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The Daily Columbian Mar 13, 1890

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Array Daily
ColumbIan.
VOLUME VIII.
NEW WESTMINSTEB, B. 0., THUBSDAY EVENING, MARCH 13, 1890.
NUMBER 35.
T. J. TRAPP & CO.
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN
GENERAL  *   HARDWARE
Faints, Oils, Window Glass, Wall Paper, Brushes, Tar,
Pitch, Oiikiini.  Doors and Windows at Factory Prices.
T. J. TRAPP,
Beal : Estate : Agent : and : General
Auctioneer,
COLUMBIA STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER,
dwteltc
Professional and Business Cards.
E,
M. N. WOODS, Barrlster-at-Law.
I   McKenzle Street.
Office—
dtc
THORNTON FELL, Barrister, Solicitor and
Notary Public, Masonic Block, New Westminster. dwtc
TC.  ATKINSON,  Barrister,  Solicitor,  &c.
•   Offices: Masonic Building, New Weitmln-
ater, B. 0.   dwtc
ARMSTRONG & ECKSTEIN, Barristers, Solid
tori, etc. Armstrong's Block, Now West
—'—*■*- *"n dwtc
minster, k'tT
CORBOULD, McCOLL it JENNS, Barristers.
Solicitors, etc. Offices: Masonic Buildings,
New Westminster, and Vancouver, B. C.   dwtc
JOSEPH B. OAYNOR, B. A., LL. B., Gold
Medalist ol the University of Dublin. Barrlster-at-Law of the High Court of Justice, Ireland. Offices: Corner McKenzle it Clarkson
Sts., New Westminster.     dwto
BEDEN WALKER, M.D., J„ R. C. P. & 8.,
• Edinburgh, Office: Agnes St., opposito
City Halt. Office hours: 9 to 11 a. m.; 2 to 4 and
7 to 8:80 p.m. dtc
GRANT & MACLURE,
Dealers in
Boots, Shoos, Rubbers, Etc.
c. E. WOODS, Land surveyor.
A. G. GAMBLE, Notary Public.
Woods, Turner &, Gamble,
^LAND*SURVEYORS,i*-
Real Estate, Insurance
FINANCIAL AGENTS and CONVEYANCEBS.
Land Surveying in all its branches accurately and promptly carried out.   City and
Bub. Lands for Sale.   We can show a complete list of desirable localities*
Fanning lands, improved or unimproved, throughout the district.     \_"
MONEY TO LOAN ON FIRST MORTGAGE AT
CURRENT RATES OF INTEREST;
Agents for the following Insurance Companies:
Western of Toronto, Mina, City of London, Hartford
and Travellers.
OFFICE—Opposite Post Officii, Bank or B. C. Buii.dinq, Columbia Struct,
New Westminster.   Telephone Call No. 33.   P. 0. Drawer W.
MAJOR & PEARSON,
Beal Estate Brokers,
FINANCIAL * AND * INSURANCE * AGENTS.
Property for Sale in all parts of the City nnd Suburbs. We also have listed
seme of the finest farming land iu the Province. MONEY TO LOAN. HOUSES
TO RENT. Agents for the Confederation Life Association of Toronto, the London and Guarantee and Accident Co., Limited. Goneral Agents for British Columbia for the American Steam Boiler Insurance Co. of New York, and agents for
the Royal and Atlas Fire Assurance Companies of England, Union Fire and
Marine Insurance Co. of San Francisco, South British Fire and Marine Insurance
Co. of New Zealand.
OFFIOE8:
NEW WESTMINSTER-Columhin Street, Bank of B. 0. Block.
VANCOUVER-Cordova Street.
RAND BROS.
Real Estate Brokers
SPECIAL OFFER FOR FEBRUARY ONLY
-   -OK	
Cheap Lots on Easy Terms
WITHOUT interest.
[ Lots in Subdivision of Lot 11, Sub. Block 1?
Fronting on Thome Road and overlooking the North
Arm of the Fraser River.
A J, HOLMES. I), D. 8., Surgeon Dentist.
• Graduate of the Ohio College of Dental
Burger)'. In office of Dr. C. E. C. Brown.
All work skilfully performed. Rooms B & C,
Bank of B. C, Columbia St. Hours: 8 to n
a.m.; Iifl0to6p. m. dwtc
GW. GRANT,   Architect.   Office: Corner
•   Mary and Clarkson Sts., New Westminster, dwtc
CLOW at   MACLURE,  Architects.    Offlcc-
Room E, over Bank of B. C, Columbia St.,
Westminster. dtc
ILUAM   R. KINO,   Architect,   Sanitary
Engineer, Ac.  Removed to Armstrong's
Block, Columbia Bt., New Westminister—Boom
W
WTH1BAUDKAU,   Land   Surveyor   and
•    Draughtsman.   Hainloy  Block,  New
Westminster, B. C.   dtc
ALBERT J. HILL (M. Can. Hoc. C. K.), Civil
Engineer, Land Surveyor and DraughtM-
man.  Hamley Block, New Westminster,   dwto
TJ. TRAPP, Auctioneer and Appraiser.
■ Columbia St., New Westminster. All
commissions will receive prompt aud careful
attention. Best references given when required^ ■  ■    dtc
GPITTENDRIGH, Real Estate Broker and
■ County Court Agent, Commissioner, Notary Public, Ac. Rents collected. Office—McKenzle Bt., Westminster, B. C. dtc
MISSES McDOUQALL, Dress   Makers.   Colombia St., New Westminster, B. C.   Satis-
faction guaranteed. dto
MISS JENNINGS (Late of England), Fashionable Dress Maker. Corner of Church and
Columbia Sts., New Westminster. Satisfaction
guaranteed. dwto
JR. FINLAY80N, Piano Tuner, from Broad-
■ wood £ Sons, London, England, and Stein-
way it Sons, New York, now residing In Vancouver, will attend to orders left at D, Lyal &
Co.'s store. Trips first week of each month, dtc
WM. B. TOWNSEND, Commission Merchant,
General Dealer in Fanners'Produce, Columbia Street, corner of Douglas, adjoining
Railway Depot, Consignments solicited,  dto
TURNER, BEETON & CO., Merchants. Wharf
St.. Victoria. Agents for North British and
Mercantile Insurance Co. for Mainland. H. C.
Bieton it Co.< 86 Finsbury Circus, Ixnidon,
E. C. dtc
THOMAS GIFFORD, Watchmaker and Jcw-
eller.  Front St., New Westminster,  dwtc
BAY, House, Sign and Ornamental
r. Paper Hanging and Kalsomlning
None but flrstaiass men employed,
ton St.; Residence, Lome St.    dwtc
MONEY TO LOAN
rN J.AROE OK SMALL SUMS.   Apply la
L   dwnlltc        ARMSTRONG i KUKSTKH
MONEY TO LOAN
fN  ANY AMOUNT, LARGE OR SMALL, on
L  first mortgage, on larm lands,
dto WOODS, TURNER & GAMBLE
For Sale.
HOUSE ON CLINTON  STREET;  8 Room*.
Apply to
W. R. GREIG,
dinh4tc Clinton St., near Pclhara.
FURNISHED ROOMS
E
N 8UI.E OR SINGLE, IN ONE OF THE
 i most eligible and pleasant localities in the
city, convenient to the post office, and other faculties. Ever)- room commands a beautiful
view of tho river and has access to a balcony.
Apply to F, ST1R8KY, Watchmaker and Jew-
elerlbrto- "  _,,_MRS^E. C. BTIR8KYB, ,
CROSS & POINGDESTRE,
Wholesale and Retail
TOBACCONISTS
CHOICE BRANDS OF
IMPORTED CIGARS,
Finest  Cigarettes,
Fancy Imported FIFES, POUCHES, CIGARET1E
CASES, ETC.
Choice Smoking Tobacco.
Thompson's Old Photo Gallery,
COLUMBIA BTREET,     NEW WESTMINSTER.
Welti!
W.J.WALKEB&OO.
TELEPHONE CALL H.
Chartered Accountants,
City Auditors 1886-7-8-9,
Conveyancer*,
Notaries Public.
REAL ESTATE
London & Lancashire fir* lnnurai.ee Co
HANK B. C. BLOCK.
Mary Street,      -     -     NEW WESTMINSTER
'dwfeltc      „ ... - '
BIGGAR'S SUCCESSOR.
Pamell Karnes an Ulster Protestant
as Biggar'g Successor la the
Home of Commons.
General Elphiustone Washed from
the Seek of a Steamship
and Drowned.
Influenza is Raging in Siberia with
a Death Rate of Over Seventy
Per   Day.
RICH CHUCOTUN.
If you have a Cold, use Climax Cough Cure.
If you have a Cough, use Cli
max Cough Cure.
If you have Bronchitis, use
Climax Cough Cure.
I
DRUGGISTS,
Night Bell Attendance. Telephone 67.
dleltc
u
60CO.
Real   Estate,
INSURANCE
-AND-
Financial  Agents,
Purchase, Sell and Lease
Property,
Collect Rents,
Make Loans on Mortgages
And transact all luminous relating to
REAL E8TATE.
 AGENTS FOR	
Loudon Assurance Corporation,
Connecticut   Fire Insuranoe Co. of
Hartford,
Loudon and Lancashire Life Assurance Co.,
Canton Insuranoe Office, Limited (Ma-
rlne).
OFFICES:
Columbia St., New West'r,
41 Government St., Victoria.
dwteltc
H DHNDY LINE
Men's and Boys' Spring Suits
EQUAL   TO  CUSTOM   MADE.
J. E. PHILLIPS',
Leading * Clothier # and * Hatter
COLUMBIA STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
dwleltfl
I      PRICES RANGING FROM $75 TO $150 PER LOT.
Terms, one-fifth oash, balance in monthly payments extending
over a year, without interest.
fVThis property is situated In the growing part of the City and commands
an excellent view. Purchasers at present prices are certain to quickly realize
handsomely on their Investments.
NEW WESTMINSTER OFFICE:
Corner MoKknssik and Clarkson Strbkts.
VANCOUVER OFFICES:
Granville St., and Cor. Cordova and Abbott Sts.
LONDON (ENG.) OFFICE:
107 Cannon Strekt.
dwhuto
RICHARDS & MACKINTOSH
Real Estate
INSURANCE  AGENTS
Colonial Block, New Westminster, B. C.
Hlggar's Successor.
Dublin. Mar. 13.—Parnell linn recommended VeBey Knox, an Ulster Protestant, to the electors of West Oaven i
candidate for Parliament to succeed the
late Jos. Biggur,
General Elplnstone Drowned.
London, Mar. 18.—News has been received here that General Elphinstone,
comptroller of the Duke of Connaught's
household, was washed overboard from
the deck of thejsteamship upon which lie
was a passenger when off Tenrlffe. The
body was not recovered. The wife and
daughter of General Elphinstone were
passengers on the same steamer.
The Doctor won.
London, Mar. 13.—Tho case of Hammond, a servant of Lady Robinson,
who sued Dr. Sherman, of London and
New York, for damages on account of
wrong treatment for double rupture,
was heard in the county court of Westminster this morning. The doctor had
already returned to the plaintiff a fee of
twenty guineas received from her. The
jury brought in a verdict in favor of defendant. Counsel for defendent advised
him to waive the right to costs, and the
doctor consented.
Royal Courtesies.
Berlin, Mar. 13.—On the celebration
last Monday of the Czar's birthday, Emperor William sent a despatch of congratulation and the German ambassador at St. Petersburg addressed a special
audience at which he presented to the
Czar a portrait of the Emperor in the
uniform of the Russian guards as worn at
the review during the Emperor's visit
to St Petersburg.
OUR LISTS COMPRISE SOME OF THE CHOICEST BUSINESS AND RESIDENCE PROPERTY IN THE CITY.
WE HAVE ALSO CHOICE FARMING LANDS, IMPROVED
AND UNIMPROVED, IN ALL PARTS
OF THE DISTRICT.
TIMBER LIMITS AND MINING CLAIMS.
We are Agents for the Sale of Lots In Blaine, B. 0.
THIS TOWNSITE IS SITUATED ON THE BOUNDARY LINE,
immediately adjoining and forming part of Blaine, Washington; and
with the early completion of the New Westminster Southern Railway
Is bound lo become a thriving centre. Already purchasers of lots in
this townilto have realized one iiundkkii pkr cent, pbopit on their
1NVX8TMINTS.
WE ARE ALSO AGENTS FOR THE TOWNSITE OF STEVESTON,
at the mouth of the Fraser river, and the Tretliewey Estate,
at the Junction of the C. P. R. and S. L. S. & E. R, R., at Mission, B. C.
dfeltc
The Roman Church  In Japan.
London, March 13.—The Pope proposes to appoint a Metropolitan and
four Suffragan bishops in Japan if the
Japanese government consents.
. Struck hy a Cyclone.
Fort Smith. Ark., March 13.—The
village of Excelsior, 15 mites from here,
was struck by a cyclone yesterday, every
building in the place including a large
mill being demolished. No ono was
killed but 7 or 8 persons were seriously
injured. A mother nnd 3 children were
blown 60 feet and left uninjured.
Influence! In Siberia.
London, March 13.—It is reported influenza is raging in Siberia with a daily
average of 70 deaths, Several members
of the Royal family are seriously ill.
New Development!,
New York, March 13.—It is semiofficially announced that Villard has
completed his arrangements for the
liquidation of the Oregon Transcontinental. The Northern Pacific, according
to the Villard authorities, is also about
to be greatly benefited by new developments.	
Redaction Work* Humeri,
Reno, March 13.—The Reno Reduction Works, which cost ovor $75,000,
were destroyed by fire last evening.
They were situated on the Truckee
River, about a mile cast of the town.
Insurance $10,000.
An Katy Settlement.
New York, March 13.—The New |
England fishermen have withdrawn
their pressure on the State Department
for new regulations to govern the New-
foundland fisheries as well as for the re-
establishment of the modus mvendi, and
the settlement of the Behring Sea controversy Is now regarded in diplomatic
circles as a very easy matter.
A Cool  Proposition.
Washington, March 13.—The proposition of certain gentlemen in Southern
California that the Government acquire
possession of the Peninsula of Lower
California meets with little favor in official circles. The sentiment of Secretary Blaine is that it shall not be so,
ana in thiB it may be stated he is endorsed by nearly all the delegation from
California. Representative Vandever
apparently stands alone in his desire to
secure Lower California. Vandever
said to-day: "I am determined to bring
about the acquisition of Lower California
if it is possible. Upper and Lower California are like two drops of water near
together, and they must join to form
one. I have made no proposition that
should cause uneasiness to either the
Mexican Government or the United
States, and if the former yields us the
territory they should be re-imburscd.
\ Terrible Punishment.
Pierre, S, IX, March 13.—Summary
and terrible punishment was meted out
to Dirty Fool, the Sioux buck who attempted murder yesterday at the camp
on Bad River. Dirty Fool, got possession of some whiskey at Fort Pierre, and
on arriving at tlie camp got drunk, went
to bis tepee, there found a squaw known
as "Fcdsal" and picked up an ax and
struck her on the forehead cracking her
skull. A crowd fathered and Dirty Fool
was caught fiau thrown Into the fire in
the centre of the tepee, and when he
tried to escape was thrown back till
burned almost to a crisp.
The Canadian Whin.
Sanpord, Fla., March 13. — In the
three mile single scull race here yesterday Jake Gaudaur won in 20 minutes, 28
seconds, beating Ten Eyek, Hamm aud
Hosmer. In the one mile race Gaudaur
was first in 0 minutes 3 seconds and
Hamm second in (J minutes 11 seconds,
The water waa rough.
Hehrlni Sea Negotiations.
Ottawa, Mar. 13.—The official correspondence between Great Britain, the
United States and Canadian Governments shows the question of a closed sea
will not enter into the negotiations now
going on at Washington on the Behring
Sea difficulty. From Information received from the British Minister and
Minister Tapper at Washington, tho
auestion of adjudicating tho claims for
images on the part of owners of British
sealers seized in Behring Sea by United
States cruisers has mainly occupied the
attention of the conference. The question of protecting by soino international
arrangement the seal fisheries from absolute depletion, irrespective of any
claims of the United States to exclusive
jurisdiction have been only informally
considered.
The new Frill Lace Curtain in Ivory
Ib the lateat-at Ellard & Co.'s.     *tc
A  Practically  Unknown   and   Undeveloped   Land   ol  Vast and  Varied
Resources.
Mr. J. N. J. Brown, of Empire Valley,
Chilcoten, was in Vancouver last week
and favored the World with a call. Following is the result of tho interview as
published in that paper:
Mr. Brown is a native of the Province,
has trailed over and visited much of the
interior, and being a gentleman of more
than ordinary intelligence his knowledge
of and information concerning the great
interior of the mainland of British Columbia are of great value. As to the
Chilcoten country, with its magnificent
grazing plains, its uplands for farming
Burposes, and its rich alluvial valleys,
[r. Brown entertains the belief that at
no distant day thiB section of tho Province will be of immense importance.
