,000,000 he eould have paid an
annual dividend of t per cent. As the
owner of more than half of the stock
he could have put more than $300,000,-
000 into his own' pockets and become
ianother Carnegie. He could have reduced wages, starved his employees
into strikes, shot them down if nec6s-<
sary, and virtuously resisted all: demands for more wagep by declaring
that we already paying so much wages
that he could pay omy 4 per cent
dividend upon his stock.
.But Henry Ford did none of these
things. The Ford Automobile Company1, Instead of being capitalized at
$625,000,000, is capitalized, at $2,000,-
000. The stock of the company, Instead of being scattered broadcast
throughout the country, Ib owned hy
seven men, Mr. Ford himself owning
more than half. Mr. Ford, in other
words, has been and is engaged in
the making and selling of automobiles
rait her than in the making and selling
of stock.
Therein Ford differs" from the cdn-
centional big business man. Because
his company is honestly capitalized,
his .books in 1013 showed a profit of
-m..-. ^-*-t.,v* ii— 1-^5-ijv—ijtzi—v-chxt—i ir~ia~'~ u-e*"
cause his books showed a profit of
more ilnn 1,200 per cent that the
Ford company is pointed out as an
unusually successful enterprise. If
Ford company were capitalized for
seven or eight hundred million dollars,
the very men who how regard It as a
pcld mine would regard it as a gold
brick.
.And it  would  be a gold -brick to
everybody except the men who sold
only half of the $25,000,000 annual
•pnofi'ts, when they should have all of
the profits' except what might justly
•oe paid to hiirn as compensation for
iiis services, .which are ot undoubted
value; and, being entirely voluntary,
iiordis pian ni*-*/ be wt'ihdiuA'u *jy
him at any moment.
.No man should have the right to
W'k-hdraw at any time anything to
which any **other man ls entitled.
■Either.' Ford's employees create the
wealth that, is produced In his .plant
or they -do not. if they do noit create
this -wealth, it !Would be Interesting
ito discover who does create It. li
nhey <io create It they are entitled to
all they create all the .time. If they
did -not create the $25,000,000 of pro-
'iits ithi.1t the plant produced in 1913,
■Chen Ford and hi® ©ix partners did
create them and are now doling them
back to- their -employees in the form
or charity. If the workers of this
country, in demanding higher wages,
are seeking.'charity, I have not heard
their cry aright. If Ford, in announcing his profit-sharing plan, 'branded it
a-s an act of charity, I did not read
his announcement aright.
"All our men," said Henry Ford to
the Xew York Times, on January 11,
1914, "have helped us in our business;
We feel they are entitled to share in
the profits."
X'ct a word about eharlity in that.
Xor in this:
"I do not believe in prolonging tha
conditions which, ever since the Civil
War, have befen developing Into a
curso  upou  the  country—the  condl-
tlan£_.\yMcli. have built un a faw mil, i wages
nor helps move a railway .train. Rockefeller only plays goir. Not a great
captain of industry works anything
but the public, ^y-ith. rare exceptions,
such energies as they devote to business are de-voted to the .business of
profit-making.
Profit-making does the puhlie no
good. If the public must -be buncoed
out of a profit, the public has-no interest in the destination of the .profit.
It is Immaterial to the public whether
the profit goes to 'Morgan, to Rocksfol-
ler or to t'ho Vanderbilts. The public
should not, therefore, be compelled to
pay ^lr. Morgan for so arranging matters that a certain profit goes to him
raither than to somebody else. That
kind of "'work" does not constitute
public service and should uot be ;aid
ior by the public.
Yet tt Is the only bind of work
these gentlemen do. To -do this
"work" is the only excuse they have
for owning the country's industries.
If they were to get out, the industries
would go on. The men who are making steel would continue to make
steel. The men who are digging ooal
would continue to dug coal. The men
who are weaving wooi wouia continue
.to weave wool. Nothing would happen except thait a few graftera would
no longer be 'permitted to fatten at the
expense of everybody else. What Ford
has done for his 25,000 employees
would be more than duplicated for
every ether working man and woman
in the United States. Ford is giving
only half of his profits back to the
men who originally created them. Socialism would hand over the other
half. Socialism would leave nothing
for the mere owner—for the man who
did nothing ibut stand at the pay window with a club.
IMen like Henry Ford would be
caken care of. Men like Henry Ford
are as easy .to take care of as they aro
scarce. In the Xew York Times interview that I have quoted he said:
"I don't expect to leave much of a
fortune when I die." He knows how
little money can do toward the making
of happiness. Yet he knows how ne-
ccissary it is that everybody should be
able to receive for his labor enough
money to enable him to live comfortably. "I believe it is better for the
nation," he said to the Times, "and' far
better for human'jty, .that between 20,-
000 and 30,000 men and women who
work for me should be contented and
we'll fejl than that a few millionaires
-should*he made."
The needs of all the rest of the people areas great as the needs of Ford's
employees. He believes—and quite
.•rightly.—that he„has helped humanity
hy giving half of his profits to his em-
'ployees. I believe humanity would be
helped still more by giving all of 'the
profits that now go to capitalists to
<he working men and women who are
creating them. That Is what Socialism stands for. It exists for no other
puriiose. It has a plan fer putting its
program into effect. The trusts can
be paid for witli bonds. The bonds
can -run for 50 years. The profits
from the bonds could thus be used to
pay for the trusts. The cost could be
spread over two generations. Nobody
would feel the burden. On the contrary, prices could immediately be
gre-niy    reduced    without    reducing
IN DRIEST KANSAS
Told at a Topeka temperance meeting: "I went into a drug store," said
a sad-eyed man, "to get liniment for
my rheumatism. I asked for linH
ment, and never -winked; but when I
got home I found the druggist 'had
given -roe 'whiskey. - My wife then,
went and asked for liniment for me,
and when she got home we found
that they had also given her whisky.
Then I sent my prattling innocent
child of six for medicine for her sick
father, and the druggist wrapped up
whisky. Js it impossible to get anything in the drug stores of this town
hut whisky?"
•Women know the worst of poverty.
It is the wife who has the spending
of the insufficient income, who learns
all the hitter ways of scrimping and
paring and saving. The hus-band
must present a decent appearance*,
for policy's sake, when he goes to business; certain things are necessary
for the children; and so the heaviest
of all deprivations fall upon the woman who stays at home ancl strives
to make ono dollar do the work of
five. This is the way of the ordinary
woman; and what sacrifices she
makes, what tastes she crucifies, what
longings for pretty things she smothers, not even her own family guess.
They think it is an eccentricity that
makes her choose the neck of a
chicken and the hard end of the loaf
and to stay home from any little outing.   Ah,, if they only knew!
Directory of Fraternal
Societies
EBBBBHnmmmTOMHMHutraBBanaml
cnalres and actually pau^rized m -     That ls wJm we need ,   tW
1 ons or kep   them poor.   Such condl-j.try.   We n«,ed to wWen y,e marffln,be.
.uons are out or -aate. tweea ln60me aml necessary ex-pendl-
?rto^°ldltionAflr!ai.n!La!6.0.u,t,0J ture.    It does no good  to Increase
wages If the cost of living be also In-
dat&   Such conditions were hever IN
date.    They were never just.    They
are not  just  now.   But  to   declare i
them   "out   of   date"   accomplishes 00 any &ood to ^^ the coal of llv,
creased so much tliat nothing Is left
. ot the Increased wages.   Nor does it
Sometimes one has more flowers
piled on his coffin and grave than he
ever had given to him In all his life.
We want our flowers while we are
living. The dead are past all that.
If we would do good let us do it while
we are aliva to those who are living.
OUR HOME WOMEN
HAVE BEAUTIFUL HAIR
Next time you go to the theatre or
to the "movies," just notice, If you
please, how many of our home ladles
have beautiful hair—glossy, lustrous,
and well-dressed. Then, If- you will
pick out five or ten of those whose
hair seems to be particularly pretty
and will ask them what they use on it,
we feel sure that at least, more than
half of them will say "Harmony Hair
Beautifier." It is fast becoming the
rage with both men and women who
are particular about the appearance of
their hair.
Sprinkle a little Harmony Hair
Beautifier on your hair each time before 'brushing It. 'Contains jio oil; will
not change color of hair, nor darken
gray hair.
To keep hair and scalp dandruff-
free and clean, use Harmony Shampoo. This pure liquid shampoo gives
an instantaneous rich lather that immediately penetrates to every part of
hair and scalp, insuring a quick, thorough cleasing. Washed off just as
quickly, the entire operation takes only a few moments. Contains nothing
that can harm the hair, leaves no
harshness or stickiness—just a sweet
cleanliness;
INDEPENDENT ORDER
OF ODD FELLOWS
Meets every Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock ln K. P.
Hall.
Noble Grand, H. 13. Barnes.'
Secretary, J. B. Mciklejohn.
ANCIENT ORDER OF-
FORESTERS
Meet at Aiello's Hall second and third. Mondays in
each month.
John M. Woods, Secretary.
Fernie, Box 657.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Meet every Tuesday at 7.30
p.m. In their own Hall, Victoria Avenue.
C. C, A. Bunch.
K. of.S., D. J. Black.
M. of F., Jas. Madison.
LOYAL ORDER OF
MOOSE
Meet every Monday at 8
p.m. in K. of P. Hall.
Dictator, T, Uphill.
Secretary, G. Moses.
139 McPherson Avenue.
«ir^Wirtr«^^Tf»\T*T7»T*l»\r(«\r/»^»UV»AT/^tl*»'
WHAT   IS   DEMOCRACY?
nothing. Even if they are out of date,
the conditions still exist. ,\Vhat wa
need Is to put them out of existence.
How can we do that?   Ford's plan
Ing If wages be so reduced that the
worker can pay only for the cheaper
living. The people ot tills country
will never be any better off untllthe
Both preparations come In add-
shaped, very ornamental bottles, with
sprinkler tops. Harmony Hair Beautifier. $1.00. Harmony Shampoo. 50c.
Both guaranteed to satisfy you In
every way, or your money hack. Sold
only at the ijjore than 7,000 Rexall
Stores, and in this town only by us.
