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The Weekly News Jul 9, 1895

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NO. 139.       UNION, COMOX DISTRICT, B. C, TUESDAY, JULY 9. 1895.       $2.00 PER YEAR
Gash! Gash!
I   WILL   NOT   BE   UNDERSOLD.
HtlT CANNOT SBM. CIOODS AT COST ON CRBDITj C ONSKQUKNTI.V
1 ON AND AF'CBR Al'kll. ist I wil,1, no BUSINKSS ON THE  CASH
SYSTEM, AND MV PRICKS ARE:
MEW
CM.
*��*****No Skimping in Weights mc* Measures'*;"'**
nt the
CUMBBRLAHD     STORE.
JAMES Mi KIM, Union, B.CMar.20,1895.
THE   NEW   ENGLAND
RESTAURANT
The Best Me&ls on the Coa'tfor 25 Cen's.
Elegantly Furnished  Rooms in   Connection.
Special rates made for monthly boarders. This is the best
place for working men. Good wash house. All the cooking
is done by  white   men.    Come   one come all, we stili have
PLENTY   OF   ROOM.
ICE   0~l~2A.1A.   FiLH/LOK-S
��� Union, B. 0, ��� -
Soda Water. Candies, Stationery and Books.
FRUIT Ja. SPECIALTY.
o
Imparted and  Domestic Cigars    Briar and Meerschaum Goods.
%ke Above Store*) Adjoin., Where Every thin*" of the licet in their Respective
Hues will bu found.
A. M'. Mclntyre Prop.
THE FASHIONABLE   TAILOR
r**CJis**>TS    ELOOK
OOMOX     6 A.W     MILL
Courtenay
Rough and Dressed Lumber,
B.C.
All orders promptly executed.
UH-GITJII A. JR-T
WARNINGL
All persons driving* ovor the wlmrf nr
oridj.fs in Cnhtnx district tastier tli.m a
��alk, will Ik prosecuted iii-cording to
In*.'
S. Creecli,
Gov, Agent,
JAMES ABRAMS
Choice  Family (���rockriks.
Also KlouR, Ff.kii, Etc., at
LOWEST CA��H PRICE
A. W. RENNISON, Mgr
!.":
I
"'IS
Notary Public.
Agent, for 1 he Allinnce Fire
Inaurance company of Lon
don and the Phoenix of
Hartford	
Agent tor the Provincial
Building and Loan Asso-
alstJoiot Toronto	
"'Moa B|C.
THIS SPACE RESERVED
lews kj fire.
Gladstone's Farewell to his Mldlo
Milan Constituency-Bismarck In
Critical Condition-Mystery of
Voung Carter's Disappearance
Investigated-Employees of the
N.V.C. Co. Agree to continuance
of Reduction for Further Term
-Flta-simmons to Leave -No Remedial Legislation Likely- Here
and There.
GLADSTONE'3 FAREWELL.
Edinburgh.���At the meeting- of Midlothian Liberal Association a letter of farewell was read from thc Right Hon. W.
E. Gladstone who has represented Midlo
thian since I880 in the House of Commons. Gladstone says lhat though in regard to public affairs, there is much that
is disputable ancl some things lhat belong
to history, it is for example, he adds, beyond question that the century expiring
has exhibited unexampled progress in the
reform of thc franchises of people; and
lie claims aa overwhelming proportion of
these reforms were effected by the Liberal party.
PRINCE MtStARQK.
Berlin dispatches slate that Prince Bismarck is verv ill. His condition is critical.
���SCOMOX BAY STORt|
Comox, B. C. v
YOUNG RICHARD CARTER.
Nanaimo, July 6.���The police here
and at Vicioria arc engaged ill the search
for Kichard Cuter, of Cumoxj who uiys-
leriuuslv disappeared un June 151b lasl.
Carlcr was in Nanaimo on lhat ilav and
was supposed to have gone on to Victoria; but nothing has been heard of him
there nr elsewhere. 11 is father is here
now aiding in the search. Ife inclines
to lhe opinion thai his son has been (milly dealt with It's believed Ik llie pi lice
that lie crossed over to lhe Sound.
REDUCTION CONTINUED.
Nanaimo, July 6. -The miners in ihc
employ of N. V. C Co. at a mass ineci-
ing on Thursday agreed to a continuance
lor lhe further icrin nl' six niuiilh. ul the
10 per cent reduction.
FIXZSIMMONS   WITHDRAWN.
Warden Mcl'ride is superannuated
and succeeded by Wm; Moresby
as warden of ths Provincial jail. Deputy warden, F'uz.immnns, has b;*n
withdrawn from the Province. lie, il is
said, will be succeeded by a skilled officer, probably from Kingston.
NO REMEDIAL LEGISLATION
Later Ottawa dispatches announce that
Gov't is slid undecided uliat action to
take. It is likely thai there will be no re
medial legislation at tiiis session.
KKS. O'DAY.
Nanaimo, July 6.���Tiie l.ue Mrs. (i'l).iy
wlio.se remains were brought down from
Courtenay last Tuesday was interred here
on Thursday.
MRS. McFARLANE CHAD.
Nanaimo, July ti.- Mrs. Laura Mc-
Farlanc, the young wife of Ed. Mcl'ar-
lane of this city died suddenly last week,
only 20 years old' She wis the daughter of Mark Churchill of Chase Kiver.
KILL AND CANNERY   HU3NED.
Vancouver, July 6lh.~Wednesday lhe
Phconix *v llunfrics cannery at Steves-
tun waa completely distroyed by fire: loss
estimated at $35,000, Insurance Iij,-
000. The same rlav lhe Brunette Saw
Mill an-l l.aullaws Gunner) ui Sapper-
ton weie also burned to the ground. The
saw mill was only paitly insured. Loss
verv hcavv
LEGISLATURE PRrjItOGUED.
The legislature of New Foundland was
prorogued Thursday afternoon.
EXCURSION   ACCIDENT
Nanaimo, July 6.���As the str. Joan
was returning from Seattle Friday morning with big excursion on board, John
Kelly, a yonng miner of this city fell over
board. Ifis body has not been recovered. His wife was on the steamer at the
time. They had only been married a
year.
MEIUL PROMTS MD BUTCHERS
"CHS I02sT & OOUH-TEIN-JLTrr
Choicest Meats, Fresh Eggs and Vegetables
A full line of Staple and   Fancy Groceries.