The climate Ib all that could be wished
for, neither too warm in summer, nor
too severe in whiter. There is an abundance of water, pure and clear, from
innumerable springs in the hillsides of
the valleys, The country can he termed
a well watered one. Thero Ib also an
abundance of timber for fencing and fuel
purposes. The grass is of natural growth
and known as the famous bunch grass,
on which stock thrive so well. Tho
valley of Chilcoten River proper is some
40 miles in length, by an average
breadth of from 5 to 12 miles. In this
valley all kinds of cereals mature as do
likewise fruit and vegetables. Tomatoes
and watermelons are grown in great
quantities by the settlers and the natives.
The seasons, one year with another, vary
but slightly. The majority of tho settlers are on the north side of the valley.
Large tracts of excellent Innd are to be
found on the south side of the river for
a considerable distance. In some sections it will be necessary to irrigate, but
as this can Jbe done with artesian wells
the problem is easy of solution. The
settlers were prosperous and all reported
to be making substantial headway. The
great obstacle to farming- and stock-
raising is the isolated condition of the
settlement. A large number of settlers
came from Ontario and are immensely
pleased with the change they made.
The women are enjoying the very beBt
health, whilst nowhere in the Dominion
can a more robust lot of children be met
with than in Chilcoten. Another drawback is the remoteness of the settlers
from each other other nnd the lack of
educational facilities. So it is also with
churches. But these drawbacks will
shortly be remedied.
Empire Valley, iu which Mr. Brown
resides, is a particularly inviting spot.
The roads leading to it from the Cariboo
trunk road are good. To reach Empire
Valley, the trunk road has to be left at
Clinton or Soda Creek. Transportation
facilities are excellent and charges are
reasonable, In summer the temperature
ranges from 70 to 00 degrees. Near the
plains the mosquitoes are troublesome,
but in tho woods and valleys they are
not. In winter, the mercury reaches as
low as 20 to 30 degrees below zero; but
the intensenesa of that cold is not'so
severe as is 15 above zero hero, in consequence of the dryness of the interior climate as compared with the moisture on
the coast. Farmers and stock-raisers
generally provide sufficient hay for fall
and winter feeding, so that stock is
turned out on the grass in spring in excellent condition. Game is abundant,
and so also are mountain sheep, deer,
cinnamon and black bears, and bighorns.
The snow fall this year in Etmriro Valley was 12 inches; whilst at Clinton 22
inches fell, and 20 at Soda Creek. The
roads were badly drifted. Fully 18
inches of snow are still on the ground at
Lac La Hache.
At Hauceville, iu Chilcoten, there is
good country store, owned by Mr.
Thomas Hance, after whom tho village
is named. He is also postmaster, whilst
Mr. N. O. Graham has tho contract for
carrying the mails to and from that office
to Dog Creek. Mr, Graham's remuneration, however, Ib very meagre, and the
service accordingly is not as complete as
it should be. There are no lesB than
four grist mills in tho district. They
are run by water power, over-shot
wheels being generally utilized. There
is also one saw mill. The flour ground
by the local mills is of good quality, as
is also oatmeal aud the barley, the latter
used largely for soup making purposes.
At Hauceville a good deal of trading with
the Indians is carried on. These people
are now devoting considerable attention
to farming, such as grain-growing and
stock raising. The fur bearing animals
arc going further back, and are becoming more difficult to be caught; but still
trapping is carried on extensively and
with profit to all engaged in the fur business. The people are extremely hospitable, and the natives kind and tractable
to thoso who treat them properly. At
Hauceville sugar is aellingat 25 cents per
pound, salt, at 15 cents; coffee and tea
ranging from 40 cents to $1 per pound;
ham and bacon, at 25 cents; flour at 5
cents per pound, and all other commodities and goods lu proportion.
Bonaparte Valley is one of the most
productive in the Interior. It is well
settled. That section, as well as Chilcoten, however, sutlers from the want of
transportation facilities. In the Tulla
Like country there are promising indications of rich mineral deposits. Coal
is known to exist in large quantities iu
Aot Creek, some 17 miles from the Cache
Creok school house, at the junction of
the Bonaparte with Hob Creok. Look
at the map.sald Mr. Brown, and see how
important tho trade of this line section
would be to Vancouver were agood turnpike road built from the north side of
the inlet, by way of Seymour Creek
valley to Daisy Lake and the IVniher-
ton Meadows, thence on to the Chilcoten Plains. For a timo we cannot ox
pect a railway, hut that great modern
economizer and civillzer will reach the
country whose resources I um now
speaking of, and the richness of which
few have any conception of. At present
this vast interior empire Is practically
valueless,. Once give us roads and easy
means for the transportation of our products to the coast cities, and this will
become the homo of thousands of the
most industrious settlers to bo found in
the Dominion. To the millions of
people in Europe eking out a scanty
existence this then would be a veritable
paradise. I hope, said he, in conclusion,
to see the iron horse snorting through
these unrivalled valleys of the north ere
I leave this sublunary abode.
A cablegram was sent from Calgary on
Tuesday to the Duke of Counaught, in
Bombay, India, as follows: "Calgary,
Northwest Territory of Canada, begs
two days'visit; offers hospitality and
E'romiscs a cattlu round-up, Answer,
afferty, mayor." As no answer has
been received to letters sent the duke in
reference to his visit there the council
sent the above telegram.
A change of staff of the management
of the C. P. U. of very considerable importance is announced, says a late Tnr-
lnto dispatch. The two eastern divisions of Ontario and the Atlantic have
been consolidated under the superintendence of Thos. Tail. Under tho
present arrangement Tait has charge of
tho system from Port Arthur on the
north and Windsor in the west to Mut-
tawamkeago on the borders of New
Brunswick in the east. His hondqnur-
ters aro fixed at Toronto, and necessitates removing the accounting staff of
the Atlantle division to Toronto. The
result will probably be the return of
such well-known Torontouinns aa Ross
McKemde and Harry Suckling.
PROVINCIAL PARLIAMENT,
A   Wanii   and.   Interesting   Discasslon
Taken Place  on a   Proposed  Amenri-
Sent to the    •'Municipal Act.  1889,"
id the Amendment.Is Defeated by n
Large1 Majority.
[From Our Own Correspondent.!
Wednesday's Proceedings.
Mr. Speaker took tho chair at 2 p. m.
Prayers by Van. Archdeacon Seriven.
Mr. Martin presented the report of
tho committee on standing orders and
private bills, which stated that the
preamble had been proved in the hill
entitled "An Act to Amend the Vancouver Incorporation Act, 1880," and
amendments thereto. The report also
stated that it hud been found necessary
to amend tlie preamble to tho British
Columbia Electric Company Bill as the
committee considered the privileges desired excessive. The preamble of tho
bill of E. B. Olcott re mining privileges
opposito, Yale was proved. Tlie committee could not feel justified in report-1
ing favorably on tbe Fraser River Gold
Gravel Syndicate Bill. The bill to
amend the Vancouver Water Works Act
had been withdrawn, on arrangement
having been effected with tho corporation of that city,
Mr. Speaker said that the petition by
Mr. Croft from tho residents in the
neighborhood of Somenos Lake regarding the lowering of same wos out ol order as it asked for a money grant.
Mr. Cunningham asked leave to introduce a bill entitled "An Act for the Encouragement of Agriculture and llott .culture." Bill read u first time nnd will
receive second reading Monday next.
Mr. Semlin moved that nu Order of
the House be granted for a return of all
water records between Harrison River
and Slcainous.
Tlie mover explained that the water
in the district belongs to tho people for
irrigation purposes, and in this instance
it was not water records for mining purposes that was wanted. Hon. Mr. Robson said he fancied there would be great
difficulty in getting those returns. Hon.
Mr. Vernon statedthat duplicates of all
the water records in the Province were
kept and that those asked for would be
forthcoming Bhortly. Regulation carried.
Mr. Beaven asked the honorable the
Provincial Secretary the following question : Have you or any officer of tho
department over which you preside, or
its branch, the Education Office, any
knowledge of the facts referred to in the
following letter, published in the Colonist newspaper on 28th February, 1888,
in respect to the conduct of public school
teachers:
WANTS TO KNOW.
To the Editor: Can you inform mo
which ono of the public teachers was it
that is said to have disgraced himself at
the panorama on Saturday evening last,
by making himself conspicuous, I hear,
by creating repeated disturbances
amongst the audience,thus setting forth
anything hut a laudable example to the
many school children present.
"Enquirer."
Hon. Mr. Robson said, "No, nor am I
aware that auv officer of the Education
Department has any knowledge of the
case. The deportment has work of more
importance to attend than that of noticing anonymous scandal-mongers."
Mr. Boa von moved the further consideration of certain amendments to
the "Municipal Act, 1889,". among which
wob the following: Subsection (98a.)
To make, preserve, improve, maintain,
alter, level, raise or lower streets, or
bridges, or sidewalks; and no perBou
whose real property has been or maybe
injuriously affected by reason of any
street, or bridge, or sidewalk having
been levelled, raised or lowered, shall be
entitled to any compensation or damages
therefor, notwithstanding any law to
tbe contrary.
"The Council of any municipality
may pass ono general by-law annually,
which shall apply to all the streets,
bridges, aud sidewalks within the municipality, for any of the purposes coming
within this sub-section."
The two first subsections were read a
first and second timo. On subsection
"98 a." of section 80 a debate of considerable warmth ensued.
Hon. Mr. Turner took the ground that
it would be most unjust to cut down aud
damago people's property and allow
them no compensation for it. In his
opinion it was contrary to ull civilized
ideas of justice.
Hon Mr. Robson said that corporations should certainly be protected from
exhorbitout claims for damages by persons whose property hud been encroach
ed upon, but the amendments proposed
were in his opinion altogether too severe
for the wants of the cose.
Mr, Cunningham said that the city of
Westminster was suffering from this
very thing and cited tho case of a lady
whoso property had been so vigorously
mauled by the Board of Works of that
city that' Bhe was compelled to enter
and leave her residence by means of
crawling up and down a step-ladder.
(Laughter.) He tbrought the proposed
amendment not in accordance with
modem conceptions of justice.
Mr. Grant said tho grades had been
established iu Victoria city and alt lots
that stand in the way of improvements
have to lie cut down or filled up, that tho
established grade might bo mentioned.
He thought that property thus treated
was more valuable and better looking
than when in its first state, besides
making the strcetH as they ought lo bo.
In the cities of the United States the
citizens on which those improvements
were made were actually taxed extra for
those improvements and cuttings.
Hon. Mr. Davie Bald it was a very delicate matter to define who were the
judges as to what was for the public
good. Tbe aldermen who arrogated to
themselves that lofty title wore scarcely
the men, and yet they did not cure much
about public rights so long as it did not
affect their interests. Thoy reminded
him of Artemas Ward, who was perfectly willing to sacrifice all his wife's poor
relations for the benefit of the family, for
the benefit of himself nnd a few others.
The men were ready to Bacriflce private
rights for what they denominated the
public good. He hoped this species of
legislation would never obtain in this
Province. Such a section would have to
bo exercised under the surveillance of
somebody better able to judge of what
was righi and wrong, than tho alder*
man ie bodies. In many cases people had
had their homes taken from them hy
those klngsof one year's rule. The men
who propose fltich a measure as thiB are
trying to holster themselves up for the
purpose of plundering the public, not
by stealing money, but by doing great
damage to people whose rights should
not bo trampled upon. Tho New Westminster corporation   charter had not
Bill, upheld the very principles which
he now so strenuously opposed in the
, Municipalities Bill. He would like to
| see his honorable friend- show a little
' consistency. He stamped Mr. Davie's
speech as a tempest in a teapot, and
said he was surprised to see him speak
with so much fury on opinions so opposite to those he had upheld only a few
days before.
Hon. Mr. Beaven said he had introduced those amendments at the request
of the Municipal Council of the City of
Victoria.
Amendment "98 a" on being put to
the vote was overwhelmingly lost, only
Messrs. Beaven and Grant voting for it.
Further consideration of the matter was
adjourned until Friday next.
After a motion for second reading of
the University Bill by Mr. Duck, aud
somewhat extended remarks by the
mover on the subject, and the advancing of several railway and other private
bills a stage, the House adjourned at 0
o'clock. ■    •
A WEIRD SERVICE.
Children Cry forPitcher's ^CastorTaJ
been prepared in this province at all,
but had been taken from the laws of
other places where they knew how to
deal with such eases. In that city it
was incumbent on every one who
wished to build n house to go to the
council for the hire of the street first,
nnd, if afterwards thiB hire was changed
the property owner was entitled to compensation. Should anyone, however,
build without first applying for the
street Hues, and the street should bo altered after bis building on It, ho could
not expect any compensation. "This
amendment If carried out, would improve most of us out of our proporty,
and it would not do to allow aldermen
or any other body of men to make such
laws. He was very sorry such a measure ever came up in the bouse.
Mr. Semlin said that ho had taken notice that Mr, Davie had, in tlie Railwav
The Phonograph Enables a Dead Preacher to Preside at Hit Own Funeral.
A New York despatch of a late date
rolates tho following noteworthy incident: For tho past four years Rev.
Thos. Allen Home had resided at Larch-
mont. Eight months ago hie wife died.
Lately Mr. Home has been laid up with
pneumonia. Last Friday he expired at
the age of 77. He had left explicit instructions as to the burial and services
to be held over his remains. Yesterday
his dining room and parlor were filled
with mourners. Shortly after 1 o'clock
the ceremony commenced, and from a
table was heard the sound of a voice
singing the hymn:
"A tew more years shall roll
A few more seasons come;
And we shall be with those we love
In the land beyond the sun."
For some time a feeling of superstitious awe pervaded the apartment, as
many distinctly recognized the voice of
Mrs. Home, but when they perceived
that it came through a phonograph they
became more composed, though many
wept as they recalled tho owner of the
Bweet voice.
As soon as the hymn was over CharleB
Home, a nephew of the deceased, made
alterationa in the machine and inserted
a roll that contained the funeral sermon
of his uncle by himself. It sounded so
weird that two ladies fainted and were
carried out. The well-remembered voice
of the deceased clergyman told how, at
the time that the audience would hear
him, ho would be In the land "where
the wicked cease from troubling and tbe
weary are at rest." It is usual at funerals to eulogise the dead, and the pastor who preaches the sermon seldom
touches on the deceased's faults. On
this occasion the virtues of the dead
man were left alone, and there was a
long list of faults enumerated, for which
the mourners were asked to pray for
God's pardon.
At this point of the address the voice
had eviden tly.broken for from the instrument, the terrible Bounds of a strong
man weeping broke out with terrible
realistic force.
At the close of the address he called
upon his hearers to join him and his
wife in singing the hymn, "There is a
Better Land."
Tim nephew arranged two instruments
on the table, and at once the soprano of
tho wife and the baritone of the husband joined together in singing.
. •—•—«	
■   Tlie Salmon King.
Mr. J. Lhideuberger, of Berlin, Germany, a member of the firm of Linden-
berger& Co., the big fish dinners of
Hamburg, is in Astoria, nnd has contracted with local canuerymen for forty
carloads of salmon, to be shipped during
the coming season to Hamburg, When
seen last night by our reporter Mr.
Lindonborger said: "These fish will be
cleaned, sailed, packed in barrels and
shipped in refrigerator cars to Hamburg.
The freight will cost one and one-half
cents a pound, and we will be able to
get tho ilsh in twenty-five days from the
time they are caught. If we can get
the fish laid down there at ten cents a B
pound, we can make a profit on them.
As thoy will cost the winners five cents
a pound and two and one-half cents for
freight, there will be a very small -margin after the dinner's profit is taken out.
The object in salting them and doing
tlie canning in Germany instead of America is to save the duty of nine cents a
pound. ThiB is not an experiment with
us. We have been shipping salt salmon
long distances for years. Most of our
salmon have come from the Volga, but
last summer we got some from Alaska,
and will take mure from there this year.
This will probably be the last year that
we wiil take any fish from the Columbia
river, as we will soon be able to get all
we want much cheaper in Alaska.
Altogether we have contracted for 110
carloads of fish on this coast forthecoming year, making about2,000,000 pounds
of raw fish which will cost lu the neighborhood of $200,000. It is only a matter
of a short time, continued Mr. Lindonborger, "until the canners here will
have to combine or quit the business.
While Columbia river salmon is worth
more than Alaskan fish, dealers are not
going to pnv five times as much for it.
The fish here costs five cents a pound—
iu Alaska one cent. Alaska will booh
have the business cornered and Columbia river salmon will only bo sold on the
market raw."—Astorian Morning Coluin-
Man.        ^^^^^^^^^^
The theory of the detectives engaged
in the Niagara Falls murder case, says
the Montreal Star, involves the astounding assumption that a gang of murderers has been organized todecoy Englishmen with money out to Canada to be
killed ami plundered; and there really
appears to bo evidence to give color to
the theory. Were bucIi an idea utilised
as the plot for a sensational novel it
would be scouted us too ridiculously improbable. Yot the only remarkable
thing about it iB that men can be found
to engage in a wholesale murder plot
involving so much deliberation and
weeks of social intercourse with the victims previous to the murder. Tho
methods appear to be simple enough for
men capable of planning such a crime.