X. B. Suddaby. Druggist. Victoria Ave--
nue, Fernie, B. C.
„. 21wi. 'Tn,**.naVe Xr ,W15   wiU Mt *>*•    Fori1'8 l,to» lfl ™,un' coat   of^   tvinir  can £T trem* douriv
Z l8ln i!.Un?rf? ^Uo'!u rl woul? tary.   If we wait until the great «pH«2»2   i'thLf^&hP^rt *
-wiu* £W*,WS *** tb0,r ™Ilie?y «*»*» of thte wmt*y voluntarily ot- i?™*fjj^SS,SK ttJ^hiiS
?-«'• ^^"h«f fen»»wM«diick'ii..;fer to r6i.jnqul8h halt of their profits h  incii wWiout liUeaX Z*
!?5wI1h8}HH1 TOtn^ BuUt ^f CW1 > their employee*, we shall probably LSlhfi at al?   V\Sh hri„^
stockholders   would   be   dissatisfied walt utltil  Gabriel blows his horn. f cf lhlM aL "1L' Whteh hrinar'1 ""
with the small return upon th«ir in- who is willing to waft so long?   If
vestment, und the workers wojiM be Uvery capitalist should voluntarily fdl
dtetart-tsfM   with  their  wages. J-he tow Ford's example tomorrow, what
wftgesef.floor sweepers would not be'could   nrevent them   from   tdimielm
to the paltry promises that the other
political parties make—and don't
keep.
How miserable ore the promises of
the Democratic party—empty though
much a year.
Hii anybody.
Hut every  Industry ln the United j
Pordknowa thii as well; ststen Is not a Konl automobile fac-! marjKl(I   ffrnw111**   w»»t to   reduce, have lost?
hat
, , ,       ■»«.,/..   -.. could prevent them  from   changing
would $10,000.(100 be handed out oach Don't. let your mind buckle up at!tbey have proved to be~bc«!de what
year to other employees. More likely j this point Here 1-s where you should I Henry Ford la actually doing. The
the wages of everybody would lw re-j^o vour thinking. It Is because you Democratic party promised to reduce
duced.   And ^the reduction would be always stop before you get to this tbe coat oflhing by reducing thetar-
"*"" " ' " " " " "'   got anywhere.' Iff-   If anyone can show that the cost
the loot—how are ] ot living has gone down since the
,.   ., ...  «... v.... property? ' Underwood tariff l&'y became effect-
pay our stockholders a fair rate of In-.    \\'e have shorn that stock watering live he will have accomplished some-
'^^'V!,',• Ms u ilttiio by which profits aro con-jthlug that Drad»tr«*et's lus btjui un-
Wo hear this cry every day.   The ceoled—how are we to get what we able to do.    The Democratic  party
uuceu.   aiiu uie reduction woura »e always »top before y
based upon the excuse that ts every-!point  that you never
whcTB  irlven ;by  big business men:  We have uncovered th
\\ e must reduce wages In order to vvt> to recover the pror
iproniiced.tbat It would Increase pros-
Th«  lit-t't  tinn  liu  liiiHM
:ry— thia from our friends the graft
vhmvix Ut tiurrciidur half of his profits era wiw w.uu l0 |<,h*p tiling
*h<»'v-> <ha».  Y* Viuowh  it.    The  fact ;>■ m u,,.y „rt..   Hardly anybody
tlmt b« ban i-lioiw'n to nturn half of -.,,yt  jH  making so  much  monev ns
nrLLa.   l!° "Ct mUrtl *yrt'  «'hlch.
/'   ,.* . Uc:«;ttjitp* <annot afford
m'tiv  „iIemployf-es living wages.
tlr*ly blind.
means'-, uu*liu«>i men could not afford to pay
\faifvn ov liii'R'tt»e frwlglit rat*—tliey j    Vou cannot tio It by decreasing the j Per.'ty  b.v   "^forming" the carrenoy.
The .'iilnlns, tariff. ; The currency haa been reformed, but
rd to pay OKir     You cannot do I.', by Increasing the: «-.,">,'W nun are Idle In New York city
No million-: tariff. i alone,   and   millions  more  are  Idle
hy fussing with -throughout the country.   The Democratic party promised to stop extor-
passlng moroitan   by   "streugthenlug"   the   laws
the trusts, '■ «P,.,»ln,-»f th»» tmm, bin whrn Mr. Wl!-
enacted against *o» outllneil hli antHrust program to
*\,i-nA ht** money, ] the trusts that will do the people any, «>ngrfss Wall Street smiled all over
Democracy means rule, by the people.
The democratic .party ls not In favor of democracy. This is proved hy
the.fact that lt has disfranchised negroes and many of the poor whites of
the south and Is for the most part opposed to woman suffrage.
The republican party is not in favor
of democracy, because it believes in
representative rule rather than rule
by the people.
Neither the-republicans, democrats
or so-called progressives favor democratic rule, because every one of them
favors autocracy in industry—that is,
rulershlp by the few men who control.
Autocracy In Industry makes the people dependent on the owners of the
machine for- employment and for the
prices of things In the markets.
The Socialist party alone stands for
democracy or popular rule. It favors
the extension of the franchise to women and to all men. It favors the Initiative, referendum and recall. In industry It favors an ending of autocratic control hy making the people owners of the means of making and dla-
trlbutlng goods so that they mav con-
trol things democratically.
In many places Socialism is called
by the fuller name, Social democracy.
Socialists kre for this reason the
only people in the world who are ln
line with all progress the'world has
ever made, the only people who stand
wilh social evolution .or development.
They are tbe only real democrats In
tbe world.—Appeal to Reason,
Imperial Bank of Canada
• •imii
6,925,000
72,000,000
H&AD OFFICE, TORONTO
Capital Authorized ..   $10,000,000      Capital Paid Up
Reservs and Undlvld- ToU| .    u
ed Profits       8,100,000 ,MW
O. R. WILKIE, Prssldsnl HON.* ROOT JAFFRAY, Vles-Pres.
BRANCHES  M   BRITISH COLUMBIA  *
Arrowhead, Cranbrook, Fsrnls, Golden,  Kamloops,   Michel,   NeUon,..
Revelstoke, Vsnesuvsr and Victor!v
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT ,
Intersil allowed on deposits at e>*rrsnt rats from dsU of dtpotil.
FERNIE BRANCH A. M, OWEN, Manager
||   THE     ML f|   SR1854
HomedanK'Canada
to vw,rk and m\ onlyVptirr of Vb-it' ,u m„(>h liecaiwe thoy'are dolnir bus'-•    Y*'f rammon  next** should  Ml  us -kootl Pa*s n law 'compelling the trust,* 'nnd declared publicly that'tlw Prenl*
mi* «.rn*. ;„*„ jj"1., vastrtuJ  ilcavunelsh wav.!1'1*** tho Ford plant I* not the only In- «« •*»• «!>«!»■ plants io the government, de-nt's *tnt«'«manthlp was superb,
.... ... '     '* '** "'.94,   ,-911       I'tV-*.,  .......9.,        „.,,»»   J     . , ...-.,„,..        *,.  ..    ,   ..        .»      * , „»     m     *,,«,     «.mIM^.     HM-4    ..Mil     ../lit    t* 9 ....    .1 -*.«A
iMnsmss*
IJut let. us hurry ulong.   We Hochil-'hu""!}^ Rmir'iiidustries' are' as w«il | «t,«-»'J**' '» the* I'nited '8tate« tiiat Is »« a Just price, and you will have done
I**** »«!(| ytm •»■•■.' iti-\i r i ]■)»• *j-•< ■>! ■ ,».!.»  ». fv.fi !<> pay what he Is p.v- n,,,"»*°g much mnney.   Why *h/»sill tht* sometning.   \ou will men ne in a tm*
Tho ai^omcbili' Industry Is hlsh-
.*,   . .  •'(<,,*,. Tl,,.      .*.■>..  .ii      ..... *■
of Industry  ovt-u  !!■"  !:iw*|'-<:   wurk-; in«.
!tiirMvt,ii  i ,ii,A  '•..'   '*. *<   •■  *'*   . ■ *  "• '.* •   ' I.
You hontod ut uh.   Yfii hull «*« wt-rt* wl 'eh lnvt* nearly, If not <|iilt<>, (!►•)•••
fools.    Tin*  rich  nit-it  it-Ail  'a,.  utr»« r-.rs*.v«-«t <'Oiiti>>-tlttod in tlu-lr r«-K|H-<'tl\<*
%
V;
Vi
ii
H
u
M
u
fel
H
f4
For.l   plant  be  si" cnn»ld.-re:IT    Tlip-!t,0,» J0 know tlwt  >ou will get tlu»
(•'."•I iii'int itviVi"* noMili'" tin* 't,niri'\*rf iirot'.tn made bv  ''", 'ni-»»«     Owrn-rn
b!J.-s.   Autoinck'.lfs aiv not nerewwry nrvpr hnvo nny dlttlftiHy In collecting
•o Uf*>. Most v*'tii>'.i' d.> n.i; luw ih»-m. 'b" l"*"-'lf» that th-Hr Industrlea make.
«<•   -   .,1 ... i .   .   ,, -    , M   ...      .<   ., it' ■*«•', 'i f« uri- 'bo i***ly om« "vht 'vivo
t'oiipfrn*'list   ns'il,.-  ar.d "»««ll   *h"it difficulty in collfcMng profit* en oih«'r
i-vit>Ihi«1> mu*t Iiivk .sirmld bt* niucb l"-*;'!**'1* projierty.
n'.er.- prufj^n.-u** tl-.-n. .* <"..iuc-nt Uu*. ,.Th" Ampri««n {"-.nte or*  •yr*: %t-.
Si-:*}**  hi  *i.:«t imi)   is  (,-*• ran havi«. '"" >  »-"'Ul-l '**** ',i,Mvi»     TIm- ti»upl>-
\   srcit   nllnvnl   »*..•. :n   *lui«M   tie °' "><• I'n!:*1! Kta'.-s B-'mnld ittn lh-
mor*' prosp* ,-.)-w tiuii m .tut.omo'.il.* l'"'«*'.rlH» of il.<-rnl'i-i! Bta'M.   They
•il.uit.   Tin- It.* f Tmxt oh.mid tie mor." «'«» ■«:*  'be  *ork   in  the»* InduatrlHi.
