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The British Columbian Jan 28, 1885

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Array GsTcrnmont Gm-M>'
THI BRITISH COLUMBIAN
 IS   PUHLIBIIED	
Kvori Wednesday & Saturday,
■-air—
D   ROBSON & CO.
OFFI *E COLUMBIA STKEET. EstRAI«*«l) Eoi-
iorialand Business Demitmeht tkdhoh T. R.
Pearson & Co's. Book & Stationery 8tore.
TEKHH-lly Mnll, Bajenri ,1(0 for 0 mo..I
tl lm JI rrros. t payable la Advance. DellT.rorl
try Cinilnriir Agent, $1 per quarter, payable
quarterly In Carrier or Agent.
AOENTS
T.». Hiheu & Co. ■■•■'• Viotoria.
T.N. Pearson * Co Yau.
1. P. FISHER Ad.ertl.lag Agent, 31 Merchant'.
£zcliiingi., rjnn FrancUcn, l.mitSarl.erlttmc.I.e
Adfel llrii'iiientl fbr tht, paper.
THIS
. a DEB   nwybsfijUDd on file at
Midi   Geo.  P. Howell 4 Co.'a
where udt.n titling contract! may b
NKW Y0BK.
%\\t $vitislt Columbian.
Wednesday Morning. Jan. 'in, 1B85.
current Events mid Opinions.
Canadians cannot fail to wtitoli
witli interest tlie railway development of India, for with the extension of' lines in that country more
and more of , tho 26,000,000 acre
wheat Held of tho Indian Empire,
will be able to send its immense
crop 'into the world's markets to
■ lower tho price of wheat from this
continent. The proposal of the Indian government is to leave to private enterprise those lines which are
Hkely to pay well, and to construct
either directly or indirectly by State
aid those not likely to be profitable,
but considered indispensable for protection, against famine or for other
urgeu*; purposes. The Select Oommittee of tho British parliament
consider the ovicienee in favor of
railway extension conclusive, but
do not wholly agree with the recommendation of the Indian authorities.
They do not approve of the entire
removal of checks to the construction of unremunerative roads and
evidently do not enre to spend the
money of the British taxpayer in
what practically amounts .to bouus-
ing the Indian wheat-grower to
compete with the British farmer.—
Globe.
The British Columbian.
VOLUME 37
NEW  WESTMINSTER* B. O., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1885.
NUMBER 8
It would seem that we are steadily advancing towards the universal
adoption of cremation ns a means of
disposing of our dead, and although
the idea at iirst strikes us as extremely inhuman and repulsive, a
little thought will readily convince
our better judgment that it undoubtedly is the least dangerous means of
disposing of the corruptible part of
our being when it can no longer lie
either of use or ornament to us. In
a legal point, perhaps, it will not be
conducive to tho detection of crime,
for, certain evidences will necessarily be destroyed by the action of
the fire, both chemical and physical,
still, with care and the appointment
of proper and competent officials,
whose business it will be to attend
to such matters, there is tittle
ground for fear. In the East, cremation has been practiced for many
centuries, and the moral standard
there is certainly not lower than it
is in Europe and America, Another
source of danger which somo people
seem to dread is that of being placed
in the furnace before death had actually supervened, and it ennuot be
denied that when cremation becomes
common nnd general, the strictest
surveilance will be necessary to prevent accidents occurring; but it
may be fairly asked whether the
danger of being hurried alive is not
just as imminent, and tho idea is
certainly quite as shocking and repulsive, and quite as dangerous if it
did occur to the unhappy victim.
On the other hand the benefits to
accrue from cremation are many
and of vital importance to the whole
human family in n moral and sanitary point of view, ns well as in a
financial one.—Truth. >x:'
New Westminster city wns promised nn extension of the 0. P. railway or a branch line by Mr. Van
Home whon that gentleman visited
the province last summer. For some
reason the promise was not kept;
at least, New Westminster is not
included in the scheme which proposes to make Goal Harbor the terminus of the transcontinental line,
although that line will pass within
a mile and a half of the Royal Oity.
The people of that oity are naturally
impressed with the belief that it is
not the intention of tho railway
company to guard their interests in'
this respect; and as every town of
* nny importune,' in the province is
enjoying or is about to enjoy tho
benefits of railway connection, they
hnvo drawn the attention of the
local government to the omission
that has been made in their case.
The government, it is gratifying to
know, recognize the importance and
pertinence of the demand of the
New Westni historians and have
taken steps which, it is believed,
will eventuate in securing for them
justice. No town iu the province
is more entitled to consideration
thnn our neighbor on ihe Fraser.
It is situated in the midst of and is
the m trket for the most extensive
agricultural nml lumbering industries iu the country; it is the seat
of sevornl extensive manufacturing
establishments and of several important public institutions. It is
the distributing depot for a very
largo section of country nnd if encouraged nnd fostered must always
be a place of conaideaable com mer;
cial importance. A railway is an
essential to the permanent prosperity of the place. In view of the
thrift of the inhabitants, their enterprise and commerce, and the industries they sustain, the short line
of railway nsked for would doubtless prove a paying investment Tho
petition should meet with n roady
acquiesence.—Colonist.
Provincial Legislature.
THUHSDAY.
Mr. Cunningham presented a petition from Now Westminster praying
for an act to deal with certain lands.
Mr. Orr presented a petition for a bill
to allow tho construction of a railway
frum the south fork uf the Seinilka-
meon river to connect with the O.P.R.
Mr. Martin presented petitions asking
fur a delay in construction of u bridge
across the Thompson river, and stating
that the point selected was not convenient.
Mr. Semliti moved "Tlmt a select
committee be appointed to enquire
into the claims of settlers on the lands
proposed to be transferred by the provincial government tu the Canadian
Puuifio railway syndicate; ^haid committee to be composed nf Meura. Cunningham, Wilson, Martin, Helgesen
and the mover; and to have power to
send for persons and papers, nud to
report to this house." Ho said that it
was reported that there were settlors
on some of the lands, and it wuuld be
{or the committee to examine nnd report on the claims. It hnd been reported that Borne of the squatters had
been placed there by the local agent
and tho whole facts of the case should
be laid before the house, Hon. Mr.
Smitho Baid there would bu no objection to the committee, He pointed
out some curious features connected
with these claims, and suggested that
Mr. Dunsmuir's name be udded to
the committee. The suggestion wns
adopted, nnd Mr, McTavisli's name
was substituted in place of Mr. Martin, who wished to be relieved.
On motion of Mr. Orr, seconded by
Mr. Cunningham, nu address was ordered to bo presented to the lieutenant*
governor asking for the establishment
of polling places nt Sapperton, Port
Moody, Lehman's Landing, Moodyville, and T. Shannon's, Clover Valley.
On motion of Mr. Orr, seconded ty
Mr. Cunningham, an order was granted
for a return of all papers and correspondence relating to the appointment
of a resident physician at the asylum
at New Westminster.
On motion of Mr. Martin, seconded
by Mr. Cunningham, it wab ordered
tlmt nn address be presented to the
Heut,-governor asking for the establishment of a poling place at Eagle
Pass.
Mr. Duck moved, seconded by Mr.
Galbraith, for a' return1'^ provinoial
laud suld, from 1st January 1883 to
31st December 1884, showing tho name
of the purchaser, number ot acres purchased by each person, location of the
land, price per acre, and amount paid.
The motion was adopted without objection.
Mr. Theu. Davie rose to n question
of privilege growing out of a statement
mado by Mr. Grant two years ago
respecting his (Mr. Davie'b)professional
conduct in Cassiar. The speaker ruled
the matter out of order.
In reply to Mr. John, Hop. Mr.
Smitho said tho $10,000 deposited by
McNnmee A Cu. as security ou account
uf diy dock contract had beon forfoited
tu the government. In reply to Mr.
Orr, Hon. Mr. Smithe snid the question uf increased representation for
New Westminster district was under
consideration. In reply to Mr. Duck,
Hon. Mr. Smithe said the Innds at Coal
Harbor had been given to tlio syndicate under authority of sec. 58 uf the
Lund Act, 1884. In ruply to Mr.
Duck, Hon. Mr. Smithe said a grant
hud been made to Mr. Gruhmnn, as
representative of thu Kouten&y Lake
syndicate, upon condition that the
syndicate form a company with a capital of £50,000 for the purpose of reclaiming and colonizing the lands in
question; that they place a steamboat
un the Kootonay and Upper Columbia
river, erect a sawmill, make the requisite surveys, and carry out the. work of
reclamation within a certain period,'
In reply to Mr. Duck, Hon. Mr. Robson said the total amount received from
the Dominion jtovernnient on account
of dry-duck refund was 8492,172.88.
Taking interest into account, the'
amount roceivod was not in excess of
the provincial outlay. After the advancement of somo bills, the houso
adjourned until Friday.
1~\H. K. J. OFFBRHAVS,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
oc20tc Kamloops, S. C.
IOHN GARROW, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Ofkick—Next Elson's Tailor Shop, Cor.
Church and Columbia Sts. no22tc
DR. S. CLARKE,
Member College Physicians
and Surgeons, Ontario.   HeglHtcred under
Medienl Ordinance of llrlllsh Columbia.
Ofiiee In I>, S. Curt Is A Co.'s Drug Store,
Now Westminster, B. C; nolMtc
31   II. MATHERS, IU. D.
mcK-Temporarllyin Wise's building,
Frontstreet.
Residence—St. John street, opposite tho
Public School, Now Westminster.
inlilfMc
TdHN S. McGUIRE, M.D..
•J - PHYSICIAN A SURGEON,
oradiiatoof Trinity College, Dublin; iiIho
Assistant Surgeon late Honorable Kant
India Company Service, having removed
from Clinton to New WestmiiiHter.may
be found on cor. Mary A Clarkson sts.
Office hours, 9 to 11 a. m.; 7 to 8 p.m. [dl7tc
TT   M. COOPER, B. A.,1)1. D.,
*    PHYSICIAN & SURGEON.
OPPIOE and RESIDENCE-Churbh St,
(next door to Farmers' Homo), near
Columbia St., Now Westminster, B.O.
OFFICE HOURS-8toI0a.ni.) Ito Sand
0.30 lo 8 p. m. Calls In town and country promptly attended to. , fe2tc
DENTISTRY*
DR. C. E. C. BROWN, late of the
Province of Quebec, has opened an ofllce
at Mra. Holmes', Mary Street. Offlco hours,
fl a.m. to '> p. m.   All work guaranteed,
no20to
0
IORBOULD A McCOLL,
BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, AC.
Office—MoKensIo street, New Westminster, B. O,
HOWSE & RICKMAN
LAND SURVEYORS,
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
Eto. EtO.
WISE'S BUILDING,
Opposite 0. P. N. GO'S Wharf,
NEW WESTMINSTER.
se20to
W. H. EALDINC.
A.J.MMUM.E.
FALDING & McMILLAN,
LAND SURVEYORS
DRAUGHTSMEN,
Accountants, Conveyancers*
kl Estate asd Insurance Agents
OFFICE i-MoKENZIE ST.
Spread or Fenlniilsiu,
London, Jan. 15.— Police Superintendent Mallou of Dublin, who was
promoted to hia present rank for liis
services in hunting down tho Phtunix
Park asBassim, has recently beon traveling through England, to enquire into
the spread of. Feniani-ou in this country. He was visited to-day by a correspondent, who inquired about the
result of hia investigations, Million
replied:
"I was 'prepared to find some evidence of Feniunisni in England, but I
confess I have beep /mtpqiihojl at. the
extent and boldness of tlio organiaa-
tion, especiuMy in the northern c.iun-
tioV"    '
"In what towns did you find the
Fenians must numerous?"
"In Leeds, Manchester, ShelKeld,
Newcastle and Liverpool, In a yen-
era! way all the mining and iron manufacturing centers nre hot-beds of this
form of lawlessness. In all the towns
I have mentioned Fenianism is ram-
fiaiit, and in somo places there is Imrd-
y an effort mado to conceal the existence of tho organization,-or to keep
secrecy as to the meetings of the circles."
"What do the operations of the
Fenians iu England consist of?"
"Thoir .work seems to be mainly tho
collection of money, in small, but frequent sums, from working men and
women. Presumably thia money, or
such of it as does not stick to the
fingers of the oflicers, is used in dynamite explosions and other attempts on
lifo and proporty, such as we have
lately had a taste of in London,"
"At what points in Ireland are the
Fenians most active V   '■
"In counties Cork, Kilkenny and
Kings, and the cities nf Cork, Tulla*
more and Waterford."   *
"What about Dublin?"
"Fenianism seems to bo at low
water-mark in Dublin just now, owing
to the paucity of funds, Hut tbe ex*
pooled visits of John O'Leary und others from abroad will probably revive
the agitation within the next few
weeks. . There is to be a great publio
demonstration in honor of O'leary to
morrow and another next Monday."
XJLT   NORMAN BOLE,
"      BARRI8TER-AT-LAW.
Lnnd A {-nil. Money lo Loan.
New Westminster, B.C.
Jny7m3
M
[RRAY * PRY,
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTERS,
G ruin tug, KalHomluing and Papor-Hang-
Iiir. Shop—Clarkson street, opposite tlie
Now Westminster Jail, New Westminster,
Brit l«h Columbia, opMc
R°
OVAL HOTEL,
CENTREVILM3, CHIUilWHACK.
FIrst-Clnss accommodation for Travelers.
MRS. II. A. HARPER,
mvjil-rfH-ly Proprietress.
M"
RS. HI. A, HARPER,
CENTREVILLE, CHILLIWHACK.
Dry tiooiln anil fincerlcs, Mllllqery and
Fancy (ioods.
Plrst-Cluss Dressmaker In attendance,
my21-'84-ly	
TTVOUES A ATKINSON,
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
And Conveyancers. Accounts collected
unci Loans Negotiated. Offlce, Columbia
street, opposite tlio Post Office, New Westminster, B. C.
J. C. HunHES, T. c, Atkinson,
Notary Public,
Jell-to
E. E. RAND.
Real Kslale Brokers. •Tonwyancrn and
Insurance Agents.
Port Moody and New Westminster Property u specialty.
OPFICE-Cohunbln Street, opposito Post
Offlee, Now Westminstor,'.
JlySto
m  J. TRAPP,
AUCTIONEER AND APPRAISER,
Columbia Streot, .'New Westminster
Parties desirous of disposing of thoir
farms, eto., will do well to place tlie same
In the hands of the above.
All commissions will receive prompt
und careful attention. Bost references
given when required.     "        . nililfrtc
NEW
WESTMINSTER,  B.
deale
WALSH'S
Tailoring
Emporinm
•HOST FASHIONABLE IN THE CITY.
Opposito ttie Bank, Columbia street,
New Westminster, B. C.       t»ny*W-tc.
BOOTS and SHOES
FBOM
HEATHORN'S
Boot & Shoe Manufactory,
VICTORIA,
AT   VICTOBIA   PEICES.
R. THOMAS,
8'iop under tho new Oddfellow Hall, Col*
umbiast,, New Westminster,
WEST END
Plain and Fancy
Bread, Buns, Pies, Cakes,
And Confectionery always on hand.
J. BAGNALL,
IMNRTER A MAMUFACTIMR OF
AND ALL. KINDS OV
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
WILL VISIT THE MAINLAND,
on a Professional Tour, and will
be happy to receive and execute orders
for all kinds of Musical Instruments.
Pianos and Organs tuned or regulated,
Favors from the Mainland, forwarded
through Vf, H. Keary, N. W., will receive prompt attention. jy28to
COME AND SEE
Sood Times Bart Coos Again, Sojsl
HE PROPRIETOR, JAMES TURN-
_ BULL, Having again taken possession
of lire TEMrEBlJWE HOME fronting on
T. N. HlBBEN A CO.
AND GENERAL DEALERS IN THE
many varieties of stock indirectly
connected with the above.
Having studied the best markets for the
poot quarter of a century, economy In
purchasing lias boon attained by Importing In quantities direct from the publishers and manufacturers, and no pains is
spared tn keep a full and well-selected
stock.
Old Masonic Building. Goverment St.
VICTORIA. B. C.
KTTlie following New Books Just*received! CMadlan Plf tares, by Martial*
•r Low* Treasary or mOrngt Craw's rail vailed Family Atlas. oc2Dta
WmJcM
Haste West
3IHAT IS TO SAY, HE HAS REMOVED
. his well selected stork of General
err hand 1st! Into
Lundbom's Block, Colombia St.
Whero he hopes to meet all his old friends
and lots of new ones.
MEN'S CLOTHING
-AND-
Furnishing Goods
JUST ARRIVED.
rills assortment at UIWCIIFK ADO
  oitjr
nniriini r.m.ul
Ke5o.mFo»i>rioea.
cannot be bent tn this ott
Give liinin cnll and Judge tor yourselves,
selSto
Delivered o nny part of the city.
JKSXrXTX* BJRCS-.   Columbia Street.
•o21-to
MRS.   DOMINY,
1E8PBQTFULLY SOLICITS A SHARE
X ot the patronage of the Ladle.-* of Now
I'slnilnstiT.   Address,
Caro of Miu. Monck,
ilcfliinl Douglas St.
J. S. McGUIRE, IH. D.
NEW WESTMINSTER, R. C.
Ills great Rrmrdt for t'onsatupllou la
lis flrst or seread stage.
Dlt. MciflUIKK WILL AGREE to cure
CmiHuniptlon In Us lirst or second
singe under his iidvlrc and treatment. No
'    requlrod If not a perfect cm re obtained,
v— *   ■  ■■• ■■       " *
ilcdulre treat*) all disease of the
uingH without cod liver oil, Fellows1 com*
pound syrup of hypophosphales, or any
other medltilnpH advertised tar liiwrdlH-
eiisc. Thu Doetor has mado this disease
his specialty for the hint tlftocn years.
Thorough examination and advice, SKi.
Those who cannot visit Dr. MvGuIre at
Now West,, II. C, should send a full and
minute statement of thoir trouble, with
fi"i, nud In return a full course, nf medlelno
will bo forwarded.
dottle J. H. MCGUIRB, M. D.
Every Man to his Own Business
PRACTICAL
CHEMIST& DRUGGIST,
COLUMBIA   STREET
(OPP   00I.0SI4I. HOTH,),
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B. 0.
Myslclina' Freicrlpllons una Family Rctlpei n Specially.
N.  B. — Only Genuine Drugs used.
Over twenty vcara' experience,    mr2°
asroTioB.