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc., etc., etc.
���WANTS MONEY.
-'ancouver World has heen sued for
damages by Aid Gallagher of that citv.
This probably grows oul ofthe criticisms
upon the conduct of the Police investigation.
COMMITTED
Locksly has been committed for trial
at New Westminster on the charge of
obtaining money under false pretenses.
THE    SEARCH FOR FORTUNE.
Ity   A.   Ll minny.
! No 6. )
Although some of us wero inclined to
regret the waste of so much good liquor
tl soon became evident that the drastic
means we had taken 10 get rid ot Joe
anil his den acted as a check on olher
unruly spirits m the camp; and we had
comparative quiet for a lime; bui the
evil had been sown in a fruitful! soil, and
witli the mad thirst for liquor unsatisfied
they soon became an unmitigated nuisance ar.d menace to us. Very soon
they found means to get it at points lower down the river and bring it up to llie
ranchcrie, where their orgies made night
and day hideous. Then the annoyance
took the form nf demands for payment
for the lumber wc cut and the. waler we
used. These blear-eyed tyliees, naked,
save for a dirty blanket, and loaded with
whisky would squat on the bank above
thn claim and harangue us by the hour
gesticulating and whooping like lietids
while their dirt,' squaws and papooses
and a legion of many curs, Iij hied
screamed and barked in chorus, or
swarmed through oar s!mc*~s, picking up
whatever they could lay their Hands on.
This was the state of things when October was well advanced ancl the rainy
season set in, and snow was beginning to
be on the mountain lops.
One rainy n:ght as we lay in nur leaky
shack 1 said, "IJ,in, let lis cell out and
leave these diggings, and winter in Victoria The rest of the boys evidently
mean to stay an;l will no doubt vivo us a
good price for our interest in the claim."
"Yes," he said, "1 w.t, thinking the same.
We haven't had a word from home for a
long time and we ought to let the folks
there known how the world has been using us; besides that Jack Fraser told us
when he came up. lhat a war had broken
oul 111 the States, and I wanted to hear
how the old state has gone. Thai girl of
yours, too, w ill begin to think you have
lingoiicn her, and will forget you." "Very
true, Dave," I said, "but I don't believe a
continued diet of bacon and beans, with
an occasional dish of salmon, help to
make a young man's fancy turn to
thoughts of love. The fact is I've been
thinking more lately ol fresh vegetables
and of fruit, and a goou* square meal than
of Ljirls. Let us try how a good bath, a
'bilcd'shirt and store cloths, feel unci:
more." So before we fell asleep we
agreed to make for civilization,
Carrying out our plan we broached 'lie
matter to the re-i nf ihc boys, and by
night they made us an offer which v.c
accepted, .uul then and there transferred
ail our light, title, anil interest in and to
the Hard Scrabble Claim; and next
morning we pulled up slake-, and with
many a good bye to those left behind us
we turned a corner in the trail and Inst
sight of the camp on our way to the
coast.
In three clays wc were once more in
Yale, took passage in express canoe to
New Westminster, and from there in the
old "Beaver to Victoria, when; we sold
our dust, and left our money iu the bank
ancl turned ourselves loose to enjoy the
luxuries we had been deprived of so long.
The rainfall for the month of June was
1.42.
A panther has been very friendly lately
with the geese of Mr. J. H-dliday: also
with the sheep of Mi. Matt  Piercy.
Lieut-Governor Dcivdncy is roported
up on ope of tne warships, fishing in the
Courtenay River.
BIRTH.
MAGS-OWE.���At Union July 7th, 10
Mrs. Magnone, a daughter; still born.
Ill.AKISY.���At Union, July 8th, the
wife of Henry Blakie, of a son.
NOTICE.
All bills against the Union and Como*
District Hospital must de sent to J. B.
McLean, Secretary, P. Q. box No. 114.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH.
Services; to a. in. Class meeting.
11 a. m. Divine Service��� Subject:
"Things to think on." 2. 30 p. m. Sunday School and Bible Class 7 p. in..
Evening Service���Subject; "A great gift*
Prayer meeting Thursday Evening 7.3a.
Union Gospel .meeting, Saturday evening
8 o'clock.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.    *
Services next sabbath as usual conduct
ed by the Pastor Kev. D, Mclntyre ta
the hall. Morning at it,- Subject���Peter prayed oul of prison. Evening at 7.
Subject -lhe hero of two strange battles.
Sabbath school at 2 p.m. Pastor's Bible
class 3 p.m. Prayer meeting Wednesday
evening at 7.30 in the Hall. Y.I'.S.C.E.
on Friday evening at 8 o'clock
HAPPY  PICNICKERS.
Thc United Sunelav ;*liool piei.ic on
July 1 was held at 1,'nun wliarf. The
grounds were delightful and the clay su*
perb. There vu-re between 300 and 40a
present, 'lhe long tables accommodated
at least 60 ar.d 70 at one sitting. There
were lots of lemonade, milk etc There
wet-., swings, and games, and prlr.es f"i
gills and l-oys races, ii was the merriest
ofnierrv limes, aud teachers and patents
caught tlie :,pint of tlie nccatiion and vied
in some instances, with the lutle ones in
manifestations of delight. Ail returned
h.-ipuy at 6.30. The managers desire tu
thank the president and superintendent
ofthe Union Colliery Co. for tlie facilities
furnished the picnickers ��n reaching aud
returning from the grounds,
UNION SHIPPING.
The str. Chittigong left on Ihe 3rd.
with 518 tons of coal for fuel. This boat
belongs to the new line running lxttweeu
China and Portland, Oregon.
Str. Walla Walla left with 1350 tons of
coal for the Oregon Improvement Co. at
San Francisco.
'1 he tug Falcon and scow left on the
4th for New Western Steamship Co. with
148 tons of coal.
Thc Thistle look 1132 tons of coal for
the Electric Tramway, Victoria and ti
tons of coke for the  Union Colliery Co.
The Daisy took 14010ns ol wash nut
i oal for C. Peabody.
The San Mateo is loading.
Thc Mineola is due.
The new fan is going and No 4 slope
in operation as usual.
Trratui'tt*. of Hj-rinuigi'itrt.