;ir..*iM'Mti* t:\M, un  :ui'.,iii.iMle phnt. Tl i-y h.tv,« n«-f-d for all the produMa of
'4   T!'«-    V\*«-r l*-n
Vl
; r, »)»T<j4Ii»   '-
Tit- A'ttA T
. I l'.lll-   'At ll!
fit
Tri*-' f'!.)ii!| lie tn;rr«<
11" .hi uKiiiiiKt'iijt- plnn:.
ii^i -.'.ft'ilif in- mon- iir-i-i-
:.)      *i* ii. ASS.!*   jil tii'..   \t '■
HI'*    i    *   IllV
ih"*' iml;u:tIt* Wh? »h'iul«l iti»-y
lii ,« it-,\ Uta'.i'.i in own t*\,.|>iljiini
w Iiii;- itm r«*l nf Mn" i>eop!i- B'antl out-
Nor is tbat all. What If tho Demo-
t::s*;c party lud acjuAlly k*n*i It* pro-
mlnto  to r**luce the  co^t of  living?
'•''"   '.   '.:    ',i    l-  .-u.Il   ,.-;•.,   UjJ',
Himii' :!:,i «\mine man's living cost i
i.» ililnit.'    The ;ivtr.i«i> man's  living
ili.ii.. tuKi  if»» Uiati ».iiti u )tur, be-1
(.tii*<.« hiit total  tntome la  lt«s than
i\ it Jtim.    Wh.it  If the ItemocrutU-
It.irn' h-iif i-nnb-i'-l the .v.trte** mnn ' '
Ihi- f.r nothing aivl  hv*1 hi* *ho!«
hii nm*.- of tt'iu :Stan |.Mmi « yner"! What
Aoiilii lha*. atrlik-vemrnt have amount-
».| to tiisid*' ihe art of Ford Sn piling
••veil lil* lloor KA'i-f.-,ierii 11.Mr, a ywr?
If For {'* f'fir «*»*'i'i«'r* want t*i liv*
f:n 1« •* than t".*'ti a }tar. na mo*" Am-.
< rifju wortfltmnun ;irp >i; in petit it '\
I
Your account it respectfully solicited! for any
tranuaction in which a Chartered Bank may
be of service,
J. F. MACDONALD, Manager
VIOTORIA AVt„ .v 9t. flRNII   B. O.
U
THE CANADIAN BANK
K l'i n-l in v.'i', t" i zim j.ir tfo'.   \'o*
J*;    I'll'     of    »||.   ■•■    I     I-'S    ):IM    n'tt«»«    I -.' l!»
n
i. nn-1 pny .-.. r   UM-.g?   It u „nI bt-  v      „,.,, ,„ fvH.,, f|o„f ,wri.|wni rm
,'....: ■■: ■    *'....  i    i*.    ■'.  'Am* If,
O-M'ftfW AT* Wit
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mn..If. H
!}ii*% vciir
f tifili^tltifl     i.l
i 11 < i   I ■ I I ,\    I
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Mil .ii   \i ill*:
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,-•• .,1   .      >. . I.. Ujj,»<»<>i   .
lAi\l Unlay  if*,at
■iil.i;|i.i(.   I' n| .) -   f* ,i|i   I   *,|||,.
Mtttf limn ftnir linmir««i
VI,'     UHlf    ,Iil<*?
j    *■   '.u.       .uul
till
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Mi'l
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The Hanson Garage
CRANBROOK      -      -      -      B.C.
btt\-*n huftiirHl ilollarn ts fit* prtr* <jf « F»r4 nuubout;
th*. to«m»« rar t* eeven kundreA and t'-ttr. I", o. ||. Tras-
brmk    Wrlt« us far particular*.
I
■miM,hmimmMiUumm*n,wwKe9m*iftpai^^
'IHI-II    »,!*(*►   Of   »'<   ,1   *!'!>
' ,     <    1,11 A    t'-Tf.jl,    !..*.< ,
••' tht**p tm*'*. mi »
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."■r.  iia  (4U.>t:tf, .*  uvu.-WMi',*., »a lUtitiii ..
•Lis;, •'''•" *''itftx*.* * t.'.iiii u<-iua iitif '.*>,
P J set mm*. ■<
ik;    lite   kmetkmn   p*o\*m   er*   taintf
HI tmU-d that's all.   Th* buslnraa Inif- j
J".'';».'..' t. r.t tut ikh romiiry arc mac*.*.*!-.
. .**..        ,9... **, *^»V****.*« i*«^«.*rt*^ *,tk*.K9l&9k ,,
y'Duk, Wh»t Void Is liolms all th*;*
1 irr*m hmtmm tntertw'n of th* t'n!w*»i j
* 8:*t*»-i wntM ito If %h*y arooH. '
(    Thw     -rstlromis     fonM     d******** -
| fnHtht nnd -pnnmnnwr m** sn-l Ik- ,
' cf*»*« »tt#*
j    Tho   Betf   T«tt    -aooM   !scrf*s*« J
*>Mi'*v iiivt w t'.i''» '.hi* ',i*yt.•*•• ,.'.' '.'...j,-,,;
f   Tb« Woolsfi Trs-«i nnA tt* nt**ii
Tf»»»*   tiraM   •*J1   t>i»-lr   ,'itv»*<>'»i'   »•>»«•'
_i • \e*a mA paf thtit awtiMfr*-*. mtvrn,
li   Vwr4 arenea mm ho dtpl!cM*N! hyj
.*»r trwet the* H attaint *tt vf-'r** I**'
iattd*tt4 etoeh AM tmmm ttt tta em.*
[|l»lai««j» half or mm* ot the tnvf.t,*
llm th*** corn** the rab To r«"
[ttiw> demited i remit feiMli t.f thr (*ot**^
.,**'.itu*«, viiinittlua* tun-', j*„ U*»„u*.»
Itsbwat, t'ati4««Msa(tss »*•*• ta taenK'^t
*', Art Pint*A t<* i. mi
v * rt,t-rn     Tile?   h-i-I tn lu*. ,t *;?i-s »r'' t
.. t .!-.•► ant,, on, nt-;. nr-it ii«*t no«.   iiuai.
.... ^  ft,.   *,..*.*.* i../*
«.• ••*> *>*u.    linn .in m*«lt<-» mt etrrl,
Siity Years the $t«4anl
two
BAHNS
mm
m VHM if imtM w&KNNR
m\e luoni Hinn ll.ooo a yvjtt.   VorA
iif unity t'irrt uid xk* *aa«-a of oath
.,*•> i,i. ,|..... *..,,<.„..,. it* ■ *■*, ... ,*.    H*
nif .*>• thin *?:itii»V-l 'lir-ir w\eta *e*U*
t'.'t ir.i'ii  tri****  t'.-.j ••)  fl *,«*.       T'l*
•   lit ■r'•!•'rl■^"i^ jisrtv *'.*-t*tr j.r-sm'fi'-J Oi*
. »"rMne winV of »h*« itwintrr morv
*b*t, t )-il!r-»   rt 1in-'J«ii In ti"»- rr,9* t*f
A.vii.i,   *!'<i  i-,f» fuvrant*M!>  whstsvor
111'     l'i!.'"   ivmllil   UO'.   *n*   <'f C'Ji..*V'Mlt-'
,injply r«..tn*-T'1. \a n miner of f«fl.:
t *bt. t*t\-r* Af r,r1n»"*«*«t«"   *t** «»" «■*■»■ *
• iwii w»»t tiks^N to wiles' ibo arortd-wldO'
, ji i.a*u ** m otmt suii«MB*a, i
* v*?<r -1**4 Xit\tr. R*)»o**f"t*t*l, Sa hh wnawJ \
I *ntrs*air»nt UMimii, orer ptomls*'
I ani ihint that emM be mmpnrad artth I
: 9^-9,... Dttryri* fn**?* *,*,« Sima fm* 1* i*n.
■< wnr. Mr. fUwmrrelt, if he ta wstf |
l rarefally. ma*t rwilly prntninod mntb I
i of anrrhfnt.   H* ultaij ftthlr obmt s e
t aoctaJ inatiee,"  bnt be  tmvet took j ■
tho ifoubtt- ■«> traoalau hia ^urssM*
i tola t«rsas «f ta#f and pawitass,  Aty <
. ptdtttml phtnn* that ca»nwl ta 4wm4
it*ti» tt-nm nt kaet nod ■fmemmm Is*
,j>oer j'fiutii's lw tij©»e alio tmooaoi
I the -potM-MI phmse km fMlwl  —
. *»<i.o.<, -Ut U *,. atittl *,*9ii.»St)ma.
I        ttomthmtd m pste otmnt
ShihhkCun
tm EOmJKD WALKKM,CVX>,H,tX. PjCJ**, ftaallasl
lXUa*.Qatt**IHmmm JOHN AIM©.AmftOnsnl
mn, tuymm reserve fuu, Ji3^oojioo
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the currant mt* ft allowed on all deposit!! of It and
Vpwards,   Careful attention is given to ewjr account  Small accounts
t".
* <**-. , #**-*tfcttr iMittr.t-ii*   r\
-•-9>
, -■**#***  wefn-em  *» *•'A *
*.m n-rjf
Xii i xAx !'» ,Uv*)j   lw i-^'^i'J M iJ.V *J.W*WV.'i  i-'Ui^itSS   .JmvV*   f>4,**Am**k$  H *****
4tam a4* ta bt OMult fey ««gr mm of titan or by Um Mirvivgr* ttl
To Sports Committees
Tilt Pernie Coil Creek Excelsior Band is now
open tor engagements   Satisfaction guaranteed
For Terms Etc Apply
ROBT. OONNELL, S*or«tary
P.O. Box 990 - P«rfil#, a a l^gsiiMsi^iP
S^^^g^^^^r^^^!^?,b'^^^'j^->^^'^J*g^- ■.^^gjg^5"^8^''*^^*-^f,:-^
*smm**r«*
mv* ■*» gwaiinwi-Wwapg
■H*mpCT»WW»**'
,'1 f'l
THE DISTBICT LJSDGERrFEENIE, B. C, MAY 2, 1914.