N
i the Hustings tlovernmont
'he former point
OTICE IS HEREHY OIVEN thnt
_„ application will bo made, at the
next session of tho Legislature of llrltlsh
Columbia, for an Act tn Inoorparuto a
Company for tho purposo of constructing
and operating a streot railway between
(Irimvlllc and the Hastln~ " 	
Reserve, and botween tht ._  ,	
Hilda point on English Hny, with power
to tho snid Company lo extend branch
linos In a northerly orsonthorlydliveilon,
such railway lo pass ovor such lands only
ns nro at tho passing of this Act, nr wlilcli
may ho hereafter, set aside for publio
roads.
D. M. K11KRTS,
Solicitor for Applicants,
1 IXi'ed 11th December, IMI. JnyHtc
Next Swell's Cannery,
Columbia Street,  New Westminster,
SPEIRS &KAT0N,
MACHINISTS AND GENERAL HLACK*
SMITHS.
Tho latest appliances in machinory and
tools, and a goad Job guaranteed,
Horso shooing, Repairing and Jobbing
of ovory description. All orders promptly
attended to. ocltc
A. GUTMANN,
DEALER IN
General Merchandise
COLUMBIA BTREET,
Onrji. Colonial Hotel, "ten Urslmluatrr.
Guns, Ammunition,
(JIriips, Tobacco, Candy,
JJtiCXIJBmsOIX-A.'U JMJ   JPJJJJFJJBS.
HIGHEST 0A81I PRIOE PAID KOllAM.
KINDS OP PUIW.
  oeldto
IMPERIAL
FIRE INSURANCE COMW.
1 Old Hniuu St. uid 10 Pali, Mali,
LONDON.
INSTITUTED 1808.
IjlOR INSURING HOUSES A OTHER
' Buildings, Goods, Wares, Merchandise, Manufacturing and Farming Stock,
Ships in Port, Harbor or Bock, and the
Cargoes of such Vessels; also, Ships building and repairing, Barges and other Vessols on navigable riven and canals, and
(Ioods on hoard such Vessels, throughout
Great Britain and Ireland and in Foreign
Countries,
FROM LOBS OR DAM AUK BY FUR.
Subscribed and Invested Capital,
£1,(500,000 8TG.
Rates of Premium and evory information can be obtained on application to
W. J. ABM8TB0N6,
Agont for Now Weitminiter,
ffOOBS & TOMB,
LAND SURVEYORS
 ANJI	
DRAUGHTSMEN
Columhlu nnd Church StreetH. opposite
Episcopal Church, City of New Westmin*
ster, li, 0., nnd now known as the
FARMER'S    HOME,"
Will accommodate all his old friends and
llio publio Konernlly who favor him with
a call, nt old prices. Board per day, f 1.00;
Bonrd por ween, 85.00; Single Meals, 2G
cents* Beds' 25 cents. Bar Good accommodation for Ladles and Families.    uii2Utc
1
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
GRANVILLE,
Burrard Inlet, B. C.
ALEX. JOHNSTONE,
i'KOPRIETOR.
(Jiyfori)
STATION RESTAURANT
YALE, B.C.
CLOSE AT HAND TO THE RAILROAD
STATION.
THE UNDERSIGNED having fitted up
tills new OKtuhliKlimt-iitasuflrKt-clnHS
restaurant, invite tho public to give him
a call where Menls are served on the
Shortest Notice. Next door will lie found
A Wcll'Sclected Slock or
GROCERIES, CAME AND FRUIT
Alio, a Flnt-Clati Bakery.
.   ' P. CLAIR,
*xrOm Proprietor.
 DEALERS IN -
BOOKS,
STATIONERY,
Fancy Goods, &c,
YALE,  b.  c.
ordi
LAHGrf   ,. _„   _„
hand.  Goods not In stook will he
STOCK   ALWAYS-ON
lered promptly.
Newspapers  aud   Magazines  nup-
plled from all parts of the world.
Ja26tc]     A. G. JOHNSTON, Manager,
-ROYAL CITY-
TOWN PLOTS \ SPECIALTY
Commission Agents,
Conveyancing or all Descrlp'
lions   accurate!)   and
promptly done.
i-. tt. Drawer w.
Trlrlifc.ar St..«.
Ellurd'r
OFFIOE:
Block,   Coiumbin   Street,
OPP. HANK or BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Jnyaio wood* at Tl ■»:■.
Meohanics' Store!
ONE PRICE TO ALLI
LUNDBOM'S BLOCK,
New   Wkstminstkr,   B.   0.
GROCERIES
(told hy Wholesale.
ItKTAII.   DEPARTMENT;
DRY QOODS,
CLOTHING,
Boots and Shoes I
Hold at exceedingly low prioes.
Also, on hand, a large stoek of
OILCLOTH "SIS.,1,05l"",u
L, GOLD.
OOMPANY, LIMITED,
Richard Street,
HE! UNSIS, 8. C,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS
IN AIX KINDS OP
ROUGH AND DRESSED
The Only Ire-Proof Hotel
in tiwCity,
TM CULINARY DEPARTMENT
IS UNDER THE CHARGE OF AN
EXPERIENCED ARTIST.
THE UNDERSIGNED BEOS LEAVE
to announce to the Public that he
hu purchued the tbove Hotel, where
everything will be found first-cUss, and
at reasonable rates.
The Parlors and bleeping Apart-
neitl are nnder the superintendence
of Mrs. Austin.
Private Dining Rooms lor Ladies,
Families and Private Parties.
A Private Beading Boen, commodious, comfortably furnished, and
well supplied witli books and papers, is
provider! for the use of guests.
JNO. AUSTIN,
Proprietor.
Jfor Sale ov <&o ftnl.
FURNISHED ROOMS TO LET
QN AONES STREET, WITH OB WITH-
out Board,       Apply al nils om«.
YOKE OE HEAVY WORK OXEN KOB
Side.        Apylyat THIS OFFIOE.
no!2tc
FOR SALE:
4 COW,   NPWLY   CALVED;   OOOD
milker; well broken.  Also, several
er well broken cows about to calf.
.     ' W. H. LADNBB,
Jny21tc Ladner's Landing.
HOUSE
Doug
TO LET.
RENT FROM THE 1st FEBRUARY
next, a (••roomed House and stable on
ut*lus slreel.
Jnyilte
Apply to
H. V, EDMONDS,
Land Agent,
To Rent or Lease!
tlie corner ot Douglas and Pelham
Streets; with the lot containing Ik acrea.
Rent low.   Applyto
delate JAfi. CUNNINGHAM. -
A Rare Chance I
A 0001) FARM ON IJOWER FRASEB
to rent or sell.  Terms erwy.   For
particulars ripply by letter to
J. H. HUNTER,
Jny2lui!) port Moody, B. C.
FOR   SALE.
QECOND-HAND
ENGINE   (O Under.
8x12.
Shell Holler.
02-inch SpaldingToolh Saw.
'1-liorec Wagon.
90feet%-lnch Steel Wire Rope.
4 Ox Token.
The above will be sold cheap,
the Brunette Sawmill.
Apply at
DeBECK BROS. A CO.
THE
HASTINCS, B. I.
THIS. FINE AND COMMODIOUS
new Hotel has been recently completed and ia furnished with every convenience for the comfort of guests. The
situation and accommodations are unsurpassed on Burrard Inlet, which lias be.
come the most fashionable
WATERING PLACE
in British Columbia The prospect is
charming, the sea breezes aro invigorating, and the facilities for bathing and
boating are excellent. Private Sitting
and Dining Rooms. Suites of apartments for families or parties. The Bar
is entirely detatohed . from the main
building. .1.
tr The Hotel Is under the immediate
superintendence of Mrs. Black.
First-class stabling and feed for Horses. Busses to and from New Westminster twice a day.
GEO.
jy28tc
BLACK,
Proprietor.
LSJUR
Shingles,
Shakes,
Laths,
Pickets,
Net Floats, Trays
AND ALL KINDS OF
Wood Furnishing for
Canneries,
Doors,
Windows,
Blinds.
Frames,
Mouldings.
Brackets,
Railings.
Balusters,
Newels,
Plain * K«nr« t s)\ Kindt ,f
TURNED    WORK.
l(sMlo)
FURNITURE I
THE UNDERSIGNED HAS PLEA-
sure in announcing that he is now
prepared to supply all kinds of Furniture, 4c, at the lowest possible prices.
Cabinet work and Upholstering done
promptly and in fint-clau style.
UNDERTAKING
In all Its branches. The undersigned
haa the only HEARSE tn the City. A
continuance of public patronage solicited.
Old stand, noxt Occident Hotel.
J. G. BUNTE,
Late Manager SehPs Branch Furniture
Store. au5tc
FORJSALE.
1440 ACRES CHOICE
DELTA LANDS
q MILES FROM LADNER'S
0 Landing, on the Trunk Wagon
Road; two other roads runninfrthrough
the premises.   Apply to
E. A. WADHAMS,
de22lc Ladner's Landing.B.C.
c.p.E,ffl»in.
COALHARBOB
FOU SALE UY
HUGHES & ATKINSON,
Oppmlle P..I OOee, JJTew Wtnl.ila.lrr,
British ,'olanilrla.
deSlc
F. KIMBLE,
CITY BAKER
 AND	
Produce Dealer.
Colombia St.,     New WrstnlnMer.
seste
0. R. & N. CO.
mHE STEAMER
"1DA.HO"
Will run between
Nev Westminster i Tacoma
Tailing at Port Townsend, Scntlle,
mul intermediate Ports,
as fellows:
UaviTmiim mn Wemium «ti ..•uuivmc
At NtW WEITMMT« F«IM Msisrsi.
itAvi Ntw WiimiMm inn Situim, ar
I«.«., Minim at Tacoma Simdav aftii-
MM.
RIDUOTION OP FARES.
Niw Whtwiiith to Poit Tiwmno, m.m
Siattle, • • I.M
Taooma, •   •    -1.00
seSto ft E. CI.AXCKY, Agon!.
solStc
ESTABLISHED 1859.
ROBT. DICKINSON,
BUTCHER,
Neirljr Oppoilte Ihe Colonial Hotel,
NEW WESTMINSTER
THE  LARGEST AND   CHOICEST
aanrtmint et all descriptions of
MEATS AND VEfiETABLES
Constantly on hand, and supplied to Families, Restaurant., and Steamboats at tlie
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES.
TERMINUS
Livery and Stage Stables I
OOLUMBIA STBEET,
Foot of Douglas,   HEW WEaTHIsmi.
WM.B.TOWNHW^PMPIIIETN.
T> ECUIAB Une .mages t. r.H NMdjf-
Special cjxtrn Bigs when required.
Saddle Horses nnd Buggies for hire.
General Teaming promptly attended to.
SOO COROS OF FIRE WOOD FOR SALE   ,
Orders left at the London Market will
bo promptly filled. ocStc
COLONIAL -HOTEL
OOLUMBIA  STREET,
New Westminster, fi. C.
mHE LARGEST, HEST PURNI8HXD
X and most complete Hotel In British
Columblu,
Building and Furniture entirely new,
and unsurpassed In the province.
Every comfort /or guests. Suits of rooms
for families.
CHRIS. WILSON, J.E.IHSUY,
Manager. Proprietor
     Jny21tc
GUNS!
Rifles & Revolvers!
BREECH-LOADING SHOT C0M8
Framtl0.00totl50.00.
BREECH-LOADING JtlFLES
From K.00 to tTfr.OO.
REVOLVERS
Fromt3.S0totlt6.00.
SHOT, SHOT, SHOT,
AU sites, from dust to 28 ball.
Eagle-Duck t Curtis ft Unit*
Diamond drain Powder.
Having imported direct fromtli. Factory the largest stock of Gum, Rifle, and
Revolvers over held in this Province, I
can and will sell cheaper than any oth.r
house in B. C, and what WEBB says
you can rely on.
Mainland Gun Store,
IT., Nil I
1* Immense ,t<ek •* •IMltllg ■nil,
rocket tHllerr .wl TeWcmlsl.' *■■•
dries, and ranrvCmts, a\il!te NEW ADVERTISEMENTS THIS DAY.
Dentist F, Welih
Strayed 0. 0. Cameron
Coming Cricket
Artillery No. 1 Battery
Wxt llritish (Ealumbum.
Wednesday  Horning, Jan. *8, vm.
Mercenary Journalism.
Not long ago wo took occasion to
protest agahiBt the journalistic ethics
put forward by tlie Whatcom Ifc
veilk. That journal intimated that
the Seattle Post-Intelligencer had
sold its columns to the democratic
candidate during the late election
and maintained in justification of
the aot that a newspaper had a
right to sell its influence to the
highest bidder. A case bearing
upon the principle involved lately
came before the supreme court of
California. Fitch entered an action
for libel against De Young, of the
Chronicle, because it had asserted
that the Bulletin had told its columns to a wealthy company. In
pronouncing judgment the judge
said: "Suppose the proprietors of
the Call and Bulletin had announced
in the columns of those papers that
they liad changed their course, and
hud negotiated a salo of their support and advocacy to the railroad
corporations named in the com
plaint, for the sum of thirty odd
thousand dollars, would such an announcement have exposed the proprietors to contempt or ridicule, or
have tended to injure them in their
occupation1! If not, there is no libel
in the article complained of. Tf yea
(and of this tliere can be no doubt),
the article is foundation for un
action." The force of this illustration must carry conviction to every
mind. There can be no doubt that
the moral effect of tlie doctrine propounded by the Reveille would be
disastrous.
Exciting Times.
The events of the past few days
have been more than usually exciting. The battle between the British and Arab forces in Egypt produced a profound sensation everywhere, and the mystery which surrounds Stewart's subsequent movements adds to the anxiety whicli
has filled tlie'public mind. Every
one must fervently hope that the
expedition for the relief of Khartoum has met with no disaster.
Close upon the heels of tlie
Egyptian conflict comes tlie horrible dynamite outrage which lias
profoundly stirred the whole civilized world. The evil results of this
fiendish deed have been marvellously
small. It is wonderful that not
oue of all that crowd, where destruction and death seemed so closely allied, was killed. The absence
of fatal results, however, does not
detract from the horrible guilt of
the perpetrators of the deed. They
evidently cared nothing for human
life, and meditated the destruction
of a great many people.
In our own province, too, the
times seem to be exciting. It is
rumored that there are many different forces combining in a supreme
attempt to defeat the government
unless certain concessions arc made.
We do not take much stock in the
public rumors afloat, but there is no
doubt tliat excitement runs high at
the provincial capital. We hope
the government will firmly resist
every scheme thnt is not founded
upon perfect justice, nnd that it will
receive a loyal support so long as it
aims at promoting the country's interests,
A Wide Difference.
It sometimes makes a great deal
of difference whose ox is gored. Tlie
speech from the throne, delivered at
the opening of the provincial legislature, contains a paragraph relating
to the Alaska boundary. It expresses the*hope and belief that the
Dominion government will take
steps to secure to this province the
valuable strip of territory along the
north-west coast of British Columbia which is claimed as part of Alaska. This reference is made a pretext for some rather unreasonable
and lofty utterances by the Seattle
Poet-Intelligencer. It says this particular strip of territory is thought
by many to lie the most valuable
part of Alaska, and that in it the
capital is situated. It does not
think the people of Canada will care
to declare war against the United
States over Alaska, and it considers-
it "safe to say that tlie United
States will never cede the country
peaceably." This strip, it says, has
been in possession of Russia and tlie
United States for over a century,
and "it 'is not to be supposed that
any shadowy treaty entered into in
1826 between Great Britain and
Russia can now shako the title of
tbe United States" to any portion
of tlw country. Our contemporary
further observes .that if tlie treaty
"was not observed by either of the
contracting   pttfiw.   it   certainly
should not bo binding upon us."
This savors of bluster moro than
one commonly looks for in such a
journal as the Seattle Post-InieUi-
gencer. It may be that Britain
nover claimed' the territory in dispute because she had no particular
interests there which called attention to it. If a person owns a piece
of wild land, the fact that he does
not take possession of >t formally
would not be held as a valid reason
why his neighbor should take it
from him, It may be that the claim
set up by British Oolumbia is
"shadowy" and could not be enforced. In that case it should be
abandoned. But if the claim should
happen to be valid and good, docs
our esteemed contemporary pretend
to hold that the territory should not
be given up except through force of
necessity 1 Surely not. Nations
should treat each other as individuals would, aud a rule like this could
never be tolerated. But the president's message contains a paragraph
which has also produced considerable
international discussion. . It. referred at considerable length to a treaty
wliich the government of tho United
States seems to have entered into
with the republic of Central America for the construction of the Nicaragua canal. By the terms of tliis
treaty Central America agrees to
cede a strip of territory to the
United States, extending from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, in consideration of the construction and maintenance of a ship canal. The United
States undertakes to build forts at
the ends of this canal, and to defend
it against all enemies whatsoever.
In fact, the canal and the strip of
territory through which it runs become by this agreement a possession of the United States. Now,
it so happens that in 1850 a treaty
was made and ratified between Great
Britain nnd the United States respecting this very canal. This
treaty is known as the Bulwer-Clay-
ton treaty, and in it Great Britain
and the United States severally
bind themselves that neither will
obtain exclusive control over the
canal which it was then proposed to
build, or erect any fortifications on
any part of the country. It must
be apparent that the treaty just
entered into between the United
States and Central America is directly iu violation of the Buhver-
Clayton treaty, which has never
been abrogated. Referring to this
matter tlie Seattle PoBt-Intetfigencer
says there will bo "absolutely no excuse for a refusal on the part of the
senate to ratify the treaty. * * *
The people of the United States are
determined that it (the canal) shall
be American. * * * It is hard
to believe that the senate would be
influenced by such a shadowy and
dream-like substance as a reminiscence of the unfulfilled Clayton-
Buhver treaty." It seems to us the
Post-Intelligencer has a very peculiar
notion of the force of treaties and
tho obligations of states. It interprets, all treaties and circumstances
so as to favor tlie United States,
aud will uot hesitate to abrogate,
without notice, any treaty whicli
may happen to conflict with national
schemes. It is not consistent. If
British Columbia has a claim to
part of Alaska by virtue of a former
treaty, let her have the territory.
If the Bulwer-Clayton treaty has
not been abrogated, common decency
would suggest the propriety of advising Great Britain before negotiating the Nicaragua treaty. The
Bulwer-Clayton treaty expressly declares that the United States shall
not "occupy, fortify or colonize, or
assume or exercise any dominion
over, any part of Central America."
The Nicaragua treaty expressly violates every one of these declarations.
Docs the Post-Intelligencer feel itself
justified in defending it? The New
York Commercial Advertiser, a newspaper with a knowledge of facts and
circumstances uqual to that of any
journal in the United States, says:
"Instead of indicating to Great
Britain in plain language the intention of our government to abrogate
the treaty, the president has negotiated a treaty with Nicaragua
whicli boldly puts at defiance Great
Britain's views of the Clayton-Bul-
wer treaty, and also the views held
by our own government for over
thirty years. The B^uation is confusing, so much so that we are told
even senators and representatives
who are strongly disposed to favor
the construction of the proposed
canal are embarrassed by the diplomatic hodge-podge which they have
discovered in the official dispatches
of the State department."- This is
a much more statesmanlike view of
the subject, and much more in accordance with what we conceive to
be honorable and right.
