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The British Columbian, Weekly Edition Nov 13, 1889

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Array A DaCos-ioa,'
Columbian.
WEEKLY ,_E3_DITIO0_>r.-12   PAGES.
VOLUME 34
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. 0., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,  1889.
NUMBER 46
THE   DAILY    COLUMBIAN
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fcF'i'f-raons aeiulhiia Iii advertisements
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are In appear In Lhe Uall*. KdlM-.n, or'he
W**i-UI-,or both. \ liberal reduction is
mudo when Inserti-d In both. No advertisement inserted for leas than 61.
SUBSCRIBER!*
Who do not receive their paper regularly,
from the Carriers or through  tbe Pot-it
Ofllue, will confera favor by reporting the
Bame to the office of publication at onee.
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WBefely Britisli ColuiMan,
Weilneulaj Noriilnit, Nov. Ill, 18811.
"How Lord Dufferin got even on
Chicago" would do as the heading
of part of a report in a late number
of the London Times. The distinguished nobleman was presented
with the freedom of the burgh of
Kirkcaldy, whioh, as his lordship
put it in his reply to the address,
has ever been foremost in advancing tho interests of the kingdom of
Fife, and the adjoining and not less
honorable kingrlnni nf Scotland, Regretting in a humorous way, that, as
an ambassador, his tongue was tied
at a time when other men were
stirring the country with exciting
and vivacious speeches, Lord Dufferin
said ho knew they would excuse
him, and not endeavor to treat him
as he had, when viceroy of Canada,
been treated in Chicago, When
there, ho was invited to visit the
board of trade; but being very unwell, sent an excuse, as he felt it
would be impossible for him to
make a speech. Promptly came a
reply, assuring him that no speech
was expected, that he was asked
only to meet a few gentlemen in a
private room, over some sherry and
biscuits, have a chat and shake
hands. Feeling equal to that, he
went—met a few gentlemen, had a
glass of sherry and a chat, and rose
to take leave. But when he endeavored to go out as he had come
in, he was shown through a different door, along a narrow passage,
through another door into the enormous corn exchange of Chicago.
"Before me," said his lordship,
were 4,000 eager faces and a glass
of water, and behind me a voice
which cried, 'The governor-guneral
of Canada will now address the
meeting.' " Tho future historian of
Kirkcaldy will have to its roll of
honors that it gave Lord Dufferin a
chance to get even on Chicago, by
exposing tho character of itR bos-
pi tnlitv.
A GRATEFUL ind *">•'.'"'-•''■   '      ,:
covery has recently been mndo by a
Dutch physician, and his name, as
yet undivulged, should go down to
posterity as that of one who has
oleansed the fair fame of many of
bis fellow creatures who for ages
past have rested under the stigma
of an unmerited nnd baseless calumny. Red noses, says this wise
man, are the signs of overtaxed
mental faculties. Whenever this
gentleman has a patient whose proboscis is of the strawberry order he
at once treats hint for nasal tumour,
and the result (so ho says) is marvellous. At onco the sufferer becomes bright and cheerful, nnd his
mental faculties nssumo their proper brilliancy.   The glad news will
be read by many, and we can now
account, without difficulty, for the
brilliancy of the nasal organs on the
faces of some of our acquaintances.
Wo are now sure that they have
been burning the midnight oil to a
very large extent, not, as uncharitable people would suppose, in tho
hnr-ronms and saloons, but in tho
quicludo of their own libraries, with
a wet towel round tho throbbing
forehead, and sipping an infusion of
green tea to keep the mental machino in a proper stato of wakeful
activity. When paterfamilias comes
home unusually lively, and so excited in fact that lio is quite unable
lo wind up his chronometer with
the house door key, Mm irate part
ner of his joys will bo able to account for the dazzling brilliancy of
liis rubicund visugc in the consideration of the fact that perhaps he has
been listening to tlie eloquence of
some learned professor, and remembering tliis, alio will not, ns was heretofore tno frequently the case, endeavor to increase bis knowledge
by making him sea stars with the
nid of a Hat iron, or, failing that,
the kitchen poker. It is really astounding to notice how the   human
THE TABLES TURNED,
The Democrats Turn the Tables on
the Republicans ani Hake
Large Gains.
The Cottonseea Oil Trust Shows a
Handsome Shortage of Half
a Million.
The Cashier of  n Toledo Bank
Embezzles a Large Amount
of Cash.
intelligence is developing. A very
short time ago, and the unsteady
gait or "ruby nose" would have
been attributed to liquor, rather
than literature, but all this seems
likely to be ohanged, nnd when
Dives, after attending a public dinner, wends his way homeward with
a distinct hiccough, and endeavois
to walk on both sides of tbe street
at once, tho extraordinary nature of
his behaviour must in future (if tho
Dutchman speaks truth) bo attributed rather to tho brilliant wit, of
the company or the oratory of the
speakers than to the pickled salmon
or devilled bones.
It is generally conceded by all
who have reflected   and  informed
themselves on tho subject, observes
a cotemporary, that the  prevalent
practice in disposing of the dead is
not philosophical.   At one time it
was supposed that the cleanly und
innocuous    practice   of   cremation
would take tho place of burial, but
to many the idea is revolting, and
after many years of advocacy it has
failed to obtain a  strong hold on
public favor.   To meet the  hygenic
objections to burial, and  tho   sentimental objections to • cremation, a
compromise has   beeu   inaugurated
in the east which seems designed to
win popularity.   The new idea is
dubbed "the Mausoleum  plan."   It
is proposed to build  in   each   large
city a large structure, tho  size proportionate to  probable   necessity,
composed  of stone  and   concrete,
with a compartment for each   body,
each    compartment   to   have  two
doors, an outer of iron or stone and
an inner one of thick glass, hermetically sealed.   Each chamber to be
ventilated   by a fanning   process,
which carries off the gases arising
from the bodies to a central furnace
n a sub collar where they are consumed,    By this process the body is
dessicated and becomes inoffensive
to sight and smell.   The weight is
reduced about two-tbirds, but the
form and features are not materially
altered.    Ths   main  structure is
architecturally handsome, and family vaults can he made as elegant as
the parties  appropriating them see
fit.   Tho cost of a mausoleum will
he much less than the cost of a
cemetery, on account of land values,
without including in the latter case
the cost of monuments, for  a   mausoleum can bo built of any required
height, wliich from  time  to  time
could  be  increased.    One    thing
which  would  seem   calculated to
popularize this plan is the opportunity it would afford to poor and rich
alike, of  preserving,  and  at  will
the   iiiieniuoiilB   of   their
, ijeeii no mistake
:ost of carrying it
out, or of the results it will accom
plish, there  seems  little   room to
doubt that this plan will be extensively adopted.
viewing
licit.i,   Ii there ,
in estimating tlie
STILL REPUBLICAN.
Boston, Mass., Nov. fi.—With fourteen towns ir.is_.iigi the total vote in
Massachusetts is: Bnickett, republi-
win, 123,691; Russell, democrat, 117,-
523; Bluckuier, prohibitionist, 13,263.
WHALING NEWS.
San Fhancisco, Nuv. 6,-The whaling Btoauior Belvedoo, Captain Conk,
has arrived, 14 days from Fox island.
She brings no further news from the
Arctic licet. She captured one small
whulo, making her catch threo iu all.
As piissengors she brought down Capt.
Whiteside, tlio engineer and three nf
the crew of lhe steamer Lucretia,which
waa wrecked on Sept. 5th, on a shoal
oil' the northwestern part nf Herald
island. Oapt. Whiteside said that the
reef on whicli lie struck is improperly
placed on lhe clinrt. The steamer
sunk so rapidly thut tlie crew had barely timo to gat tlio boats and make their
escape. Luckily the Bteamer Bolvedoc
Was near and picked them up. The
whu lin» bark Lancer has also arrived
frum Fox island. Her entire catch
numbered only two, which will just
about pay tlio expenses of her trip.
WHOLESALE ROBBERY.
Toledo, Ohio, Nov. C,—Ex-Cashier
E. S. Vanhoesens, of tlio Toledo National hank, wan arrested to-day charged
with embezzling .58,000 of the hank's
funds during his incumbency. John
McKee, teller of the bank, was nlso arrested charged with embezzling §1,200.
GREAT SHORTAGE.
New York, Nov. ((.-.The investigation of the finances of the Cotton Seed
Oil trust, mado by two members of the
committee on plans of reorganization,
was announced at the meeting of certificate holders held to-day, aud shows a
Bhortngoof $522,611, of which Flagler
and Moss, tho ex-president and troasuror
of the trust, offer to mako good .250,-
000.
HORSEFLESH AT LOW RATES,
New Yolk, Nov. 6.—At an auction
sale of horses to-day tho first lot offered
wore those of D. McCarthy, of San
Francisco, tlie bidding waa very slow
nnd tho prices were conceded on all
sides, very low. They ranged from
_.800 to §2,000. The lalter prico for
Hidalgo, a buy gelding, sire Sultan,
dam Atlierton.
investigating
San Fbanoisco, Nov. O.—The investigation into tjio loss of the Bteamer
Granada, which was totally wrecked at
Point Tojupon, Lower California, on
the night of June 22(1, has commenced. Capt. Deering, her commander, only arrived from the scene
of the wreck on tho Panama steamer
ou last Friday, causing tho delay in
the investigation.
PASSENGER LIST.
San Francisco, Nov. O. — The
steamor Umatilla sailed for Victoria
and Puget Sound ports this morning
with the following passengers for Vic
toria; W. Lock, W. T. Stern, Mrs. H.
Wallace, J. Gray, Mrs. Humphreys,
Mrs. J. H. Gaeddes and two children,
H. J. Scott.
One of Chicago's millionaires was
arrested the other day for cruelty to
animals and fined in the police
court. Anothor ono in Rhode Island lately applied to a New York
court for a writ of habeas corpus to
get him out of a private insano asylum, where he had been wrongfully
confined. Still another in Now
York does four men's work every
day, carries burdens to crush an
ordinary man, is a victim to insoni-
onia and dyspepsia. Yet nearly
nil mankind want to bo millionaires,
Ex.
FORAKEll TO CAMPBELL.
Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 0—At one
o'clock this afternoon Guvernur For*
aker sent the following telegram: Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 6.—To Hon. Jas.
E. Campbell, Hamilton, Ohio: To the
full extent, tho defeated candidate can
do so with propriety, allow me to offer
my congratulations and assure you
that it will give me pleasure to extend
to you every courtesy that I can show
you in connection with your inauguration and the commencement of your
administration.
(Signed) J.* B. Fouaker.
VIRGINIA DEMOCRATS VICTORIOUS.
Richmond, Nov. 0.—Largo Democratic gains in overy section are shown
by tho returns received from two-thirds
of the Stato. The gains now exceed
30,000 over that of 1888, wilh losses
less than 200. In the legislature the
Democrats will lmve a two-thirds ma-
jurity on the joint ballot.
IOWA GOES DEMOCRATIC.
Des Moines, Iowa, Nov fi.—Lator
returns show the election of the entiro
Democratic Stato ticket by a majority
probably exceeding 10,000.
THE FRENCH ANNOYED.
Paris, Nov. 6.—The Jouroa! des
Deliafs says the only ministers of the
powers who attended the Princo of
Wales' reception in Cairo wero those of
Germany, Denmark and Greece. Tho
princes' journey was not only useless,
but it showed smnll regard for French
fooling. Franco hns not abandouod
her claiii-s in Egypt.
REFUSED THE U1IIU0N.
Paris, Nov, 0,—Alex. Harrison,
lhc marine painter and member of tho
American art jury nf tho exposition,
has refused tho decoration of an ollicor
of the academy, conferrod nu him by
tho jury of awards. To a correspondent ho said:   "I hnvo rofusod the  de
coration becauso it was nothing but a
little purple ribbon for which I had no
use."
EATEN BY NATIVBS.
London, Nov. fi.—News ia received
of the murder of an Englishman named Nelson by the natives of one of the
Solomon Islands. Nelson and three
native boys, who wero in his employ,
wore decoyed into a hostile locality,
and after being killed were devoured.
A Britisli cruiser afterwards punished
the natives by shelling and destroying
a number nf ,\ illagcs. Tho inhabitants
fled to the inferior. Some other instances of cannibalism un these islands
aro reported.
A NARROW ESCAPE.
Liveri'iiol, Nov. 0.—The steamer
^Bulgarian from Boston has arrived. On
Afenulay tire was discovered in her hold
aud only its timely discovery saved the
vessel from destruction. Several bales
of cotton were damaged before the lire
was subdued.
THE ATCHISON RAILROAD.
London, Nov. li.—A meeting of the
Atchison bondholders advises all parties
to accept the plan of reorganization, provided the interest on the income bonds
bo made cumulative after the year 1892.
VALUADLE PRESENTS.
Constantinople, Nov. Ii.—Anion"
the Sultan's present* t-i the imperial
visitors are -,, jewelled collar valued at
£5,000 fur the enipro-s, and a sabre
studded with diamonds for the Emperor William.
llllillER WAGES.
Hamburgh, Nov. fi.—One thousand
ship carpenters bavo struck for better
winter pay. The masters are inclined to
accede .to their demands provided the
men will work the same number of hours
as in summer,
CHARGES   DUPLICITY.
London, Nov. 6.—Resuming his address fnr tiie Times before the Parnell
commission to-dny, Sir Henry James
quoted from the speeches made by
Davitt in 1880 and argued that the
quotations showed the purpose to coin-
bine the forces of both moderates and
extremists in the American Olan-na-
Gael with those of the constitutional
patty iu Ireland, tn keep Ireland unsettled. Thu organization was to
cloak its real object with ennatitution-
ul forms. Parnell has not thon assumed the disguise of moderation, but associated with Fenians. His reception
at Cork in March. 1880, on his return
from America had decidedly a Fenian
character, and when his frionds welcomed him at dinner, Biggar made
the memorable Hartn.au speech wherein asanssination was encouraged and
applauded, the killing of tho czar
by the nihilists boing fresh in evory
one's mind. The commission has been
furnished with evidenco regarding the
importation of arms into Ireland,
through mun openly supporting Pnr-
nell, and who were members of the
lcairuc ill active sympathy with its
work, "Surely" snid Sir Henry, "If
it had been proved that crime was ripe
in many districts where nn distress existed, but where tho people had been
aroused against the league the source
of ciime must be held and proved."
DR. PETERS MURDERED.
Zanzibar, Nov. 6.—A report hss
reached here that the Masais or So-
malis, havo murdered Dr. PeterB, tho
German explorer, in charge of Emin
Bey relief expedition, and the entire
party except one European and one
Somala, who was with the party, both
of whom wero wounded and are at
Ngao. The latest known about Dr.
Peters, who started inland from Vitu,
July 2fith, is that he reached Korwowa,
a long way up the Tann river. It is
not known whether the second column,
which left Vitu in September, ever
joined Peters' advance party.
A PRINCELY  l'RENIDENT.
Paris, Nov. 5,—President Carnot
has given another contribution of 725,-
000 francs for the poor of Paris.
WHAT ABOUT CANADA.
London, Nov. 6.—The Sfatidaiii
thinks the time is not yet ripe for federation, but believes the mother country will endorse whatever plan of settlement is devised upon by the Australian colonies.
THE  RUSSIANS LOTTERY MAIL
St. Petersburg, Nov. 5.—A perfect
mania for speculation has seized the
people in consequence of tho new lottery loan. Tho offerings have been nl,
least a hundred limes more than the
amount of the loan.
the unspeakable turk.
London, Nov. 5.—It is asserted by
the Daily News' correspondent iu
Oreto thnt the outrages upon Christians still continue, and that throe
leading Christi-uis have heen arrested.
The common people nre bastinadoed
on the flimsiest pretexts.
CALLS THINGS BY THEIR RIGHT NAMES.
London, Nov. 5.—Sir Henry James
continued his argument for the Times
to-day beforo tho Parnell commission.
He declared Parnollism to be a conspiracy to destroy landlordism and rupture the Union. Parnell's visit to
America, though ostensibly to collect
money for the rcliof of the districts,
was roally to sccuro Bupport for the
league's treasonable schemes, and ho
instanced men well known as plotters
against the British government
INTERESTING CEREMONY.
Washington, D. C, Nov. 5.—Tlio
president started tho machinery of the
Montgomery (Ain.) exposition at noon
to-day, by touching an electric koy at
tho White House iu the presenco of nil
the mouibors of the cabinet. '
RATHER SUSPICIOUS.
The Emperor of Austria Fears He
has been Made a Catspaw
by Germany.
The Wild Dervishes have been Bad*
ly Defeated by the Abyssinian Troops.
The EniDcror William Wants
New Yacht but the Opposition
Object to It.
WILLIAM   WANTS A Bill YACHT.
Berlin, Nov 8.—Among tlie items
in tbo new naval estimates beforo tlm
reichstag that hnvo aroused the bit'er-
eat hostility nf the opposition, is that
fnr 460,000 mark* fur n new yacht for
the Kniser and Kaiserie. jt is announced thnt the Hohenzollcrii ib ton
small, thouuh she is a stoamer of 1700
tuns, and th. Kaiser wants a larger
yacht.
THE  WILY  GERMAN.
London, Nov. 8.—The emperor nf
Austria begins to havo serious doubts
whether ho has not been used by Ger
many as a cntspaw, Tho recent visit
of William the Second to tho Sultan
hns evidently resulted in a good understanding between the Porto and
Germany, and what is much more important, it is believed the meeting between the emperor and the czar at
Berlin is likely to lead tu very close
relations between the governments.
PHILOMEL   AVON.
London, Nov. 8.—The race fnr the
Liverpool cup at tho Liverpool autumn
meeting, wns won tu-day by Philomel,
Bevedor Becond, and Theosophis'
third.   Twelve starters.
RATHER DOUBTFUL.
London, Nov. 8.—It is reported
thai: tho king of Denmark is about to
send a mission to tho pope on the
subject of settling the question of the
Balkans by arbitration.
dervishes defeated.
Rome, Nov. 8. - Official advices from
Abyssinia i.ay tho Dervishes burned
Gondar but wero afterwards defeated
by the Abyssmians, who killed threo of
their chiefs.
heavy suit.
San Francisco, Nov. 8.—Clara
Belle McDonald will bring suit this
afternoon against her father-in-law, R.
II. McDonald, for live-hundred thousand dollars for damages alleged to have
been sustained on account of his having
her arrested nearly a year ago on a
charge of forging his name to railroad
stock which she sold to Sonator Stamford.
PROBABLY MURDER.
San Fhancisco, Nov. 8.—Dominico
Romero, uu Italian, who has not been
living with hia wifo for some time,
went to a saloon kept by her about 2
o'clock this morning, and kicking in
the door found Harry Mason, a sailor,
there. Romero attacked tie Litter
with a penknife, and, it is brlieved,
fatally stubbed him. Romero was arrested.
SMOOTHED   HIM DOWN.
Vincennes, Ind., Nov. 8.—Sallie
Utterbock, a domestic in a hotel ut
Shoals, threw a smoothing iron at James
Richey, a ci>mmmcrcial traveller, last
niaht, for oirculatina derogatory storieB
about her. lt struck him over the eye,
cracking his skull. His recovery is
doubtful.
INDIAN   MURDERERS.
Fresno, Cal., Nov. 8.—Three Indiana have been arrested for the murder of an Indian named Bob, of another tribe, who disappeared on Oct
16th, and whose body waa found nearly three weeks later. A bitter feeling
existed between the two tribes.
HORRIBLE OCCURRENCE.
Memphis, Nov. 8.—A strange and
horrible accident is reported from a
plantation six miles from this city.
Tho two-years-old ohild of Wm. Stiles
(colored) was killed and partially devoured by a boar. Tho parents left the
child in their cabin aud went to the
fields to pick cotton, and a half-starved
dog was left ou guard. The dog defended the child and paid the penalty
with his lifo. Ho lay noar the child
with both legs broken and his body
ripped open.   Tho bear was killed.
ANOTHER RAILROAD SLAUOHTER,
Altoona, Pa., Nov. 8.—News haa
just reached this city of a bad railroad
wreck fivo miles weat of hero. A
freight train going at a rapid rate
crashed into a gravel train and both
wero badly demolished. Nino men
were killed and about fifteen injured, a
number of thom will die. Physicians
have loft hore for tho scene of the
wreck. Only tho abovo meagre details
have been received.
WANTS A DISCHARGE.
Chicago, Nov. 8.—Alexander Sullivan, who is held for the grand jury by
tho coroner's jury for complicity in the
Cronin murder, oppeared beforo Judge
Baker this morning with his attorney
to ask for his discharge Judge Baker
set tho hearing for ten o'elook to-morrow.
MONTANA   ADMITTED.
Washington, D.C, Nov. 8.—Tho
president signed today tho proclamation admitting Montana as a state.
The proclamation is similar in form to
thoso with relation to Dakota.
SHOCKING I'.EVELATION.
Toronto, Nov. Oi—Two girls of re
spectable parentage have returned here
and made a shocking revelation. They,
with about a dozen other young women, were engaged here and taken to
the Western States, by a woman, ostensibly to lako situations as domestics
in a largo hotel. The whole party-
were driven to a lumber camp new
Denver, Col.; were drugged there, debauched and told that any attempt at
escape would be punished with death.
Several of tho unfortunates, among
them these two, escaped recently, bnt
the others aro still thero. The story
they tell of thoir treatment is similar
to that told by the fugitives from the
Michigan pinery dens, of enforced prostitution and continuous brutality.
WITHOUT  FOUNDATION.
_ Denver, Ool, Nov. 8.—A careful
ilivcstigiitiini shows that the reports
from Toronto, Cnnnda, to lhe
effect that a number nf girls sent out
frnm Toronto have been lured to
lumber camps in Colorado by procuresses are absolutely without foundation.
GERMANY  DISCLAIMS.
London, Nov. 7.—In spite of the
apparent indifference nf the German
Government as to the fate uf Dr. Peters, there is no duubt that tho massacre of that explorer and his party haa
added to n great extent to tho depression caused in Berlin by the report that
Wadelai had fallen into the hands of
Mahidsts, and with it everything that
remained uf European or Egyptian
domination in Central Africa. So long;
as England nr indeed any European
power retained a fuot-hold iu the Son-
dan ur its environs thero remained -a
hope that the numerous efforts of Germany to obtain a portion of the commerce or the agriculturo "f lho interior
regions might be siiopessful in uno case*
at least. But i-.ni that hope ia noiv
abandoned, whili tho German autliori-
ties hash-., t • disclaim any responsibility fur l'r. Peters or his expedition.
Meanwhile the English are exulting
over their own successes in South Africa and are nut, slow in calling attention
to tho now ulmust indisputable fact that
Dr. Peters was killed within the bounds,
of territory in that region over which
England exercises a protectorate.
THIRSTY TULARE.
Tulare, Cal, Nov. 5,—Tulare presented a strong temperanco aspect thia
inoruin-., and early seekers for the reviving cocktail were sorely disappointed. Every Baloon iu the city was-
closed, the proprietors having given
bond on the contract binding oach to
remain closed until further >rder»_
Their action was tho result of an ordinance passed by tha board of trustees fixing the liquor license at 9100
per quarter.
OTTAWA NOTES.
Ottawa, Nov. 5.—A large number
of persoiiB assembled at the Quebec
Government offices in Montreal this
mornini! tu witness the payment of the
Jesuit Estate money. Mr. Merciei-
and his Cabinet and many prominent
politicians wore present The money
was passed river to Father I'urgeoii,
the Superior uf tho Jesuits.
The astronumor, Otto Klutz, has returned from Alaska, whither he had
beeu sent by the Dominion government to gather data fnr the s°ttlomcnt
of the Alaskan bouiuinry. The result
of his mission will be utilized in tbe
negotiations now in progress between:
the British und American governments. Some trouble, it is expected,
will be experienced in locating the
southern portion of the boundary,
which the treaty provides ahall, despite
the mountain ranges, follow the sinuosities of the coast at a distance of ten
miles therefrom.
Three thousand Orangemen to-day
celebrated the anniversary of the discovery of the gunpowder plot. Th*
Btreets were paraded. At a public
meeting tho speakers, including Col.
O'Brien, M.P., and Mr. Charlton, M.
P., the government was denounced
and the usual anti-Jesuit resolutions
were paaaed
Ottawa, Nov. 7.—The failure of tho
Labrador fisheries and the destitution
of the tiahornien are attributed to tbe
inroads of the American and French
fishermen, who une trap neta and other
engines for tho wholesale destruction
of the fish, lt is asserted that during
tho season vessels from Gloucester
swept these shores, getting full cargoes
and treating the 3-mile limit with contempt. Tho fishery department is
making an investigation.
Provincial Secretary Gibson denies
positively that the Ontario elections-
will tako placo beforo another session
of parliament.
The accident to the Hon. C. H. Topper, the minister of marine and fisheries, was not quite so serious as at first
reported. He wns riding last evening
down the Odoro street at a smart trot
and when near the rifle range his hone
stumbled and fell heavily, throwing,
his rider to the ground,
Miss Minnie O'Connor, of Toronto,,
has instituted proceedings against
dentist Frank Stowe, to recover damages for injuries received through carbolic acid spilling ovor and disfiguring
her faco whilo attending to her teeth.
Stowo claims the accident was the
fanlt of the patient.
Tho ordor-in-council of May last*,
providing that steamships plying in
Canadian waters with boilers constructed in the United kingdom, ant?
inspected by the imperial board of
trndo of England, shall bc exempted
from inspection in Canada for a period
of twolvo months from dato of inspection in tho United Kingdom, has been
cancelled, says n late Ottawa dl.pat.___,
\%m VOLUME 34.
WEEKLY BRITISH COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, b. C, NOVEMBER 13, 188_.
Weekly British Columbian
Wednesday Morning. Nov. IS.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
Great Britain mined almost 10,-
■000,000 morn tons of coal, iron and
other minerals last year than in
1887, and employed 10,000 more
men in the work, but fewer lives
were lost in the process. The total
number of fatal accidents was 885,
and of deaths occasioned thereby
960, being an increase of four in the
accidents, but a decrease of 91 in
the lives lost.
Mr. Labouchere, speaking, at Gins
gow, recently, said the present government was as little likely to oap-
itulnte as a cow that liatl got into a
clover-field. They knew- that a general election would sweep them from
power, nnd also sweep a number of
their supporters from political life.
The political slavery whicli existed
in Ireland would cease when the
Liberals got the uppor hand.
Thus does Phineas T. Bamum, the
"great showman," philosophize : "If
you would be happy as a child, pleaso
one. Childish laughter is tho echo
■of heavenly music. Tho noblest nrt
is that of making others happy.
Amusement to children is like rain
to flowers. Wholesome recreation
conquers evil thoughts. 'Ihe author
of harmless mirth is n public benefactor. Innocent amusement trans
forms tears into rainbows."
Tlio 30th duy of September has
been a pivotal one in tho history of
Frederick Douglass. On that clay
183S he arrived in New York ti fugitive slave without friends, money
or food, and spent the night on the
cotton bales. On thu same date 51
years later he embarked on tlie famous war ship Kearsarge as tlio minister of the United States to a foreign country. Douglass may well
exclaim: "What hath God wrought!"
The Whitehaven,(Eng.) Bourdo.
Guardians linve decided liy ten votes
to nine that "tin- boys in the workhouse school bo taught shorthand."
The discussion that arose on the
resolution wus entertaining, Onu
member, Mr. Bi-aithwaite, did not
approve of the proposal, fearing that,
they would be nsked to introduce
music masters and pianos next, Mr.
Musgrave, another member, confessed that he had tried his hand nt
shorthand ; he had learned to writo
it, bnt could never learn to read it.
Amid laughter ho added that "mauy
of the ratepayers could not write
longhand let alone shorthacl, and yet
they had to pay the rates."
SCIENTIFIC MISCELLANY.
A chicken's cornea is suid to have
been successfully grafted into the
human eye by Dr. Gravenigo, of
Padua.
The oldest medical work, an Egyptian papyrus dating from 1500
years or more before Christ, and containing prescriptions then old, has
been translated by George Ebers, the
German novelist.
A new botanical garden in the
Alps of Vnlnis is situated on a cone-
•shaped knoll about 200 feet high, at
an altitude above sea-level of more
■than 5,000 feet. Plants from all the
alpine regions of the globe will bo
cultivated.
Mr. C. II, Williams has pointed
out a possiblo example of what evolutionists might term reversion to
the fossil type of toed horses, Suetonius having recorded that "Ocesar
made use of u n-tnarkablo horse, with
feet almost human, and hoofs divided in the manner of toes."
The latest report states that
twenty-one observatories are now
engaged in the international under
•taking of photographing tho entire
heavens, Each observatory will
have to take about 700 photographs
in the zone assigned to it, und it is
hoped to finish the work in three or
four years.
A Cheat Weapon.—Tho largest
gun in existence has boen sent by
Messrs. Krupp to Cronstadt. It is
of cast steel, weighs 235 tons, has
a barrel 10 feot long, a diameter of
C' feet in the largest part, and
a bore of 13J, inches. Its range is
over 11 miles, and it will fire two
shots per minute, each shot costing
from ,-.12.0 to $1500. In a trial of
■the war monster, the projectile—1
led long ami weighing tbuu pounds,
and propelled by a charge of 700
pounds of powder—penetrated 19'
inches nnd went 1318 yards beyond
the target.
Mental Capacity of Spiders,—
Experiments on the mental powers
of hundreds of spiders have been
made by Messrs. (1. W. and E. G.
Peckhatn. Evidence was given that
the faculty nf smell is fairly developed in all but three out of twenty-six
species, but tbe position of the organ
of smell was not found and it is not
known Loud sounds were apparently uupeiceivi'il ; the Epeirids
■wero sensitive to tin- sound of a tuning fork, while the spiders that do
not make wobs gave no heed to it,
Love of offspring was mnnifestotl i"
all spiders by eagerness to receive
blaok cocoons within twenty-four
hours, though few recognized them
after a longer period, and none seemed able to distinguish their own cocoons from another spider's or from
pitch-balls of the same size. Sight
appeared to be good, though from
familiarity only through touch, cocoons were found with difficulty
even when within three-fourths of
an inch. The color-sense seemed
fairly developed, with preference for
red. The authors discredit the notion that spiders feign death, accepting Darwin's explanation that the
habit of lying motionless has been
acquired in different degrees to serve
different purposes.
OoMritEss-ED Ant Power.—As the
result of detailed investigations,
Prof. A. B. W. Kennedy, F. 11. S.,
reports that the compressed air
transmission system in Paris is now
being conducted on a large commercial scale in such fashion that a
small motor four miles from tho central station can indicate in round
numbers 10 horso power for 20 indicated horse power at the station
itself, allowing for coke used to heat
the air, or for 25 indicated horse
power if the air be not heated at
all. Larger motors may work somewhat more, nnd smaller motors
somewhat less, economically. The
present compressing engines at the
central station indicate more than
2000 horse power, but the plant is
being greatly enlarged. Most of
the air supplied is used for working
motors, of which the groat majority
nre more than two miles nway, nnd
of A to 50 horse power. A novel
feature in the use of this power is
that the exhaust can be made to
supply ventilation and cooling.
This is an important advantage for
any largo city, but in tropical countries—where cooling appliances nre
rather a necessity than a luxury—
we might have the apparent paradox of a motor worked essentially
for its exhaust, the work being a
by-product nnd the cold nit-the principal thing.  '
CORRESPONDENCE.
Fads and nn Inference.
Editor Columbian: Sir—Mr. Sum
(ireer is hostile to the local government;
he has declared he will uso all his influence to up.si.-t llolisoii's political coach
and he is canvassing night and day for
Tom Cunningham ! Now if Tom is elected by Sam, will the government trust
Tom? I say "No I" emphatically "No."
If Tom ia elected by the enemies of the
government weshail get no conrt house,
uo bridge, nn grant of government lands.
It is not probable the government, call
trust any man elected by their enemies.
I say that is a fact, anil I am
l'Al' Mali.ov.
I'lilltlfs anil lln* l.m'r Lois.
Editor Columbian; Sir—I would
like, through tlie columns of your valuable paper, lo say a few words to the
electors of New Westminster in regard
to the iiianne; iu wliich Mr. Thomas
Cunningham is conducting Ins canvass.
I understand Mr. Cunningham poses as
an out and out supporter of tho present
government, nud in fact claims to have
the confidence of the existing government. What grounds he has fur doing
so I leave to tho good sense of the electors, but it ia a well known fact that
Mr. Ham Greer lias come over from Vancouver to electioneer for Mr. Cunningham. Now it is equally woll known that
Mr. Greer is a deadly opponent of the
present government, and more especially
of tho premier, Hon. John Robson, ill
fact has stated that he is going to spend
hia time and nioiiuy to have him defeated
nt the next general election, if posaiblo.
Now, Mr. Cunningham I1113 joined bauds
with Mr. Greer nml has promised (if
elected) to force the government to give
titles to the pnrtics who have purchased
the Greer lots, Now, there is only one
of two things, either Mr. Cunningham is
in direct opposition to the government,
or he is grossly misleading the electors.
If he is in opposition, New Westminster
don't want hiin, as we have hod in tho
past too much opposition; but, on the
other hnnd, if he is misleading the electors and trying to sail on under false colors, he ia not worthy the support of any
right thinking man.
I11theca.se of Greer, no doubt he thinks
lie lias a grievance ugainst the .government, and is acting in good faith, but ns
I understand that the government sonic
three yeara ngo issued to the C. P. R. Co.
a crown grant for the land Mr. Greer
claims, which makes the matter a dead
issue, nnd I think no government after
issuing a crown grant would dare change
the same. Should they ilo ro, every opponent of any government would be at
their mercy.
Now, I think that Mr. Corbould
struck the key note in his able address
when he pledges himself to support au
act wliich will place our government in
the aamo position as other governments
of,our Dominion, that is su us tlicy can he
sued; then if Mr. Greer has auy claim
against the government he can get ro-
dreaB in the courts, and f think parties
holding Greer lots, should they consult
tlieir own interests, will support Mr.
Corbould, and by doing so will place 11
iiiuii in tbo local house that is both able
and willing to see that justice is done his
constituents. Elector.
Now Westminstor, Nov, 11, 1880.
Vancouvor has twu nowepnpErs, so-
called. The local news in thoir column, is obtained frnm their provincial
exchanges, while their editoral matter
tni!*. with rare exceptions, done duty
cl-cwliiiri'. The only tiling that is not
borrowed i» their telegraphic dispatch*
os, and they would nlsn be in keeping
witli the real did the opportunity offer tu
get them witlmut cost. Vancuuver
sadly needs a good, live newspaper,
Those tho city how has are corpses.—
IVeeklg Vii-.uirhtii,
...I'liiiiomi Council.
Council met in the town hall on Saturday, Nov. 2. Present Reeve Kidd, and
Councillors Keid, Garratt, Stewart and
Daniels.
Communications wero read, from Fred.
G. Walker, giving a legal opinion anent
the powers of the municipality with re-
Bpect to public roads, wharves, otc., received and filed; R. Barker, received
and olork instructed to reply; E. A.
Jonns, received and clerk instructed to
reply; D. Robson, city clerk Westmin.
ster council, inviting the council to be
present and assist in receiving the governor-general, on Wednesday, Nov. 6,
received and clerk instructed to acknowledge receipt of invitation; B. W.
Garratt, stating that as a new dyke had
been mado in front of his place he was
ready to hand over the old dyke at $1.60
per rod; received and considered.
The following reports wero received:
From the reevo stating that he had received a letter from the deputy C. M. C.
in regard to the Brunette Sawmill Co,,
which lie had answered, and asking that
the clerk be instructed to notify the
Sawmill Company of the intentions of
tho counoil in regard to the lumber received from them. The report was on
motion adopted antl the clerk instructed
to communicate with the Sawmill Co.
From A. H. Daniels, saying that ho had
let the contract of male ing the first half
mile of road No. 8, to Lee Won, at §2
per rod, and had engaged Spence' and
Wilkins tu deepen the ditch on road No.
7, at,, 1 per red, and recommending that
.100 be paid on their contract; also that
..200 bo paid on Ah Sam's contract. From
D. Reid, stating tliat Kwong Tong
Cheng's contract on road No. (i waa completed antl recommending paymentof the
balance duo on -nino. From W. l'\
Garratt, recommending that §500 be paid
on Ah Leu's contract; also that the approaches to the main bridges had been
lettoGcu. Oliver at $2.25 per foot, and
that lie had seen Mr. Brighotiso, bnt
failed to como to au understanding, From
li. W. Garratt, stating that the contract
for four bridges had been let to D. Waling at S2.;,0 per foot, running measure,
antl that Mr. Vermilyea was ready to
hand over the old dyke at $1.16 per rod,
and iccommonding payment of this
amount; also that the contract for a road
from No. 2 road to Vcrmilyea's slough
had been let to Ah Sam, HO rods at $1.20
per rod; and that the contract for a road
from Vermilyca's barn to Milligan's lower
barn had been let at $1 per rod, antl recommending that $00 be paid All Sam on
the contract across *!. W. Sexsmith's
place. From A. Jl, Daniels and B. W.
Garratt, reporting that thoy had inspected the Sea Island road, sec. 17 nml 20,
and found same unprotected from over-
How, nud rccommendiugadyke to be built;
also submitting nn agreement from F.
W. Stewart to take over and maintain
the dyke after its completion.
It was decided on motion that the
several reports of tho board of works bc
received and adopted and that tho
amounts therein specified bc ordered
paid.
Mr. Kilgour uppeared in person antl
asked permission to drain into road ditch
of road No. 13. On motion it was decided that permission be granted Mr.
Kilgour to open drains as requested.
It waa decided, on motion, that the
old dyko tendered by Mr. Garratt bc
taken over for road purposes and the
sum of $1.00 por roil be paid on the
same.
It was decided, 011 motion, that the
reeve and Coun. Stewart be appointed a
committee to obtain legal advice in respect to wharf privileges at end of roads,
anil if tho advice be found favorable to
have a by-law drafted forthe purchase of
land for wharf sites.
The following bills were received: All
Sam, $!I0; Thos. Spence, $100; Ah Sam,
$200; Kwong Tong Chong, $285; Ah
ben, $500; H. Vermilyea, $.'17.38; Ah
Sam, $50; Ah Sam, $00; Alex. McLeod,
$12; D. Waling, $7.50; H. Tiffin, $5;
Keid ft Currie, $0.25; British Colum-
iiiax, $31.38. A bill was read from Dr.
.McCitigan ami, on motiou, laid over for
further consideration. On motion it was
decided that the remaining bills be paid.
The following notice of motion was
given by Coun. Daniels: That he would
introduce a bylaw at next regular meeting in order to designate the roada by
numbers.
Council adjourned to meot first Saturday in December.
COMMENDABLE.
All claims not consistent with the high
character of Syrup of Figs arc purposely
avoided by the Cal. Fig Syrup Company.
It acts gently on the kidneyi, liver and
bowels, cleansing the system effectually,
but it ia not a euro-all and makes no
pretensions that every bottle will not
substantiate.
C. C. Richards i_ Co.
Gents,—My daughter had a severe cold
and injured lier Rpine so sic could not
walk, nnd suffered very much. I called
in uur family physician; he pronounced
it Inflammation of the spin** and recommended MINARD'S LINIAIKNT to bo
used freely. 3 bottles oured her. I have
used your' MINARD'S LINIMENT for
a broken breast; it reduced tho inflammation and cured mc in 10 days. I
would recommend it to all ladies who
arc sitlloi-ing from the siime severe
trouble. Mns. F. SiI.VEU.