Hydrangeas that have been forced nud
which will b�� wotcd for forcing again
next winter should, according toChu-deu-
ing, bu treated as follows: Cut tbe ohl
llowur heads oil, but don't cut back tlie
shoots ct all: lieepthepliiitooutoll doors
und givo them lots of water all auuiui -t
long, kiwiiing tliein 'ruuh and plump and
their leaves iat aud green. 11 they are iu
potsortnbs, ������lunge theso jurt way iutlie
tyround to neve watering*) lunch. Don't
ivpot theui till September or Oelotwr.
-**��� MEDITERRANEAN   PIRATES,
Moors Loot an Oil-Laden Dutch
Brigantiue.
The Brig ll.mi-iliit Iiy Armed Me" Between
.llelllla iuul Cmilu���The mate uml Cup-
l��ln  Shut  and  the   Hunt   Flundered-
Sallors  Bsoape  tu   the   Spanish  Coast.
Navlgatlug Without it Compass.
Washington despatch:     A Stirring
tale ot the Bea, that reads    liko    a
romance ol   Stephenson's, comes   to
tbe state Department In a despatch
from    Acting United    States    Consul
Spinguo ut Gibraltar, uudcr dato ol
May 2.    The Btory Is nil    the more
surprising   because   the     events recorded occurred in the well-travelled
waters ol the Mediterranean.
According to tho story    the steuin
tug llereuie;
the
and
THE HAP AO THE WIM
the afternoon ut
April 80, towed Into Gibraltar Bay
tlio Dutch brlgnntine Anna, which
had been 1 lying signals ol distress ol!
Europa Point, Tiio experiences ol
thu Anna, as told by ono uf lior crew,
recall the worst dayB ol piracy. On
Ma rcli 10 she set sail irom Bar!,
a port in tho Adriatic, With a cargo
of oil, and on Sunday. April ~(>, he-
came becalmed about seven miles from
���shore near Alhucema's Buy, in
Kill Country, between Melilla
(Junta,
Who waa manned by a captain, a
mute, three seamen and u conk.
About li or 3 o'clock In the afternoon a boat approached from shore,
manned bv seven or eight Moors,
They were savage-looking fellows,
Stripped naked to tho waist, with
heads entirely yhaven clean of hair,
except ;l long tuft on top. BreecU-
loading rifles and lung knives were
their arms. "When within hailing distance tho Moors called in Spanish to
the brlgnntine to lower sail, and on
being refused commenced firing on
the vessel. As the boat came alongside, the crew armed themselves with
hatchets and crowbars, and one of
the Moors, who attempted to board,
was struck down by the mate
with a blow from a crowbar. A volley was returned and the mate fell.
Seizing a revolver, the only firearm on
boa nl, Capt. Velvls began to use it
on the pirates, but had fired only one
���shot when lie was wounded in the
hand. Meanwhile the wounded man
had proceeded aft, where he fell on
the deck. Four bullets hud entered
his body. Then the captain was permanently disabled by a shot wound
in the stomach.
About this time several other boats
put out from shore and resistance was
out ofthe question, Leaping onboard
tho pirates began their work of plunder. Tlie ship's boat was lowered, and
bedding, cooking utensils, compasses,
side lights, spare sails, a portion of
tho cargo, all the provisions, except
salt meats, and many other things
were loaded Into the boats and taken
to land.   Several trips wero made.
"When night came the buccaneers left
tho ship, and, a light breeze springing
up, the sailors endeavored to sail for
the Spanish coast, although without a
compass. They sailed all that night
and the next day, using burning
oakum for signals, bnt although several vessels passed within sight, no
attention wus paid to them. At 4
o'clock the next morning Capt. Yelvis
died, and after many hardships tho
Anna was sighted and brought Into
port. The mate, who had been badly
wounded in both thighs, in the abdomen and right baud, is now in a critical condition.
The Anna hulled from Old Pokela, In
Holland. The consul for tho Netherlands at Gibraltar Is investigating
tho outrage.
MASSACHUSETTS' BLUE LAWS.
The following enactments wero contained in tlie first draft of the laws
of Massachusetts, as drawn up by
John Cotton, a Puritan minister, who
hud emigrated from Boston in Lincolnshire : *' Whoever shall profane the
Lord's day by doing unnecessary travelling, or by sports and recreation,
he or tbey wlio so trespass shall forfeit fifty shillings, or be publicly
whipped, but if it shall appear to
have been done presumptuously, such
persou or persons shall be put to
death, or otherwise severely punished
at thc discretion of the court. No
one bhall run on the Sabbath duy, or
walk In his garden or elsewhere, except reverently to or from meeting.
No one Bhall travel, cook victuals,
make beds, sweep houses, cut hair or
shave on the Sabbath day. No woman sliall kiss her child on tho Sabbath day or fasting day. If any man
���shall kiss his wifo or wife her husband on the Lord's day, tho party In
fault shall be punished at the discretion of the magistrate.
SYSTEMATIC BEST.
To understand the way to rest, says
���the American Analyst, is of more importance than to know how to work
Tbe hitter can be learned easily; the
former It takes years to learn, and
some people never learn tbo art of
resting. It Is simply a change of
scenes and activities. Loafing may
not be resting. Sleeping Is not always resting, Sitting down for days
with nothing to do Is not restful. A
change Is needed to bring Into play
a different set of faculties and to
turn tho life Into a new channel, The
man who works hard finds his best
rest in playing hard. The man who
is bordered with care finds relief In
something that Is active, yet free
from responsibility. Above nil, keep
good-natured, and don't abuse your
best friend, the stomach.
ACCOUNTED FOR.
" All the symptoms* dacftor, ane, yon
say, of hay fever'.' But how," asked an Indian army chaplain of pronounced ecclesiastical views, when
returning to England on leave, " cau
ono possibly get hay fever in mid-
ocean?" "I dont know," replied the
doctor, "But we liavo several grass
widows on board, nnd you have been
a great deal  in  their society."
COMBINATION    FOB    8UCCB88FCL
CHBISTIAN WORK.
The Wing TjplAea Prayer and the Band
Represents Buinan UutminentaUty���
The Prayer Must Have tbe Band I'mlcr
the Wing���Practical Christianity Urged.