A Wide-Sprbad Evil.—-The great
Honree of consumption and of ugly sores
is scrofula in tho blood, Uurdock Blood
Bitters purify the whole system and cure
scrofula, ee well en the more common
blood humors..	
Thirty tons of firat clam hay to be sold
at a low fif-fure. Apply at the "City
Market," Janttml.
ri  WELSH,
DKNTIST,
Rooms 51 and 52,
Over KB, Curtis A Co.'s Drugstore.
Qny2Stc)|
'~st rayed-
TO GEORGE DLACK'S HANCH on Coquitlam river, a Black Cow with boll
on; a lso, a lln 11 of same color,
0. 0, CAMERON,
Muck's Ranch,
January Sttth, 1880, Jny28tc
No. 1 Battery Artillery!
THE COMPANY WIM. PARADE at
Hi,  I Hlf -i Mil   iWclii-vl-iv) nl^lit
ut 8 o'clock, for drill.   A full attendance Is
expected. _    ■    ,
jnyiStl By Oilier.
C0MIMI DOMING!
lit!
ANCILLA De MONTIS
OK,   ONE    SUMMER,
With Key,
BY   THE   CRICKET
ANEW STORY JUST PUBLISHED,
Tho famous literary sensation of the
porlod—"Anollla Uo Montis; or, One Hummer," by the Cricket, is a production with
the opening Heeiie laid In llrltlsh Columbia and aft cnvtmlK followed up in dlllbr-
ont sections of the United States, with a
brief mention of the great dismal swamp
nnd a splendid description of suutherii
eainp-'iieetliiL' and plantation scenes
tliroughoul lhe sunny smith. Tiie reader
of thin work will Hnd it to ho exciting nml
amusing. Everv chapter Is full of new
lnteresl. It lnlioduees to the puhllc ,V,
prominent characters in hoth countries,
who lltfuro under assumed names. In tho
production of Anollla Do Montis- tho author has made every effort to successfully
place beforo the people of British Columbia a story founded on facts, with a deep
and thrilling plot of intense interest. The
leading feature of this lonianco Is tho
grand style and vory excellent manner
that thenulhor describes and pictures tho
several characlers eomprlsln*,' the work.
The main object Is to fully please In
everv seiifo the public, with the hopo
that all may derive the pleasure of lionising 1U pages from the beginning to tho
end. The Hook will he sold by subscription only. Parties desirous of purchasing
a copy of this work will soon have the opportunity to do so. The Book will appear
shortly and can bo procured bysubserlb-
Ing for it through the authorized agent
for the snlo of the work In British Columbia. He will cnll with the Intention of
supplying ull with tho first novel written
and produced in this country. The work
will bo delivered to auy partof the provinco hy the canvasser. Advlca to, nil—
Buy the work entitled, Anrllln lie Mmiltst
or One Hummer, with key, by Iho Cricket,
Author. Jny28ml
MAN WANTED.
(MARRIED PREFERRED.)
WITH ABOUT FIVE HUNDRED DOL-
lars capital, to take charge of a farm,
(Produce Is more prolltnble thnn labor).
Applyto      T. W. KERR,
no22tc New Westminstor, B. C.
THE NINTH CONCERT
 OF THE	
CHORAL UNION
WIU. DB GIVES IN THK
SKATING    ^INK
On Wednesday*!-: Jan. 28th,' 1885.
T1HE   PROGRAMME   Will   consist   of
selections from   "The Hay Harm,"
and a varied collection of sni.OS ivocal
and Instrumental), DUETS, TKIUM,
QUARTETTE*-!, CHORUSES, Ae.
Doors open nt, 7.30 p. nt.| concert nt 8
o'clock. Tickets *>() cts.; Reserved seals 7.1
cts., mny be secured at T. lt. Pearson ft
co's,  J"y!!l!L
Words Fail __?££;
Selbv Carter, of Nnslivllle, Tenn., "for
tho bouofits derived from
Ayer's Sarsaparilla.
Having been afflicted nil iny life with Scrof.
uln, my system seemed sat united with it. It
came out In Blotches, Ulcers, and Mattery
Bores, nil over my body." Mr, Carter states
that ho wns entirely cured by tho use of
AVer's Sarsai'AMLIsA, and since diBCon-
tinulng Its uso, eight months ago, he has hod
bo return of tho scrofulous symptoms.
All baneful Infections of the blood are
promptly removed by this une'juallcd alterative.
PREPARED BY
Dr.J.C.Ayer&Co., Lowell, Masi.
Sold by all Drngglsts; fl, six bottles for **■
ANNUAL
HACK BALL!
THE HYACK EIRE COMPANY havo
pleasure In annnuuclng thnt they will
give thoir annual Ball nnd Supper In the
DRILL SHED
. ON	
Friday Night, Jnn. 30th, 1885,
To which they cordlnlly Invite their
friends and the citizens generally,
Dnncing at 8.80 p.m.
TICKETS: Gentlemen (Including sup-
por),$2.60; Ladles free.
Tickets mny he had from Chief Engineer
Win. McColl, Cant, .Jno. Hold, Lieut. Fred
Homer, or at T. ft. Pearson A Co's.
.    JOHN McMUHPHY,
Jl)y2H8 , Secretary.
NOTICE.
XTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thnt we
Pj intend making application to Iho
Chief Commissioner of Lands nud Works
for permission to lense for timbering purposes the following described lund sltunt-
ed in New West minster District:
Commencing at post on the right bank
of a creek running through Deep Valley
into ItamsnyArm nbout 1% miles from
mouth; theuco north 40 chnins, thenco
cast '2 miles, thenco south 40ehnins, thence
west 2 miles; containing 010 acres.
MOODYVILLE SAW MILL CO.
(Limited),
uo29m2 B. Sl'RlNdKlt, Manager.
J. A. BOWES
BUTCHER
YALE e\ HOPE. B. C.
All Orders ror Heat promptly lllleil
(doOTc)
D.S. CURTIS.
S. UARKB, M.D.
MEDICAL HALL
D.S. CURTIS SCO.
WHOLESALE ts RETAIL
Druggists
DISPENSING -ts FAMILY
CHEMISTS
New Westminster, B.0.
OPEN SUNDAYS 10 TO 12 A.M.; 2 TO 4 P.M.
NEXT DOOR TO THE COLONIAL HOTEL.
(jny24tc)
THE
WEEK
So-
A Canadian Journal of Politics,
ciety, and Literature.
Published Everv Thursday, at S3 per Year.
THE WEEK, "Canada's Literary J;aiir-
mil," whioh has Just entered upon Its
Becond vcnr, oppeatfe by Ita comprehensive
table of contents to Ihe different tastes
wliich exist within thn circle of a cultured
home, and will endeavor faithfully to relied and summarize the Intellectual,
social, and pollcal movements ot the day.
Helton, In the fnrm hoth of serials and
Hhort stories, also occupies a prominent
The" union whioh It presonts. of tho Magazine with the Weekly Journal appears
to ho recognized as the thing needed, and
Independent Journalism Is evidently
growing in favor wllh the most enlightened and patriotic ofthe community, Tho
literary talent of Canada, linvlngon organ
offered to It, Is being drawn forth, and our
stall of Contributors Is constantly Increasing. Wo nro thus enabled lo. improve
from time to time special denarliiicnts,
siti'h as those of Commerce, Education,
Art, Science, Music and Chess. The lovers
of music hove, we trust, of lato been sensible of our desire to promote the Interests
of thai great source of happiness anil refinement.
Hi polities, THE WEEK is thoroughly
Independent. It Is untrammelled by
party connections, free from party leanings, unbiassed by parly considerations.
In Canadlun pullttcs Us desire will be to
further, to the utmost of Its power, Ihe
free and healthy development of the Nation.
Bead tbe fallowing List uf Contributor*.
"The Bystander" (Professor Ooldwln
Smith) will contribute, at Intervals, reviews of current events lu Canada, the
United Slates, anil in Europe. Principal
<*runt, I). D.,*Dr.Daniel.WllBon, Professor
Murray. L. L. P., Chas. Llndsev, Hev.
Prof. Clark, M. A., Sir Francis tlincks,
Louis Honons Frechette, Win. Houston,
V, lllukcCrofton, O. Mercer Adam, Hon.
U 8. Huntingdon, Col. G. T. Denlson,
Pendleton King, J. W. Longley, John
Held, Hev. Dr. Scudding, O. C. Aurlnger,
George Stewart, Jr., John Kendo, Joaquin
Miller, John Charles Dont, J. E. Collins,
J. Hu liter-Durvar, Miss Maehar, Mrs.
Kate Seymour McLean, Miss Louisa Murray, Miss Jcanlc Oliver Smith, andothers.
fi Jordan Street, Toronto.
LOOK OUDT
ALL ACCOUNTS
Due to me up to Dec. 31st,
1884,
1
FORTHWITH.
AU Accounts standing over three
months are liable and will
be charged with interest
A1J amounts   unpaid   on  20th
inst. will be placed in court
for collection.
A settlement I must have and I
shall insist upon it.
C.G. MAJOR
January C, 1884.
1885.
Harper's   Weekly.
ILLUSTRATED.
IUrph'b Wiiiit hiu now, for twenty yonra,
maintained its portion hh the lending llluit rated
weekly neWHpnpcr in Amerlcn. With a coimUnt
Increaso of literary mid nttinllc resource*, It li
ablo to offer for tho uiiatting yenr nttrnctiom un-
■quailed by any previous volume, embracing a
capital llhaitrated eerhtl story by W. K. Nobbis;
tdl article* with special refwonce to tho
Went uml Smith, Including: the World'* Exposition nt Now Orleans; entertaining short Htorlu,
mostly illustrated, nnd Important unpen hy high
niillu.Yilie-i on the chief topics cf tfiflday.
Everyone who dualree a trustworthy |
Kulcle, and entertaining und Instructive family
Juiirtinl, entirely froo from oljecllonntdo features
in either letter-pies or lllnstrnlldiin, ahould aiib-
wribo to IIahpm's VfmVt,
HARPER'S   PERIODICALS.
PER YE All i
HARPHR'S WEEKLY W 00
lURPKR'S MAGAZINE 4 00
IIABPBR'S   BAZAR   , * 00
HARPER'S YOUNO PEWI.K 2 00
IIAHPBH'8 FRANKLIN SQUARE LIBRARY,
Ono Yoar (fi2 Numbers) tfl 00
PoBtngo free to id) subscribers In tho United
States or Canada-
Tho Volumes of the Weekly hnglii witli tbe Ont
Number for January of euch year. When no
timo Is mentioned, It will be understood that the
subscriber wlwlioa to comniL'tico with the Number
next aftor tlm receipt of order.
Hie dnil Five Annunl Volnm« of Ham-mi's
WttiLi, >n neat cloth binding, will be sent by
mall, postage pnid, or by oxjireu, freo or oxbetjM
(provided tho freight docs not item ono dollnt
per volume), for 17 por volume.
Cloth Oases for each volume, suitable for bind*
Ing, will be sent by mnll, postpaid, on receipt of
Remittances should bu Hindu by Poet-Oflico
Money Order or Draft, to avoid chance of loss,
NoVspapora aro not to copy this advcrtlsoinent
without the express order of Harper A Brothers.
Address       HARPXR * BROS., New York.
Abstract Statement of Receipts and
nnd Expenditure of tbe Municipality of Surrey ror Tear
ending Dec. Slut, 1884.
RECEIPTS:
Cash lu hand Jun. 1,18fW 8 687 23
linu estate tas collected for wsi    15 20
it "        m>    is so
" " HWl    103 26
» " lrtrti 1115«
Kond tux mlloctcd    MB «0
tiovt urnnt for yi'ur tndlim Jum-
80111, 18H5 .-  hWOOO
Govt Kraut for your ending June	
30th, 1884 , «..    36 7u
Total ■> .'?:..*32I10 Itl
BXPENDITUBEBi
Rondo end Drldtfca $2830 05
Printing nnd advertising  40 35
stationery end postage  17 15
Logal cxiicnsns  » 00
Refund tnxoH (mud Ux)  2 00
Auditing accounts  fi 00
Bounty for destruction of wild animals   17 50
Other contingent oxpenses..  3100
Election expenses  80 00
Snlnry nccount  2« 2-s
Cash on hand Dec. 81st, 1881  0127
Total $3200 37
Balance Sheet of tbe Municipality
of Surrey for the year ending
Dec. 31st, 1884.
* it
T® s
*|.s
COLUMBIA STREET,
New Westminster, B. C.
—HIPOHTEIIS AND DEALISBS IN— '
Books,
Stationery,
Fancy Goods,
Pianos,
Organs,
Music,
Newspapers,
Magazines,
Toys, etc.
The Largest Stock on the Mainland,  and  second  to  no
House in British Columbia,
—SOLR AGENTS FOR	
The Henry F. Killer Fiano,
Of Boston,
The Dominion Organ,
Of Bowmanville, Ont.,
And agent* for all tho leading American
PIANOS & ORGANS
EXPRESS RATES.
UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE the rates
of express freight on packages and
parcels, safely and properly put up and
not containing any extra vnlunble or'
dangerous compounds will he:
Between Victoria and New West*
minster.
Pneknges under 10 lbs.... 25 cts. each
Pucknges over D and under 25...60 ots. each
Packages over 24 and undor 50..75 cts, each
Pucknges over 50 at... .....1 cent per lb
From New Westminster to Tale.
Leas than 8 lhs 25 ots. each
From a lbs. to 10 lhs 50 cts. eaoh
From 10 lbs, to 25lbs j..75ots. eaeh
From 25llm. to 50 lbs 81 00each
From rw IUm. u>:& ||JH tl GOeacli
From 75 lbs. to 100 lbs. or ovor..2ets. per lb
To Miwnce's Bridge anil Points belweem
Yale and Hpcnce's Bridge.
Less thnn 2 lbs. 25 ots. each
From 2 lbs. to fi lbs 50 ots. each
From 5 lbs, to 10 lbs $1 00 eaeh
From 10 lbs. to25 lbs in cts. per lb
From 25 lbs. to 75 lbs _ gets, per lb
Over75 lbs dots,perlb
To Nicola, Savona, Kamloops,  Cache
Creek and Clinton, 20 ots, per lb.
To Barkerville and nll  points between
Barkerville and Clinton ..25 cts. per lb
On C. O. D. and valuable packages one
por cent, on value In addition to ordlnury
rates.
MONEY  RATES
Between Victoria and New Wvslnilniter,
M CTS. PER ft tee.
Remittances Insured against all risk at
"Lloyd's,"
FHANk   8.  BAHNABD,
Manager II. C. Express Co
C. Q. MAJOR, Columbia St..
BU2to Agent New West mi niter.
F. M. COULTER. T. ., ARMSTRONG.
4
Pure l^s I Mais
PERFUMERY,
TOILET ARTICLES, ETC,
PHYSICIANS'   rUESCHIPTIONS
A SPECIALTY.
Compounded all hour, of tho Da; * Night
PHARMACY-Opponite B»nk ot B.
JJ„ Columbia St., Now Wcitmimtor.
Night Calln-Rorim SO, Colonial Hotel.
(Jnyniir)
ARSETSr
Do) Inauent tnxerr on  nrrsorrrrment
roll and belleverl to be collect-
nolo tor yonra lMO-1-2-3 »172 7»
Delinquent taxcrr, 1884  408 75
Cash on hand  fll 27
Tolal mi «1
MABILITIKBi
Unlnnce due on Milton ronrl 9 OTr 00
n ri      Latlmerrond  114 GO
Tall drain to Brown roarl.   25 00
« Hall. Prairie rond  40 00
Bnlance duo on Johnston rond  48 00
J>ilo J. Woodwnrd for clearing trees,   4 00
Due J. Johnston " »0
Snlnry nccount    2.;; JO
Klcctlon oxponnm....  JO 00
Approprlntlon pn Coaat mer dlon
road and not yot under contract. 150 00
Appropriation on  Johnston  rond      M
and not yet under contract   GO 00
Amets ovor Liabilities 100 81
Total •■ »«2 01
Certified correct,
DUNCAN MACKENZIE.
Clover Valley, Jnnilnry 10,1885.     Jny24U
The balanoe of
Men's Overcoats, Ladles' Jackets and Ulsters, Women's and
Children's Hosiery,
&c, all Dress Ooods,
at a sacrifice.
jny7tc
CUMn
WATCHMAKER
Jeweller & Optician,
COLUMBIA STREET,
New Westminster, B, Q.,
Bcgn to inform his patrons and the in-
habitants of British Columbia, that
lie hns engaged tho service, of
MR. F. CRAKE,
For n number of years manager of the
Watchmaking nnd Repairing Department of Mi'ssi'H. Savage, Lyman ft Co,,
of Montreal. They say of him that he
is one of the very best workmen over in
their employ, and they part with him
with regret, whioh is a lullioientguaran.
tee of his ability', 1 have spared neither
trouble nor expense to get one of the
ablest men, aud T am determined to
make my business second to none In
British Columbia. Mr. Crake will have
entire chargo of the Watch department.
Chronometers. Kcpeaten, Ghrono-
gntpllN, and all complicated watches
rated and adjusted. Broken or lost parti
made equal to now, Any parties having
Watches which have been in the hands
of incompetent Watchmakers and can't
be made to go, seiiil thein to me, packed
in a small box, by mall, registered or
otherwise, and they will have my Immediate attention; and perfect satisfaction
will be given.
The manufacturing Jewelry Is under
my personal charge. All kinds of Jewelry made to order and the quality of the
goods guaranteed. Diamonds and precious stones set with care. All my
charges are moderate, I have a new and
well selected stock of M atrhCH, GlOCkl,
Hold, Silver mid Rolled PUte Jewelry and Plated Ware, all of the but
quality. New patterns constantly arriving-
All Watches sold will be closely regulated to a few seconds a month, thus doing uway witli tho annoyance of having
an imperfect tiino-Itooper.
C. M. MuNAlHiHTEN,
jnySto Watchmaker ft Jeweller,
SPECIAL FORMS
RULED & PRINTED
On th, premises, as neatly and cheaply
a. at uy othel establishment in the
Province.
 AOENTS  FOB—
Cwiftdtntion Lilt Awurtnee Co..
North Britiih and Mercwitlli Fire
Iniuranet Co..