PAGE SEVEN
The Hotel
DALLAS
One of the
Best
C. J. ECKSTORM      Prop.
Lethbridge, Alta.
The
Original
.and
Only
Genuine
Beware of
Imitations
Sold on the
Merits of
MinarcTs
Liniment
Three Questions
Translated from the Russian of Leo
..Tolstoy by Theresa and Leon .   -
Malkiel
Passburg
Hotel
You're always welcome here
Clean Rooms, Best of
Food and every
attention
THOS. DUNCAN ' Passburg
P. Carosella
Wholesale Liquor Dealer
Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots aad
Shoes, Gents' Furnishings
BAKER  AVENUE^
"BRANCH  AT  HoHmjErT B.C.
COLEMAN
Liquor Co.
Wholesale Dealers in
Wines
Liquors
Cigars
Fernle-Fort Steele
Brewing Co., Ltd.
Beer
and
Porter
Bottled Goods a Specialty
Central
Hotel
Large Airy Rooms &
Good Board
-Ross &=Hackay ^£E!
Mail Orders receive
prompt attention
Full supply of following
fer an appetising meal ta
chaos* from.
Beef, Pork, Mutton
Poultry, Butter
and Eggs
Try not Cambridge ttua*
a§ta far tamarraWa ktnok>
fail.
mmmmmmtmmmmmwmmmmmm
C#'.L OR PHONI
Cilgiry Cattle Cs.
bheeoU Wwdttfwt
■9irnii, a, &
THE FERNIE
LUMBER CO.
A. MeDougall, Mgi
Manufacturers of and Dealers in all kinds of Rough
and Dressed Lumber
Send us your orders
lc occurred to the Czar one day,
while examining some state matters,
that if he was to know the right time
for each undertaking, who are the
most important people in his empire,
and above all which of his many
undertakings is the most urgent, he
would never fail.
In' order to find an answer to these
Questions, the Czar issued a proclamation offering a large reward to any
person who could give him the much-
desired answers.
In a short while the Czar's palace
was besieged by eager throngs of
peoplo, who claimed to knovjhe right
answer to the "Czar's questions. In
reply to his first question as to the
right time for eaeb undertaking some
advised lilm to make a list of all the
affairs In his hands, place a date 'beforo each of them, then follow the
given dates. -They claimed that all
the Czar needed was a systematic
wny of doing business.
Others told him that it was impossible to foretell beforehand what may
be most important in the future. That
the best for him to do is to watch
carefully after everything that happens and he would be sure to do the
right thing at the rig/t time.
StilJ others insisted that the Czar
alone -could never succeed ln knowing
the right time for his numerous affairs that he ought to engage a number of advisers and they would 'be
able to tell what to do and when.
'The same division of opinion occurred in reference to the second
•question, as to who are the most important people in tbe land. Some
said, the politicians, others the soldiers, the third were in favor of doctors, the -fourth of priests, and so
forth.
In reply to the third question some
assured the Czar that the most urgent
undertaking, is education, others were
in favor of the military art, some said
religion, still otliers commerce.
The Czar rejected every one of
those answers and sect the eager ones
away without the much desired- re-
,ward.!i He himself had meanwhile decided to ask the advice of a learned
hermit who lived in a mud hut In the
depths of a nearby forest.
The Czar dressed himself in simple
clothes (for the hermit was a plain
man, did not care for show, and preferred poor people to the rich) and,
leaving his courtiers at some distance
! from the hut, sought the hermit on
foot.
The Czar found the hermit digging
in the garden.    The Czar saw from
the first glance that the hermit was
rot very strong, for he breathed heavily   after   raising   each   spadeful   of
earth.    But   the  hermir   worked  on,
raising his head only long enough to
iSXSSLJhe^-Czax
T   "My dear man," said the Czar to
j the hermit. "I came to you In  the
hope that you will give me an answer
i to  three  questions:    What  moment
'must we always bear in mind so as
not to miss? Who are the people niost
necessary to the welfare of my kingdom?   And  which of all  my undertakings Ib the moBt urgent one?"
The   hermit   worked   on.     If   he
[I'P'ird the Czar's questions he did not
show It.
"You are tired," said the Czar next
"If you will give me your spade I
will gladly dig some of the garden for
yau,'
The hermit thanked him for his
kindness, handed him the spade and
pat down to rest. -The Cuar dug for a
while, stopped and asked once more:
Most venerable elder, could you
inawer my questlona?" The hermit
roar and, without answering him,
nt-etched out his hand for the spade
"With your permission." said the
Czar, "I will dig a while longer." The
hermit did not object and went back
to his seat nearby.
Interested in his work, the Ciar did
not notice how the time flew by. nor
tlmt tbe sun -was already setting behind the bills.
"I do. not know you," replied the
Czar, "and have no cause io either
condemn or pardon you."
r "Yea may not know me, but I know
who you are," the stranger informed
him. "I am—your -^enemy, the one
whose brother was executed by your
order, the one whom you have robbed
of his property, the one who has
sworn to take revenge upon you. I
knew that you had gone to the hermit
and hid myself in tbe woods in order
to kill you on your way home. But I
waited and waited the whole day long
and still you did not come. Not knowing what kept yoii'T came out of the
thicket to look for yon, was met by
your courtiers who recognized and
wounded me. I. barely escaped from
tbem Vvlth my life. And bleeding pro-
fusel v I would havo died from loss of
blood if you had not washed v my
wcund and stopped-the-'flow of blood.
I wanted to kill you. and you Saved*
my life instead. I therefore pledge
myself. If I should remain among the
living, to devote the rest of my life
'o your service. Now do forgive me,
merciful Czar."
The Czar.was only too glad to make
pence with his 'bitter enemy, lie forgave him his wicked intentions and
promised to return his property and
send his 'personal physician to attend
to the wound.   Taking leave of the
I No other hair j
| tonic or restora-
I five is as effec-
9 tive or satisfactory as
f*_ffaii
Slealt
I! It restores natural color
g to grey or faded hair.   Pre-1
_ vents dandruff, stops falling'
■ hair.    A   healthy beautiful
8 growth follows its use.
" $l,0a»cS6c.»tdmeg)«t«. Lit***! trial I
H alzo bottlo oa receipt ot He. ami yoar i
m druggist'* name.
fl Mllo Hn Specialties C-x, Toronto, Ont.
JOSEPH    HICKS
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
'MACLEOD Box 7 ALBERTA
Visits Bellevue on the 14th of each
month
JOSEPH     HICKS
Advokat
Verejny Notar
MACLEOD Box 7 ALBERTA
Nactivuje Bellevue na 14 ka§dy mesac
the Jaw. ..They are exceedingly particular as to wtet the law shall be.
They would like tlie" law always to be
cmi --their side. It is easier to do anything when the law i-s on one's side.
Yo u Khoiild know this as well as they
do. You should know it so well that
you wot|Jd go about. It Intelligently to
make the law as you want it,
' That is precisely what you do not
do. When you strike you do -not
cheese J. Pierpbnt .Morgan or Johii
I). Rockefeller as your leader.    You
sick man, the Czar went out into thej choose one of your own' men".    But
courtyard, where he found the hermit  when you go after something of much
sotting seed in the lately dug ground.'
"Venerable elder,"  said  the  Czar,
coming near the hermit, "before leav
ing for home I implore you once more
to give me an, answer to my questions.
"But they have 'been answered already," said the hermit.
"When and how?" demanded the
puzzled Czar.
"If you had not taken pity on me
yesterday and dug up my ground you
would have gone home early and thus
met with certain death. So you can
see for yourself that it was just the
right moment for you to dig1 my garden. I was the most necessary person to ycu in the world and your kindness to me was the most urgent undertaking.
"Later, when the man came gasping for breath; you did riot miss the
right moment to wash his wound, or
he would have died /without repenting. To you he was then the1 most important person In your whole kingdom, and what you have-done'for him
was the most urgent undertaking.
You  must,  therefore,  bear ln  mind
DR.  JOHN   BARBER,   DENTIST
Office: Above Bleasdell's Drug Store
Phone 121
Residence: 21 Victoria Avenue
'I Gpow Hair, I Do"
Fac-similes of Prof. A. Garlow.
>2
Bald at £0.
/53
Fine hair at 55.
FERNIE
B. C.
ALEXANDER MACNEIL
8arrister, Solicitor, Notary, etc.
Off ices:  Eckstein Building,
Fernie, B.C.
e. O; Lawe
Alex. I. Fi she
ll] are Important—that is to say, political power—you always choose J, Pier-
pont Morgan or John D. Rockefeller
as your leader. I mean you always
vote with some party that is controlled a-Ti'd,. financed by the rich men
whom you wish, to conquer.
You see Roosevelt, but you do not
see George W. Perkins.
You see Wilson, but you do not see
August Belmont and Thomas F. Ryan.
You are solemnly assured that Perkins, Belmont and Ryan do not count,
•but when your hero lias finished his
term- in the White House they are always more enthusiastic about him
tton you are. You may not know
why, hut •they do." You 'believed he
'belonged io your side. They knew he
did not. Some of the men who recently built a monument in Princeton,
New Jersey, to the memory of Grover
Cleveland are the men whom Cleve-
lamd was elected to put out of business It is always so. A man who ia
elected by the capitalist class cannot
be depended upon to -prevent that
class from preying upon the people.
In writing as 1 have written I ha^e
LAWE & FISHER
A 1 "J'UI
UVHYS-*   '
Fernie,
■b. c.. ; ■'■*.■■
KING'S
HOTEL
Bar supplied with
the  best Wines.
Liquors iuul Cigars
DINING  ROOM  J
N  CONNECTION
W.MILLS,
Prop
l^!i„_nJL^^ i* to -be done without
that the right moment is the present no .^hcr purpose than to promote the
This moment ie supreme, because of
the present alone can we Judge
clearly.