Hnutsport.
NO. 40.
w
Rl| W
Wholesale cay Market.
Reel,' ht ltd lbs. llvo weight. I nil & I 30
Pork             "        1 Oil 13 7 60
Mutton           "          8 110 a 0 00
Potntoesaiew"             73 (1, I 00
Cabbage        "              50® 100
Onions          "           100 & 1 50
Wlienl,           "          130 a 0 00
Oats               "           100.. 125
Peas               "           I -5 (0! I 60
Hay,        por ton    10 MHOO
Butter (roils) per th      'lolit 30
Cheese,             "           H _", 15
Bugs,       pei'tltia.      :_i@ 40
CurilwootlirctJilllperoui-d   3 511 _*. 4 00
Apples, per box      80® 100
Hlt.es.gr'iiliier 100 lbs    4_0r_l II Oil
"    (dry)        "            6 Slug DOO
Wool, per lb       (!_. 11
biiiiii"~
l.usn—In Mils city, on November 5th,
Kt'-lla Louise, oiliest tlnii_;lit,cr nf / . O.
Lund, aged 5years and 5 months.
Whon Baby waa sick, ve fitvo hor Cnutorla,
Wliea ahe was a Child, ahe cried tor Caotorit,
Whon she bot-amo Misa, alio clung to Caatoria,
Whan aht had Children, aho gavs thom Caatoria
Job printing of all kinda neatly done
at the Colum-Uak offico. Prices will ho
found aa low aa at anv other olllco in
the province.-—Ad-,
T. II. ATKIKSOM,
BAK.MSTKB, SOLICITOR, Ac. Offlces--
Masoultl I'.ulMtiig, Sow Westminster,
ll. C. dwic
Alt,11 •.Till!At. Ss,  KOiiSTISIW,
ARRIS'i'ERS,   SOLICITORS,   ETC. -
Masonic liulldiiig,   New   Wwitlniti-
ster, R. O. dwmylte
B
r.tn.un».--., iii-i-i.,i. .1 .si'.vxs,
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, etc.  Oillces—Mnsonlo Buildings, Mew Westmlnater, and Vancouver, 11. 0.        dwtc
A. C. BKYIIONB-JACK, M.A.,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR, NOTARY
Publle, Ac. Olllcc In tho Humley
l.iiilrlhi_., Colnmbla St., opposito tlie Colonial Hotol. dwati_to
.rOSKl'Il K. <;a V.t'OIl, II.A.,I,I..R.
/".OLD MEDALIST o( Iho Unlverslt, ol
\J Dublin. BARRISTER-AT LAW of
lhc Iilgli Court, of Justice, Ireland. Oillces,
Cornor MoKenzIo *- Clarkson Sts., Kew
Wostmlnster. dwfe2Itc
O. W. UK A NT.
ARCHITECT.   Olllnc-C'or'iior Mary and
Olarkson Sts., Westminster,    tlwto
..l.BKRT J.   IIII.1.
(M.CAN.Soo.C.E.),
OIVILEN-.1INEER.LANDSURVEYOR
nnd   DRAUGHTSMAN.      Hamley
block, New Westminster.    dv.au2i.to
POR  SALE.
rpWOOaTIIUKHiNFAV MILCH COWS.
X   Apply on tlu. promises.
WILLIAM   ARTHUR,
Ladner's Landing.
Nov. (i, ISSn. wnol.tml
_RE'J_-v£0"V\iO:_..
HERBERT G. ROSS,
HAS. HKMOVKH HTK OFFICE KROM
the Humley Bloclt to next .inor...
Johnston's Boot Stun.' nnd Is prepared to
handle iill kinda of Goods and Produco on
commission, d.vnofinil
MERO
WESTMINSTER STREET,
CENTREVILLE,   B. C.
Dealer ln Cutlery, Earthenware,
Bonks, -Stationery nnd Medicines.
Land Agent, Conveyancer, and
Xotary Public.
Agent for "The Columbian."
Post Otllce Address, Chilllwhack.
 v*Je20tc
By-Law No. 34.
WHEREAS IT HAH BECOMT*. NI'.C-
css-iiry to establish a grade on Wellington street, in the villusic of OentrevUlo,
slt-iute In the municipality of Chilliwack;
Therefore ho it enacted hy the Reeve
and Council of tho municipality of Chll 11-
whaekas follows:
That WolHngton street grade Khali he
forty-seven [17] feet wide, centro of grade
to ho thirtv-three [fffl] feet from outside
street Hue, and to he une [I] foot lower at
the outside of ijnulo than in the centre.
The sidewalks shall -.be eight [Kl feet
wido, aud eighteen |is] inches above tho
lowest partof the grade, and to hcclglit-
teon [18] inohes space between tho sidewalk and grade.
That any person nr persons having a
verandah, -.food or othor obstruction on
said street be given ten [10] days' notice to
havo tho same removed, when it has become necessary to grade said street, said
notico to be served by the Clerk when instructed to do so by the Municipal Couucil.
This By-law mav ho died for nil purposes as tlie "Wellington Street Grado By-
Law."
Read a third time and passed by (lie
Municipal Council of Ohilliwhack tills
HthdavofScptenibei, A.D, 1881),
Reconsidered, ii ually passed, signed and
the senl of lhe Corporation appended
thereto this 7Lh dayof October, A.D. 188!).
or-*—* J, REECE, Cbnrlman.
\ Seal >   S. A. CAWi.KY.C. M. 0,
 -■■■ _   WlloMI-lt	
THAT TERRIBLE PARESIS.
Are lhc Canadian People n_-t--i.i_.tng
a Nation of Lunatics!—Tlie frightful lncreaie of thli. most peculiar
li_.--_i.alty and how It Is cured.
Am
T1IR MAIN (jmn a photo<*raf>It,)
Iltalthy Condition, With Paresis Latent
Thero are ninny well known men confined in our Asylums who but n shorl timo
ago wore prominent unions our business
and social circles.
Why arc they there?
Paresis I
Did it eome on at once'.'
Not at all. It wns a gradual but posltlvo
growth. ThcyoverlHXcdna! ure. The drain
on their vitality, tholr nerve powers,
their brain tissuo, was too great, and thoy
gradually but surely sank under it, Tho
things they did to bring tliissad ond about
aro precisely the same things being
done by thousands of inon and women
to-day. It Is not necessary to name them.
They'all end disastrously unless chocked
or regulated.
Prof, Pholps, of Dartmouth College,
knew this fully whon lie bogan his experiments which resulted iu tho discovery
of tho wondorful Palne's Celery Compound. He realized that Paresis (consumption of tho brain) was our groat
National weakness. Ho knew that tho
brain and nervous systom must ho fortified ioinoot the great strains whicli modern
life bring upon It. Ho saw that mou wore
hccomliigdebilltated and womon weak-
ed bv the pressure and demands of lifo,
and he sought and discovered thn romody.
Palno's Celery Compound, If rightly
taken, will rouow tho brain and build up
nervo tissues as fast as they become ox*
hausted, Itls not a narcotic, lt contains
no drugs, no nostrums. It Is perfectly
puro. It is absolutely liarmlosH. Tho
high oharactor of Its discoverer guarantees tills, and the indorsement of tho
medical nnd chemical professions
provo It.
iftt__uy;_.y_ yjyj
Mm Worki So,
( r.II_CIT_SD )
Engineers, Boiler Makers, and Iron and Brass Founders
HAMNU   GREATLY  INCRl-AS.--.   THEIK fUEMISES  AND MAI'HIN-
, „Fh ttro ln a P°sitio-- to undertake the construction and repairs of Ilurinn
and Stationary Engines and Boilers, Milling, Mining and Caimwy
Maclilnery. as well as Castings and Forgings of every description y
JBstintiitcs given s all work guaranteed.
F. BAKER, A. McKELVIE,
 Skckktahy.         dwjllTtc Mkohanioal Mamobb.
GRANT & MACLURE.
Rubbers.
ORDERS BY MAIL PROMPTLY FILLED,
dwtc
I fl. STHCIIASB k Ci.
IlJiiliflipiiir_Jlcl.li
We have thi-: Largest and Finest Stock of
GARRIAOES, PHAETONS, HANDY MARKET & CHURCH WAGONS
lfl THE MARKET. ALL OUR RICS ARE FULLY GUARANTEED.
Repairs of ali hinds neatly and promptly done.
F. C, STR.CJCLAP.D & CO.
Webster's Building, Westminster, B. C.
GENERAL '& SHELF HARDWARE,
in all colors; Liquid 1'aitttS in all shades") Floor Paints ready to use; (irinct
Stones; Wall Paper in all designs) Brooms •& Brushes' for all purposes;
..lubricating Oils; Traps of all descriptions, anil a gonorai assortment ol
Agricultural Implements,
tST Special attention given to ordors by mail.
T. J. ,_r_H^___."JP_P SZ CO.,
dwjly3to Columbia SntEiiT, New Wkstminstub,
ENGLISH KB OPTS
-jkrE?-
Mine's Boot & Shoe Emporium.
The Waterproof "IC"; tiic Country "It"- tlm City "K"; also Ladies' Buttoned and
Laced, and Boys' anil Youths "K" Boots.
Write to-day fora pair.  Goods cxpre.°scd C. O. D.
.__&.. _B. EESKINE,
10_ Govornment SI., .01. Johnson, VICTORIA, it, C.
THIS SI'ACE BELONGS '10
H. T. READ & GO.
HARDWARE MERCHANT*.
MAJOR  tt  PEARSON,
REAL ESTATE BROKERS,
financial and Insurance Agents.
i'ropcrty _.u» anu   .1 .<\ p-tUG. -     ...... iaa .-...»;..        ,,,........ luwc luted somo
of tho finest farming land ia the Provinue. MON I..Y TO LOAN. HOUSKS TO
RENT. Agonts for the ConfodoVatfoii '-if" Association of Toronto, tlio London
Guarantee and Accident Co., Limited. General Audita tor British Columbia for
tho American Steam Boiler Insuranco Co, of New York, tho lloyal and Atlas Flro
Assurance Companies of England, Union Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of San
Francisco, Month British Firo and Marino Insurance Co, of Now Zealand;
 OFFICES	
NKW Wl-STMINSTEU-Columbia Streot, Bank of II. C. Blook.
VANCOUVEll—Hastings Stroet, opposito tho Post Olllco,
dwsolOtc
■B_aMn^_MM^_^W«___aM__H._«M.^.M.^__«_w_fl___M__^__*^_B«_-B«-.^^HaMa^_MM_MNHB
COMMERCIAL PRINTING.
The Columbian Puintinci Establishment has first-class facilities for
all kinds of Commercial Printing. Bill Heads. Letter Heads, Circulars,
Cards, Envelopes, Blank Forms of every description, Posters, Dodgers,
Prioe Lists, &c. Prices will bo found as low as at any other officii where.
first-class worlc is done. tVBKKI.Y BRITISH COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
NO. 40.
POOR  MERCIER
Allows His Tongue to Wag Rather
Freely at Baltimore and Gets
into Trouble.
Oliver Johnson, One of tho First
American Anti-Slavery Agitators, is Dying.
A Doctor of Divinity in California  Murders   His   Wife
and Child.
MU.  MEI-CIE1- ABHOAD.
Quebec, Nov. 12.—Premier Mer-
ciei-'B statements al Baltimore that
Oanadian Catholics desire to be independent of England is denied by
Judge Foui'uier, nx-judgo of the supreme cuurt uf Ouiiudu; Turto, the
editor of Le C'aiiadien-, F. C. Cosgrnin,
and mnny other leading citizens of
Montreal. The Mercier interview in
Baltimore is discredited generally, or
denied indignantly.
prize winkt.us.
New Okleans, Nov. 12. -No. 03
wins tho capital prize in to-diiy's drawing uf the Louisiana state lottery.
Second prize, 58,441; third, 7,752;
fourth, 2,492; fifth, 33,fi_2; sixth, 95,-
271; seventh, 73,444- eighth, 1,097.
ONE OP THE NOBLE TWELVE.
New Yoek, Nov. 12.—Oliver Johnson, a prominent figure in the old
abolition patty, organized in 1830, and
who played an important part in accomplishing tho emancipation of the
southern slaves, is ill beyond hope of
recovery at Brooklyn. Jphtistju.ia Hie
last of tho twelve agittt.rs who organized tlio first anti-slavery sooiety in
1832
HOuniULE MIHUIEll.
Stockton, Cal. Nov. 12.—The little
town of Loolteford, about 17 miles
noith east of Stockton, in this county,
wa3 startled early thia morning by the
report that a horrible niurder had been
committed at the residence of Rev. Dr.
Boss, about 2 miles from thero. The
authorities were soon on the spot, uutl
brenkini-. in the door they discovered
tho botiies of the wife and chiid in one
room, having been cruelly murdered
by Ihu father und lmsband who lay
dead iu another room, shot through
tho head. Nothing can be learned as
yet as to the cause of tho minder and
suicide, as tho scene of tragedy is remote from telegraph communication.
Ross has relations in San Jose, Cal.,
wlio have been notified. Tho coroner
holds un inquest tliis afternoon.
ANOTHER DIS.UlitEEJIEXT.
San Fhancisco, Nov, 12.— The third
trial of Mrs, Louisa Hngenow, cliarged
witli murdering Annie Dorregs, sixteen
years of age, by malpractice ended this
morning in a disagreement. The jury
stood 9 for acquittal and 3 for convictions.
A OREAT PAVOllITE.
Chicago, Nov. 11.—Miss Frances
E. Willard wns re-elected presidont of
the Woman's Christian Temperance
Union by a practically unanimous vote.
LOST AT SEA.
New York, Nov. 11.—Cnpt. Brooks,
of the Guion steamship Arizona, which
arrived to-day, report! having seen on
tho 5th inst. the steamor Qucoiismore,
whioh afterwards foundered and sunk
at Three Castle Head last week. The
Queensniore was bound from Baltimore
to Liverpool, and when the Arizona
Baw her was flying signals of distress.
The captain said tho ship was on fire,
and asked tho Arizona lo tow liim to
some eastern port. Capt. Brooks refused to do this and was then asked to
Btand by the burning vessel. Ho did
so, remaining over an hour, whon the
captain of tho Queensmore said he was
all right and both vessels parted company.    _____________
vTctobiOews.
The Bush-McLean lince—Opium Sum*..
Biers Act!vc-.-A Government Steam,
er Sank In (he Harbor.
FUKEKAL SEI-UON
the direction which is  emphasized to
I us   in   thiB  Becond lesson for to-day.
Special to The Columiiian.
Victouia, Nov. 11.—Alex. McLean,
of Westminster, and Charles Bush,
will row a single scull race next Saturday on Viotoria harbor. Considerable
money has boen wagered with McLean
as favorite.
The opium ring is very active and
largo quantities of opium are being,
smuggled over to tho other side. It ia
Baid that a firm in Pott Townsend,
worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, is heavily interested in the illegal
business.
The government tugboat Princess
wus sunk at thu custom house wharf
yestorday morning. Tho captain, who
was asleep aboard, baroly escaped with
his life. It is thought that one of the
valves was left open by mistake, causing the steamer to fill.
Itolili.r I'aiiKlit
■ailing
The Liiiluer lamllng
ai-iiiiijj ti*.** .'„„■,•. •
SKlinnnpr -IrtT.f.1**
Victoria, Nov. 12.—A
hiius '" ___u.hni.ICa
this city last night on suspicion of having stolen property in his possession.
He was attempting to sell lino Canadian clothing at a very cheap rate. Ho
was offering five pairs of eight-dollar
pants for $10. It is bolieved that ho
wns iinpliontod in the robbery of Gus
Hanck's store at Ladner's Landing,
and that these are some of the goods.
The pants have Montreal buttons on
them, which leads to tho conclusion
that they are Canadian goods.
Messra. Hall, Goopel Ss Co., of this
oity, have purchased a fine schooner nt
Lunenburg, N. S. Slio is named tlio
Oconn Belle, and will bo used in the
sealing business.
Workmen aro busy to-day raising
the sunken govornmont steamer Princess.
Tho court of inquiry into tho causo
of the Amphion disaster will he commenced on Thursday.
K'rcaclieti L_ (lie '.,:......-.*; ___-e_i.lea-i.il
Woods on the late Knlil. Vlcltln.nu.
At Holy Trinity Church, yesterday
murning, the Venerable Archdeacon
Woods preached the funeral sermon of
tho lato Robert Dickinson to a large
una deeply affected congregation. The
text was taken from Hebrews 4thohap.,
9th verse: "There remaineth therefore a rest." Tho Venerable Archdeacon said: In the closing wordB of
chapter HI., it is Bhuwn that entraiico
into the rest of God stands over, remaineth, for the Christian, Our seoond lesson for this morning shows in
what scii3o we Christians enter into
His rest—tho rost of God. Tho warning drawn from the 95th psalm against
hardening the heart is repeated—lest
a promise beingleftof entering into His
rest any should come short uf it. The
refit of God ia explained tu us—the
rest of tho place where He dwells. His
rest: because it is which He enjoys,that
which Hu alone can confer. Tho promise ia that thero is to us admittance*
to the enjoyment nf peaco and rest
whero God dwells. But there ia added
very emphatic oxbortatiun to diligence
ill striving after it; let u-* labor, lot us
earnestly strive. There is a rost, tlie
attainment of which is tvorili all effort.
Many hnvo failed nf reaching it because
of their unbelief—that evil heart of unbelief ngninst which warning is given in
Hebrews III chap ,12th verse—t-o there
is danger that wc mny fail, and failure
must be irremediably a_-ful. Let an
labor, therefore, to enter into thnt
rest.
Rest:. Has it not been, is it not the
aim and hopo and longing of the human
heart from the hour when the Hist
lullaby soothed to sleep tlio all but unconscious babe on its mother's brenst,
to tho hour when wearied by the labors
and conflicts and ceaseless round of
toil which has worn ont liis lifo, iho
man full of yoars longs to lav down the
burden. The child looks on to the
iluy when as a youth he shall be freed
from childliood's euros nnd restraints,
and so find what he fondly hopes wili
prove rest—only to find that yeais
bring with them tasks uf greater difficulty, and work morn wearying, and
that he has not yet found rest. But
whon youth has merged into tho freedom of manhood, thon suroiy will
como . rest! But manhood has
its yoko—God forbid that it
bo the yoke of indulged sin—by nu
menus easy, and its burdens far from
light; but when manliood shall have
reaped tho rewards of aucenss, thrnugh
labor of whatever kind, of hands or
brain, or heart, then cornea rest? No!
rest is not yet reached, for tlio very
success which promised rost—mid what
shall bc said of failure— has but multi
plied labor, made tho yoke less easy
and the light burdous heavy. But by
and by'us age creeps on, whon labor
and caves, when work and affairs, of
necessity, cea3e to occupy man; at last,
will cumo rest. Why, then, arc the
evil days, when moil shall say I have
no pleasure in theni,whon tho keepers
of tho house shall tremble, aud tlio
strong mon shall bow themselves; when
fears shall bo in tlio way, when tho
grasshopper shall he a burden and desire fail. No! thero is no rest this
side the grave but to those who road
into tho text, the concluding words,
"There rumaineth, therefore, a rest;"
but to whom?   To tho people of Gotl.
To tho people of Gud all time, nil
labor, ovory burden, every yoko is
rest, elso were Crist's own words without meaning: "Come unto Mo nil ye
that labor and are heavy laden antl I
will givo you rest." Ho gives us burdous, but He gives no strength to benr;
He fits tho load to the strength nud
tho strength to tho load, and gives
more power as he adds more weight.
Tlioso who cheerfully bear tho burden
Ho lays upon them aro brought nenr
to Him, and learning tu know H*m
better, lovo Him more. They learn to
look upon the burdens He lays upon
them as pledges that He is training
thom for a servico of perfect freedom,
of perfect joy and of porfect rest. On
tho other hand, bear the burden languidly, complaiiiingly, murmur at having to bear it, nnd it will weigh you
down.
Yuu know bow frequently from this
place 1 have urged the wisdom ut accenting the lessons of eaoh day as the
Word's leuching iu His own school.
One lutH been gathered tu rest; one
whom we all knew and all esteemed.
The better he was known the more ho
was loved. 1 shrink from saying much,
lest personal esteem und affection—
extending over many years—tempt me
into exaggerated expression. Will it
not be enough in this church, and in
this congregation, where, and amongst
whom, he has worshipped for bo long,
to remind you uf the honorable and
straightforward man of business—of
tho citizen always ready to advance the
welfare and true interests of your city,
at whatever cost uf labor to himself,
oven when ihoso most intimate with
him knuw how much he Btood in need
of rost—of the politician who sought no
bye ends, but acted always straight and
clear nconrding tu his convictions, ever
ready to give time aud thought and
honest work when called on. To those
who knew him best I need not, indeed, I could nut, spoak fully of his
generous, ungrudging, unstinted, ever
ready help tu all in need. I do not
think lie know it himself, for in such
help he only counted tho neod, nover
tho help, [lis loved ones, his own,
must always hold iu dearest memory
the devoted husband, lho affectionate
fathor, the true slid trusted friend. If
in a few words I tried to express the
unanimous judgment of all who knew
hiin, I'think 1 might say lhat Robert
Dickinson was, iu nil tho relations of
lift--, (te best local man in New West-
minster.
"Mueh must lie bomo whicli Is hard lo
bein-,
Mac!, given away wiilcli itwere sweet to
keep,
Gotl help us all who need indeed His care,
Ami yet wo know The Shepherd loves Ills
shoep,"
Pur myself 1 wuuld liko to say that
at ti time when I wns nut a little east
down, troubled by many conflicting
anxieties, it was a bright gleam of sunshine t' sec him kneel at the Lord's
table on list Easter day, and how his
his presence at St. Mary's, Sapperton,
cheered mc in my new work when he
received from mo what, proved, I believo, liis last communion. May we not,
hope that thu "Comfortable Words"
oame home n, him in power: "Come
unto me all ye lhat travail and are
heavy laden and I will refresh you, 1
will give you i-cst." His death was
unexpected, but uut on tliat account
sudden in the sense of not finding him
ready.
To all oach day uf lifo loads on to
the day of death. How and when
each is iu go hence none but God can
tell. Man is suro of uno thing—that
some time, some day he bhall die, and
ilio world with all its sorrows, all its
joys, nil its labors, all its cares, all its
successes, all its failures, shall be left
behind. I libera must dio, but is death
appoiuted unto mc / Shall the sounds
of earth grow faint, while strange
voices reach me frum another world?
Shall the spirit leavo tho body—help-
less, still, dead? Shall frionds think of
mo ns gone, and my place know me
no more forever? Yes! An end is
coming tu mi/ life here, but not an end
of mo—not an end of what I shall do.
I shall go ou Jiving and acting ill a new
stato which shall nut end.
Oh, lot each and all strive to die to
sin, td nio in heart to all that harms the
soul. Let Ohrist be our life nuw, and in
the hourof death weshall fear no evil, for
Ho shall be with us and in, us. Tho lesson of the day is: "There remaineth a
rest to the people of God " The lesson of tlie past week, and of every
week and of ovcry day and hour is:
"Let ns four lest a promise being left
us of entering into His rest, any of you
should seem to come short of it," nnd
again, "Let us labor to enter into that
rest"
Almighty and Eternal God, teach
mc to ln-e as one who must die; kill in
me all that would kill my soul. May
Iny life ou earth prepare me for life
with Theo; my work on earth for the
rest that remaineth to the people of
God.
CITY COUNCIL.
The Aiiinhltiii Accident.
There Ib a joy In sorrows home
"Whero the Saviour trod,
When tlio path of pain is worn
By the feet of God.
Thero Is a rest when hour by hour
As tlio will oheyB
Gomes dlvinu almighty powor
Fulling strength to raise.
Let those who have burdens to bear—
and who is free?—pray for more faith,
more love, more hearty will to submit
to His will, more entire readiness lo
say, "not my will but Thine!" and He
will givo you rest—rest here in this
life, rest when weighed down with
work and care and weariness, rest when
triod sore with heaviest grief and deepest Borrow; rest tu the heart when evon
tears bring no relief nnd sloop no for-
gotfulness; rost whon \i hat seems a
dark impenetrable cloud seems to have
risen botween you and ull that waB
bright in tho world. Rest and liglit,
Tt.__t,   whon hntw*   _i.*>unt' dear! because
i"-          I1' ','• ■-   lib. has **•"<. I
yuu i ■* uiessagt ■ mud ft" bu ,. n
i.i* ••!- to hoar: "1 'akf away frum th-
tno uu..iiu ui tiuue eyes with a stroke,'
Rost and light nnd ponce; rest here in
this life, and in the life beyond. Who
can find words to oxpress tho rest, the
peace, the victory, the glory.
Crowns for the valiant, to woury one vest,
Clod shall bo All and In all over blest.
St. Paul spoaltB in calm, sober words
of suro confidence whon ho snys, "to
die is gain." Gain I to exchange tho
wearying strain of work for the
reward of work woll dono — tho
watch and fight with sin—forthe poaco
and rost of righteousness—whilo ho
looks forward to thu resurrection un tlio
timo of coronation, "Heno.for.h
thoro is laid up for me a crown uf
righteousness, which lho Lord, Unrighteous .Judge, shall givo nio at thnt
dny."
It can hardly bo but tliat the
thoughts of many huvo takon throughout tho week that is past something of
The Times has received the following letter concerning the accident from
Mr. Frederick Villiers, the noted wnr
correspondent: "On reading the account of the accident to 11. M. S. Amphion published Thursday morning in
the Colonist, as I was an eye-witness of
the accident I was much surprised to
road "that confusion reigned" even for
a moment "among tho distinguished
passengers." 1 have had the misfortune to be iu other situations of the
samo kind, but never have 1 experienced such perfect coolness exhibited
by pnasengors distinguished, or otherwise, as duriugyesterday's disaster. Tho
behavior uf tlio ladies of tho vico-regal
party, whu exhibited the greatest calmness from the first moment of the accident and throughout the trying period when tlio waters wore slowly but
surely gaining upon us, was simply
the admiration and talk of all on board.
The Ctoiomta- roporter must hnvo been
!',' ! '.,-..., _. on that scuro, or more
'■'.' !j iiilio'.uoad into it a littlo'local color.' Ho wns also wrong regarding ihe oile f ho accident. This can
bo excused, for no doubt it was diffi
cull when ho visited the ship to get
accurate information. When a rift
through the fog showed us our danger
ti moment before wo struck, I noticed
wo woro running close in shore parallel
to a precipitous height, whicli wns afterwards found to bo tho Keolet bluff.
Evidently the strung current at this
point drovo the vessel from tho truo
course, which tho density of tho fog
obscured. She scorned to have ripped
hor starboard side along the bluff. Oil
looking back ovor the anxious period
Unit followed, ouo thing seems to hnvo
brightened tliu dreary timo and evon
to make tho fog less dismal, and that
was—the splendid discipline exhibited,
tlm coolness of the captain aud oflicers,
antl the steadiness of tho men of H. M.
S, Aniphion."
Children Cryfor
The council met Monday night at 8
o'clock for the transaction of business.
Present — Aldermen Shiles, Reid,
Keary, Calbick, Curtis.
His worship Mayor Townsond in the
chair.
COMMUNICATIONS.
From Hon. John Robson, stating
the governmont could not interfere in
the case of MrB. Brooks, of Cariboo.
Received and filed.
From G. W. Brewster, applying for
a position on the police force. Received and referred to the polico committee.
From the chief of police in regard
to a poor woman named Campbell,
and stating that her husband being nn
inmate of the insane asylum, she needed sume assistance. The chief of police was authorized to go around and
solicit subscriptions for Mrs. Campbell's benefit.
From E. A Jenns, asking correct
street linos fur suburban lots 14 and
15, block 4. Received antl referred to
the board of works with power to act.
From 1). C. Webber, clork of Maplo
Ridge council, l'l Abbott, T. McGui-
gan, of Vancouver, II. Vermilyea,
clerk uf the Nntth Arm council, and
P. Bn it'll, itckiinwIetUing with thanks
the receipt ul llie council's invitation
to be present tit the official reception
nf the governor-general, Received
and filed.
REPORTS.
Aid. Slides reportod verbally fm- the
health cuinuiittee that lhe infirm man
named Simuiison bail been examined
medically anil committed tu tlio Insane
asylum.
Aid. Calbick roported that the board
ul works' report was nut ready.
Adopted.
Aid. Keary asked if anything had
been dono about tho drain at Mr.
Freeze's place at the ond uf Agnes
street.
Aid. Calbick said the drain ought to
have been Iinislied, but the men had
pi'idiably been busy elsewhere.
Aid. Curtis wanted to know what
the board of works' force was doing.
His worship explained tlmt un account uf tho bad weather thoy had
been unable to du anything. Arrangements hnvo been made fur systematic
wurk by the gang.
The firo and light, Committee reported in regard tu the plans uf thu new
firo hall, that they had been duly altered aooording to the wishes ol the
council.   Adopted.
ACCOUNTS.
Gas company fur street lighting and
city hall, S20i.50; Jus. Cunningham,
88.87.
UNFINISHED   BUSINESS.
The street naming and numbering
by-law, in the abscuse of tho chairman,
was laid over.
Thu Park loan by-law was brought
forward, but unaccompanied by the
plans. All the councillors presont
were very anxiouB to proceed with the
by-law, but owing to the absence of
the chairman it wns laid uver.
Aid. Keary proposed that a meeting
be called for Thursday night. This
proposal was dealt with later.
The civio election by-law was read
a lirat time, and, tlio rules of order
having been suspended, it received its
Becond rending. The council then went
into committee of the whole on tho bylaw, Aid. Shiles in the chair. The bylaw was read by clauses.
Tho propusal from Aid. Keary that
the polling place for the Fourth Ward
be in the surgery of tho Royal Columbian Hospital, waB adopted.
Aid. Curtis said it was a mighty
suggestive pluce for the next council to
be elected in.
Aid. Curtis enquired if a by law
similar to this ouo could not be drawn
up fcr the water works commissioners'
election?
Tlio clerk said the original by-law
could uut be altered.
The committee roBe and repotted
the bylaw complete with amendments.
The by-law was, on motion, read a
third time, and ordered signed, sealed
and published according to the usual
form.
Thero was some discussion on the
water works question, principally with
reference to tho late heavy advance in
the prioe of iron.
NOTICES OP MOTION.
Moved by Aid. Calbick, seconded
by Aid. Reid: That the finance committee be authorized to arrange at the
Bank of Montreal for an overdraft
sufficient to moot current expenses in
connection with the city water works,
and to deposit the water works' debentures ns collateral security tor such
overdraft until said debentures are
sold.   Carried.
Aid. Keary Baid the finance committee ought to receivo somo intimation of
such things. This was the second time
ho hud been so treated; he had never
hoard of it before.
Aid. Curtis said that if it wore possible tho council ought to try and got
the water commissioners by-law into
shape on the spot.
His ivurship said that if they could
do anything with it at all they should
go ahead with it at once.
The olcrlt repotted that ho had received no information on tho subject,
so the mattor shared tho common sad
fato of the other by-laws, and waa laid
over once more.
Aid. Curtis gavo notico that at tho
noxt meeting of tho council ho would
introduco a by-law to fix the number
of aldermen to be eleotod for 1890.
Also a by-law fixing tho salary of tho
mayor for the year 1890.
Also a by-law for the olection of
wator commissioners and for fixing the
salary of tho same.
Tho council adjourned to meet again
Thursday evening.
D. S. CURTIS * CO.
AGENTS B. LAURANCE'S SPECTACLES.
Wholesale and Eetail Druggists
NEXT COLONIAL HOTEL. NEW WESTMINSTER. Ji. C.
Hold Your Orders
 -A.3ST-D	
Save  Money!
As wo have a Car-load of the Celebrated
Adams & Son's Lumber Wagons,
Which will bc hero in about 10 Days.
Wo will also receive a number of Delivery Wagons by the name car.
tVlainland Carriage Works.
doolto SStt __________ ______ "x- &.  !_0_Et"3rso_Er.
____B__»__1_U____-*-fl*Bl
1UGGIES!
JUST RECEIVED,
A CAIK-LOAO Off-
Pell, Rice Coil-sprin
.iss mj ®_5- -sss- jt ■©___
DUPLEX, HANDY, BRADLEY _. OTHER
Sxpress
ggT The Best and Cheapest Rigs ever offered for sale in
British Columbia.-"!!
ilwaplitr
Ir-Loici efts Ourrie.
W. & G. Wolfenden,
Cor. Columbia and Mary Sts., New Westminster.
The above named firm having fully decided to retire from the
Dry Goods Business and confine their attention to the Grocery
Business for the future, now offer the whole of their
Choice, New, Well Selected and Well Bought Stock of Dry
Goods and Clothing at
Cost Prices for Cash.
A rare chanco is now offered to intending purchasers, as the stock consists ol
goods just suited for the present and confine season. All fresh and iu prime order
and purchased In tho bost foroign markets at rock    ttom prices.
Sale to commence on Monday, the 16th instant, and to continue until the whole
of the stook has been olosed out. REMEMBER THE PLACE: Corner of Columbia and Mary Streets.
W.&G. WOLFENDEN.
A homing pigeon, only nine months
old, lately sold to Nuw York pnrties,
has returned to Toronto from Bridgeport, Conn. This is ono of tho longest
fliglit. on record for so young a bird.
Pitcher's Castoria.
ROYAL CITY
Planing Ills Company, Ld.
RICHARD STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
MANUFACTPRERS AND DEALERS IN
Shingles, Shakes, Laths, Pickets,
SALMON BOXES, NET FLOATS, TRAYS.
•AJSTD ALL KX1TDS OS"
Wood Furnishing for Canneries.
Doors,   Frames,   Windows.
Rloold-usrs. Balusters,
Blinds. Brackets,
-Sailings, Newels.
PLAIN AND FANCY ANO ALL KINDS OIF TURNED WORK.
nolOdwly VOLUME 54.
WEEKLY BRITISH COLUMBIAN, SEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER'13, 188..
iHrgriV-|.'-JM_.:.J.,
ttaaa___a__iiaBa«ai-n
NO. 46.
Weekly .-iritism Columbian i
Wednesday Morning. Kor. IS, 1889.
tfrmi- Daily Columbian, Nov. fi.)
The membors of Liberati's band in
tlieir gay uniforms enlivened the streets
this afternoon
The Y. M. C. A. gymnastic class
met in tho drill shed to train for the
commit: exhibition.
The str. Duuamuir left for Nanaimo
this morning with a full load of freight
and a large number of passengers.
The fog last uight was tlio heaviest
seen in some timo. The moon was
almost totally obscured by the mint.
The str. Fairy Queon will in futuro
make its headquarters at Mathers &
Milligan's whnrf, instead of Austin's.
Tho string band practice last night
at tho Y. M. C. A. rooms gavo every
indication of tlie increasing capabilities of the band.
It liiva been definitely arranged that
the Caledonian and St. Andrew's Society annual dinnor will take place on
Friday evening Nov. 21).
The exact number of salmon ova
placed in tlio hatchery amounts to
9,200,000, considerably more than was
at first intended to lay in.
Tho common drunk arrested last
night was released thia afternoon on
$5. hail. Ho had imbibed so much uf
the poteen that he was not quite sober
when let out.
H. Mathers, Esq., .1. P., returned
yesterday from a trip to the old country. Mr. Mathers enjoyed his visit, but
joins tlie chorus of returning British
Columbians, "no place like home."
The man, Clutpelle, who was thrown
off tbo wagon during the runaway yesterday, had one of tho small bones of
the leu broken, lie is under the care
of Dr. Walker. The wound is painful,
but not serious.
Game was very plentiful on the
market to-day, but Thanksgiving dinners had to bo provided for and consequently tlio supply wns nearly exhausted by evening. Some exceedingly tine venison was displayed by
W. H. Vianen tliis morning.
A 'nan wns found lying paralyzed
with strong drink, in the streets last
night. He was taken to the police
station and money to the amount of
.,1207.35 was found in his pockets.
The man was too drunk to appear beforo the magistrates this morning.
Tho present glorious weather will
serve better to impress our distinguished visitors with tiio natural advantages
<l£ this province than any amount of
verbal assurance. It is queens' weather, nnd her majesty's representative
must have brought it along with him.
British Columbia always gets protty
closo to the front. Samuel J. Worth,
of this city, who is attending the Pic-
ton, N. S., academy, lias won second
place in first year, class D. John T.
Blaikie, a brother of J. M. Biaikie,
oue <>f onr woll known citizens, took
first place.
British Columbia is noted for its luxuriant growth of ferns, buta specimen
of this plant was found near Burnaby
Le.ke a few days ago that overtops anything we have yet heard nf. The fern
measured 19i feet in height, had
branches between four and live feet
lone and the stalk near the ground waB
over an inch thick. Close to where
this mammoth was found were many
more ferns averaging from 14 to 10 foet
in height. Mr. Robson win the discoverer of these wonderful specimens
of fern growth.
E'cnr Tree. In Blossom.
Strawberries, raspberries and other
aniall fruits, ripening in the open air
in the month of November in Westminster is not bad and speaks well for
the climate, but whou tho pear trees
after yielding a most prolific crop,
burst out again in full blossom it is
time tti draw the lino und call a halt
on perpetual summer. A. C. Morrison, of Sapperton suburb, has a fow
pear trees out in spring garb and The
Columbian lins been made tho recipient of a handsome bouquet of the blossoms. It is hardly possible tho fruit
will mature before the cold weather
comes.
Tbe Gililcs of lhc Bar.
The leoture Inst night nt tho Y. M.
C. A. rooms by Mr. A. C. Brydone-
Jack, on lho "Ethics of the Bar," wub
not so well attended as it deserved.
The lecturer briefly sketched tho history of law from the remotest times,
and gravely assured his hearers that
although the words "lawyer" and
"bar" sounded startiiigly similar, there
waa 11 wido distinction. The speaker
said tho lawyers used to have great
trouble in collecting their fees in the
olden time, but to day it was quite
different, as the matter was considered
rather as a debt of honor than as a
stringent obligation. The lecture was
most instructive and amusing, and Mr.
Brydone-Jaci; may be induced to repeat it at some future date.
■I ..rent Disappointment,
'A very strong feeling of disappointment became general this afternoon when
it wits positively learned that the viceregal party could not arrive. Many citizens had shown the utmost zeal in preparing the decorations, which were very
effective and pretty, indeed; and, naturally they felt put out at this unwolcomo
intelligence. Tlio opera house had received the attention of two gentlemen
whose artistic taste and skill arc there
to speak for themselves. The fine, new
wharf belonging to Messrs. Mathers and
Milligan had ulso been put into a state
of creditable ornamentation, a daiii
prepared, carpet laid down and Chinese
lanterns got ready.
The heavy fog which prevailed in
the gulf all dny mnde it impossible for
the man-o'-wnr conveying their excellencies, to roach Vancouvor, and in
consequence of this unfortunate circumstance muoh of the timo and
trouble expended on the work of decoration will be thrown away.
Ttio _-.nl.Lo lilciiiiir.
Mr. George H. Cooper ia building a
fine steamer at Sapperton which ho intends to use in the deep sea fisheries.
The new craft will be 00 feot in length,
12 feet beam and 8 feet hold. She
will be furnished with GO horse-power
engines which it is expected will give
tho vessel a speed of 12 knots per
hour. Tho new stenmer will be complete aud ready for operations, early
next spring, and sho will cruise betweon the mouth of the Fraser and
Queen Charlotte Islands in tho cod and
halibut fisheries. She will be tho most
complete fishing vessel on the const,
and will be furnished with the first
trawl nets ever usod in Northern Pacific waters. Mr. Cuoper wis for somo
years a flehorman on the coast of England, and the experience sained there
will doubtlesa provo of much value to
him in these waters.