— Agent, (or First-Han—
SHIPNKfi  BIC1IPTB,
■HIS SMNICKS,
■ILLS W BALI,
CUBT0* I0VBI UMKB,
LUSH, pits, mis,
•BHIS, BI0IIPTS,
And all kind, of Blank Booksjuid Blank
Forms on hand.
 All th. Leading—
NEWSPAPERS
——AND	
PERIODICALS
STILL CONTINUE
FOR NOVEMBER I
THE PEOPLE OF NEW   WKSTMIN-
slernnd surrounding country »ro Invited to see Uio
tt£»QREAT REDUCTION
In the prices of Uoods nt
The ROYAL CITY
Boot & Shoe Store
Tho peoplo nre no doubt awaro ot the Superior quality of Boots ond Shoes
and other Qoods kept by
MRS. E. GOLD,
Which aro unquestionably the best In this
City, and cannot bo surpassed anywhere In the Provinco.
NOW IS THE TIME
To moke purchases, when Qoods nre sold
to suit tho limes, because
Money Saved Is Money Earned.
The following goods, Imported from the
manufactories, are offered at a great re*
duotlon.ns the slock Is larger than the
state of the market Justifies:
49 pieces Canadian Tweeds.
275 suits of Men's, Boys' and Youths
Clothes,
100 doson Whito Shirts.
60 doien assorted Shirts.
85 riosen fine American Hats of the la*
test style* and Bnost quality.
16 cases of New Goods Just received by
steamer Idaho,
The following Is the reduction of prices)
50 per cent, off Boots and Shoes,
25     "     M     Tweeds,
85    "     "     Clothing aud Hats,
85     "     '!     Dry Qoods,
40     "     "     Fancy Goods.
This -Ureal Modarlloa krglas •■
Tuesday, October Uth
AND WILL CONTINUE UNTIL
FUBTHER NOTIOE.
RaguUrly reoolved. Subscriptions taksn
(or any Publication at lowest rates.
a**W. import direct from manufacturers, and cannot b* undersold In this
Province.
T, R. PEARSON A 00..
COLUMBU   STRUT,
N«w  Weitminitw, B. 0,
(MM
■^.Country orders will be pnnctnall,
attended to.
NOTE THE ADDRESS:
MRS. E. GOLD,
ROYAL CITY
Boot and Shoe Store
COLUMBIA BTREET,
Opp. Ewen's Cannery,     NlwWllTUIMlll.
oolite. 	
GIRL WANTED.
ONE   WHO UNDERSTANDS GENE-
nil housework. Apply to
*   MIW. D. ROBSON,
detto Royal Avenue ADVERTISING   RATES.
Transient Advorllsements.—First insertion, Sols, perllne; Hubxet-iienl 'nuerltonS,
•Jcin. perllne.
Reguliir Commercial and HuhIin.ss Ad-
Tertisotnent*.—I uoltimn, 512 per month)
K col., ti por mouth; V,'ool.,H per mon tht
Jlnebes, fi per montli; 1 inch, 91.50 pel
month. These rules to be eharpi-d on
•tandlug udvorHnemcnl* whieh remain
over :! months- If for it loss period th*
rates will hu: I col., ftf per month; J.; col,,
|B; !<cnl.,$o; 3 Inches,«; 1 Ineli.Jl
SpcdialK.'among reading mat ler.—First
Insertion, 10 cts. per lino; subnet-110111. Insertions. -■»cts, perllne.
Iilrih», Marrluges and Deaths, $1 eaoh.
Puncntt notices aecompuuyiim divuli no*
lice, .Mi tils. extra.
•tt" All Liauslent advertisements will be
measured by a scute of solid Nonpuriel,
Whicli makes 12 lines lo ttie Inch und 7
words!.* the line.   Display lines  st be
'11 mnking cNtlmitd's.   No tui-
allowed for in n _ ....,
▼erlisi fiicnl Inserter for lei
(hiin jl.00.
Ww- British Columbian.
Wednesday Maniac* Jan. S8.
The Royal Oity Planing Mills will
begin work to-day.
The atr. Teaser arrived from Vicioria
at 11 o'clook Monday forenoon.
Preparations for the Hyack ball next
Friday night am proceeding satisfactorily.
The Salvation Army hu made over
sevan hundred converts in the Oity of
Gaelph.
. Yosterday was a lovely day, bright
and warm. The snow Is disappearing
rapidly,
lurnod, but we are assured its mission
hu beon successful.
A scow load of lumber for the island
railway was shipped from the Dominion Sawmill Inst night.
The sir. Princess Louise arrived
from Victoria at 2:45 yesterday afternoon.   Tally onu for the Louise.
For coughs aud colds, uso Imperial
Cough Syrup, sold only by I). 8. Utrtis
ft Co., wholesale and retail druggists,
New Westminster, B, 0. jnyUte ■■
Quile a largo number (if passengers
oame up yesterday, many,of whom belong to what is known as the squatters'
ring-
Evangelistic services nro boing continued in the Methodist Church ovory
night this *. week, and aro largely attended;
The str. Otter, with a barge in tow,
left hore on Sunday, We are afraid
this breach of the Sabbath was not
justifiable.
On Monday the Dominion Sawmill
began working, after having been
dosed nearly a month on account of
cold weather.
Last week the barge Maude brought
250 tons of coal for the 0. P. N. Co.,
and on Sunday the Dunsmuir brought
30 tons more.
Don't forget the Choral Union concert at the Skating Rink to-night.
The proceeds of this concert go to the
Mechanics' Institute.
The chaingang has been employed
several days cleaning snow off the sidewalks, and the service has been highly
appreciated by our citizens,
Two Bturgeons wero brought to the
C. P. N, wharf yesterday afternoon
weighing from 700 to BOO lbs. each.
They were caught,by Indians,
As selling oil is the order of the day,
James KUard k Co. beg to .inform tlie
, public that they will give 10 per cent.
discount on all goods bought for rash.
(dcl7tc)
The ratio of inhabitants to the square
mile in Canada is 1.23; in the United
States 13.02, and in Belgium.481.71.
The ratio in Canada is the smallest of
any country in the world, and in Bel*
gium the largest.
A correspondent at Clover Valley
says that the nrrival uf Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Walker, from Toronto,'has
marked by a dance. There were over
80 persons present, aud dancing was
kept up till 0 o'clock in tho morning.
The str. Idaho, from Tacoma, arrived on Saturday morning with 40
tons of froight, She cumo via Victoria, where sho discharged 11 quantity
uf powder, and this made her a day
late. She brought thu new steam tire
engine for this oity.
The commission appointed by the
legislature to investigate tho claims of
Coal Harbor "squatters" makes very
slow progress, and it is said a conclusion will not be reached iu less than
two or three weeks. In the mean
time, everything is unsettled.
The new steam Sre engine, which
arrived by the str. Idaho lut Saturday
morning, was tested by the Hyack Co.
on Monday afternoon, The tests, wo
believe, .were quite satisfactory. In
our next issue we ahall' givo some particulars about this engine nnd its capacity.
The str. Dunsmuir this morning
takes 60 pigs for Nanaimo. These
pigs oome from the farm of Messrs.
Innes Bros,, Langley, and aro as fine
a looking lot of animals as one would
wish to see. They were raised entirely
on the farm. We understand they
have been sold en bloc to a Nanaimo
commission merohnnt.
Rev. Robt. Lennie, late of Ontario,
arrived by the str. Teaser on Monday,
and wilt proceed at once to organize a
Baptist congregation in this city. Mr.
Lennie is accompanied by his wifo and
a family of 7 children. Service will
be held in the Court House until n
church hu boen erected, for which
arrangements will be made in the
apring.      '
It is wise to provide against emergencies that are liable to arise In every
family, A cold may be a dangerous
thing, or not, depending upon the means
at hand to combat it In sudden attacks
of cold, oroup, asthma, eto., Ayer's Cher*
ry Pectoral will prove the quickest and
meat effective cure, and your best friend.
To thb Ladies.—Mr. Henry W.
Hughes, having been engaged working
for The Columbian sinco Dec. 8,1884,
lias beon unable to make his regular
calls with Frank Siddall's soap to his
regular lady patrons. Any person
running out of stock, however, can be
supplied by sending a postal card, or
by calling at the store of Mr. 0. O.
Major, who sells the soap, and Mr.
Hughes gets all the profits, —Adv.
A Oiuab Makinci Leper.—A young
German cigar dealer reported discovering a cue uf leprosy at police headquarters recently, nnd Officer Michaels
wu sent with him to investigate it.
His guide led him to the Wong Ti Wo
oigar factory, on Pacific streot, just
above Dupont, and pointed out his
Hnd on n small shelf-like structure
built ou the wall of the factory. The
sick man's face and hands showed few
signs of diseue, but the crown of his
head and the joints of his body wore
perfectly rotten... Great running sores
covered many portions of his body,
and had eaten deep holes, ranging
from a half inch to two inches in diameter. One of his legs wu bo far
gone that his hoot wu nearly filled
with matter, from which a frightful
stench arose, Michaels was so kick-
ened by tbe sight that he did not wait
to call in n physioiau, but summoned
an express wagon and bundled the siek
man off to the pest house post haste.
There iB a doubt existing whether the
Chinaman's disease wu really leprosy
or an advanced stago of syphilis. " He
haa been employed in the notary, as a
tobacco stripper for many years,' and
only quit work recently, when he became too ill to stand it.—if. F. Alta.
People who smoke cigars made where
Chinamen are employed had better
mnke a note of this paragraph.
The Professor and the Premier.
—Presiding at tho annual, dinner of
the Manchester St. Andrew's Society
in celebration of St. Andrew's Day.
Professor Blackie, in the course of a
characteristic speech, said he. would
mention a conversation he haa with
that grand old man Gladstone—(applause)—at Dalmcny Outle, mid he
was perfectly worthy to 'alt cheek by
jowl with that grand old man, because
eleven months ago ho wu publicly
baptised by the noble members of the
St. Andrew's Society qf Manchester
"the grand old boy; (Laughter and
applause,) Well, he met' 'the grand
old man, who said to him, "Professor
Blackie, what element of .Celtic blood
Ib there in you?" He said, "None at
all; I am all Saxon from tip to too."
"Oh," said Oladetone,. ^tjAre JLfeat
you, bocause I ..am-'botir ft«|4of> and
Colt, My fathor came from Dumfries*
shire and Lanarkshire"—ijt^i^f/^r*
fectly wall known that "this wu no—
"and my grandmother came from
Dingwall; tlterefore I am both Saxon
ani! Celt." "Therefore,*1 Baid ho (Professor Blackie), "that is why you are
the man you aro. You got all your
solidity and sense From Iho Saxon, and
you, got your inspiration and seriousness aiid apostlesnip nnd enthusiastiq
love of justice from tho perfervidum
ingeniumScotomm, (Applause.) And
then he sang to Gladstone twu Scottish
songs- (laughter)—the' result of which
was that Gladstone was well pleased
with Blackie, and Blackiu was mure
pleasod with Gladstone. (Laughter
and applause.)
Cranberry Culture.—"Two years
ago," says the Willamette Partner, "a
man who understood tho culture of
cranberries purchased a swamp in
Western Washington and planted out
the wild native cranberry with such
success that iii two years hiB cultivation produced a berry three times the
size of tho wild fruit. This is the second year and hu has picked 1,100 bar
rels of berries. He has now planted
out tho larger eastern 'cranberry; but
believes the smaller native fruit will
possess superior flavor aiid acquire
sufficient size. By comparing eastern
cuttings with native vines he is satisfied that they will improve vory rapidly. The man alluded to purchased 7,*
000 ncres of swamp for a song, and in
two years has 1,100 barrels of fruit
worth $16 per barrel (816,600) while
his total outlay was uot half that. The
cranberry is the most delicious fruit
for sauce with moats that is known,
and always commands a high price. It
can be kept for a year, ur at least for
many months and can be actually sent
around tho world. They ure put in
barrels filled with water and thus
kopt." Tho California (Wei-adds
"No doubt the native cranberry
"swamps along Fraser river and many
other portions uf the country could be
utilized for this purpose, and would
yield a large profit ta thoso who. engage in the business, There will always ben good market for them, both
at homo und abroad. For a person
with n small capital and one wnn understands thu growing of them, we
believe it to be one of the best openings in the country for a permanent
payiug business."
Freaks of Justice.—Tho dearth uf
items in the police court wu broken by
tho presenco of a case on Monday
morning which possessed some remarkablo features, Sometimo about the
middle uf this month n man named John
Russoll was arrested at Port Moody,
taken befuro the muuistrate aiid sentenced to two months in New Westminster Jail for vagrancy. Instead of
bringing' him over to this city, for
somo reason tho constable kept him at
the Purt Muody lockup, Tho constable asked him one day if he wanted to
run away, tu which he snid "uo."
"Then," snid Constable Sharpe, "you'd
bottor come out and cut this wood."
Russell went at tho wood, nnd Sharpe
went off. When Sharpe returned Russell had disappeared, and the constable's loaded revolver was tnisaiiig too.
Word wns eent to this city,' and on the
same day Russell was arrested here by
Mr. Moresby aud lodged in jail. There
he remained until Monday, when he
was brought before Messrs, W, D.
Ferris and B. V. Edmonds, J. Pa, and
sentenced to six months in gaol with
hard, labor.' This punishment was inflicted for the theft of the revolver,
found in his possession. The court declined to impose any penalty for the
escape from custody, asit was considered
the constable had no right in the tirst
Rlace to keep tho prisoner, nt Port
loody when ho was sentenced to jail,
and iq the second place he should havo
been properly guarded. The court
also remarked upon the impropriety of
keeping the man in. jail ton .day* before bringing him up for trial. The
circumstances were, certainly quite ro-
marlmblo. Mr. McColl (Corbould &
McColl) appeared.for the prosecution,
Geo. Andrews, overseer of the Lowell
Carpet Corporation, Wu' for over twenty
years, before his removal to Lowell,
afflicted with.Bait rheum in its worst
fonn. Its ulcerations -actually covered
more than half the surface of his body
and limbs. He wu entirely cured by
Ayer's Sarsaparilla, See certificate fn
Ayer's Almanac for 1883.'
Maple Itldffe Council.
' -.The first regular meeting of the nuw
council was hold on the 10th inst.
All tbe members-elect- Reeve Geo.
Howison, Esq., and Couns, Harris,
Laity, Isaac, Baker and Fitapatrick,
were present and were sworn in, in the
usual way. The municipal officers of
lut year wero re-appointed. The collector wu instructed to. take proceedings ngaiiiBt thoso in arrears for taxes.
The olerk was requested. ta apply to
the chiof commissioner of lands and
works to establish as public highways
the roads advertised in tho B. C, Gazette. It wai resolved thnt nn application be made to the members for the
district fur u liberal grant for the construction of roads. Coiiqcil then adjourned till the first Saturday in February.
        .»      ——
Drive it Away;— Drive away alt poisonous humor from thu blood beforo It
develops in scrofula or some chrouio fonn
of disease. Burdock Blood Bitters will
dolt.
Communication*.
Cburcli Doors.
Editor Columbian.—Ib there uot a
law requiring the doors of all public
buildings to open outwards 1 If so,
whose duty is it to see that said law is
enforced 1 I notice that the doors of
some of the churches in this city open
inwards, and in case of any alarm by
fire or otherwise, when these buildings
ate filled with people, the cousequencei
might be very seriouB. Vory few net-
sens have any idea of the danger there
is in being caught in a crowd when
said crowd is excited and trying to
force itself through a narrow passage
Knowing from experience what this
means is my reason for drawing attention to tho matter.—Yours, fto.. ,
Publio Safety,
N. W., Jan. 20, 1885.   -
Some Historical Facts.
Editor Columbian.—It may be well
just now to review the history of the
municipality of New Westminster in
order to strengthen the hands of our
delegates in their mission to the house
of representatives fur aid and encouragement to bring a branch of the C.
P. R. into this city.
In 1859 a proclamation was made
that Her Majesty's government was
desirous of establishing a commercial
as well u a political capital in British
Columbia.. The result was thu choice
Of the present site of the city of New
Westminster. About ■ four hundred
acres were surveyed into city lots nnd
sold by auction with a promise that
the proceeds uf sale should go towards
clearing and making thejitreets of said
city. ..This promise produced spirited
competition, and tho price paid by
purchasers amounted to One hundred
and twenty-seven thousand dollars and
twenty-eight cents; and the paltry
Bum uf nine thousand two hundred
and seventy-seven dollars only wu
laid out in improving the streets! The
promise was repudiated by the then
ruling power. In 1860 the city municipality was established, and during
the 4 years following the city council
had levied, collected and paid for improving this royal city the sunt of $42,-
400, and sinco that time (18(14) there
has been levied nnd collected up to
date und expended in improving this
city, to make it a suitable place to reside in for the thousands who are now
coming tu our shores, the further sum
of about $240,000, making a sum total,
including the purchue price paid for
the land of about 3410,000! New Westminster has always been first and fore*
most in overy improvement local and
provincial. Wo were incorporated two
years in advance of all other municipalities iu the province and have carried self-imposed burthens enough to
dishearten and crush the faint-hearted.
None but those who witnessed the
difficulties of the early pioneers in
making a oity out of the tremendous
forest which covered the ground, and
grading the streets, filling the ravines,
and building a water-frontage, oan
havo any correct conceptions Jof the
heavy burthens (self-imposedjf which
the law loving and abiding citizens of
New Westminster have carried the
past twenty four yean. Rut these
natural difficulties have.disappeared,
the wilderness has been made .to bud
and blossbm-'iS^She'roie, and we-can
now view with pride and pleasure the
result of our labors —this beautiful
royal oity. But groat as the natural
difficulties have been in forming this
city, they woro nothing in comparison
to the political difficulties whioh wero
imposed upon us. It is too painful to
dwell upon, but if evor there was a
community scattered and peeled by
former governments or powers it was
the people of New Westminster. They
purchased with an imperial pledge that
this would be made tho political aud
commercial capital uf British Columbia, nnd this pledge was almost immediately repudiated without nny compensation. The promise of making
the streets by the colonial powera was
also repudiated, with the exception of
tho sum named above. These two
facts abovo were sufficient to discourage aud keep back the city fur years.