'The most important person is the
one who needs your help the most.
And the most urgent undertaking is
tbe one of doing good, for it ls the
only object Sor which man was born
THE BOMBSHELL THAT
HENRY FORD FIREO
<Continued from page six)
public welfare. People who . thinl
know not how the public welfare can
be promoted except by urging the
people to take over the ownership of
the country's industries and operate
ithem for the public benefit. Such peo-
•pie believe we can pack meat without
Mr. Arm'otii^jTjisxieilejM-we^c^-n-do-f--;
What we need in thlB country it
more food, more ejjothlng, better shelter, more leisure and less political
hat sir. Mr, Roosevelt, wilting, as he
Always Is, to promise at least all he
believe* he can deliver, really never
promised anything that was definite
enough to be Identified by an adding
machine, If he had promised to the
people of the country even half of
what Ford 'is actually delivering to his'
employees, H is a grave question whether he would have received as many
votes as he did. It would have seemed too much. Nobody would have believed Mie country'* industries could
stand the drain. Yet Ford, honestly
capitalized as hia company Is, has
turned the trick and Is still paying aii
annual dividend of 000 per cent upon
bis 12,000,000 or stock.
We who live In this country should
dare to hope.  We are living In both a
.marvellous country and a marvellous
Only with the approach of twilight I age.    We have the men. the machin
rry and the material* with which to
produce averytMt|'* we need, tt'e
ishoutd no longer be content with a
bare living. We should live well aud
j live easily. We should work lets and
toutume mere. We should demand
much and Insist upon (totting It. We
thould have no patience with patltl
did the Cisr lay aside the spade. "I
have walled the whole day," he then
snid to the hermit, "lu the hope that
you will consider my questions and
Klve me an answer to them. At least
tell me ihat you are not going to
answer them and I will depart with-
out nny III will for you."
"TVre I* nome one coming tills
way," the hermit Interrupted, speak-
Inn for the first time that day. "Come,
let im #ee who Is speeding our way."
The C'isar turned at the hrrmlt'a jHst deserts. We who do the work
word* and saw n tall man running to-Uf this country are entitled lo *x»r*-
ward th* hut, A minute later the man.thin* thai is produced In thi* coun-ry.
approMhed. A stream of blood flowed'\Ve should havo no miiltl-mllllonilrff
freelffrom under hf« ront. »Mi<m$h ,j.Un>. vu< mumi«I have no paupers
he held his hands tightly to his side, * hen*.. We *honH have neither If
*t* stonped, gasped for breath and j #veryw> wer* tn havo- th* vn!u<- <»f
Wl lo tbe troittiA. , wlmt be create* and no more.
With the hermit's help the -Tsar un- We need only to ro about It sanely
<tr««»ed  tbe wounded  man. washed!*•<, *ati»fy mir need*.   Tb* Industries i*^
the help of anybody. They know we
ceil da everything that is to be done,
because we have -always done it. and
r.re still doing it, We should only
mis.* ithe activities of the gentlemen
who keep us pcor wh'le we are working. Thinking people believe we could
endure their absence. They also believe we eould endure the absence of
'ihelr ageiKs in conurp-ss. They believe congress, without any trust
agents in It, would be quite a respectable body. -They should not trust, it
tco far-—they should hold lt In check
with the initiative, the referendum
and the recall—hut they believe it
wctild do very well. Since tlie government has succeeded Ip digging the
Panama Canal, they believe It could
be trusted lo dig coal and grind wheat,
weave cloth and smoke hams.
In short, tliey believe so much In
our country that they are exceedingly
anxious to take possession of it They
should like to place everybody, not
merely on n level with Mr. Ford's
sweeper*, km up with his 13,000 or
14,000 a year mechanics. At present
each of i.Mr. Ford's floor sweepers Is
annually in receipt of an income that
Is more than three Unit1* «s great as
chat cf Mie uverase American—and
Mr. Ford has enough left to my a dlv.
'dcn:l of COO per -cent u|K»n his stock.
Mr, Ford and hl« floor sweepers may j
be proud of th'.s fact, but ho* do you]
feel about It?
I POSITIVELY Cure all hair and
scalp DISEASES. Prevent BALDNESS
and premature ■ grayness. GROW ladies' and children's bak rapidly.
I TAKE NO DOUBTFUL cases and
positively cure all 1 do take. Hair
can be fully restored on all heads
that stlk show fine hair or fuzz to
prove that the roots j.r t'APILHARY
glands are not dead.
I HAVE A: PERKKCT system of
HOME TREATMENT for oul-of-tbe-
CITY people who cannot come to me
for personal treatment. WRITE TODAY for Question Rlank and PAR-
TICULARS. Enclose stamp and mention this paper.
MY PRICES arc reasonable My
cures are POSITIVE and PERMANENT:
PROF. GEO. A. GARLOW
Tne World's Most Scientific Hair and
Scalp Specialist
Room 1, Weldon   Rlock,   WINNIPEG,
MAN.
Bar Unexcelled
All White Helo
Everything:
Up-to-date
Call in and
Sua
T-'~
Pari
see us once
JOHN P0DBIELANCIK, Prop.
I
If young Jrhn I), wps in closer touch
wVh the undercurrent of thought *!•
Cently   going   over  tbH  rr.mitry   lie
^i«„- -mvtr. ...<.«.!.» ... ,9tttr,. *.„a -4»*»i*"ou'd probably ask to amend hi* re-
clans who promise u* trifles and give .,,„. „,,,,,-m,***, i,,,*/..,, ♦»... ,*/.,*»,,'„»>'
us nothing. Any politician who phiw.!Mnt r*m,rkfc '" r* ,!" «»<"«•»«••'•
Ises us trifles la either crooked or t|,.ktl
lacking In realisation of what are our!
«,<3n,n:'*',:f>n !nvr.jt!g:ir!rig th<» Color.i-.lo
We Are Ready to Scratch
off your bill auy Item of lumber cu
found just as we represented. Then
ts no hocus pocus in
This Lumber Business
When you trad spruce we do noi
<end you hemlock. When you buj
first-class lumber we don't slip ln a
lot of culls. Thoso who buy once froo
us always come again. Tboso wbc
have not yet made our acquaintance
are taking chances they wouldn't en
counter if they bought their lumbei
bore.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
— Dealers in —
Lumbar, Lath, Shingles, Sash and
Doors. SPECIALTIES-Mouldlngt
Turnings, Brackets, and Detail Work
Of FICE AND YARD-McPhtrion ave
Opposite G. N. Otpot. P.O. Boa tl
Phone 23.
Southern
HOTEL
BELLEVUE, ALBERTA
,„ * .i *  , .    »    ^___
Every
convenience
and
attention
Meals tliat tnsto liko
mother used to cook
Best in the Pass
Jos, Grafton, Proprietor
the bleeding wound, whlrh am»eiir«f tnf this roait'ry are no leaner sultwi t<i. ..,,,,1, *a.;,„.J
very deep. Only after much effort did; private ownership. Anything that etuvi!.;;', Lfai;
he succwd In stopping the flow of not lw run by Its owners 1* too larrej ' "'     m)'
Let all  the p-pciti'.*  o-vii  !!)<>  *•*»'
tnliift en-1 cyenl* 'Ait'-n In 1V* iv.'* "•
! :', i■-* a" '.h'» propJe.   Tint f« f!i» rjttv
i*sij4«.;,.  Idm  wiil end the w:»rf.m» ti»-
'Aicn ilie nun who dlir the coal and
tbe nit'ti who em '.h* ■■.inV'    << ' ■ r
nH?>:in   miy   und   protaTily   will   !«•
, i'tr!«| !w*. eoantr or leirr It tuu* do
b'*t--pi'blle ownership of tlw m!m*.
re |.* r.x m !nt«lll«t>iii mnn lit the
hut knows tli!* in true
Steam Heated Throughout
Electric Lighted
Wood.
ifor Us owners to own.   Lincoln said,
When they carried the man Into the no man was good mouth to foverti 11 DC1I MCRVP IM
hwt and placed him on the hermit** j enot|>er man without tbat other man's'« MtHI. n til ft MID
eoL he opened his eyes and asked for (-cfm*n'    We may that no man haa «      BARV mill Mil A UrftlAlllf*
«™u*ot£"'f JfiX•f,;?iU£h"*1*1 ri^* «• •*■ *tM h* c*l",,',   BUOrHUILIIIIIo McOlblnc
pain, die Caar  browim   nlm   some operate, but whl<"h other men miit*.*.
ff»sh water from the spring and, hold- rTM.ri-<' If they er* to IH*.   Tlw mmu
Inn bis -head, helped bim to a drink, j-rrwp of men who own the Industries     We ;*?li<>ve Hnail Olive Oil Kmul
liefore long the  wounded  man  fell;of this (wintry rannot opemte ?h-»m *lnn I* the .><••■' remf.lv ms«l» tar tm
asleep, and with him the tired fTsar.'««t4 lo im s,**a. s.hui.   tide in-n mi the nones, enriching the blm.d
«t)« dosed ott. sitting on the herwlt'eItrromi td men witn ^iterate the lediv I Ualldlita at, **«».»• f n«»>i.-«  renewing
do-ont***. tries of thU loimcrj do not own th«»m, health, atrenath snd energy—the t*»t
THE KING EDWARD HOTEL
J. L. GATES, Proprietor
Fernie, B. C.
The Leading
Commercial Hotel
of the City
Rates $2.50 per day
With Pritate Bath $100
Fire Proof Sample
Rooms in Connection
J
InvMtmtnt,
fte-cawse of the anususl work he had
doae the Csar slept harder than orer,
and when he opened tilt eyes tbe neat
List of Locals District ] fi
ft
4*1
431
1W
w*
mi
tm
*m
un
■Ull
ittbt
tm
1*4*
ttft,
tm
•Am
tns
m
mm
Homo, tec ood P. O. Alareaa
WMt« Ash MIm. ..Wm. Marrt, Taber. Alta.
Uaalcfetad F w«'V, Vs AA .*..', .U»*..