Caledonian and SI* Andrew's Stii-lt-l*.-,
The adjourned meeting of the Caledonian and St. Andrew's Society, held
last evening was the most successful
business meeting the society hns had
for a long timo. Mr. L. F. Bonson
occupied the choir in tho absence of tho
chief, Mr. A. Ewon, who, however,
cumo in lute in tho evening. Several
now membors were admitted and a considerable amount of dues in arrears was
collected. The election of officers resulted as follows: Chiof, Mr. A. Ewen
(re-elected); first chieftain, Peter
Grant; second chieftain, James Stevens; Secretary and Treasurer, S. Mcintosh; chaplain and warden, John McMurphy, seiir.; directors, James
Punch, L. F. Bonson, James Laidlaw,
T. F. Sinclair and Thomas Mowat.
The chief, first and Becond chieftains
and the secretary were appointed a
committee to complote arrangements
for the annual dinner on St. Andrew's
night, Nov. 30., or, that being Saturday, such other evening as they may
deem most convenient. The meeting
adjourned a few minutes beforo 10 o'clock.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Strnii*_c Utterances.
Editor Columbian.- -Sir:—Tho governor-general is making a progress
through British Columbia, nnd almost
everwhere his advent has beon hailed
with the loyal enthusiasm of the people,
almost everywhere, but not quite, and
it has remained for a Christian minister
to draw a self-imposed and indecent (not
to use a harder term) contrast between
Lord Stanley and the King of Heaven.
If Lord Stanley had come here like a
second Herod, aud had tho peoplo fallen
down and worshipped him as a god, the
ill-natured and unchristian Christianity
of this preacher would have had excuse.
But nothing of this nature has happened.
Lord Stanley has come hero os tho embodiment of the principles of our government, and as the representative of our
good queen. As such he has been received, and I think in keeping with the
apostoJic injunction to "fear God nnd
honor the king," nnd even in accord with
the direct teaching of Christ himself,
"Kendcr unto Ctosar the things that are
Ciesar's, and to God the things that arc
God's." For Lord Stanley, as bucIi, I
care littlo; for the governor-general, the
representative of our excellent system of
government, I have the most profound
feeling of enthusiastic respect. Life is
too full of knotty problems for the christian preacher to aid in solving, without
his endeavoring to inise a spirit of bitter
and uncharitable strife where no reason
warrants. Mr. Kennedy's reference to
the Anglican prayer-book is unworthy of
remark, save that it displayed an undercurrent of intolerance, and therefore was
unchristian. His scriptural quotations
were altogether certainly not apropos to
the governor-general's reception and reminded one of tho old saw that "the
dovil can quote scripture when it suits
his purpose." Loyalty,
Mr. fllamble's Story.
Editor Columbian—Sir: In reply
to Mr. Cunningham's letter in Monday night's Columiiian, regarding the
.interests of truth, I should like to give
a littlo liglit on tlie samo subject.
When Mr. Major uud myself went
around nnd got 11 largely signed requisition for Mr. Corbould, Mr. Major
told me of a conversation ho and Mr.
Cuimingluim had had on the subject of
sending a representative to Victoria
by acclamation. Mr. Major said that
Mr. Cunningham hnd suited lhat ho
would be willing to withdraw from the
field, but the only man he would with
draw in favor of was Mr. Corbould,
and that if a requisition was not iqi fur
hiin ho would throw up both bunds
and support him.
Now, we thought, as Mr. Cunningham had said this, that it was only fair
to givo him the chance to fulfill his
promise. So wo called on Mr. Cunningham, as he states, and told him
we had u largoly signed requisition,
and askod him if ho was willing to retire iu favor of Mr. Corbould, as in all
probability it would be a fight between
the two uf thom, as it wos understood
that, if Mr. Jenns' supporters agreed
to it, Mr. Jenns would retire from Iho
field.
Mr. Cunningham's answer was, "No,
I will not withdraw for any man, not
even if 1 get only ten votes." "But,"
Baid Mr. Major, "did you not say, Mr.
Cunningham, that, if a requisition was
got up for Mr. Corhould, you would
throw up both hands and support
him." "I did say so, but I won't do
it."
At this reply we withdrew, as we
considered it wnstc of time getting
promises from Mr. Cunningham, as he
would probably change hiB mind when
it suited him.
Yours faithfully,
A. G. Gamble,
The 1'iillllral Conies!.
Editor Columbian.— Sir: The efforts of Mr. Cunningham's opponents
havo resulted in bringing forward Mr.
Corbould as a candidate for the vacant
seat in the house,  and lhe contest
being between two only is cure t >
create interest among the electors.
It is well known that Mr. Corbould
(and I may add somo of his strongest
supporters, too) is largely interested in
tho progress of Vancouver. Is it not
possible, yea probable, that, like other
human beings, he will succumb to personal interests? Whnt assurance have
we that Mr. Corbould will bo less
zealous in tho future uf his own interests, hut that henceforth he will sacrifice himself on the altar of Westminster? Has lio done aught to commit
himself to the Bide of this city?
Vancouver is rapidly growing in
powor as woll as size, and her ambition
to become possessed of the chief institutions of the district is well known.
That cily is now not a bad Hold for lawyers, and many of the profession would
Jose little by transferring their business
and themselves there; nnd if the seat of
the supremo court bo there they would
certainly find an advantage in being
near it. The principle applicable to
mainland representatives by mainlanders should be followed in having a
constituency supported by a person
whose interests lie therein. Mr. Cunningham's intereats are bound up in
the progress ol Wostmlnster, and this
fact alone should be a guarantee that
he will not build up anything to lessen
their value. Since his residence
amongst us Mr. Cunningham has identified himself with every matter having
for its object tho advancement of his
adopted city. Contrast the work of
Mr. Cunningham with the indifferent
interest taken by Mr. Corbould in
reference to mutters affecting our prosperity. May wc ift reasonably take
each gentleman's actions in tlio past aa
a criterion of his future conduct? Mr.
Cunningham in fighting for Westminster is protecting himself, and, ns
he hus nothing to gain but everything
to lose by doing otherwise, I think tho
electors may safoly trust him with the
representation of this city. Thanking
you, Mr. Editor, for Bpaco 111 your
columns.    Yours, etc.,
For Westminster.
5th November, 1880.
Mr. Major's Bijulnder,
Editor Columbian.—Sir: 1 will bo
as brief na posaiblo in reply to Mr.
Cunningham's effusion of yesterday.
1 feel 1 owe you un apology for giving
that gentleman a chance to "dead-
boat" his election address in your
columns.
Ho begins by saying that as lie has
been on friendly terms with me for a
long time, he cannot account for my
action, except on the supposition that
I am excited by the "bare chance" of
getting Mr. Corbould into the legislature to look after some supposed interests or schemes of mino in connection with my Vancouver property.
It is truo that we havo beon on
friendly tonus for a long time; but it is
now evident that it was 11 one-side arrangement. As soon ns I refused to bo
hitched to tile kite-tail of Mr. Cunningham's ambition, ho showed the
valuo of his friendly professions by
publishing 11 grossly untruthful and
slanderous statement about me—conduct which I would not put up with
trom a friend of fifty yoars' standing;
and when I, aa calmly and gently ns
possiblo, repel the attack which Ac
mnde upon me, he begins to whino
ubout my violence! I have sought no
quarrel wilh Mr. Cunningham, and
seek none; I simply claim tho right to
repel unjust attack.
I own sonic property in Vancouver;
(I hnve none in Oregon, though). 1
paid 100 cents in tlie dollar for it, and
as I have dono so, and have tho titles,
I fail to seo wherein I need tho assistance of either Mr. Corbould or Mr.
Cunningham.
It mny bo a crimo to own property
in Vancouver. If it ia, I think Mr,
Cunningham had better luok after his
own principal supporter—the gentleman who, at the recent public meeting,
proposed his unanimous election. That
gentleman, I beliove, owns about ten
times as much property in Vancouver
as I do.
But even if 1 owned the whole of
Vancouvor—even if 1 had gono thore
and declared my solemn intention to
becomo a citizen—I don't understand
how it affects the point at issue, which
is, did Mr. Cunningham or did he not
volunteer tho statement that ho would
retire in Mr. Corbould's favor if that
gentleman came tuit; nnd did he or did
he not acknowledge, in the presence uf
the witness whom 1 named, lhat he
had voluntarily made that offer? I
have already suid, and repeat that he
did both. Whether ho was under the
influence of a "strong delusion" at the
time or not, I can't Bay—1 enn only
testify us ti, tlio facts.
In his column of windy imaginings,
Mr. Cunningham says 1 told him thai
if he resigned (from the council) I
would soil out and movo away. Thin
new fiction, like thoso which preoeded
it, has a slight admixture uf truth. I
snid he was needed in tile council (1
confess I have had a little new light
Hince 1 said so); but the rest of Mr.
Cunningham's statement ia the product
of hia own "imaginative nature." I
never aaid I would sell out and move
away, nor did auch a thought evor
enter my iniiid.
When Mr. Cunningham aaya that ho
could not have volunteered to resign,
becouso "the interests involved aro of
too serious u nnture for such a thought,"
does he refer 1.0 private interests—axes
to grind, in fact—or is the sentence an
instance of munumental cheek—an assertion that ho is the only man in New
Westminster (it to represent us in the
local house?
I have now done with this matter
until nud unless Mr. Cunningham is
prepared to rebut tho tostiiiiony of
iny witness to hia acknowledgment.
Should 1, however, bo compelled to
troublo you for further space, I propose
to poy you advertising ratos.
5th Nov., 1889.
Chas. G. Major,
Children Cryfor
IFrom Daily Columbian, Nov. ,..)
Judge Bolo dined a largo number of
the provincial legal fraternity at the
Club this afternoon.
The salmon run is bo well played out
that the fishermen havo abandoned operations for the present.
The str. Gladys left for up rivor ports
this morning with a large number of
passengers and a full load  of freight.
The str. Princess Louise left for Victoria yesterday morning with 75 bond
of cattle, 40 tons farifi produce and 30
passengers.
Tho deep aea fishermen atPlumper'a
Pass nre doing vory poorly at present,
and in consequence the market is il!
supplied with fish.
C'-uuty Court wus in session to-day,
His Honor Judgo Harrison presiding.
None of the cnseB before the court ore
of publio importance.
It is reported lhat the body 0? au
Indian, oncloacd in a box, was found
on the bank of the river somewhere
opposite Lulu Island.
A chess club ia to bo formed at the
Y. M. C. A. next Monday evening.
About six gentlemen are expected to
form the nucleus of the club.
The Rithet left for Victoria yesterday morning with 4000 cases of Balmon
from tho Sea Island Cannery and a
large quantity of farm produco.
A number of Btoros oponed up yesterday morning for 11 short time, and
the work on the buildings and on the
atreeta went forward uninterruptedly.
Tho Wm. Renton has ovor 400,000
feot of her cargo aboard, and the deck
load is creeping up level with the' deckhouses. She will be ready for sea in a
few days.
Advices from Okanagon slate tlmt
heavy ruins have fallen during tbo past
two weeks, much to tho delight of the
ranchers who look for an excellent hay
crop next year.
D. A. Slides, son of Alderman
Slides, of this city, left by tho 1 o'clock
train yesterday for Laurel, Sussex
county, Delaware, TJ. S., where ho will
visit friends for about six months.
Tho only newspapers in the province
that issued on Thanksgiving Day, ami
deprived thoir employees of tbo holiday, were the News Advertiser, of Vancouver,   and The Truth of this city.
Polly, a dusky damsel of Siwush extraction, forgot the rules of propriety,
and got intoxicated yesterday. She
waa possessed of sufficient "ohioka-
min" to bail herself out nt the poJico
station.
Thelrvingarrived from up river ports
yesterday morning at 2 o'clock with a
full load of lime and farm produce.
Sho left for Chilliwack again at 7 a. in.
with 30 tons of freight and a largo
number of passengers.
The Fairhaven and Southern Railway ongineors have located their lino
into Blaine immediately in front of tho
international boundary post opposite
St. Leonard's Hotel. It would seem
from this that tho line will skirt Boundary Bay,
The St. Leonard Hotel, Seuiiuhninno
Bay, the iinest salt water resort on tho
Pacific coast, has been leased by Mr.
Wm. Ross to an enterprising liotol
manager. Mr. Ross and liis family
have returned to Westminster and will
reside here permanently.
Mr. D. Robertson has returned from
Granite Creek, tho cold weather having caused a suspension nf mining
operations for the winter. Ho expects
to return to Granito Crock in the
spring, as prospects are excellent und
everything indicates a successful season.
A guest at the Holbrook house lost
a valuable hound this morning, nnd
was making up his mind that he had
parted with it forever, when the animal turned up us if nothing hnd hap
peiied. The dog is valued at $80 and
tho owner ia naturally elated at his
good fortune in recovering it.
Wodnesday afternoon about 4:30
o'clock, a man named Georgo Bones
fell down in an epileptic fit on the
sidowalk opposito the American hotel.
Several persons came to hio assistance
and brought him round hy tho usual
means of cold water and rubbing his
hands. The man appeared to suffer
considerably and it bcchis is subject to
such ntt icks.
Last niglit between 11 and 12 o'clock
a brilliant scintillating light was seen
in the heavens to the south. It was
at lirst thought to ho a slur, but wus
much too volatile in its motions and
many-hued colorings. It is now
thought to havo been a liro balloon
sent up by somebody iu Washington
Territory. After floating in tho air a
short time it disappeared iu tho clouds.
A 1'iilnc Kiiniiir.
Tho rumor so industriously circulated
through this city and district for somo
weeks pnat, to the effect that tho C. P.
N. Co. hud bought the stoamor Delawaro, and that it would not bo run oil
the Fraaer river, proves to be absolutely false. The dilectors of tho new
company say the Delaware is not for
sale, but will be run us already announced between Westminster and up
liver jioi-is as aoon as she is ready for
the inuio, n',1'1 i, ,vill bo nit
days at the farthest.
fe
Clinnncl Improvements.
Mr. T. F. Sinclair, contractor for
the channel improvements, roports
work to be progressing satisfactorily.
and rapidly. Up to dato twonty mat-
trcBses havo beeu sunk, and this number will be increased nt tho rato of ono
overy day until the wholo lot aro in
position. Tho manner in which the
improvements aro boing carried out
this year is in perfoct accord with tho
ideas of the most oxporionccd navigators on tho rivor, and it is oxpoctod by
them that greater good will result from
the presont season's improvements
than all the work that haB beon dono
in the past.
Pitcher's Castoria.
Iffioria dueli,
A meeting wna hold at Victoria
last night by quite a number of people
interested in tho re-orgnnlzation of the
Britisli Colunjbia Agricultural Association. Letters wore read from several
persons at Chilliwack, Ladner's Laud-
ing and Maplo Ridgo sympathizing
with tho movement and promising
support. Quite a heated discussion
occupiod lho moeting for several hours,
sonic advocating cutting loose from the
mainland entirely. Amotion to form
the Britisli Columbia Agricultural Association waa carried, and 11 committee
appointed to   incorporate the aocioty.
Juvenile lacrosse.
The junior iacroase match botween
teams from the east and west ends,
yesterday morning, was romarkablo
for tho earnest nnd almost desperate
manlier in which it was played. Each
boy entered into the name with a do-
termination to mako his side win, oud
rough kunckB were taken and givon
with much heartiness. During tho
'heat cf a sharp scuffle for the ball, n
boy named William Higgins received a
heavy blow from a lacrosso stick, inflicting a deep and ugly cut over the
right eye of a serious nature. Piny
was stopped and tho Ind taken to Dr.
DeWolf Smith, who found it necessary
to put bix stitches in tho wound. The
littlo chap bore the operation bravely
although considerable pain accom
panicd it.
A Little Hoax.
There was somotliing in the naturo
of ,1 hoax played on some of our, respected citizens Wodnesday evening. Over
on lho point, on tho soutli sido of tlie
river, stono Siwashes had lighted a (ire
und fm tho timo the illumination
looked uncommonly like tlio headlight
of nn approaching vessel. Some wag
iu the crowd started the story thut it
w,'s H. M. S. Amphion coining in
witii the governor-general aboard. For
a few minutes tho wildest excitement
prevailed, but aome who waited to
watch tlto light saw it expand, dilute,
blaze amain und shout skyward in ruddy flames, ut onco showing thut it was
n blazing stump, "only this und until
ing more." The wag could not be
found, and the crowd abandoned their
intention of decorating tho nearest
lamp-post with his funny carcass, imd
with heads bowed down went home to
bed.
Terminated Filially.
Frank Emerson, who fell between a
pair of runaway horse? last Monday
and was dragged a distance of about a
mile, succumbed to his injuries last
night at 11:30 o'clock. Beyond a number of bud scratches nnd bruises, it
wns not supposed that Emerson hud
been Boriously hurt, b..t yesterday
evening alarming symptoms of internal troublo showed that he had undergone much graver hurt than waa nt
first supposed. Dr. Cooper, who was
attending the injured man, realized
tho dangerous position of bis patient,
but 111 spite of all tho efforts of medical scienco, Emerson sank rapidly and
died at the hour nbove named. Tlio
deceased camo from the cast about lust
May and has been in the omploy of
Gilley Bros, ever sinco. Ho was only
21 years of ugc, and a good and faithful servant. Hin iiioi her and aisturi
are on their wuy to Westminster, antl
his father has gono to meet thein ut
somo point up 'holino.
THANKSGIVING DAY
Observed
llcni-rnlly    na    a
Tliroil'flliillt the Cily
tlnltilny
Thanksgiving Day was observed in
tho usual monner by nearly everybody.
Some few stores opened in tlie lore
part of the day for lho benefit of tlinao
who had neglected to procure the
wherewithal to grnco tho dinner table,
but tho general appearance of the oity
was of the Sabbath or holiday kind
Not a few boating, hunting and fishing
parties left town iu the morning for up
tho river, Lulu Island end across it
the Brownsville shore, along lhe Scott
and Yule roads to scare up the speckled beauties of the Onpso and dell
Thanksgiving services wore held in 11
few of the churches, The annual prize
meeting of the Riflo Association attracted a considerable number Over t>
tho Brownsville ranges; the day was so
exquisitely clear and tho ail- sti still,
that tho crack of tho titles could h*
heard miles away.
The builders of course could nut be
expected to loso Buch a Bplondid day
for thoir work, and so all ongnged in
that lino put in full time. Ou the
street work also thore was no cessation.
and by common consent every iu,,i,
wns ou hand to push tho work. In
the afternoon there wus a football
match at the Park which attracted a
number of spectators; the game iv-*s
betwoen scratch learns frnm tliu local
dun and was a very well contested
mnteh. In lhe morning there was »n
interesting game of lacrosse played on
the uid orioket-field between two junior teams,     llm gain ts must hotly
cuntcsted and i\, nl severe serini
niii_es took place, ,111 ■ oi whi ih
ouo of the pUyoi-s retired suffering
from a heavy blow delivered by a lacrosse stick. In tho ovening with the
return of tho fishing and hunting par-
tics the miraculous fish-story begun to
roll up iu all its fishiuess. And won
dorful things wore told of game shot,
and, of courae, lost in tho oubIi. The
rise of tho moon last night wns a sight
nevor to bo forgotten. It was tho full
moon, and owing to tho clearness of
the atmosphere, alio wa3 not ruddy or
sallow, but bright aa polished silvor.
Tho giant forms of tlio pines 011 tho
liill showed out gaunt and clear-cut
against the radiance of the nsconding
orb, and soon tho broad expanse of the
rivor wos liko a fiheet of roughened
Bilvor. Ovor the moonlit wator several
pleasure boats could bu soon moving;
in sumo instances the occupants nwnk*
iiu* itie'eolioos wit.11 sung aud laughter.
Thore .was quite a number of evening parties* and social gatherings ut
night, and the inhabitants of the Royal
Ci y niihuut doubt enjoyed a royal
Thanksgiving Day. The Y. M. O. A.
had in point of numbei'B a grand gathering around their festive board to discuss the east. n, qu,-t.|,ion—that is, the
present state of turkey. The evening
was spent in the enjoyment of niusio
and social intercourse in the parlors.
The polico experienced little tr -uble
in keeping ort'cr, and no drunks mistook Columbia avenue for their own
"domestic bunk," by going to bed in
the gutter or on aomnbody's front
stepa.
Annual I-trlzr Meeting.
The Annual prize meeting of the
Now Westminster Riflo Association
was held on the Brownsville range yestorday, under vory favorable auspices.
The shooting on the wholo was fair,
but so long aa the competitions aro
with the ahort Binders, military issue,
the result will bo unsatisfactory as
there rifles are nearly worthleas.
Westminster turned tlio tables on Vancouver and won tlio team mutch.
Following is the official prize list:
No 1—Handicap Match—200 yards, 5
shots; short Sutler rifles. Open to all
members of the association who have
never won a prize exceeding §5. Entrance fee, 50 cents.
J A McMartin 26
A E Pittendrigh 24
H O Chamberlain 23
T J Trapp   22
W Wolfenden 21
JHSharp  21
H Collins 21
J C Chamberlain 21
G Turnbull 21
G Pittendrigh   21
No 2 li- ut. -Covornor's Cup—200 and
400 yards: 7 shots at eacli range: short
Snider rides. Open to all 1110 bers of
of the association.   Entrance fee, 1,0 cts.
Captain Stewart, (cup) 57
P A Grant, (bronze urn) 50
J H Sharp 56
GTurnhiill 56
Cnpt Scoullar 56
W Wolfenden 55
.1 Wilson 55
J C Chamberlain 54
H Shelton 53
T J Trapp  53
No 3—Corporation Cnp-200 and 500
yards: 5 shots at each range. Open as
No, 2.   Entrance fee, 50 cts.
W Wolfenden 41
J C Chamberlain 41
Capt Stewart 38
Dr Hull Irving 37
H Brooklesby 37
P A Grant 35
HSheltoi 34
H Collins 33
A F Cotton 32
J Wilson 32
No 4—Tcnm Match—500 and 000
yards;   7 shots at each range;   anv rifle.
Highest individual score, T .1 Trapp,
61; second highest, Dr Bell-Irving, 61;
third highest, H C Chamberlain, 60.
No 5—Grand Aggregate Prizes—for
tlio highest aggregate scores iu Nos 1, 2
and 3. 1st prize, silver medal presented
by tho D R A. 2nd prizo, bronze medal
presented by the 11 R A.
IV Wolfenden 117
J C Chamberlain 110
No 0—Bull's eyes prizes—For the
greatest number of bull's eyes mado in
competitions 2 and 3. Capt Stewart, 10
bull's eyes.
TEAM MATCH.
X EW WESTMINSTEB,
500 000   Total.
TJTrapp 30 31 61
H Chamberlain 28 32 00
Lieut Mowat 27 28 55
AFCottuu  28 27 55
J C Chumberhi'ii 31 23 54
Geo Turnbull 27 24 51
J H Shay 20 28 48
Total 384
VANOOUVER.
500 000   Total.
Dr Boll-Irving 32 20 01
W H Forrest 31 25 60
1'A Grant 32 24 56
11 Brooklesby: 31 23 54
,1 I.) Stewart 27 2(1 5-1
Capt Thompson 31 22 53
H Collins 27 23 50
Totnl 383
mum news.
.Special 10 Tun Colusi nlAN.
Victoria. N"V 0.—Tho guvernor-
gi 11 -t.l returned I.mil Nnnnimo by
his speoial train last evening in tiuiu to
open tlie citizens' bull, which closed
tno festivities in his honor. Four
hundred cnupjes occupied the floor of
the large assembly hull, which was
beautifully decoiuted forthe occasion.
The scene at midnight was most animate and charming. His excellency
und Lady Stanloy ltd the grand march
at 0 o'clock, in vihich n hundred
couples tuok part.
Tho men of B.CB.G.A. will bo
paid it parade to duy.
The str. Rustler arrivod nt Nnnnimo from tho north, brings news that
four loggers are missing at Bute Island and Humprey's Channel. All
four uro supposed to have been niur-
dured by Indians.
Heavy investment, of Victoria cupi-
,', ..,1, icing mado iu and around Port
■ igu'„ *, ■--.',..,'.,., directly opposite this
■ \ The canoo of the excitement is
.-..nd to lie- i.e. itlmuht certain construction of a railroad from Portland to Port
Angeles.
This morning his excellency visited
the jubilee school nnd ombarked on
H. M. S. Amphion at 10 o'clock for
Vancouver. Whilo on tho trip to
Nanaimo his oxcellenoy rodo on tho
cow-catcher, tho better to enjoy the
scenery.
Tlio Islander hos not arrived up to
10 o'clock tliis morning, and is probably
detained by thn deneo fog whicli wrapped tbe city and straits last night.
Miss Katie Vankoughnet, daughter
fo thn late Hon. P. Vankoughnet, of
Cornwall, Out., suicided early Friday
by hanging hersolf with a towel in the
collur of hor residonco, Sho had boon
depressed iu spirits for aomo limo. VOLUME 34,
WKEKLY..BBIIISH COLOMBIAN, NEW WBaTMlN8'f-_R, B, 0., NOVEMBKlt 13, 1889,'
■MM
HO. 46,
Weekly British Columbian
Wiulnesdiiy Morning, Nov. 13, 1880.
(From Daily Columbian, Nor. 9.)
The police docket this morning wns
bare of cases.
The gulf was clear of fog to-day for
tho first time this week.
Mathers & Milligan's fino new wharf
made a Bplendid place for the reception of the vice-regal party.
The str. Dunsmuir arrived from Nnnaimo to day with a nuriiber of passengers and a full load of coal.
The str. Irving left for Chilliwack
this morning with a full load of freight
and a numbor of passengers.
The atr. Princoss Louise left for
Victoria this morning with 80 tons
farm produce and 30 passengers.
The never-failing signs of storm and
dirty weather, the rings around the
mo* ifl th.e laat two nights, brought the
mn sture experienced to-day.
The football match, Vancouver vs.
Westminstor, which was to have been
pltyed nt Hastings to-day, has boen
postponed until noxt Saturday on ao
co mt of the rain.
Mr. J. G. Moylan, inspector of penitentiaries, reports that the increase of
ooin'i-tsin thia provinco will neces
sit- -i the construction of au additional
wing of the N :w Westminster peniten-
tioi'V. He hu i recnmniended that an
ad ciou of seenty feet to lho presont
bu   ling be ei :oted,
■unk Em rson, who diod through
in; "icb recc ''ed in a runaway acci-
de .:t, was bu Jed tu-day with I, 0. G,
T, honors, Tho Rev. Mr. Haddon
performed tha funeral servico, and
nt't-- reaching the Masonic cemetery
th brethren of the order performed
th ,i-preacrib :d rights over the grave.
At the ndjnurned general meeting
of ihiireholdeisof the B. C. Smelting
Co hold a few days since in London,
no decision was arrived at respecting
any arrangements for providing further
capital in order to start up tlie smelter.
It appears probable that the company
will go into liquidation and its property
be disposed of to discharge its liabilities,
Wnr nn a While Sheet.
The lecture, "War on a Whito
Sheet," given by Mr, Frederick Villiers last night at the opera house was
not a. woll attended as had been anticipated, Tho floor of the house was
woll filled at the front and in the gallery n lair sprinkling could be observed.
Tho necorations of the house looked a
littl* lonely and as if they wanted tobo
used. At about 8:30 p in. tlie atere
opticon having been put in working order tho lecturer attired in his
fighting costumo of t_-eeds, knickerbockers, Norfolk shooting jacket.
ht'K'hc-stockings, blown lentln-r lace
bonis, huge revolver in its holster
hanging handy, a field knife and the
Turkish hood over his shoulders. A
ni _< manly and thoroughly Britiah
figure it wus, and his easy and uncoil
nti ni i'il milliner and hia ,-vident desire
to do liia beat in the It-mure ni-.de the
audience feel quite at homo with him
ami il cited from them frequent rounds
ot -t'tirty applause The pictures
ih"*' ii on tho sheet were rough
sko Ct- 8 done on the b.utlo fiel- , and
what hey lacked in Irtish they certainly niiide np in thoae skillful penoil
da-he- lhat tell inoro thun tho moat elaborate work. The horrors of th.
Ru-sii-Turkish cum; lign, the grent
battle of Plevna, the redoubt of tho
Gravnz.t and the terriblo struggle at
Radishova, to all of which tho lecturor
had boen an eye witness, were described in a simple easy way just as
other people talk about matters of
courso. From the snows of tho Shipka
Puss the audience was transported
su lietily into the glare of the Egyptian
bu nnd among the gorgeous palaces of
A .andriu, nil ablaze during the bomba ment. Then the trials and priva-
th i of tho British army on tho great
ex dition to relievo Khartoum were
st- 'ii and 'escribed. Tho lecturer
ci ened tin descriptions with ninus-
in lUeodotes ind tho recital of comical
pi null udvi iturcs The great battle
of bu Idea 'as stirringly described,
ai tho porti it of Ool. Fred Burns-
b; vho lost: is life in that hot fight
di ■ applaud from the audience. Tho
di i'lptitiii ol the bloody battlo fought
oi ;ho baii 3 of the Nile aftoi
lo. ng the : irobn. was exciting, and
th nutation if thi- coolness and por
fe i isolpliii of the British soldiers
in 3 ofovei helming legions of howl-
in. 11 ibs, ni.! tin mannor in which
th- moved down their fanatical foos
wi h volley alter volley from tho deadly M irtini-Honry, provoked enthu-
Btn-iiu applause from tho hearers. At
the ci inclusion of his lecturo hia lordship, Bishop Sillitoe roso and proposed
a hearty voto of thanks to' the talentod
lecturer fur the interesting ontertnin-
moni he had given; the bishop also referred in humorous terms to the accident to tho Amphion, and suggested
that it might figure as a thrilling incident in some future lecture in some
other part of the world. Tho vote of
thanks was heartily given, and in responding Mr. Villiers said the Colonist
account of the accident was all wrong,
and mint have been purely imagination on tho part of the writer; it was
vory incorroct; fa voice in the rear,
"It'i never onythiiig elso"). He was
pleased to seo that the other papors got
tolerably correet accounts of it,
Tho New York Commercial Advertiser snys that Columbus was
muoh shocked ot the decollete
drosses worn by Americnn ladies on
the day lie arrived in this country.
What would the poor man say if he
could gazo into an American ball
room in this year of our Lord 18891
—Ex.
Job printing ol all kinds neatly done
at the Columbian offlce, Prices will bo
fount! as loir as at iny other office in
the province.—_l_li),
STANLEY OF PRESTON
Receives from the People of lhc
, Royal City a Right Hearty
Welcome.
The Civic, Board of Trade and
Other Addresses Presented to
His Excellency.
Amidst Much Enthusiasm the First
Welcome to Lord and Lady Stanley is Concluded.
After a wholo week of us line weather
as ovor the aun shone on, Saturday
and Lord Stanley arrived bringing a
damp and diaagrooablo climatic change
with them. The many' disappointments Of the lost few days lind made
the people doubtful of the Governor
General's arrival, oven after the hour
was at last officially announced; and
whon tho train finally rolled in thero
was not nearly the immense throiig
eipected. But the shriek of the locomotive whistlo wss heard throughout
the city, and in less than a minute a
sufficient crowd had found its way to
the landing place to givo His Excellency and Lady Stanloy a right royal
welcome. Uufortunately tlio wet
weather prevented tho attendance of
ladies in large numbers, and thus much
of the attractiveness of the occasion was
lost. Hnd the weather been lino and
the recoption taken placo us at first arranged, Lord Stanley would have received a welcome in the lloyal City
that would havo eclipsed any givon
him in the province. Everyprepurtitioti
had been mado for the notable event,
and beforo the hour fixed for Uis Excellency's arrival hud been reached the
laat of tho arrangementsa had boen auc-
ceaBfully completed. Columbia, Front
and many other streets w ero handao mely
decorated with evergreens, bunting
and flags, and the entrance to Herring's Opera House, by wny of Prevost
Btreet was through an avenue of young
fir trees planted for tho occasion.
Mathers & Milligan's wharf, whero Hia
Excellency was received, had been
specially decorated, and made as ornamental looking ns good taste and the
material at hand would permit. Near
tho centre of the shed a dais wu3 raised
for tho vico-tegnl visitors, and tliis
ulso wus handsomely decorated.
It waa just 10 o'clock when the train
camo to a standstill. Lord Stanley
and suite immediately descended from
tlio curs and were heartily welcomed
by Mayor and Mra. Townsond. Among
those preaent to welcome the vice regal
party were Bishop Sillitoe, Mr. Justice
McCreight, his honor Judge Bolo,
John Kirkland, Reeve of Delta, James
Punch, Reeve of Surrey, Mr. and
Mrs. Sheriff Armstrong, Aid. Curtis,
Aid. Calbick, Aid. Cunningham, Aid.
Held. Aid. Ewen, John Hendry, President of the B.iard of Trado, Mr. D.
Robson, Secretary Bonrdof Trade, Rev,
0. Croucher, Rov. J. H. White, Mr.
Warden McBrido, Kev. H. Irwin, Mr.
and Mrs. Edmonds, Mis. Hill, and
many others. After the party hud ascended 'he plntforni and tho usuid in
traductions hnd taken place, Mayor
Townsend ste qied tu the front antl
rend the following nddress:
To His Excellency lhc Right -Honorable
Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley of Preston,
in the County of Lancaster, in Ihe Peerage of the United Kingdom, Knight.
Grand Cross of the Most Honorable
Order of the llalh. Governor-General of
Canada and Vice-Admiral of llie same:
May it Please Your Excellency:
On behalf of tho citizona of Now
Westminster, tho mnyor and aldermen
have great ploasure in extending to
your excellency a most cordial welcome.
A representative of hov most gracious majesty we desiro to express to
you our unchanging loyalty and devotion to tho queen aud tho British
throne; and wo desire also to assure
you of iho gratification experienced by
nil citizens at tho opportunity of doing
honor to so distinguished a nobleman
as your excellency.
Wo need scarcely remind your excellency that the vast territory over
wliich your jurisdiction extends is remarkably rich in resources developed
and undeveloped, and abundantly capable of maintaining a population vory
rfluch greatur than that of 1 ho United
Kingdom. It embraces within its
boundaries half a continent, and ia destined to becomo the homo for many
millions.
In no part of this new Dominion has
nature more lavishly bestowed hor
priceless gifts than in the province of
British Columbia. With a climate un
surpassed on the continent, with rich
treasures in tho mountains tho valleys,
the rivers and seas, and with avenues
of commerce by land and water, bringing ub into touch with tho whole civilized world, the people of British Columbia look forward with prido and
confidence to a futuro full of promise.
Permit us to express the hopo that
your oxcellonclcs may entry away with
you tho most gratifying recollections
of your visit to the Paciiic provinco,
and oBpocially to the city of Now WestminBter, and that your 'too brief stay
among us may bo sulliciout to inspire
you with something of the same confidence that fills tho heart nnd stimulates
tho energies of ovory British Columbian.
May your excellencies enjoy a safo
and ploassnt journey, und may you
long be spared to aid in tho counsels of
the groat nation to whicli wo are
always pleased  to belong.
We havo tho honor to bo yonr excellency's obodiont soi-vunts,
W. 11. Townsend,
Mnyor.
D. RonsoN,
City Clerk.
The following addrosaos wero then
presented to His Excellency:
To His Excellency the Hight Honorable
Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley, Baron
Stanley, in the County of Lancaster, in
the Peerage of the United Kingdom,
Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honorable Order of the llalh, Governor-
Qeneral of Canada and Vice-Admiral
of th,1 same.
May it Please Your Exukllency:
Thu members of tliu board of trndo
of the city of New Westminster desire
to express to you the pleasure and sat
isfactiuu with which they greet you on
tho banks Of the Fraser River, and
within the limits of the Royal City.
Your visit to this land and lo this
city is welcome because yoa come to
ua os the accredited representative of
Her Most Gracious Majeaty the Qucbii,
whom all the world delights to honor;
and because of the distinguished position you have filled so long and so
well in the counsels of the nation.
The practical experience which your
excellency has gathered in tho active
school of British statesmanship, added
to theptnctical goot! seuoe with which
nature Iihb endowed you, aro to us a
sufficient ground for tho hope that
your vis t will not bc unfruitful of
practical results in tlio development of
this the fairest province of Her Majesty's vast dominions.
During your brief stay with us your
excellency could nut full to observe
that there are in this country abundant
materials fur tbo erection of a ricji and
populous community,-and tliat tho city
to whicli you are now welcomed is peculiarly favored in its situation and
Surroundings.
Now Westminster stands in the centre of the liileat agricultural district in
Britisli Columbin, One of our own
citisens hud the honor to curry off the
highest awards for fruit tit the Toronto
Industrial exposition, recently held,
whoro tho wholo Dominion of Canada
met in competition; tint! in tlie otlier
products of the soil this district is Becond i-' none. Wo are also the centre
of the groat salmon canning industry,
and one of the most important lumbering centres uf lho province.
The situation of thia city for trado
and commerce, ns your excellency
must know, is most fortunate. It is
the fresh water terminus of Canada's great national railway, that won-
derful monument of the fuith and en-
orgy of tlio Canadian peop'e; it is the
western terminus of tho New Westminster Southorn Railwny, now under
construction, and, therefore, the point
of union between the Canadian und
Atnerieiiu systems of railway communication; Now Westminster is nlso tlio
city of iho Finsei-; tho great waterway
of the province.
Your excellency will bc glad to know
that the commerce of this splondid
river is increasing with u rapidity
which promises speedily to make it
ono.of the most important e -inniereial
avenues in the Dominion.
Hitherto the shipping interests oE
this river have been seriously embarrassed becauso of tlio difficulty of ob
tinning a reaBonablo grunt for the improvement "f tiio channel fit its mouth.
This obstacle is being gradually overcome, uud with a reasonable addition
to the sum already expended tiio Frasor could be mado tho best freshwater
harbor oh tho Pacitic const, capable uf
admitting without risk the largest ships
afloat, Tlie grent importance uf carrying mi this work with energy will bo
apparent lo your excellency.
The board hopes that you and Lady
Stanley hnve enjoyed your visit to this
province, and that you will carry aon-su
the continent the icst pleasant recollections, ond if tho fide of events
should ever bring you again to our
shores it will bo moat gratifying to us
to bring to your excellency's notice the
rapid advancement which ivo are suro
your preaent visit will lend to promote.
Signed on behalf of the Btmrd of
Trade. John Hendry,
President.
David Rorson,
Secretory.
To His Excellency Sir Frederick Arthur
Stanley, Huron. Stanley of Preston, in
the Peerage of the. United Kingdom,
Knight of lhe Grand Cross of the Most
Noble Order of the Bath, Governor-General of Canada and Vice-Admiral of
the same:
May it Please Your Excellency:
Wo, the Reeve and Council of tho
Municipality of Delta, in the District
of New Westminster u::d J'l-ovince ui
British Columbia, in behalf of the residents ui our municipality beg respectfully to tender to yor Excellency and
Lady Stanley ;i most hearty welcome
to our district, nnd lo express our devotion nud loyalty t" our beJovod sovereign lady Queen Victoria.
Wo hope that Yonr Excellency nnd
Lndy Stanley muy bc pleased to visit
our municipality and examine the agricultural capabilities and restiurces of
tho Delta of the Fraser, and atthe
sumo time inspect some of our numer-
our salmon canneries which nre, aa
your excellency ia nwaro. one nf tho
chief industries of the province.