Theie are other difficulties which need
not be now mentioned, but many who
read these lines will remember them
for thoir name is legi'.n. But, thank
God, imbecility and redtapeism has left
our shores forever; and now, faithful
to our principles of freedom and responsibility, wo have obtained.n liberal,
enlightened and responsible government—a government that has the confidence of the people—and we are encouraged to send our respected delegates on their mission to lay before
this paternal govornment our claims
for aid to bring into our city a bnuioh
of the C.P.R, If auy community in
tho province is worthy of favorable
consideration from,the government, it
is this community, which hu fuught
bo lung and so hard under so many
difficulties and at last won prosperity
and success. We are second to uo
other community in the province in
upholding a good govornment. We
are uut booming upon false speculations or investments, although we
think if thero is one spot more favorable than another in B.C. for sure and
profitable investment it is iu New
Westminster. This is nut the idea of
n moment; it is the convictions of
yenrs that whon tho C. V. R. was
brought to Coal Harbor or Port Moody
the first boom wuuld be at those places,
but when these had time to cool down
thu whole booming, from the Atlantic
to the Pacific, consequent upon the
C.P. It., would finish up at New Westminster. New Westminster is tuo important a place to be passed by when
tho right kind of people cume to onr
shores. We are nut envious nm- jealous nt the prospects of Purt Moody nr
Conl Harbor. Wo nro near enough iu
either place to be benefitted by their
prosperity. We have advantages over
either place, and will bide our timo.
While the peoplo of New Westminstor
have already signified their willingness
to give a reasonable bonus for railway
connection, it seems to me thu government would not be exceeding its duly
if it secured that connection without
any additional burdens upon us. —■
Yours, fto., Wm. Clahkhon,
Good KcsolnTlons for 1885.
To Insure my life in the Equitable on
the Semi Tontine system; also,
To insure my house, furniture and
stock in the 1'honix of Brooklyn or the
Liverpool and London and Globe,
ju .Ito       Woods k Turner, Agents,
DOES This Refer to You?--Are you
troubled with biliousness, dyspepsln,
liver or kidney complains, or bad blood?
If so you will find a certain cure in Burdock Blood Bitter.
If you want a neat calendar for 1886,
call at T, R. Pearson k Co's. •   '
The Dynamite Fiends
House or Commons Blown Up I
London Tower and White Hall
In Ruins!
LATEST AND FULLEST PARTICULARS.
[By Telegraph te tbe  Columbian.]
London, Jan. 24, 2:10 p. m.—An alarming explosion hu just occurred in the
houses of parliament.
.2:30 p. in.—The houses of parliament
und government   offices were severely
shaken and considerable damage done.
It is impossible at this moment to tefl
the extent of the calamity.   The report
of the explosion was heard in Downing
street. Great excitement prevails. Enormous crowds are assembling at the so
of the explosion.   The origin of the
plosion is wrapped in mystery,"
believed to have been caused
mite.
* 4 p. m,—The explosion occurred close
to the house of lords, near Westminster
Hall, It Ib reported that the explosive
was placed in tho crypt under the build*
ing. A policeman was hurt by the force
of the shock, which was tremendous and
was folt at a great distance. The amount
of damage done is very great. Rumors
are current at the house that another ex*
plosion occurred at 2 o'clock this after-
noon at London Tower. The excitement
increases with every moment, and the
oity is filled with fifing rumors.   Then
of the eg*
y, but it Is
t by dyMB
were two explosions instead of one,
first supposed at the parliament houses.
The second caffle about 3 minutes after
the first. One was near the house of
commons, the. other at, Westminster
Hall. One man was arrested near the
scene of the explosion. • The detective
force is hard at work now seeking further developments whieh are anxiously
awaited, particularly by people In tiie
neighborhood of Westminster Hall.
4:10 p.m.-Rumors regarding the ex-
explosion at London Tower are confirm'
ed. The oitrage was the most successful
yet made upon any of the publio build*
mgs since the inauguration of the present
era of dynamite warfare. The famous
old building was crowded with visiters
at the time of the explosion. The wildest rumors are in circulation as to the
number of 'persons injured. These rumors are being carried through the city
and constantly exaggerated by visitors
present at the time. Up to 4 o'clock but
lli person* have been officially reported
as injured by tho explosion, none mortally.
The attack was made on buildings
known as White Tower. It was fairly
fitted with visitors at the time, and moat
if not all those hurt were moving about
in the, tower at the time of the explosion,
White Tower is almost completely
wrecked by force of the explosion; the
roof is blown dear off the structure.
All the persons - known to be injured
wero visitors. The police, the moment
they realized the nature of the explosion,
effectually barred all egress from the
tower and grounds and are now subjecting every person detained to a most rigid
search upon the theory that the attack
was perpetrated by some person or p^r*
sons inside the premises.
Surgeons were promptly summoned to
tho assistance ofthe injured, who are
now receiving alt attention practicable.
The excitement Ib, growing as news of
the explosion spreads. Tho crowds in
the vicinity of the damaged buildings are
increasing momentarily.
Saturday, being usual visiting day at
the houses of parliament, the buildings
contained a great number of slght-seert
at the time of the explosions. The first
explosion occurred in the crypt of Wesl*
minster hall; the second took place '
the strangers' gallery in the house
commons. Immediately before the.first
explosion a lady visitor who was alone 1
and about tp enter the building beAoned■!
to a policeman and called bis attention'
to a package lying on tho stoop outside.
Tlio policeman picked up the package
carelessly, not suspecting anything, and
went with it into Westiniuster halt He
had no sooner reached the hull than the
package, exploded.
4:30 p. tn.—Investigation so far made
leads to tho conclusion that the exploive
used in the attack on tbe tower was
handled by persona who gained access to
the structure as sightseers. The ruins
also show the explosives operated from a
point somewhere on the inner bastion, or
m the esplanade nearest the Thames. It
now turns out that the police were unusually prompt and successful In placing
their embargo upon atl egress from the
tower aud grounds. But few persons
had loft when the embargo was ordered.
Extra guards have beeu posted about the
walls, and every person within them will
be subjected to personal examination.
Tlie report made by the tower explosion
was terrific, and was heard for mites up
and down the Thames, and at once attracted an immense crowd to tbe scene.
A clue to the perpetrators of the outrage js thought to have been discovered.
Just before the explosion occurred a man
and woman, the latter carrying a baud
bag, engaged a cab outside the parliament yard and diove rapidly away, giving no directions as to destination. They
liad not gone far when the explosion
happened. The cabman hearing this
stopped. The man and woman at once
leaped out and hastened quickly from
the spot. The cabman went in pursuit
of ihe runaways who wore soon overtaken
and arrested by the police,
4:30 p. m.—The prevalent belief is
that the destructive agent was conveyed
into the house of commons by some of
Saturday's visitors. Fuller investigation shows tlie extent of the damage
much greater than was first supposed.
The western extremity of the house is a
total wreck. Thero is uow no doubt but
tho oxptosive was placed under the peers'
gollery, ou thu government side of the
house. All the wood-work of that part
of tho building is shattered, and a wide
hole made through thu floor. Tho gallery is displaced and thu solid stone work
of thu doorways either pulverized or
shifted from position. Every pants of
glass in thu Iioubo is smashed to atoms.
Thu gallery benches are overturned and
broken and tlie gallery dismantled.
This exptopiou knocked a policeman
down and Injured him seriously. His
case is considered critical. Its force also
knocked down 2 other policemen stand*
ing in the vicinity aud stunned them. A
lady aud gentleman near the officer who
had tlie package were also prostrated.
The great window over the main en.
trance to Westminster hall is smashed to
atoms and all the side windows are
blown out. Iu the interior of the house
of comnioiiB, upon the floor the only seat
damaged by the explosion was that whieh
(Hailstone occupied, A small chip is
torn oil' the top of the speaker's chair.
Tho explosion caused a panic among the
visitors. Those who were in the house
of commons fled precipitately. Many
ladies wore bruised and crashed. The
second explosion in the parliament buildings occurred 3 minutes later, and was
far more destructive. The dynamite
whicli caused the second explosion must
have been placed under the peers'gallery ou the left side. Little hope Is eu-
tertaiuud of the survival of the wounded
policeman. The force of tho explosion
wns suoh that ouo man was blown to the
earth 200 yards from thu point of explosion. The lobby of tho houso of commons ia completely demolished.
5 p.m.— Later reports show the first
stories about the damage to the White
Tower somewhat exaggerated. The
White Tower building wus not destroyed, and tt Is now said tho structure was
not very seriously injured. Those later
reports tended somewhat to allay public
excitement, If the explosion really de-
moliahed tho White Tower, the result
must be necessarily more serious for that
part of the building used an the armory
-at present for the storage, of rifles and
often for lorge quantities of ammunition.
This fact makes the popular indignation
against the perpetrators of the outrage
iudiacribable- A large number of children were among the visitors. Many of
tliese little ones nad their faces and hands
badly torn by broken glass and flying
splinters. Tbe most piteous sight in
the large crowd of innocent prisoners temporarily detained within the
tower's walls was afforded by theso little
ones with their pale faces and bleeding
heads.
London, Jan. 24, 4:30 p. in.—A lady
visiting the house of commons at tbe
time of the outrage was seriously injured. Immense damage was done in
the lobby. The Mosaic decorations and
sculpture aro utterly destroyed. Tlie
place is described as literally blown to
pieces, The shook was fety in Pall Mall,
and persons in the vicinity say the very
earth shook. Sir William Vernon Har-
court, home secretary, and the Marquis
of Hartingson, secretary of state for war,
visiting the scene. Another account of
the explosion at Westminster Halt says
explosion wss more disastrous than at
ii'rat anticipated, Four persons were badly
injured, including two policemen fatally.
A lady who was tn tho hall spied an infernal machine and called tlie attention
of policeman Cole, on duty at the time to
it. Officer Colo rushed to the spot, seized
the machine, aud attempted to extinguish the fuse, but he was not quick
enough,
LoXdon. Jan. 24.—The favorite theory of the police la tbat the dynamite
which caused the explosions in Westminster Hall and the Iioubo ef commons and
at| Tower was carried to the place in each
case concealed nnder a long coat of a wo-
aan,*Wuose appearance was tfauenade to
resemble that of a woman abtnt to become a mother. The worn**--AA "whom
this appearance was very neNwlble was
seen among visitors at the tower this af-
'ternoon shortly before the explosion occurred. She wa escorted by a tali man
with a military afr.   Neither of them
Jild be found after the gates were clos-
«fter the explosion, and when the
iters came to be searched the supposed
woman and escort escaped during the
rush that occurred just after the explosion and before the gates were closed.
This important action of the police is
generally ridiculed.
Intense anti-Irish feeling Ib caused
by the outrage, and it seems certain to
unfavorably affect the Irishmen employed
or seeking employment in England. Vigilance committees and anti-Irish leagues
are talked of. It is estimated, according
to the course and energy of the explosive
employed in the house of commons, that,
If tne house had beeu in session, Gladstone, Sir William Vernon Harcourt,
Charles Bradlaugh and 200 other members would have been killed.
The search of the visitors at the Tower
after the explosion occupied four hours,
Tbe number of those Injured by the explosion is as follows: At the Tower, six
were injured seriously, fourteen slightly.
At the parliament buildings, four seriously, ten slightly. The worst injuries
were received by constables Cox and Cole
and a civil engineer named Edwin Gran,
who was visiting the parliament buildings. Cox aud Cola are still unconscious j
their recovery Is hopeless. Over one
hundred visitors were in the house of
Commons when the explosion occurred in
Westminster Hall, Most of them rushed
out of the building to ascertain the cause
of the report, and thus many lives were
saved.
News of the Introduction in tbe Amor-
caii senate of a bill by Senator Edmunds,
to prevent and punish dynamite conspiracies in tha United .States, has had the
effect of turning aside the feeling of bitterness against America which had beun
engendered by the explosion. The Tdwer
was fairly fillet! with visitors at the time
the explosion occurred, Many persons
were seriously injured. One man had a
lag broken, another had an ear completely severed frem his head. Thty were
token to the hospital.where their wounds
were carefully dnned. AS 7.» p.w.
the crowd were' still at the Tower, ahd
cries for. vengeance continue oh every
side. The throng of people about the
parliament buildings is as great as ever
and tumultuous with excitement.
Two persons were arrested just after
the explosion, as they were hurrying
away from Westminster. The nun is
middle aged, somewhat above medium
height, and he describes himself as
a Canadian seafarer and part owner of
a vessel. The police, convinced of his
innocence, released him. The locality of
the explosion in the house of commons is
nl-t ays in a deep shadow, being directly
under the gallery. The persons who deposited the dynamite were much less likely to attract notice than in almost any
other part of the house.
The Pall Malt Gazette summarizes Us
account of the explosion in the house
of commons In the following language :—
"Thus the whole interior ofthe house of
commons presents a remarkable deal of
devastation. Although there is a great
litter, everything may be pnt right within a week's time. Nothing is more surprising about the whole dastardly outrage thau its utter failure (to effect any
substantial injury.''
All glass and other fragile articles in
the hall are smashed out of semblance
to their former selves. A large hole was
crushed through the floor at the spot
where ths dynamite was placed. Directly over head a similar hole was blown
through the roof and the wood work set
on fire by the explosion, but before any
serious damage had been done by the
flames they wero extinguished. All persons arrested during ttie afternoon, on
suspicion of being implicated iu to-day's
crime, were released this evening, there
being no facts against them sufficient to
warrant the keeping of them in custody.
The police are completely nonplussed,
and they are incapable of forming a theory, and appear to lie dazed at their own
inefficiency to prevent such outrages or
discover their perpetrators when committed. The popular indignation ran so
high, and the clamor of the crowd for
some one upon whom to wreak vengeance
for the awful crimes of the afternoon w a
so insatiate that the persons ejrrestcd on
suspicion narrowly escaped lynching
when set at liberty. Wherever men congregated—nt clubs, hotels, on the street
or at home—-the onu topic of conversation
throughout London and throughout the
United Kingdom this evening lias lieen
this last instance of tho dynamiters' devilish activity. A remarkable force was
shown by the explosion at Weitminiter
Hall, in thu downward direction. Holes
were scooped in the ground targe euouuli
to hold a man. Into one of these how
so formed constable Cox was violently
thrown, and from it was extricated in a
bruised and battered condition. Two
other policemen near tht point o( explosion were not so badly hurt, but they
were thoroughly stunned by the concussion. A further inspection of the locality
of the explosion in the house of commons
shows that the flooring was driven dear
through to the basement, The floors
throughout the buildings are littered
with the debris of broken caudeliors,
gloss and other objects of a fragile nature. The gas fixtures were wrecked,
and it was impossible for Col, Majendle,
chief of the department ot explosives, to
continue his investigation for want of
proper Illumination. The damsite, however, will not delay the assemblage uf
parliament, as everything cau be easily
repaired before the day for meeting arrives,
Lonuon, Jan. 24.—Passongers on all
the steamers which left Dover for France
this afternoon and evening were searched, in tbe hope of finding some of the
perpetrators of the London outrage, but
the search was fruitless,
PARIS,. Jan. 24—News of the dynamite
explosion at London haa caused an enormous sensation, especially among tiie
English and Germans of this city, Tho
English embassy has been besieged all
evening by anxious equirles after the lat*,
est details. The Newt dispatches from
London are posted in the main reception
room as fast as received, and bulletin
boards are constantly surrounded. Lord
Lyons could not be seen this evening,
but as far as could be learned from the
attaches of the legation there U no suspicions that Fenians in Paris, of whom
James Stephens' iu leader, were connected with the plot, and no special investigation is ordered in thb city.
New York, Jan. 24.—When D'Don*
ovan Rosaa was told about the explosion
in the house of parliament, he suid he was
glad to hear the news,and that the house
of parliament ought to have been blown
up long ago. He hadbeen preaching and
collecting money to fight England with
for the post five years. The sooner England waa crippled, he said, the better.
When asked if he knew anything about
the explosion, he shook his head iu a
Hystericus manner and replied he hod
nothing to say.
Washington, Jan. 24.—Senator Bayard introduced the following resolution
in the senate to-day: "Resolved, that
the senate of the United States has
heard with indignation aud profound
Borrow of the attempt to destroy the
houses of parliament and other public
buildings in London, and hereby express its horror and detestation of such
monstrous crimes against civilization."
Consideration postponed until Monday
to enable the senate to receive fuller in
formation.
London, Jan. 20.—A man named Cunningham has been arrested on suspicion
of Doing connected with the dynamite
explosion, He gave various addresses,
and a contradictory account of himself.
Keys were found in his possession which
exactly fitted the door of the residence
ta WW
place of abode, also keys'which fitted
in the lock of the suspicious bag and
box. Cunningham is the only suspect
now ta custody. It ia now known the
infernal machines used that caused the
disasters were ignited by sulphuric acid
which worked through cotton wool and
ate away tlie cap of the dynamite. The
process ocsupied twenty minutes time,
and this allowed the conspirators to escape before the explosion took place.
Irish newspapers denounce the outrage
ta vigorous terms. The police believe
the arrest of Cunningham is very, im'-
Sortsut and hope to be able t > establish
is connection with the dynamiters In
America. The police of Liverpool are
unable to trace his antecedents and claim
i never resided in Liverpool.
IS ew .York, Jan. 20.—The Herald re*
fening to the dynamite explosion, says:
"We propose so far as Americana are
concerned that the dynamite business
shall be brought to a speedy end. We
propose to turn on it the broad ray of
the light of publio opinion in America.
We will place the London police in possession of important facts which our correspondents have been able to glean in
Paris." The indignation over the monster outrage is all but universal in this
city. The Herald has editorial opinions
of representative men of all professions
and trades. With equal unanimity the
eastern papers of all political creeds denounce the outrages as dastardly. The
Tribune calls for concerted action on the
part of civilized nations. The Timet
says Edmunds' bill is the .beginning of
an attempt in good faith to legislate
against the preparation here for such
crimes as the London explosions; hut
doea uot entirely meet the difficulty.
The point to be met is that America contributes what Irish dynamiters may re*
emit with,
Washington, Jan. 20.—Bayard's, resolution as agreed to is as follows: Resolved tliat the senate of the United
States Us' heard With indignation and
profound sorrow of the attempt to dea-
tn/ the houses of parliament and other
public buildings in London, and to imperil Uu- lives of innocent persons-, and
hereby expresses its horror and detesta-
tion at inch monstrous crimes against
civilization-
" '•liosn^ri Jaa. **%.— After' Ool. Magen-
die had completed his prolonged and
minute scrutiny of the locality of the
explosions in the parliament building,
it was handed over to the workmen. The
cliief architect ia of opinion that temporary repairs catt be effected within 3
weeks, which will place the house of
commons in a condition exactly similar
to that ia which it was before the explosions took place. The Daily Telegraph,
commenting upon the passage of Senator Bayards resolution, says: "It'a a
poor compliment to Americans to praise
them for doing what was ho obviously
their duty regarding the recent explosion." The writer goes on to say that
the United States must rise to a full
realisation of their responsibility in this
matter, and must grapple with such
men as O'Douovan Rossa and Folk-ford,
who are heads of the mission.
London, Jan 16.—A special dispatch
from Home states it is understood in
semi-official circles that Italy is prepared, when the emergency arrises, to
send 5,000 soldiers to Egypt to assist in
support British authority there.