If tho assumption of the police be correct
tho number of the victims iB not likely
to be discovered unless some person
more or less Implicated in the plot can
bo forced to divulge the secrets of the
conspiracy. The choice of Niagara Falls
as the place of operations seems to point
to the manner at once of the murders
and of the disposal of the bodies of the
victims. Tlie fact that Bonwell was
shot on the wayside and his body left
where it foil was probably due to a failure of the original plan through some
accidental circumstance. To lure a man
across the Atlantic to Niagara of all places
on earth, and then kill mm by a. method
equally practicable anywhere else, does
not seem a rational plan. Niagara keeps
ita secrets well, "the thunder of waters"
drowns alike tho death ery of the victim
of accident, suicide, or murder. The
discovery of tho body of an unknown
person in the river provokes little interest and arouses no suspicion and the
waters themselves seem to take extraordinary pains to destroy every means
of identification. When a thief deliberately decoys his victim from England to
Niagara to rob him, it Is difficult to avoid
the suspicion that he contemplates mur-
dei nt least as a possible contingency.
The Colombian job department is
now in running order, and prepared to
turn out first-class work of every description. * THE DAILY COLUMBIAN, NEW 'WESTMINSTER, B. C.t MARCH 13, 1890.
VOLUME VIII-No. 35.
THE DAILY COLUMBIAN
PUBLISHED
Every Afternoon Except Sunday
 BY	
-8 Kennedy      Brothers fc-
At their Steam Printing Establishment, cor.
Columbia Street and Lytton Square.
BY MAIL:
One Year 18 00
Six Months 4 BO
Three Mouths »ID
DELIVERED IN THE CITY:
One Year flOOO
Six Mouths    5 60
Three Months    3 00
Per Month   1 ""
Per Week	
I'uy utbiit to be made In advance,
THE   WEEKLY    COLUMBIAN
ISBUXD EVKRY WEDNESDAY MORNING.
One Year     .12
Six Mouths 1
THE DAILY COLUMBIAN
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH IS, 1890.
TOO MUCH PROTECTION.
There is one Bubject upon which the
British Columbia press should be—and
we are glad to note such a tendency—
practically unanimous. That is the
question of piling up any more bricks on
the already too high and sufficiently oppressive tariff wall. The Columbian
has always held that British Columbia
would be the better of a far larger measure of reciprocity with her southern
neighbor than, under the Dominion customs regulations, which have governed
this intercourse since the Province came
into the Confederation, she has been
permitted to have. Whatever tho N. P.
may do for our friends iu the Eastern
Provinces—and it must bear pretty
heavily in many cases even there—it is
far from being an unmixed blessing in
this "gem of the west.". British Columbia recognized when Bhe entered the
Union that ahe was assuming a drawback with the Dominion tariff, but thiB
burden was cheerfully and loyally
shouldered. At that time, without any
direct means of communication at all
with our sister Provinces, our trade, for
food articles at least, as well as others,
was necessarily almost wholly with the
neighboring States and Territories, we
produced very little ourselves, and, obviously, free trade with the United
States would have been our natural and
most desirable condition. Late years
have altered our circumstances wonderfully, it is true. The great Canadian
transcontinental railway has brought us
into direct and comparatively easy touch
with all our sister Provinces, and with
the partial development of our resources
we have become producers to a largely
increased extent, but, while our exports
are gratifyingly and creditably large in
the products of our mines, forests and
fisheries, we still have to import extensively for the actual necessaries of life,
ns well as for nearly all classes of machinery, for which at this stage of the
Province's development there is a large
and rapidly increasing-demand. Much
of this trade we now do with the Eastern Provinces and Manitoba, but in
some articles it is impossible to do so
advantageously. Hence the agitation at
present, which it is hoped iu the interests of the Province may be fully successful, for the abolition of the duty on
mining machinery. The tariff on thiB
item, unless removed, will do much to
hinder the development of the quartz
mining industry of the Province. But
it is not in this matter alone that united
protest iB wanted. Interested parties in
the East are continually moving the
Government to put more duty on certain
articles which they manufacture or produce. From time to time such changes are
made, nearly ulways to the disadvantage of the consumer; and now it is proposed to increase the duty on flour and
on other food articles, such as fresh and
salt meats, and to re-impose the duty on
fresh fruits, etc. It goes without Baying
that such action would increase the
price of all these articles to the consumer, whether purchased at home or
imported. The movement is altogether
iu the interests of the very few as
against the great many, and the Dominion Government will justly earn the
reprobation of the entire country if It allows itself to be persuaded to enact that
the commonest necessaries of life shall
be increased in price. A united protest
should, aud we believe, will, go out
from this part of the Dominion against
any such outrage. We have got too
much so-called "protection" now.
What we want is a very considerable
relaxation of the restrictions, and not a
piling on of the burdens.
more of this Province haa lately arisen
among the sons of the cultivation of the
soli.
It la remarkable that our own country
does not create a greater degree of attention among Intending emigrants and
capitalists. We have not the least hesitation in affirming that the reason for
this Ib to be found in the lack of knowledge prevalent as to the vast capabilities and illimitable resources of the most
western of Canada's provinces. With a
climate, in many localities, possessing all
the advantages of that of Southern
Europe, and a soil fertile beyond exaggeration, British Columbia has, too,
fishery supplies which are practically
inexhaustable (if properly protected),
both in the streams which traverse her
length and breadth, and in the well
sheltered ocean waters which kiss her
shores. Mining for the precious metals,
and their baser brethren, has revealed
sufficient to prove that, with capital, enterprise and machinery, the earth can
be compelled to open treasure vaults
rich beyond the dreams of avarice. Of
the timber, which woods our mountain
sides and covers our plains, no eulogy
can be overdrawn. Its quantity, quality,
variety and sine has excited the wonder
and admiration of all those able to form
an opinion who have visited here.
These and other natural advantages
have hastened the rapid growth of our
cities.
A gentleman, when looking at some
photographs of Victoria, Vancouver and
New Westminster, expressed surprise at
the rapidity with which cities assume
respectable proportions In this part of
the world. This fact certainly must appear almost miraculous to people living
In a land where towiiB are the slow, sure
growth of centuries, but when we remember the lavish prodigality of nature
in the richness of her gifts, the astonishing thing is not the rapidity with which
our cities thrive, but that we have so
comparatively few centres of commercial
activity. At best but a very small part
of this magnificent land is known even
to us who live i* the Province. Where-
ever we may look when examining the
map vast tracts of country marked "unexplored" meet our eyes, and the fact
stares us In the face that, of the 390,000
or more square miles called by the name
of British Columbie, almost nothing is
known except, perhaps, by a few prospectors and hunters, whose love of
sport or desire for wealth has lured them
to spots never before seen by the eye of
the white man.
A commendable and statesmanlike
policy with respect to thiB very thing
was foreshadowed at the opening of this
session of the Legislature. The reference in the "speech from the throne"
to the intention of the Government to
send exploring parties into various parts
of our Province, as yet unknown, was
timely and judlcioua. That some such
steps are necessary is plain, and whatever may be the cost entailed, we believe that the results will altogether exceed any anticipation framed of the dormant wealth awaiting the'developing
hands of capital and labor. It says
much for the vigor of tlie Government
that they have frankly recognized the
urgent need of letting the world see
what a magnificent land we have fordo-
velopement. Once thiB is done, the increasing tide of humanity will flow into
our borders, and not alone will the fertility of the soil, and the fecundity of
the fisheries, together with other innumerable gifts of nature, be brought to
tlie service of our commonwealth, but,
iu proportion to all this, numerous and
thriving cities will spring up the land
over, and the steam engine, that great
civilizing influence, will assist our common country iu taking her rightful position as the fairest midmost fruitful
Province in the Dominion of Canada,
and a glory to tho Empire,
NOTES AND COMMENTS.
A FIELD FOR CAPITAL AND LABOR.
Now that the spring of the year has
come, it may reasonably be supposed
that the increase of emigration from
Europe, usual at this season, will take
place. Last year South Africa attracted
a largo number of eligible men and
women, and, although the exodus of
those seeking new homes in new lands
has as yet barely commenced for the
present year, tho booming of the Cape
has already set iu. Tho South African
press is already anticipating a dearth of
labor, and a well-known manufacturer,
Mr, Merryweathor, has been urging unemployed Englishmen to make for that
colony with all speed, assuring them of
being able to obtain work and good
wages without difficulty. The fact of
an immense population in the old world,
well fitted to become good colonists, Is
aa self-evident as ever it was, and that
the Eastern Provinces of Canada, too,
are ripe for assisting in tho work of opening up new countries aud building history has been recognized.
In England the land system has
driven and is driving the farmer off the
soil, until it has become a serious question with statesmen as to what remedy
to apply for the evil. The farmer and
his man, who barely raised the rent
during bad seasons, have found in many
cases emancipation, independence, and
a living on their own farms in the "far
west," and their toiling brothers of the
cities,' tho artisans, hearing of their success, have come west too, and so the
uncultivated wild of a few years ago has
developed into tho productive farm, and
where'biit a short time since the dense
forest stood, Ib now the factory and the
workahop,
Tho great interest evinced by Ontario farmers at tho late Toronto Exhibition in the productions sent from our
own Province would tend to show that
there Ib in the east a large and industrious class ready to test the capabilities
of British Columbia for themselves, and
we have very reliable information that
In certain parts of Eastern Canada a
very earnest spirit to know something
Over 4,000 tone of nickel la the annual
output of the Copper Cliff mine, near
Sudbury Ont. This is a larger production, says the Engineering News, than
that of all nickel mines in the world
combined. It is to be hoped that the increased production may result in a de
crease of the price, now about 80 cents
per pound, since the metal is no largely
used in plating the best class of mechanical work.—Ex.
Until within a few years a curious
custom has obtained in Switzerland,
When husband and wife expressed a de-
lire for a divorce they were requested to
enter a room and live therein together
for a fortnight, during which time they
were neither to see nor to converse with
anybody else; their food was passed to
them through a narrow opening in the
wall, and all communication with the
outside world was shut off. If, at the
end of a fortnight of this confinement
together, the couple still clamored for
divorce, it waa granted without further
ado.
Petitions are said to have little weight
with legislative bodies, but what they
have is usually proportionate to their
size. It might reasonably be supposed,
therefore, that one which was presented to the New York Assembly the other
day will have some effect upon that
body. It contains 61,144 signatures
from New York city and over 16,000
from Brooklyn, and la bound in book
form. The book is twenty-six inches
wide, thirty-two inches long, eight feet
thick, and weighs half a ton. It was
carried into the Assembly Chamber on
the shoulders of eight men, and was
laid, not on the table, but on the floor of
the House. Tho petition is in favor of
the Saxton Ballot Reform Bill, and iB
said to be the largest over secured from
any one city in the world.
Matters in South Africa aro becoming
interesting. It appears from the despatches that the opponents of the Dutch
Republican Government have become
sufficiently strong to haul down its flag
and assort British sentiment by actions
which placo its powers at defiance. This
Ib a sign of growth of the English population in a country where a abort time
ago a law waa passed practically disfranchising Englishmen. Emigration has
been pouring into South Africa from
Great Britain, and British capital aud
enterprise have been developing lands
which tho Boers have long regarded as
slave preserves. Thus it would appoar
Mint the question who is going to own
Africa from the lakes to the Cape is up
for solution, and the British colonists
have made up their minds on the anawor.
This la the way the Empire looks at It,
but does not state the case quite fairly:
A smart trick has just been frustrated.
A railway has been projected to take the
trade from Kootenay out of British Columbia into the United States. To disarm provincial opposition the crafty projectors tried the device of applying simultaneously for another charter for a
pretended railway, keeping the traffic
for the province. The British Columbian Legislature refused to be thus hoodwinked and asked Parliament to grant
neither charter except on condition that
construction went on concurrently. The
promoters confessed their fraud by refusing to be thus bound to their own
suggestion. Yet Grits, who raved about
provincial rights when advocating railways from Manitoba to the United
States, now sneer at the idea of British
Columbia having any provincial rights
when opposing such a trick to divert
railway traffic to the United States.
Some so-called Canadian journals are
for the United States and against Canada in all cases.
An interesting surgical operation, says
an exchange, was performed over a week
ago at the Roosevelt hospital, in New
York, upon a physician who had lost
his power of speech and became paralyzed in the right arm and leg by falling
from his carriage. He landed on his
head, and the doctors, believing that
the loss of speech was due to a blood
clot on the brain, an operation was decided on. A portion of his hair was
shaved off, and a circle of the skull
about an inch in diameter waa raised.
To the great satisfaction of the Burgeons
a clot Was found and removed, and the
usual appliances for grainage, etc., were
applied. No ill effects followed the
operation. In less than a week the patient was able to speak a few simple
words like "yes" and "no," and his
vocabulary is said to be growing daily.
The paralysis in his arm and leg haa entirely disappeared. His memory seems
unimpaired, and he has no trouble in
expressing Iub ideas in writing, but it is
believed that he will have to learn to
talk all over again like a child.
A report of one of Mr. Geo. Kennan's
lectures jn Chicago contains the following : There ia a supposed safeguard for
the accused in the examination of all
cases by the Ministers of the Interior,
but thiB function Ib, like the pretext of
the Government, for the use of the "administrative process," a sham. The
Minister has no time, and would not
use it if he had. He simply signs all
papers brought before him. As an example of the manner in which this iB
done, Mr. Kennan related a .case in
which a certain official, boasting of his
power with the Minister, made a wager
that the Minister would sign officially
for him the Lord's prayer. He wrote
the prayer out on an official paper and
inserted it among a number of papers
sent for the inspection of the Minister.
In due time it was returned, duly signed
and sealed with the great seal, proving
ineontestubly that the Minister had
never even glanced at the paper. The
actual wording of the accusation against
one young man exiled to the wilds of
Eastern Siberia was: "The accused Ib
suspected of an intention to commit at
some future indeterminate time
illegal act." On this charge he was
sent for years to Siberia.
F. Stirsky,
-St-EADINQsr-
WATCHMAKER: AND: JEWELER
Columbia St., opposite Scoullar Blook.
If you want to bay a nice Ladies' Gold or Silver Watch, or a Gentleman's
Gold or Silver Watch in any style, go to F. Stirsky'B.
He has Clocks from 60 cts. to $50, all styles and varieties, embracing a choice
selection of German Cuckoo Clocks, beautifully hand carved und first-class time
keepers, and astonishingly cheap.
A splendid selection of Genuine Diamond Ladies'and Gentlemen's Rings, and
a great assortment of Ladles' and Gentlemen's Engagement Rings.
Also a very large assortment of all kinds of Emblem Pins and Watch Charms..
A line selection of Ladles' and Dents' Watch Guards, and a large variety of Ladles and
Gentlemen's Jewelry.   Gentlemen's Watches from |5 to flOD.
Every article sold Is warranted as represented.  A specialty in Watch repairing.  Every
watch warranted to give perfect satisfaction.
dwfeltc Remember the Blue Store, Columbia St., opposite Scoullar Block, N. W.
M. MATHESON,
Merchant Tailor,
Is now showing a complete line of ENGLISH WORSTEDS AND SCOTCH
AND IRISH TWEEDS, which he is
prepared to make up at reasonable
rates.
A call solicited, and perfect fits guaranteed.
Douglas Street, two doors from Columbia St., New Westminster.       dfeltc
'_SOMETHING   NEW."-
Chlldren Cry for Pitcher's Castorla.
Bell-Irving, Patterson
6l Co.
IMPORTERS
Shipping Agents,
WHOLESALE
-AND-
Commission Merchants
In Stock, a full assortment of
Liquors, Vitrified Drain Pipes,
Fire Bricks, Encaustic Tiles,
Cumberland Smithy Coal, Ac,
&c, &c.
Any Description of Ooods Imported
to Order.
ilwfelte
id
<
00
0
I
a.
WANTED.
[Truth copy.]
MUMMER 4 QUIRT,
BLInc.
dmbiua
Grading & Excavating
TENDERS WILL BE RECEIVED XORORAD-
lng, excavating and ditching la the New
Westminster Brick Yard up too o'clock THURSDAY, March 13th.
Plans and speciHcatlous to bo seen at our office, Masonic Block.
W, TUBNBULL400.
New West., B. C, March B, 1890. mhStd
LECTURES!
Dr. Orpha D. Baldwin
ONE OF THE NATIONAL SUPERINTEND-
cuts of the Women's Christian Temperance
Union lu the U. H„ will give one of her popular
lectures In the oi'KHA UOUSX, on
Friday Evening, March 14th.
SUBJECTS:
"Row  to Make llf. Worth Ll.ll|."