Wo trust that tho visit of Your Excellency and Lndy Stanley to the various points of interest in our fair provinco ban been ono that will bo remembered by you witli unniiiigled pleasure,
and we hope you muy again bu permitted to viait us dining your term of offico.
Wo hope tho homeward journoy ol
Your Excellences to the capital may
bo accomplished in safoly, and that
you mny curry with you tho happiest
recollections of your visit to the Cnna-
diun Pacific Province,
John Kirkland,
Heeve.
To His Excellency lhe Hight Honorable
Bdron Stanley, C.Q.M., (huri-nor-Geu-
cral of Canada:
May it Please Youit Excellency:
Wc, tho undersigned, rop-'caonting
the council and citizoiiB of tho corporation of the district of Surrey, ombraoo
this opportunity of extending to your
excellency and Lady Stanley n cordial
und hearty welcome to thia portion of
Briliah Columbia nnd to assure your
excellency lhat we esteem it a grent
pleasure to meet with you on thia occasion, and knowing the great interest
you have nlwnys manifested ih tho pro-
gross and devolopmont of all  portions
of this vast Dominion, we ure persuaded thnt ufter having seen something of
tlio illimitable resources of this western portion thereof, your excellency
will return cast must favorably impressed with tlio bountiful provision
with which nature bus endowed this
province.
Our only regret at this time is our
inability to make your excellency personally ucquaiiited with the beauties
and advantages of our diBtrict of Surrey, together with its immenso wealth
of agricultural, dairy, fishing, lumbering, and other natural, but aa yet
undeveloped resources.
And while we hove every confidence
iu the future of this our adopted country, uur thoughts often revert lo tho
doar old land across the sea, the home
of our youth and to her most gracious
majesty, Queen Victoria, under whoso
benign rule we enjoy the blessings of
poaco and prosperity, whom God preserve.
We trust yonr excellency ttud Lady
Stanley have enjoyed your visit whilo
in British Columbia.
On behalf of thu council and oitizens
oE tho corporation of the district of
Surroy. James   Punch,
Reove.
Henry T. Thrift,
C. M. 0.
Hia excellency replied as follows.
Mr. Mayor, Mr. President of the Board
of Trade, tin1. Reeve of the MunUsipidUy
of Delia and the Reeve of the District
of Surrey,
Gentlemen,
I beg to thank you collectively for
these kind addresses, uud for tho
hearty welcome accorded mc. My
only regret is thnt the time of my arrival fails mi n dny that will not enable
me ttt soe ull the many industries for
whioh thia city ia fumoua. The unforeseen causes whicli prevented our coming on the day arranged were circumstances beyond our control. All that
is to bo said concerning tho accident ia
that "nil's well that ends well," and
hud it not been for iho skill and coolness of the oflicers and crew, and the
magnificent discipline of the ship, you
might havo been speculating to-doy
(und I hope not without some regret)
ns to wlio your next governor-general
would be (laughter). Howover, I nm
glad to bc with you, und to havo an opportunity of aeeing sumo of tho industries for which your city is famous fnp-
pl.'iuse). I am glad to noto tbat a
gentleman of this fair city lins been
successful in carrying oil' tlio first prizo
for fruit against tlie whole broad Do
minion, and in offering my congratulations to Mr. Thomas Cunningham allow ino to hopo it is only lho forerunner of a long series of victories to
conic (applause). 1 have traveled from
ono end of the province to tlio other,
and have heard much of hor glorious
prospects, but until my tirriv.il here I
did not realize the truth of what the
country i3 really capable of. I have
hud the opportunity of eeeing all the
great industries of the Dominion, and
I will tako the troublo tc acquaint
myself with tho wants of tlm industries
in your city so that I muy inform my
government of thom (applause). I
linve much pleasure iu congratulating
Now Westminater on tlie doublo railway
facilities which sho will soon enjoy; it
will tend to create in this city and the
surrounding district new markets wliich
arc sometimes wanting. "Trade follows the ling,' but it rests with thoso
who uro most uolive in the iuteres's of
the city to make tlie trado for it
(applause), I have no doubt that
when tliis province becomes better
settled and its nreds becomo much
greater it will be found necessary to
again doublo your railroad facilities.
it affords nn* tliu greatest pleasure to
visit ibio tho roynl city, and not
termed bo without somo right.
Your devotion to Hor Majesty
the Queen of this vast Dominion,
and to the laws und customs of Canada
uud Britain, give mo the deepest pleasure. (Applause). There is no nccea-
nity for making a sot speech on this
occasion, and ngain I thank you moat
respectfully for the very hearty manner in wliich wo have been greeted by
the peoplo of Westminster. You have
kindly expressed the hopo thnt the
present would not be my laat visit,
wliich hope I echo, and trust ut aome
future date to again congratulate your
citizens, nnd tlie district m general, on
still greater evidences of prosperity."
Great applause greeted tho conclusion of his excellency's speech, whicli
was delivered in such n sincere milliner
and pleasant terms hs to win tlm good
will tif all who hnd tlio pleasure of
hearing him. A few minutes later the
purty went aboard tho Samson to enjoy u trip on tho river, and ns the vessel pulled out from the wharf Cant.
Peelo called fur three clieora for his
excellency, which wore given with right
good will.
Proceeding up tliu river to tho Rosa-
McLaren Mills the Samson's speed wns
checked nnd tho vice rcgnl pnrty hud a
good luok ut that uiiinoiiso structure,
the particular points of interest about
whicli woro explained by his worship
tho mayor. Steaming up the river
again towards tho Bon Accord
Cannery n splondid viow of the
Fraser valloy with the islands
wus obtained in spito of
the pouring raiu which cume down fur
somo minutos very heavily. Arrived
tit tlio cannery tlio entire party disembarked nnd wero taken chnrgo of by
Aid. Ewen, who oonductod his distinguished visitors through the extensive establishment nnd explained iu au
interesting mannor the modus operandi
of canning. The visitors seemed muoh
Btruck with tliu large scale on which
the businesa is carried un, and betrayed great interest in the various details
connected witli it. Frum tlio c.-in-
noiy tho piti'ty wont up tho track to
the butchery, crossing thu trick of tho
WestminBter Southern, all rendy for
llio ties mul mils. Sevornl uf the city
aldermen woro considerably aatonieliod
at thS ttpponrauco of the track; tlicy
did not exfcot lo sec it in quilo auch a
finished state. Tbu Messrs. Mowat
took chu rge of the vititora at tho hatchery and took great pains tn explain tho
process of   hatching   and   handling
tho aalmoii ova. Not only the noble
strangers, but many of the Wcstinin-
sterites were astonished us well us delighted nt the peculiar process. About
half tin hour wns spent in viewing the
hatchery and His Lordship and Mr.
Thomas Mowat went up to the reservoir
whero tho water to feed tho ova baainais
stored. A return wus made to the
Samson and the steamer headed down
stream. Although raining hard as tho
steamer cumo opposito Sapperton a
Buperb view of the thriving suburb,
the penitentiary grounds and the eastern part of the city was obtained.
Keeping well over to the Brownsville
shore the view of the city became more
beautiful evory yard tho steamer wont
onward. The new brick blocks lately
orected gave it a fine, substantial
pearance, and it was with excusable
pride that the WeBtminsteritoB gazed
enthusiastically on the royal city. Tlie
governor-general and his suite were
very much impressed with tho beauty
of the scene. Taking a grand sweep
towards tho Nurth Arm the" Samson
was brought to deck at thu Royal City
Planing Mills' wharf. Here Ex-Mayor Hendry received tho visitors and
showed tho way through tho vast establishment. The ornamental woodwork department wns first visited, and
the lino specimens of fancy wood-work
wero much admired. Tlie saws wore
next visited and somo largo logs were
cut in the presenco of thu visitors
und the party wore much ustuiiished ot
the ease and facility with wliich such
enormous sticks of timber were disposed of, und greatly impressed with the
exactitude and regularity of the work.
The various other wood-working machines wore next visitod and a view of
the Ronton, loaded deep in the wator
with her cargo of timber for Australia,
was taken. Aftor taking a very
thorough survey of tho pinning mills
tlio visitors wore conveyed to Sapperton for lunch, Later in the alter-
noon His Excellency paid a visit
to the British Columbia penitentiary, where Mr. Wurden McBride
explained tho management and
discipline of the institution, with all
of which Lord Stanley was favorably
impressed. It was a part of the programme that Lady Stanley should
plant the first treo in Queen's park,
but tho ceremony was performed by
proxy, by Lord Stanley, owing to a
slight indisposition on tho part of her
ladyship. After the coromony the
silver spado with which the earth was
turnod, was presented to Lady Stanley The spade boro the following inscription. "Presented to Lady Stanley, by the corporation of the city of
New Westminster, on the occnaion of
her planting tho tirst treo in Queen's
park, November 9th; 1889;"
The viceregal purty consisted of tlie
Governor-General,Lady Stanley; Lady
Alice and Miss Stanley, Miss Lister,
the Hon. Mr. Stanley, Capt. Colville,
aide-de-camp to his excellency; Capt.
McMahon and Sir James Grunt.
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varieB. a marvel of
Fwrlty,strojj{,'than<iwholeBomeneB8. Mow
economical than the ordinary kinds, and
oannot be sold in competition with the
multitude of low test, short weight alum
or phosphate powders. Bold only in cans.
Royal Baking Powder Co., 106 "Wall St.,
Kew "York. afely
REMOYAL.
HERBERT G. ROSS,
Goneral Commission Merchant,
HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE FROM
the Kumley Block to next door to
Johnston's Boot Store antl is prepared to
handle all kinds ot Goods and Produce oa
commission, dvinoSml
Baok of Montreal.
ESTABLISHED 1818.
CAPITAL (all paid up), . $12,000,000
REST,       ■••.'.       .       0,000,000
Head Office, - Montreal.
SIR 1). A. SMITH, K. C. M. O.-President.
O. A. DRUMMONl),Esa.-VIce-Presldent
\V. J* BUCHAN AN-General Manager.
HAVE    BRANCHES   IK   LONDON,
Em,-.; Kew York, Chicago, and In all
tbe principal cities aud towns in Canada,
lutci-cst allowed on special deposits.
C.  SWEENY,
Manageii, Vancouver.
GEO. D. BRYMNER,
Sun-agent, Now Westminster*
       wjel3m3
Movo Alaska i'nnnerlos.
Mr. J. C. Cullbrciitli, if the lirm of
Cailbroath. Grant Ss Cook, of Cassiar,
bus associated himself wilh a number
of Americnn capitalists witli the object
of going into the salmon canning business. They propose to erect u mum
moth cannery on Prince of Wales la
land ill the spring nt an outlay of $50,-
000. Jl is sa'd that lhe best site for a
cannery in tlio north hns beon purchased from four land hunters at a good
round figure, and with a capacity of
1500 cases per duy a golden harvest is
anticipated bj tho enterprising ventlc-
mon —jf'inies.
AUcgt'il Itr. ut-ii nt Ctinlrnct.
Early yosterday morning Capt. Sol,
Jacobs of tlie Mollio Adams, was arrested on a capias by Provincial Polico
Sergeant Langley, ponding tho settlement of the case heard in Chambers on
Snturdny, in which an injunction was
applied for by Baxter Ss Co. to restrain
Cnpt. Jacobs from concluding a sale of
the schooner's catch, it being alleged
that they were contracted fur in Seattle,
and their non-deliveranoe ncioss tho
line had subjected tho buyers to considerable los*. The caso linabocn enlarged until Monday nex*, Messrs.
Davie & Bodwell appearing for the
plnintlT, nnd Messrs, S. P. Mills nnd
A. L. Jlelyoa for the defence' The
sudor-! getting wind nf the captain's arrest, tlicy visited TJ, S. Vicc.Consul
Marvin, Col. Stevens being absent
from tlio city, and with his advice, visit
cd Mjeaara Drake, Jnchaon & Hclniokeii
and obtained a replevin on the skins,
to enable them to socuro their wages
and percontago of the catch in the event
of Baxter winning the suit.—27iur_-
day's Coioiu...
LURK." Reported *IUs4l:ig.
The atcamer Hustler brings down
the nows that two parties of hand
loggers aro roported missing. Ono of
tho reports refors to Sam Maliior nud
his partner, who were logging ut Bute
Inlet, for tho Moodyville mills. It
was reported that thoy had taken out
200,000 of logs, but when Mr. W.
Blaney passed thoro Inst week thero
waa not n sign of a log, and the houso
had been burned down.* Capt. Green
haa boon written to about them, bllt
neither he or Mr. Blnney had soen tho
first traco of Ihom. The otlier parly,
alao comprising two men (namea not
known), were hand logging at Humphrey Channel liist June or July; a report oamo tliat those nioii were not on
tlieir claim, nnd a matt w.ia sont ovor
to sen nnd he reported lho men away,
but that hoom chnins, provisions and a
fow logs wero on tlio bench. It wns
then thought that the mon hadgone to
n now camp, but no word haa boon
heart! of thom since. Parties there a
week or two ago aay the chains and
provisions are thoro atill. It is generally feared that thoso have mot with
foul play from Indians, and the poopio
in that seotion think that the niatter
Bhould bo investigated by tho authorities.—Free Press.
M.A.McRAE
 II AS ON	
Eg    "B    ■■■
xh am tion
The finest, ussotlmentof
English Tweeds, Worsteds,
Fancy JPantings, tic,
&e., just
'      111
IT
A cnll solicited.   Armstrong Block, Kew
dw Westminster, mh28to
WM. McCOLL,
CHOICE
Family Groceries!
And K0VISI0HS.
—ALSO—
ft WELl-SELE. TED STOCK 01
ANI FOENISHIMSS.
AT   THE   LOWEST  PRICES.
MmnROHM'R BLOCK,
Cftlnitttiln Street,        Nt* v. vrrntmliMte.
noldwly
A Pleasing Sense of Health
and Strength Renewed, and
of Ease and Comfort
Follows tho ubo of Syrup of Pigs, as it
acts gently on tho
Kidneys, Liver @ Bowels
Effectually Cleansing tlie SyBtom-when
Costive or Bilious, Diapelling
Colds, Headaches and Fevers
and poraianently curing
HABITUAL OONSTIPATXOK
■without weakening or irritating tin organs on "which it nets.
Por salo In tin bottle, by all Loading
Druggists*
JIAKCFAell-ai-.il ONLY ST Till
OALirOENIA Fid SYRUP 00
,. Sas lunuoo. Co.,,        ,.
-*niraui.Kr., Nt_-Voiii.il* VOLUME 34.
WEEKLY BRITISH COLUMBIA!., NEW WESTMINSTER, B, Q„ -.OVBMBEB 18, 1SS9.
NO. 46.
Weekly British Columbian
W*M_H-*_ta_< lUrnlig, Nov. 18, 18811.
Thb accident  lo  H.M.S.   Amphion, a few days ago, coupled with
the fact that the governor-general
and party Buffered a detention of
forty-eight hours in Victoria,  he-
cause the foggy condition of tho at
mosphere   thereabouts rendered it
unsafe for a warship tp attempt the
trip to Vancouver, seems to point
to the nooessity of establishing at
least a branch naval station in a
mainland port.   It would be disastrous to imperial as well as local interest! if a hostile ship wore left to
work its will at the mainland   ports
or Nanaimo, while H. M. ships were
fog-bound at Victoria or Esquimalt,
Foggy weather, for a longer or shorter period, may be counted on (luring
the autumn months of every year,
and tho narrow seas about Victoria
seem peculiarly subject to   obstruction from thia cause.   During the
past week, for instance, while wo
have had some fog at night and during the  early morning hours, the
days have been gloriously bright and
clear and this is the rule hore, while
in  the neighborhood  of  Plumper
Pass, and from that placo  to  Victoria,  the  misty  vapor  seems to
cling to the surface of the sua during the  whole  twenty-four  hours
Now itis evident that the large inter-
estsatstake at Westminster, Vancouver and  Nanaimo should not be at
the mercy of a fogbank; and it seems
to us that  the  matter should  be
brought  to  the  attention  of the
authorities, with a view to  having
one of  the  ships   of  the  station
always  at  New   Westminster  or
Vancouver.   This  would  at once
afford the necessary protection, and,
as  the  different    ships   "relieved
guard" from   time to time, give the
officers an opportunity—which they
laob   at   present — of   becoming
thoroughly acquainted  with the local waters.
Whilst we have been during the
past few days, deploring the presence of fog in the gulf, it is interesting to note that tbe English press
has been discussing the best method
of dealing with the foga whicli envelop London during the autumn
and winter months. A London fog
once experienced can never be forgotten. Whatever inconvenience
we may have suffered from this
cause, at least we ure supplied with
nature's own unadultem ted article,
but the "pea souper" so familiar to
London is a wonderful compound of
mist, soot and stilling thickness, a
yellow, heavy, oppressive nnd damp
cold voil which clogs the lungs,
shuts out the liglit, affects the eyes
till they run with wnter, renders
locomotion frequently impossible,
and which necessitates the use of
flaming torches by pedestrians even
at noon day. In a city where vehicular traflic is difficult and lardy
even in the brightest weather, it
may be readily surmised that this
sooty, choking mass proves a veritable source of danger to life and
limb. The question of dealing with
the fog question has been discussed
time and again and various efforts
have been made to lessen the evil,
but surely as ever the year advances
towards its close so surely the fog
fiend puts in an appearance. London is a city that is delightfully old
fashioned, with narrow crooked
streets running in every direction
without the semblance of plan or
design. It has. grown up through
many centuries and every age has
added itstiwn peculiar ideas to the
whole. So it is that to-day London
is one of the most bewildering accumulations of alleys, courts, narrow
streets and fine broad roads. In
these narrow, crooked ways the fog
fiend finds a snug home, and thence
he emerges day by day, adding the
grime, smoke and fifth of factories,
and the vapors from the river, to
his already dark presence. Whenever the fiend goes there he leaves
his mark. The increase of pulmonary diseases, of affections of the
eyes, as well as the soiling of clothes
and the practical stoppage of locomotion, the danger to life and limb,
and the loss of trade are but a few
results of his onward progress, and
the man who could guarantee a safe
and certain preventive of this evil
would be certain, too, of almost any
reward he chose to demand of the
county council.
the olerk of the woather, who had
given us the queen's own  brand for
the last week or so, took a mean advantage of us when we had been
downed  by  the   other   untoward
circumstances    beyond    our   control,    and    added    his    dampening influences to  the unfortunately postponed reception, which was
bravely     carried    through,    and
with some success, spite of everything, at Mathers & Milligan's wharf,
Saturday morning.  The threatening
weather, coupled with the oft de
ferred expectations and the uncertainties of the last few days,  made
the crowd at the wharf to welcome
Lord Stanley and his estimable lady
much smaller than it would havo
been under more favorable circumstances.   Their Excellencies,  being
eminently sensible people, would understand   the disadvantages   under
which the reception as it was was
carried out.   The best of  good feeling certainly prevaded  all parties,
aud the Governor-General and Lady
Stanley, by tlieir sincere, unaffected
speech  and courteous and amiable
manners, made the most  favorable
impression and won goldon opinions
from all who came in   contact with
them   during  the short publio reception  on   the   wharf.     Considering  the   weather  and the brief
time at their disposal, the  viceregal   visitors  have   been  shown
as   much    as   was   possible    of
the  city   and    its   environs, by
hind and water, and were perceptibly impressed as well   as  delighted
with what they saw.   Though the
to their Excellencies,   Though  the
royal city has been seriously  handicapped in its vice-regal  reception
throughout, we feel sure   that, in
loyality, spontaneousness  and  cordiality, she will not be  behind her
most ambitious  and  demonstrative
sister cities.
BOULANGISTS APPEAL.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
After many provoking but unavoidable delays, tho governor-general and Lady Stanley and party
arrived in the royal oity, more
than two days after the timo originally appointed. The delay waB unfortunate, as all enforced delays
usually are. Everyone felt that the
reception, which had been arranged
with a good deal of patriotic ardor
and enthusiasm, would be a comparative failure, after the first delay, and this feeling grew to a certainty as one day was followed hy
another without any definite news
being forthcoming as to when our
vice-regal guests would arrivo, Then
In January next Louis Kossuth
will become a man without a country, says an exchange. He will on
the 9th of that month complete the
period of absence from Hungary
which will terminate and forfeit his
citizenship of that country. His
two sons havo become Italian citizens, and the venerable patriot has
been strongly urged to do likewise,
but he probably will not do so,
It is reported from Japan that
Viscount Ennomoto, the new minister of education, is giving special attention to the introduction of technical education into tho primary
schools of the empire, and that he
has turned to Italy as a model.
His scheme is to include technical
education in the curriculum and of
the preparatory schools, and to give
children technical training from the
outset.
Indented writing upon iron hus
just been successfully done by John
Farrar, an eastern iron foundryman,
by the following process : The impression on the iron is made by writing backwards on thin paper, pinning
the paper in a mould, and then pouring in the iron. The writing thus
transferred to the plates, when the
iron is cooled, is wonderfully clear
and distinct, and is so deeply imprinted as to defy any attempt at
erasure.
A report comes from Sydney that
a butcher named George Winch has
come into a considerable amount of
property in a remarkable manner.
It appears he recently took the liberty of kissing one of his customers
—a good looking girl—who resented
the affront, and had Winch prosecuted for assault. He was fined
heavily by the local magistrates, and
the case attracted much attention
from the press. The publicity given
to tho proceedings happened to arrest the notice of a firm of solicitors
in Sydney who had been appointed
trustees of certain property whicli
had boen left to Winch by a distant
relative somo nineteen years ago and
the solicitors were unnble to find any
trace of the heir. Winch was communicated with by the firm and he
now furnished the history of his antecedents, and established his identity
beyond a doubt:
Sunday is not observed in British
Oolumbia with the care characteristic of other parts of the Dominion.
In the cities liquor is sold ns if there
were no Sunday-closing clause in the
license act; and tho daily papers
are published on Sunday morning as
on ordinary mornings. A prominent announcement in a Vancouver
paper reads thus : "Published every
morning, Monday excepted." So
that the public, yearning for news
which, it is claimed, necessiates publication on Sunday, is left unsatisfied
on the following day, Monday, The
barbers have until very recently
opened their shops for customers on
Sundays, But they now have an
asssociation, one of the rules of
which is that no barber shall work
on the sacred day. The clergy are
making un earnest effort to socuro
the obsorvance of "a Toronto Sunday" throughout the province; but
the American idea is as yet so strong
that the movement is not a success.
—Mail.
A Meeting of Boulangists Called to
Appeal Against the Blection
of a Deputy.
A New Bedford Whaler Fools the
Yankees and Captures 810,000
Worth of Seals.
Some Hopes Still Entertained for
the Safety of Di*. Peters
and Party.
U0ULAN0I8TS rttOTEST.
Paris, Nov. 9.—Tho fact that BoulJ
angiahm is not dend is evident hy an
announcement to-day in tho organs of
that faction The notice states there
will be a mass meeting of the General's
cohorts next Tuesday, and that the participants will march to the Chamber of
Deputies and mako a protest against
the attesting of M. Jonfrain as a representative of Montniartuo district.
Jonfrain, who was a Boulanger opponent in tho late election, roceived only
5500 votes out of a total of 11,200, yet
he was declared elected. The notice
goes on to Btate after bringing this unpleasantly to the memory'of the Deputies and the Boulangists, we inarch
to the residedce of President Carnot
and repeat tho protest to him. It is
considered probably the government
will take Bteps to prevent proposed
demonstration,
LDCKILV DISCOVERED.
Rome, Nov.9.—in Fanfnla reports
that a plot, organized on a large scale,
to seize the mails from India on their
passage through Italy, has been discovered. The mails are received at
Brindisi and dispatched thence overland to England. Their contents are
more valuable than those of any other
mail sont through the continent.
DOUBTS rETEHS DEATH.
Berlin, Nov. 9.—The Tagblatt haa
a special dispatch from Zanzibar which
discredits the story that Dr. Peters
and party wero massacred, and declares
until confirmatory news is received
thero ia no reason to give up hopo.
STRIKE AVERTED.
Loudon, Nov. 9—The threatened
strike of miners in Fife has been averted, tho mine owners conceding 121 per
cent, advance in wages.
LORD MAYOR OF LONDON.
L»ndon, Nov. 9.—The new Lord
Mayor, Sir Henry Aaron Isaacs, was
installed in oflice today. The customary procession, the Lord Mayor'sshow,
took place, embracing the usual foa-
tures.   The weather was cloudy.
EARTHQUAKE.
Tunis, Nov. 9.—Thore was an earthquake here to-day. The shock was too
slight to causo any damage.
FOR TURKEY.
NewYouk, Nov. 9.—Hon, Solomon
Hii-Bch, of Portland, Or., United Statea
minister to Turkey, witli family. Bailed
to-day   on Cunard   steamer Etruria.
LUCKV   TRAIN.
Boston, Mass. Nov. 9.—-Geo Francis Train was released from prison today, Judge Mcliinu ruling he did not
deem him sufficiently insane to he aent
to all asylum nor sufficiently anno to bo
held for debt.
a dense foo.
New York, Nov. 9.—The city has
beeu shrouded ull morning iu a dense
fog almoat unparalleled in the long
continuance of its density. It ia necessary, even to this hour, 11 a.m., to
have gas lighted in many stores. The
elevated railroad traffic has heen much
delayed, trains moving very slowly.
In the harbor tlioro has been much
difficulty in navigating forry boats,
and tho steamship Worn on its way
out, had a narrow escape from collision
with the Chamber's atreet ferry boat
whilo in mid stenm. The steamships
Ethiopia, Etruria, Lacbanipague and
Werra sailed for Europe this morning,
but wore obliged tn wait at quarantine
for tho fog to lift.
A DAD MAN.
Chattanooga, Nov. 9.—Dr. Ker-
chersinda will bo hanged at Ducktown
next Tuesday, as the governor has rofused to interfere. Kerchersinda was
a prominent physician. Ho eloped
with the wife of Jumes Lodforil, and
becoming jcalotiB murdered her by
Bhooting hor through tho head.
UNDER FALSE COLORS.
San Francisco, Nov. 9.—It ia understood that the whaling schoouer
Jane Gray, which is roported to have
captured one whale and left tho nortii
for this port, will be aeized by tho
revenue marine aervice as soon as Bhe
arriveB. The reason given for reported
intended seizure is lhat tho Jane Gray
instead of being a whaler is in reality
an illegal aealcr, and that instead of
having caught a whale and stowed the
bono nnd oil in her hold, she has a load
of sealskins valued at 840,000. The
Jane Gray is owned iu New Bedford.
It is also rumored that she will evade
the seizure by shaping her course for
Honolulu or Japan.
FAILED TO  ESCAPE.
IIuxtsville, Texas, Nov. 9.-Fifteen conviots made an attempt to escape from the penitentiary last night.
A laddor had been placed at the end of
the wall of the institution and four men
hud started up, having first cnuidit one
guard and held him before thom as a
shield against the shots of the others.
Three of them reaohed the top, but the
guard having escaped from thoir hands,
they were fired upon as soon as they
jumped. Uno man was killed and two
others wounded, The fourth was shot
before he reaohed the top.
OROANIZBD MAIL ROBBERS.
Ottawa, Nov. 9.—George Cattalier,
a mail clerk, and his son, havo confessed to a theft of $1,000 from the
mails. Thoy are believed to be mem-
beis of an organized gang.
ROYALTY WELCOMED.
Bombay, Nov. 8.—Prince Albert
Victor of Wales received a most enthu
siastic welcome on Iub arrival in this
city.
TERUVlAN RAILROADS.
Lima, Peru, Nov. 8.—The government has authorized the contract for
tho construction of a railroad from the
rich wine growing districts of Moque-
bua to the port of Illoilo, with connecting branches.
ANTIPODEAN SMALLPOX.
New York, Nov. 8.—South American advices received to-day say that
smallpox has carried off nearly one-
third ot the population of the Falkland
Islands,
NOT BORN CONSPIRATORS.
Baltimore, Md., Nov. 8.—Seven of
the Navassa conspirators have agreed
to confess to a plot to maaaacre the
whites at Navassa and will testify
against the ringleaders.
QUARANTINED FOR SMALLPOX.     ,
New York, Nov. 8.—The steamship
Itheinland, from Antwerp, is held at
quarantine There is a rumor that
smallpox is aboard.
STRONG-MINDED FEMALES.
Chicago, Ills., Nov. 8.—The sixteenth annual meeting of the National
Woman's Temperance Union oponed
its session this morning. All the leaders in tho movement are prosent,
Frances Willard, presiding.
KINDLY ACCEPTED THE CHEQUE.
Baltimore, Md., Nov. 8.— The
Johns Hopkins University has accepted a cheque for $100,000 from Mrs.
Caroline Donovan, of Pittsburg, to
establish a chair of English Legislature.
THE STATE OF TRADE.
New York, Nov. 8. - Messrs Dunn
Ss Co.'s review of trade will Bay: The
business outlook continues to improve.
All the news this week is favorable, for
to the public the event of the decision
adverse to the sugar trust and the exposure and re-organization in the cotton nil trust are hopeful signs. The
monetary situation has decidely improved here and abroad, and while the
Bank of England rate is still held nt 5
per cent., money is quoted in the market at 2tV por cent. That bank has lost
$415,000 for tho week, but tho Bank of
France has gained $55,000, and the fall
in tho foreign exchange to$4.85, or lower, shows that the apprehensions of a
foreign demand for specie have vanished. The volume of business is still
enormous, and the hank clearings for
October exceeded thoBe of last year by
5 per cent. Surplus foreign capital
seeks investment here, but in various in
dustrial works rather than in railroads
nnd tin* quiet*- subscription in England
of $8,000,000 for the purchase of mills,
water-powers and elevators in Minnesota allows that there is no lack of funds
available for enterprises considered to
he safe.
THE DEVOURINO ELEMENT.
Columbus, O., Nov. 8.-The Pioneer Buggy Co.'s factory is burning
and cannot bo saved, ln the building
also aro the Columbus Steel Range Oo.
and Buich Ss Collins, brass finishers.
The tolnl loss is probably $75,000.
A MORMON   BRUTE.
Washington, D. C, Nov. 8.—The
presidi lit has declined to grant the application for tho pardon of E. L Patterson, of Utah, who was convicted of
bigamy and sentenced to two yours in
the penitentiary at Salt iaike City.
His lirat wife has worked hard for hia
pardon, but owing to his brutal treatment of bur and hia evident unropent-
ant demeanoi Attorney-General Miller recommended thut the pardon be
not granted. Tho president therefore
refused it.
TEXAS REDIVIOUS.
San Francisco, Nov. 8.—A special
despatch from Laredo, Texas, says
that a merchant named Mutenas was
killed by two customs oflicora on the
road between Mier and Sumargo, Tex.,
Inst Sundny, because he refused to stop
and bo searched. At Mier the officers
wore lynched. The soldiers nnd gendarmes arrived too late to save their
lives, and in the general battle which
resulted 10 or 15 people were killed
or wounded. The town is reportod to
bo in an uproar,
A STARVINO POPULATION.
Halifax, N.S., Nov. 8.—Thero is a
roport that there is much distress
among the fishermen at Terence Bay
and Lower Proapect, west Halifax,
and it is coulirmed; nearly half the
population in each village is on the
brink of starvation owing to the failure
of the fishing. Twenty or thirty persons of each place, numbering noarly
(100 persons, have consumed every
scrap of food they could obtain. Provisions will have to be sent to them or
many will undoubtedly perish from
hunger,
OTTAWA NOTES.
Ottawa, Nov. 8.—Hon. Mr. Morton, Q. C, judge of probate, and high
Bheriff, Froesee, met in tho former's
oflice in Hampton, N. B., nnd fought
to a finish. The mill grew out of u
caso in whioh a woman tigered prominently.
Tho narrow escape of Lord Stanley
on the Amphion has created great excitement in tho east.
Methodist clergymen are shocked at
the bold utterances of one of tho brethren, Rev. VV. W. Caraon, who at Kingston doolared that ho revorenced the
altars of tho Catholic church and believed in the apostolic succession.
George Catallier, a mail clerk on the
route betwuen here and Port Arthur,
has been arrested by the Dominion
police on a charge of having on his
person decoy letters. Considerable
pilfering has been going on on this
route recently. Catallier is a ton of
Mr. Catallier, the registrar-general,
and who is an applicant for a position
under the secrotary of state,
The collectors of customs have been
notified that the recent order requiring
that the crews of foreign vessels signing articles in Canadian pons must be
engaged before the shipping master of
the port, is not to bo applied to United
States vessels.
STOVES! STOVES!
i(»0    TO-
E. S. SCOULLAR t CO.
-FOR-
Cheap Cooking Stoves & Ranges!
DON'T FORGET THE ADDRESS:
Water & Granville Sis., Vancouver.
 — OB   -PO
SAMUEL MELLARD, • CHILLIWHACK,
Whom we have appointed, our sole agent for our celebrated
Stoves in that district. Mr. Mellard will supply our Stoves at
New Westminster prices. dwnoiyi
Children Cryfor Rtcher'sCtttoria
WHAT EVERYBODY SAYS MUST BE TRUE.
The steady rush of purchasers at ROUSSEAU'S Boot and Shoe
Store shows that our straight-forward way of doing
business  has  given  the people
Perfect Satisfaction.
We offer no unreasonable inducements; our object in advertising
is to give a truthful description of our resources. We have the
largest stock of Boots and Shoes ever exhibited in the Province.
Call and see it before purchasing elsewhere.
Ladies' Kid Button Boots $2.00
Misses     do do      1.75
Children's do do      1.50
Infant's    do do     30
Men's Lace Boots $1.50
Boys'      do         1.25
Youths'  do         1.00
Wigwam Slippers  1.00
These goods are all made in the latest styles and manufactured
from the best home and imported goods. All marked in plain
figures.   Strictly one price at
JAMES   ROUSSEAU'S,
:::::::: NKW WESTMINSTER.
8i Columbia Street,
dwtc
R. J. ARMSTRONG,
DH^I/HIIl   IJST
Choice Family Groceries!
FINEST CREAMERY BUTTER A SPECIALTY.
I___aT_.rad.ox ZHZerring-s*.
*___v___ac_Lserel, Salt Cod,
_^___rrno-u_r's TTnc. _E3Cai»ts,
Armour's TJnc. Bacon.
Flour. Bran. Snorts,
__rHIGHE8T PRICKS PAID FOR FARM PRODUCE.
nomwty Soo-jllar-ArmBtrong Blook, Columbia ft.
C. McDONOUGH,
(LUNDBOM'8 BUILDING, FRONT STREKT)
_D-3-&X_EK   XX*
GENERAL MERCHANDISE!
Constantly on Hand an Extensive Stock of
Dry Goods, Groceries,  Boots A Shoes, Hats A Caps,
Crockery, Glassware, Ae.
MBN'S    *____    _B O "iT _■'    RVITI.
Great Variety of Household Artioles.   Also,
GRAIN,  SEEDS,  POTATOES,  LIME and  GENERAL STORES.
N. B.—Farm Produce bought at market rates ot sold on commission. M.Ordtl_
from the Interior promptly attended to. dwJeSUi
GROCERIES
For First-class Family Groceries and Provisions, go to
SINCLAIR'S,    ■     Oolumbia Street.
New Goods arriving all the time. A nice lot of CHRISTIE S
CRACKERS & BISCUITS just to hand. New SYRUPS, MOLASSES, etc., etc.   Call and get prices. dwtc
JAMES D. RAE
[SUCCESSOR TO D. MoPHADENJ
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF FIRST-CLASS
Groceries and Provisions
JET* M3 ___E__ MM 9    cttz *________ •
Coffees Roasted and Ground on the Premises.   Fine Teas a Specialty.
Uwly 'nmi. OOLUMBIA STRUT VOLUME 34.
mttSjLt BRITISH COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
NO. 46.
WiitKuv British Columbian
Wednesday HornlUK, Nov. 13, lsso.
Ip the report received from Vio-
itoria on Friday, that a number of
gentlemen in that city have formed
themselves into a "Britisli Columbia Agricultural Association," is
correct, we presume tho directors of
the association whioh already bears
that name will at once apply to the
courts for an injunction to restrain
the insolar monopolists from appropriating their property. No one,
of course, objects to tho formation
of any number of associations in Victoria, or anywhere, else; but there is
already a provincial association,
with a provincial name ; and thero
cannot, in the nature of things, be
two.   The new association  is, in-
Such a orystaliz&tion of portions of
Greater. Britain must tend to facilitate tho maintenance of the union
betweon the empire and its various
parts. The example thus set by
Oanada and followed by Australia
will have an influence towards hastening a similar process in South
Africa and elsewhere. Between
the mother country and these great
dominions a combined policy and
concerted action for the good of the
whole will be reached far more
easily than at present. If publio
opinion is ripe for this step, as Sir
Henry Parkes with his excellent
means of forming a judgment is evidently convinced, our Australian
brethren have an easier task beforo
them than the formation of our Dominion, ln tho mother country
they have tho type and will find the
vory foundation of our system of
rosponsiblo government by   tho  re-
deod, founded on the express plea
that it is not provincial.   It owes its: prosentativos of the people under a
stable executive ; from the United
existence to sectionatisin—to the
fact that certain good people on the
island are jealous of New Westminster, and cannot be induced to speak
or think of her with ordinary justice. It is deplorable to find men
■who assume to aet for tho capital of
the province behaving liko sulky
children ; but if they will persist in
such conduct, the only course is to
treat them as sulky children are
treated—apply the birch.
Australians as well as Canadians
are beginning to realize the desirability and necessity for closer trade
relations and better communicative
facilities of all sorts between these
two great and important sections of
the Britisli empire, and there is a
perceptible movement by the more
wide-awake and patriotic men of
both countries towards such a desirable consummation. With respect to commerce, the products of
Canada and Australia are so dissimilar tliat it is obvious u large nnd
thriving trade is destined to be built
up betweon tho southern continent
and the Canadian Dominion, when
•once the proper lines of communication are established. Lower postal
-rates are urgently required botween
Canada and Australia as well as a.
direct lino of steamers, and this is a
matter that tho latter country—or
rather the different colonies into
which Australia proper is divided-
have within their own power to a
great extent, by affiliating with tho
postal union countries. Direct communication by telegraph cable is
anothor desideratum. At presont
our telegraphic connection with
Australia is through European
foreign countries and Great Britain
via the Atlantic ocean. A Pacific
cable from Australia to Canada,
having this provinco for its terminal point on this side of tho ocean,
and completing an all-through Brit
ish telegraphic chain round the
world, is what is wanted, and what
tho indications warrant believing
will before very long be realized,
One serious obstacle, and which still
obtains, to securing closer trade relations and hotter means of communication with our Australasian
neighbors is the absence of any fed
oral head to treat with. On this
point wo aro glad to bo assured by
Mr. Will. Mcllwraith, a prominent
Australian publisher and editor now
in the province, as well as convinced
by unmistakable indications, that
tlio project of u grand Australian
federation, similar to the Canadian
Dominion, is winning ground among
the thinking people aud popular
leaders of the Australasian colonies,
and its realization is only a question
of time, and not a very long time.