New York, May 19.���Rev. Dr. Tal-
mage'a sermon in the Academy of
Muslo this afternoon was a powerful
and eloquent plea for practical Christianity. The subject as announced
was, Wing and Hand, the text being
Ezekiel, X., 81: "The likeness of the
hands of a man was under their
wings."
While tossed on the sea between
Australia and Ceylon, I first particularly noticed this text, of which then
and there I made memorandum. This
chapter is all a-flutur with cherubim.
Who are the cherubim V An order of
angels, radiant, mighty, all-knowing,
adoring, worshipful. When painter or
sculptor tried in temple at Jerusalem
or in marble in Egypt to represent,
the cherubim, he made them part lion,
or part ox, or part eagle. But much
of that la an unintended burlesque of
the cherubim, whose majesty,
speed, and splendor wo will
know until, lifted into their presence,
we behold them for ourselves, aa I
pray by the pardoning grace of God
we all
biblical,
man
wing
long,
plumage
asked that the infant Victoria might   people are busy now up the dark lanes
ght while he sat up in bed; and   of this city, and all through the moun-
- .   __j *.*-,�� fothor   tain glens, and down in the quarries
where the sunlight has never visited,
aud
never
t
be brounw*. ������....*.	
the babe was brought, and the father
prayed, "If this child should live to
become Queen of England, may she
rule In fear of God!" Having ended his
prayer, he said, "Tnke the child away."
But all who know tiie history of England for the last fifty years know that
the prayer for that Infant more than
seventy years ago lias been answered,
and with what emphasis and affection
millions of the Queen's subjects have
this duy in chapels and cathedrals, on
land and sea, supplicated, "God save
Queen!"    Prayer  flies    not    only
the
may.     But all  the accounts
und all tho suppositions hu-
represent    the    cherubim    with
,  each  wing about    seven    feet
vaster, more imposing than uny
that ever floated in  earthly
atmosphere.
Condor in flight above Chimborazo,
or Rocky mountain eagle aiming tor
the noonday sun, or albatross in play
With ocean tempests, presents no such
glory. We can get an imperfect idea
of the wing of the cherubim by the
only wing we see���the bird's pinion���
which is the arms of the bird, but In
some respects more wondrous than
the human arm; with power of making itself more light, or more heavy;
of expansion aud contraction; defying
all altitudes and all abysms; the bird
looking down with pity upon boasting
man as he toils up the sides of the
Adlrondacks, while tlie wing with a
few strokes puts the highest crags
far beneath claw and beak. But the
bird's wing is only a feeble suggestion
of cherubim's wing. The greatness of
that, the rapidity of tbat, the radlanoe
of that, the Bible again and again
sets forth.
My attention is not more attracted
by those wings thau by what they reveal  when lifted.     In  two  places  in
Ezekiel we are told there were hands
under the wings; human hands; hands
like ours.   "The likeness of the hands
of a man was under the wings."   We
have all noticed the wing of the cherubim, but no one seems yet to have
noticed   the  human  band    under   the
wing.      There    are    whole    sermons,
whole     anthems,     whole    doxologies,
whole   millenniums  in   that   combination of hand and wing.   IC this world
is ever brought to God, it will be by
appreciation   of  the  fact  that  supernatural and human agencies are to go
together;  that which soars, and  that
which   practically  works;   that  which
ascends the heavens, and that which
reaches forth to earth; the joining of
the  terrestrial  and  the celestial; the
hand and the wing.   We see this union  In  the construction  of  the Bible.
The wing of Inspiration Is    in every
chapter.      What   realrna  of  the   ransomed earth did Isaiah fly over? Over
what battle-fields    for   righteousness;
what coronations; what dominions of
gladness;   what  rainbows  around   the
throne   did   St.   John   hoverV   But   in
every book of tlie Bible you just as
certainly  see  the  human  hand    that
wrote it.   Moses, the lawyer, showing
his hand in  the Ten Commandments,
the foundation of all good legislation;
Amos,    the   herdsman,    showing   his
hand In similes drawn from fields and
flocks;   the   fishermen   apostles  showing   their  hand  when writing    about
gospel   nets;     Luke,    the    physician,
showing his  hand  by giving especial
attention    to    diseases    cured;    Paul,
showing his  scholarly hand  by quoting from heathen poets,  and making
arguments    about    tlie     Resurrection
that stand as firmly as on the day he
planted  them;   and   St.    John  shows
his hand by taking hia imagery from
the appearance of  the  bright waters
spread  around  the  Island  of Patmos
at hour of sunset, when he speaks of
the   sea  of  glass   mingled   with   fire;
scores of hands writing the parables,
the miracles, the promises, the hosan-
nas,   the  raptures,    the    consolations,
the woes of ages.   Oh, the Bible is so
human; so full of heart-beats; so sympathetic; so wet with tears; so triumphant with paira    branches,   that   it
takes hold of tht- human race as nothing else ever can take hold of it���each
writer In his own style; Job, the scientific; Solomon, the royal-blooded; Jeremiah,    the    despondent;    Daniel,    the
abstemious aud heroic���why, we know
their style so well that we need not
look to the top of the page to see who
ts the author.     No more conspicuous
the uplifting wing of inspiration than
the hand, the warm hand, tbe flexible
hand, the skilful  hand  of human instrumentality,      "The likeness  of  the
hands of a man was under the wings."
Again, behold  this    combination    of
my  text In all    successful    Christian
work.   We stand or kneel In our pulpits, and social meetings, and reformatory   associations,    offering    prayer.
Now,   If   anything has   wings,    It    is
prayer.   It can Ily farther and faster
than anything I can now think of.   In
one second   of  time  from  where  you
pit it can iiy to the throne of God and
alight In England.   In  one second   of
time from where you sit it ean fly to
the throne of God and alight in India.
It can girdle the earth In   a   shorter
time     than      you      can      aeal      a
letter,     or       clasp       a       belt,       or
hook   an   eye.    Wings, whether that
prayer starts from an Infant's tongue,
or the trembling lip of a centenarian,
rising from   the heart  of  a farmer's
wife standing at the dashing churn, or
before   the  hot  breath   of   a  country
oven, they soar away, and pick out of
all  the shipping of  the  earth, on all
the seas, the craft on which her sailor
boy Ja voyaging.   Yea, prayer can fly
ele-in down Into the future.   When the
father of Queen  Victoria  was dying,
���ops continents, but across centuries.