Colorado City, Jan. 22.—A heavy
snow storm Is in progress. The weather
for a week past has been very severe on
cattle and Bheep. If the storm continues
the loss of live stock will be very great.
Reports of losses are constantly coming
ta. Specials from Gainesville and other
northern Texas points report heavy raina
to-day. It is freezing to-night and cattle are dying rapidly.
St. Petersburg, Jan. 23.—Excitement
is rife to-day over the attempted assassination of the police Supt. Kollert. He
was attacked by the strangers in one of
the main thoroughfares in broad daylight this morning. The assailants eaoh
fired shots at him and then fled. They
were pursued and captured, and have
both been identified aa well known nihilists.
Hongkong, Jan. 23.—Special advices
say that Admiral Courbet's operations
for the seizure of the mines of Kelung
have been thwarted by the Chinese. The
despatch states that the French troops
disembarked and attacked Kelung, but
were repulsed with a loss of 75 men,
Later news contains information of the
repulse of the French, due largely to tlie
inefficiency of tlieir attack owing to miscalculation of the enemies' strength,
Tlie French, troops aro being now organised for a' combined attack upon both
Kelung and Taiiisiii.
London, Jan. 23.— A Bpecial from
Cairo says that a report was circulated
to-day to the effect that General Stew*
rnuea tne door oi tits'residence l %rVe a^,™ hftV4 h„n(Weatecl and rout-
hitechapel, claimed by him as Mftf ^ b-rEi &M& katt. - *—<
of abode, also key. which fitted | J,^ E (RStaifi advice, re-
ceived late this afternoon from Korti assert that the rebels surrounded General
Stewart in Ike desert, where he has taken
up an entrenched position, awaiting re-
enforcements from General Wolseley.
Deserters from the rebel lines state that
the Mahdi's officers consider the affair
at Abuklea Wells a draw battle. Tlie
Arabs were neither routed or pursued,
and fell back ta an orderly manner, not
in the least demoralized by tho outcome
of the engagement. They recovered
themselves so effectively and so quickly
that General Stewart dared not move
and was compelled to entrench himself
on the scene of the conflict. Government officers discredit the information
conveyed in the above private despatches.
Alexandria, Jan. 23.—Private advices from the front state that the rebels
are entrenched at Metamneh, which.fort it
will be necessary for the English to take
before they eau proceed to Khartoum.
It is reported that the rebels are collected
at Abu namel, prepared to resist General Earle.
London, Jan. 24.—No further news
concerning Oen. Stewart has been received at the war office up to noon, and
anxiety as to his fate is greatly increased.
London, Jau. 24.—The war office has
just made publio that a dispatch was.received thii afternoon from Gen. Wolseley
at Korti, which says he hu heard'nothing from Gen. Stewart The reported
capture of Omaureman by Et Mahdi's
forces, Wolseley aays, lacks confirmation
and is doubtful. Gen. Earle'i column is
thoroughh/-V|irov.sioued aud equipped.
It started to-day from Hatndab for Berber. The march is to be made by way
of Abu Hained.
The Mouaasiere tribe, under the command of Wadgamer, whe ordered the
murder of Colonel Stewart, and the fighting meu of other tribes under Moussa
have assembled in war order at Pit).
This is 35 miles ai>ove Hamdab, the
starting point of to-day's expedition.
Wolseley saya both Wadgamer and
Mousse boast that they are determined
to give battle, If so the engagement
between these chiefs and Gen. Earle by
Monday would seem inevitable. Wol-
Mky •totMrbs«av«c,that the soldiers
who go with Earle are in the best of
health and spirits. They regard Stew
art's battle last Saturday oa a glorious
victory, are proud of achievements of
comrades and anxious to meet the rebels
on their own account. Wo seley declares that the Arabs have been do
pressed by the news of Stewart's victory and its effect has been so great and
widespread, in his opinion, it may be
properly considered doubtful if Earle
will meet any serious opposition before
reaching Berber.
London, Jan. 20.—Dispatches from
Rome state that reports are current
which say that Italian forces, recently
dispatched to Assof, will assist the British forces in the Soudan as soon as
landed.
Sopuan, Jan. 20, 2:30 r. h.—The war
office has juat made publio the contents of
a dispatch received this afternoon from
General Wolseley at Korti. He says he
has not received any further news from
General Stewart. Ho assures the government that, in hia opinion, there ia no
cause for anxiety on this long absence of
intelligence.
Whatever additional reports General
Stewart may have dispatched, General
Wolseley Bays, must come by camel coin-
ieia with the ordinary British escort.
London, Jan. 27.—Up to midnight on
Monday no tidings were received at the
m*um mm, an mbi-* ar tub HMMB      i War Office from General   Stewart.   The
MWt FROM ALL P«T» BF THI WDM.     | gU(Wen dwWoil of   Gtnnral Wolseley
_»     . , i to go to tho front is considered ominous.
London, Jan. i. — The Army anal
Xttrtf Gazelle, commenting upon the outbreak in Cores, refers to two strong reasons which Russia has for designing to
extend southward her frontier to Coren.
First, she wishes a warmer, smaller and
more cosily dsfonded naval station than
Vladivostok, whose harbor is blocked
with ice several weeks in the year. 2d,
Russia wishes to obtain a large additional
native population, from whieh to raise a
large Imve to guard the Pacific coast and
enable her htrttrr to cope with China,
Tlie Gazelle, urges England and America,
both having large interests ta Cores, to
join with Japan In the endeavor to frustrate tlie design of Russia. England.saya
tlio Gazette, should render Hong Kong
safe against Russian attacks ami maintain a strong fleet iu tho Pacific.
Nuw York, Jan. 15.—The Sun saya:
The only lively branch of business seems
to be that of steam navigation. The
Pacific Mail is doing a rattling business
in spite of the bad times. Ocean steamship companies are talking of running
thoir ships ou the European plan—making
psaseugera pay for cabin only, and charging meals a la carle. Everybody coin-
ilains of hard times. The theatrical two-
ile awl restauraut-keepers say tbat thev
jave not seen anything like this since
the days of the Wall-street panic of 1873,
The begtaaiug of the year brought back
to New York the first-class theatrical
companies which started out with the
brightest hopes but a few weeks before
Christmas. Tbe agent of oue of the leading champagne firms says ho sold ta 1884
40,000 less rases of wine thau he did in
any othor year since he had the agency
of the firm.
Panama. Jan. 10.—The Nicaragnan
Treaty with tho United States has just
been published in full here, and exoitoa
much comment. The Star and Herald
says: "No sympathy exists in Central
America with the proposed cession of
territory. Gen. Grant is mistaken when
ho says the sympathy of the whole country is with the movement. Ths statements by Gen. Zavala are apparently intended to blind the public or to advance
a speculative movement, in which Central America cau have little interest, nnd
Nicaragusus none whatever," Referring
to the proposed Nicaragnan Canal it
says: "Every inch of tho hundred miles
of earth and rock-cutting teems with
lingering germs of tropical disease, which
havo been accumulating for centuries on
the muddy hanks of the rivers and lakes,
whioh are suddenly to be converted into
navigable channels,"
Well Spoken Of.—R. N. Wheeler, of
Everton, speaks highly of Hagyard's
Pectoral Balsam. It cured him of inflammation of the lungs and an obstinate
cough. It loosens the phlegm and heals
the lungs.
A Total Wreck.—Many a strong
frame haa been totally wrecked by rheumatism. D. McCrimmon, of Lancaster,
was cured of chronic rheumatism by Burdock Blood Bitters. It cures all blood
impurities.
YESTERDAY'SMSPATCHES
(/.rntrnl tolfcCUiMiMM.)
Nkw OuLkANa, Jan. 20.— When tho
train bearing the liberty bell drew up at
the reservoir this afternoon, Varna
Davis Hayes, grand-child of Jeff Davis,
was lifted to tlie bell, which she warmly
clasped and kissed, and exclaimed, "God
bleaa the dear eld bell." The incident
waa greeted with cheers. Mr. Davis
himself soon drove np, and Frank Bacon,
U. S. commissioner of Kansas and president of the commission, greeting him,.
said: "Mr. Davis, on behalf of the association of the United States commissioners,
representing different states and territories of onr common country, joined by
the great common industries, extend to
you a cordial invitation to join ta escorting to New Orleans and to the exposition
Cuds tlw old liberty bell so generously
sd us by the city of tn-otherly lovt,"
Mr, Davis responded ss follows: "I feel
most deeply complimented by this reception and the expressions that accompany
it. I wu sick ta bed when this notice
reached me, and 1 immediately arose
when I heard that that glorious old bell
was at the station. 1 thank you and
your associates and trust that your anticipation of the harmonizing tendencies of
the journey of the old bell across tho
states of the Union, some of which have
sprung Into existence since its tones first
filled the air, may hi every respect be
fully realised, 1 think the time has
come when reason should be substituted
for passion, and when men who have
fought in support of tlieir honest convictions should do justice to each other.
Yen sacred organ that gave voice to the
proudest declaration that a handful, of
men ever made, when they lace,I the
greatest military power on earth; when
a handful of men declared to tho world
their inalienable rights, and staked life,
liberty and prosperity in defense of this
declaration. There 'twas with your
clear tones you sent notice to all who
were willing to live or die for liberty,
and felt that the time was at hand
when every patriot must do patriot's
duty;     Glorious old bell I the son of a
revolutionary soldier Imws in reverence
to you, worn by time but increasing ta
sacred memories. Mr. President, accept my thanks, whLh are heartfelt and
sincerely given."
New YORK, Jan. 27.—A Herald cable
says, on the whole the position of Gladstone grows, instead of diminishing, in
difficulty. . Fiji correspondence comes
upon the top of other disquieting events
to still further damage the reputation of
the foreign and colonial ofllce, and it
looks as though the British public will
now soon be convinced that as long as
Gladstone is at the bead of affairs
everything is bound to go wrong.
A Settled Fact.—It is a significant
fact that Hagyard's Yellow Oil is the
best household remedy for internal and
external use in cases of pain, soreness,
lameness and inflammatory complaints.
MAJOR.--In tbis eity,on the 24th Inst,,
Mnry UwoiKlolln, daughter of C, G.
Major, aged 10 months and ft days.
FASftEMNU.
Mrs Rcldk'lftli, Rev Mr I>ennlc, wife and
7 children, Mi'surs J AVI 1 Hams, TTmvera,
I'Asluir, H riij-liiiiK, Sutherland, It Cun*
nltiKhiini, Union, .1 r Itoiirke, H bodge,
Horsi'ly, Hudson, O Fiilkcnlet, J Fulkcii-
lei, 1 Indian.
Per str. Idaho, from Tacoma, Jon,
24-C* McDouough, 0 HcNiuntliteii, D H
Curtis A Co, O T Kyle, H Hells, H W
Hughes, Jus Cunningham, Jas Rousseau,,
J M Brunswick Balk Co, J Wilson, J Ellard A Co, MrsE Cold, TnibBros, TR
Poantou, W B Austin, W E McCartney.
.   Coal Harbor Property,
Having subdivided my
COAL HARBOR PROPERTY,
I am prepared to soil lots at from $50
upwards.
LAND ALSO BY THB ACRE.
Applv to
HENRY V. EDMONDS,
Land Agent,
n29te New Westminster.
The results of tbe Semi Tontine system
of the Equitable are really marvellous.
Ask Woods k Tcrmer for one of their
cards showing the profits secured bythe
assured. ,''   jny3to
THE WEST 81IMK FOB 8EPTE!»EB.
-The Great lllnslrated British €«!■■••
bia Mil ion. A mil ••'•puly mow •■ ■"■•<
at T. B. Praraon A Co's., sale agents hr
Ilie .11 til ii land, al VI tin. each. le
Job printing of all kinds neatly done
at the Columhian ollice. Prices will be
found lower than at any other ofllce In
the provinco.—'Adv,
Mortgages, Deeds, Leases, Agree
ments of Sale, and blank forms. ?T all
kinds, at T. II. Pearson k Co's. *
Beautiful photographic panoramic
views in British .Columbia, 75 cts. per
set at T. R. Pearson k Co.'s. *
Property belonging to the Ebenezer
Brown estate for sale by C. D. RAND.*
If you want Gold, lead the Mechanics'
Store Advertisement iu this paper,   (te)
.Several housei for sale by C. D. RAN D.
JjX Uov. C. Watson, Pastor. Services at
11 a. in. mul 7 p. in. Sunday School and
HiMe Oliiss 2:*ju p. m, I'rayer Meeting on
Thursdays at 8 j». in. Hcntp free; strangers
cordially Invited. Je"*te.
M
UNION LOPUE Mo. 9, A. V.
A A. HI.—-The tegular Com*
munlcntloiis of this Lodge are
.    .    . held on the Hrst Monday In each
month.  Sojourning brethren ar© cordially Invited toutU'iul D. WILSON,
fe'SMc Secretary.
evtrr Bunds)
■'      ryHatf,
1 QT-^JftAUL'S  CHURCH.    Rev. G.
TO"*XR«v,TtiBelBr. -flervlmnvvciyBn'
nt II a. M. nnd 7 i>. u. In the Rectory ,
Ki.,tuh ii street, below Royal avenue. Heats
froe, ail nre cordially Invited. Sumluv
School it( 2.30 I', m. Rector's residence,
MoitI vale street, below Agnes street. Baptism administered tochiluren nt ai|y time
und place desired by parents. Mnrrlnge
solcmul/cd aud performed whenever and
where ver requested—subject to the provisions of the " MtiiTiiija* Ordinance, 1817."
The service ior tlie "Ilurlnl of the Dead"
enn ho used for Ihe baptised or the nnbiip*
tlsod. no2-te
FOR SAT.ll.
YOKE OF HEAVY WORK OXEN-FOB
Snle.        Apyly at THJS OFFIOE.
nol2tc
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral.
11 Onrllle, Ohio, Sept. 10, ML
COLDS. " I,ftWn8 to" sutplMt to * •*•■■
ehltd affection, with frequent
colds, (or a number of years, I henby certify tbat AVER'S CHERRY PECTOUE. giVSS
ne prompt relief, and Is tbe most effective
remedy I have ever tried.
James A. Hawltox,
Editor of The Creteeet."
1 Mt. Ollead, Ohio, Joce M, 1682.
" I have used Aveb's Gbwt
Pectoral this spring for a seven) cough and lone trouble with good
effect,.and I am pleased to recommend It
tb any one similarly affected.
IlARVtT BADOBMAir,
Proprietor Globe Hotel**
PREPARED BY
Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, i
SoldbyallOnotits.
Burdock
B LO O D
WILL CURE OR REUEVE
BILIOUSNESS,    ■■ DIZZINESS,
•nopsr, 	
FLWTEMHQ
0F THE HEART,
•am* of
THE STOMACH
OUTNESS
OF THE SKIM,
f cJlienia aritln. froir
*~0«MOH,
0TSPEPSIA,
INDIGESTION,
JAUNDICE.
ERYSIPELAS,
SALT RHEUM,
HEARTBURN,
HEADACHE,
And .very sptda,
dlwrdered LIV..I,    K.ONiYS,   STI
BOWELU OD   CLOOO,
T. HILBURHI SO., ^5U
ORGANS
 ASD      -
PIANOS
iwusicT
-KOH HALRBY	
T. R. PEARSON & CO.,
COLUMBIA STREET,
New   Westminster,  B.
(sclBlo)
c. fflui gtoig.
k REMARKABLE STORY.
"Perhaps sho does ask the shop people," said Miss Matilda; "it.would bo
wiso of her, for I should not think
they'd ever see tho color of their
money. The old Merridews can never
keep np nil that extravagance, and
Algy is nothing move than a clerk in.
his fathVs oilieo. lt ia dreadful to
see a young man dragged on to destruction like that."
"Oh, I hope it is not so bad!" cried
Mrs. John.   "I am sure, if 1 thought
so, I should never let "
"It is tho talk of the town," said
Miss Matilda. "A thing must be very
bad before it comes to us, who nevor
hear any gossip,"
"Oh, everybody knows" said Miss
Martha.
It was happy thut Hester's mind was
so fully occupied, and I lint tlie conversation passed harmlessly ovor lior head.
Whon they reached the Vernonry, Mr.
Mildway Vornon got down from the
box, where he had been seated wrapped up from head tu foot, but which
lio protested ugainst with n continuous
volley of short coughs, as ho helped the
ladtos out, each one after tho other.
He thought iu his heart that if one of
these strong young women had beeu
put upon thu box, who had no rheumatism, it would have beon more appropriate.
"I hope you have enjoyed your
ovening, including your dinner," he
said. " I havo made up my mind to
rheumatism to-morrow; but what does
that matter iu comparison with such a
delightful entertainment ?"
"It was vory nice," said Mrs. John,
dubious as to his meaning, us she always was.
"Nico," hu said, with a griuimuce,"n
sort of little heaven upon earth',"
"It is wicked to be so satirical,"
said one sister, with a laugh ; and
"Dear Catherino, I am sure sho meant
everything that was kind," said the
other.
And then there was u little flutter of
"good-nights," tho respective doors
opening, aud lights flashing out into
the dark'.
This entertainment was followed,
very shortly after, by the larger gathering which Catherino bud announced
her intention of giving somo timo bofore, and ta which all Redborough wus
convoked, besides the immediate family. The period between these two
parties was the climax of Hester's hostility to Catherine Vernon. Sho had
never been so actively indignant, so
angry, nor ao impotent against her old
and wealthy cousin as in these wintry
days. Catherine was a kind of impersonation of injustice and uukindness to
Hester. She felt not only that sho
herself was oppressed and injured, but
that the persecution of which ahe was
the object was of a kind winch was
most petty and miserable, degrading to
the author of it us well as to its victim.
The attempt at interferenco with her
movements was not only a kind of
meddling most irritating to u higli
spirited girl, but it was alao tho kind
of assault which her pride prevented
her from resisting openly. Hester felt
that sho would have lowered her own
pride and wounded her own self
spect, had she uttered a word of reply,
or taken uny notice of the small and
petty attack upon her. The incident
of the pearls, though so trifling, excited her almost us much us the other and
more important grievance sho had
against Catherine. That Edward should
be so cowed by this woman that he
had to conceal sentiments, to otlend
the girl whom he loved, to compromise
his own honor and dignity, all because
of Catherine's watch upon him, and
the subjection in which it held him
was such u miserable thought to Hester
that it wus all sho could do to restrain
herself at all. It is terriblo to be com
polled to endure one who has harmed
those who are uear to you, hut to enter her house nnd preserve a show of
peace and good-feeling, though you are
aware Bhe is causing the self-debasement of those yon love, this is the
hardest all. What should it matter to
him that Catherine's eye waa upon him}
An honorable aud fine spirit would not
have been .influenced by any auoh oppression. It made Hester's heart sick
to think that lie did this consciously,
deceived his benefactress and pretended to obey her when in liis heart he
loathed his bondage; and to think that
she herself should be called upon to
sustain this humiliation filled her with
shame and rage. But though her heart
was bitter against Edward, there was a
softening in it, nn involuntary indulgence, which made her glad to elude
the question so far as he was concerned, and to fix upon Catharine, who
was the cause of it, with all her forco
of indignation.