Nearer IStotb .J. Loughran. Bs«r«r rrwwk, tto Plachar. Alu.
Bellevue.,.   Janet Rorfcoi, Dn M, DaUeroe, Alta.
Blslrmort W. C Christophers. Blalrnsore. Alta.
Mtrmtf T, O. Harrkw.PMehvrg.AHa.
Carboadale.............J. MHehell, Oarbondttlt. Coleasan, Alt*.
■JfWj— ^i^^^^Jj^ thff ■^JlUftd^t      WBil'^.*^****^^**^        gf^^k>^^ri|^^*^MH^ -b AllMfa
\mOmttww..4.,-.4 4...*,, tMtnweet aatwrwe. awwwttnw, -une.
r'.jyutan i. Jo-an-won, CoJeattea. MUr
tuOtbiO... --. *<•......... ItOO, nPttS, OSWIfll, It. v,
CIS*.-, ik U'nm* *... .Ja**, Hor»e. tttla^h. -rta IMamotid CiU', AJU.
hwt »»«» have nftem to them If they medicine yon r»n nsi» if ymi are run
are to lire.    Tfcey i-mnof obtain ac- <!a»n. tlred-out. lu-mmn sml dehllitat-
em* to ttiem ewrpt ly tuakiua terms<ed<  »«  motter »h»'  the i-ause,    It
morning the sun sltone bright through wiih their owner*.   The terms nr»< nl- .I-h-hii'i tb'imul (nr hu nmul "thut mum
the open door and the little \vliid<ow, wny* tke k>«e«i  ***** upon whkh *l'«hol  or hahlt-formins  drugs,  lie*
the Osar robbed Ita eyta, for he tbo worker* will  eoneent  w f*rta* '-i****** <» --**<■■»- „^ ..„,
leottld mt  reek* out  ti* *   ***    '„„,,«   -m-un   *tr  tn*  tmwn koonnneimke ymi t**l better it* » tr-r ht**^
fwat*f*ft« waa, nor who waa the men<♦**•■>'.*.-'<\r*   X---.     !".    ■ ,.Ki-k4,.-A t**,*.U,,»**■* *■  <**** uui»a >u»» t«*i t«*xi*r, we '
li: ''j-n ta iU -ivti ■***■* ttttitiitt at MM-tta tthe the fnh* tor wa«et that will' ari» sun.', just *» anon #* l.v t«aie and *
tilt fesr. ;>4eM a bar* living. (food  properties  M  e«nr*lR«  •»**■■■*  a"
"l^*tdoil ■»•,*• aald the stranger gt?    Ihtm-mm,',-- 4t-ttm- "Jim* nuimomatAeknne* to get  Into the Wood and.*
ere tale*.   Piwgtwfvee deeftlfw these through the blotid. Into the re«t of the
jStaiemettts aw Ma*.   RennMlfans de-' system,    l'utf f>llv«> OH »n4 'h* H*
■ r-for* ttiftt* ,--r*i*iff*   ■"-.  '..-,.      *,*.^     .¥,'. j,,».«»,«,*» ,.9,,-t. m**e ««*« r»*tt«r»wl
*i»rtaM<»f« ?r»jieetf»fly rail attention! »y meeenotol phyakiana. bw her*-. t«r
l« the fa«* that tb* eainffallata who ere -the flrat time, they are lomttnt-d imo
rebMnt yon are time: Ina eaeb of the one preparation whlrh, as a nerw-f-wtd
ipaKiet th« A*rhri" n* Jtaetetiats are and a builder of strength ;mA h'.,*ltb,
',1'tra    Wf »',*, i •!' >>>fir mn-nUnn fri hss no en«tal.
Mh-H   rornJiiioae   thf   !>»>»•   *tl*   and      If >oti don't teel -*••;;. ;..--k.!i '*k,- e
tta* -f-sisted t'.r.tt-  «chi  were born      Retail Ollre Oil KwuKion to!s*    •■. I
the WALDORF
. ..Thoa rphlH. Femie. ». C.
 Kate M-affa-A, Praflik, AM.
... W. tlttldataA-m*, ttootmt. R, C.
... .las. Gorton. HUkr»«t» Alta,
... I* Mots***, l»f Mztb Anom, S. LetlhrM**
 Vtea-k irtemMftrnm. t^mnhvnt, Alt*.
i, nSm Wwm-WT^Wma WWtmblmTmt rtlflf.
... H. B»m#r. Michel. B. C.
-.. .* T. «, llanftos, P-aartwr*. AJta.
SM^Lg|>M|r Jh       Hb*^||g|AA.-^ygA     nRkftkMtfa      tb ItHtk
o««nref-»w«. Caatww»...]f«x VhtOor. n*atrf*te*n. Cstmora. Alta.
w emt*. ....4.4*4,...
Ttunk.,	
*Mw#»i»er.,.;	
HtlhiWft	
l*-iiibrt*it*t. —.....
r.-'Mrr.ttfu CiilHnitU.
Maple
Ml-, hei. -
«#-» e*   t, . ■ • *"■
c. A. Mills, MttikKtr   S
Excellent Cuisine — American and
European Plan — Electric Light —
Hot & Cold Water Samnlt* Rnnm*
Phones  Special Rates hy the month
Evrejwtn Plan Room Rites
Me. and Upwards
American Plan iUtet
12.00 per D«y
l!-t.
Isrd l^ne h*-f*r*    Th-> t^h'»»ew.-'    ' '■("■♦ : -'ir •■ ..: :. .,...', ..,.„.   ..
"U'l   i-L'vx.ix    'ik,    »-»ikli(K»i-*-n   tlw* *»»:*'iii agalnsJ mor* at-ntut*
\w*tM onr. h*\t> tf***r, »nA sttll  tire To   if»Ti*ii1«--»tv.««*        ,   t
„„.. (ni'i'r-r-n sr.it till o'l,,;,. -i.
U j..,i m*i.: :■> tti'< )(*if i«»^k*-:«. *on ran-down  or alllna,   ** t,it, -
ta*n '  t !»-»i   i >»-  r-y« *     faio rltjaat-t. tilt*** if.'. Kie-tWrtn * •'. ■
t--.',   :, I     ,..   t,.^9"*aittt,  of MfMWii*-.'  th*t.  If It AtTt-**: '   "•>»■
•'  ,:      ■   '.  ■>•*   ,'f-Altrfl   (•) »*"'f   «ri i »T.)IVg SK**,I«.  .1   t,, t ,    ■
.»,     T' ■■  -  'Vf-rii »rr tr>l!is i..i'l»ii.g.   l! »•• «!trt"! *.>-.- •»*
•t , •      Ti *   • i,,.   ' *■ .1 .:■   '.  **»•  «i»ti:.r. t .tf.
•■•  ,-    ■*'•'''.: I,*' "'I* t.t:-   :■ ' > )«*>    t\t* ar<« ».ir*- 'In'        •   ■
' ■• -   * »". iaftr******** nf thia h'n»- •i«t—f I* t',t\ «|t: ., . ,.,,
»»'   •; .       >- .   ;-•.' ■    -   'n   ■' ■•   '■  is tr-i-n-.li,   4!. I X'-.ttul n- X.
-■»r-tr'     th* n'ti'lr-mm whi  *■ --vrir♦t-fn-4 it • ■> j^j,     -t., ;
•is i«m nf an \tr%* a nmytr* '•','• m«r«- th»« ".it*** Uri »u M''<t •   i
■'• 1 ti t.r-'-*.ut- art* 1,*t lt",m li.i* to»» only b> u«    » I *«*    \
:Mf-     tttr-ftM* I let   e"*-t*tr*lt*tj   •< *, jffi»d't-.l''> .   ft;.is*',* ,    \n:,i:i.,    \v
TL-v Irww. Iwaeowr th8ef e»a> Feml*. H. C.
lUt*
Stephen T, Humble
Furniture, Hardware, China,
Stationery, etc,
OLD COUNTRY PERIODICALS
BELLEVUE
Alberts Wl$i?^±p&
*ACU5 SIGHT
THE DISTRICT LBDGftR, FERNIE, B. 0., MAT 2, 1014.
EARLY CLOSING ANNOUNCEMENT
Tliis   Store   will   close   at   1   p.m.   on   Friday,   May   1st   and   on   each   Wednesday
following; at 1 p. m. until further notice \
Mies Ready%-Weap Dept;
offers particularly strong values for this week end.
A visit to the Department will reveal many striking values in wanted goods. Belaw we list two of
the items as being particularly good.
We are dividing our Women's
Suits into three
prices for quick
selling.
30 only Tailored
and Fancy Suits,
23 of these in
Navy Blue, selling
at ... $15.00 each
49 only Suits,
fancy, all colors,
every style, regular up to $32.50
for .. $25.00 each
15 only Fancy
Suits, selling regular $40.00, $42.50,
$45.00 and $50.00.
Now one price
$32.50 each
Now these three
lines are of very
strong merit and
worthy of iimne-
diate  attention.
..gj,,They  are  cut  in
7M the season's new-
pk est    styles    and
■     made and designed by the best ladies' tailors in the
country.   The colors are all good,
the    fabrics    the
best produced.
Come early.
175 Ladies' Blouses
Regular $1.50 to $2.25, all one price 95c each
First here will get first choice, and the choosing
is good. The Waists are made in all styles,,low
neck and short sleeves, high neck and long sleeves.
The qualities and styles are A 1. This is a rare
bargain, so be on hand early.   Regular to   QCft
I FRIDAY  MORNING  SPECIALS, 9 a.m. till 1 p.m.
SHIRT SPECIALS
From 9 a. m. until
1 p. m. we will sell
Men's Fine Negligee
and Outing Shirts
made from best Percales, Ginghams,
Dimities and Zephyrs, with collar
bands and stiff cuffs
(coat style), also
with soft collars attached and soft
French cuffs. These
are regular values up
to $1.75 each. On
■sale at each.