If prayer had only foet, it might run
here and there and do wonders. But
It has wings, and they are as radiant
of Plume, and as swift to rise, or
swoop, or dart, or circle, aa the cherubim's wings which swept through Bze-
ki'-l's vision. But, oh, my friends, the
prayer must have tlie hand under the
wing, or It mny amount to nothing. The
mother's hand, or tlie father's hand,
must write to the wayward boy as soon
as you can hear how to address him.
Christian souls must contribute to the
evangelism of that far-off land for
which they have been praying. Stop
singing, "Fly abroad, though mighty
gospel," unless you are willing to give
something of your means to make it
fly. Have you been praying for the
salvation of a young man's soul. That
Is right; but also extend the hand of
Invitation to come to a religious meeting. It always excites our sympathy
to see a man with his hand in a sling.
We ask him, "What is the matter?
Hope it is not a Ohm;" or. "Have your
fingers been crushedV" But nine out
of ten of all Christians are going their
life long with their hand in a sling.
They have been hurt by indifference,
or wrong Ideas of what Is best; and
they never put forth that hand to lift,
or help, or rescue aay one. They pray,
and their prayer has wings, but there
is no hand under the wings, From the
very structure of the hand, we might
make up our mind as to some of the
things it was made for; to hold fast, to
lift, to push, to pull, to help, and to
rescue. And endowed with two hands, 1
we might take the broad hint that for 1
others as well as for ourselves we were :
to hold fast, to lift, to push, to pull, to
help, to rescue. Wondrous hand! You
know something of the Bridgewater
Treatises. When ltev. Francis Henry
Bridgewater in his will left $40,000 for
essays on "The Power, Wisdom and
Goodness of God, as Manifested in the
Creation," and Davles Gilbert, the
president of the Royal society, chose
eight persons to write eight books, Bir
Charles Bell, the scientist, chose aa the
subject of his great book, "The Hand;
Its Mechanism and Vital Endowments
as Evincing Design." Oh, the hand!
Its machinery beginning at the shoulder, and working through shafts of
bone, upper arm and forearm, down to
the eight bones of the wrist, and the
live bones of the palm, and the fourteen bones of the fingers and thumb,
and composed cf labyrinth of muscle,
and nerve, and artery, and flesh, which
no one but Almighty God could have
planner or executed, But how suggestive when It reached down to us from
under the wings of the cherubim! "The
likeness of the handa of a man was under the wings."
This  idea   is   combined    in    Christ.
When He rose from Mount Olivet He
took wing.    All up and down His life
yuu see the uplifting divinity.   It glow*
ed in His forehead.   It flashed iu Ilia
eyes.   Its cadences were heard in His
voice.   But He was also very human.
It was the hand under the wing that
touched   tlie  woes  of  the  world,  and
took hold uf the sympathies of the centuries.    Watch His hand before it was
spiked.    There was a dead girl in a
governor's house, and Christ cuines into
the room and takes her pale, cold  hand
in His warm grasp, and she opens her
eyes on tlie weeping household,    and
says, "Father, what are   you   crying
about?    Mother, what are you crying
about?"   The Book says, "He took her
by the hand, and the maid arose."   A
follower, angered at an insult offered
Christ,  drew  the sword Irom sheath,
and struck at a man with  tho sharp
edge, aiming, 1 think, at his forehead. |
Uul ihe weapon glanced aside, and took I
olf tne right oar at Us roots.    Christ
with   His    hand    reconstructed   that
wonderful    organ    of    bound,     that
whispering    gallery     of     the     soul,
that collector of vibrations, that arched way to lhe auditory nerve, that tunnel without which all tiie musical   instruments of    earth would  be of   no
avail.    The Book says,    "He touched
his ear and healed him."   Meeting   a
lull-grown man who had never seen a
sunrise, or a sunset, or a flower, or the
face of his own father or mother, Christ
moistens the dust from His own tongue,
and stirs the dust into an eye-salve,
and with His own hands applies    the
strange   medicament, and suddenly ull
the colors of earth and, sky rush    in
upon the newly-created optic    nerve,
and the instantaneous noon drove   out
the long night. When lie sees the grief
of Mary and Martha He sits down and
cries with them.    Some say it is    the
shortest verse in the Bible; but to   me
it seems,    because of Its far-reaching
sympathies, about the longest���"Jesus
wept!"    Ho very human.     He    could
not stand the sight of dropsy, or epilepsy, or paralysis, or hunger, or dementia; but He stretches out His sympathetic hand toward it.     So very,   very
human.     Omnipotent, and     majestic,
and glorious, this Angel of   the   New
Covenant, with wings capable of   encircling a universe, and yet hands   of
gentleness, hands of helpfulness, "The
hands  uf a    mun   under  the  wings."
There Is a kind of religion In our day
that my text rebukes.    There are men
and women spending their time In delectation over their saved state, going
about from prayer meeting to prayer
meeting, and from church to   church,
tolling how happy they are.    But show
them a subscription paper, or ask them
to go and visit the sick, or tell them   to
reclaim a wanderer, or speak out for
some   unpopular   Christian  enterprise
and they have bronchitis, or stitch In
the side, or sudden attack of grippe.
Their religion la all wing nnd no hand.
They cun fly heavenward, but they can
not reach out earthward.
While Thomas Chalmers occupied the
chair of Moral Philosophy in St. Andrew's university, he had at the same
time a Sabbath school class of poor
boya down In the eluma of Edinburgh,
Wlille Lord Fitzgerald was traveling
In Canada he saw a poor Indian squaw
carrying a crushing load, and he took
the burden on hia own shoulders. That
waa Christ-like. That waa "a hand
under the wing." The highest type of
religion says little about itself, but la
busy for God and In helping to the
heavenly shore the crew and passengers of thia shipwrecked planet.   Such
aud all throug
tain glens, and down in the quarries
where the sunlight has never visited,
and amid the rigging, helping to take
in another reef before the Carribean
whirlwind. A friend was telling me uf
an exquisite thing about Seattle, then
of Washington territory, now of Washington state. The people of Seattle had
raised a generous sum of money fur
the Johnstown sufferers from the flood.