The imperial ' federationist cannot
but see in all theso movements the
harbingers of the fulfilment of his
"glorious dream,"
The proposal of Sir Henry Parkes
for a convention of delegates for tlio
purposo of bringing about a federal
government for Australia on the
basis of a federal parliament is a
noteworthy indication of the growth
of a movement of which thero have
been many other evidences, observes
an eastern exchange, which continues: When an experienced statesman like Sir Henry Parkes thinks
that tlio time has como for taking
such a practical step, wo may be
suro that he fouls that he has the
current of public opinion at his
back. IE the policy he favors were
as yot only iii ilioeducational stftgo,
he would avoid such a course, us
obviously being likely to retard -the
progress of the movement rnthor
than to advance it. A declaration
by delegates ugainst such a system of
.government would give tho proposal
a setback, and bo a gravo obstacle
to any further gradual conversion of
tho Australian population. Evidently Sir Honry Pal'kos thinks ho
oan venture to nsk for a manifestation of tho public sontiment on this
question, and doos not fear that it
will be adverse. Tho federation of
tho Australasian colonies into a dominion would not only bo greatly to
tho advantage directly of tho peoplo
immediately concerned, but nlso indirectly of tlm wholo British omptri*.
States, with its federal system, they
can gather some valuablo hints, not
tho least useful of wliich will be
those wliich teach what to avoid;
and in tho Dominion of Oanada
they have an example undor circumstances almost similar to their
own and which affords them the experience of the actual working of
the system. In Australia thoy are
freo from some of the difficulties
which had to be considered here at
the time of confederation, though
on the otlier hand it must be admitted that the Australian colonies
have from several causes entertained
feelings of rivalry that were much
less prevalent in the Nortii American provinces. This rivalry in any
aggressive or invidious form should
not be allowed to stand in the way
of union, and will soon disappear if
public sentiment is prepared to accept Sir Henry Parkes' proposal for
federation. Tho Dominion of Canada will have a cordial welcome and
a hearty sympathy for an Australasian Dominion.
d ni uio houso of deputies it was
defeated by only five votes in a total
of 230. This looks like paving the
wny for an Andover case in the
Episcopal church.
New York's chances of securing
the World's Fair of 1892 seem to be
growing beautifully less every day.
■Chicago leads the running at present, and St. Louis and Washington
are quickening their pace. A meeting of representatives of a number
of the Middle and Southern States
wns held at the latter city the other
day, at whioh a memorial to Congress was prepared which concludes
as follows: "Your memorialists pray
tbat the dignity of the Nation be
not entrusted on the proposed
occasion to the keeping of any corporation, association, or municipality, upon any inducement whatever,
but the Exposition be held at the
National Capital exclusively under
the direction and control of the General Govornment, and that from the
Treasury of the United States, overflowing as it is with revenues far in
excess of the needs of the government, the excess of the expenditures,
if any abovo the receipts, bo met."
LIBEJUTI'S CONCERT.
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
"Well, 1 can't see any fun in at-
tendin' court," said an observant old
lady. "Every time a witness goes
to tell anything that's got anything
to do witli the caso, all the lawyers
jnmp up and holler, and the judgo
rules the testimony out."
Whatever may be said against it,
asphalt paving is growing in favor
throughout America. The New
York board of estimate and apportionment has just placed in its estimates for next year an item of
$100,000, tho greater part of which
is to bo spent in oxtending the area
of asphalt pavement in that city.
Paul du Ohaillu, who first attained
fame by his discovery of the gorilla,
caused a sensation at the recent annual meoting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science
by reading beforo it a papor in
wliich he maintained that the English race is descended from the Vikings. Should this prove to be
true, what effect will it have upon
the Anglo-Israel theory, asks an
exchange
The Duke and Duchess of Oon-
nnught leavo India in March next
and will return homeward by way of
Ceylon, China, Japan nnd Canada,
probably arriving in England in
June. It will be six years on Nov.
26 since his royal highness lirst took
a divisional command in Tndin.
This he held until Septomber 20,
1885. Ho wont out again in September, 1886, to take up a divisional
appointment, and has beon com-
tnandor-in-chieE of the Madras army
since December 11,1886. It will
bo ton years in May next since his
royal highness becamo a general officer, and twenty-two in June sinco
ho joined tho Roynl Engineers as a
subaltern.
Otto, the mad King of Bavaria, is
thus described by one who has scon
him at Fustenried: "Tall and almost as gigantic in stature as his
brothor, tho lato King Ludwig, his
appearance is sufficient to startlo
anyone who has seen him for tho
lirst time. His hair is long und un
kompt, and his bushy brown board
reachos down below his waist.
There is a kind of wild, weird look
iu his eyes, the gaze of which remains steadfastly fixed straight u-
head into empty space The only
person who can succeed in bringing
a gleam nf iiitelligen.e to liis face is
the sixty-year-old Mme. Mario, who
was his nurso when n child, She
is tho only person who is permitted
to speak to him."
The Episcopal convention at New
York came vory near sanctioning
tho otlier day a doctrine to which
Protestantism has over been strongly
oppose'.'. A resolution wus introduced to the effect that tlie committee
on liturgical revision should be instructed to udd to the ollico for the
burial of the (load some suitable
prayer commending tho departed
soul to its Creator and Saviour.
In other words, it wag proposed to introduce a prayer for
tho dead, which would imply belief
in the theory of future probation,
'riio bishops lind puss, cl the resolul ion
The Cily Fatlicrs Manage the Croat Com-
blnalion Like Green Uoom
Vetcrana,
The Opera Houao was gay with banners aud festoons and all that goes to
make a line show, Wednesday night,
Over the stago on the brow ofthe arch
was the legend in gilt letters, "Queon
Victoria is our Spouso." At intervals
around the hull were gilt shields with
theletter "8" in the centre, lnthemid-
dle of the liouse a prolty terraced
dais covered with blooming flowers
and green plants lent an air of charming freshness to the scene. The great
mirrors on tho walls reflected a thou
sand lights, and very kindly showed
one part of fhe audience what the
other part waa doing with itself. The
audience waa a representative one; all
Westminster's fashion, beauty and
wealth camo out to drink in tlio inspired strains of tho finest musical or
gamzation that has over performed
here. Tho disorderly element was
totally absent and tho youngsters in
the gallory were too much overawed
by tho wonderful music to indulge in
much "gnddiahnesa." Promptly at
7:30 o'clock Signor Liberati made his
bow and raised his magic wand and the
band dashed off into a splendid inarch
by Liberati. It iB always a raro treat
to listen to the composer conducting
the rendition of his own work, and if
Liberati stands in tho front rank as a
conductor ho is certainly no novice in
composing. Tho march was full of
boautiful passages and was rapturously
applauded by the audience. Next
came tho grand overture to "Rienzi'
by Wagner. The magnificient rolling
strains and wild, fitful bursts of weird
harmony losing themselves in one
grand climatic crash of euphony, such
as only the works of Wagner, Handel
and llach contain, wero in this pieco
rendered with all tho soul and touch
only possiblo to such musicians as
Liberati and hia wonderful band. The
marvellous precision Bhown by tho
players in tlieir obedienco to the baton
anil tlio expressive gestures of tho conductor threw the audience into the
greatest astonishment. The next number on tho programmo was an old favorite with Weatniiuatcrdaiicers, Walil-
teufel'a lovely waltz, "Estudiantina."
It maybo safely assertedthatasthorich,
swelling music floated out, every note
of it scorning to invito to the "mazy
dance," many had difficulty in restraining themselves from gotting up and
starting an impromptu valso on the
spot. An encore was loudly demanded
and gracefully accorded in a sweet lit
tie piece rivalling in beauty ita prcde
cessor.
Madame Homaui then weuded her
way through among tho chairs of the
musicians and made hoi conge tO
the audionco. Her soprano solo was
beyond criticism hero, but if good
singing means the most ploasurable
ornoi ions in the hearers then it waa very
good singing indeed. Tho personal
heauiy of theainger and her easy, graceful stage presenco quite captivated the
audience, and in reply tn their demands
fur au encore, Madame liomani sweetly
replied in a protty Herman lied, for
which ahe gained enthusiastic plaudits.
Tlio serenade for flute and horn by
Titl wub played by Mosars. (luercai
and Nickel ina mannor that made the
audionco feel that thoy woro listening
to couauinmato masters of melody.
Tbo audionco in the next number was
fairly carried by storm; it wasBounis-
Baeu'a fautiisio, "Robert Bruce," and
consisted of a selection of the boi>t
known songs of Scotland. From the
plaintive, tender nines of "Annie Laurie" the music suddenly would bound
into the grand bravura stiains of "In
tliu garb of Auld Caul" or "Blue Bonnets over the liorder." Then one could
scarcely keep from roars of laughter aa
tlie music slyly slowed round on to
"Willie brewed a peck o'niaut" or tho
"White Cockade." The Scotch clement present, and ihey woro there in
force, was, in lhe classical laiguage of
Yank .eland, "tickled to death." And
when a lirat class imitation of Calo-
don'a wild pibroch skirled out, tho
lightsome "reel o' Tullnch" and "Speed
tlio plough" tho eiithuainsin of tho
Scots wna quite perceptible. The selection linislieil with ii magnificent, triumphant rendition "f "Hole Britannia," nt thu bonolualoii of which the
audionco, quite carried away by the
music, cheered nnd applauded in the
most enthusiastic manlier. In the en-
cure which followed tlm sweet, pathetic
uira of Ireland woro given most touch-
iugly, and Liberati mid hia men j
brought down tho last and heaviest
blow of all on the hearts nl Ilia audi- j
unco by melting away 'nto ilic song of i
■ii ■;.'-, Hi ■ ind.sol-l.ifiV "Hlllill'.SlVOOt!
H me " It seemed aa it the applauae
would never cease, and the great conductor again and again bowed and
smiled his acknowledgements.
Part second opened with the overture to "Raymond" by Thomas; need*
less to Bay it suffered no depreciation
in such hands. The trio from "Atti-
la," by Madame Romani, Siga. PeBoi
and Belli, wub faultlessly rendered.
Sig. Pesci's dress suit had been unfortunately left at the depot, and he had
to sing in a band uniform. Italian
opera in Italian is perhaps a "leetle"
Bupremo for ub here, but this selection
undoubtedly gave the utmost pleasure
to the cultured few. Liszt's Rhapsodic,
Hongroise, No. 2, is an old favorite
with all lovers of the classics in music.
The soul uf the master swept through
every strain, and the wailing aud Bobbing of the wild Magyar melodies telling in music thoir wronga and sorrows
would again give place to the battle
Bhouta of SobieBki's conquering Poles.
To many in lhe audience this divine
selection waa tho piece dc resistance of
the ovoning. The cornet solo by Signor Liberati, "Souvenir de la Suisse,"
composed by himsolf, gave him au opportunity to show hia powors on that
instrument. And after hearing him
the audience well thought that the five
gold medals on his manly chest wero
indisputably well oarned. The rendition
of "Cod Save the Queen," as it was
never played here before, audience
standing, onded this grand concert.
The city counoil are to be congratulated
on their excellent taste in catering so
superbly to the public amusement, and
had they only given this evidenco of
their theatrical ability earlier in the
season every man jack of them would
have beon easily re-elected to the new
council.
A Blrll Null.
Mr. Hall, tho Hudson Bay Co.'s head
officer at Fort Simpson, who has been
making a tour of the interior and is at
present in Victoria, reports the discovery of a rich new creek in Omineca district. He has been giving fhe tip to all
the old miners on Ins way down, ao that
they con secure their claims before the
news becomes genetal and thegold fever
sends hundreds to tho newly discovered
treasure bod. The new find waa flrat
reported by an Indian who made the
discovery while on a hunting trip. Obtaining tho location of the creek from
him, an old miner at once went to tho
placo indicated and found it oven richer
than he had beon led to expect. Very
shallow and easily worked, tho creek
curries a largo amount of gold, $10 being secured to one pan by the prospecting miner. Ho haB settled down, with
great hopes for tho futuro of the creek;
and already the old miners are flocking
about him.—Ooiom'st.
The Fruit Growers.
The B, C. Fruit Growers' Association
held a regular meeting Tuesday afternoon, Presidont J. M. Browning in the
chair. The incorporation of the as*
nociatiun was the most important mat
ter which came up for consideration,
The opinion of those preaent was to
follow tho example of tho Ontario
Fruit Growers' Association and have
the local association incorporated under
the auspices of the government. The
matter was left in the hands of tho
president to got into shape by nost
meeting. It wns decided to subscribe
to the Ontario Hbr.iiittl.uri--.' A suggestion was thrown out that atthe next
meeting, in January, 1890, papors on
fruit culture and such subjects bo submitted by Messrs. T. Cunningham, fi.
W. Honry, C. Hutcherson, E. Harris,
O. D. Sweet, A. C. Wells and others,
It was suggested that tho president
make un addross on that occasion,
Samples of fruit and vegotablos wore
shown by some of tho membors and ex
amined by those present.—IFoiJc..
CRIMINAL COURT.
Before His Honor Judge Hole.
All Foo, indicted for porjury, elected
Tuesday to be tried summarily and
his trial was fixed for December 4th,
bail being takon in 84,000 tor his appearance. Mr. Hatninersly prosecutes
and Mr. McColl defends.
John Bradley, oharged with Btoaling
goods from Ellard it Co.'s store,
cleotod to be tried by jury.
Mr. Eckatein nsked his honor If he
would hear an application from H.
Dominy, charged with stubbing an Indian boy, as it was probablo lie would
consent to bo tried summarily.
His honor said: "I wish in this
caso to direct attention to tho fact
that the law has made stabbing a vory
serious offenco, and I feel that in any
ciiBO of conviction before mo that I
shall bo co-ercod in the discharge of
my public duty to inflict severe sentences." His Honor conoludod by
saying ho would hear the application
ou Monday.
In the last number of the Dominion
J.Uttsit-a.__l, Hamilton is well represented both as tn ica leading men and to itB
arcliitectural features—claiming three
entire pages. "Thn meet nf the Ottawa Ciiniie Olub" will gratify canooiats
at the capital and elsewhere. Sportsmen will enjoy "Where's tho Field)"
and the Noon-Day Nap is u blissful reminiscence of the Biimmor that is no
more. Tho Dominion Illustrated ia
published by the Dominion HliiBtrated
Publishing Compnny, Mr. G. E. Dos-
barut8, managing-director. Subacnp-
tiou, $4. Addreas; 73 St. James
street, Montreal.
D. S. CURTIS & CO.
AGENTS B. LAURANCE'S SPECTACLES.
Wholesale and Retail Druggists
NEXT COLONIAL HOTEL. NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Holden at   Chilliwack.
mill'.   NEXT  SITTING   of   III,'  nl.o.e
1    Court will bo liclil on TUKSUAY llio
ituii iln. iirNiivconiii'r. a. ii. Ifiwi.
Uwoi-MIll W. 11. ',''.*. 1,111 Nil.
BON  MARCHE,
SPECIAL BARGAINS in New Dress
Goods, Jackets, Paletots, Dolmanettes,
and Ulsters.
A Large Assortment of MEN'S SUITS
from $7.00.
WALKER & SHADWELL,
awn-tOte COLUMBIA STREET.
BUGGIES!     PUGGIESI
JUST RECEIVED,
A CAR-LOAD OF
Pell, Rice Coil-spring rfeLaagWan
_8___S MJ -________- «___£ _J_S_ "B33 SP
 AXSO	
DUPLEX, HANDY,  BRADLEY & OTHER
Democrat and Express Wagons!
mW The Best and Cheapest Rigs ever offered for sale in
British Columbia.""!!
Uwap.to
"■R-eicl db Ourrie.
mm m it ht.
W. A G. Woifeii
Cor. Columbia and Mary Sts., New Westminster.
The above named firm having fully decided to retire from the
Dry Goods Business and confine their attention to the Grocery
Business for the future, now offer the whole of their
Choice, New, Well Selected and  Well Bought Stock of Dry
Goods and Clothing at
A rare chanco is now offered to iatending purcha8ers, aa the atock consists of
gooda juat suited for tiio present and cominc season. All fresh and in prime order
and purchased in the bost foreign markets at rock    ttom prices.
Salo to commence on Monday, the ldth instant, and to continue until the whole
of tho stock has heen closed out.    KEMEMBER THE PLACE:   Corner of Col
umbia ami .Mary Streets.
W. & G. WOLFENDEN.
ROYAL CITY
llllg
8 ill jllj
RICHARD STREET, NEWWESTMINSTER.
MASOFACI'l'IlEHS A!in DEALERS IN
MKMsofMi!iaiO_s*1Lil:n-
Shingles, Shakes, Laths, Pickets,
SALMON BOXES, NET FLOATS, TRAYS,
js.Tsn> -A.M. ici_sms OS-
Wood Furnishing for Canneries.
Doors.   Frames,   Windows-,
_ffl®u_Utiii.__.8« Bal asters*.
SSSiaids. Brockets,
Railings*, Newels.
PLAIN m KMl AHD All KINDS OF TURNED WORK,
nolOdVi'ly VOLUME 34.
WEEKLY BRITISH OOTTTMBTAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
MtttttlMIMM-iain'MIl 1 111    H     *HIHIllM   11 l_Ml—i ■ !■!■ ll IIIIIWIII1 III !■■! HIT.. !■—■11l,ll*_|ll^—IMIIIIf I   ll  HI Mill
NO. 40.
Weekly British Columbian
-Wednesday Horning, Nov. 13. It»_>.
It would appear that tho Gov
ernor-General during his tour
through the Northwest was the recipient of an address, amongst the
numerous documents of welcome,
from the Mormons of the Northwest
Territories. The address was kindly and loyal in its tone. It declared
devotion to hor majesty the Queen
and good feeling for Lord Stanley.
"Our prophet Joseph," it added;
"hath discerned that of all the kingdoms of the world, the British principalities, by reason of their high integrity and their judicial purity,
will be the last to fall; and it is for.
this reason, ns well as from un affectionate admiration of her own
womanly virtues, that wo invoke
the blessing of heaven upon the
sovereign of these vast realms." His
Excellency's answer to the Mormon
deputation lias been mndo public.
The Governor-General, according to
a report of the address-presenting
ceremony, "replied very happily,
heartily welcoming the Latter-Day
Saints to Canada, saying that the
country was free to all creeds, and
to as many of their people as desired to come." An eastern cotemporary thinks, not altogether without reason, that there is considerable room for difference of opinion
as to the advisability of throwing
open the door and cordially inviting
the Mormons to como in. If the
Mormons nro those of the non-polygamous sort, says our eoteinporiiry,
and if, in addition, tlicy are peaceable and industrious, Canadians
generally will not object to the hearty welcome oxtended them, or to
the invitation offered to other Mormons to make this country thoir
home. But it is pointed out tlmt,
although the Mormons in the Canadian Northwest lmve been officially
reported to bo all hard-working,
non-polygamous setilers, themselves
denying that they are polygamous,
it is to bo questioned if they are not
simply holding the obnoxious doctrine in abeyance till u convenient
time arrives for putting it in practice. To judgo from tlie frequent
printed ebulitions of the irrepressible Maitlimd Stenhouse, whilom
M.P. P. for Comox in this province,
and now high-priest of the North
west Mormon colony, he, at any
rate, is determined to exercise the
salient privilege of Mormonism and
involve himself in a double knot.
The latest proposal of the astute
Stenhouse, who, it appears, is still a
bachelor, is to take unto himself a
plurality of wives at onco nnd thus
try and evade the technical objection
of the law against bigamy. Mait-
land will evidently bear watching,
and so, undoubtedly, will the entire
colony of his co-religionists in the
Northwest. If they can be pro-
vented from transgressing the laws
of the country in the direction to
which they are most liablo. the
Mormons, with their industrious,
hard-working habits, will be an acquisition to the Northwest. Judging, however, from tho experience
of our American neighbors with
these people, they are far from
being an unmitigated blessing to
any country.
The Liberal-Unionists are just
now discovering that, as an eminent statesman put it, "England
does not love a coalition." Things
are rapidly regaining the old equilibrium, and already, practically, the
country is again Liberal and Tory,
lt is evident from recent speeches
that both Lord Hartington and Mr.
Chamberlain perceive, ulthough they
refuse to own it, that Liberal-Unionism is an unknown quantity, except
on the floor of the House of Commons, and exists there only by reason of the Septennial Act, which
permits a member to sit long after
liis constituents have no furthor use
for him. While the recent by-elections have emphatically shown that
the opinion of the peoplo is for
Home Rule in Ireland, the Tory
newspapers have begun to grumble
ominously at the relative positions
of the two wings of the Tory-Unionist army. Thoir complaint is not
without reason. "Why," in effect
say these prints, "why i3 it that our
side (tho Tories) have to bear all
the blame 1 You Liberal-Unionists
who aro helping us by your votes
should also share your responsibility by representation ih the cabinet." But the seceders from the
old flag are cunning as serpents, if
not quite as harmless as doves, and
hesitate before committing themselves so far. There may come a
time, and beforo long, when questions of moment will open up, upon
■which all Liberals who have a shred
of Liberalism left will be able to
fight shoulder to shoulder, and
should that day come, the men who
have sheltered themselves in the
fancied security of the Tory cabinet
will lind it well nigh impossible to
do as they would wish. Just now
tho Liberal-Unionists appear to havo
proved tho truth of tho adago that
"botween two stools you aro likely
to como to the ground," Something, however, has to bo done if
these gentlemen are to continue in
political life. Goschen has already
chosen. He is in the Tory net, and
will never be wanted again by
thorough-going Liberals. Hartington is too good a man to be lost for
ever to the Progressive Party, and
it is unlikely he will so far commit
himself as tq take office in a Conservative-cabinet. Chamberlain is
the Judas of Liberalism, and the
Radicals, whom he has wantonly betrayed, will never trust him as they
once did. He was once the grand
young man of the Liberal hope; to
day he is hated by the rank unci file,
distrusted by his late colleagues, and
despised by the Tories, who, now
they have no further use for him,
ure only anxious to see him shelved
out of the way. It seems as though
he perceives all this, for, like a libertine, one day all boisterous recklessness, the next depressed almost to
madness, he first of all dreams of a
great "National Party" (to be led by
himself of course),
"When none are for a party,
But all are for tho state;
When the rich man helps the poor
And the poor man loves the great"
And   then   the vision fades, and lie
talks of  retirement.   Poor  Chamberlain ! he seems to havo lost   his
political balance ever since  he was
deprived of the support   afforded by
Sir Charles Dilke's skirt tails. It is
a melancholy picture to see the mun
who once was the most advanced in
the conquering Liberal host, now reduced to such pitiable plight   that
there are "nono so poor to do   him
reverence."
Portugal, and its offuirs have
been brought into momentary pio-
minence, observes an exchange, by
the death of King Luiz, a sovereign
remarkable more for the elegance of
his tastes nnd his literary accomplishments than for his abilities as a
ruler. Portugal, however, is an interesting country of which, notwithstanding the cordial connection
which has always existed between
it and Great Britain, most people
know nothing, or next to nothing,
more than the bare facts relating
to its history and policy as a European state. The literature of Portugal, especially its ballads, curiously
preservative of an Arabic and Saracenic origin, is a mine that has yet
to be explored by English students.
The Portuguese have beon famous
as seafaring adventurers from tho
earliest times and have always been
remarkable for their success in dealing with savage peoples. It is
claimed that Portuguese traders had
penetrated every nook and cranny
of Africa, from tho Zambesi to the
Congo and Niger, on the north, and
the Zanzibar coast on the east, in
search of gold and ivory, long before Livingstone or Stanley set foot
on the dark continent. They are a
peoplo without prejudices in matters
of trade and, being devoid of color
antipathies, intor-marry with blacks,
yellows and reds in their colonies,
from these unions a curious race has
developed that is known throughout
the tropics for keeness and unscru-
pulousness as traders. British creditors of the Portuguese government
are numerous, and the recent trouble at Delagoa Bay was in the nature of an effort to throw off the
yoke imposed by British capital and
enterprise. In spite of their adventurous character the Portuguese
are the most conservative people in
the world. It seems that in ideas
and habits, they are incapable of
progressive change and every ,year
they drop farther in the rear of the
march of European progress. The
new king is said to be energetic and
ambitious, and may possibly find
full employment for his abilities in
the work of internal reform, of
which the kingdom stands greatly in
need.
Tuk addresses of the two candidates for legislative honors are now
bofore tho public in public print.
If any one wishes to know just how
mnch Westminster wants, and must
have, they are respectfully referred
to these documents, Seriously, both
addresses display an intimate knowledge and an intelligent appreciation
on the part of their authors of the
requirements of this constituency,
while both, it must be admitted, are
circumscribed in their horizon with
regard to provincial politics. This
being tho closing session of the
present parliament, as Mr. Oorbould
remarks, he does not think it necessary to detail his views as to general
legislation. Mr. Cunningham is
evidently of tho samo mind, as he
confines himself to questions immediately affecting this city and
district, Westminster first, and
last, would appear to bo the motto
of both candidates. As this spirit
is to a great extent tho actuating
principle in our provincial politics
at present, it follows that disposition and ability to look out for Numbor Ono—Number Ono boing the
interests of his constituency, nnd
not simply his own private interests
I —is a necessary virtue  in a candi
date. Westminster, with its absurdly small representation in comparison with some other places,
certainly requires that its single representative should be a faithful and able champion of its
rights and interests, and at
the same time qualified to
act intelligently, creditably, and
for the common good, on all
questions of general legislation.
The most important issue which will
come before tho next and last session
of tho present parliament is undeniably the redistribution of seats question. Both candidates seem to realize this, and tn be practically unanimous on all other questions which
ihey touch besides. Tho unprejudiced elector will not be able to find
grounds for doubting the presont
sincerity of cither, and the only question seems to be, Who is likely to
prove the most faithful and able in
carrying out his promises 1 Personal
predilection is bound to largely affect this verdict. Notwithstanding,
however, the similarity of policy ami
views of the two candidates, tlioro
is every indication that the contest
will be   an   interesting and   close
A SNOW STORM
In the Southeastern States Blocks
Railways and Destroys Ten
Thousand Cattle.
The people of Ontario, says an
eastern exchange, are becoming disgusted with the steady manufacture
of criminals that is going on in that
province, as elsewhere throughout
the continent. On a Sunday recently the pulpit generally protested
against sending mon und women to
gaol who, on trial, were proved not
guilty of any crime ; against sending children, guilty only of their
first minor offence, to reformatories
and prisons, where there is no clus-
silication of prisoners und when; the
comparatively innocent juveniles
are educated in crime by the vicious
and depraved ; ngninst keeping men
in idleness in prisons, when reason
nnd the public interest call for iheir
employment at some useful trade ;
ngninst turning criminals out upon
the world again, detested and abhorred, and to prey upon society,
instead of the state providing somo
menus, by employment on publio
works or other honest livelihood, to
enable them to regain their former
status as honorable citizens. All
these points were emphasized and
a large amount of valuable information wns conveyed to the public
which oould not fail to convince all
doubters, of the absolute wickedness
of tho present system of, so-called
punishment, under which crime increases, and the public, as well as
the prisoners, is being punished.
The operation of grinding out criminals in the Toronto polico court
was described with great effect, this,
of course, being the great criminal
mill of the province, although courts
scarcely second to it in this regard
may be found elsewhere in Canada.
The injustice of many of the sentences imposed in police and higher
courts was boldly criticized and liy
men entitled by their legal attainments and experience in affairs to
challenge the decision even of the.
highest judges, one of the speakers
being the Hon. S. H. Blake. A demand was made for the Ontario
government to appoint a commission
to investigate the question of crime
and its causes, tho condition of the
provincial prisons and reformatories,
and the steps to be taken to bring
about needed reforms. Stress was
laid upon the necessity for provid
ing houses of detention to which
persons accused of crimes and offences should be taken pending their
trial; so that those who were shown
to be not guilty might uot be subjected to tho stain of the gaol. It
was always demanded that in every
prison there should be suitable employment, thus reducing the cost of
incarceration and providing somo
honest trado for those who must return to mingle with their fellow
men, It was held, too, that the policy of indeterminate sentences, rather than fixed sentences, should be
adopted, thus supplying to the prisoners in provincial institutions a
strong motive to good conduct and
selfimproveniont, making the period
of thoir detention depend largely
upon themselves. It is evident that
a popular agitation along these lines
will bo carried on by many able
men, and already public sentiment
is being rapidly crystalizcd in behalf
of the movement, It is clear that,
notwithstanding the excellent sys-
tora of popular education in Ontario,
and the efforts of churches, Sunday
schools, and moral influences of every
kind, the people are becoming
alarmed ovor the existence of so
much crime in tlieir midst. They
are, no doubt, correct, thinks the exchange quoted from, in believing
that the criminal punishment system
as administered by the provincial
authorities is spreading rather than
reducing crime, and they are moving in tho right direction to bring
about the necdod reform. The agitation will bo watched with interest
throughout tho Dominion.
The Russians Accuse Lord Sal isbury
of Insincerity in His Lord Mayor's Day Speech.
Mr. Parnell's Action Against the
"Times" for Libol Adjourned
till Spring.
Rev. J. A. S. Allen, of Cobourg,
Ont., has accopted a call to tho pastorate of Graco Methodist church, Winnipeg.
SNOW  BLOCKADE.
Denver, Col., Nov. 11.—Tho snow
blockade ou tlio Denver, Texas Ss Fort
Worth R.R., which was brokon Saturday after lasting eight days, by the arrival of the lirat through train from tho
south, roports a and condition of affairs
along tbo line, aa entiro towns and
ranches within a radius of liftoen and
twenty miles wore short of suppliea
and aomo entirely cleaned nut. lt is
pronounced by atuckmeii the heaviest
ever experienced any soaaon in tho
south. The loss of caltlo and shoep
haa boen enormoua. Tho depth nf
anow has averaged over threo foot on
the level. The reports of loss of lifo
among cowboys und aheop borders
eoiiiiuu'.i increasing, At Union,N.M.,
the loss ot caltlo tilono will roach 10,000
find'.oieralcompanies will be ruined.
ATTEMPTED ESC'APH.
Fresno, Oiil., Nov. 11.—While tho
prisoners in tho citv jail, numbering
■2'.), were iu tho corridor Saturday
night, they attempted to escape but
worn trustiated by the prompt action
of the jail officials, nnd returned to
their cells.
ANGRY  DAUGHTERS.
Charleston, S.C., Nov. 11.—There
is trouble in ihe order of the King's
DaUnlltoi'B hoio. The royal chapter,
winch is composed of delegates fi'iiin
various circles in tho Btate, met horo
yosterday and wus filially ntteuded.
The Binull iiitoiiilnnoe was attributed
to the publication in thu neivspopcr of
a ciirtl, supposed to have been written
by a prominent member, ami in whicli
the writer urged tho King's Daughters
tn got U|i a petition to Queon Victoria
for tin* pardon of Mrs. Maybrick. It
is said the uui'licittiini of this letter kept
many ul the delegates from tho meet-
in_>. Tin; mutter wns nut formally
discussed, hut thu Indies who wero
present wore angry at the publication.
.'. I'llINTEUs'  QUARREL
Salt Lake Citv, Nov. 11.—Two
printers, Prank D. Romayne and T.
M. Hughes, typo setters in the Tribune
oflico here, met in front of tho oflico
yesterdny afternoon und renewed a
quarrel which hud been going on for
two weeks. Both were armod and
Hughes Bred live shots, ono shot going
through Roinayno's body, killing him
in a few minutes. Hughes was ar-
roatod.
heat the record.
San Francisco, Nov. 11.—The atr.
Oceanic arrived from Hong Kong and
Yokohama this morning, thirteen dnys,
fourteen hours and four minutes frnm
the latter port, the fastest time on
record.
UNFORTUNATE JOHNSTOWN.
Johnstown, Ph., Nov. 11.—The long
bridge connecting Cambria and Millvule
was entirely demolished this morning hy
the high water anil driftwood in the Coii-
e'maugli river. The loss of the structure
will greatly retard the removal of dend
bodies from Millvale cemetery to their
permanent resting-place in Prospect cemetery. Lust night the Christian church,
Main atreet, waa badly damaged by lire.
MODJESKA AND BOOTH.
New York, Nov. 11.—Madamo Mod-
jeaka indignantly denica the truth of the
article published this morning to the effect that aho would apply for the annulment of her contract ou account of
Booth'a tmgentletnanly conduct. She
aaya aho ia, and always has been, friendly with Booth, and has no doubt will
continue bo till tho end of tho season.
THAT BLOODY COTTON.
Chicaoo, Nov. 11.—Tho first witness
thia morning in the Cronin trial waa Dr.
Belflcld'a stenographer, who testified that
Capt. Schaack gave Dr. Belfield some
bloody cotton on tho morning of May
6th. This was to trace the connection
of blood from the trunk to Belfield.
THE  CATHOLIC CONGRESS.
Baltimore, Nov. 11.—Tho Catholio
congress began its session this morning. Tho delegates, numbering 1200,
assisted at solemn pontifical high mass
in the morning, celebrated by Archbishop Corrigun of Now York. Tho
aormon was preached by Archbishop Groaae, of Oregon. Ho welcomed the delegates and gavo a brief
outline of the history of the church in
America for lho past hundred yoars.
At the conclusion of the aoriuun the
delegates marched to Concordia opera
houae. Tho congress was called to order at 11:15 a. m., by Wm. J. Onahan,
of Chicago; Archbishop Ireland, of St.
Paul, prayed that tho liglit of tho Holy
Spirit might bo shod ou the deliberations of the congress. Mr. Onahan
next read a measure from tho Pope,
whose name waa greeted with trc-
mendous applause. Tho measago road:
"Having made known to tho Holy
Father tho expressions of dovotion conveyed to him on tlio part of tlio Catholic congrosa to bo held in Baltimore,
His Holiness graciously bids me to say
ho offers his affectionate blessings to
all tho members. (Signed). Cardinal
Rnnngolla-" Mr. Onnhan then welcomed tho delegates of foroign countries as woll as of tlio United States,
and hoped that in 1802 thoy would
havo tho pleasure of welcoming thom
to tho International congress. Among
thoao on tho stngo woro Bisnops Vir-
tuo, of England, Foley, .of Detroit,
Fathor Hayburn, of Mexico, ond many
other prolatos, priests, otc. Governor
John Leo Carroll, of Maryland, wa3
then elected temporary chairman, and
tlio following Bocroturics appointed:
Leo Hamilton, of Georgetown Collego;
fi. F. Edwards, of Notre Dame University, of Indiana; W. S. McDonald,
of Boston College; J. P. Fisher, of the
Iuiinaciil.-ito Concnptioii Collego, New
Orleansi'Romity Raybere, of St. Louis
College, and John M. Duffy, of Chicago. A long list of vice-presidents
from each state was also read.
specie decreased.
Berlin, Nov. 11. - The apecio iu the
Imperial Bank mis decreased 640,000
marks during the past week.
TO REORGANIZE.
London, Nov. 11—The associated
Amsterdam and Loudon committee of
tho Missouri Kansas and Texas RR.
securities havo decided-on a reorganization plan for converting tho various
classes of bonds into now 4's d voting
trust has been created.
VERY PROBABLE.
Paris, Nov. 11. -TheSaliel saya tho recent interview between tho Czar and
Bismarck resulted in a decision to oust
Ferdinand from tho Bulgarian throne.
AN ARTIFICIAL SPEAKER.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 11.— Tho
Nove Vremga auys Lord Sulisbui'y'a
speech at tho Lord Mayor's banquet
on Saturday night displayed optimism
that was artificial and insincere, and
Ids' prediction uf unbroken peace, as
tho outcome of present tendencies, incredible.
mysterious disappearance,
Belgrade, Nov. 11.—Considerable ox
citement has been aroused here hy the
mysterious disappearance of M. Cristite-
ly, formerly Servian minister at Berlin.
He has suddenly dropped out of aight,
and uo one eooma to know what haa become of him.
WILL COME  OUT AN  OLD MAN.
San Franoisco, Nov. 0. - Julian
Portilli, who murdered John Mofsutt,
his partner in thu chicken peddling
bUBineaa, was sontenood tu thirty yours
in tlio still-' prison to-day.
MORE HANGING NEEDED.
San Fhancisco, Nov. 0 - Inflammatory circlularsare being quietly distributed tu-duy by local socialists, announcing that a memorial meoting will bo
held Monday evening next to com-
inouioi-iite llm atmivoraary of the execution nf iho Chicago anarchists, and
urging ull workijignien to attend.
TO  PREY   AGAIN  ON   SOCIETY.
Baltimore, Nov. !).-(ieorge Bell,
alias Williamson, one of tho most notorious forgers in America, was re-
leased from tlio Maryland penitentiary
to-day, having completed a leu years'
sentence. Eto was tho accomplice of
Chus. O. Brookwuy, tho prince of forgers, in doing forgoriea by which they
got 810,000 from Baltimore bunks.
LIBEL  ADJOURNED.
London, Nov. 0.—Mr. Parnell's
action for libel against the Times baa
been adjourned until spring. Mr.
Gladstone, upon being questioned us to
whether his proposed Irish parliament
would havo power to endorse Roman
Catholic educational institutions in
Ireland, aaid the Irisli parliament
should not huvo thut power nnd that
denominational education ought to bo
abolished iu Grout Britain, But this
would mt pleaae sectarians of England
and Scotland.
CHURCH   MATTERS.
London, Nov. il.—Mr. Spurgeon
has severed his connection with the
Baptist Missionary Socioty, with tho
intention of forming ;i Tabernacle Society to send independent niiasioua
abroad. Dr. Parker has accepted tho
presidency uf tho Congregational
Onion of 181)0.
NEW THEATRICAL OLUB.
London, Nov. 0.—The nciive managers of the Loudon theatres have
formed a club society which is to be
exclusively uf their own. The committee consists of Augustus Harris,
Abud, Hollingshead and Greet.
mu. parnell's health.
London. Nov. O.—The reports us tu
Mr. Purtiell's ill health nro happily unfounded. Ho is in much better health
than at this time lust your and regards
this coming session with more interest
than any preceding one of thia parliament. It ia his opinion that tho government will fall, uot, perhaps, in tho
next session, but in that which follows.
Mr. Parnell scorns to have a very clear
opinion bb to the proBent duty of the
opposition; that tho government should
now be resisted and opposed on the
ground that it has no valid claim to
represent tlie country. It has never
reproBonted Ireland, Scotland or Wales
and now that England too- Iiub -turned
against it, tho time haa arrived when
quite at the beginning of the session its
claim lo legislate for the peoplo, who have
intimated a want of confidence, should
be stoutly denied. Thore is good reason to believe, that theae opinions are
r.ot hold alone by tho IriBh leaders,
but alao by the liberal leaders generally, and that iu February thoy will bo
acted upon with a view to forcing the
government to make an appeal to the
country. It is already practically
agreed that at the opening of the session the whole woight of the opposition
will bo given to the amendment to tho
addri'ssdircctly ohullonging tho position
of tho govornmont.
WILL LIVE AT C'OBURO.
London, Nov. O.—The Duke und
Ducheas of Edinburgh and thoir
daughters have gono to Coburg. Tho
duke is preparing to reaido thoro permanently.
THE PREMIER'S SPEECH.
London, Nov. !).—Lord Salisbury,
speaking at tho Lord Mayor's banquet
in tho Cuild Hall tonight, congratulated the country ou the expansion of
its trade, warned tho labor agitators
that in pursuing their courso they undertook a great responsiblity and ad-
viBcd tho employers to bo cautious, os
imprudonco un thoir part would jeopardise tlieir interests. Tho prosperity of
Ireland, ho asserted, was increasing,
and disorder was consequently disappearing. Tho government hud not
indulged in any wild theories of Home
Rulo, but wns ready to furthor any
practical and satisfactory policy for
Ireland's good. Tho government's
Egyptian policy romainod uncliongod,
Egypt, at present, being unable to protect horsolf without British assistance.
The tendency of Europe waa peaceful
and the great powers were of one accord
in wishing to avoid a conflict.