"What Shall W« Tmeh Oar Children!"
DR. BALDWIN will also tin > talk lo (llrls Id
Iho OKANUK HAM,, Curlier ol SI. John Street
bii'1 Royal Avenue, on THURSDAY AFTERNOON, nt a o'clock, at which all Udle. and
(llrls ol lr, years and over will bo eordl.Uy welcomed.
ADMISSION, to Evening Lecture, a cents!
Afternoon, 10 cents. dmhioto
BEGGS 6c HEARD
 ARE OFFERING	
Suits for the Next 30 Days at Prices that Can't be Touched & Goods & Workmanship
THAT SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.
jar We must have room for our SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS
(direct from England). If you want anything in our line call and be
satisfied. BEGGS & HEARD, Merchant Tailors, Columbia, St., one
door west Dickinson's Butcher Shop. dfeltc
Consignment of Adams & Son's (Ont.)
Celebrated Wagons
JUST   ARRIVED.
Delivery, Express Wagons and Lorries.
ge raiiM ana diubmi
MAINLAND CARRIAGE WORKS,
SULLEY & BRTSON.
Queen's Hotel.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
The above hotel has recently changed hands and is now being
run in first-class style.   The table is supplied with
the very best the Beason affords.
^"Tliis is the only Family Hotel in New Westminster.
Special Accommodation for Ladies and Commercial Travellers.
dviteue H. G-. WALKER, Proprietor.
A. McRAE.
Merchant Tailor.
A -:- Call  -:- Solicited
Armstrong Block, Columbia St., New Westminster,
d&wfeatc
to
McPhaden,
James D. Rae, SuocessDr
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF FIRST-CLASS
Groceries: and: Provisions
-JiFEED, ETC.ie
Coffees Roasted and Ground on the Premises.   Fine Teas a Specialty
COLUMBIA STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
dwfelto
DesBRISAY,
.   —SELLS—
GROCERIES  AND  PROVISIONS
Eiy A First-class stock of everything in the Grocery line al
ways on hand.    Orders called for.    Goods Delivered to
ALL  TARTS  OP  THE   ClTY.
Corner Columbia and Blackio Sts., opp. C. P. R. Station.
dfelte
This Space is Reserved for the
Royal City Planing Mills Company,
Tho Pioneer and Leading
Lumber Manufacturing Establishment of the Royal City.
Richard Street, New Westminster.
SPECIAL LINES AND YALUES THIS WEEK.
Men's Goon Wearing Boots $1 60 per pair
a i     "    Better    " "     1 75      "
!|     "    Best   .   '.' "   from (2.60 to  3 60      "
1| PERFECTION BOOTS.
"j a Men's Patent Seamless Boots, from $2.60 to ... $3 60 per pair  a-.
1 J  BoyB'      " " "        "     2.00 to ... 2 25 per pair  ej
« CANNOT RIP.   PERFECT FITTING.   THE BEST
S WALKING BOOT MADE.
West End Bdot & Shoe Store
' dtelto
COMMERCIAL PRINTING.
 0	
The Columbian Printing Establishment has first-class facilities
for all kinds of Commercial Printing. Bill Heads, Letter Heads, Circulars,
Cards, Envelopes, Blank Forms of every description, Posters, Dodgers,
Price Lists, Ac. Prices will be found as low as at any other office where
first-class work is done.
STOVES!       STOVES!
GO TO
E. S. Scoullar & Co.
— FOR-
East of Colonial Hotel,
Has jimt received n full Hue of tho latest designs In
Suitings & Fancy Worsteds,
And Is prepared to make up clot lies In any style
to milt all that favor him with their
patronage.
THE ONLY ARTISTIC CUTTER &
TAILOR IN THE CITY.
A Call Solicited.    FIT GUARANTIED OR NO
PAY.  1'rloen reasonable.
dfeltc
TENDEES WANTED.
TENDERS WILL BE RECEIVED BY THE
nndursigned up to Saturday, the Kith day
of March, at noon, for the erection of a Prenl>y<
tcrlan Church In Township Four, Delta Municipality.
Plans find specifications may be seen at Ladder's Landing,
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. JOHN McKEE, Br.,
FRANCES PAGE.
Ladncr's Landing, March 8th, 1890.   dmhlOtd
Occidental Hotel k Restaurant
Opp. Oddfellows' Hall,
Columbia St.,   -   Westminster
Rates per day, $1 and upward. Board and
lodging, per wcok,|5 and upward, according to
room.
Meals at all Hours, Day and Nioht,
Served In first-clans style.
dfe28tc PHIL, H. SMITH, Manager.
deaf Ming Stow ail Ranges.
Water St., Vancouver.    Columbia St., New Westminster.
H.T.READ&CO.
THE   LEADING
Hardware and Paint Merchants ot New Westminster.
Contractors and others erecting houses should call on ua and examine our extensive stock of
Builder..' Hardware, which Is excelled by no other house in the Province.
1411;
We Carry the Largest Assortment of Locks in the City.
To those requiring Paints and Oils wo beg to call attention to our extensive variety. Superior
Coach Colors, In all shades, Tube Colors of every description.  Floor Paints, ready tor use.
Wc have much pleasure in announcing that we have been appointed Sole Agents in this City for
the sale of the Celebrated Johnson's Magnetic Iron Paint, the highest grade Fire
Proof Paint In the world.  Guaranteed 92 per cent pure oxide,
MASONIC AND ODD FELLOWS' BLOCK, NEW WESTMINSTER.
dwfeltc
Reid & Currie,
MACHINISTS.
Have Just Received
Fresh Creamery and Boll Butter.  Extra Quality.
Also Fresh Groceries and General Provisions.
Goods delivered to any part of the city free.
Cor. Columbia and Douglas Sts.
dfelte NEW WESTMINSTER.
W. R. AUSTIN'S
FARM PRODUCE.
Hard-wood, Fir, Bark,
Ac., Ac., &e.
LEAVE  ORDERS AND BETTI.E  ACCOUNTS
AT AUSTIN'S WHARF.
dfelte
NOTICE!
WE HAVE OPENED A
General Store
GROCERIES,   ETC.,
AT BROWNSVILLE FERRY LANDING,
And will handle all Produce In all quantities,
paying highest  prices.
Our object is to sell cheap as wo have been
accustomed to doing business on small profits.
BEATON & PIKE,
dwinhStc Brownsvk-lk, B. O,
Central Hotel
Gob. Columbia & Douglas Sts.
JAMES CASH, - PROP.
RATES, fi.00 AND $1.60 PER DAY,
ACCORDING TO ROOM.
f^Speclal Rates by the Week or
Month. dfeltc
ESTABLISHED   18138.
DICKINSON & COM'Y
BUTCHERS,
Nearly Opposito Colonial Hotel,
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
Tho LargeBt and Choicest Agsoi-tmont
of all Descriptions of
MEATS AND VEGETABLES
Constantly on hand, and supplied to
Families, Restaurants, and Steamboats
at the
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES,
dfeltc
E. DICKINSON,
-DEALER IN-
WOOD,
Lime, Plaster, Cement, etc, etc.
^iCOALfc-
ORDERS TAKEN FOR
New Wellington Goal.
Office opposito Canadian Pacific Navigation Go's Wharf.
TELEPHONE CALL9:-
OUioe, OS; Residence, 71.
df.lt.
I!
ri
Forging and Bolt Making.
BRASS and IRON CASTINGS
Estimates Furnished and Drawings Made in our office
by a Practical Draughtsman.
Skilled Mechanics and Latest Improved Machinery only used.
AGENTS FOR
JOHN DOTY—Stationary, Marine and Hoisting Engines.
CHAS. SMITH—Duplex Steam Pumps; also, Centrifugal and Rotary Pumps.
LONDON TOOL CO.—Manufacturers of all kinds of Iron-making Tools.
A. R. WILLIAMS—Manufacturers and Dealers in ail kinds of Machinery.
ALSO, AGENTS FOR
All kinds of Saw Mill, Sash and Door Factory, Brickyard and Canning Machinery.
FULL LINE IN STOCK OF
Wagons, Carriages, Buggies, Phaetons, Hacks and Carriage Materials.
istT*Calalogucs and Prices furnished on application.   All work
thoroughly guaranteed.
dwfelto
WINTEMUTE BROS.
—THE  I.EADINO-
MANUFACTURERS -:- AND -:- IMPORTERS
FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY,
EXTENSIVE SHOW ROOMS AND
WAREHOUSE.
Columbia St., New Westminster.
chas. Mcdonough
Front Street, New Westminster.
k Westminster ft Men falsi
EXTRA FAMILY BLANKETS,
Flannels, Worsteds and all kinds of Woolen Ooods.]
Ready-Made Clothing.
'lie only House on tho Mainland which keeps the Manufactures of the Neva
Westminster Woolen Mills.   1'atbokibk Home Industry.
ZED. S. HALL,
Bookseller STATION! Allmporter
(WHOLESALE AND RETAIL),
Columbia Street, New Westminster, B. C.
English, Foreign and United States Periodicals and Newspapers
constantly on hand.   Hookn imported to order.
dl.ltc VOLUME Vin-No. 35.
THE DAILY COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, MARCH 13, 1890.
THE FATAL AUTOGRAPH.
•' Will you write lu my autograph book!" said
she,
And he dared not answer nay,
Though his heart beat quick, and his breath
came thick.
And he trembled in dismay;
For he loved the maid, and waa sore afraid—
And be dared not answer nay.
Bo he took the book and prayed lor a thought,
And long for a thought did pray,
And long did he look in the dictionary book,
And the cy-clo-pe-dl-a.
" I will write a Terse," said he, " that Is torse
And bang-up and 0. K."
And he searcb-ed thro'   the "Library of
Song,"
And ho Bearoh-ed many a day.
" I will show the maid that the poetry trade,"
Said he, " Is Just my lay.
I will tlnd a verso that Is sweet and terse,
If I hunt forever and aye 1"
And he scaroh-ed long, and he found a versa
At the end of the fortieth day,
" She will think every line," he chuckled, "la
mine,"
And he laughed full loud and gay.
" I'm a ge-nt-UB, and I make no fuss
To write good verse.  Hoo-ray I"
Then he turned the page, and his rival's
name
Was writ with much display
'Neath the very same verse, and It made him
curse;
And his raven looks turned gray;
And ho fell on bis side, and quickly died
. Of by-po-ohon-drl-a.
-9. W. Fobs, in Puck.
BINGO, THE FIRE-DOG.
Borne of His Many Bxplolte-How
He Died.
Bingo wm exceedingly black. Eyei,
skin, hair, every thing about Bingo, except his disposition, was of the most
somber hue. He had the most charming
qualities as an offset to his funereal coloring. Be was intelligent, he was kind,
he waa unselfish, he was faithful and he
was devoted to his vocation.
Now, thiB description is a history in
itself, and if one only adds to it that
Bingo died in the full prime ot his powers, it would aenm a Rembrandt portrait
of him, with powerful contrasts of light
and Bhade.
But to make the history of Bingo more
appealing to human sympathy, some of
the vicissitudes of his career should bo
set forth. Virtuos are nothing If they
are not exercised, and the action of life
is the grindstone which rubs them
smooth.
Bingo was a dog.
Butsuchadogl Both his parents wero
French, so, according to tho law of canine genealogy, Bingo, though born in
the United States, was a French poodle.
His mamma was a trick-dog named Frou-
Frou, that hud been trained by a Now
York fireman named John Farley. She
belonged to a very elegant young gentleman, whose occupation In life was to
amuse himself, one of. the hardest things
in the world to do when it is the only
employment which one has.
This young man thought that Frou-
Frou would contribute to his efforts to
make life amusing if she were taught
sevoral things which no dog, not even a
French poodle, would ever pick up by
itaolf. So the young gentleman brought
Frou-Frou to John Farley and asked
him to educate her in tho very highest
fashion possible to a young, aristocratic
dog.
Farley was a great Instructor of dogs.
Ho was very successful In his methods,
having pretty well solved the educational problem, bo far as dogs are concerned.
Ho was stationed at tho water-tower on
Thirteenth street, and be used to keep
Frou-Frou in the room whero ho slept,
which was also her school-room.
But It is not necessary to dwell at
length on the education of Frou-Frou,
since this is the history of her son
Bingo. It iB enough to say that after
her course was completed she was one
of the best-oducatcd poodles in Gotham,
and she furnished a good deal of enjoyment to tho young gentloman inquest
of amusement. She has been mentionod
only to show that Bingo had an ancostry
of which no dog noed have been
ashamed, and to account for tho sphere
of life in which Bingo achieved distinction.
The young man was pleased with Farley's sucoess with Frou-Frou, and boside
paying tbe bill for her tuition, he gave
Bingo to the fireman when he was a
very young and utterly ignorant little
poodle. Farley accepted the puppy and
trained him with the greatest care.
Bingo became a flre-dog.
A fire-dog is one which lives in an
englnerhouse and takes an active interest in conflagrations. Although there
are not many of thoso dogs to-day in tho
New York engino-houses, they used to
be a common feature of these houses.
Those dogs t*ko Instinctively to their
calling. They are not speciully trained
to their vocation, hut they fall Into the
waya of flre-dogs naturally.
Farley taught Bingo many tricks and
accomplishments, but where fires were
concerned tbe dog picked up every thing
by himself. In tho engine-houses the
horses are kept in stalls hy the sido of
the engine. Every thing is arranged so
that there will be no delay in starting
off for the fire the moment tho alarm is
sounded. The harness hangs from tbe
ceiling, high enough from the ground to
allow tho horse to como under it.
The moment the alarm sounds the
horses start with the greatest alacrity,
spring from their stalls, go to tho engine and put themselves in position to
bo' harnessed. By the time they are
there the firemen are sliding down tho
smooth, round pole which goes from tho
ground floor of tho ongine-house up to
the room whore they sleep.
The harness is dropped on the horse,
the buckles made fast in a jiffy. The
driver vaults into his Beat and In a moment more tho horses aro galloping full
tilt through the busy streets, the gong
clanging constantly to warn tho vehicles
and pedestrians to get out of tho way.
It is a moat oxolting sight to boo tho
horses bounding along, tho heavy engine, rattling over tho stones, while the
brass olang of the gong Is incessantly
sounding.
Bingo soon determined what his
function was, and ho acquitted himself
of it with the most ardent zeal. This,
of course, was after he had grown up
and had reached maturity. When he
was a wabbly little puppy, and when,
later, he was a thoughtless, giddy
young dog, he did not go to fires, butwas
fed and trained upstairs.
But he grew to be very strong, although he was never very largo. Bis
hair was clipped so that he looked like
an African lion. It was out very close
in places, but was left thick around his
shoulders and head, with*a tuft on the
end of his tall. He had little armlets of
his own hair on his legs and a little
clump on his haunches.
His black, shiny eyes glistened from
beneath tho silky hair that hung over
thnm, and ho'looked so keen And quick
tiiat one felt obliged to bo very clear
and precise with him, beoauso he had
tho air of not being able to lose any
1 time In foolishness,
. Bangt bang! bang! would go the gong.
The' horses would spring forward,
trampling the floor with their sounding
hoofs, and at the same moment Bingo's
cheery bark was heard as ho scurried
around in mad anxiety to get every
body off all right to put out tho fire. Oh,
how important he felt when the alarm
was given and he felt called on to con*
tribute to tho good of tho community by
his generous e .forts!
After tbo engine had started out hi-
tore along ahead of it about half a
square, turning round now and then to
see that It was following, and dodging
around among the feet of the horses and
tho teams that he met He barked all
this time with a tremendous sense of
his importance, as if proclaiming:
"Clear the way, good folk! Clear the
wayl There is a fire and we are in a
hurry to put it out."
Bingo used to follow the men who
went into the burning building, and
would frequently make his way to the
roof. It was his chief delight to get
near the pipeman who held the nozzle
of the hose-pipo and directed the discharge ot the water upon the fire.
Bingo seemed to feel that he was helping to extinguish the flames when he
was near the hose-pipe. Who could
question his utility then?
Whon the fire was out he trotted back
with the proudest air of complacency,
and upon returning to tho engine-house
he would frisk around Farley as if
courting attention and praise for his
services.
But when his master would put Bingo
through his paces and exhibit the whole
round of his accomplishments to visitors, he was quite another animal. His
relationship to the elegant Frou-Frou
became apparent then. His wool was
as fine as silk, and every morning he
was washed and sorubbed and his beautiful hair combed.
He had around his neok a neat collar
of russet leather with small spike-heads
in it, and his name Bingo engraved
on a Uttlo silver plate. He looked quite
a dandy, and his oyos shono like jet
through the long, orinkly hair that
hung over them.
Farloy was very fond of Bingo; who
could help being fond of suoh a bright,
faithful, affectionate poodle as ho was?
You havo been told at tho start that
Bingo was cut off In his beautiful prime.
Long before his legs began to got miff,
or his memory to fail him, Bingo diod.