75c
SHOE DEPARTMENT
Men's Chocolate Calf Blucher, medium round
toe and low heel, a good roomy and 0Q AC
comfortable Shoe.   Reg. $5.50, special   OvIUU
Men's Black Box Calf Blucher, low receding toe
and medium heel, a very serviceable, 'AQ ftr
and dressy Shoe.   Reg. $5.50, special.,    $J | *y J
SPECIAL LINE OF LADIES' OXFORDS AND
SLIPPERS FOR SATURDAY
Ladies' Patent Colt and Vici Kid Strap Slippers
in several different styles, regular pric- A AA
es from $2.50 to $3.25, special Saturday     £|(JU
Ladies' Patent Colt, Vici Kil, Gun Metal and
Tan Calf Oxfords, all neat and up-to-date lasts.
Regular  prices  from   $2.50   to   $3.50.
Special Saturday	
2.00
ea
Grocery* Specials
For Saturday
2.25, for each
DRESS GOODS, 75c YARD
Dress materials suitable for everyday wear.
Dresses, Suits and Separate Skirls, etc. Clothes
that are in every way perfect and good wearing
and suitable for this season's wear. 40 to 7E<j|
50 inches wide.   Reg^ to $1.25, for per yard   | Jj^j
PONGEE SILKS
Natural Color Pongee in a splendid wearing
(iuality, free from knots and cords, the best Silk
for Summer Wash Waists and Children's I A*
Wash Dresses.    Special     • •   tUU
EMBROIDERIES, INSERTIONS AND EDGINGS
5c per yard
One sale table piled high with beautiful mew
Embrodiery Edgings and Insertions, good   (\Kp
new patterns, good qualities.   Per yard..   "•■'**
BED SPREADS—Special 75c each
Slightly soiled Bed Spreads that are made in a
honeycomb quality, fringed, good size and
good quality.   Extra special, each ...
How about the new Curtain Netts and Scrims?
You'll want some for housecleaning time,
fiuy, them Saturday, per yard :	
75c
icrims?
25C
MEN'S NAVY
SERGE SUITS
On sale in
our Clothing
partmcnt. Men'
Depart ment.
Men's hand finished Serge
Suits in Blue
only, sizes 34
to 44, cut in
single breasted
three button
style. Sale
price ... $12.50
$12.50
MEN'S
NECKWEAR
On sale Fri-
d a y morning
and Saturday,
a great range
of patterns awd
colors in new
Silks will be
sold at ... 50c
Eastern Township Butter  2 lbs. .65 ,
Canada First Evaporated Milk per tin .10
Robin Hood Porridge Ots 5 lb. cartoon .20
Robin Hood Breakfast Food ..... 3 packets .25
Braid's Best Coffee, fresh ground .... 2 lbs. .85.
Fry's Cocoa i/2 lb, tin .25
Lowney's Cocoa   JJ0
Peaches   2 lb. tin .15
Lombard Plums, 2 lb. tin 2 for .25
Gooseberries, 2 lb. tin 2 for -^35
Evaporated Peaches • per lb. .10
Oranges  per dozen .25
Medicine Hat Flour «)8 lb. sack 2.90
Robin Hood Flour  3.10
Lemonade Powder, small size 2 for .25
Tuxedo Jelly Powder 4 for .25
Cross & Blackwell's Jam 7 lb. tins 1.10
Cross & Blackwell's Red Currant. Jelly, 1 lb.
glass  .25
Armour's Shield Ham per lb. , .23
Sago  4 lbs. .25
Special Blend Bulk Tea 3 lbs. 1.00
Carrots  12 lbs. i .26
Assorted Toilet Soaps, reg. 35e and 40c box .25
Liquid Veneer  large size .35
Church's Alabastine per packet .45
Old Dutch Cleanser 3 tins .25
White Swan Washing Powder ..; per packet .25
PATENT MEDICINE SPECIALS
Castoria per bottle .25
Lyman's Beef Iron & Wine 40
Abbey's Salts large size .50
Eno's Salts  ;  large size .75
Pepps for Colds , 35
Allenbury's Food No. 2 large .85
Allenbury's Food ,No. 1 large .85
Horlick's Malted Milk  large size .90
Nestles Food  ,-... .45
The Store of
~.—Quality—
^
BRANCHES AT FERNIE, MICHEL, NATAL AND COAL CREEK
COMMUNICATED
To the Editor,
District Ledger.
Dear Sir,—It iu not my purpose to
•in a,py way defend the brother in my
■profession, who was the victim of such
a fusUade of abuse last week. Suffice it to way that if you had taken
Ui© trouble to find out all about the
oase you would not 'have spoken as
you did. However, such language In
the organ of the workers of the Pass
opens u*p a very real problem which I
think you will be frank enough to face.
Thrown in the face of an undlsc-rimin-
ating mass such a mixture 'of ...truth
and error, relevant and irrelevant argument, prejudices tlie mind and aggravate* a problem which I think lias
your sympathy. I am not going to
discuss Uio action of certain lords In
tihe British -pftblnet I am going to
refer to a problem existing In the
Crow's Nest Pass In the year 1914.
Tho fact is till*, we are up against
a financial stringency, Many of the
worker* are reduced to deplorable
Httraiahts. 1 am frank to admit that
my rtilpcnd, such as it is, comes from
Che workers, not indirectly but directly, not (paid because of any, encouragement they get from their official organ but in spite of the discouragement. It Is true I do not produce material wealth, in that matter
I belong to a very Illustrious class
consisting of politicians, school teachers, university professors, union secretaries, Socialist organizers aod
newspaper editors. I am permitted by
-Uie workers to live because they have
sense enough to1 see that there are
commodities which have value which
eannot be measured In terms of dollars. But dollars are a necessity just
as much to the hungry workera aud
their wives and children as to myse't.
You can tell mo where the money
should come from to feed these hungry people. I know that as well as
you do, but you and I are helpless 'n
the matter of procuring it, You will
Uoi Ide my thoory of tlie utility of char-
it.;. 1 think there ls not a minister in
tlie Vam but whait will agree to Its
futility. Hut tho fact is that there are
numbers of your organisation who,
failing to procure from you the ne.
cosslties of life, turn next to the
Church. It is safe to say that the
ministers are making the 'biggest per
Send for Five Roses
Cook Book—
M>*.   ».,*.■.#  „ i   Mil-,,   tltW.
IV i * ■«.*( i..,-«'.... tat* ~
miv, a •.■••*' \t t.*r f,(K*»t> nrrit'TA ,.„,,„•<»
•   n i*  . ,*        i „ ..*,. -t ,..i, i-9.. •■ *,* .* |
•a*,** .J;,! i  >,* ,f t ,,**-1'*.**,»» H.wnl,,™^!-,*.,,) C«r.s.i*,
!,_„„_ ; *
■ .1 j*. J
:i   O'^-M't-tAy.
M*»u»»» Unm.il t**C t't "nl tsSXi ttiuw U UiiH-MWWPIS
""■*    1HSTRIBUTO&8   PERNIB, B. 0.
We4<un Canada Whale-ait' Cu.    Tnlcs-WooU Co.
rJimmmmm»r®*
sonal sacrifice, not hecause nhey are
more chartable than others, but because in the nature of their office they
are made to see with .their own eyes,
■Che stench1 is to (their own nostrils,
and the human heart cannot resist
personal appeals of this character.
We are doing our utmost, often secretly and indirectly, and ex-peotlng
no reward. Wo recognize how thankless a job it is either for the Churoh
or District 18. You may call us fools
but that won't help us or yourselves.
When wo get down to hard facts, Mr
Editor, toils is no time for mud s'llng-
ing, Our problem is one, whether we
call lt "The Social Commonwealth" or
"The Kingdom of God." We may differ among ourselves ns to methods, as
also do the members of the 'V. M. W.
of A. But the immediate crisis challenges us to accept any and all methods that will get bread onto the empty
tables. If District 18 has done its
best,! and it has done creditably under
'tlw circumstances, then why not keep
your hands off If perchance we might
do a little more? Thanking you for
iwst favors and in anticipation.
Yours sincerely,
WM. H. IRWIN,
|The above communication does not
call for much comment, u» the correspondent makes the candid admission
that his stipend comes from the worker, and the worker alone. To explain
this was th© burden of our reply to
(Mr. Watkln-Jones, Wo would, how-
over, iiolivt out to Mr. Irwin that ho
has Introduced a (mention altogether
outside the -pi-uwouit UUcu»»iiiu, but
why should be presume that we will
mieer at his -charitable efforts we are
nt a loss to understand. It is no part
of our duty to Interfere with' tlio
church or church work, and we do
tiot Intend that these -columns thfflll bo
used to either eulogise or abuse any
partltrtilnr sect or creed. There is no
doubt that the peoplo of Bellevue appreciate .Mr. Irwin's efforts on -their
behalf, and If they did not do so would
ho churlish Indeed, The comments In
our issue of the ISth were not made
wkh tlw Intention of belittling tlw
efforts «f ■rliurehnwn, hut simply to
point out the absurdity of Mr. Watklfl-!
Jones' contention that the worker did j
ml unAr'Ami*' t><*.<i\l*» the upkeep of
Wm •ntnirr-h.   J-M.l ;
i
To tlw Kdltor, |
IiiuU'kt Ledger, j
Dor Sir,   After reading a lominual-
cation from the legal advisor of 8uto-i
I"        -    *    i       ... il     .      Ml -*•■-.•   * "
• rn*) t*n<* e«tiM not help romlnn to the
Muinitunon ximi n «»» ut&u tiuw mat
n great effort wss um4*) ky thtt wati»
workers of this Proline*!, towards
twinging about n change In the law as
H exists in the Administration Aet.