A RADICAL OPINION.
London, Nov. 9.—Noarly all the
members of the government atiended
the Lord Mayor's b-niquei to-day. A
number of other Tory members uf parliament are also in tho city, and those
are clearly of the opinion that tho reverses whioh tho government have suffered in the recent elections will incline tho party in power to bold on
firmly to the end. "Two more sessions and perhaps three" is thu reply
in the mnutha of ministers to the quostion whether lhe iioverninent will remain in power. But when tho question is put tn them, "Whul will yuu
propose or do in order to justify such
a retention of power?" thero is nu response. Except that something will
be proposed abnui tho Iriah hind question next session, there i8 a genernl
licliof that Lord Salisbury ami Lurd
Hartington aru both opposed tu any
relaxation uf the policy of coercion
und ti. any largo aoiiemu of local government. The heavy-weights uf iho
gnvernment nro certainly disposed to
go with Lord Selhoiii'iie in objecting
to a vory heavy programme for next
session. Tlioro nre minor members of
the government win, think that there-
will bo do difficulty whatever in resiat-
ing such invitations' us tbu-o uf Mr.
Chamberlain and Mr Onurteiiay to a
vulumniuua programme. Tho Tories
du nut think thut. any uf the dissentient Liberals will really try tn "bull"
just yet. Such iiu attempt may happen, thev any, Inter un in tlm life of
thii parliament n-lieii tho critical time
of a gencrnl electinn is nonr at hand.
But fur the moment thii sentiment nf a
common danger is upon nil the ministerialist party nnd thoir first impulse
ia to hold together and no un fur a
time._ That the government will fall
tu pieces whenever it enters upon a
new Irisli policy, i- un opinion ou
which the leading Tories and the loading Liberals nnd Mr. Parnell himself
are all agreed,
A GORY WRETCH.
New Orleans, Nov. 8. —A butchery,. ■
probably tho work uf an insulin man,
uccurod nn Wodnesday nt Bayou Biouf,
La., iu which two men were killed und
four desperately wounded. Quite a
number of people had gathered at a
hamlet to attend a "wake;" Among
theso wns Leon Thibodeaux, who wns
standing on the railroad platCdim, A
stranger approached Thibodeaux and
shipped him familiarly on tbo back.
Thibodeaux remonstrated with the
man, who for an answer drew a long
knifo and plunged it into Thibodeoux's
buck and neck. His brother, Neil
Thibodeaux, run to liis assistance and
was nlso met hy tlio stranger's knife,
which was thrust into his throat, partly
severing-one of the arteries and causing
hiin to fall to tho ground frum loss of
blood. Meanwhile Leon Thibodeaux
had succeeded in drawing his revolver
and fired ono shut at his assailant without hitting him. Molns Thibudoaux,
a cousin nf the wounded men, then ran
to tlieir nsaistance, to bo met in turn
with tho knife dripping with the blond
of his relatives, lu an instant it had
been plunged into hia buck and side inflicting two ugly wounds. Frank
Penuison ran to tbo aid oftho wounded
men. The Btran_:er plunged his knifo
intu Penuiauti'a honrt, and tho pool-
follow fell over uud died almost without a groan, Tho stranger thou sprang
upon Joshua Morrison, a one-armed
employee nf tlm railroad. Morrison
made a gullant light and succeeded in
knocking down the murderer several
times befuro ho fell himsi-lf, with ten
cula on hia porauu. Tho murderer
then run to tbe bayou tuid'stepping into
a skiff pushed ufl'into tbo stream. Mr.
Auohem pursued linn, and aftor firing
several shots struck tho murderer, who
tumbled into tlie bayou nud sank out
of sight.	
The ritlnii simmers.
It will ho learned with pleasure that
no change in tho present line of stunners running between Vancouver and
Japan will occur, the arrangements
heretofore existing continuing until the
new steamers are put on. At no time
was thore any danger of the discontinuance of the Bervice, as the management of the Canadian PaoiBo Navigation Company had determined to
maintain it, but whatever truth there
existed as to the rumours of tho intended withdrawal rf the ships horotoforo
chartored, it ia now certain thot such
intention will not be carried intu effect.
—News.
Clillllwnck Council.
Tho municipal council of Chilliwack
held their regular moeting on Nov. 7th.
Preaent—Conna. Recce, Armstrong, Kennedy, Bayley and Lickman. His worship the reevo being absent, Councillor
Reece wus iinaiiimoaaly voted to tho
chair. Minutea of provioiiB meeting wero
road anil adopted. Communications
wero received from G. K. Ashwell, D.
ltohaon, D. McGillivray, A. C. Wells,
H. Webb, W. Snider, Geo. Rutherford,
N. Munro, W.H. Caw.ey aud Joseph
Gibson. The following accounts were
received, aad ordered paid: C. P. N.
Co., .10.25, freight nn hn i from Pop-
cum Mill; Knight Bros., $60.00, supply
of lumber; C. Midglev, .6; Chaa. Hooao,
§6; Joseph Pcei-B, 820, repairing Mountain road; Alex. McBrido, $35, repairs
to Chilliwack river road; Theo. Willie,
§100, construction of Luck-a-kuck river
bridge; Chaa. Allitt, $36.44, repairs to
bridge on Hoove's road. T. H. Irwin's
bill of,.100.7U, for gravelling on Trunk
road laid over till next meeting. On motion,
Postmaster A. C. Wella was instructed
to expend *?25 on tho Luck-a-kuck river
crossing. On motion, tho board of
worka waa ioatructcd to examine the sito
for tho proposed road through A. Reeve's
farm, and ropc-t at next meeting. On
motion, N. Munro's request for un extension of timo to complete contract waa
granted; time extended to Dec. lat. On
motion, 1'ostmaater Cawley was instructed to repair the rond leading to Hopo
slough around the Shannon mountain.
Council adjourned to meet 30th November, 1S8D, wheu the voter's Hat will be
comploted, VOLUME 34.
WEEKLY BRITISH COLUMBiAtJ, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
NO. 40.
wttKLY Bmri-iH Columbian
Wcilntailay Monilim. Nov. Ill, 181111.
{From Daily Columbian, Nov. 11.)
Royal, the Nnniumo horse, beat
Maud, the Ladunrs horse, two bents
nut of three, for a purso of $1000, ut
Queen's park mi Saturday afternoon.
The Bemi annual oxaminatiun of applicants for entrance to the high school
ia announced tn bo held in the central
sclmol buildhm, this city, nt 9:30 a.m.,
on Wodnesday, Nov. 27th.
The str. Princess Louiao arrived
from Victoria this morning with 25
passengers and 130 tons freight. She
left on tho return trip this aftornoon
on the arrival ot the Pacitic express.
Bev. Mr. Haddon, of St. Paul's (R.
E.) church, preached tho funeral sermon laat evening of Frank Emerson,
tho young mnn who met his death by
the runaway accident last week. ^ A
large congregation listened to the impressive discourse delivered.
Tho Governor-General's reception
on Saturday ovening was very fairly
attended considering the disagreeable
weather und the hour at which it wus
held. About 100 poople attended and
were introduced tu their excellencies.
Shortly aftor 8 o'clock tho train boar-
ins tho,vice-regal party, left for tho
east.
A Ureal Beciinl.
The str. Active left Hastings mills,
Vancouver, with tho barquo George in
tow on Friday morning last at 11
o'clock und reached Esquimalt harbor
nt!) o'oloek the same evening; loft for
Westminster at 10 p. in. unci reached
ihia port at 5 a.m., making the run in
seven hours. This ia a record difficult
i ii beat by any tug on tho cuast, but,
uf cnuiso, Ihe Active is aa lino nnd
swift a vessel as any in the towing
business.
The Kiliinwiiy Wife.
Tim above piny ns presented by the
MoKee Rankin Company at tho Opora
House Snturdny niglit, waa uno of the
best druinntio eutortninmonts over put
on thu s'ligc in this city. Mr. McKee
Rankin, as Arthur Eastman was-powerful, bis paruxyBins uf rage nnd des
pair, unit passages uf love and tender*
ness being ns natural na lite. Tbo acting nf Mias Mubol Bert, ns Lady Alice,
wns must pleasing, und as an eniotioiial
and polished actress she is certainly
in tbo front ranks. Miaa Larena At-
wond, ub Lillian, did perfect justice to
her part. She is both graceful nnd
pretty, und haa a freshness of manner
that ib quite satisfactory. Misa Wood,
na Hester, una all that a terrible old
woman could bo expected to bc. Mr.
C. T. Arpur.ns Hon. Talbot Vane, was
scarcely up to the mark, there being
room in his part fur much liner acting
thun wna displayed. Mr. Crosbie, aa
Dr. Prescott, was _jbod, and ao wna Mr
Harry Sedley ua Sir Luuucelut Travel's,
The snme mny nlan be said uf Mr. Chaa.
Wyngate who played the dillicult role
of Arthur Vere.
A Lively Heeling.
Yesterday afternoon at tho Y. M. C.
A. rooms tlioro wus ono of the liveliest
meetinga thnt ever occurred there. Secrotary Davie during the usual servico
rose nnd called for subscriptions for
the benefit of tho international committoe. Dr. Kent, who was presont,
immediately roso and aaked when tho
international committee and this aaaociation camo into partnership. Before Mr. Davio could reply Dr. Kont
began a very bitter tirade against tho
committeo nnd the association, and accused Mr, Davio of being an impostor
for trying to collect funds for the intor-
natioinil committee. He onid Mr.
Davio was hirod to do secular work,
and Iinislied up by saying the association wns run by tho Methodist church,
and tlmt Mr. Fisher or any oilier clergyman, hud no right to bo hired by tbo
association to conduct the services
during the weok of prayer. Dr. Kent
snt down amid a storm of JiiBses, and
seizing his hat ho got up and left the
room. Outsido ho was met by Mr.
FraBer, wbo spoko vory plainly to him,
and SHid such conduct had a worse effect
on young men than tho writings uf
"Tom Payne" or Bob Ingersoll. The
8er.ico was conducted io tho end after
the dopartue of Dr. Kont, but thore
was considerahlo excitement throughout the meeting.
»	
THE  NOMINATIONS
duty of tbe member elected to sec that
the whole maiiiUn wn' pinperly e
presented. Rouda uud briuges throughout the wholo district woro urgently
needed, particularly a road to the North
Arm and to Maplo Ridge. The improvements uf roads throughout tho
country cannot but provo beneficial to
tin* city, c nscquently no effort sliuuhl
bo left unturned to bring the ruiids into good condition. The timo had come
when Westminster Bhould have a court
house not only suitable to ils present
wants, but large enough to fill lhe re
quiromontB for some years to come.
Westminstor wns an important city
und Bhuuld bo at lhe bend of tho cities
uf the mainland. He felt certain tho
government oould he induced to furnish the city with a proper court house
iu accordance with its importance. If
oloeled, Mr. Corbould promised to
urge the government for assistance to
build a frou traflic bridgo across the
FraBer at Westminster, which would
upon tu uur morchnnls tho unrestricted
trado of a largo outlying farming district. Ho would contend forthe usual
government vote of $1,000 to the agricultural socioty on tho mainland,
should tho island sot up a society of
its own. Tho fostering of industries,
liy government support, would also
hnvo his heartiest assistance. Concluding, Mr. Corbould said it had boen
rumored ho had bought land m Vancouver; this wos true, but he had sold
ovor half of the property and every
cont of the proceeds hud been spent in
WestminBter and not one cent in Vancouver. Ho owned more land in Westminster than Mr. Cunningham, liis
residence was hero, and that did not
iook liko deserting tho city. He hoped
tho contest would bo conducted in a
friendly spirit, and not givo rise to
hard feelings. Mr. Corbould was frequently interrupted by applause.
Mr. Cunningham wus next called to
tho platform. Ho suid his views had
been lnid beforo the public at a previous meeting. He would support the
present government just so long ns it
dues justice to this city and district,
but his hnnd wuuld never be raised
against any measure ho considered just
and right. He had no interests, except a little laud up the river, outside
of Westminster; it wns therefore ensy
to see ho wuuld work faithfully fur this
city if eleoted to tho houao. Ho had
been working for several years to unite
Westminster city und district, fur they
should bo strong allies. He was for
Westminster cily nnd district lirst nnd
always, the rest of lho province had
proven nblo tu cure fur itself. As in
tbo past he wuuld urge the erection uf
a now court house commensurate with
the want! uf the city. New schools
wero badly required, and if elected ho
would insist upon tho government
giving our children tlio proper accommodations. Victoria and Vancouver
wero well supplied in this way, while
the Westminstor schools were fifty
yenrs behind the ngo. Tho question
of n freo traffio bridgo across ihu Fraser
he had supported iu tho pnst, and
would work in the same direction in
tho future. He thought tho government could bo induced to givo a liberal assistance to the proposed bridge.
The roads generally throughout the
district require much improvement,
and new roads woro required, particularly a trunk road through tho centre
of Lulu Island from tho Gulf of Georgia
to Now Westminster. Tho Yalo road
also was sadly in need of repair, the
settlers woro suffering for want of good
roads by which to get their produco to
market, and if he was elected he would
heartily support road improvements ou
a largo scale. The timo hud arrivod
when a fruit canning and packing establishment was necessary in Westminster, ur the fruit growers of British
Columbia would suffer much loss
Much canned fruit was imported nnd
this might ns woll bo supplied by homo
industry. If elected ho would urco
that a government bonus bo givon lo
tho tirst fruit cannery, He would
bring in a measure, if elected, to make
the registration of voters compulsory,
on tho part uf either municipality or
government. Mr. Cunningham com
eluded by saying he hud tho promotion
of other industries in view, but which
would be bad policy to make public at
present. He wanted to go to parliament to striko heavy blows for Westminster, and wuuld do so if oloctod.
With Mr. Corbould ho wished the contest to be friendly throughout. Mr.
Cunningham wns liberally applauded
at the conclusion uf his addross.
After passing n vote of thanks to the
cliairinun tlio meeting adjourned.
oor., ESPONDEr.ee.
IVIiiini slinnlil We Elect?
Editor Columbian.—Sir—In deciding who should be returned to the provincial parliament by New Westminster
city we should realize the general duties
and uccesaary qualifications of such a
member; secondly, who among us is
available, most ablo and willing to Bub-
servo our interests.
The timo has arrived in the hiatory
ul Now WestminBter when she muat assert herself politically in ordor to secure
that influence and legislative favor whioh
her rapidly increaaing industries demand,
and to accomplish this alio must be represented hy men who arc not ouly zealously alive to-the questions affecting hor
future interests, but who posaoss the
ability to forward thoso ioteresta, whose
unyielding efforts and highest ambition
will bo ably directed in securing to this
city in, part, at least, her long neglected
wants and political rights, and whose
ambition will bc to make their public
record, and not the position, a stepping
stone to futuro proferment. Thia is a
high and praiseworthy ambition, the only
one that merits public fuvor, and wheu a
candidate possesses it, I bqo no reason
why his ambition should bc maligned.
I believo Thomaa Cunningham ia such
a man, and that ho possesses traits of
character, ability and ambition which
peculiarly qualify him for a high aud
valuable servico us our representative.
His past efforts in tho public sorvico
have stamped him as a mun of political
character, strong convictions, clear foresight, and decisive action. He has
shown an untiring, determined energy in
pursuing to a successful issue the public
measures ho has undertaken. Ho has
ahown himself thoroughly and zealously
alive to tho interests of thia community.
His intimate acquaintance with public
measures, and public men, his broad
scope ot knowledge on subjects which
willurise in future, nnd which will affect
both the former, will arm hiin with a
power which must be felt in the interests
of this community.
It is this vantage ground, tho strong
individuality of the man and hia tenacity
of purpose, which will force a hearing in
New Westminster's interests and crown
Mr. Cunninghain's efforts with success
when ut'giog hor claims us representative.
Observer.
Only Bring Two Ciinilliliit. s lo Uil* Frit lit
mill 1-iiHHon'ilHli-dy.
The nomination of candidates for
the election of n member to the
provincial parliament, to fill tho
vacancy at present existing, caused
by the olovation of Mr. Bolo to
the bench, took plnco to-day, and
passod off very quietly. When tho
timo lor receiving nominations had expired, Mr. Chaa. Warwick, government
ai_ent, read the following n.iiminatiotia:
Gordon E. Corbould, burristor, proposed by Chns. McDonough, seconded
by Henry Elliott mid assented to by
I. B. Fisher, Wm. McCull aud L 1''
Butiaoii Tliniiiiis Ciinuingliam, proposed by David McNair, seconded by
Chas. J. Fagan, and assented to by
Alex. Ewon, J. C. Armstrong and
John Reid. A poll was called for the
25th inst., at tho court house.
On motion Cnpt. Scoullar was called
to the chnir and requested the candidates to lay their views beforo tho
meeting.
Mr. Corbould was the first called on.
Ho snid it wna his intention to call a
public meeting at an enily date, and
would therefore present his views very
shortly un this occasion. The lirst
important question he considered wns
the ro-distiibution of s.i.tB. Viotoria
had four representatives in the huuso,
while Westminster had only one. The
time hnd como when thia must be
changed, nut only for thia ci'y bnt for
tho whole district,    lt should  In  the
Police Court.
(Boforo.'. O. Atkinson, 1'. II.I
Juhniiy McGee, a Thompson Hirer
Indian, deposited gii fur being drunk
and incapable, and forfeited the sumo
by non-appearance thia morning,
Johnny, a Hydah Indian, for having
nu intuxic iting liquor ill his possession,
wus romaiidi'd one woek fur sentence.
John Grunt, the man wbo supplied
thu liquor, wns al.iu remanded fur a
week.
Edward L nvell give officer Toihlnie
heaps uf trouble in running him in
yesterday. Lowell wns drunk en-'uuh
tn brin}! uut h'I the ugliness uf his
character, und bti.ul'u the stalwart oth-
uor tuok hniil nt him sworo there were
not tbren policemen in Woatminster
whu could nrrcst him. In the police
Station he mado a terrible disturbance.
Fined 832.50 iu all, on throe charges.
This afternoon oiiul't sab again mi n
charge of assnult perpetrated bySnok*
ecu Charley upon John Audera -n. It
oame uut in evidence that Ainlorann
hud taken nwny Charley's kloiicliinan
and kept her ns bis kliinclimnn. Jenny,
tho lady above mentioned, waa in court
and looked very rospeoiable. Charley
was fined u dollnrund costs.
Tommy, a Hydah Indian, who was
witli Charley when tho assault ocourred
uud kindly relieved Mr. Anderson nf
livo shins and a liar, was bound over
tn appeal- to-uiorr.iw tu r-'cuivo au:.-.
teiice. Mr. McTiernnii tuld Charley
if lie would bring uno uf the tyres of
his tribe ho wonld get him hia lilnuch
again.
snn ETiisiinel-Iicil.
Editor Columbian.—Sir: I have purposely delayed il reply to tho letters of
Messrs. Major and Gamble which ap-
poured in your issue of the Oth inst. till
nfter the visit of the governor-genernl
and pnrty. I am sorry to he involved in
this unpleasant and unprofitable controversy at nil. It is unseemly at any time,
but much moro so would it be unwise to
parado our differences while distinguished strangers ure amongst us, I would
prefer to Buffer in silence than have unfavorable impressions cnrriod awny at
the expense of this community. Now
that the vice-regal party have gone, I
feci it is due to my frienda and myself to
correct some statements contained in the
letter above referred to. I would stato,
lirst, that 1 had no intention te dead-
beat my election address, as Mr. Major
insinuates. "When I handed my letter to
your city editor I distinctly stated that
I desired the publishers of The Columbian to charge for the spnoo occupied at
the usual rates. Mr. Glover will bear
mo out in this statement, and if you had
not been advised of this, the fault is not
mine. When I published my lirat card
in Truth I made the samo request. So
there was no attempt whatever to dead-
beat.
My first charge against the friends of
Mr. Corbould was this: In circulating
the requisition to thut gentleman, they
were misrepresenting facts and mislead-
ing my friends in stating that I had withdrawn in Mr. Corbould's fuvor. In proof
of this I beg to aubniit the following
statements from four gentlemen, cither
oj whom is as much entitled to credence
as either Mr. Major or Mr. Gamble; in
faot, much more so, for these gentlemen
have no schemes to foster or interests to
boom at tho expense of New Westminster; tbey are simply independent electors, und state us follows:
We the undersigned were persuadod to
sign ili'i'nuisittoii lo Mr. C'oi'houlil hy tho
friends of that gontleman, Messrs. Major
und Gnmble, nssurlnii us Unit Mr. Ctin-
nhigliiini hint withdrawn lu Mr. Corbould's favor.
i'W. 15. Townsend.
(Signed)!-! St. A. RoUAE.
_\V. MolUB,
I havo no hesitation in stating: that I was
Induced to sign Mr. Corbould's requisition
hy representations being made ut tlie
lime that Mr. Ounnlngliam hail withdrawn In Mr. Corbould's fuvor.
(Signed):       G. W. Gilley.
Now, air, T am suro that my contention is proven, and that I had just cause
for charging Major and Gamble for doing
that which nny gentleman would consider
discrcdituble. I used uo harsher term;
and having proved my case, I can afford
to lot tho rest go.
Had I known that Mr. Major, in his
eager hnste to evolve bis own political
schemes, could so far forget himself as to
bring along a VOLUNTEER witness to involve mu in nn endless controversy, 1
would havo "fired" botb of them much
more unceremoniously than I did. Mr.
Major declares thut ho did not seek a
quarrel with mc. Why did he, with his
iiiuii l-'iidny, seek mo stall? Why did
hu intrude where he wus not invited ?
His cng'ir bnsti* betrays bis scheming,
and, I may ndd, tbe whole manngomont
of the Coi'lmiild business, iu lirst pushing out nn innocont, inoft'ortslvo young
man, tin n trying to use onr late depart*
mi friend, and. flunlly, isi bringing out
Mr. Ciirbuiild, shows th  up in no enviable light The -!-'-;-'-i'c slr-'i's t"
which tboy lire ludueoil should open the
people's oj ea.
Yours I'usquiik'hed,
Thomas Ci'n.mnukam-
When II. M. S, Ainpliiun struck tlio
sunken i-"i-i- nt 7 minutes to 12-o'elook
nn Wiidiii'Silny iio-'ll, Lilly Stanley,
Lidy'AI'Oe Stanley, .Mrs Oovillo und
Mi.-u Lister were oiijnying.lho Comforts
nf tho wind room. Al lhc limo the jar
frnm striking wn» felt, Lndy Stmicy
oxcla'ined "Oh! mv!" i 1'ir.ui'il feniiu-
ine oxpi'i'S-'uui. It wus nft^rwiu'ds proposed  by -Lu.'-i'i   jtaiiluy  nine the
spot "Oiti mi!" which una ucenl'iliuuly
ilunn. The ship wus tbrcn quniturs uf
un hour near the S[n t, dlirlim which
time Miss L*sior tunic Bnver.il photos
with bur ctinieta.-   Times
t_'*-■_-/« Daily Columbian, Nov. 12.)
Tho str. Belle arrived this morning
from Mud Bay with two booms of logs.
Armstrong  Ss  Eckstein are advertising money to loan in large or small
amounts.
The barometer is still on tho rise
and the weather promises fair for a
few days to come.
The Btr. Dunsmuir arrived from Nanaimo to day with a number of passengers and a full load of coal.
Tho street decorations in honor of
tho governor-general'B visit were taken
down to-day and carted away.
The str. Irving loft for Chilliwack
this morning with 12,000 feot of lumber, 20 tons of freight and 40 passengers.
Look out for November meteors.
The data for the annual showers extends from the 13th to 15th of this
month.
Tho str. Active is ou tbo way from
Victoria with a scow load of iron nud
another of glass, lately arrived from
England.
The Royal City Planing Mills Co.
shipped to-day a double car of long car
sills fnr use in lho C. P. R. shops at
Montreal.
It is likely that another ship will arrive this week ot tho Royal City Planing Mills wharf to load lumber for
Australia.
Snow fell heavily in the mountains
last night. Tho Pitt range gave incontestable evidence of the fact to-day,
and looked rather wintry.
The new chambers in thooourt house
for Judge Bolo are nearly ready for
occupation, and liis honor will be in
possession early noxt week.
Tho residents of Sapperton are of
the opinion that n grocery store in that
suburb would be well suported and
prove u profitablo enterprise.
Tho str. Stella goes out to Mud Bay
today to fetch sumo booms of loga.
Sho will take a load of groceries and
food fur tho use of tho camp at tho bay.
To Farmers.—Messrs. Woods,Turner
Ss Gamble make a specialty of lending
money un farming lands; any amount
from $100 to §20,000, according to
security. ocl7m
Building operations were resumed
this morning with grout vigor; lho
valuo of the present grand weather is
more fully appreciated by tho builders
than any other body of individuals.
The Fairy Queen brought up from
the North Arm to-dny 140 sucks potatoes and 50 bales of hay. She takes
down a load of furniture for Lulu Island parties from Wintemute Broa.
The last load of rook from the Pitt
rivur quarry for the Ross-McLaren
nulls was brought down on Saturday.
An immense quantity of this stone has
been used in the construction of the
mill.
A hunting party left the city this
morning for tho vicinity of Murphy's
lugging camp. Deer is the gamo they
are loaded for, and they are reported
plentiful in the neighborhood of Mud
Bay.
A line was transposed in Mr. Corbould's address yeslerday, by a mo
chauiciil inadvortance. The address
will be found on tho second page nf
the paper to-day, "right side up wilh
caro."
A general meeting of the lacrosse
club will be hold on Thursday ovening
ut S o'clock, in Richards and Mackintosh's oflice, to discuss matters of great
importance and ovory member is expected to attend.
' Tho str. Emma arrived from Nu-
naimo hiBt night with a scow load of
coal for Gilley Bros. The Emma is
having her bulwarks and tup rail completely renewed, and McPhno Bros,
uro doing the work iu a substantial
manner.
A dead horae has been lying iu the
vacant lot opposito Mayor Townsend's
rosidonco, sinco Saturday lust, and the
people nf thnt neighborhood think it is
high time the carcasa wus removed to
tho boncyard, ur whatever place is Bet
apart for such purposes.
Thoro aro about 700 votes likely to
be polled ou tho 25th inst and this
number muat be cost in 480 minutes.
Consequently tho electors muat bo on
timo or aomo of them will loso their
vote. Tlio eleotion act ought to be
amended to allow moro than one
polling place.
Tho paralytic namod Simonaon, who
has been such a source uf trouble and
annoyance to the council and the peoplo, was examined yesterday afternoon st
the police station, by Doctors DeWolf
Smith and Walker, who pronounced
him iiiBiine and had him sent to the
nsjluiu at once.
Tlm Pitt rivor railway bridgo ia undergoing repairs. Several piles aro
being replaced and timbers un tho tup
renewed. Tho bridge-foremen have
received orders to reduce their stuff
nnd ns tho necessary repairs on the
bridges nro complotod tho staff will be
cut down about one half.
At the ciiy council meeting last niglit
Aid. Curtis gavo notice of motion Hint
lio wuuld introduce u by-lnw to fix a
snlnry fur iho mnyor. Although R very
honorable ollicu tn hold, the chief
magistracy is nut n lucrative billet, but
un the contrary calls fur a considerable
outlay uf money ench year.
The iliree-masted schuuiier, William
Rentou, of Sun Ffiinbiscii, clcnred
frum tho lloyal City Planing Mills
whnrf on Sundny for Adelaide, South
Australia. Shu had uu buard 530,000
feet uf rough and dressed lumber, and
cnrriod a considerable portion of it on
her decks. Sbo was towed to sea by
the steamer Active.
In tiie criminal cuurt this morning,
boforo Ills Honor Judge Bole, an old
offender,  nnmed James Cavilling.!, at
presont a prisouor in  iho pruviH_i.il
I K'lnl,   iippi'iirod   for   uloutioll   on the
j chnrgo "f  Biidiimv.   Tbo  crime  wns
onmiiiitinl in uiinl, and reaching the
o-us uf tlm governor, the latter   insli*
i tuted tliu proceedings.    Caviitwgb el-
i cctcd  lu bi! tried lit the Ml I'ssVcs
The storm wjiich raged on Saturday
night, ubout 11 o'clock, was one of the
severest known here in many years.
The wind was very strong with a velocity of about 30 or 35 miles an hour.
The surface of the river was raised into
great waves, and made, under tho
light of the moon, a grand sight. Several chimney tops and pieces of fence
were blown down, but no serious damage done.
Persons who have had good opportunities of judging, say that game is
becoming scarcer every year around
Pitt meadows. Duck were never seen
in auch meagre numbers nor so wild as
thoy are this season, A groat deal of
pot-hunting goes on all the time, in
and out of Benson; and, ns every Siwash has a gun and blazes away at all
hours of day and night, it is not to bo
wondered at that tho game is disappearing from its old-time feeding
grounds. 	
Course i>r r.iit*-rliiliiiit.*ut*t.
Tickets have been issued for the
winter course of entertainments uf the
Langloy Prairie Presbyterian church.
The cout'Bu commences with Dec. 3rd
next, ending on April 1st, 1890, and
comprises live lectures, with muBio by
the choir, und one concert. The lecturers are Revs. O. Fraaer and P.
McF. McLeod, of Victoria; Rev. Mr.
Ross, of Chilliwack, and Rev. Mr.
Scouler and Mr. G. W. Rasure, nf Hub
city. Tickets for the course have been
placed at $1, and fhe proceeds will go
to the building fund uf tho church.
Children Cryfor Pitcher's Castoria,
Htlll  improving.
The Agnes st. improvements die
hard. The south side of that interesting thoroughfare -was rashly thought
by tho public tu bc Iinislied (although
it buro ao little evidence of finish), but
now a deep trench has been dug along
the soutli sidewalk and some mysteriuus
operations are in progress under tbe
same. Tho sound of tho hammer and
the bum' cnu bo heard, and everything
indicates thnt "someone has blundered", and thnt alterations aro needed.
When finished this line street will bo i.
great driving nud riding avenue for
the  posterity uf the next generation.
Small UrimnilK for C'eiupltilnl.
The members of the Westminster
football club naturally ennugb feel indignant over the strictures passed
upon thom by tho Vancouver News-
Advertiser Inst Sundny. Tho club, un
account uf the visit uf tho gu.emnr-
general here un Saturday, could not
get awaj% for reasons that must be
obvious even to tho dullest intellect.
The intention of tho club wub to havo
gone, and but for the visit of his excellency at that time would havo done
bo. If there ia auy blame to bo attached tu any une, it must be to Lord
Stanloy for uot fulfilling his engagements.
 _—_»-*	
Comity Court Hull's.
At a meeting of the county court
judgeB hold ou Saturday lust ut Judge
Bole's residence, and at which wero
present Judges Harrison, Bole and
Cornwall, the necessity of making the
now rules and the nature of the
changes wero fully discUBsed and arrangements wore mudo to havo the
draft of rules rendy nt uu early day.
When completed the rules will be laid
befuro the lieutenant-governor for approval. It is understood that tho rulcB
uf procedure of tho oounty court will
bo made in every way compatible with
tho dignity which should always accompany tho administration of justico.
. —__- _ —
New Order lit Council.
All iirdei'-in-oounoil has been passed
Booting apart, until otherwise ordered,
that pnitiuiiofEsqiiimnltharbor, B. C,
kuowu ns Constnnee dive, for the exclusive use nf hot' Majesty's ships.
The evo will heroafior be kuown ns
the inan-nf-wai' aiiohtii'in_e, nut access
to it will at ull times be allowed tu
vessds desirous nf making use of the
graving deck. This reservation will
prevent the recurrences of anything
like the Hustede incident of a few
weeks anu. The minister uf marine
has explained that in setting apart the
covo for, English men-of-war tho government bad simply followed the plan
which is in vogue at Halifax, N. S.,
and the principal purts uf England.
 »_•_.	
A Nolnlili' Fveilt.
Tho congregation of Huly Trinity
church will nsseinble at the opera
liouse to-morrow evening nt eight
o'clock tn celebrate tlio 1-Otii anniversary of tho ciinsi'ci-ntinn uf Bishop
Sillitoe, and the foundation of ibis
diocese. After the reception to be
hold by 'Bishop und Mrs. Sillitoe, a
number of addresses, referring tn the
occasion, will bu delivered, slid then a
short programme .of sunns, etc., will
follow. Refreshments m the sliupc of
tea, coffee, cakes, etc., will conclude
tbo oveiiinu's cniertiininent. This
will bc the first social event in connection with Huly Trinity congregation in
a long time, and it is certain, uwing to
the importance of the occasion, tu be
icry hugely attended,
ThatI'linfiirlliliatii Cnsi-.
The case uf Mrs. Orde, who waa
brought from Cariboo, committed by
two justices of the pence at Richfield
tu tho insano asylum, antl found on
subsequent examination to bo perfectly
slum, so far as could bn discovered, Is
not likely to be settled for some time,
if it over is. The city couucil moved
iu tbo matter, nnd addressed ll letter to
the provincial govornment asking thnt
siiiiiu assistance bc given Mrs. Oi'do In
enable her to return houie, but the
govurtiuioiit, it uppeiii'B, not boing tu
bin ill a in tbe c isc,refuses tu lake action,
nud a-' the unfortunate cuso stands.
Mis. Orde hns bemi advised lhat she
bus excellent grounds for an action
against the magistrates, but what stops
she will tike hns ii"t yit been decided.
A Ule Hilling Deal.
. The News says the deal ior the Carbonate mountain mines has been successfully consummated through Mr. C.
D. Rand. They were purchased by a
syndicate represented by Mr. Isaac
Robinson, London, England. Seventeen claims, anioug which are the
Southern Cross, Great Republic, Carbonate Chief and Old Dominion are included in tlie purchase. It ia the intention to develop them at once and
pack trains are being mado ready. A
good deal of excitement prevails in
Donald and Golden as a consequence.
The miners are jubilant as they see in
this the beginnini. of (lie mining developments bo long looked for. Mr.
Robinaon leaves Calgary to-day for
England. Mr. Rand arrived at Westminater on Sunday un his way home.
Ho was aa fur enst as Calgary.
Tcui-Iiiti*' Institute.
On Saturday lust some of uur city
teacheis attended a meeting of the executive committee of tho mainland institute, at Vancouver, where the committee concluded the final arrangements for the coining meeting of the
institute which will be held at the central school in that city on 2nd aud 3rd
of Janunry next.
According to present indications the
coming convention will be the most
successful yet held on the mainland.
Though the institute is under mainland
management efforts are being made to
induce all the teachers of the province
to attend, and it is hoped that the
committee will be able to Becure reduced rales ub usual from the railway
and navigation companies.
Already over n dozen paperB on educational subjects are forthcoming, and
tho committee have secured the as-
si_t:vnco of several prominent oitizens
of Vancouver.
A new feature will be a display of
pupils' work, and at lhe clu3e uf the
sessiuns a good public entertainment
will be given under the management of
the Vnncouvor teachers.
Trained Oarsmen.
Mr. Alexander McLean went down
to Victoda to-day to meet Oarsman
Bush in a rowing contest. The betting is in favor of McLean; and those
who had tlio opportunity of seeing Iub
splendid wurk at Vancouver last Dominion duy feel quite confident that
he can run awny from anybody around
these parts. Old (or middle) ugc has
not cooled the ardor ol this veteran,
fur aquatic contests, uud lie is still able
lo make it awfully warm wurk even
for renowned professionals. West-
niinsterites feel ihat McLean is, in a
manner, their champion, and should
anticipations prove correct, it will be
another reason for ber to feel proud of
her athletic citizens. Bush gave a
very pretty exhibition of his powera as
a sculler when ho was here at the exhibition reguttu. His part of that race
was a species of "walk-over," but it
gave thoso who are qualified to judge,a
good chance to see that he is no
amateur in tho shell. His action with
the sculls is beautiful and bis timo perfect; what hiB endurance is, is quite
another matter, tfiat will be pretty
thoroughly tested in the coming   race.
The Full Assizes.
The fall sitting of the court cf assizes
commences to-morrow morning at 11:
30 o'clock, Chiof Justice Begbie presiding. Following are the cases on the
docket.
■John Ward, fur huuso breaking and
robbery at Vancouver,
Mike Brennan, fur cutting und
wounding at Yalo.
Jim, an Indian, for murder nt Vancouver.
John Russiler, fm' larcoucy, at Vancouver.
Chu Chue, for cutting and wuimding
ut Vancouver.
All Sing, fur attempted murder at
Ciiiiiiwiiuk.
T. 11. Spring, fur larceucy ut Vancuuver.
Bradley, fur having stolen property
in possession.-
Martha Fuller, for larceny nt Vancouver.
H. Dominy, for wounding with intent.
Chitig Chow, fur larceny ut l'ort
Moody.
James Cavanagh, fur sodomy at
Westminster.
Personal.
Uout Harvey, of Victoria, is in the
city un a business visit.
Mrs. Alex. Matheson, of Kauiluops,
arrived yesterdsy and is tlio gin it of
Mr. Peter Grnnt,
Chief Justice Sir Mat hew linilhe
Begbie will arrive ill tho ciiy tn-mor-
row tu preside m. ihe full scsuh-ii if tho
assizes.  _____
I'irsf Fruits or tlie Order.
During Friday night tho Britisli bark
George, Cnpt. Townsend, owned by
Oapt. Wm. Grant, of this city, arrivod
from the Inlet nnd anchored ... Eaij i-
mult harbor, just inside the „„,,.. .
point. This point being within Constance Cuve, and by the ricently issu.d
order ill-council under tho direct chargo
of tho oflicers of H. M. Navy and appropriated to tlieir use, as soon na dny-
light showed the position of the *ark
the admiral sent on bonrd requesting
the oaptain to shift lu some other part
uf the harbor, and offering 11 orew for
tho purpose, Seeing that nothing else1
wns lo be done, Cnpt. Grant allowed
the bluejackets t" cum'.' mi board and
rumors, thu Geurgo tu another portion
of the harbor.—Colonist.
A St. John's, Newfoundland despatch uf Saturday snys: It looks as if
the government was defeated. Only
i four districts hnvo yet declared full
| return.. These sne iiiioxpi'it'.*d gains
i fur Whitoway. Premier Thutublirn is
! probably defeated. VOLUME 34.
WEEKLY BRITISH COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTWTWBTKl.   B. 0, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
—~^—■——u—inwr—-in v~—..—^nrmmtrttmmtttmttmtt
NO. 46.
Weekly British Columbian
Wednesday Morning, Nov. 19, ISSS.
THE AMPHION ACCIDENT.
She  Strikes  llaro Beer and  Sustains
(nil Damage.
When the vice-regal party embarked
on H. M. S. Amphion yeBterday morning, and that fino warship, the pride of
the Pacifio  squadron, steamed  away
from tho outer wharf, no one expected
to see the distinguished visitors return,
at  least   for  many months.   As the
Amphion left, it was nt a speed of 17.5
knots an hour, tlie dense fog preventing the full speed of 1!)  knots   being
steamed.    Soon the wnrahip  waa lost
to sight in tho mist, and nothing   further was heard uf her until shurtly after 8 o'olook ill the evening,   when  a
telephnnic message was reoeived from
Eaquitualt, calling fur hacks tn bring
the guvernur-general and his suito back
to Victoria.   They arrived in tho city
at  9   o'clock   and   registered ut   the
Driard, where they will remain   until
further arrangements are mado for their
departure from   tlio city.   The causo
of tho unexpected return was an  accident which, considering tho naturo uf
the   day,   might   very easily have resulted in the luss uf tho ship.    When
tho  Amphion  in  charge of Capt. E.