Thero was a certain fittlngnoHs in tho
manner of his taking oir, oeoauso Bingo
was, above all, a fire-dog. Ho was a
trick-dog for the amusemont ot others,
but ho was a fire-dog through philanthropy and natural bent. His doath occurred in this way:
Ono cold, bright night in December
the alarm of tiro sounded in the engine-
house. Tho horses sprang before tho
engine. Thero was the rush of firemen,
but there occurred for some reason or
other a moment's delay, Bingo was
skipping wound in great distress of
mind at this hindrance Thero was that
fire burning mid where was ho?
Ab soon as the doors wero opened ho
charged madly forward. Some one was
in his way, however, und in dodging him
he flung himself against a door-post.
The shock was so great that ho was
thrown hack and fell under the hoofs of
the horses as tlioychargod out. A heavy
hoof with its iron shoo crushed down
upon his sido.
Poor llingol When tho engine had
passed over him lie feebly and painfully
dragged himself toward ono ot the stalls
for tho horses, lie waa panting and
onco or twice ho uttered u fooblo whine.
Thero was not ono of those ho loved
most near at hand to comfort him. Thoy
wero at tho fire. Ho would never go to
a fire again. Ho raised his head and
looked around the familiar online-house
with a sigh; then his head fell heavily
to the ground and Bingo was dead.
Whon thoy came back from the fire
and found tho poor dog stiff and cold,
a film over his jet-black eyes, tho men
felt bad enough, especially Farloy. The
lost poodle hail lived a noble life—for a
poodlo—and had died in harness, which
was somewhat of a consolation to thoso
who mourned him. So poor Bingo was
buried decently and his joyous bark was
missed in the engine-house, whore ho is
still romomhoretl.— John J. a Bucket,
in Youth's Companion.
HEROIC ABBIE   BURGESS.
An American Girl Who Wai Every Whit
m llravo as tira.ua Hurling,
A woman who is now assistant keeper
at White Head Light could enlighten
thoso who wish to know -something of
tho experiences of light-house keepers.
In 1850 this woman lived at Madtlninus
Rock, twenty-five miles from the mainland, and inaccessible except in pleasant weather. Her father, 8amuel
Burgess, was tho keeper at this light,
and his family consisted of an invalid
wife and five children, one daughter,
Abbie, being seventeen years old. At
tho time of the memorablo gale that
swept Minot's Light into the sea the
keeper happened to be away. The heavy
seas broke over the rook, washing every
movable-thing away until ot the dwelling not a stone remained. The little
ones hurried the mothor to the tower,
und then crept in themselves as the sea
cleared the rock of all save the stone
light-house. For four weeks they lived
there alone, for no human being could
go to their rescue, but night after night
Abbie lighted the beacon, and it never
failed to shine through the galo.
One day in 1857 Mr. Burgess left the
rook to obtain his salary and to sooure
provisions, A gale prevented his return
and the family ran short of food. Abbie
fashioned a sail, and her brother, who
happened to be at home, started in a
small skiff to procure iood. For twenty-one days the family lived on a cup of
corn-meal and an egg each per day, for
the son waa not heard from until the
twenty-second day, and added to the
risk of famine was the suspense as to
the fato ot tholr father and brother, for
were they drowned tho family would
havo starved on the desolate rook.
During all this time, at tho end of which
the father returned, Abbie oared for tho
sick mother,comforted tho children and
kept the bright light burning to save
the passing ships from dashing on Mad*
tinlousrook. To-day, says the Lowiston
Journal, hor husband is keeper at White
Bead Light and Bhe is tho assistant, and
a braver woman never lived.
She Girl of the Family.
There iB nothing so pitiful as a girl's
generosity. Though her pocket-book
seldom contains more than one dollar
and her own wants aro many and
urgent, sho always manages to scrape
enough together to buy presents tor
some one else. It Is the girl ot the
family who remembers the birthdays
that como so often. She is worrying
now that her hoard of pennies is so
small and tho number to buy presents
for is so large. It a present ot money
was given her for herself she would
not buy thlngB for herself with it She
would remember the long list of people
that she fools that she really must give
to and would deny herself. There is
no one so poor as the girl of the family
and no one so generous.
The Food Value of Egfi,
/The food value of eggs, as compared
with fruits, has been studied by Fresen-
ius, who, after a long series of analysis,
states that one ordinary hen's egg contains as much nourishment as 17 ounces
of cherries, 80 ounces of grapes, 94
ounces ol russet apples, 9 pounds gooseberries and 4 pounds of pears. The
same distinguished authority says that
114 pounds of grapes, 197 pounds of apples, 199 pounds of pears and 897 pounds
of plums are equal in nourishment to
100 pounds of potatoes.
Eleetrlo Fir* Dotector.
Tho latest electric device is for detecting fires. When the temperature of
a room reaches a dangerous point the
composition of the little button starts
£' °'«» fwm in the office. The
aarmi8ke tup ^ tompenrt
THE BLOOMER  COSTUME.
rh« I*dy Whoso Kama It Bears Deal**
That She Introduced It.
The following lettor from Mrs. Amelia
Bloomer, whose name became world-
famous years ago in connection with
what was known as the "Bloomer costume," is printed in the Ladles'Borne
Journal, and has a keen degree of Interest In that the Mrs. Bloomer denies
the credit of introducing the costume in
America. This letter, recently written,
Is now produced in print for the first
time:
Couhcil Bluffs, la. — My Dear Sir:
I hardly know how to write about the
"costume" associated with my name.
But I was not its inventor or originator,
as Is so generally believed.
In March, 1861, Elisabeth Smith Miller, daughter of Hon. Gerritt Smith, of
Peterboro, N. Y., visited her cousin,
Elisabeth Cady Stanton, at Seneca Falls,
Nr. Y., which was then my home, and
where I was publishing the Lily, and
where Mrs. Stanton also resided, Mrs.
Miller came to us In a short skirt and
full Turkish trousers, a style of dress
she had been wearing some two months.
The mattor ot woman's dress having
been just previously discussed In the
filly, Mrs. Miller's appearance led Mrs.
Stanton to at onoe adopt the style, and I
Try Boon followed, Mrs. Stanton Intro-
liming it to tho Seneca Falls public two
•>' three days in advanoe of me. In the
iest number of my paper following my
uloptlon of the dress (April, 1851.) I
■vrote an article announcing to my read-
ors that I had donned the style to which
their attention had been called In previous numbers.
The New York Tribune noticed my
article, and made it known to its thousands of readers that I had donned a
short Bkirt and trousers, and from this
it went from paper to paper throughout
this country and countries abroad. I
found myself noticed and pictured in
many papers at home and abroad. I was
praised and censured, glorified and ridiculed, until I stood in amazement at the
furor I had wrought by my pen while
fitting quietly in my little office at
home attending to my duties,
Suffice it that it waa the press at
large that got up all tho excitement and
that named the drees. I never called It
the "Bloomer Costume." With me it
was always tho short dress and trousers.
It consisted of a skirt shortened to a
few Inches below the kneea and the
substitution of trousers made of the
tame material as the dress. In other
v,poets, the dress was the same as
.vorn by all women. At the outset the
rousers were full and baggy, but we
improved upon them by making them
narrower and gathered at the ankle,
utd finally by making entirely plain
nnd straight falling to the shoe like
Jie trousers of men.
To some extent, I think the style was
adopted abroad, but not largely, or, for
Lliat matter, at home. There were individuals here and there who gladly
threw off the burden of heavy skirts
and adopted the short ones, but Boon
both press and people turned upon it
i heir ridicule and censure, and women
had not the strength of principle to
withstand the criticism, and bo returned
to tholr dragging skirts. For myself, I
wore the short dross and no other, at
.ionie and everywhere, for six or
.even years, long after Mrs. Stan-
urn, Luoy Stone and others had abandoned It. Lucy Stone wore the dress
several years, traveled and lectured In
it, and was married in it, I think. Nona
of ub ever lectured on the dress question, or in any way introduced it Into
our lectures. We only wore it beuauso
we found it comfortable, convenient,
safe and tidy—with no thought of introducing a fashion, but with tho wish that
evory woman would throw oft the burden of olothes that was dragging her
life out
This dress question has been of secondary Importance with mo, and it is not'
for that I wish to be remembered. As
you will see from what 1 have written
above, a wrong impression prevails in
regard to my part in that matter. I
was not its originator. I adopted tho
style and made it known to the public.
The preBB did the rest
I am not lecturing at all these last
few years. A throat difficulty and my
seventy years have compelled me to re-
tiro from actlvo participation in works
tor the advancement of woman.
MIGHTY  HARD TIMES.
What Washington Territory Colonists
a Few Yean Ago.
During the spring and summer of
1887 about 800 colonists went to Port
Angeles, says the Seattle Press,
and during those samo seasons over &!().-
000 was spent. 11 was a glorious big picnic. The men would work on the colony's tramways until they fancied them*
selves tired, when thoy would call a
halt and stop work for the day. They
held stormy meetings, at which all
hands would pitch into the debate, and
then after adjournment they would all
attend a dance and havo a gloriously good
time of it. This was kept up until tbe
funds were all spent and a big debt of
about $10,000 or more was accumulated
In Seattle and Port Townsend. A cloud
had gathered over their heads and thoy
could not see the silver lining. Starvation stalked through tho colony wigwams and pointed with bony fingers at
the victims he Intended to carry to his
home over the snows of winter,
The boot supply was out down from a
whole carcass a week to a quarter, and
then the beet supply was out olf altogether. The butter bill, which had
been ranging as high as 855 a week, was
wiped out, and the colonists had no
butter. Retrenchment was tho ordor of
tho day, and It was carried to suuh an
extont that the standard bill of fare was
as follows:
Potatoes, broad und cotton-seed oil gravy
for breakfast.
Bread, potatoes and cotton-seed oil gravy for
dinner, and
Cottonseed oil gravy, potatoes and bread for
■upper.
Some people did not havo oven
enough of this. Philip Moagher, who
has lived in Port Angeles for twenty-
six years, says:
"Many a time have I stood on this
wharf and counted from forty to fifty
lanterns going along that beach. They
were colonists, and they carried with
them each one a spade and a bucket,
going after a meal of clams. They
were proud, but 1 tell you they were
hungry, too, and no mistake.
There is in Georgia to-day a Confederate General who was literally shot
full of pins during the late war. He
was an extemporized pln-oushion, hut
tbe pins saved his life. On one occasion the Gonoral was lying in his
tent at night The Federals were near
enough to shoot into the camp. It is
said he had Just finished a letter home
and had thrown himself down for a few
hours'rest before the hot work that
would begin in the early morning, when
pingt a Minie bullet from a sharpshooter's rifle sped through the tent and
struck the General In his left side. The
blow stunned htm, and he lay as dead
for a few moments. When he recovered
consciousness he was surprised to find
himself still alive. Be felt a stinging
pain In his breast, and, tearing open
bis shirt, found that the ball had struck
a package ot pins his wife had given
him, thinking they would be needful In
those days when there was no one to
sew and patch, and had driven every
one ot them Into his flesh. They had
laved his life, but he was a walking
iushion bristling with pin-heads.
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT APPLI-
cationwill be made to the Legislative As-
sembly of the Province of British Columbia, ot
Its next session, for an act to incorporate a company to construct, operate and mafntain p street
railway In the City of New Westminster, and to
acquire lands and do all things necessary for
the purposes aforesaid.
Dated this 25th day of September, 1889.
B. DOUGLAS,-
HENRY V. EDMONDS,
dseSOtc For selves and others.
Licensing Board.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
_t next regular meeting of the Licensing
Board for tho City of New Westminster will he
held In the City Hall on
Wednesday the 19th March,
at 10 o'clock a. tn., of which all persons interested are requested to take notice and govern
themselves accordingly.
D. ROBSON,
City Clerk.
City Hall, New Westminster,
March 1,1890. drahltd
NOTICE OF SALE BY SHERIFF
Pursuant to Execution  Against
Lands Act, 1874.
In the Supreme Court of British Columbia.
E. M. N. WOODS, Plaintiff.
JAMES PATTERSON, JOSEPH R.
CHAPMAN, CLIFFORD PATTER-
SON, JAMES W. PATTERSON,
JOSEPH PATTERSON and THOS.
PATTERSON, Defendants.
TN OBEDIENCE TO A WRIT OP Ft. FA. IS-
1 sued out of the Supreme Court of British Columbia at New Westminster on the 18th day of
February, 1890, nnd to mc directed In tho above
named suit, for the sum of &m.(Q, debt and
costs, together with Interest on samo at the rate
of six per centum per annum from the 8th day
o[ March, 1888, besides Hlierl.ru fees and poundage, Ac., I havo seized, and will sell by Auction,
at the Court House, New Wcstm luster, on
Monday, the 34th Day of March Next,
At 12 o'clock noon, all tho right, title and Interest of James Patterson, one of the defendants, in
the lands as described in this advertisement, or
sufficient thereof to satisfy the judgment debts
and costs in this action, subject to a mortgage
for 11800 and Interest on said mortgage at 8 per
centum iter annum, from the 15th February, 1888.
Now
Westminister.
Concise Descri|j-
tlon of Property.
SouthWeit
H of lot 21,
Town'p 26
U roup II.
Estate or
Interest.
Farming Lands
containing 152
acres.
The judgment was registered in the Land
Registry Office, New Westminster, against said
land on the 18th day of February, 1880.
18 ©O.
HARPER'S   BAZAR.
ILLUSTRATED.
harper's Bazar is a journal for tbe home.
Giving the latest Information with regard to the
Fashions, Its numerous Illustrations, fashion
plates and pattern-sheet supplements are indispensable alike to the home dressmaker and the
professional modiste. No expense Is spared In
making Us artistic attractiveness of the highest
order. Its clever short stories, parlor plays and
thoughtful essays satisfy all tastes, and Its last
Fage is famous as a budget of wit and humor.
11 its weekly issues everything is included
which is of lutorest to women. During IH'JU
Olive Thome Miller, Christine Tcrlnine Hcrrfck
and Mary Lowe Dickinson will respectively furnish a series of papers on "Tho Daughter at
Home," "Three Meals a day," and "The woman
of the Period." The serial novels will bo written by Walter llesaut and F. W. Robinson.
Harper's Periodicals.
l'er Year.
Harper's Bazar. (I 00
II rper's Magazine 4 00
Harper's Weekly .' 4 00
Harper's Young People  2 00
Postage Free to att subscribers in the Untied
States, Canada or Mexico.
Tlie volumes of the Bazar begin with the first
number for January of each year. When no
time Ib mentioned, subscriptions will begin with
the number current at time of receipt of order.
Bound volumes of Harper's Bazar for three
years back, In neat doth binding, will be sent
by mail, postage paid, or by express, free of ex-
Senae [provided the freight does not exceed ono
ollar per volume] for 17 per volume.
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binding, will be sent by mail, postpaid, on receipt of SI each.
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Address—
dfe5        HA RPER it BROTHERS, New York.
18 ©O.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE.
ILLUSTRATED.
A new Shakespeare—the Shakespeare of Edwin A. Abbey—will be presented in Harper's
Magasine for 1890, with comments by Andrew
Lang. Harper's Magazine has also made special
arrangements with Alphonse Daudet, the greatest of living French novelists, for the exclusive
fiubllcatlon, In serial form, of a humorous story
0 be entitled "The Colonists ofTarascon: the
Last adventures of the Famous Tartarin." The
story will be translated by Henry James, and
illustrated by Rossi and Myrbaoh.
W. D. Howells will contribute a novelette In
three parts, and Lafcadlo Hearn a novelette In
two parts, entitled "Youma," handsomely illustrated.
In illustrated papers, touching subjects of
current interest, and in its short stories, poems,
and timely articles, the Magazine will maintain
Its well-known standard.
Harper's Periodicals.
Per Year.
Harper's Magazine 11 00
Harper's Weekly 4 00
Harper's Bazar  4 00
Harper's Young People  2 00
Postage Free to all subscribers in the Untied
States, Canada or Mexico.
The volumes of the Magazine begin with the
numbers for Juueand December of each year.
When no time is specified, subscriptions will
begin with the number current at the time of
receipt of order.
Bound volumes of Harper's Magazine for three
Sears back, in neat cloth binding, will be sent
y mail, postpaid, on receipt of |tt per volume.
Cloth eases for binding, 60 cents each, by mall,
postpaid.
Index to Harper's Magazine, alphabetical, analytical and classified, for volumes 1 to 70, Inclusive, from June, 1850, to June, 1885, ono vol.,8vo,
cloth, H,
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Address,
dloS       HARPER it BROTHERS, New York.
18 90.
HARPER'S    WEEKLY.
ILLUSTRATED.
Harper's Weekly has a well-established place
as the leading illustrated newspaper in America. The fairness of Its editorial comments on
current politics has earned forlt the respect and
confidence of all Impartial readers, and the variety and excellence of its literary contents
which Include serial and short stories by the
best and most popular writers, fit It for the perusal ofpeopioof the widest range of tastes and
pursuits. The Weekly supplements are of remarkable variety, interest and value No expense li spared to bring the blithest order of artistic ability to bear upon the Illustration of the
changeful phases ot home and foreign history.