Uwriuly. uIm'U I tnn>lU*d tor powt-r* to
.Ktlll!ll>«-.|.li4>     Wt«3    til. at..    U.     UHU     rfll*M»
PiikttllH. who was killed In Hosmer
titiut'* on July 5th last, and left a
wlilow and three children In Germany,
'Judge Thompson, to whom the nppll-
'cation was mad**, hand* I down n de-
jcitlon that where Use;**: wi-ri? \ut rob-
itiiriw* resident in the I'rovtnee the of-
*ihUi. •»> luiiiiim i.t',.1.   .i, .      ..*.'   x',*,„; i.i-
jof th-e estate,   Sltie-e thnt division the
' .i-rf.1,1 ., *■<,*,, In l.--.*.***,» ... '.*.'.*.,, I .,,,,*,»)
h»i(-    titl.'f nillg    Of    *.'.;>■     ',-'*:!-       . !     ,1.1-All,
|M) from now on in al) jiiManw-s where
\'b.f o'ffi«'l»l sdmlii'k'';-X":- •** u■,,;„,'.nud
\'il) eontfitioantinn tnntti*'"* r-c-eovfred
I must no tlirouu'w 1«'» l..ii,.l#, from
' »n'h!''h *h« -wnn tit ■•"> i»*r i-.-v u <!<-«itict.
ii-il.    A* tlW •Olii-iier i»...::</' nut  in hi*
(   ,,.*..^.J*t  ,     *-*l**4»*      .*■*     *,**       .,..*.:,.,       ".f.t.t        .».».*
| Workman's Comp-vru'."!*)!!  Ar* m nil
•a lv**.-1.» ni'nu'V" '-li--.11!!!   =*    * ■'■! *iwr tu
thiis way, and that it is well known
law that any compensation moneys recovered do not belong to the estate.
One ls .tempted to express in no uncertain manner his disgust and contempt for those who (mostly political
appointees) take advantage of this
ruling of Judge Thompson and the
Attorney General and exact their
pound of flesh from penniless W/idows
and orphans, especially In view of the
faot. that thej' do not undertake any
work or liability whatever with the
conduct of the canes.
Yours in revolt.
W. BALDERSTONE.
Hosmer, B. C, April 27th, 1914,
A trip to Coail Creek is sometimes
one of Interest, amusement and d*ls»
guet. One hoards the train at the depot of the Al. F. and li. This .train la
really for the purpose of conveying
peculiar bipeds called miners to the
Coal Creek mines. These creatures
ure very userul to their owners, because they enter Into the dark subterranean passages of the earth and
extraot a rock commonly known as
coal. This rock Is used by modern
society to keep warm their houses in
winter, because It contains the properties of giving forth heat and furthermore, It Is used as the motive
power of modern civilisation. The
coaches used on the 51. P. and *M, ore
more often dirty than clean. The
windows aro dulled by dust and dirt,
which makes it Impossible to view the
1 ami ir-ii pe -mid mountain trlndes
through which the railway winds like
a serpentine trail. Sometimes tho
grisgly and carnivorous bears and
graceful deer descend from the higher
slopes ito ■browse on. the more verdant
grwa of the pass. They gaze sym-
pathetl<?a*b' upon their frtlow cren-
tnrra cooped up thus in these vile ami
111-ventilated conveyances, At rare Intervals the owners do take a spasm of
solicitude for these creatures and
clean out the pens, 8o fascinated was
one of thew unfortunate* with the
prospeet of the inoufitaln freedom (for
they have not y*A lost tlwlr hereditary
instincts) lu attempting to escape he
crashed his head against thn crystal
window slam, willed knA recently received « spring cleaning. Htupldlty
nnd iiKtrwlnlMv wss manifest on his
countenance, l^et us hope thst when
we hsve occasion to visit Coal Creek
■ihHl -■*'« do not liave to subject, our sacred persons to th© revolting and eon-
t!itnlij!iit.(w| iiitinospheplo condition* tin- j
| der which these creatures eilst.        j
i    A iimi) KotimiiK «■• MineiiiiiiMM ■**■•
1 •',,,   1i;.(i.i   hf M**     C.irtVlV'f-     Tli" hir* '
1 pv pntr were Mr. Sidney Ward and ■
| Miss Brhel Cartlldgft, both being old |
t'.iuit* ot IV fit j- of P-etmSe1. Tb* tier. ■
jl>. M. Perley tied tha nuptial kmL
'■ Afir-r \b* e«>twnony and the customary
,-,,',.,f,in* ,*tiinc   nn  Xirtirtll-r  prifvAfA
tlw brldil party sat down to « »umi»-
tiious repast.   The table was el«4)0^
1 iiteiy siht nml groaned under the abtin-
idanee of meats, eoke* and delicious
fruitsi.   Tlw ftuettt* were conflnod to
mwn-b-erm of both families sad a few
1 Intimate friends.   The latter part of
:-tio rvtifh'"' iri*4 en*nt. in th* siniflnsr
ut annua nnj Ut*-* pai-taWiJK of oxhil-
' "K-'Vire tato**. whlrh I* an lndHp«nsl-
■ um-  il   H".)«till«imt   i-U-HH-tn*  *****■. t.u:,iA...
Unto Ui*s ixdlUy nnd bwminott ot wed-
i'Une tt*.im%.   Thn wediled pair ttdt on
stiw Jijt-r for KpwJune. ekera 'My XI
'■*.\*t*i-A tlt»*lr lwn*»)i»»o;»ii, aft»»r which
I tiny con'em plate n world's tour.
j    Th** w*Mt<»!n«r ).ri'«en«»> were ituincr-
fi,.*-.  ..,.,..»   ..rn ,„i,   tt.   itU.wU   V,C   *■■ •• y
' nw'-nthw a f»»w:   A h«m«tMnl ru*< i»>
ns.j*.!!' i" of lit-M.>:  tea «rt witli mltxA
bowil, (butter dish, biscuit barrel and
fruit dish, by parents of bridegroom
and intimate friends; stiver vegetable
■bowl, by Mrs. W. Stdckwell; table
cloth, by vMrs. Clarkstone; umbrella
■stand, by Mr, and iMrs. Whltaster;
white bedspread, by Mrs. J. Brooks;
(pillow oaBe by ..Mrs. B. Cartlidge; pair
of. towele, by Miss Burke; hand worked pillow from Miss Jacobs; dinner j
service, by Mr. and Mrs, Butledge;
book, 'by Rev. D..M, Perley; table cloth
from brother of bride; bridegroom to
bride, a gold brooch; bride to bridegroom*, gold tie pin.
-.Miss Brown, assistant postmistress, |
has just returned from her holiday.
She reported having a good time.   We
welcome her smiling and genial pros-
ence into our midst once again.
..Miss Jean Corsan left on Sunday
morning for the girls' school at Cranbrook.
•Mr. B. Nugent, ot Taber, and Mr.
John iMakin, of Coleman, were In the
city, Tliey were acting as tellers tor
District IS over the recent elections.
J, Hilton, of Pernie, was third teller.
The mother ot Mrs, Cllft arrived in
town, and Intends residing with her
daughter.
'Mr. D. Rees leaves on Thursday to
attend the International Board meeting, U. M. AV. of A., held at Indianapolis-.
Mrs. Albert Hart and children left
Um Saturday tor Wigan, Lancashire.
Albert will lead a bachelor's life ln
the meantime.
PROVINCIAL COURT
INTELLIGENCE
'Mrs, -Green, the wife of the colored
murdered man, w<ts committed for
trial iat the next assize court on a
murder charge.
John O'Shea, of Wardner. w\s arrested on a charge of burglaiy. He
comes up for trial on Thursday,
John Tolly, charged With pointing a
firearm, was fined $15,00 and costs,
or M days,   He is doing time.
II. Mazey got seven holidays for
coutwMpl of court at Ho-siuer.
The Spring assize court will be hold
on the 4th of May, Mr. P. B. Wilson,
of Xelson, will aot as -ritown prtoecut-
or, when the two cases of murder wIM
come up for trial.
WHO'S TO BLAME?
Those responsible do not. appear to
have been guilty of excessive wisdom
or tact in permitting the aggregation
at present encamped at the north of
Main Street-, to come Into town this
week. Tho character ot some of tho
party Ib scarcely calculated to increase
the peace.and orderliness of our city.
These people seem to imagine that
tliey can come Into our town, introduce
a mild form of hooliganism*, skin the
inquisitive young man (and old ones
who will fall for their talk), and inflict an obtruslveness that is likely to
annoy respectable citizens. One1 ot the
favorite methods of tho ladles of the
party is to parade our streets with
hands linked lind force pedestrians off
the sidewalk, and the police and chief
executive would only be performing
their duty did i-h-W' retwo io .grant
permits to ■these travelling show*.
Surely with our own sports and other
amusements, we can entertain without
introducing shows of suoh a questionable nature.
ISIS THEATRE
BEST
ALWAYS
Fernie's Exclusive Picture Theatre
Special Friday May lst
A THRILLING ITORY OF THt PIRIL* OF MOUNTAINEERING IN THE ALW
A Tragedy In the Alps
3 reels,   A thrilling and sensational picture secured especially for our May Day program.   Produced by
the great Knglleh firm, B ft C
SPECIAL SATURDAY—Matinee aad Evening
LOIt WBBIR ANO PHILLlPi SMALLEV IN A "REX" DRAMA WRITTEN  ANO  PROOUOEO »V
THEMIELVEI
The Female of the Species
•i rwl* Mi*s Weber places before us, In a series of finely drawn, coherent. Intensely InteretUttK
scenes, two women, one n good "bad*' woman, and the other « bad "good" woman, and develops tiie
types with remarkable Insight into chaw ter.   A Pleturt Worth itiln§
Special Tuesday May 5th
Tutan fSO TWP POPULAR "BISON" PIRATE tflRIEt
Tlie Buccaneers
3 reels,  A thrilling story tbat tnken us back to the old swMhbucWtaf days of the nth centum obm
Jean ia Fette and MacMMwrd, captains ot bloodthirsty crewi.ot moBii*l»..*pw«.< ««»r ee tke Mgk
seas
EXTRA SPECIAL Thursday May 7
THOMAt W. ROSE IN HENRY M. tLOMOM, JRt., GREAT RACING PLAY
\
I
t reels   Checker* as a book and a play. fca» delighted lumdrertt of thousands.   As n moving picture
'.: 'iA.ll iAigh*. mmr.ina
Coming; Soon
SECONO OF THE PANTOMAtl tlRIES
Fantomas - The Mysterious Finger Print
S r**l*    Fnrth*r Adventatwi of the "Maa in Black."

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