Gray Hulton, left Victoria, the   dense
aud dismal fog wliich had covered the
water aud tho Straits  for" two  days,
rendering   navigation   daugoroos   as
well as dillicult, atill  hung  ovor  the
water.   No  city   pilot was on board,
nor was it thought that any  would be
required, as Capt. Hulton   knew   the
waters   well.   All  went  woll for tho
first twu huurs.   Plumper's PasB liglit
was reached and  left  safely   behind,
and tho Amphion entered Haru ciiannol, along both sides uf which the shore
extends, ragged and ruugh.    Hero the
apecd   of   tiio steamer was reduced to
about 15 knots as slio made her way up
the  channel.   About a mile und half
beyond Plumper's Pass  light stands
Haru Point, a line of juggod rucks extending  out  intu  the passage.   Tlio
close proximity of tho abutting point,
owing to tbe fog, waa not observed as
the ship approached, and tho lirst intimation   of   danger  was   the   loud,
crashing sound, as tbo warship's  starboard sido was pierced by tho saw-like
rocks; followed by the rushing noise of
tho   water  pouring  into her forward
compartments.    She   shivered   for   a
moment   from   the  shuck,  and then
glided gracefully on, the blow having
been a glancing ulthuu_.li a most disastrous one.   For a  moment  cunfusion
reigned among the distinguished  passengers, who booh saw that an accident
had   occurred  which  imperilled  the
safety of the ship.   The momentary
alarm waB quickly allayed by the coolness  and   precision  with   which the
orders were given by the oflicers,  and
the promptitude  and  precision   with
which they were obeyed by the men,
whose discipline nothing could shake.
Whilo not armored below water-mark,
tho Amphion is double cased, i.e., with
a space between the outer  and  inner
lining  of  the  hull, through both of
which the projecting rock had  torn  a
long and jagged  scum.   Immediately
tho four compartments effected bogan
to fill, and all hands were ordered to
the pumps, while  the  steam  pumps
were also put at work.   Tho ship was
at once turned, and her prow pointed
toward Esquimalt, while the speed was
increased   as  much as   it conld  be
with   safety   in   the   fog.     Despite
the    good    work    doue     by     the
hand  and  steam  pumps, the   water
gained   on  them  slowly  but surely.
The Royal Roads wore entered at sundown, and from  that  time   constant
soiiiidings had to bu made in order to
properly locate Esquimalt harbor. The
ship was then badly listed to starboard,
while, despite  the  hard work of  tho
men and tho good service rendered by
the engino room  pumps —fortunately
the engine room compartments had not
beon effected—she was  settling down
in tho water.   Coming  to  anchor in
Constance Cove, directly opposite   the
naval yard, the  vice-regal  party was
taken ashore and tho  services  of the
dockyard steam engine were obtained,
while the dock was quickly made ready
for the leception of the disabled  ship
as soon as the tide should rise  go that
she could be filiated.   A   Colonial   reporter paid a visit tu the Amphion  at
midnight, when Bhe waB listed  at  an
angle of about 22' to starboard.   Both
the ship  and  dockyard engines were
at work pumping, and they had  only
just begun tu get command ot the in-
rushing water.    The starboard   gangway, by which tlio reporter   passed on
board, was almost un a level with the
water, while tho deck was bo much inclined as tu be inconvenient  tu walk.
Capt. Ilutuit was not  lo bu seen, and
the oflicer un watch was  nut   inclined
to bo communicative in rogatd  tu the
accident.     Ho  explained    how   she
struck, or rather glanced on  tho rock
tearing a long seam through her doublo
side. After the accident ho Baid everything thut cuuld bc had been  done to
savo the ship, but although   lhe stoam
and hand pumps wore kept going constantly, thoy had  not  been  able  to
keep oven with the water the Bhip was
making.   It was only with tho help of
the dockyard engine  that they could
keep tho wator at tho same level.   Until a survey was made  in the dock, uo
one could determine the full extent of
the disaster, which, howover, was  undoubtedly a very serious ono.   At midnight tho holo had been partially covered and divers wero preparing to go
down and mako a survey.   It was  intended if possible to gat  the  ship  in
tho dock ot high tido,   when the  full
damage would bo ascertained and the
work of repair would be oommencod.
It wns expected that tho tido would
allow tho docking of the ship nt about
5 o'clock this morning, when moro particulars of tho nature and oxtont of tho
accident will bu obtainable,   The Amphion   is a  twin-scrow,   Bocond-clnns
stoani cruiser of 3,750 tuns and 5,000
h. p.    J u all probability tho ripping of
her sido was duo to her great weight,
and the momentum she had on at the
time. Had she struck bow un, the
rock alone would have suffered, the
prow being armored to resist the foroe
of auy collision. As it was, the rock,
almost under the boat, was forced
through her side by her weight, and
the hole was extended into a long passage of the ship before she could be
stopped.—Thursday's Colonist.
tSn.slnr Uohl.
Gold Commissioner Crimp, of Cassiar, who came down by the Corona
on Saturday night, reports that the
season just closed has been a very satisfactory une for his distriot. The
weather has been fairly good, and all
the claims have paid woll. Operations
are now practically at an end for the
year, although a few of the claims are
still beiug worked. Tho Bonanza, on
Dense creek, has done the best this
year, panning nut from $7,000 to §8,-
000. On the Tibbet creek the Mc-
Vicar As Foster Company's claim
has also done well, while Quartz
Creek lias fully justified expectations in regard   tn   its   richness.
In all, Caasiar has produced this year
between §12,000 and $13,000 worth of
gold moro this season than last. Had it
not been for the rain ami the freahets
which washed out the low lying claims,
this output would have beeu very con
Bidcrubly increased. Most of the gold
came from the tunnels nnd hills, while
tho Chinese hnve done badly this season.
Tbo health of the district haa been unusually good, only two miners having
died, and both from diseases acute and
of long standing. It is Mr. Crimp':
opinion that next season will far surpass
the one just over, aud iu tea years more
Cassiar will bo one on the largest gold-
producing districts in British Columbia.
—Colonist.
FREDDY AND  LILY.
New York, Nov. C— A rumor to
the effect that Mrs. Langtry and Freddy Gebhard hare quarreled has been
freely circulatod fur soveral dnys past.
About a week ago Mr. Gebhard received a missive from England, written by Mrs. Langtry, and tho contents
wero evidently displeasing to Mr. Gebhard. A member of the Union club,
Who is closo to Mr. Gebhard, in commenting upon the Ut tor's aotion sinco
the receipt of tlmt fateful letter, said
last night: "lt knocked tho poor boy
completely nut." Another club man
said that it was freely rumored that
Mrs. Langtry is at present receiving
tho attention of a well known English
nobleman with a title as long as Mr.
Gebhard's puree. Ho supposed thut
it was the knowledge of this fact that
had Btarted Mr. Gebhard upon a round
of jollity. A circumstance that goes far
in comfirniation of tho story of a quarrel, is the fact that Mr. Gebhard no
longer sleeps ot Mrs. Langtry's handsomo residence on West 23rd street.
THE SIGNAL SERVICE.
Washinoton, Nov. 0 —Gen. A. W.
Greely, the chief sigual officer of tho
army, has made his annual report to
the secretary of war. He complains of
the lack of facilities for using or caring
for the field telegraph trainB or othor
equipments under his chargo, for practically training and drilling tho officers
and enlisted men of the corps, and of
tho need of attention to the necessity
of improvement and of a change in tho
current methods of signal instruction
and praotice. The records show that
less than ono oflicer out of nine of the
army has received any instructions in
signalling during the year. Those
evils aro especially pronounced in view
uf the construction of the telephones
and other instruments of modern invention whioh are applicable to signalling purposes. The issue of weather
forecasts and storm warnings has boen
interrupted through the year. The
chief signal officer recommends that
the force of enlistod men in the servico be reduced from 470 to 200. The
cold wave predictions, he says, have
proved successful in many ways, and
thia branch of tho aervice has improved
greatly since its inauguration. The
weather crop bulletin has mot with
groat favor. General Greely calls attention to the fact that the two grand
prizes were awarded to the Borvice for
its display at the Paris exposition.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
L„_...E....i_._.Ap-y
( LIMIT-ED )
THOMAS ALLSOP, 1
HENRY S. MASON, > DIRECTORS.
CUYLERA. HOLLAND, J
HEAD OFFICE I
15 Serjeant's Inn, Fleet Street,
LONDON,  ENG.
Tho Business of ALLSOP 4 MASON una
beeu morgeil In the above Company and
will bo carried on by the Company trom
tbls date as a genoral Land Investment
and Insurance Agency.
MONEY TO LOAN on Mortgage at Low
Elites. Town Lots and Farming Lands
for Salo on easy terms.
Victoria, B. C, May 10th, 1887. dwjly6
CASTORIA
for Infantt and Children.
•'CMtorlaiitoweUuUptodto childrenthat I Cutoria curat CoHe, Constipation,
[recommendltaiiupeiisrtouypi_HripUon I four Stomach, DiMTh-_a, ^cMim,
tammt-m-."     1_!1 Aicmi,ItB..        I KUIjWoras, gives sleep, and promote.di*
Ul So. Oxford St, Brooklyn, N. Y.   | Without Injurious medication.
Tai Cnmun Company, 77 Murray Streot, N. Y.
8'
OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
.., the partnership heretofore subsisting botween the undersigned under tlio
flrr.i name of Comerforu & McDougall,
Merchant Tailors, haB beon dissolved this
day by mutual consent. All accounts
owing the late lirm are to bo paid to J.-A.
McDnugnll, and nil claims against the
said firm will be seltled by blm.
T. COMEItl'-ORD.
,T. A. MoIIOUGALL.
New West., Aug. 31,
89.
&C0.
HAVE   JUST RECEIVED
' New Ml Dress Goods
IN ALL THE LATEST STYLES AND SHADES,
A LARGE ASS011T1EIT of BLASKE
New Art and Chenille Curtains,
___f^_acL POETIBEES.
A SPLENDID LINE OF
NAPKINS, SIDE BOARD COVERS, &c.
The largest assortment of AU-Wool Kidderminster, Tapestry
and Brussels Carpets, Door Mats, Hearth Rugs, and
Smyrna Rugs to be found in the Province.
PRICES RIGHT.
LONDON HOUSE,
COLUMBIA STREET, , NEW WESTMINSTER.
t_.WOC_.8U_
We are now opening a repeat line of,
Carpets and Linoleums, also, large invoices of White and Colored Blankets.
Our stock of House Furnishings is the
most complete on the market notwithstanding the immense sales of the past
month.
Specials this Week:—Linen Crumb
Cloths, all colors.
Ogle, Campbell & Freeman
THE LEADING DRY GOODS HOOSE.
MASONIC BLOCK,
NEW WESTMINSTE-..
Mr. J. A. McDougall
WII_.li CONTINUE THE BUSINESS
under IiIh own miiTic, at tlio samo
fitorn, on Columbia utreet, next to F,
Crake's. A ..onUmmiico Of tlio public
putronnKo Ih respectfully solicited. Hatls*
motion guaranteed. ihvseOtu
Practical Watchmaker, Manufacturing
Jeweler & Optician.
OPPOSITE THE BANK OF MONTREAL.
WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, PLATED WARE, &C.
BEST QUALITY.   EASTERN PRICES.
A (ull line ot Spectacles & Eye-Classes in stool, rubber, silver arc gi id
frames.  The finest Pobblc, made, H per pair* all eights suiteil.
Special attention given to FINE WATCH REPAIRS. Having loiirn.,". tlie
business thoroughly from somo of tlio finest Horologers in England, anil since thon
managed tlio watch-repairing departments of n fow of tho host firms on the continent of Amoricn, is a sufficient guarantee ol jjooil workmanship, Formerly inniu*
ger lor nearly 8 years of the well-known firm of Savago & Lyman, Montreal.
Cliiu-gi'S Model-lite, ,. , _     	
Montiihal, Dec, 1887.—Mr. P, Crake.—Aiulw. l.obortBon, Esq., Chairman of
Montreal Harbor Commissioners, says: "I never found a Watchmaker who did so
well for mo as you did when iu Montreal, nnd I am sorry you aro not hero to-day."
ilwupl.lc
FOR  SALE.
HIGH-GRADE DURHAM BULL, suitable tor breeding purposes or for
work lu a logging enmp; about 5 yenrs
old and a heavy, powerful animal.—Apply
THOS. MACKIE,
oc81-dlt-w2t Norlh Arm.
Business Notice.
THE UNDERSIGNED IS PREPARED
to furnish plans and speculations for
all classes of buildings (stone and brlok a
specialty). Will furnish ull the necessary
drawings and superintend work through a
competent foreman, and will guarantee
perfeot work for 3 per cent, of cost, Offlce
in Rank of B. C. Building, up stairs. New
Westminster. JAM-LB KENNEDY,
dwsolltc Architect.
Nortii Britisli and Mercantile
FIRE INSURANC
aoi43?-A.zsr-5_-.
Capital,   •    $15,00(.,OOI>.
RATES ON FARM BUILDINGS.
DWELLINGS, Hard or Lumber Finishes,
100 feot from Hams, "/, per cent, for 1
year, or I'/., per cent, for ;J years,
STABLES—2 per oont. for I year, or 1 per
cent, for S your,*:.
J. <_. JAOUES, Agent,
wuu7ml       Nbw Westminster, 11. C.
TO SMOKERS.
IF YOU WANT TO ENJOY A GOOD
CIGAR, ASK FOR THE
BRITISH LION
HENRY LEE5
tfST'riiey arc not only made of tlio
Choicest Tol»acCO but they are of
ISomic SSaiBUiactiirc, and should bo
patronized by nil good citizens.
WM. TIETJEN, Manufacturer,
IIULIIROOK BUILDING,
COLUMBIA STIIEET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
dwl7noly
<3Z   OO.
Real  Estate,
INSURANCE
 AND——
Financial Agents
Purchase Sell and Lease Property,
Collect Rents,
Make Loans on Mortgages,
And transact all Business relating to
Real Estato.
 AGENTS FOR	
London Assurance Corporation.
Connecticut Fire Insuranco Co. ot
Hartford.
London and Lancashire litre Assurance Co.
Clinton Insurance Oflice, Ld. (Marino)
OFFICES:
Columbia St., New West'r.
41 Government St., Victoria
dwsellyl
DRESS MAKING
Al MISS JBS_MJ.CS',
{Late op England)
Corner nl Ohuroh and Columbia streets,
NEW WESTMINSTEB.
e-TSatlsfnctlon guaranteed.    dwfe7to
BAK£R BROS. & CO'Y
10 Chapel Walk, South Cnstlo St., Liverpool, England.
9 Bank Buildings, Columbia Street, New
Westminster,!;. O.
Shipping and Ceimission
A-G_--H__8Tf__.3,
Ceheral Wholesale M-_.HAirr___l_ip._T-__
Anydesi-rlntlon of Clooiis Imporled to
order and Custom uud snip Broking
trammeled. Latest Freight and Ma.ket
Quotations. dwiiuZtc
Fruit Trees,
Ornamental Trees,
Small Fruits,
And GARDEN STOCK on hnnd In great
variety.
Everything flrat-clnss nml furnished In
good simps,
nta-Send 15 cts. for valuable 80-pngo Descriptive Catalogue wllh 0 beautiful colored plates.   Prlee Lists sent free.
U. W. HENHY,
dwdelilto Port Hammond, 11. C.
Plants for Sale!
 ATTHE	
Douglas SW Nursery,
ORDERS TAKEN  FOR FRUIT AND
ORNAMENTAL TREES,   including
all the lending varieties of
Apples, Pcnrs, Plums, Cherries,
 ALSO	
Sll ALL FKl'lTi of ovory description,
tlouqiicis, -I. renins uml -Trns.es mnile
to order.
ddwnpSyl P. LATHAM.
Columbia and Church Streets.
JUST AURIVED-A largo shipment of
the finest Red Granite JIIuilll-
llll'llts, from New Brunswick.
ALEX. HAMILTON,
dwto PROPRIETOR.-
f.LLunnl»Ci
330-33-2 CORDOVA STRKKT,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Importers und Denlere lu
MACHINERY
OF ALI, DKSCRITIONS.
MARINE WORK A SPECIALTY.
dwdeSOt.
Ground Pons ?.'10 00
"    Barley  30 00
"        "   and l'cus,mixed.... 30 00
"     Oats      "      " 1—*, peas 20 00
"         1—I   "   27 00
"    Oats  20 0O
TERMS CASH on delivery for the nbovo
low prices.
Alf grain thoroughly el* nned niter being
dried.
__t-Gash paid for lirst-elass barley and
wheat,
LANGLEY MILLS,
Lnngley, 11, C.
Jas. Hassock, Proprietor. ocDw
Puyallup  Nursery!
TKEE8, SEEDS, SEED POTATOES.
Grown In the famous Hop : oglon nl Puyallup and White River Valleys.
ib£v OVER ONE MILLION ,
_!-•___£*   TREES k PLANTS,
TONS of Grass and Clover Seed.
TONS of Choice seed Potatoes(lOklnds)
TONS of Choicest Vegetable Seeds.
■    SEASON 18811 * 1800.	
Enough for Dealers.  Enough for Planters
New revised List and Prices lust out.
Don't fool yourself by not sending lor It
innneiliutili, nnd lenrn what Is grown nnd
to bo hnd closo at home. Catalogue free
to nil. j. u. in.1.1:.
wjesmli Puyallup, Wnsh. Ter.
OliLlII
BANK BUILDINGS,
Mary Street, NewWestminster, B.C.
ITlI.KfHONE No. 5.5.1
14 CURE ROAD, HALIFAX, ENGUND.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS
CONVEYANCERS, REAL ESTATE AND
INSURANCE AGENTS,
STOCK AND SHARE BROKERS.
London and Lancashire Fire and
Brltlin Umpire Lift Insurance
Companies.
New Weitmimter Building Society.
Accountant'! Oflloe, Diocese of N.W.
City Auditor!, 1B80, 1_«. and 1889.
ADVISE CLIENTS IN   THE  BUYING
AND SELLING OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE CITY AND DISTRICT,
and other mouotary transactions.
Havo sovernl good Investments on their
books, and all now coiners will do well to
cnll before doing business clsowhcrc,
dwUdcly VOLUME 34.
WKEKLY lil.TTT'-T. rOTTTMBTAN, NEW WESTMINRlBfi, B. C„ NOVEMBER 13, 18__.
mt^ltttmWfttmmtttnmnmlmti»mmtmmml^ttmtatm*t^tKttttmmmtmmm^
1.0. 40.
Weekly British Columbian
Wednesday Moraine, Nov. 13, 188-.
It would appear that  the  Governor-General     during    his    tour
through the Northwest  was the recipient of an  address, amongst the
numerous documents   of   welcome,
from the Mormons of the Northwest
Territories.   The nddress was kindly and loyal in its tone.    It declared
devotion to her majesty the   Queen
and good feeling for Lord  Stanley.
"Our   prophet   Joseph," it   added;
"hath discerned that of all the kingdoms of .thn world, the British  principalities, by reuson of tlieir high integrity and   their  judicial   purity,
will be the lust to fall; nud  it is for
this reason, us wel I us from   uu affectionate  admiration of her own
womanly virtues, that  wu   invoke
the   blessing of heaven   upon   tlie
sovereign of these vast realms." His
Excellency's answer to the Mormon
deputation has been   made   public.
The Governor-General, according to
a report of  the  address-presenting
ceremony,   "replied    very   happily,
heartily welcoming the  Latter-Day
Saints to Oanada, saying  that   the
country was free to all   creeds, and
to as many of tlieir   people   as   desired to come."   An eastern  cotemporary thinks, not altogether   without reasou, that there   is   considerable room for difference  of opinion
as to the advisability   of   throwing
open lhe door and cordially inviting
the Mormons to eome   in.    If   the
Mormons are those of the  non-polygamous sort, says our   cotoiiipornry,
and if, in addition, they ure   peaceable   and    industrious,   Canadians
generally will not object to the hearty   welcome   extended   them, or to
the invitation  offered to other Mormons to  make   this   country their
home.    But it is pointed out  that,
although the Mormons in the Canadian Northwest have been  officially
reported  to   be   all   hard-working,
non-polygamous settlers, themselves
denying that they are   polygamous,
it is to bc questioned if they are not
simply holding the  obnoxious  doctrine in abeyance   till a convenient
time arrives for putting it   in practice.   To judge from the  frequent
printed nbulitions of the   irrepressible    Maitlund   Stenhouse,  whilom
M.P. P. for Oomox in this province,
and now high-priest of the   North
west  Mormon  colony, he, at any
rate, is determined to exercise  the
salient privilege of Mormonism and
in-'olve himself in a  double  knot.
The latest proposal  of   the astute
Stenhouse, who, it appears, is still a
bachelor, is to take   unto  himself a
plurality of wives at once and  thus
try and evade the technical objection
of the law against   bigamy.    Mait-
land will evidently  bear  watching,
and so, undoubtedly, will tho entire
colony of his co-religionists  in  the
Northwest.   If they   can   be  pro-
vented from transgressing the laws
of the country  in   the  direction to
which  thoy  are most  liable, the
Mormons,  with   their   industrious,
hard-working habits, will be   an acquisition to the  Northwest.   Judging, however, from   the   experience
of our   American   neighbors   with
these poople,   they   are   far   from
being   an   unmitigated   blessing to
any country,
The Liberal-Unionists are just
now discovering that, as an eminent statesman put it, "England
does not love a coalition." Things
are rapidly regaining the old equilibrium, and already, practically, the
country is again Liberal and Tory,
lt is evident from recent speeches
that both Lord Hartington and Mr.
Ohamberlain perceive, although they
refuse to own it, that Liberal-Unionism is an unknown quantity, except
on the floor of tho House of Commons, and exists there only by reason of the Septennial Act, which
permits a member to sit long after
his constituents have no further use
for him, While the recent by-elections have i-nipliaticiilly shown that
the opinion of the people is for
Home Rule in Ireland, the Tory
newspapers have begun to grumble
ominously at the relative positions
of the two wings of the Tory-Unionist army. Tlieir complaint is not
without reaBon. "Why," in effect
say theso prints, "why is it that our
side (the Tories) have to bear all
the blume 1 You Liberal-Unionists
who are helping us by your votes
should also share your responsibility by representation ih the cabinet." J3ut the secednrs from the
old flag are cunning as serpents, if
not quite as harmless as doves, and
hesitate before committing themselves so far. There may come a
time, and beforo long, when questions of moment will open up, upon
which all Liberals who have a shred
of Liberalism left will be able to
fight shoulder to shoulder, and
sbould that day come, the men who
have sheltered themselves in tho
fancied security of the Tory cabinet
will find it well nigh impossible to
do as tiiey would wish. Just now
the Liberal-Unionists appear to havo
proved tho truth of the adago that
"between two stools you are likely
to como to the ground." Something, however, has to be done if
these gentlemen are to continue in
political life. Goschen has already
chosen. He is in the Tory net, and
will never be wanted again by
thorough-going Liberals. Hartington is too good a man to be lost for
ever to the Progressive Party, nnd
it is unlikely he will so far commit
himself as to take office in a Conservative cabinet. Chamberlain is
the Judas of Liberalism, and the
Radicals, whom he has wantonly betrayed, will never trust him as they
once did. He was once the grand
young man of the Liberal hope; to
day ho is hated by the rank and file,
distrusted by his late colleagues, and
despised by the Tories, who, now
they have no further uso for him,
ure only anxious to see him shelved
out of the wuy. It seems as though
he perceives all this, for, like a libertine, one day all boisterous recklessness, the next depressed almost to
madness, he first of all dreams of a
great "National Party" (to be led by
himself of course),
"When none are for a party,
But all are for tho state;
AVlien tlio rich man helps tho poor
And the poor man loves the great"
And then tlie vision fades, and ho
talks of retirement. Poor Chamberlain ! ho seems to have lost his
political balance ever since he was
deprived of the support afforded by
Sir Cliarles Dilke's skirt tails. It is
a melancholy picturo to see the man
who once was the most advanced in
the conquering Liberal host, now reduced to such pitiable plight that
there are "nono so poor to do him
reverence."
Portugal, and its affairs have
been brought into momentary pio-
minence, observes an exchange, by
the death of King Luiz, a sovereign
remarkable more for the elegance of
his tastes and his literary accomplishments than for his abilities us a
ruler. Portugal, however, is an interesting country of which, notwithstanding the cordial connection
wliich has always existed between
it and Great Britain, most people
know nothing, or next to nothing,
moro than the bare facts relating
to its history and policy as a European state. The literature of Portugal, especially its ballads, curiously
preservative of an Arabic and Saracenic origin, is a mine that has yet
to be explored by English students.
The Portuguese have beon famous
ns seafaring adventurers from tho
earliest times and have always been
remarkable for their success in dealing with savage peoples. It is
claimed that Portuguese traders had
penetrated every nook and cranny
of Africa, from the Zambesi to the
Congo and Niger, on the north, and
the Zanzibar coast on the east, in
search of gold and ivory, long before Livingstone or Stanley set foot
on the dark continent. They are a
peoplo without prejudices in matters
of trade and, being devoid of color
antipathies, inter-marry with blacks,
yellows and reds in their colonies.
From these unions a curious race has
developed that is known throughout
the tropics for keeness and unscru-
pulousness as traders. British creditors of the Portuguese government
are numerous, and the recent trouble at Delagoa Bay was in the nature of an effort to throw off the
yoke imposed by British capital and
enterprise. In spite of their adventurous character the Portuguese
are the most conservative people in
the world. It seems that in ideas
and habits, they are incapable of
progressive change and every .year
they drop farther in the rear of the
march of European progress. The
new king is said to be energetic and
ambitious, and may possibly find
full employment for his abilities in
the work of internal reform, of
which the kingdom stands greatly in
need.
The addresses of the two candidates for legislative honors aro now
before the public in public print.
If any one wishos to know just how
mnch Westminster wants, and must
have, they are respectfully referred
to these documents. Seriously, both
addresses display an intimate knowledge and an intelligent appreciation
on tho pnrt of their authors of the
requirements of this constituency,
while both, it must bo admitted, are
circumscribed in their horizon with
regard to provincial politics. This
being the closing session of the
present parliament, as Mr. Corbould
remarks, he does not think it necessary to detail his views as to general
legislation. Mr. Cunningham is
.evidently of the same mind, as he
conline3 himself to questions immediately affecting this city and
district. Westminster iirst, and
last, would appear to be the motto
of both candidates. As this spirit
is to a great extent the actuating
principle in our provincial politics
at prosent, it follows that disposition and ability to look out for Numbor One—Number One boing the
interests of his constituency, and
not simply his own private interests
—is a necessary virtue  in a candi
date. Westminster, with its absurdly small representation in comparison with some other places,
certainly requires that its single representative should be a faithful and able champion of its
rights and interests, and at
the same time qualified to
act intelligently, creditably, and
for the common good, on all
questions of general legislation.
The most important issue which will
como before tho next and last session
of tho present parliament is undeniably the redistribution of seats question. Both candidates seem to realize this, and tn be practically unanimous on all other questions which
ihey touch besides. The unprejudiced elector will not be able to find
grounds for doubting tho presont
sincerity of either, and the only question seems to bu, Who is likely to
prove tho most faithful nnd able in
carrying out his promises'! Personal
predilection is bound to largely affect this verdict. Notwithstanding,
however, the similarity of policy and
views of the two candidates, there
is every indication that tlie contest
will be nn interesting and close
one.
Tun people of Ontario, says an
eastern exchange, are becoming disgusted with the steady manufacture
of criminals that is going on in that
province, as elsewhere throughout
the continent. On a Sundny recently the pulpit generally protested
against sending men and women to
gaol who, on trial, were proved not
guilty of nny crime ; ngninst sending children, guilty only of thoir
first minor offence, to reformatories
and prisons, where there is no classification of prisoners and where the
comparatively innocent juveniles
are educated in crime by the vicious
nnd depraved ; against keeping men
in idleness in prisons, when reason
nnd the public interest call for iheir
employment at some useful trade ;
ngninst turning criminals out upou
the world again, detested and abhorred, and to prey upon society,
instead of the state providing some
means, by employment ou public
works or other honest livelihood, to
enable thein to regain their former
status as honorable citizens. All
these points wero emphasized and
n large amountof valuable information was conveyed to the public
which could not fail to convince all
doubters, of the absolute wickedness
of the present, system of so-called
punishment, under which crime increases, and the public, as well as
the prisoners, is being punished.
The operation of grinding out criminals in the Toronto polico court
wus described with great effect, this,
of course, being the great criminal
mill of the province, although courts
scarcely second to it in this regard
may bo found elsewhere in Oanada.
The injustice of many of the sentences imposed in police and higher
courts was boldly criticized and by
men entitled by tlieir legal attainments and experience in affairs to
challenge the decision even of the.
highest judges, one of the speakers
being the Hon. S. H. Blake. A demand was made for the Ontario
government to appoint a commission
to investigate the question of crime
and its causes, the condition of the
provincial prisons and reformatories,
and the steps to be taken to bring
about needed reforms. Stress was
laid upon the necessity for provid
ing houses of detention to wliich
persons accused of crimes and offences should be taken pending their
trial; so that those who were shown
to be not guilty might uot be subjected to tho stain of the gaol. It
was always demanded that iu every
prison there should be suitable employment, thus reducing the cost of
incarceration and providing somo
honest trade for those who must return to mingle with their fellow
men. It was held, too, that the policy of indeterminate sentences, rather than fixed sentences, should bc
adopted, thus supplying to the prisoners in provincial institutions a
strong motive to good conduct and
self-improvement, making the period
of their detention depend largoly
upon themselves. It is evident that
a popular agitation along these lines
will be carried on by many able
men, and already public sentiment
is being rapidly crystalized in behalf
of the movement, It is clear that,
notwithstanding the excellent system of popular education in Ontario,
and the efforts of churches, Sunday
schools, and moral influences of every
kind, the people are becoming
alarmed over the existence of so
muoh crime in their midst, lliey
are, no doubt, correct, thinks the exchange quoted from, in believing
that the criminal punishment system
as administered by the provincial
authorities is spreading rather than
reducing crime, and they are moving in tho right direction to bring
about the needed reform. The agitation will be watched with intorest
throughout tho Dominion.
A SNOW STOEM
In the Southeastern States Blocks
Railways and Destroys Ten
Thousand Cattle.
Tlie Russians Accuse Lord Salisbury
of Insincerity in His Lord Mayor's Day Speech.
Jlr. Parnell's Action Against the
"Times" for Libel Adjourned
till Spring.
Rev. J. A. S, Alien, of Oobourg,
Ont., hns accopted a cnll to the pastorate of Graco Mothodist church, Winnipeg,
SNOW  BLOCKADE.
Denver, Col., Nov. 11.—Tho snow
blockade an tlio Denver, Texas Ss Port
Worth R.B., which was broken Saturday after lasting eight days, by the arrival of the lirst through train from the
south, reports a sad condition of affairs
along the line, ns entiro towns and
ranches within a radius of fifteen and
twenty miles were short nf supplies
anil sonic entirely cleaned out. lt is
pronounced by stockmen tlio heaviest
ever experienced any soason in tho
south. Tho loss nf cattle and sheep
linn been enormous. Tho depth of
snow lins averaged over three foot nn
the level. The reports of loss of life
among cowbnys nnd sheep borders
comiulu, increasing, At Htilon,N.M.,
the I'M ol cattle nlono will reach 10,000
and several cnoipanics will be ruined.
ATTEMPTED ESCAPE.
Fresno, Cnl., Nov. 11.—-While the
prisoners in the citv jail, numbering
29, weru iu tho corridor Saturday
night, they attempted tu escape but
weru trustiated by the prompt action
nf thu jail officials, nnd returned to
their ceils.
ANCIKY DAUGHTERS.
Charleston, S.Or, Nov. 11.—There
i.-i troublo in ibe order of the King's
Daughters heic. The royal chapter,
which is composed of delegates frnm
various circles in lho state, met holo
yosterday and was sliinly ntteuded.
Tin; smnll attendance was attributed
to the publication in thu newspaper of
a card, .supposed to have been written
by a prominent member, and in which
tiio writer urged tho King's Daughters
tn get up a petition lo Queon Victoria
for tin1 pardon uf Mrs. Maybrick. It
is said the publication of this letter kept
many uf the delegates from the meeting. Tliu niatter was uut formally
discussed, but the ladies whu were
present woro angry ut the publication.
A PRINTEIIS'   QUARREL.
Salt Lake Citv, Nuv. 11.—Two
printers, Frank D. Romayne and T.
M. Hughes, type setters in tin* Tribune
oiUee here, met in front uf tho oflico
yesterday afternoon and renewed a
quarrel which had been i_oin» on for
two weeks. Buth were armed and
Hughos fired five shots, ono Bhot going
through Rnniayne's body, killing him
in a few minutes. Hughes wub ar-
rOBted.
BEAT THE 11EC0U11.
San Fkancisco, Nov. 11.—The atr.
Oceanic arrived from Hong Koug and
Yokohama this morning, thirteen days,
fourteen hours and four minutes frum
the latter port, the fastest time on
record.
UNFORTUNATE JOHNSTOWN.
Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 11.—The long
bridge connecting Cambria and Millvale
was entirely demolished this morning by
the high water and driftwood in thoCon-
eniaugli river. The loss of the structure
will greatly retard the removal of dead
bodies from Millvale cemetery to their
permanent resting-place in Prospect cemetery. Last night the Christian churoh,
Main street, was badly damaged by liro.
MODJESKA AND BOOTH.
NewYouk, Nov. 11.—Madame Mod -
jeska indignantly denies the truth of the
article published this morning to the effect that she would apply for the annulment of her contract on account of
Booth's ungentlomanly conduct. She
Bays slio iB, and always has been, friendly with Booth, and has no doubt will
continue so till the end of the season.
THAT BOOM- COTTON.
Chicaoo, Nov. 11.—The first witness
this morning in the Cronin trial was Dr.
liellicld's stenographer, who testified that
Capt. Schaack gave Dr. Belfield aome
bloody cotton on tho morning of May
6th. This was to trace the connection
of blood from the trunk to Belfield.
THE  CATHOLIC CONGRESS.
Baltimore, Nov. 11.—The Catholic
congress began its session this morning. The delegates, numbering 1200,
assisted at solemn pontifical high mass
in the morning, celebrated by Archbishop Corrigan of New York. The
sermon wub preached by Arch-
bislwii Grosse, of Oregon. Ho welcomed the delegates and gave a brief
outline of the history of the church in
America for tho past liundrcd years.
At tho conclusion of the sermon tho
delegates inarched tn Concordia opora
house. Tho congress was called to order nt 11:15 a. m., by Wm. J. Onahan,
of Chicago; Archbishop Ireland, of St.
Paul, prayed that the light of tho Holy
Spirit might be shed on the deliberations of the congress. Mr. Onahan
next road a message from tlio Pope,
whose name wns greeted with tremendous applause. Tho measngo read:
"Having mado. known to the Holy
Father the expressions of devotion convoyed to him on tho part of tho Catholic congress to bo held in Baltimore,
His Holiness graciously bids mo to say
he offers his affectionate blessings to
all tho membors. (Signed). Cardinal
Ranagolla-" Mr. Onahan then welcomed tho delegates of foreign countries as well as of the United States,
and hoped that in 1892 thoy would
havo tho pleasure of wolcoming thom
to tho International congress. Among
thoso on tho Btngo wero Bisnops Vir-
tuo, of Engl, nd, Foley,. of Detroit,
Father llaybuvn, of Mexico, and many
other prelates, priests, otc. Govornor
John Leo Carroll, of Maryland, was
then elected temporary chairman, and
tlio following secretaries appointed;
Leo Hamilton, of Georgetown Collego;
G. F. Edwards, of Notre Dame University, of Indiana; W. S. McDonald,
of Boston Collego; J. P, Fishor, of tho
Immaculate'Conception Collego, New
Orleonsi'Romity Rayberg. of St. Louis
UjlL-ge, und John M. Duffy, of Chicago. A long list of vice-presidents
from each state waB also rend.
specie decreased.
Berlin, Nov. 11. - The specie in the
Imperial Bank mis decreased  640,000
marks during the past week.
to reorganize.
London, Nov. 11 The associated
Amsterdam uud Luudon committee of
tho Missouri Kati3iis and Texaa RR.
securities liavo decided-ou a reorganization plan for converting the various
classes of bonds into now 4Js d voting
truBt has been created.
very probable.
Paris, Nov. ll.-TlieSnlic. says tho recent interview between the Czar and
Bismarck resulted iu a deciaion to oust
Ferdinand from tho Bulgarian throne.
AN ARTIFICIAL SPEAKER.
St. Petersburg, Nov. l'l.—Tho
Nove Vremya snys Lord Salisbury's
speech at the Lord Mayor's bniiqiiet
on Saturday night displayed optimism
that ivas artificial ami insincere, and
his* prediction of unbroken peace, as
the outcome uf present tendencies, incredible.
MYSTERIOUS disappearance,
Belgrade, Nov. il.—Considerable ox
citoluent has been nrouseil here by the
mysterious disappearance of M. Cristite-
ly, formerly Servian minister at Berlin.
Ho has suddenly dropped out of sight,
and no one seems to know what lias becomo of him.
WILL COME OUT AN OLD MAN.
San Fhancisco, Nov. 9. - Julian
Portilli, who murdered John Mofsutt,
Ins partner in the chicken peddling
business, was sentenced tu thiity ynura
in the Stat" prison to-dny.
MORE HANGING NEEDED.
San Fhancisco, Nuv. 9 - Inflammatory circlulars.iu'o being quietly distributed to-day by local socialists, aiuiouuc-
ing that a memorial meeting will bo
hulil Monday evening next to com-
nionioi 'to Hn: anniversary uf the execution of ihe Chicago anarchists, and
urging all workingmen to atinnd.
TO l'REV AOAIN ON SOCIETY.
Baltimore, Nov. 9. —George Bell,
alias Williamson, uno of tlio most no-
torious forgers in America, wub released frnm tho Maryland penitentiary
to-dny, having completed a leu years'
sentence. Ho was tho accomplice of
Chas. O. Brookwuy, tho prince of forgers, in doing fdrgorieB by wliich they
gol §10,000 from Baltimore banks.
LIBEL ADJOURNED.
London, Nov. 9.—Mr. Parnell's
notion for libel against the Times has
been adjourned until spring. Mr.
Gladstone, upon being questioned as tu
whether liis proposed Irish parliament
wuuld havo power to endorse Roman
Catholic oiiucutioual institutions in
Ireland, said the Irisli parliament
ehould not have that power and that
denominational educution ought to be
abolished iu Great Britain, But this
would not please sectarians of England
and Scotland,
OHUROH   MATTERS.
London, Nov. 9.—Mr. Spurgeon
haa severed bis connection with the
Baptist Missionary Society, wilh tho
intention of forming a Tabernacle Sooiety to send independent missions
abroad. Dr. Parker has accepted tlio
presidency uf ihe Congregational
Union of 181)0.
NEW THEATRICAL CLUB.
London, Nov. 9.—The nciivc managers of thu Loudon theatres have
funned a club society which is tu be
exclusively nf their own. The cum-
mitteo consists of Augustus Harris,
Abuil, Hnllingshcad and Greet.
mil parnell's health.
London, Nuv. !).—The reports as to
Mr. Parnell's ill health nro happily unfounded. Ho ia iu mnch better health
than at this time last yoar and regards
this coming session wilh moro interest
than any preceding one of this parliament. It is his opinion that tho government will fall, not, perhaps, in the
next session, but in that which follows.