A Mexican romance, from the pen of Thomas
A. Janvier, will appear in the Weekly in 1890,
Harper's Periodicals.
Per Year.
Harper's Weekly	
Harper's Magasine	
Harper's Basar	
Harper's Young People	
...M
... 400
... 400
... 200
Postage Free to all ■ubMrlbm in the United
States, Canada or Mexico.
The volumes of the Weekly begin with tbe tirst
number for January of each year. When ho
time Is mentioned, subscriptions will begin with
the number current at the time of receipt of order.
Hound volumes of Harper's Weekly for three
Sears back, In neat cloth binding, will be sent
y mall, postage paid, or by express, free of ex-
Sense (provided tho freight does not exceed one
ollar per volume), for ft per volume.
Cloth rases for each volume, suitable for
binding, will be sent by malt, postpaid, on receipt of II each.
Remittances should be made by Post Office
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss.
Newspapers are not to copy this advertisement
without the express order of Harper & Brothers.
Address:
dfeS        HARPER & BROWERS, New York.
F. CRAKE,
Practical Watchmaker & Manufacturing Jeweler
4 DOORS WEST FROM POST OFFICE.
Gold and  Silver Watches, Chains, Diamond, Ruby
Sapphire and Other Rings.
The best quality of PLATED and TABLE WARE in all designs.
A Fine Assortment of Clocks
Spectacles and Eye-Glasses to suit all Sights.
Special   attention  to  Watch   Repairing.     All   kinds   of   Jewelery
manufactured on the premises by first-
class workmen.
The Cheapest House In Town.
dwfelto
TJAPTIST CHURCH, Agues Btreet, East of
D Mary Street. Lord's Day Services at 11
11. tn. and? p. m. Sabbath School and Bible Class
at 2:80 p. m. All seats free: strangers cordially
welcomed.'—Rev. Thos. Baldwin, pastor.
METHODIST CHURCH, Mary Street. Rev.
J; H. White, Pastor. Services at 11 a. m.
and 7 p. m. Sunday School and Bible Class 2:80
~.m. Prayer Meeting on Thursdays at 7:80 p.m.
aatBfree; strangers cordially Invited.	
CHURCH OF KNOLAND.-HOLY TRINITY CHURCH; Rector, The BiBhop. H.
MARY'S CHURCH; Rector, The Ven. Archdeacon Woods. Services in both churches every
day. -All scats free. Both churches open all
day for private prayer. -
PKK8HYTEUIAN OHUKOH (ST. ANDREW'S), corner Carnarvon and Blackwood fits. Rev. Thos. Scouler, pastor. Services
at 11 a. 111. and 7 p. m.; Sunday School and Bible
Class at 2:.J0 p. in.; Prayer Meeting on Thursday
evenings at 7:!I0. Seats free; strangers welcome.	
ST. PAUL'S - REFORMED EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, John St. (opposite Orange Hall):
Rev. Thos. Haddon, B. »., Heotor. Services
every Sunday at 11 a. m. and 7 p. m. Sunday
School and Bible Class at 2:30 p.m. Thursday
eventugnorv.ee at 7:110. Beats free; all are cordially invited.	
THK NEW WESTMINSTER WORKWOMEN'S
LEAGUE meet evory Friday evening at 8
O'clock lu  il,o  FoK.utara'   Hull — \    I. MlCHIE.
~   ,-Bec. dfe22m!l
K
P.-ROYAL LODGE NO. 6.   Regular Meet-
•   Ing every Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock,
-J. E. KMIOHT, K.of B
IO. O. T.-EXCELSIOR LODUE NO. 8meetB
• every Monday evening at 8 o'clock, in the
Temperance Hall, Columbia St. Visiting mem ■
bers are cordially invited.—W. C. Lovr, Ree.
AO. F.-COURT LORD DUFFERIN, NO.
• 6304, The regular meetings of the above
Court are held at the Foresters' Hall, on the
first and third Wednesday In each month, at 8
p. m.—Jho. McMubphy, Benr., P. C. B.
CALEDONIA ft ST. ANDREWS SOCIETY.—'The regular meetings of this association aro held on the last Tuesday of each
month, at 8 o'clock p. m. All Scotchmen are
invited to attend.—John Bum, Sec.	
. O. O. F.-NEW WESTMINSTER LODGE NO. 3.-Tho regular meetings of this Lodge are
held at the Oddfellows' Hall every Friday evening at 8 o'clock. Visiting brethren cordially invited to attend.—T. Tyleb, Ree. Sec.	
■     UNION LODGE NO. 0, A. V.& A.M.
mA The regular meetings of this Lodge
Eh are held in the Masonic Temple on
*▼ tho first Wednesday in each month, at
:30 o'clock p. m. Sojourning brethren are
cordially Invited to attend.—P. Grant, Sec.
BOARD OF TRADE.—Board Room, Odd
Fellows' Brick Block (up-stolrs). Council
meets on the first Wednesday in cacli month, at
' p. m. Quarterly meetings on the 22ml of Feb.,
Jay, Aug., and Nov., at 7:30 p.m. New members inav tie proposed aud elected at any Quarterly meeting.—D. Robson, Sec.
IMPERIAL.
Fire Insurance Company
OF LONDON.
Capital,     -     -    £1,600,000 Stg.
Bates as low as any other reliable Company
doing business In British Columbia.
W, J. ARMSTRONG,
elte Agent New West.
W. C. LOYE,
JB~ Repairing neatly done.  Cork sole work
a specialty.  Orders promptly attended to.
Ci-abkhonSt.. inrearof Colonial Hotel, next
to Rand Bros.' office. dfelte
BAKER BROS. & CO'Y
10 Chapel Walk, South  Castle St., Liverpool,
England.
Bank Buildings, Columbia Street, New Westminster, B. C.
Shipping and Commission
AGENTS,
General Wholesale  Merchants   and
Importers.
Any description of Goods Imported to order
and   custom   and ship Broking transited.
TIME  TABLE.
Str. ROBERT DUNSMUIR
LEAVES WESTMINSTER EVERY  MONDAY
morning at 7 o'clock for Nanaimo, via Vancouver, returning Tuesday, via Vancouver.
Leaves Westminster every Wednesday at? n.ni.
for Nanaimo direct, connecting with Island
railway aud Comox steamer.
Leaves Nanaimo for Vancouver on Thursdays
and Fridays and returns same days.
For freight or passage apply 011 board, or to T
L. Bkioub, C. P. N. wharf. dfeltc
Douglas Street Bakery!
Fresh Bread, CakeB, Pastry, Confectionery, etc., etc.
Hotel and Restaurant Trade Solicited.
Foot of Douglas, near Columbia St.
All orders promptly attended to und delivered to any part of the oily free. dfeltc
Str. Emma!
HAVING CHARTERED the staunch Bteamor
Emma from Laidlaw & Co. I am prepared
to enter into contracts for
GENERAL TOWING.
Scows and Tarpaulins tn connection with the
lug.
CAPT. EDWARD McCOSKRIE.
Agents in New Westminster:
dfelte MatiIkus & Milmoan.
W.H.VIANEN
Fish (StGame
DEALER
FRONT ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
M0* Highest Price paid (or Furs and Doer
Hides.  Correspondence invited.
Telephone Call No. 6. dlel
moiiMntal
WORKS.
Columbia & Church Sts.
JUST ARRIVED—A large shipment of tho finest
RED OKANITE MONUMENTS, from
New Brunswick.
ALEX. HAMILTON,
dwteltc PROPRIETOR.
THtS   SPACE   IS   RESERVED
J.S.M ANSON
MERCHANT. TAILOR.
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TIIAT SIXTY
days after date we intend to apply to tbe
Hon, Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to purchase 6,071 acres, more or
less, being land covered by our Timber Lease
L, situate on a lake emptying Into Village Bay,
Valdei Island, Sayward District.
ROYAL CITY PLANING MILLS CO. (Lt'd)
John Hendry, Manager,
January 17th, 1800. djal8m2
In the Supreme Court of British Columbia
JOSEPH BROWN, Plaintiff;
 AHD	
T. E. MARTIN, Defendant.
TAKE NOTICE THAT A CAVEAT HAS THIS
day been Issued by Hon. J. F. McCrkkiht,
Judge of the Supreme Court, restraining the
Deputy Registrar of New Westminster Registry
from effecting registration of Lot Eleven, Block
Five, New Westminster Suburban Lands, or any
part thereof.
FRED. G. WALKER,
Defendant's Solicitor.
March 7, 1890. dinhSml
NOTICE.
Walworth & Sexsmith
NURSERY    STOCK,
Conslsllni!   of   FRUIT   nnd   ORNAMENTAL
TREES, SMALL FRUITS. PLANTS, SHRUBS,
ROSES, Ac.
Orders cull be tcit ut the old High School
Building. Goods delivered ill any part of the
city tree of ehnrge.
Orders by mail will receive prompt attention.
WALWORTH 4 SEXSMITH.
New West., March 10.1890". dwlnhloml
COUNTY COURT OF NEW WESTMINSTER
HOLDEN AT NEW WESTMINSTER.
_ Tuesday the llth March instant, will be
postponed to TUESDAY the lal April next,
nt 11 a, in., of which all parties concerned are
required to take notice.   —
JOHN S. CLUTE, Jb.,
Deputy Registrar.
Dated 0th March, 1890. dmli7t6
Land Registry Act.
In the Matter of a Portion of Section 16,
Range 6 West, Block 5 North, in the
District of New Westminster.
WHEREAS THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE
No. 8872a, of Jambs William Russell
Rowlinq to the above hereditaments has been
lost or destroyed and application has been
made to mc for a duplicnte thereof:
Notice Is hercbv given that such duplicate
Certificate of Title will be issued by me at the
expiration of one month from date unless in
the meantime valid objection be made to me In
writlug. T. O. TOWNLEY,
District Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
New Westminster, 12th Feb., 1890.     dfelSml
PACIFIC DIVISION.
General Superintendent's Office,
0
CAUTION.
WNERS AND MAS1ERS OF VESSELS AND
_ other Craft navigating the Fraser River are
cautioned to keep within the Buoys painted Red
and White, respectively, ut the Mission Bridge,
as during tbo construction of tbe Bridge, navl-
fitlon between the banks of the River and tbe
uoys Is dangerous, owing to piles being driven
there. H. ABBOTT,
General Superintendent.
Vancouver, B.C., 7th May, 1889. dmyStc
For Sale.
FARM OF 874 ACRES (WILL SOB-DIVIDE
 If required), including dwolling house,
iliilrv with cellar; ice house: .1 chicken houses;
pig pens; workshop and root cellar; granary; 2
frame barns, 72x60, and Mx60; good orchard In
bearing. Half a mile from steamboat lauding
und about 1 mile from school and church. A
self binder, mower, and all other Implements
can be bought'wit h farm. Terms easy.
Also IS dairy cows due to calve within a
month; young cattle, 7 head horses, in:. Ac.
Bad health reason for Belling.
THOS. E. KITCHEN,
dwfotfml Chilltwack.
By Private Sak—A Bargain,
1HAVE RECEIVED INSTRUCTIONS FROM
Mrs. A. M. Johhstonk, of Mud Bay, to dispose of her Homestead, which consists of 272
acres of Land, good Dwolling House, excellent
Barn and Stabling for 40 head of stock, good
Dairy and an abundance of Spring Water.
The property Is situated on the sunny side of
Mud Bay, the land is second to none anywhere,
and parties wanting an investment for their
capital cannot do better than take a look at
this before investing elsewhere.
Stock and implements can go with Ranch If
Tkhm's-One-third cash ; balance to suit purchaser, at 8 per cent, per annum.
For further particular!) apply to
T. J. TRArl,
New West.
fl^Several other Farms at Liitigloy and
otnerpartsof"    '     '
SCI ENTTFIC AMERICAN
nrrennmcn papnr puuuaueu aim nan inv ■■■■"'
circulation of any paper of Its class in the world.
Fully Illustrated. Best class of^Wood Engravings. Published weakly- Sand for iiprelinm
oopT, PriMflajear. Four months'trial, 11.
mCNN ft CO., PuBt.isnKHB, Dill Broadway, N.Y.
ARCHITECTS* IUILDERO
Edition of Seltntlflo Aim-lean. 0
vraphin plates of country anil cltrreildsn.
or public biillitlti.fi. Numerous •wrravinf■
full plana and siweltlcatluns for the use of
Bthographls
•as or publit
■ •     plain
lUTEMtSiii
■ 40 mn' experience and have made oyer
■ WO.to arr-'icatloni for America", aod For.
■ alf n patents. Bend for Handbook. Coma*
pondsuca strictly confidential.
TRADE MARKS.
In eaat your mark la not regtitered In the Pat-
Mt OBct, apply to Mv.vti x Co., and procure
•tmmwlata promotion.   Send for Handbook.
COPYRIGHTS for books, charts, naps,
tto., quickly procured.  Addnes
MUNN * GO.) Pnteat H»I loiters.
w  aunnuL orrni i Ml Bboadwat, n, t.
WHO IS YOUR SHOEMAKER?
JAS. ROUSSEAU
Can fill the bill to a nicety, and supply everything in
FOOT  GEAR1
From the Tiny Shoelet of the New Baby to the Brobdignagian
Brogan of the Solid Rancher from Wayback.
Give him a Call.
81 COLUMBIA STREET, WESTMINSTER.
LONDON MARKET.
FRONT STREET, NEW WESTMINSTER.
S.  MANAHAN,
DEALER in ALL KINDS of FRESH and SALT MEAT
HAMS, BACON, SAUSAGE, BOLOGNAS, ETC.
British: Columbia: Meat: Market
Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Van * Vol ken burgh * Bros.
WHOLESALE AND ItETAL BUTCHERS.
MEAT PURVEYORS IN GENERAL.    FRESH AND CORNED MEATS
ALWAYS ON HAND.
Special lines quoted for tlie shipping trade.   Family orders strictly attended to.
Hotels will find it to their interest to place their orders with the above firm,
dfeltc
c. Mcdonough,
LUNDBOM'S BUILDING, FRONT ST.
CONSTANTLY ON HAND AN EXTENSIVE STOCK OF
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, HATS and CAPS,
CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, ETC.
Hen's and Boy'a Sulfa.    Great Variety of Household Articles.    Also, Grain, Seeds,
Potatoes, Lime and General Stores.
N. 11.—Farm Produce bought at market rates or sold on commission.   Orders from the Interior
promptly attended to. dwfelto
CAST0RIA
far Infants and Children.
nowntome."     H.A.Aichib,1i,D..        1      watton,
maokOiftrtBi»BiDoUrBiN.T.   |wBLwiUijorlmnrtlc«ltaL
Tm Cwtaob Compakt, 77 Murray Street, N. T.
PUBLIC   NOTICE.
I HEREBY  GIVE   FUBLIC   NOTICE THAT
the firm of Quong On Lung, doing business
in this city, will not bo responsible for any
debts contracted except by my written order.
(Signed). 1.EE COY.
Now West., Mar. C, 1800. dmhfin
NOTICE.
In re Estate of JOHN STEWART, Deceased.
ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS AGAINST
lliu above Estate arc requested to forward
tho same with proper proof thereof to tho undersigned on or before the 5th day of April,
1800. Vi. H. FALDING,
Administrator,
Dated -1th March, 1SQ0. dinli-luil
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT 60 DAYS
after date we intend to apply lo the Honorable Chief Commissioner of l-muls mid Works
for permission to purchase 11-11 acres, more or
less, being land covered by our timber lease,
l.ot 618, Group I, New Westminster District.
ROYAL CITY PLANING MILLS CO. Ld.
John Hf.kiihy, Mnnnger.
New Westminster, March 7,1800.     d7mh2in
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
partnership heretofore subsisting between
us, the undcrslencd, as i)rj Goods Merchants,
bus been this diiv dissolved by mutual consent.
All debts owing to the said partnership arc to
he paid to 11. B. Hhadwem,, aud all claims
against the said partnership am to be presented
to the said II. B. Siiadwell, by whom the same
will be settled.
Dated the 7th day of March, 1890.
(Signed), H. G. WALKER.
H.   B.  8HADWELL
Witness:—Akdukw Lea my.      mhll-dfit-wtl
Samuel Mellard
REAL ESTATE,
Financial & Insurance Agent, Etc.
CONVEYANCER AND NOTARV PUBLIC.
Commissioner for Oaths.