A few days after Seattle was destroyed
by lire. I saw it while the whole city
were living in tents. In a public meeting some one proposed tbat the money
raised for Johnstown be used for the
relief of their own city, and the cry
was No! No! No! Sena the money tu
Johnstown, and by acclamation the
money waa sent. Nothing more beautiful or sublime than that.    Under the
wing of lire that smote Seattle the
sympathetic hand, the helping hand,
tlie mighty hand of Christian relief for
people thousands of miles away. Why,
there are a hundred thousand men and
women whose oue business is to help
others. Helping hands,Inspiring hands,
lifting hands, emancipating hands.sav-
ing hands. Sure enough, those people
had wings of faith, and wings of prayer, and wings of consolation, but "the
likeness of the hands of a man" was
In that which the robust boatman said
when three were In a boat off the coast
in a sudden storm, that threatened to
sink the boat, and one suggested that
they all kneel down In the boat to pray,
and the robust man took hold of the
oar and began to pull, saying, "Let
you, the strong, stout fellow, lay hold
of the other oar, and let the weak one
who cannot pull give himaelf up to
prayer." Pray by all means; but at
the aame time pull with all your might
for the world's rescue. An Arctic traveler, hunting beaver while the ice was
breaking up, and supposing that there
was no human being within a hundred miles, heard the ice crackle, and
Jo! a lost man, insane with hunger and
"cold, was wading in the ice water. The
explorer took the man into his canoe
and made for land, and the people gathered on the shore. All the Islanders had
been looking for the lost man, and finding hlm.accordingto prearrangement.all
the bells rang, and all the guns fired.
Oh, you can make a gladder time among the towers and hilltops of heaven
if you can fetch home a wanderer.
There is also in my subject the suggestion of rewarded work for God and
righteousness.    When   the  wing went
the hand  went.    When   the  wing ascended   the  hand   ascended;   and   for
every useful and Christian hand there
will be elevation, celestial and eternal.
Expect no human gratitude, for it will
not come.   But,  my hearers,  the day
Cometh  when your  work,  which  perhaps no one haa noticed, or rewarded,
or honored, will rise to heavenly recognition.    While  I  have  been   telling
you that the hand was under the wing
of the cherubim, I want you  to realize  that the wing was over the hand.
Perhaps reward may not come to you
right away,     Washington lost    more
battles than he won, but he triumphed
at last.   Walter Scott, In boyhood, was
called   "The  Greek    Blackhead,"   but
what heights of renown did he not afterward   tread?    And   I  promise  you
victory further on and  higher up;  if
not  In  this  world,  then In  the  next.
Oh, the heavenly day when your lifted
hand shall be gloved with what honors,   Its   fingers   enringed   with   what
jewels,   its   wrist  clasped   with   what
splendors?   Come up and take it, you
' Christian woman,  who served  at  the
wash tub.    Come up and take  It, you
Christian shoemaker, who pounded the
shoe last.   Come up and take It, you
professional  nurse,  whose    compensation never fully paid for broken nights
and the whims and struggles of delirious sick rooms.   Come up and take it,
you    firemen,    besweated,   far    down
amid  the greasy machinery of ocean
steamers, and ye conductors and engineers   on   railroads,   that   knew   no
Sunday, and whose ringing bella and
loud   whistle  never  warned   off  your
own anxieties.   Come and lake It, you
mothers, who rocked and lullabled the
family brood until they took wing for
other  nests,   and    never    appreciated
what you had done and suffered for
them.    Your  hand  was  well  favored
when you were young, and it was a
beautiful   hand,   so   well   rounded,   so
graceful that many admired and eulogized It; but hard work calloused it,
and twisted it, and self-sacrificing toil
for others paled it, and many household  griefs  thinned  it,  and   the  ring
whioh went on only with a push at
the marriage altar, now la  too large,
ami falls off, and again and again you
have lost it.   Poor handl  Weary handl
Worn out hand!   But God will reconstruct it, re-animate It, readorn It, and
all heaven will kuow the story of lhat
hand.    What fallen ones it lifted up!
What   tears   It   wiped   away!     What
wounds  it    bandaged!     What    lighthouses it kindled!   What storm-tossed
ships it brought into the pearl-beached
harbor!   Oh, I am so glad that in the
vision   of   my   text   Ezekiel   saw   the
wing above  the hand.    Roll  on  that
everlasting rest for all the toiling, and
misunderstood,    and     suffering     and
weary children of God, and know right
well  that  to join your hand,  at hist
emancipated  from    the  struggle,  will
be the soft hand, the gentle hand, the
triumphant hand of HIra wlio wipeth
away all  tears from all  faces.    That
will   be   the  palace   of   the   King,   of
which    the  poet  sang  in    somewhat
Scotch dialect;
It's a bonnie, bonnie warl'  that we're
livin' In  the noo,
An' sunny is tlie Ian' we afteu tralvel
thro';
But ia vain wo look for something to
which oor hearts can cling,
For Its beauty is as nae thing to the
Palace o' the King.
We see oor frJen's await ua ower yonder at the gate;
Then let us a' be ready, fur ye ken
it'a gettin' late;
Let our lamps be brlcblly burnln'i
let's raise oor voice an' Bing:
Soon wo'll meet to part nae mair, l'
the Palace o' the King.
NOTES AND COMMENTS
IS Mgr. SatollI Is to bo given authority over tho Canadian altnlrs o( the
Soman Catholic Church, will he apply
to tho school question settlement the
same principles enunciated by him for
tho States?
James Northrup, of Hopedale,
Mass., Iias perfected automatic devices for filling shuttles so that one
operator will be able to tako charge
oi sixteen looms, instead of six as at
present. Iiy and by all tho men
will have to do will bo to sit down
and look on.
George Parsons Lathrop, discussing
tlio social condition of tlio Japanese,
expresses concern lest wo of America
may be " approaching a gyunrchy,"
meaning, ot course, petticoat rule.
It's all very well for O. P, to blow
himself in the newspapers, but when,,,
Mrs. G. P. gets him on her native
heath there will bo no question in G.
P's. uilud as to how things stand in
that regard. Gcorgo wears his hair
Bhort.
Perhaps if some of tlie parents who
inveigh against pool rooms had
stayed away from lodge, club ami
society meetings more, and acquired
tlie love and confidence of their families by making tlio namo "home" for
them a title of endearment, there
would be for tliein no personal interest in tlie question of how to keep
boys away from tlio pool tables of
saloons and cigar stores. The home
training is at fault.