Mr. Parnell scorns to have a very clear
opinion ns to the proBent duty of the
opposition; that lhe government ahould
now be resisted und opposed on the
ground that it has no valid claim to
represent the country. It has never
represented Ireland, Scotland or Wales
nnd now that England too- has turned
against it, tho time has arrived whou
quite at tho beginning of the session its
claim tolegislate fur the people, who have
intimated a want of coufidenco, Bhould
be atuutly denied. There ia good reason to believe, thut theso opinions are
not hold alone by tho Irish leaders,
but also by tho liberal leaders generally, and that in February thoy will bo
acted upon with a view to forcing the
government to make an appeal to the
country. It ia already practically
agreed that at the opening of tho session the wholo woight of the opposition
will bo given to tho amendment to the
address directly challenging tho poaition
of tho government.
WILL LIVE AT COlll'IUI.
London, Nov. 9.—The Duko nnd
Duchess of Edinburgh and their
daughters havo gono to Coburg. Tho
duko ia preparing to rcsido tlioro permanently.
THE PREMIER'S SPEECH.
London, Nov. 9.—Lord Salisbury,
speaking at tho Lord Mayor's banquet
in tho Guild Hull to-night, congratulated the country on tho expansion of
its trade, warned tho labor agitators
that in pursuing their courso thoy undertook a great responsiblity and advised tho omployers to bo cautious, as
imprudence un their part would jeopardise tlieir interests. Tho prosperity of
Ireland, he asserted, was increasing,
and disorder was consequently disappearing. Tho government had not
indulged in any wild theories of Home
Rulo, but wan ready to furthor any
practical and satisfactory policy for
Ireland's good. The government's
Egyptian pulley remained unchanged,
Egypt, ut present, boing unable to pro-
tcct herself without British assistance.
The tendency of Europe was peaceful
and the great powers were of one accord-
in wiahing to avoid a conflict.
A RADICAL OPINION,
London, Nov. 9.—Nearly all the
members of the governmeni atiended
the Lord Mayor's banquet today. A
number of other Tory members uf parliament are also in the oity, and those
am clearly of tho opinion lhat the reverses whieh the government have suffered in the reoent elections will inclino the party in power to hold un
firmly to the end. "Two nmre sessions and perhaps three" is the reply
in the mouths of ministers to the question whether the government will remain in power. But when tho question iB put to them, "Wine will you
propose ur do in order to justify such
u retention uf power?" there is no re-
spouse. Except that something will
be proposed about the Irish land question next session, lliero is n general
belief that Lord Salisbury ami Lurrt
Hartiiigti.il aro both opposed tn any
relaxation of tho policy of coercion
nud tc nny largo scheme uf local government. The heavy-weights uf iho
government aro certainly disposed to
go with Lord Sel lion rni- in objecting
to a vory heavy programme* fnr next
Si'ssinu. There are minor membera of
tho government win, think that there-
will bu do difficulty wiiafever in resisting such invitations as thu-e of Mr.
Chamberlain and Mr Oiiui'teniiy tn a
vnliminiiiiis programme Tho 'lories
do nut think that any uf tlm dissentient. Liberals will really try tn "bolt"
just yet. Suoh iiu ntioinpt may happen, they any, Inter un io the lifo of
this parliament when (l.o critical time
uf a general electinn is noar ut hand.
But fur tho moment th.- sentiment "f n
common danger is upon all v.,u ministerialist party and their lirst impulse
is to hold together nnd go mi fur a
time. That the governmiinl will fall
to pieces whenever it enters upon a
new Irisli polioy, i. an opinion uu
whicli thu leading Tories and the loading Liberals and Air. Parnell himself
uro all agreed.
A GORY WRETCH.
New Orleans, Nov. 8.— A butchery,. •
probably the work of an insane mail,
uccurod un Wednesday nt Bayou Bieuf,
La., in wliich twu num were killed and
fuur desperately wounded. Quite a
number of people had gathered ntn
hamlet tu attend a "wake." Among
theso was Leon Thibodeaux, who was
standing on the railroad platform, A
stranger approached Thibodeaux and
slapped him familiarly on tho back.
Thibodeaux remonstrated with the
man, whu for an answer drew a long
knifo and plunged it into Thibodeaux's
buck and neck. His brother, Neil
Thibodeaux, ran tu his assistance and
was nlso met by tho stranger's knife,
wliich was thrust inlo his thruat, partly
severing one of tho arteries and causing
him to fall to the ground from loss of
blood. Meanwhile Leun Thibodeaux
had succeeded iu drawing his revolver
and fired uno shut at his assailant without hitting him. Molas Thibudonux,
a cousin uf the wounded men, then ran
to their Assistance, to bo met iu turn
with tho knife dripping with thn blond
of his relatives. In an instant it had
been plunged into his back ..nd side inflicting two ugly wounds. Frank
Pennison ran to tho aid oftho wounded
men. The atranger plunged his knifo
intu Poiinison's heart, and tho poor
follow foil over aud died almost without a groan. The stranger then sprang
upon Joshua Morrison, n one-armed
employee nf tbu railroad. Morriaou
mado a gallant liglit and succeeded in
Knocking down the uiurdoror several
times before hi: fell himself, with ten
cuia nn his person. Tho murderer
thon ran to tho bayou and'stcppingiiito
a skiff pushed off into tho stream. Mr.
Aucbein pursued him, and aftor firing
several shots struck tho murderer, who
tumbled into the bayou and sank out
of sight.	
The liilim Nii'Aiite.s.
It will bo learned with pleasure that
no change in tho presont line of st.amors running between Vancouver and
Japan will occur, the arrangements
heretofore existing continuing until the
new steamers are put on. At no time
was thore any danger of tho discontinuance of the aervice, na the management if the Canadian Pacifio Navigation Company had determined to
maintain it, but whatever truth there
existed aB to the rumours of the intend-
ed withdrawal if tho Bhipa horotoforo
chartered, it is now eortain that such
intention will not be carried into effect.
—News.
        ^ ■ 1	
Chilliwack council.
Tho municipal council of Chilliwack
held their regular meeting on Nov. 7th.
Present—Couna. Recce, Armstrong, Kennedy, Bay ley und Link man. His worship the reevo being absent, Councillor
Reece was unanimously voted to tho
chair, Minutes of previous meeting wero
road and adopted. Communieations
wero received from G. R. Ashwell, D.
Robson, D. McGillivray, A. C. Wells,
H. Webb, W. Snider, Geo. Rutherford,
N. Munro, W.H. Caw ey und Joseph
Gibson. The following accounts w_.ii.
rcceived, and ordered paid: C. P. N.
Co., §10.25, freight r.-\ I n '■ ,- from Pup-
cum Mill; Knight Bros., ?(J0.60, supply
of lumber; C. Midglev, $6; Chas. Hooso,
36; Joseph PcerB, _$2I3, repairing Mountain road; Alex. McBrido, $35, repairs
to Chilliwack river road; Theo. Willie,
gilOO, construction of Luck-a-kuck river
bridge; Chas. Allitt, $36.44, repairs to
bridge on Reeve's road. T. U. Irwin's
bill of $100.76, for gravelling on Trunk
road laid over till next meoting. On motion,
Postmaster A. C. Wells was instructed
to expond $25 on tho Luck-a-kuck river
crossing. On motion, tho board of
works was iiiBtructcd to examine tho sito
for tho proposed road through A. Rcevo'a
farm, and roport at next meeting. On
motion, N. Munro's rc-joest for an ox-
tension of timo to completo contract was
granted; time extended toDco. 1st. On
motion, .PostmoBtur Cawley was instructed to repair the road leading to llopo
slough around the ■Shannon mountain.
Council ndjournod to meet 30th Novembor, 1880, wheu thu voter's list will bo
comploted,
■HM
^■M^M VOLUME 34.
w_.i-.ki_y British Columbian
ncilm-ulu. Jlonilng, Nov. Ill, I8ffl>.
(From Daily Columbian, Nov.  11.)
Royal, the Nnniomo horse, beat
Maud, ihe Laduora horse, two heats
out of three, for a purso of $1000, nt
Queen's park mi Saturday afternoon.
The semi annual examination of applicants for entrance to the high school
is announced tn bo held in the central
aeh'.ol building, thia city, nt 9:30 a.m.,
on Wednesday', Nov. 27th.
The str. Princess Louiso arrived
from Victoria this morning with 25
passengers and 130 tuna freight. She
left un lho return trip this afternoon
on the arrival of tho Pacific express.
Bev. Mr. Haddon, of St. Paul's (R.
E.) church, preached the funeral sermon last evening of Frank Emerson,
tho young man who met hia death by
the runaway nccident last week. A
largo congregation listened to the int-
preaaivo discourse delivered.
Tho Governor-General's reception
on Saturday evening was very fairly
attended considering thu disagreeable"
weather and the hour at which it was
held. About 100 people attended and
were introduced tn their excellencies.
Shortly aftor 8 o'clock the train bearing tho,vice-regal party, left for the
east.
WEEKLY BlUTlSH COLUMBiAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, NOVEMBER 13, 1889.
NO. 46.
A Ureal Recoril.
The str. Active left Hastings mills,
Vancouver, with the barque George in
tmv on Friday morning last ttt 11
o'clock and reached Esquimalt harbor
at 1) o'clock the same evening; loft for
Westminster at 10 p.m. and reached
ibis port at 5 a.m., making tho run in
seven houra. This is a record difficult
i o beat by any tug on the coast, bnt,
bf coutse, lhe Active ia as lino and
swift   a   vessel   as any iu the towing
business.
 >____ .
Till! Sliinnvtity Wife.
Too above piny as presented by the
McKee Rankin Company at the Opera
House Saturday night, was one of the
best dramatic entertainments ever put
on the s'age in this oity. Mr. McKee
Rankin, as Arthur Eastman was powerful, Ins paroxysms uf rage and des
pair, an*! passages uf love and tender*
ness being its natural as liio. The acting uf lins Mabol Bert, us Lady Alice,
waa ui">t pleasing, and as an emotional
and polished actress she is certainly
in tho from ranks. Miss Larena At-
wnod, as Lillian, did perfect justice to
her part. Sho is buth graceful and
pretty, anil has a freshness of manner
that is quite satisfactory. Miss Wood,
as Hester, waa all that a terrible uid
woman cuuld be expected to be. Mr.
C. T. Arper, ns Hon. Talbot Viiue, was
scarcely up to the mark, there being
ronin ill hia part fur much finer acting
than wns displayed. Mr. Crosbie, aa
Dr. Pri'scutt. waa good, and so wns Mr.
Harry Sedley as Sir Lauucelot Trayera.
The same may nlsu be said uf Mr. Chas.
Wyugatu whu played tho dillicult role
of Arthur Vero.
A Lively Meeting.
Yesterday afternoon at tho Y. M. C.
A. rooms there was ono of tho liveliest
meetings that ever occurred thero. Secretary Davie during the usual sorvico
roso and called for subscriptions for
tho benefit of tho international committoe. Dr. Kent, whu wns present,
immediately i-obo and asked wlion tho
international committee and thia association came into partnership. Before Mr. Davio could reply Dr. Kont
began a very bitter tirade against tho
committee and tho association, and accused Mr, Davio uf being an impuster
for trying to collect funds for the international committee. Ho said Mv.
Davin was hirod to do secular work,
and 'finished up by saying the association was run by tho Methodist ohurch,
and that Mr. Fisher or any other clergyman, had no right to bo hired by tho
association to conduct the services
during the weok of prayer. Dr. Kent
sat down amid a storm uf hisses, and
seizing his hat ho got up and left the
room. Outside ho waa mei by Mr.
FraBer, who spoko vory plainly to him,
and aiiid auch conduct had a wnrBe effect
on young men than tho writiugs of
"Tom Payne" or Bob Ingersoll. The
service was conducted io tho end after
the departue of Dr. Kent, but there
wub considerable excitement throughout the meeting.
THE  NOMINATIONS
Only Bring Two -rutiiltilui. *t to the Frnm
nml 1-itHs off (liili-tly.
The nomination of candidates for
the election of a member to the
provincial parliament, to fill the
vacancy at preaent existing, caused
by tho elevation of Mr. Holo to
the bench, took place to-dny, and
pa8Bod off very quietly. When tho
timo fur receiving Homiuatiuiis had expired, Mr. Chaa. Warwick, guvernment
agent, read the following nominatiotiB:
Gordon E. Corbould, barrister, pro-
pusod by Chaa. McDonough, seconded
by Henry Elliott and assented to bv
I. B. Fisher, Win. McColl uud U 1''
Bunsoii Thomas Cunningham, proposed by David McNair, seconded by
Chas. J, Fagan, and assented to by
Alex. Ewen, J. C. Armstrong and
John Reid, A poll was called for the
25th inst., nt tho court houae.
On motion Capt. Scoullar was called
to the chair and requested tlie candidates to lay their views beforo tho
meeting.
Mr. Corbould waa the lirat called on.
Ho said it was his intention to call n
public meeting at an ually dnte, and
would therefore present hia views very
shortly on thiB occasion. The lirst
important question he considered was
the ro diatiibiilion of stnts, Viotoria
had fuur representatives iu the huuso,
whilo Westminster had only one. The
time had como whuu this must be
changid, nut only for this ci'y but for
the win ilo district,    lt ahould  le   lhe
duty uf the member elected tu see that
li . whole mninUti wn. properly e
preaentea. Itoadauud bnugeaihruugii-
out the wholo district wero urgently
needed, particularly a road to theNorth
Arm and to Maple Ridge. The im-
pruvementa uf roads throughout the
country cannot but prove beneficial to
the city, c nacqucntly nu effort shouhl
be left unturned io bring tbo mads into good condition. The timo had come
when Westminster should have a court
house not only suitable to ils prcseut
wants, but large enough to fill the re
quiremonts for some yeara to come.
Westminster was an important city
and should be at the head of the cities
of the mainland. He felt certain tho
government could be induced to furnish the city with a propor court houso
in accordance with its importance. If
olocled, Mr. Corbould promised to
urge the government for assistance to
build a freo traffic bridgo across the
Fraaer at Westminster, which would
upon tu uur merchants the unrestricted
trndo of a large outlying farming district. Ho would contend forthe usual
government vote of S1.000 to lhe agricultural sucicty on tho mainland,
should the island set np n society of
its own. The fostoring of industries,
by government support, would also
have his heartiest assistance. Concluding, Mr.'Corbould said it had been
rumored ho had bought land in Vancouver; this wub true, but he had aold
over half of the property and every
cont of the proceeds had been spent in
Westminster and not oue cent in Vancouver. Ho owned more land in Westminster than Mr. Cunningham, his
residence was hero, and that did not
look liko deserting tho city. He hoped
tho contest would bo conducted in iv
friendly spirit, and nut givo rise to
hard feelings. Mr. Corbould was frequently interrupted by applause.
Mr. Cunningham was next called to
the platform. Ho said his views had
been laid beforo tho publio at a previous meeting. He would support the
preaent government just bu long as it
does justico to this city and district,
but his hand would never be raised
against any measure he considered juat
and right. He hud no interests, except a litilo land up the river, outsido
of Wostminstcr; it was therefore easy
tn see bo would work faithfully fur this
city if eleoted tn tho house. Ho had
been working fur sevornl yeara tn unite
Westminater city and district, fnr they
should bn strung allies. He wus for
Westminster cily nud district- first and
always, the rest of lho province had
proven able tu car*.! fur itself. As in
tho past he wuuld urge tbo erection uf
a new court house cuniuiciisurati! with
tho want! uf tho city. New schools
wero badly required, and if elected he
would insist upon thu , govornment
giving our children the proper accommodations. Victoria and Vancouver
woro well supplied in this way, while
the Westminster schools were lifty
years behind tho age. Tho question
of a freo traffic bridge across the Fraser
he had supported in the past, and
would work in the same direction in
tlio future. He thought tho government coold be induced to givo a liberal assistance to the proposed bridge.
Tlio roads generally throughout the
district require much improvement,
and new roada wero required, portiou-
larly a trunk road through tho centro
of Lulu Island from tho Gulf of Georgia
to Now Westminster. Tho Yalo road
also wns sadly in need of repair, tlie
settlers wero suffering for want of good
roads by whicli tu get tlieir produco to
murkot, and if he waa elected he would
heartily support road improvements on
a large Beale. The time had arrived
whon a fruit canning and packing establishment was necessary in Westminster, ur the fruit growers of Britiah
Columbia would suffer much loss
Much canned fruit wna imported nnd
thia might na well bo supplied by homo
industry. If elected ho would ur<ro
that a government bonus be givon to
the tirst fruit cannery. He would
bring in a measure, if elected, to make
the registration of volers compulsory
on tho part uf eithor municipality or
government. Mr. Cunningham concluded by saying ho had the promotion
of other industries in view, but which
would be bnd policy to make public at
present. He wanted tu go lo parliament to strike heavy blows for Westminater, and would do an if olectod.
With Mr. Corbnuld ho wished the contest lo bo friendly throughout. Mr.
Cunningham was liberally applauded
at the conclusion of hia addross.
After passing a vote of thanks to the
chairman tho meeting adjourned.
GOR.-ii.SPOND_.NGfc..
Police Court.
il'.etoreT. O. Atkinson,P. 11.1
Johnny McGee, a Thompson River
Indian, deposited $5 for being drunk
and incapable, und forfeited thn same
by non-appearance this morning.
Johnny, a Hydah Indian, fur having
an intuxiciting liquor iu his posscaaion,
was remanded nun week fur sentence.
John Grant, tho man who supplied
thu liquor, was alio rouitindcd fur a
week.
Edward L iiVell givo ulBooi' Toihiine
heaps uf trouble m running him in
yesterday, Luivell was drunk enough
tn bring uut al tbu ugliness uf his
character, and beful'o tho stalwart nfli-
cer took liulu ut huu sworn there were
nut three policemen in Westminster
whu oould arrest him. In the police
station he mndo a terrible disturbance.
Fined $32,60 iu all, on threo charges.
This afternoon cunt sat again on a
charge uf assault pnrpctrated by S:ick-
ueii Cbailey upuii Juhn Andei-a-.n, It
ciiuie uut iu evidence that Aiiilersnii
had taken away Charley's kloiichiluili
and kept her as hia klunchmuii. Jenny,
tho lady above mentioned, was in cuurt
nud lookod vory roBpt'Olnble. Charley
wns lined a dollar anil cin-ts.
Tommy, a Hydah Indian, who wns
with Charley when the assault occurred
and kiniUy reliuvuil Mr. Autlnt'don of
two shins and u lint, was bound over
tn appeal' to-morrow to rveuivu sou*
tuiice. Mr. McTieman Mil Charley
if ho wuuld bring ouo ul tliu lyres ui I "ith hm
his tribe lie would get him bis klnucli ' '
again.
Whom Slioiilil We Elecl?
Editor Columbian.—Sir:—In deciding who should be returned to the provincial parliament by New Westminster
city we should realize the general duties
and necessary qualification of such a
member; secondly, who among us is
available, most ablo and willing to subserve our interests.
The time has arrived iu the history
oi flow VV'estininater when she muat assert herself politically in ordor to secure
that influence and legislative favor which
her rapidly increasing industries demand,
and to accomplish this she must be represented by men who arc not ouly zealously alivo to-the questions affecting hor
future interests, but who possess tho
ability to Eorward thoso iuteresta, whose
unyielding efforts and highest ambition
will bc ably directed in scouring to this
city in, part, at least, her long neglected
wants and political rights, and whoso
ambition will be to mnko tlieir public
record, and not the position, a stopping
stone to future preferment. This is a
high and praiseworthy ambition, thcoiiJy
ono that merits public favor, and when a
candidate possesses it, I seo no reason
why his ambition should be maligned.
1 believo Thomas Cunningham is such
a man, and that he possesses traits of
character, ability and ambition whicli
peculiarly qualify him for a high and
valuable service as our representative.
His past efforts iu the public service
have stamped hiin ns a man of political
character, strong convictions, clear foresight, and decisive action. He has
shown an untiring, determined energy in
pursuing to a successful issuo the public
measures he has undertaken. Ho has
shown himself thoroughly aud zealously
alive to the interests of this community.
His intimate acquaintance with public
measures, und public men, his broad
scope ol knowledge ou subjects which
will arise in future, and which will affect
both the former, will arm bim with a
power which must be felt in the interests
of this community,
It is this vfliitago ground, the strung
individuality of the man and his tenacity
of purpose, which will force a hearing in
New Westminster's iuteresta and crown
Mr. Cunningham's efforts with success
when urging her claims as representative.
OBSERVE]..
SUU Bliistineletictl.
Editor Columbian.—.Sir: I have purposely delayed a reply to tho letters of
Messrs. Major and Gamble which appeared iu your issue of the Oth inst. till
after the visit of the governor-general
and party. I am sorry to be involved in
this unpleasant and unprofitable controversy at all. It is unseemly at any time,
but much more so would it be unwise to
parade our differences while distinguished strangers arc amongst us. I would
prefer to suffer in silence than have unfavorable impressions carried away at
the expense of this community. Now
that the vice-regal party havo gone, 1
feel it ia due to my frionda and myself to
correct somo statements contained in the
letter above referred to. I would state,
first, that I had no intention to dead-
beat my election address, na Mr. Major
insinuates. When I handed my letter to
your city editor 1 distinctly stated that
I desired the publishers of The Columbian to charge for the spaco occupied at
the usual rates. Mr. Clover will bear
me out in this statement, and if you had
not been advised of this, tho fault ia not
mine. When I published roy firat card
in Truth I made the same request. So
there was no attempt whatever to iload-
bcat.
My first charge against the friends of
Mr. Corbould was this: In circulating
the requisition to that gentleman, they
were misrepresenting facta and mialead-
ing my frienda in stnting that I had withdrawn in Mr. Corbould's favor. In proof
of tins I beg to submit the following
statements from four gentlemen, cither
of whom is aa much entitled to credence
as either Mr. Major or Mr. Gamble; in
fact, much more so, for these gentlemen
have no schemes to foster or interests to
boom at the expense of New Westmin*
atcr; they are simply independent electors, ami state as follows;
We the undersigned wero persuaded to
sign a requisition In Mr. Corboulil hy the
friends of thnt gentleman, Messrs. Mnjor
uiul Gamble, assuring us thai, Mr. Cuii-
iiltiKlisini had withdrawn lu Mr. Corbould's favor.
i'\V. 13.Tr.WNsr.Nii.
(Signed)!-] M. A. IUiI.ai:.
,;< in.
lw.
McHae.
I huvo no hesltnlk.il in sliitlngtlinl.IwttB
Indlieeil to sign Mr. Corbould's rci'tilsltton
by representations being iiuule ut the
time thnt Mr. Cunningham had wltli*
ilniwn In Mr. Corhoulil's favor.
(Signed):       G. W. Gilley.
Now, sir, I am sure that my contention is proven, and that I had just cause
for charging Major and Gamble for doing
that which any gentleman would consider
discreditable. I used no harsher term;
and having proved my case, I can afford
to let tho rest go.
Had I known that Mr. Major, iu liis
eager haste to evolve his own political
schemes, could so far forget himself ns to
bring along a VOLUNTEER wltuoBB to involve mo in an endless controversy, 1
would have "fired" both of them much
more unceremoniously than I did. Mr,
Major declares that ho did not seek a
quarrel with me. Why did he, with his
man Friday, seek ine at alt? Why did
he Intrude where he was nut invited':
His ung.:!' hnsto betrays his scheming,
anil, 1 may add, the whole management
of the Corbould bu.liioBB, hi lirst. pushing out an innocent, inoffensive young
limn, tin n trying to uso onr late depart*
on friend, and. finally, in bringing out
Mr. Corhould, shows tlium up i:i uu enviable  light      The  •!■-; i>" straits to
which thoy are ruduceil should open the
people's oj oi.
Yours tJiipquulohcd,
Thomas Cunningham.
S, Ainpliiou struck tliu
? illinium tn 12 o'clock
uu 'ii,  Luly Stanley,
When 11. M.
! sunken i-.-i-k at
nn   Wuiliiuailaj
Lidy'AI'.i' Stanley, Mrs Oovillo and
Mii*s Lister were uiijuying tbo comforts
uf lhe waul room. Atthe lime tliu'ill'
from striking iviis felt, Lady Stuiluy
exclil'ined ''Oh! mv!" ., uir.uitd feminine oxpivs-inii. It iias afterward, proposed by Lii."d Stanley '" name the
spot "Oa! mi!' which mis neoni'iliiuily
ilniii.. The ship was tlii'eiiquiiriui's nf
an holli' hear the sp* t, during whicli
time Miss l.'sior tniik Bever-il plintua
norn.—VViiii'.s
\i',oi„ Daily Columbian. Nov. 12.)
The str. Belle arrived thiB morning
from Mud Bay with two booms of logB.
Armstrong & Eckstein are advertising money to loan in large or small
amounts,
The barometer is still on the rise
and the weather promises fair for a
few days to come.
The str. DunBmuir arrived from Nanaimo to day with a number of passengers and a full load of coal.
The Btreet decorations in honor of
the governor-general's visit were taken
down to-day and carted away.
The str. Irving left for Chilliwack
this morning with 12,000 feot of lumber, 20 tons of freight and 40 passengers.
Look out for November meteors.
The dats fur the annual shuwers extends frum the 13th to 16th uf this
month.
Tho str. Active is nil the way frum
Aricturia with a scow load uf iron and
another of glass, lately arrived from
England.
The Royal City Planing Mills Co.
shipped to-day a double car of long ear
sills for ubo in the C. P. fi. shopa at
Montreal.
It ia likely tliat another ahip will arrive thia week at the Royal Oily Plau-
ing Milla wharf to load lumber for
Australia.
Snow fell heavily in the mountains
last night. Tho Pitt range gave incontestable evidence of the fact to-day,
and looked rather wintry.
The new chambers in thecourt house
for Judge Bolo are nearly ready for
occupation, and liis honor will be in
possession early noxt week.
Thu residents of Sapperton are of
tho opinion that a grocery store iu that
suburb wuuld be well auported and
prove a prufitablo enterprise.
Tho str. Stella goes out to Mud Bay
today to fetch aomo booms of logs.
She will tnko a load of groceries and
feed for tho uao of tho camp at tho bay.
To Farmers.—Messrs. Woods,Turner
& Gamble make a specialty * f lending
money un farming lands; any amount
from 8100 to _*20,0_0, aooording to
security. ocl7m
Building operations were resumed
thia morning with great vigor; tho
value of the present grand weather is
more fully appreciated by the builders
than any other   budy of individuals.
Tho Fairy Queen brought up from
the North Arm to-day 140 aacks potatoes and 50 bales of hay. She takes
down a load of furnituro for Lulu Island parties from  Wintemuto   Bros.
The last load of rock from the Pitt
river quarry fur tho Ross-McLaren
mills wits brought down on Saturday.
An immonso quantity of this stone has
been used in tho construction of the
mill.
A hunting party left tho city this
morning fur the vicinity of Murphy's
logging camp. Deer is the game they
are loaded for, and they aro reported
plentiful in tho neighborhood of Mud
Bay.
A line was transposed in Mr. Corbould's address yesterday, by a ine
chanicttl inadvertence. The address
will be found on tho seoond page of
the paper to-day, "right side up with
care."
A general meeting of the lacrosse
club will bo hold on Thursday evening
at 8 o'clock, in Richards and Mackintosh's office, to discuss matters of great
importance and ovory member is oxpeeted to nttoiul.
The atr. Emma arrived from Nanaimo laat night with a scow load of
coal for Gilley Bros. Tho Emma is
having her bulwnrkB and top rail completely renewed, and McPhee Bros,
are doing the work iu a substantial
manner.
A dead horse hns been lying in the
vacant lot opposite Mayor Tnwnscnd's
rosidonct', since Saturday last, and the
people nf that neighborhood think it is
high time tho carcass was removed tu
tho boncyard, or whatever placo is eet
apart for such purpuacs.
Thoro nre about 700 votea likoly to
be polled ou the 25th inst and this
number must bo cast in 480 minutes.
Consequently the electors must bo on
time or aomo of thom will lose their
vote. The election net ought to be
amended to allow moro than ono
polling place.
The paralytic named Sinionaou, who
has been such a aourco of trouble and
annoyance to the council nnd lhe people, was examined yesterday afternuohat
the pulice station, by Doctors DeWolf
Smith and Walker, who prunnunccil
him insane and had hiin sent to the
asylum at once.
The Pitt rivor railway bridgo is undergoing repairs. Several piles uro
being replaced and timbers un the tup
renewed. Tho bridge-foramen have
recoived orders to reduce thoir Btnif
and as tho necessary repaira on the
bridges are comploted tho staff will be
cut down about uno half.
At the ciiy council mooting last night
Aid. Curtis gave notico if motion lhat
be would introduce u by-law to lis a
salary for the mayor, Although a very
honorable office to hold, the chief
magistracy is imt a lucrative billet, but
nn ibe contrary cMIs fur a considerable
uutlay nf money ench year.
The tin-i -misted aclinoiier, William
Ronton, nf San Francisco, cleared
frum tho Boyal City Planing Mills
wharf uii Sunday fm- Adelaide, South
Australia. Sho had uu board 530,000
feet uf rough and dressed lumber, and
carried a conaiderablo portion of it on
lu'i' decks. Sim was tun ed to sea by
the steamer Active.
In tiio criminal court this morning,
beloiu His Honor Judge Buie, an old
offender, iinmeil James Onvanagli, nt
proi-uiit a prisunnr in lho pruvinoi.il
goal, iippi'in-i'd fur I'lin'iuii uu the
charge uf sudtmiv. Thu crime was
ooinniill.nl In umil, and reaching tin.* I
o ns nf lliii governor, the bitter insli, I
toted the proceeding*!. Caynungh ul-
I'Cteil  in bo Ivied at tbo Ml assizes
The storm winch raged on Saturday
night, about 11 o'olock, was one of the
severest known here in many yeara.
Tlie wind was very strong with a velocity of about 30 or 35 miles au hour.
The surface of the river was raised into
great waves, and made, under tho
light of the moon, a grand sight. Several chimney tops and pieces of fence
were blown down, but no serious damage done.
Persons who have had good opportunities of judging, say that game is
becoming scarcer evory year around
Pitt meadows. Duck were never seen
in such meagre numbers nor so wild as
they aro thiB season, A groat deal of
pot-hunting goes on all the time, in
and out of aeaaon; and, as every Si-
waBh haa a gun and blazes away at all
houra uf day and night, it is not to be
wondured at that the game is disappearing from its old-time feeding
grounds.
I'niii'.i* of ibiii'rialiiiiit-iils.
Tickets have been issued for the
winter course of entertainments of the
Langley Prairie Presbyterian church.
The course commences with Dec. 3rd
next, ending on April 1st, 1890, and
compriBea fivo lectures, with muaic by
the choir, and one concert. The lecturers are Revs. D. Fraaer and P.
McF. McLeod, of Victoria; Rev. Mr.
Ross, of Chilliwack, and Rev, Mr.
Scquier and Mr. G. W. Rasuro, nf this
city. Tickets for tho courso have been
placed at $1, and the proceeds will go
to the building fund of tbo church.
HUH ImiirovltiR.
The Agues at. improvements die
hard. The aouth side of that interesting thoroughfare «waa rashly thought
by the public to bo finished (although
it boro su liitle evidence of huiBh), but
now a deep trench has been dug along
the south sidewalk and sume mysterious
operations are in progress under the
same. The sound of the hammer and
the snw can bo heard, and everything
indicates that "someone has blundered", and that alterations an*, needed.
When finished this line street will be it
great driving and riding avenue for
tho posterity of the next generation.
Small (Irimiiil*. for Canipiulni.
Tho members uf the Westminster
football club naturally enough feel indignant over the strictures passed
upon thom by tho Vancouver News-
Advertiser last Sunday. The club, on
account nf the visit uf the governor*
genernl here un Saturday, cuuld not
get nway, for reasons that must be
obvious evon to the dullest intellect.
The intention of tho club was to havo
gone, and but for the visit uf hia ex
cellcncy at that time would have dune
so. If there ia any blame to bo attached to any one, it must be to Lord
Stanley for not fulfilling liis engage
monls.
A Hie Mining Deal.
■ The News saya the deal lor tho Carbonate mountain mines has been successfully consummated through Mr. O.
D. Rand. They were purchased by a
syndicate represented by Mr. Isaac
Robinson, London, England. Seventeen claims, aiming which are tho
Southern CrosB, Great Republic, Carbonate Chief and Old Dominion aro included in the purchase. It ia the intention to develup them at onco and
pack trains are being mado ready. A
good deal of excitement prevails in
Donald and Golden as a consequence.
Tho minora are jubilant ita they tee in
this the beginning uf lhe mining developments ao long looked fur. Mr.
Robinaon leaves Calgary today for
England. Mr. Rand arrived at Westminater on Sunday on hia way home.
Ilo was as far east as Calgary.
Teachers* Institute.
On Saturday Jast some of uur city
teachers attended u meeting of the executive oommittee of the mainland institute, at Vanoouver, where the cum-
mittee concluded the final arrangements fur the coming meeting of the
institute which will be held at the central scliool in that city on 2nd and 3rd
of January next.
According to preseut indications the
coming convention will be the most
successful yet held uu the mainland.
Though the institute is under mainland
management efforts are being made to
induce nil the teachers uf the province
to attend, and it is hoped that the
committee will be able to aecure reduced ratea ua usual from tho railway
and navigation companies.
Already over a dozen papers ou educational subjects are forthcoming, and
the committee have aecured the as-
Bistauco of several prominent oitizena
of Vancouver.
A new feature will be a display of
pupils' work, and at the close of the
sessions a good public entertainment
will be given under the management of
the Vancuuver teachers.
Trainer Oarsmen.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
Comity Court Rules.
At a meeting of the county court
judges hold on Saturday lust at Judge
Bole's residence, and at which were
presont Judges Harrison, Bole and
Cornwall, the necessity of making the
new rules and tho nature of the
changes were fully discussed and arrangements worn made to havo tho
drnftof rules ready nt an early day.
Wlion completed the rules will be laid
before the lieut-.nant-governor for approval. It is understood that the rules
of procedure uf the county cuurt will
be mudo in overy way compatible with
the dignity which should always accompany tho administration of justice
Xi.w Order In Council,
Au nrder-iu-oounoil has been passed
aeeting aptirt, until otherwise ordered,
that portion of-Esquimalt harbor, B. C,
known na Cnnatauce dive, fov tho exclusive uso if her Majesty's ship.-',
Tho c'vo will heroaftiir be known as
the man-of-war nnohnraste. nut access
tu it will at all thnus be allowed to
vcaB-1-.de-.iiou-. <if milking uso of the
graving deck. Tins reservation will
prevent the recurrences of anything
like the Hustedo incident of a few
weeks ago. The minister of marine
has explained tlmt in setting apart the
cove for English men*of-war tho government had simply followed the plan
which is in vogue at Halifax, N. S.,
aud the principal ports of England.
A .Nol ii tile Kvent.
Tlio congregation of Holy Trinity
church will assemble at the opera
house to-nv-rrow evening at eight
o'clock to celebrate the llOth miniver-
nary of the consecration of Bishop
Sillitoe, and the foundation of this
diocese. After tho reception to be
hold by'Bishop nod Mrs. Sillitoe, a
number of addresses, referring to the
occaaion, will be delivered, and then a
short programme of songs, etc, will
follow. Refreshments in the shape of
tea, cntlee, cukes, etc., will conclude
the evening's entertainment. This
will be tie first Bimial event in connection witli Holy Trinity congregation in
a long time, mid it is certain, owing to
the importance of the occasion, to be
very luryely attended.
That I iiitfiirtmintf Vase.
The esse of Mrs. Orde, who was
brought from Cariboo, committed by
two justices of the peace at Bichtield
to the insane asylum, and found on
subsequent examination to be perfectly
sane, so far as could be di*.co.'cred, is
not likely to bu settled lor some time,
if it ever is, The city council moved
in the matter, and addressed a letter to
the provincial government as-king that
some iissia'atu'e be given Mvs. Orde to
en-ible her to return home, but the
government, it appears, in t being to
blame iu the c ian,refuses to take notion,
and so the unfortunate caso stand-..
Mis. Orde haa been advised that she
has excellent, grounds foi* an action
ugainst the mngistratis, but what Rtcj-s
she will tako bus imt yit been decided,
Mr. Alexander McLean went down
to Victoria to-day tu meet Oarsman
Bush in a rowing cuntest, The betting is in favor of McLean; and those
who had tho opportunity of seeing hiB
splendid work at Vuncouver last Dominion day ft-ol quite confident that
he can run away from anybody around
theae parts. Old (or middle) n»e haa
uot cooled the ardor of tins veteran,
for aquatic contests, and he is sill) able
to mnke it awfully warm work even
for renowned professionals. West-
minsterites feel that McLean ia, in a
manner, their chuiupion, and should
anticipations prove correct, it will be
auothet* reason for ber to feel proud of
her athletic citizens. Bush gavo a
very pretty exhibition of his powers as
a sculler when he waB here at the exhibition regatta. His part of that race
was a species of '-walk-over," but it
gave those who are qualified to jndge,a
good chance to see that he is no
amatour in tho shell. His action with
the sculls is beautiful and his timo perfect; what hiB endurance is, is quite
another matter, that will be pretty
thoroughly tested in the ceming   race.
The Full Assizes.
The fall sitting of thecourt cf assizes
commences to-morrow morning at 11:
30 o'clock, Chief Justico Begbie presiding. Following are the cases on the
docket.
■John Ward, fm- house breaking and
robbery at Vancouver,
Mike Brennan, for cutting and
wounding at Yale,
dim, an Indian, for murder at Vancou vtr.
Johu Kossiter, for Ureeucy, at Vancouver.
Chu Chue, for cutting and wounding
at Vancouver.
AU Sing, fur attempted mui-der at
ChiUiwHuk.
T. B. Spring, for larccncy t:t Vancouver,
Bradley, for having stolen property
in possession.-
Martha Faber, for larceny at Vancouver,
ti, Dominy, for wounding with intent.
Ching Chow, for larceny at t'ort
Moody.
James Cavanagh, for Bodmny at
Westminster.
Personal.
Rout Harvey, of Victorin, is iu the
city on a business visit.
Mrs. Alex. MutheBou, id' Kamloops,
art'ivod yesterday and is the guott of
Mr. Peter Grant.
Chief Justice Sir Mathew Bnilhe
Begbie will arrive iu the coy to-morrow to preside at iho fall session   f the
5'irni I'i'uHk of the Order*
During Friday niglit tlio Britisit bark
George, Capt. Townsend, owned by
Capt. Wm. Grant, of this city, arrivod
from the Inlet and anchored in Ea.4 I-
malt harbor, just iuside Lho _.._...'. j
point. This point being within Constance Cove, and by the ncently issui.d
ordor iu-council under the direct charge
of the oflicers of H. M. Navy aud appropriated to their use, as sonn tio daylight showed the position of the >nrk
the admiral sent on board requesting
the captain to shift to some otlier part
of the harbor, and oll'ering a crow for
the purpose. Seeing that nothing else'
was to bo doue, Capt. Grant allowed
the bluejackets to come on bonrd and
rum ivu tho George to anothor portion
of tlie harbur.—Ooiohist,
A St. John's, Newfoundland des-
pitch of Saturday snys: It looks as if
the government was defeated, Only
four districts have yet declared full
return*. These give Unexpected gains
for Whitoway. Premier Tfcoruburn is
probably defeat  '.

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