CHILLIWACK, B. C.
wfeaflte
NOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Application will bo made nt the next session of
the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia
for an Act to incorporate a Company, to be
called "The British Columbia Mills, Timber and
Trading Company." for the purpose of acquiring
the shares in tne capital, and the business,
property and privileges, and also of assuming
the liabilities of the Roval City Finning Mills
Company, Limited, and tlio Hastings Saw Mill
Company, Limited, respectively, aud to provide
for tne said Companies being merged therein
and extinguished; and
To operate and curry on the business of the
aforesaid MIUs;
To acquire by purchase or otherwise, build
and operate, equip and maintain, mills, factories and maehiuo shops of any description, steam vessels and other vessels of any
description, railways, tramways, canals and
ferries, and to dispose of the same, or any interest therein, by sale or otherwise;
To acquire, by purchase or otherwise, and
Construct roads, dams, bridges, aqeducts, Humes,
etc., and to dispose of the same, or any interest
therein, by sale or otherwise;
To acquire, by purchase or otherwise, leases
of timber and other lands and timber privileges,
and to dispose of the same, or any interest therein, by sale or otherwise:
To acquire, by pun-base or otherwise, and
bold lands, mil dispose of the same, or any interest therein, by sale or otherwise;
To acquire, by purchase or otherwise, gold,
silver and other ores and minerals, logs, timber,
lumber and merchandise of any description,
bills of lading, bills of exchange, promlssorv
notes, and securities for money, and to dispose
of the same;
lo exercise and carry on .the business of mill-
owners (snw, grist or other mills), timber anil
lumber merchants, manufactures, wharfingers,
and carriers, aud to conduct and carry on a
shipping, towing and general trading business;
To undertake agencies and conduct financial
business of any kind other than that of banking or insurance:
To perform all such nuts, matters nnd things
as tbe Coinpanv mav deem incidental or otherwise conducive to tbe attainment of any of the
above objects, or to the conversion or disposition of any security or property held by tbe
Company.
BRAKE, JACKSON A HELMCKEN,
Solicitors for the Applicant)..
Dated 4th December, 1881).
Victoria, B.C. dde7tc
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CUYLER A. HOLLAND,*
HEAD   OFFICE:
15 Serjeant's Inn, Fleet Street,
LONDON, ENG.
The Business of Allsop it Mason has been
merged In the above Company and will be carried on by the Company from this date ax a general Land Investment and Insurance Agency.
MONEY TO LOAN on Mortgage at Low Ratos.
Town Lots aud Farming Lauds for Sale on easy
terms.
Victoria, B. C, May 16th, 1887.
MAINLAND
Transfer,   Hack,  Livery,
Stage, Feed and Sale
Stables.
THK 3UI1SCRIBER8 ARE NOW PREP
TO TURN OCT
Double and Single Rigs
At Special Low Rates.
ing and Ml Kinds of Teaming
Done nt Shortest Notice.
Dry Cohowood delivered to any part of Hi
City.
Orders by Telephone will rccelvo prompt attention,
sffff* Stables nearly opposite 0. P. R. Depot.
Columbia St., New Westminster.
dfeltc GILLEY BROS.. Props.
Jos. M. Wise,
 dhai.ki. lv	
COAL and WOOD
A Large Supply Constantly on Hand.
0a*Ordei'B left at the offioe of Messrs.
Mathers & Milligttn, Commission Merchants, Front Street, will havo prompt
attention. JOS. Jf. WISE.
dtelto
TO SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
—MY WAV OP THK—
Southern Pacific Company's
-S1L.INE.IS-
THEMT. SHASTA ROUTE.
QUICKER  IN  TIME  THAN   ANY   OTHER
ROUTE BETWEEN
New Westminster mid San Francisco, Cal.
GRAND   SCENIC  ROUTE  OF THE
PACIFIC COAST.
Pullman Bullet Sleepers, Tourist Sleeping
Cars for accommodation of Second-Class Passengers, attached to Express Trains.
Fare from Portland to Sncramento and San
Francisco—Unlimited, |2fi; First-class (limited),
p0; Second-class (limited), »15. Through Tick
.its to all points South nnd East, via California.
Tickkt OFricKB-City Office, No. 134 Cor. First
and Alder Streets; Depot Office, Cur. F & ¥vo» t
Btsvl Portland, Oregon.
R. KOEHLER. E. P. ROGERS,
Manager. Asat. U. V. A P. A'gl THE DAILY COLUMBIAN, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. 0., MARCH 13, 31890.
VOLUME Vm-No. 35.
THE DAILY COLUMBIAN
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 13,1890.
Advertising; Bates for the Dally.
Transient Advertisements.—First insertion,
10 ets. per line, solid nonpareil: each subsequent
consecutive Insertion, Scents per line. Advertisements not inserted every day, 10 cts. per line
each insertion. ,     ,
Stanwnb Advertisements.— Professional or
Business Cards (condensed), (2 per month. Special rates for general commercial advertising,
according to space occupied and duration or
contract. ...      j n«
Auction Sales, when displayed, charged.28
per cent, less than transient advts. If solid,
charged at regular transient rates.
special Notices among reading matter, 20 cts.
per line each insertion. Specials inserted hy the
month at reduced rates.
Births, Marriages and Deaths, $1 for each insertion, Funeral notices in connection with
deaths, no cts. each insertion.
Weekly Advertising Hates.
Transient Advertisements- Each insertion,
10 cts. per line (solid nenpareil).
Standino advertisements.—Professional or
Business Cards (condensed), $1.60 per month.
Special rates for general trade advertising.   ,
Special Notices. BirthH, Marriages and Deaths,
same rates as Daily.
Cuts must be all metal, and for large cuts an
extra rate will be charged.
Persons sending iu advertisements should be
careful to state whether they are to appear In
the Dally Edition, or the Weekly, or both. A
liberal reduction is made when Inserted In.both.
No advertisement inserted for less than $1.
SUBSCRIBE RS
Who do not receive their paper regularly, from
the Carriers nr through the Post Office, will
confer n favor by reporting tho same to the
office of publication nt once.	
New Advertisements This Day.
Notice... A Tnnasse
Notice H.   Abbott
Great Clearing Bale Ogle, Campbell St Co.
LOCAL   AND  PROVINCIAL
Fresh Eastern Ovsteffl just arrived ftt
the Club. ' *tc
Tlie Btr. Clam Port went down the
river this morning.
The streets are dry but not dusty, and
wheeling Is again a pleasure.
New lot of Linoleums and Linoleum
Mats; something new, at Ellard &
Co.'s. *tc
The tug Belle arrived from the not them coast this morning with a boom of
logs in tow for the Brunette mills.
The steamer Fairy Queen is doing an
excellent business carrying goods and
passengers to and from the North Arm.
The Btr. Yosemite left for Victoria
this morning with 66 head of cattle, 40
tons of merchandise and 30 passengers.
By a reference to Mr. Trapp's real
estate auction sale adv., it will be seen
that a number of valuable lots have been
added.
The Royal Templars of Temperance
will give a free entertainment at their
hall on Wednesday next. Everybody is
invited to attend.
The Canadian Pacific local telegraph
office has been removed to the premises
occupied by Messrs. Major & Pearson in
the Bank Building.
Another streets ami sidewalks by-law
breaker'was before the police magistrate
this morning and fined f5, More cases
of the same kind will be on the docket
to-morrow.
It Ib expected that a number of the
most prominent members of the Masonic
order in Vancouver will come over and
assist at the ceremony of laying the
corner stone of the Parish Building on
Tuesday next.
The weather continues mild and
springlike, the trees are budding, honeysuckle is bursting into leaf, ana flowers
tire beginning to bloom iu the gardens.
.Besides these the cherry blossoms give
evidence of soon opening out in all their
beauty.
The incut market is up to its old stan
dard again, and the supply of all kinds
of flesh is plentiful and good. Beef,
pork, mutton and veal were offered on
the market to-day, and it was very noticeable that the quality is greatly improved from a few weeks ago.
The market was bare of fish to-day
despite the fine weather the fishermen
have been favored with of late. To
those who are endeavouring to keep
Lent as it iB ordered to be kept, a diet of
salt iish is very discouraging and usat-
isfactory, but little bettor is to be had
at least four days in every week.
The editorial and business offices of
The Columbian have been removed to
the new Powell Block, Columbia street,
where parties having business to transact with any of our departments are requested to call. Our new offices have
not been completely fitted up yet, but it
was deemed advisable for greater convenience to have the whole working of
the establishment under one roof. *tc
The lacrosse players are putting in
some solid practice on tho cricket
grounds, and great improvement is expected among some of tne younger members. From the manner in which some
of the youngsters handle the stick it is
evident that in the course of a year or
two Westminster will have enough good
native material to draw from to retain a
first place iu the ranks of lacrosse in this
Province.
It Is a significant incident of tbe importance of Victoria's trade that within
the past ten days three large ships, with
a combined tonnage of about 3,000, have
arrived from the old country with full
cargoes for Victoria merchants. The
united freights will amount to4,000tous,
at a low estimate valued at $250,000;
and the little fleet now discharging forms
only a percentage of the total number
of ships that are annually required to
bring tho merchandise handled by Victoria's importers of this city.—Colonist.
A Vancouver saloon keeper telephoned over to the police last night asking
them to arrest a man who had skippeu
from Vancouver leaving a debt of $75
unpaid. Without a warrant the police
could do nothing, and word was sent
back to this effect. This morning a
saloon keeper came over and hunted up
his man, and it is thought an amicable
settlement-was arrived at, as no warrant
has been taken out. In less than half
an hour from the time the telephone
was received, the police had located the
man, although they hud only a description of him to go by.
"How tn Hake Life Worth Living."
The lecture to he delivered to-inorrow
evening at Herring's Opera House by
Dr. Orpha D. Baldwin, under the auspices of the ladies of the W. C. T. U.,
should not be overlooked, but on the
contrary should be largely attended as
the discourse will be of a practical nature, and can be made profitable in every
day life to the general run of people.
The subject fixed for the occasion is,
"How to make life worth living," and
the lecture will point out the principles
of health, how to obtain it, and the best
means to be adopted in order to retain
it. The admission fee to the lecture has
been fixed at twenty-five cents, a very
small consideration, placing tho lecture
within the reach of every one.
The Teeth  Fitted.
While on duty last night Constable
Dominy' picked up a beautiful set of false
teeth on Columbia street, which he conveyed to the police station to be recovered there by the owner. The teeth
were lost by a gentleman who is paving
the city a visit, and who dropped them
last night while slightly under the influence of the "crater." When ho awakened this morning and found be bad no
teeth to eat with he was sorely puzzled
as to how he would keep up a proper
facial expression. Finally he resolved
to visit the police station as the most
likely place to gain information of his
lost grinders. Constable Smith, with
his usual cautiousness, made the stranger put the teeth into his mouth and
show that they fitted before relinquishing absolute possession of them, The
teeth fitted, the constable was satisfied
and the owner went his way rejoicing.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castorla.
Information Wanted.
Information is wanted of Byron S.
Brown, who left home, Court-right,
River St. Clair, Ont, Canada, in May,
1880. His age now is about 28 years;
height,5 ft. 11^ in., dark hair; brown
eves. He is supposed to be living in
this locality, and anyone having seen or
heard of him would confer a kindly
favor by communicating with his parents.
Please address K. C. Brown, London
P.O., Ont.
 *—»   a *
Th« Channel Improvements.
The snagboat Samson returned to port
yesterday afternoon from Langley, having in tow a boom of piles got out at
that point for use in connection with the
channel improvements. The Samson
left for the Sandheads this morning with
her tow, and will commence driving
the piles forthwith in order to have this
part of the work in readiness for the laying of the mattresses. Mr. Sinclair, the
contractor, has a number of men now at
work on the mattresses, and wilt launch
them at the rate of four per week until
the whole number are placed. The
Samson will be engaged in connection
with the channel improvements for sev
eral weeks.
. J <v—«.—a. ..i.
Traced by a Number.
A man named George Thompson, who
has been committed for trial for attempted safe robbery at Vancouver,
appeared before Capt. Pittendrigh this
afternoon on the charge of stealing a.
watch. It appears that when Thompson was first arrested he had a watch in
his possession, which the Vancouver
lockup keeper, as usual, held until the
case should be tried. He procured the
services of a lawyer named McGee,
who defended him aud as payment was
given an order for the watch as Thompson had no money to pay the fee. The
police happened to inspect the number
of the watch and found that it tallied
with a stolen one of which they had been
notified. This discovery resulted in
Thompson being brought up on a second
charge. When the case came before the
cyurt, the prosecutor, James Porter,
asked that it might be tried in a summary manner. To this Capt. Pittendrigh consented, and on the charges
being proven be sentenced Thompson to
six months imprisonment with hard
labor.
» ■»  <	
Music Hath Charms, Etc.
The majority of our readers will remember the Fort Douglas Indian band
which has visited Westminster for a few
months during the canning season for
the last three years. The baud was
noted for the excellence of its music,
and deservedly so, for it could put to
shame many a similar organization of
more musical and cultured pretensions.
It is learned that this band has ordered
a complete new set of instruments
through Mr. Harry Kades, of this city,
and that they are now on the rood from
the east and may be expected to arrive
shortly. The instruments will be more
expensive than the set now in use, and
a number of new pieces are being added
which will give greater strenth to the
band. During the past winter Mr.
Brandon, the well-known musical instructor, has been teaching the Fort
Douglas band, and it is reported they
havetnade great progress during the
course of instruction.
It is further learned that three other
Indian tribes have about completed
negotiations with Mr. Eades for sets of
brass instruments, and the probability
iB that half a dozen Indian bands will
be fully organized aud equipped in this
district before fall. The Indians have a
fine ear for music, are easily taught and
take an amazing interest in the art. To
be a member of the tribal baud is an
honor which every young Siwash strives
for most diligently, and when once the
position is gained he takes care that his
conduct and attention iB such that there
can be no occasion for his dismissal
The missionaries find these band organizations of much use in assisting to tame
the wild nature of the Indian, and they
heartily encourage the tribes to develop
their musical tastes.'
The construction of the works. is to
be commenced within a reasonable time
and prosecuted With energy after the
commencement thereof.
Before opening any street for the purpose of construction the Company will
give the City Engineer 10 days notice in
writing of such intention, and no more
than 1,500 lineal feetof said streets shall
be opened at any one time, except by
special authority from the Board of
Works. The track of the Company will
be laid flush with the streetB, and the
pattern of rails such as may be reasonably required by the City. The tracks
shall conform to the grades of various
streets through which they run.
Plans of location will first be submitted to the City Engineer; the City shall
have the right to take up'the street traversed by the rails, either for the purpose of altering the grades, constructing
drains, laying water aud gas pipes, without being liable for any compensation
or damage that may be occasioned to the
working of the railway in connection
therewith; the surface and track to be
restored by the City.
' The works shall not be open to the
Sublic until the sanction of the Council
as been previously obtained; the speed
of the curs shall not exceed 6 miles per
hour; no higher fare than 5 cents shall
be charged for the conveyance of each
passenger, provided that this clause shall
not take effect until the city shall have
a population of 10,000. The Company
will be liable for all damages arising out
of the construction of the railways. In
the event of other parties proposing to
construct street railways on any of the
streets not occupied by the Company,
the Company will have the option of
constructing such proposed railway on
similar conditions, if such option is
availed of within ono month. When
streets are opened the work shall be
carried on and completed with all reasonable speed; the Company will not
erect any pole higher than 150 feet, nor
affix any wire less than 22 feet from the
ground; the poles are to be straight and
painted any color the Council may require ; the Company will not cut down
or mutilate any ornamental trees.
StreetB opened for the purposes of construction will he restored by the Company, and wires may be cut whenever it
ib necessary in case of fire, the Company
not being entitled to damages therefor.
SOUTH ARM NOTES.
BRUIN IN TOWN.
A Chance for the Bear Slayers—A Wild
Bear In the (suburbs.
"The noble tear slayers who crowned
themselves with glory in the vicinity of
the North Arm of the Inlet some twenty
months ago, are hereby summoned to
attend a special convocation for the
purpose of organizing the greatest and
most terribly desperate bear hunt ever
proposed or determined on in this or
any other country."
This or some similar notice should
crowd closely upon the publication of
the following: Yesterday morning a
resident of the West End shouldered a
spade and went out to pulverize the
earth in the vicinity of his potato patch.
He had only reached the edge of the
little field when he was astonished to
behold a full-sized and healthy black
bear approaching the enclosure from the
opposite direction. At first the citizen
thought he was still in the arms of Morpheus, and that some terrible vision bud
come over his dreams, but after pinching his left ear vigorously, and viciously
stabbing the corner of the spade into
the centre of his most aggravating corn,
he came to the conclusion sleep had left
his eyelids and that the bear was getting dangerously close. By a superhuman effort the citizen managed to
make a double bock handspring, and
then turning about fled for his rifle.
but he didn t happen to possess such a
weapon, so he continued his course at a
4:05 gait until he reached the residence
of Mr. F. R. Robinson, to whom the
story was related with all its horrible
details. Mr. Robinson did not happen
to have a supply of firearms in the
house, but he volunteered to go back and
have a look at his bearship and assist to
round it up and corral it if possible. Together they proceeded most carefully to
the potato field only to find, however,
that bruin had concluded his visit, and
was making off in a hurry as If anxious
to get home. Not having a rifle, it was
deemed both useless and dangerous to
track the brute further, and-tlie twain
returned home and later reported the
affair to the proper authorities. But
the latter wero unable to take any action
for the reason that the pound by-law
does not come into force until April 1st,
and in the meantime a whole jungleful
of Rons, tigers and leopards might roam
the streets at their own sweet will without question «r impediment.