From Hester's point of  view there
was, indeed, little to bo aaid for this
woman, who, to ao many in the placo,
was the very impersonation of active
benevolence and goodness—a  tyrant
who seized upon tho very soul of tho
young man whom she favored moat,
(tnd whose prying nud vigilant observation  forced  him  to deception, and
made him true to himself only when
he was out of her Bight -a woman who,
while she gavo with one hand, closed n
grasp upon the people obliged to her
with the other, and would prescribe
* their vory dross if she could.    Oh, how
true it must be, nfter all, the picture
of tho tynnieil, narrow despot, exacting,  remorseless,   descending  to tho
lowest details, which a woman, when
endued with irresponsible power, was
allowed tu make. Hester (had rebelled,
as a girl doe!*, against every injurious
picture of women; but it occurred to
her now that it muBt all bo true.   No
' doubt it was unsafe  to trust  nuch a
creature with any kind of authority.
She would not be content with absolute
sway.   She would let no charity nor
ruth, nor tho hearts of oLhera,nnr tlieir
wishes, stand iu their way,   Sho would
crash a young life with no moro compunction than a savage.   Thus Hestor
took refuse from questions more Irving from the aspect, of Edward, which
within these last fow days hnd   been
moro and more important to hor.  Her
whole being seemed to be flowing toward him with a current   which  ahe
felt herself unable  to  restrain.   Sho
did  not any longer ask heraelf questions about hia love.   She tried not to
ask any questions about him nt all.
In her secret consciousness there wna
a distrust of him, nnd nervousness nml
fear, whioh had never beon breathed
into any ear—scarcely oven into her
wwn.   Indeed, Hester  was hor   own
only confidante.   All tho things whioh
occupied her  were  uncommunicuble.
She had grown a woman.   Everything
that happened was now moro important lo ner thau in earlier days.   And
now there had como a crisis in her fnte,
and It was not she who held tlie key of
tho problem, nur hor lover, nor any
legitimate authority-but Catherine;
Catherine controlled her future nnd ull
iti issues, through  hiin 1   Catherine
oould have stopped all further develop
ment for both—she could have checked thoir love ruthlessly, and made an
end of their happiness. The girl began
to feel that thero was something iu tho
presence of this woman, in her influence, in hor very name, that .was insupportable. Thai impulse of flight
which alwnjrs presents itself to the impatient spirit camo upon her strongly.
Why .should not she and hor mother
shako themselves free from tho imbroglio—go away anywhere, it did not matter where, and get peace at least, and
a lifo free of agitations and complications 1 Awny from the Vernons she
would be free to work us she pleased,
and so make up for the aid that Catherino gave. Away from them there
would bo no more question of love nnd
hate—lovo afraid to declare itself, hate
veiled beneath the aspect of benevolence.
Hestor hud very littlo to do at home.
She had not oven books to read. She
hud unbounded timo to think. Even
her visits to her old friends, the captain and his wife, hud grown Iobb frequent since Emma camo, for Emma's
monologues were not amusing to Hester's excited mind, and the captain and
Mrs. Morgan had both yielded to thoir
granddaughter's irrepressible talent of
speech. Hester was more at home in
consequence, mure alone, loss subject
to wholesome distractions and interruptions, She would think and think tho
whole ovening through. The Then dan-
santes began to till her with a sort of
sickening, of weariness aud disgust.
Sho felt as if she, too, liko Emma, had
gono lo got her "chalice" there, and
was, like Emma, hung up in degrading suspense until ho should speak.
The rage with her position, the scorn
of horself with this filled her, is indescribable. Shu would burst forth into
wild laughter nfter one of Emma's calculations, often repented, about Reginald Merridew; thou hide her face in
her hands to conceal the burning blush,
tho bitter consciousness that her own
circumstances were not much different.
Thu self-ridicule was more painful slill
thau the self-disgust. She shed no
tears over the question, but the laughter wus a great deal more bitter than
uny tears. '    -
Mrs. John was as unconscious of this
struggle as if it had gone on in Kamt-
chutka aud did uot under her own eyo,
in her own parlor, and the bedroom
that opened into hers. She was not
one of tho women who divino. She
understood what was told her, and not
always that—never anything moro than
was told her. She thought her child
was not looking well, but then she had
a cold, and there is nothing more oppressive than a cold. Tho first thing
that really startled her was Heater's
determination not to go to Mra. Merri-
dew's party on the first Thursday that
occurred aftor Christmas, which wns to
be a particularly brilliant one. This
struck her mother with consternation.
"Do you think your cold is so bad
as that I I would not wish you to do
anything imprudent, but I huve often
heard girls say that a ball was tho very
bost thing for n cold. If you were to
nurse up this evening, and have your
breakfast in bed, I can't help thinking
you would feci quito yourself to-morrow, my darling," Mrs. John said.
"It is not my cold," said Hostor;
und thou she reflected that it was a
pity to throw aside so excellent a plea,
"At least, it is not altogether my
cold."
"Oh, I know how oppressed one
feels—just good for nothing ; but, my
hive, you would feel sorry after. It is
a pity to give in. You shall hnve a
foot-bath to-night, with some mustard
in it, aud a hot drink. And you must
not get up till mid-day. You'll feel a
grent deal botter after that."
"I don't menu to go—I nm tired of
them," Hester said, her impatience
getting tho better of her; "once a week
is a great deal too often. I am sick of
tho very name of dnncing."
"My lovo," cried her mother, in
consternation. Thou sho came behind
her and gavo her a soft littlo kiss. ''I
think I shall givo you quinine, for I'm
sure you're low," sho said: "and you
must bu bright uud well, and looking
you're bust,for Catherine's party,which
is next week."
"I don't," cried Hester, She then
stopped short, for sho had uot the
heart to give her mother a double
wound by declaring sho would not go
to Catherine's party. One such blow
waa onough at a time,
Tlm astonishment with which her
noii-uppearnuccat Mra. Morridew's was
regarded by all the connection was unbounded. The discovery that Hester
waa not going filled the Miss Ridge-
ways with excitement. What could he
the cause ?
"I Biippose there has been a quarrel,"
tho sisters said, "Ellen is a little
minx; but still she is a true Vernon,
and won't stand nny such airs as that
girl gives herself. Her mother and
she aro insupportable, with her pearls
and their pretenses."
"Roman pearls," aaid Mr. Mildmay
Vernon, "and Brummagem presents."
So they discussed the question.
When Hester wont in next day to Captain Morgan's, not without a little cu*
riosity to hear from Emma what had
been Baid of her absence, "I am glad
you have recovered," Mrs. Morgan
said, kissing hor, and looking into her
face with an nir of reproach and a
shake of the head.
'It is not like you to give in for a
cold," the old captain,added, but fortunately for Hester all explanation ou
hor part and all remonstrance ou theirs
was cut short by the persevering, deliberate voice wliich now was the principal circumstance in the old people's
house.
"1 assure ynu Ellon was very, much
astonished. She looked at mo as if she
could not beliovo her uyus. And thuy
all looked at me as if it was my fault.
,Huw could it bo iny fault ? I didn't
givo you your cold! I think there
were mom poople than usual there.
We had Sir Roger do Covorly, yon
know, because it wns Christmas. I
danced it with young Mr. Norris, who
has just como into his fortune, you
know. Ho is very nice. He ar.ked
me for ftmr dances, but I only gavo
him three. Don't you think I was
right, grandmamma ? That is the
worst of Ellen's parties, that thero are
no old chaperons with experience that
could advise on a point like that. Two
waltzes and the Sir Roger, which is a
sort of extra, you know, and doesn't
count. I don't think thoro could be
anything wrong in that,"
"You should not givo in, Hosier,"
aid the old captain. "That is not
liko you. What is a cold at your ago 1
You should always stand to you colors,
and hold your—'
(To be Continued.)
NEW SCALE OF  PRICES.
JL,. GtOIjD
HAH PEC'IDEO TO SELL IUB QUO*
carles by retail, giving to Ihe Public
nil the advantage of tho wholesale market— for cash, viz.:
Bnt Flour, $3.ill^ per	
Light llromi sugar, 9 c, per lb.
tiranulateil     **     lie.    *
IK-1 Mack Ten        *Uc.    "
Best Green Tea       4.1c.   "
Hest Green Coffee, I'i' .j •?.    "
Best Uracil t'oflce, pure Java, tf lbs. fur
a dollar.
Besl (.rouii'l Coffee, pure Java, 9__, per
pound.
Eastern covered Hams, 'Uir, iter lit.
Gulden Byrnp, J3c per mil.
Online nl, Mr. per sack, 10 lbs.
Lump Sugar, W-.e. per lb.
Bite, $:Mft prr rut.
All description of Qroeerles, Spices, Ao,,
will be sold in proportion, ii detailed list
being too long,
Dry V<hh1s, Boots and Sliees, ('lut bias,
Ae., are offered at equally low prices.
The above prices being actually the
wholesale rates, no rebate will'bo made
no matter bow largo the quantity purchased. Jnyilte
•"NVE "W
&
 IMPORTERS	
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
FROM ST., . KKW WKTTMINSTKR
OFFER FOR SALE
Extra, SuperUne and Gralism
PLOUE
BARLEY,
GROUND BARLEY,
WHEAT,
MIDDLINGS
mm MMjm,.?m9
OIL CAKE,
OATS,
OAT MEAL,
CORN MEAL,
CRAIN  SACKS,
HAMS, BACON, LARD, BUTTER,
DRIED FRUIT,  COFFEE ,
AND SPICES.
TURNER, BEETON & GO.
MERCHANTS,
WHAKF STKEET • VIOTOMA.
North British and Mercantile
Insurance Co. Tor Mainland.
H.C. BEETON & CO.,
'.ICi Fiiisbuiy Circus,
London, E. C.
Just Opened Out
— AT	
ILIUM I CM
500 Copies H-'tHlih- Miliary,
Inoludluiic Uu' New Style,
GOVERNMENT  NOTICES.
NOTICE,
Hale or Lots In Osoyoos District
NQTtO& lis HKH13BY OIVEN, tlmt tbo
lots into which tho Govornment He-
nerve tit S|iiillnnurh(!oii Land In ■{ has boen
divided, now designated Bclvldero, will
lie offered for milo nt public miction nt the
oflleeof Walter Dewdney; Esq;, Government Agent. Hpalliimolieon, oi noon on
Saturday, Iii.li February;
WM, HMITHK,
Ohlef Commissloner of LiiiuIh it Works,
Lunds nnd Works Department,
Victoria, 11. 0„ Dec, 17,1881.       27W
Full Lino of
HoliertNfin'N Mill Herlot,
Agents for Pacific Coast Steamship Co,
(ja9to)
JAMES WISE
OFFERS FOR SALE A LARGE AND
woll selected stook of General Mer*
Men's CIotliliiK,
Hoofs nnd Shoes,
Gum Boots,
Bum Coats,
OH-skln Clothing, Ac.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OP
Velveteens,    Cashmeres,    Plaids,
Flannels, Sheetings, Snlrtlngs,
and Table Damasks.
LADIES1 & MISSES' WINTER    t
Cloaks,  Jackets,   and  Milliner;.
A FINE ASSORTMENT OF
Ladles' t Children's Underclothing.
LACKS,   EMBROIDERIES,  CARPETS,
HOOP SKIRTS, BUSTLES, rtc.
(irorerirs. Provisions, Hay, Grain,
Feed, ilc, de.
»s* Prices to suit lire limes.
JAMES WISE,
iletjin'2     Front street, New Westminster.
IN ISSUING THIS CIRCULAR, I wish
to return thanks to iny numberous
Mentis ninl euslomers for thoir patronage, uml hope tn hnvo n continuance of
tlie snmo. Business during tho last few
months has been less than expected. I
havoslllln
Large Stockof Goods
on hand, well  assorted, which will bo
sold until further notico at
COST PUCES FOR mST USB,
The Stook comprises
Dress Materials, Flannels, Cottons,
linens,   Homespuns,   Tweeds,
Cloths, Blankets, Quilts, Xc.
BRITISH nnd CANADIAN   HOSIERY.
Men's, Youth's und Boys'
Clothing, Flannel Underwear,
&c,  Ac., &c.
JACKETS, DOLMANS and   ULSTERS,
And n great variety of other Goods.
uar* Inspection Invited. Goods nil flrst-
claiM and quite new.
(JH0CEKIE8 Hold tit very low figures.
"WM.     HAH.
dol8to
Goal Harbor Properly.
Having sub-divided my
COAL HARBOR PROPERTY,
I nm prepared to sell Iota at from 8oO
upward*.
LAND ALSO BY THE ACRE,
Apply to
HENRY V. EDMONDH,
ll5Ht(!
Land Agent,
New Westminster.
JUST OPENED!
City Market
W. II. KBARY'S OLD STAND,
OPPOSITE POST OFFIOE
Cnll ami noo otirbirgeRtock of General
VEGETABLES A SPECIALTY
drown principally on otir own Farms,
HtmAt sold In nny qnnntltlra,  either
Wholesale or Kclnll.
itrt'AI) orders promptly attended to and
deliveries made In any part of the Oity
free of charge.
M. STEVES & SONS.
Proprietors.
4-fllnmhlaHt., Opp. Past OMet.   del7to
WE HAVE JUST OPENED AT
W. J. French's Old Stani
COLUMBIA STREET
(Centrally located for convenience of
Ladies ordering), a Market to supply the
Public with all kinds of Fresh, Salt and
Smoketl
Fish,  Game,
Vegetables, Fruit,
 AND—- ;
General Fan Produce, &o.,
Wliera there wilt always be found a good
supply on baud.
QOODS . DELIVERED FREE OF
CHARGE to private housos and hotels,
upon orders being left at the otlice.
We respectfully solicit tlio patronage
of tho Public.
tT Remember the stand—TffO DOOM
below Trapp Bros.
WINDSOR k NELSON,
Managers at Market.
JAMES TAUFANDOLE,. .
jlyStc Manager Fishing.
Very Complete Mho nf
The I'ocls, Various f,tylen,
Mark Twain's Experience, 1 bit.
Job Lot of '2,'s cent Novels.
KirjiiiniHiii's t'iiino Instructor,
jieUo's Organ Instructor.
Superb Hon? Dook, 81.
Hong Folio, SI.
T. R. PEARSON & CO.,
Books, Stationery, and Music. Columbia
street, Now Westminster.
Brunette Sat 1.
DeBeck Bros. & Go,
Manufacturers and dealers In all
kinds of
Rough & Dressed Lumber.
Shingles, Hhnkcs, Pickets,
AND TRAYS.
Wo Intend to keep a full stock of
Sash,
Doors,
Blinds,
Mouldings
Ae., Ac., Ac, in fuel
Tlmt will be required to
FINISH A  HOUSE
From bottom to top.
Orders for Hrrell Mmlng, Trimming
aad HbMiil** will lie promptly and caw-
fully attended to. Wo pay particular attention to the manufacture of good, dry
Salmon Boxes,
And we believe our customers will bear
us out In saying that we make
The Beit Salmon Sons on the Rinr.
We sincerely thank those who have favored us with their patronage In the past,
nnd beg to solicit a continuance of tboir
favors. During the past winter wo have
made extensive additions to our MIU, and
can now SU orders more promptly and
cheaply than ever. We have chartered
the steamer "Iris" for the season, nnd will
therefore be able to deliver Lumber
promptly. We have also to announce to
thoeltlxensofrartNMdy that we have
opened a branch of our business at that
place, and will be nble to fill orders from
thoro In a tew days,
DkBEOK BROS, A 00.
New Westminster, Mar 28th, mt. Ito
R. T. WILLIAMS,
BOOK BINDER, PAPER RULER,
and Blank Book Manufacturer..
M.ps ind Drawing Paper Mounted.
Files of Magaitnn, Illustrated Papers,
eto., neatly and cheaply Bound.
eoTfrnnent Street, Vlclorln, 1.0.
General Groceries,
Provisions,
Dry Goods,
Hats and Gaps,
Boots and Shoes,
Hardware,
Crockery,
Tinware,
 -AND	
GENERAL  DEALER,
UDlflftUHMKi), IL
(iy%i)
Ma A. Wliite
Importer ahd Denier lu
Men's, Youths', Boys'
and Children's'
CLOTHING
GENTLEMEN'S
Furnishing Goods,
HATS I CAPS,
Rubber Clothing
UMBRELLAS, ETC.
«**THE  BEST ASSORTMENT
-OF-
ENTIRELY NEW OOODS
IN Tin* CITV.
OOLUMBIA STBEET
OppoHltc Hunk of Itriilsh Col um bin,
OOlBlo
Importer**, "Mi'iiiifiichuviv, and
Dealers In
HARNESS
SADDLERY,
Harness Trimmings, &c.
Have opened a Store In the new
Colonial Block,
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B. C.
.   And lmvo a lino ii«norl mint of every*
thhig required in our lino,
11HANKIN0 -OUR NUMBBOIW TA
. *.- trans in all parik of tlio l'rovlncofor
puHl support, wo tiope, liy h|Met attention
to tlio waiitK of our customers, toeontlnue
supplying them, and to gain new patron*
ngo In tliis vioinity, Wo fenl confident
that wo ean give better nnd cheaper Harness and Baddies thau cau be purchaiiod
elsewhere, hnving a largo and varied Muck
of everything on hand.
OUR  YALE  BRANCH
la conducted by It. DKHIHTON,
and
SPENCE'S BRIDGE BRANCH
By J. W. BURH.
Parties ordering from any of those places
can have Hnrnoss, Ac, at freight advances
on cost at this place.
Now Westminster, Nov. 11,1881.
nn22tc
PltOVINCIATi SEOHETABY'8 OFFICE,
nib January, 1883.
WHEREAS lhe Ideutonnnt-Qoveruor
In Council Ih empowered, under tbo
"Public Ki-hools Act, 187H," lo create School
Districts, in addition lo those already ox*
lsl iu-i, iiml todoflne ibe boundaries thereof, and from Minn to time to alter the
boundaries nt exist IngDlNlrlct-sj It Is.hereby notified Hint 11 Is Honour hus been
pleased loereale thetrncLuf land enclosod
within ibe undermentioned bnunthiricsa
i-icboul   ni.slrlcl,   under  ibe title of the
"Hall's i'ralrle School District,'! viz.j—
Cominonclllgnt lhe Iron Post, International Boundary Llnol HonilahmooBay;
thoneooufit, along mid boundary line, to
the eastern boundary of Hurrey; theiicts
north, nlonj; lhe eastern boundary lino df
Surrey, a dt stance of three milea; thence
west, to Senihihmno Buy; thenoo south,
along lhe shore line of Semiahmoo Bay,
to the point of commencement.