In a lecture nt Buffalo the other
night Bishop Vincent had something
to sny as to the church of the future
and its creed and conduct. " I believe," said he, " that tlie family la
designed to be the model of tho futuro life of the church." The family is not being improved by some
of the methods of tlie present day
church organizations. How many
church workers spend tlielr evenings
in tlio bosom of their families, giving
them tlio instruction and example
whicli aro their duo'! Numberless societies nro killing out family life.
Governor Hastings, of Pennsylvania, has vetoed a 1)111 to permit married women to buy, sell or otherwise
dispose of real property, alleging
that it would " invito ill-considered
and selfish advico from nioddlesomo
and impecunious relatives, and to afford now opportunities to tlio Itln-
erent speculator on tho credulity and
Inexperience of tho people." Governor
Hastings ought to have a leather
modal with a hole In It. Suppose he
applied his reasoning to some other
subjects. Bis paternalistic oversight of the ladles Is touching In Its
absurdity.
Tho Toronto Telegram says: "That
some women nre better fitted for the
franchise thnn some men is a truth
that needs no demonstration. Whether nil women should have tho franchise is another question." And it
argues that because all women do
not demand tlio franchise, the fran;
cliiso should not"*lie"extended to any
women. That argument won't carry
much weight. There nre somo men
who don't want tlie franchise and
who never voto, and there are many
who have it and use it who have vory
Ilttlo intelligence, somo even trafficking in it. Yot we " give" men
votes. Somo slaves did not want
tlielr freedom, and would not leave
their old masters when they got It,
and many aro mueli worso off to-day
than when they were with their old
masters. Yet they were freed.
Why ? Becauso liberty was a right
whicli mankind owed them. Why not
go at it and show that the accident
of sex Is just cause for depriving one-
half tho race of what Is a right to
the other half? That would bo facing tlie Issue.
TONS OP CATERPILLARS.
Thirty-six tons of cnterpillars nnd a
large number of cocoons���In all about
8fi,000,000 Insects���were destroyed In
the effort to drive tho post from the
young- plantation of trees on Hong
Kong Island. They appeared on tho
pine trees with which the Government
is trying to reafforest tho Island, and
lasted for two months. Stations wero
established where the caterpillars
were received and paid for by weight,
and this method appears to havo
proved as effective as could be desired.���Invention,
Tho affairs of the United States
Mutual Accident Association, one of
tho largest concerns of Its kind, and
which does a largo business in Canada, nro said to bo In a bad shapo,
and tho directors have asked the
Stato Insuranco Department to Investigate. Tlio insuranco reports for
183a showed the company to havo a
balanco of $150,557.03. In 180J, tho
balance had shrunk to $07,000.01.
Now It lias disappeared entirely. During the year ending January 1st, 1804,-
tho company nppllcd to mortuary and
accident claims $37G,3(IG ; to expenses,
$175,700 j a total disbursement of
$852,075. Covering the same Interval
its Income was $7(i5,024, n deficit tor
tlie year In receipts under expenditures of $80,451, and $145,000 In deferred claims. Disgruntled policy holders allege that tho management has
been extravagant and wasteful, and
a statement calculated yesterday sot
forth that $354,000 of the company's
assets were unaccounted for. Tlie
company's officers nsscrt that every
dollar hns been accounted for, and It
Is said the United States Casualty
Company Is being asked to tako over
the  business. AN   ARTIST'S   WEIRD   TALE,
" Who's there ?'
11 It's I. "Will you opeu the door,
or am I to stand hero ami freeze to
death ?"
There was a i orvous r ��� . ing at
the lock, a sharp click as It turned,
and ut last I wns admitted to thc
(-studio of my friend Collin*-:. 1 had
never berore experienced the slightest difficulty in eutering It, for the
latch was free at all hours, and I
wus In the habit oi dropping around
for a smoke and a chat at any time,
faan-i cerenu.no. Resides, it was New
Year's eve, find thero had beeu a
previous      agreement      i"**"*       +"-
irevioua iigiucuiuuu that together we would smoke the old year
out with some very excellent Turkish inixturo 1 had picked up.
Jayuo Collins wns an ohl friend of
mine. At school ho did vile caricatures of me In the (ly leaves ol his
books, nnd there hud sprung from this
inauspicious begiunlug KL lasting intimacy. At 'JO ho weut to Europe
to study art, and I BUW nothing of
him tor nearly seven yoars. Then
lie turned up iu Minneapolis and opened a studio, so that fur a year previous tu this chilly New Year's eve
uur previous friendship had been as
close us In thc old day.**.
I wns surprised on entering tu find
tlie apartment cold. Thero wns nu
firo lu the stuve, mnd thu kettle
standing on it, a. particularly Ilttlo
jovial affair, gave ncitber sign nor
���sound. The punch bowl lay inverted
on tho shelf. The eflect of all this
wus particularly depressing, additionally su, perhaps, tbat a widely
different scene had beeu cunjuredup
in my mind from past experience^in
this very room���a scene In Which the
littlu cupper kettle snug right merrily, the punch bowl stood lull to tho
brim with a special brew uf which
its owner alono had tho secret, and
.a cloud of blue tobacco -smoke formed
the background.
Noting at a glance the unusual conditions I turned to Culltus tor an ex-
plnnntiun, and saw ho was carefully
rclocking the duur. In fact, there
was something su' thoroughly odd
and inexplicable in my friend's behavior that I stood watchlug him
fur a moment in silent speculation as
to the causo of it. Just as I was
about to voico my bewilderment he
anticipated mo.
"Don't talk loudly," he said in an
excited whisper; "I'm hiding."
"Hiding I" I exclaimed, "frum what,
pray?"
\\n* it possible that he had become n lunatic, I thought, it was
slow and discouraging for an artist
in the Northwest, and Collins \vas
very despondent at times, but so
sudden a collapse was hideous ;��� tu
contemplate.
"Confuuud It, man, don't scream!"
ho cried, gesticulating wildly in the
direction of tho dour. "I'm hiding
from a pack of ncwsgnthcrlng devils
armed with innumerable pencils and
whole reams uf paper. So far I have
���eluded them, but they keep knocking
there, thc lufcrunl ravcus! I sny,
Lcnnun," ho went un, throwing hiin-
tfell astride a chair and glaring at
mo over tho back or it, "I'm in tho
very deuce uf a moss, old chap; compromised everlastingly. Tho thing
will bo lu every paper on the cou- ;
tlncnt to-morrow morning.1'
"Who is tho woman?"" I usked,
seized with n sudden Idea.