The tracks of the bear are still to be
seen, and the brute can be followed and
killed if the bear slayers decide that it
should die. This is an opportunity to
add another leaf to the weighty crown
of laurels that the bruin-killers have
already won, and the chance should not
be neglected as the privilege may not be
accorded again for a long time—or at
least till the oolacban season hursts
forth in all its glory.
 »-■♦ ♦
SATISFACTORILY amended.
Special Meeting of the Council .1 Which
the Street Railway Agreement
I. Amended.
A special meeting of the City Council
was held yesterday afternoon to discuss
and ratify the agreement between the
City and tlie New Westminster Electric
Btreet Railway Co. Mayor Brown aud
Aldermen Johnson, Hoy, McPhaden,
Sinclair, Shiles, l.yal anil Hmltlier wero
present.
Messrs. H. V. Edmonds, 8. T. Mackintosh and A. J. McColl represented the
company.
The articles of agreement were amended and passed. The principal points in
the agreement are as follows: Tho agreement shall take effect upon the passing
of the act of Incorporation applied for by
the Company! the City grants to the
Company full permission to construct,
maintain, equip and operate tlie works
provided for by the said act subject to
certain conditions hereafter contained;
THE AMERICAN  BOY.
Be Is Bring Crowded Almost Zlatlrelr
Out of Esoploymoot.
What is to become of the boy If the
present tendency to crowd him out of
employment goes on? asked the New
York Tribune. Messengers with beards
seem to be growing more numerous all
the time, and the elevator boy has been
largely replaced by the elevator man.
Cash boys, once common In the city,
have given way cto cash girls to a
great extent The uniformed, brass-
buttoned call-boys at the hotels are still
little more than a memory, and in their
places are men. It is true there are
newsboys about the entrance to the
bridge, and other, places where there
are generally crowds of people, but
newswomen and newsmen are competing with them In ever-increasing numbers. Uptown the newsdealer has
virtually driven the boys out of the
business. With bootblacks the story is
the same. A few of them still pursue
their calling, but grown Italians have
seized hold of the bestcorners, and with
their big arm-chairs easily take away
the business ot their youthful rivals,
whose oustomers havo to balance themselves on ono leg against the sharp corner of tho building. There are a few
boy peddlers of shoestrings and handkerchiefs, but this occupation is far
more appropriate to those who have arrived at years when an amble Is the
natural gait. On trains there are still
many lads who go about distributing
illustrated papers, light novels and
boxes of candy, and then go about again
collecting them, incidentally selling a
few of the articles, but even here the
men are getting ahead of them. Yes,
what shall become of the boy Is a serious
question, if tbe present movement
toward his displacement continues the
only thing left for him to do will be to
grow up and become a man, but un-
fortun.tolj thin tekoa .Imp.       '
GREAT CLEARANCE SALE
Men's Clothing
and   FURNISHINGS
What In Going on at the South Side of
Lulu Inland.
Steveston, the lately formed townsite
on Lulu Island, is reported to be looking
up. Quite a number of lotB have been
sold since they were placed on the market, and a number of cottages have been
built.
W. H. Steves, the founder of the new
town, has his seed supplying establishment at that place, and is right in the
midst of his busiest season, packing and
shipping seeds to all parts of the district
ana province.
The new salmon canning company,
of which Mr. W. A. Duncan, of this city,
is reported to be one of the principal
members, has purchased a piece of land
on the South Arm from Mr. E. Girard,
and the erection of the new cannery
will be shortly proceeded with.
Mr. W. H. London is engaged at present enlarging and finishing Ids hotel,
Messrs. McMynn Bros, arc putting up
a very large barn for general purposes,
aud have six carpenters employed on
it.
The Richmond council is carrying out
needed aud satisfactory improvements
on the south side, us well as other parts
of the island, in the way of bridges aud
road ditches.
IMPORTANT TO FARMERS.
An Opportunity to Furchaie Prise liar
ley at a Very Low Kate.
The Government of Canada, on the
recommendation of the Minister of
Agriculture, has agreed to place in the
estimates a sum to provide for the purchase and distribution of two-rowed
barley for seed, to bo supplied to the
farmers of the Dominion at cost.
In furtherance of this object the Miu
inter of Agriculture lias purchased 10,000
of "Carter's l'rizo Prolific" barley from
the well-known seed establishment of
James Carter & Co., of London. England. T1hb variety of two-rowed barley
—a recently improved strain of the
Chevalier type—ranks high in great
Great Britain for malting purposes, and
has been pronounced by experts as one
of the best sorts obtainable. It has
been awarded many prizes and was
given tho first prize at the Windsor
Royal Agricultural show last year. It
iB very prolific, has stout, bright straw
and long heavy heads, usually averaging
under good cultivation, about forty
grains per head. It may be sown thinner than less vigorous growing sorts, one
and a half bushels to the acre is considered sufficient. This variety was
grown from samples distributed from the
Central Experimental Farm, iu the
barley districts of Ontario, and other
parts of the Dominion, during tlie past
somewhat unfavorable season, weighing
from 54 to 50 lbs. per bushel; samples ol
which have been Buqmitted to experts
in England, who have pronounced them
■to be good, marketable specimens of
malting barley, which would command
at present from 38s. to 40s. per quarter
of 448 lbs., in the English market, equal
to 99c. to fl.04 respectively for tho Canadian bushel of 48 lbs. This " Prise
Prolific barley—for which Carter's catalogue price is 10s. Od. stg. per bushel of
5(1 lbs.—will be offered to the farmers of
Canada iu bags of two English bushels
(112 lbs.) one bag to each Individual, at
four dollars per bag. At this price the
barley will be delivered to tho nearest
railway station so that farmers in every
province may obtain it ut a uniform
rate.
Those who desire to participate in this
distribution should send their applications at once, with four dollars enclosed,
to Win. Saunders, Director Experimental Farms, Ottawa, giving the name and
post office address plainly, and the name
of the nearest railway station. The
names of thoso who remit will be entered
in the order in which they are received,
and the distribution made in the same
order as fur as possible, having regard to
tho requirements of the several provinces. Should the applications exceed
the supply, those who apply last will
have their money refunded, nut if the
quantity Imported should be greater
than the demand, on the basis of a two
bushel distribution, then the applications of those who may havo asked for
larger quantities will be considered, and
the remaining stock apportioned among
such applicants.
Death hy Drowning.
A young man named James Davis, an
able seaman of H. M. S. Amphion, was
drowned in Esquimalt harbor at about
4 o'clock on Monday afternoon. Davis,
with a companion, had started from the
dry dock in a skiff to go over to the torpedo teats, when a squall struck tlie
little boat, capsizing it. Davis then
started to swim ashore, and was seen to
have reached within ten yards of the
rocks, when he went down. His companion was picked up by a teat from the
Acorn, in a very exhausted condition,
The body of the young man, who was a
native of the north of England, was
picked up yesterday afternoon about 2
o'clock and taken to the Naval hospital,
from which the funeral will take place
at 2 o'clock Hub afternoon.—Wednesday1*
Colonist. '
PERSONAL.
Mr. Walker, of the Queens, returned
from Victoria this afternoon.
Mr. W. H. Rowlingeame up from tho
North Arm to-day on busbies matters.
Mr. M. King, the Comox logger, well
known all over the1 coast, was in the city
to-day.
Children Cry for Pitcher's CastoHa!
When Baby was tick, we gave her Castorto,
When the w*i a Child, ibe cried tor Castorla.
When the became Miss, she clung to Castori*.
When ibe had Children, alio gave them Castorla.
NEW   WKSTMINSTKlt MARKET.
Beef,     peHOOlbn ...$o» @
Pork, "         0 50 @
Mutton,      "        •  10 00 @
Potatoes.,     "  lSTJdg
Cabbage,     "          '"" "
Onions,      "
Wheat "        	
Oats, " 	
Peon, "        	
Hay, per ton      ...
Butter, mils, per \\>	
Cheese, "     ....   w
Eprh, pur doss   0
Conlwuod, reiati, ,ilti-ord  H
Coal, retail, |ter ion   K
Aimles, per box         2
Hide!', green, per ion ft  a
*'     dry.        "          4
Wool," per ft   o
Flour, retail, per bill    6
025 @ o:
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel of purity,
strength and whok<snracnes.<*. More economical
than tbe ordinary kinds, ami cannot lie sold in
competition with the multitude of low test,
short weight alum or phosphate powders. Sold
only in cans. Roval Baking Powi>rrCo„106
Wall 8t, New York, dfeSyl
NOTICE.
NOTICE 13 1IEKKBY GIVES THAT I WILL
not be responsible for any debts contracted
by my wife, Martha Fabien, without my written
order. APOSTLE TANARHK.
New Went., March i:i. 18H1. ilnililHuil
Canadian Pacific Railway.
NOTICE.
ON SATURDAY, THE 1BPH INST., TRAIN
timed to leave Westminster at 16 o'clock
for Vancouver will not leave until 18 o'clock, in
order to give people an opportunity of Attending foot-ball match,
(Signed), H. ABBOTT,
(icn. Snpt.
Vancouver, March lltb, ism.       <.mhl»t2
TO   LET.
UNFURNISHED ROOM TO LET,   with  or
without board,   Apply1* " B-*m
din lints
y P. O. Box 251.
Notice to Contractors,
TENDERS   WILL   BE RECEIVED   UP TO
6 p. in. on THURSDAY the soth In-t,
for tho erection of a
3-Storey Brick Building
On Front Street, for Mr. James Cunningham.
Plans and spec! ileal Ions may he Keen at my
office, Mary street.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted,
O. W.URANT,
Architect.
Westminister, March 12,1X00.        dmbl2td
HEAL ESTATE AUCTION SALE
ON SATURDAY NEXT, THE Ifith INST., I
Will Bell by Public Auction, the ft>Iluwlli>;
Real Estate:
LOTS 5 A 6 ol LOT 95, BLK. 0, N. W. SUBURBS,
Facing •■) Montreal Street,
SOME CHOICE 5-ACRE LOTS, in LOT 25, BLK.
5 NORTH, RANGE 2 West, near the Yale Road
anil a short distance from Drownsvilie. One
half cash, balance In 6 mouths at K per cent.
BLOCKS I!), 15, and 10, In the New Westminster
Addition.
LOTS 0 to 18 in BLK. 2, New Westminster Addition.
LOT 10 of LOT 8, of BLK. 0, N. W. Suburbs.
LOTS t it*, Sub.-niv. of LOT 10, HLK, lit, K.W,
Suburbs.
LOTS 2, 3, 4. 5. 8, 7. 8. D, 10, 11, 12,17,18. IV.
20, and 21, Hub.-Dlv. of LOTS C, 7, 8, and 14 ol
Suburban lot 8, BLK. 9.
LOT ft, Huh.-Itiv. of Suburban Lot V, BLK. t>.
with Dwelling House, Stable, Chicken House,
and Wood-Shed. Good Garden of Fruit Trees.
Good Well of Water and Pump. Tho Lot Is
Thoroughly Cleared. Also 2 Milch Cows; one
will calve In a week, the other has Wen milking 0 mouths, Also, :H) Chickens, partly Black
Spanish.
LOT 25, Sub.-Dlv. LOTS t, 4, 5, 8, 7, H, 0,11,12.
Ill, aud H, being Suli.-IUv. of LOT 7, BLOOK !',
N. W, Suburbs.
A GOOD CORNER LOT, Facing Dublin Street.
LOTS l, 2, a. 4, and 5, Sub.-Ulv. of Bntmrlmn
LOT 16, HLK. la, Facing on Mary Street.
, This is n good chance for Speculation, aa (he
lot must lie sold.
5 par cunt, discount will he allowed for'Casb.
otherwise one-half Cash, balance in I year at 8
per cent.
Sale will take place at MART, nt 7.1» o'clock.
T. J. Tit All',
dmhl2td Auctioneer,
IMPERIAL
Fire  IiiHiinmce Company
OF LONDON,
Capital,    -     •    £1,000,000 Stg,
Hates as low as mm'Other-reliable Company
doing business in British Columbia.
W. J. ARMSTRONG,
dfeltc Agent New West.
New Millinery!
Ogle, Campbell & Co.' s Store
We beg to inform our customers
and the general public that we will
have a Clearance Sale to make way for
our large stock of Spring and Summer
Goods to arrive shortly. We would invite one and all to come arid examine
this genuine stock laid out. You will
save money by buying at this sale.
The following are some of the Special Bargains laid out for sale and must
be cleared at any cost:
75 MEN'S & BOYS' TWEED & FANCY CORD SUITS,
8 DOZ. MEN'S and BOYS' TWEED TROWSERS,
40 MEN'S & BOYS' ASSORTED CHESTERFIELD OVERCOATS,
15 DOZ. DRESS, REGATTA and OXFORD SHIRTS,
20 DOZ. ASSORTED WHITE LINEN COLLARS, 7*c. each,
25 DOZ. ASSORTED MEN'S and BOYS' BLACK and COL.
ORED FELT HATS.
To Clear-a large lot of MEN'S and BOYS' SHETLAND
GREY and SCARLET LAMB'S WOOL SHIRTS and
PANTS.
Sale commences to-day, Thursday, March 13th,
and will last Seven Days only.
OGLE, CAMPBELL & CO.,
dwfeltc Next Doon Bank of Montreal.
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED OUR FIRST CONSIGNMENT OP
NEW SPRING
Millinery and Trimmings
R. J. ARMSTRONG,
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES,
CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE,
AKMSTKONG BLOCK, COLUMBIA STREET.
Telephone Cull 18. Goods delivered in any part of tlie city.
ilwtt'Uc
DRUGGISTS
(Telephone No. Si.)
Queen't Hotel Block,       New Westminister.
RELIABLE DRUGS and MEDICINES.
Toilet Articles and Sundries.
dfclto
PRESCRIPTIONS
A SPECIALTY.
Sinclair's Central Grocery!
Has just received Five Cases of Hams, Roll and Flat
Bacon and other kinds of Meats.  His Boneless Hams
aro extra fine in quality and flavor, and only five to seven pounds in
weight. In SIDE BACON AND SALTED BACKS has some extra
choice.
Call and examine and get prices, and you will be satisfied that it is
ono of the best Grocery Stores in the City to buy good articles at low
prices.   Free delivery to all parts of the City.
WM. McCOLL,
DEALER IN CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES AND
STAPLE DRY GOODS.
Makes a specialty of the Westminster Woolon Mills' Blankots,
Flannels, etc.
Telephone Call S3. COLUMBIA ST
New Goods Arriving Daily
 AT	
CORDON^ CO'S
Ladies' Gents' and Children's Boots and Shoes,
Ask to See our Ladies' Slippers at $1.25.   Also, Men's, Boys'
and Youth's Seamless Shoes.
Sign of the Buffalo,
Columbia Street
Utr Got our prices before purchasing.
KurBBiiNCKB.—Bbitisii Colombian, E. M. N. Woods, J. B. Gnynor, G. D.
Kryiniier, and twenty-five others.
Olienpest nnd best lu tlie Market.
Nut Oil, I1u,!h nnd Bolting in Btock.
STRICKLAND & CO.
New Embroideries,
Sateens,
Prints,
Gingham and Lace Curtains.
Jas.EllardiCo
LONDON    HOUSe.
dwfeltc
GLOBE HOUSE.
To the Ladies:
Expected to arrive daily,
the largest and best assort-,
ment of Spring Millinery, Ribbons, Fancy Flowers and Feathers ever shown in New
Westminster; also, Tea Gowns
and Morning Wrappers, in all
colors; Children's Lace Collars,
Pinafores and Dresses.
It will pay you to wait and
examine our Goods before purchasing elsewhere.
.lwtoit. Mrs. WM. RAE.
D. S. CURTIS 6c CO.
WHOLESALE
AND   RETA
■l DRUGGISTS
N.it Colonl.1 Hotel, New Westminster, II. 0.
W. & G. WOLFENDEN,
IN THE BUSHBY BLOOK,
Have Re-Opened with an Entirely New Stock off
Groceries, Provisions, Etc.
New Goods are arriving daily and when complete the stock will
compare favorably with any in the Province for quality
of goods and lowness of price.
All Goods Delivered to any Part of the City.
Tolopliono 117.   P. O. Box 262. dwfelto i
Au Bon Marche
SPRING      GOODS!
Prints! Prints! Prints!1
QUALITY UNEXCELLED.     LATEST DESIGNS.
MF-Call and inspect our magnificent stock of PRINTS, SHIRTINGS, LACE CURTAINS, &o.
WALKER & SHADWELL

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