Ily Command,
■INO. ROBSON,
Jnyi'tM Provincial Socretary.
INTERNATIONAL & COLONIAL EXHIBITIONS
ANTWERP  111  ISB5.     LONDON IN 1MB.
IT IS THE INTKXT10N lo have a Canadian ropresenimion at the Inthkna*
TioNAi. Exhibition* at Antwerp, com*
mrihelrig In May, 1888! and also at the Co-
i,oMAi, mid IM'UN Kxiiidition In London In 1880.
■ Tho Oovemninit will defray tho cost of
freight in conveying Canadian Exhibits
to Antwerp, and from Antwerp to London
aiul also ut tvtm niii)* them to Canada In
thoovontof their nol being sold.
All Exhibits for   Antwerp  should be
lady for shipment not later than the first
eelc in March noxt.
These Exhibitions, tt Is believed, will
a third favorable opportunity for milking
known the natural en pa hlllf ies, and manufacturing uud I iidu*-trlul progress of the
Dominion,
circulars and   forms containing more
pnrtloulnr Information maybe obtained
by letter iposl free) addressed to the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
By Order, JOHN LOWE,
Soe, Dept. of Agriculture
Deptirtmnnl of Agriculture,
Ottawa, Dec. IDtb, 1881. JnyHW
PARTNERSHIP WANTED
BY A STEADY YOUNG MAN, RE-
Hitblo and active, with moderate
capital. References exchanged. Address
"Business," This Ollice. JnyHml
BOARD AND LODGING
A LARGE DOUBLE BEDROOM, newly
J\ furnished and well heated, suitable
for two or three gentlemen. Terms moderate,
Vf, X. BINGHAM,
Jny7to At L. Gold's Store.
NOTICE.
4LL ACCOUNTS AGAINST THE N.W.
A P. M. Telephone Co. must bo round forthwith to me, by whom, for the
future, all accounts will bo paid and all
moneys collected.
Signed: Vf, WEEKS,
iw»l« - .   Sec, A Trons.
NOTICE.
■DABTIES ARE HEREBY CAUTIONED
JT against negotiating or otherwise dealing with a promissory note drawn by
Duncan Smith In favor of A.C*. Frasor,
dated 11th Dec, 1883, for Iho sum of snin.00;
the same having beon lost by the undersigned.
RICITD. H. ALEXANDER.
Burrard Inlet, B,C.,23rdDqo. 1881,     27m
NOTICE.
PARTIES LOCATING AND PRE-
empting land are hereby notified
tbat Unit within the limits of the Hut*
togs Saw Mill Company's lease is not
opeii ('for settlement, and that any one
entering thereon will be prosecuted for
trespass,
RICH'D H. ALEXANDER,
dc8-tc Manager.
jsroTica.
XTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
il application will be made to the
Legislative Assembly of tho Provlncoof
llrltlsh Columbia, at Its next sossion, for
an Act to incorporate n Company lo construct and work a railway from anoint In
the city of New Westminster to some point
near tho 49th parallel of North latitude
between Semiahmoo Buy and Township
10 In the District of New Westminster,
Provinco of British Columbia.
CORBOULD A McCOLL,
Solicitors for Applicants.
New Westminster, Dec. Ist, I8.S1.        d I7w«
N°
chan
1TOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN that Mr. AlbertJ.
Armstrong has censed to be tho Munu-
Sor of thfi (inn of Armstrong* Burr, Lum-
er Morohantfl, i'ort Moody, and has no
authority to eiiler into any contracts, or
do any net on the part of tho firm,
Por! Moody, Jun,Oth, 1885. JnylOto
VTOTICE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT
appMcnth-n   will   ho   made at the
next session of the Legislature for n Bill
hi)iu'ur|iin*;ik* the llnmette Saw Mill Co.,
Limited.
HUGHES A ATKINSON,
Agents fm* Applicants.
New Westminster, Dee. 20, IWI.    d24w8
-ISrOT-XCE.
NOTICE IS IIEUE11Y GIVEN THAT
an application will ho mnde tu the
liCitUliitlvi' Assembly of tlie Provlncoof
British GoluiHbla.nt.ltfi next session, for
a charter to construct a llneof railway
from some i-r.iiit near the idth parallel of
north h lllude, between semiahmoo Bay
and the eastern boundary of Township
lil, In the District of New Westminster, to
the City of New Westminster,
HUGHES A ATKINSON.
Agents for Applicants.
New Westminster, Dec. 1L>, lBSi      dol3w6
IsTOTICB.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT
application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia,
at Us next session, for an Aet to amend
tho Act UjjBNioratlng the New Westminster and Port Moody Telephone Company,
Limited, fiojiK to authoi'l!-.)* the said Company to exren-l Us lines nf telephone from
(hOOltyof New Westminster to Burrard
Inlet audi liiMieetotirauvllle and throughout and boyond Granville and Its vicinity
in Mich direction as tho Company may
determine.
DaledJunuaryTlh, 1835.
CORHOULD A MoCOLL,
JnylSwil Solicitors of Applicants,
—TO-
RAILWAY CONTRACTOBS
TE'lSriD'Ej'RS
WIU. MS  IlKCEIVEn UP TO THE
lOlli Day or February Next,
-^KOIt	
IHJIKIMJ.    (.IHIIIMI  „   BMMUMI
20 miles ok 'run
KSqilMALT is X'AXAIMO IUILWAT
From Esquimau Northwnnl.
Plans, SpcolDanUonB mul Bills of ouiui-
II!Ii's cirri Fie Kirrrrr lit llio C'onipiuiyr»omco,
Viotorin. ll. 0., whoro li-rnlem nro to bo
loll,
I-'iii'tln-i' liirni'linrtioir mny lio olitnlllixt
nn Application tn .1. II1JNTKI1, Clllol Ell'
Klllnt-T.
It. Dtltil'MlTIll, President,
JnyMId IJ. d* JS. Itnllwny Co.
MAINLAND
CIGAR
FACTORY
WHITE LABOR ONLY.
WM. TIETJEN
H
AH OI'KNIOD A G'KMH FACTORY
luIho ■
Holbrook Htoue Building*
HEW WESTMISHTER,
And hnving had many years experience,
In now propared to supply tho trade with
a superior article at. prlcei an low an can
booblalned elsewhere.      Lookout for the
"MAINLAND"
WtANDOK CIQAI1A
■Wil beats lliein all, fl«24tO
3KTOTIOE.
OTIOK IH HERKBY QI VEN that the
undersigned, doing a general merchandise business at Granville, H. 0.,
under the name of Hemlaw A Co.. have
this day dissolved partnership by mutual
consent. Owing to tho III health of H.
Hemlaw, who retires from the firm, all
debt* must be paid to ]•'. Qold, who ua*
tnimesall liabilities.
(Signed) H. HEMLAW.
E. GOLD.
(Iranvlllc, B. C., Dec. 29,1881.
THANKING ALL MY FRIENDS for
their kind patronago for tho past, I
would ask a continuance of the same for
the remaining partner,
JnySto H. HEMLAW.
ESQUIMALTANONANAIMOR.lt.
< OYIItK 1IIKS OH II u.
Victoria, Sept.», IMI,.
SCHEDULE OF WAGES
ror White Labor on the Esquimau
and Nunaliuo Hallway.
Rock Foreman 93 00 to %i oo per day
Earth Foreman 2 BO " 8 00 "
Bridge Foreman 3 60 "4 00 "* •
Bridge Carpenters  3 00 "
Blacksmltnu, 1st class 3 60 "
Drlllerfl 2 00 " 2'2S "
Laborers 1 75 " 2 00 '
Howern  8 00 "
Choppers........ 1 75 " 2 00 "
All outsido labor ten hours per day.
All carpenters to furnish their own cheat
tools.
All employees find themselves board,
bed and lodging.
Hoarding Houses will  bo convenient
along the lino.
Board, U per week.
It will not be compulsory for employees
to board In the company's houses.
Wages will bo paid monthly on the 15th
o euch month.
GRAHAM A BUSK,
ocltc Contractors,
CanadionPacificRailway
NEW    SCHEDULE
—OF—
-WAG-ESS
—FOR—
WHITE   LABOR
—OK  THB-
Canadian Pacific Railway
—IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Private Bill.
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN THAT
application will be made to the
Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, at the present session
thereof, for nn Act to Incorporate a Company for tho purpose of constructing, managing and maintaining waterworks at the
terminal point of tho Canndlau Pacific
Railway, on Coal Harbor anil English
Bay, and for (he purposes Iherercof, granting to the said company the privilege of
taking water from Copltohi Creek, Burnaby Lake, or other sltable points, with
8ower to tho said company to build
times, aqueducts, lay pipes, erect dams,
acquire lands und do all other acts and
thliigr   — ' ** n 	
said.
Dated the Kith day of January
 L Jny ITOw
Solicitor for Applicants,
ry, 1885.
ILTO-rXCE.
XTOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN, that In
ll compliance with Secllon 4, "Timber
Act, IHSt," I intend applying to the Chief
Commissioner of Lauds and Works for a
license to cut and carry away timber
from the following described crown lands
slaked ofl'by me previous to (he date of
this application:
Commencing at a stake on tho shoro of
Burrard Inlet placed alongside (ho northwest corner stake of Lot four hundred nnd
forty*soven (447), Group One (I), running
thence west along the north line of suld
lot twenty chains, thenco due north forty
chains, thenee duo east forty chains,
thence due south to tho western boundary
Uno of the Moodyvillo timber reserve,
thence along the said Hues to the shore of
llurrard Inlet, and thence westerly along
said shore to the point of commencement;
containing one hundred and sixty acres,
more or less.
Jnyjlml PHIL. MoMAHON.
New West minster, Jan. 20:1S8S.
&
NOTICE.
OTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that we
, Intend making application to tlie
_„ilef Commissioner of Lands and Works
for permission to lease for timbering pur*
poses the following described lands situated in Now Westminster District:
1. Commencing nt a post on the shore of
Gillies Bay, Texada Island, about one
mile N. W. of Shelter point, extending
along the shoro for a distance of 160
ehulns, with a depth of 80cbutus,containing 1280 acres, more or less.
2. Commencing at n post on the North
shoro of CardoroChannel, nearly opposite
Denham Island, extending along the
shore for a dlstanco of 100 chains, with a
depth of 100 chains, containing 1000 acres,
moro or less.
il. Commencing at a stake on the shore
of Hemming Bav, Thurlow Island, about
one-half mite West of Jackson Point;
thence following tho shore line 120chains;
thenco lu n N. W. direction 240 chains;
thence Easterly 100 chnins; theuco South
to point of commencement, containing
XM acres, more or less.
HASTINGS SAW MILL CO'Y,
RlCttn. H. AMEXANDKR,
Managor.
Burrard Inlet, B. O„80th July, 1881.
____ aulBlc	
Legislative Assembly,
PRIVATE BILLS.
A LL APPLICATIONS FOR PRIVATE
A Bills, properly the subject of legislation by the Legislative Assembly of Brit*
Ish Columbia, within the purview of the
"British Nortii America Act, 1807," whether forHM erection or* Bridge, the making
of a Hatlroad, Turnpike Rood, or Tele-
graph Line: the const ruction or Improvement of a Harbor, Canal, Lock, Dun, or
Slide, or othor like work; the granting of
a right of Ferry; tho Incorporation of uny
S articular trade or calling, or or uny Joint
tock Company; or otherwise for gran ting
to nny Individual or Individuals any exclusive or peculiar righto or privileges
whatever, or for doing any matter or thing
which In IU operation would nftVct the
rights or proporty of other parties, or ro*
late to any particular class of the community; or for making any amendment
of a like nature to any former Act —shall
require a Notice, clearly and distinctly
specifying the nature and object ofthe
application, to be published as follows:—
A notico In the Rrltlnh Columbia Gazette,
and In one newspaper published lu the
District affected, or If there be no nowspn*
per published therein, then In a newspa*
pel In the next nearest District In which
a newspaper Is published.
Much notico shall be continued In each
case for a period of at least six weeks, during the Interval of time between the closo
of the neit'proceeding. Session and the
consideration of the Petition,
Before any Petition, praying for leave to
bring In a Private Bill forfthe erection of a
Toll Bridge, Is presented lo tbe House, the
person or persons Intending to petition
for such Bill shall, upon giving I heimit loo
prescribed bythe preceding rule, also at
ihe same time and In the same manner.
Rive notice of the rates which they Intend
i ask,tho extent of tho privilege, the
height of the arches, the Interval between
tho abutments or piers for the passage of
rafts and vessels, nnd mentioning also
whether thoy Intend to erect a drawbridge
or not, and the dimensions ofthe snmo.
THORNTON FELL,
Clerk of the Legislative Assembly.
so24fo      ■
GIRL WANTED.
ONE   WHO UNDERSTANDS GENE*
ral housework.  Apply to
MRS. D. ROBSON,
deMc Royal Avenue
Overseers ... ......$125 00 per month.
Rook Foremen... .$!( 50 to $4 00 $ Amy
Earth Foremen... 2 60 to   3 50     "
Bridge Foremen.. 3 50 to   4 60    "
Bridge Carpenters,
1st class....... 1 50 "
Bridge Carpenters,
2nd class  S 00 '!
Masons 2 50 to   3 50    "
Stone Cutters.... 3 00 to   3 60     "
Blacksmiths,    let
class  3 50 "
Blacksmiths,   2nd
class  3 00 "
Blacksmith Helpers  1 GO to   2 00     "
Drlllew ; 2 00 to 2 25    "
Laborers,..  1 75 to 2 00    "
Hewers, 1st class   3 60 "
Choppers, 1st class 2 00 to 2 50     "
Scorers, 1st class    2 60 "
All outside labor 10 hours per day.
All Carpenters to furnish their own'
Chest Tools.
All Employees to find themselves Bed,
Board and Lodging.
Boarding Houses will  be convenient
along the Line.   Board—$6 per week.
It will not he compulsory for Employees to board in the Company's Houses.
Wages will be paid monthly, on the
10th of eaoh month.
A.   ONDERDONK,
Gkkkrai. Managkr.
Office ok tiik Co nth actors,
Canadian Pacific Railway,
Yale, March 1,1883.
DR. ALLEN'S
PRIVATE DISPENSARY*
*ie% Kearny St., San Franelseo, Cal*
ESTAUUSIIED FOB lilt SCUSTIFIO  ASD HrilM CCSl
or-Ciutoxic, Nirvovs arb Bpkcul Diisaiu.
THE EXPERT SPECIALIST,
T\R. ALLEN, AS 18 WFLL KNOWN, 18 A
j.J.rtgular graduated I'liyilclan, tdncstrd il
Sowdolo Cotlpn and Uirfwifty of Hleblisn,. lis
hai dovolnl a wethuo to the itudy of tlit trtat-
ment and euro nf dlieuri within his ipKlatly.
And MIDDLE A(1ED MEN, whoor« lofffring fr»*»
Hid ciltoli of Youthful Indlwretl-mi or Ficm-ci
In maturer yaan.NiSTous and Phtiioai bsnuti,
iMfoTisci, Lost Manhood,, ainfUiion of Idru,
dull e;», NY-wlon to aociBly, detjiondency, plm*
•iIk* on tlio face, loss of energy and memory, fra.
quoncy of urinating, sio.
MY HOSPITAL KXPF.IlfKNCK
(Uaiinx beun aurgeun In charge of two leading
hi-inl'MR) eiiuhlei mi! lo treat all private tronblei
with excellent reaulta. I wiih lt dlitlncllj under*
etood that I do not claim to perform Impoeelblll-
tiin, or to have nilraculona or lupernatnral power.
I claim only to bo a tddlKlil nnd eucctufnl rbyil.
clan and Burgeon, thoroughly Informed la my
specialty—
DISEASES UP  HAN.
All. spplylnic to me will receive my bonul
opinion of their Gomplalute—No experimenting. ]
will guarantee a poiltUe cure In every ca»e 1 na>
dartake, or forfeit tl,000. Coniultatlon In office
or by letter rnti and strictly private, Chartea
reauinahle. Thorough examination, Inclndlpi
chemical ami mirrtwcoiilcal analyse of urine, sis
advice, 16.1)0. Ofllce hours, g to 8 dally, 6 to I
evening.  Sunduy, V to 12 only.   CalUraddreu
DR.   ALLEN,
%%\_ Kearney etreet, San Franciaco, Cal.
*»■* Remember, tho Doctor has a Viosuiia
Common), tba result of many years of ipeclal
practice and ban) itudy, which, under lill ipetla)
ndvlca, baa never failed of mcceu In tlis curt •
Lost Manhood, Pauimoxiasi, etc.
THB GREAT KNGLISH BEHEDY
IsaneTfr-failing
Cure for Nerir-
ouiDebillly.Kl-
hausied Vitality
of anykind,
Wtikntn, Par-
Aljiil, Proita-
torrhoea.snd all
Ihe terrlhlt ef-
frfll Of J OU til fai
follies, and ixcessti In maturer jean.
DR. UNTIE will a-cree to forfeit
Fire Hundred Dollars for a cast ot
this klnri the Vital ReRtorfttlve (under
hia special adrlce and treatment)*!!! not
cure, or for anything impure or injur lam
found in It. DR. MINTIK tttalt alt Dig-
eases lucceiifully without mercury.
Consultation free. Thorough eiaml-
nation and edifice, $6-00. Pi Ice or T1UI
Restorative, t3'00 a bottle, or four
times the quantity, flO-OOj ttnt .*.m. key
addreis upon rscetpt of price, or tl O. D,,
secure froni cVtftrmion, and in 'print*
nam* If desired, hy A. K. HIRTII,
M.D.
Those who cannot visit DR. MINTIB
to San Franciico should send a full and
minute statement of their troubles with
$2(1-00, and fn return a full count of
Medicine will be forwarded, seenrely
packed, io aa not lo excite curloitty,
All orders for medicine 0, O, D, must
be accompanied wllh $1.00 (aa a guarantee of good fnith), whioh will bt dt*
ducted when the pnekage la shipped.
HAMPI.K BOTTLE FREE.-Snt tl
application by letter stating symptom,
sex and nge, Communleatlona itrlclly
confidential. JnySMy
II Kearney Iiml. lai Fraaeleee, Cal.

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