"Woman?" he repeated, "thero's uo
womun~or, stay���yes, there is, a
very pretty widow���no, confound it,
she's not a widow now, either. Sho
was this morning, though, but���hang
it, man, the wholo thing is the vilest
thing yufl ever heard of. Why," ho
���exclaimed, starting to his feet, and
pointing nervously iu the direction of
tho window, "I left the corpse sitting up iu a black shroud, drinking
champagne; the widow, I mean,
the wife in hysterics, tho servant in
a dond faint. I left tho undertaker
cursing under his breath, aud 1 left
myself." ho concluded, with a savage
grin, "in a hack. Oh, It's a devil of
a mess all around."
Crazy as a cockroach was my Inward comment. Collins had always
been a little bit high strung, given
to fits of exultation nud depression.!
While theso thoughts flashed:
through my mind tho subject of thom
was rapidly pacing the floor, approaching a partly finished Nubian
girl, with a water jar on hor shoulder, ho deliberately kicked a hole in
the canvass. "Look hero, Jaync," I
said, "you're over-worked, tiet out
that whiskey of yours while 1 light
a fire. We'll have a quiet grog and
, smoke, and talk this mutter over
sensibly. There's nothing like a
good honest pipo when a man's In a
dilemma."
Ho eat on tho very edge of a chair,
with his elliows on his knees and his
head resting on his hands. I was on
my way to tho stovo with an armful
���of wood from tho fuol box behind tho
wcrecn. when I became conscious of
something that caused mc to drop the
"bundle of sticks and start back in
affright. Tho kindling material struck
tho floor with a crash, and Collins
raised his head. Thero was* nn
apathetic wonder In his eyes that
changed to a startled expression as
his gaze mot mine.
"What is that?* I demanded sternly, pointing tu his upraised hands.
They woro covered with blond. Ills
cuffs wero suturatod with it. Extending his forefinger*-;, with tholr
dark stains, boforo him, ho examined
them for a moment in grim silence.
"Tho corpse," he gasped, with a
���shudder. -- Ah, it was a terrible affair,
terrible."
" Good Lord, man ! What corpse nro
you talking about ?" I cried. It was
uow evident to mo that my friend
had become insane, and In his grazed
condition had committed a crime. Tho
idea was well borne out by his manner. Ho shivered like a man wtth
���swaonp fever, trying, meanwhile, in
a Iutlie sort ol way, to rub tho blood
from one hand with tho other.
" What corpse ?" ho asked, after a
pause, during which I had been watching his movements with increasing
apprehension; " why, the same Ill-conditioned champagne drinking cadaver
that has caused nil the disturbance.
Don't let them lu," he went on,   be-
1 coming intensely excited, ns several
sharp raps sounded on tho door.
" Tell them I'm gono���gone���anywhere, Now York, Now Zealand, anywhere you liko, but don't lot 'cm in,
Lonnon."
He made a rapid dive behind thc
curtains of the alcove and emerged
again only after repeated assurances
that tho reporters had gone.
"That's about the fifteenth reporter sinco I camo iu," ho said. " See
(.holding ont his lianilB) the blood is nit
off now. It had dried, you eee, and
in the excitement of the affair I did
uot notice it."
He was certainly crazy. Tliese tri-
ter mit tent periods of calmness, depression and intense excitement were
proof conclusive It seemed to me. I
shivered at tho thought.
"Its beastly cold hero," remarked
Collins, in a perfectly normal tono.
"Light the firo," lio added, "and I'll
brew- a punch. I suppose the thing
can't be helped now. but I wish it
could havo been kept out of tho
papers. I shall be branded a charlatan from San FrunClsco tu New
York.'*
Another phase of the dementia, I
mentally observed, It seemed that
tho host possible thing to be done was
to humor him. While I was busy
about the stove my friend Btood pooling a couple of lemons, now uttering
a half-subdued curse, now chuckling
Idiotically,
" 1 give you my word,' ho suddenly
broke out, " that I wus never su completely paralyzed, so absolutely appalled In my life. Why, tlio bloud
literally poured from him lu a stream.
Money wouldn't havo tempted mo to
do the thing, Lonnon, but tho woman
seemed in such intense grief that I
could do nothing but consent.'*
"Look hero, Jayac,'* I said, trying
to speak calmly, "who Is tho woman ? Whom have you killed aud
why did you commit thc crime?"
Cuilius hud finished making the
punch. lie stoud with the ladle in
his band about to fill our glasses when
my question arrested the process. He
looked at me fixedly lor a moment,
then bo laughed aloud, don't out two
goblets of the steaming brew and sat
down near the stovo.
"This affair is beyond a joke,
though, Li-uuon,'" he said, with much
gravity. "It moans that 1 shall "be '
published to the wide world as a
lakir who paints portraits from
photographs and that sort of thing���
a daubing trickster of tho 'brood
that no reputable mau wpuld recognize."
I lould not imagine what his drift
was this time. The fellow was absolutely babbling.
"You may'bo mistaken, old man,''
I said. "Tell mo how it all came
aliout."
" You know Mrs. Brown-Bailey,'' ho
began.   "Weill 1 had a note from her
yesterday.    It read:    'Come at once
without fall.'    1    was    rather   surprised, because���well, you    remember
how affairs stood between us   wheu
she suddenly decided    to    marry uid
Browne and his money.   However,  I
decided that 1 could not    afford    to
disobey tho   Injunction, bo   1   went.
Madam was in tears.      Browne had
died tho night before,  and nhe    was
utterly disconsolate.   Tho old gentleman was going    to havo a portrait
dono for tho last two ur three years,
but ho never did.   The only likeness
his wife had of him was a photograph
takeu threo years ago.    Slio wanted
me to havo Browne tilted on end in
his coffin and paint    a portrait    of
him.    I could uso the   expression iu
the photograph, she    said, nnd    the
eyos of thc youngest child wero exactly liko Browne's.    1 refused point
blank.   A man can't afford to do that
sort of thing, you know.    It savors
too much of tho    solar    print    nnd
pastel shop.   Mrs. Browne wept and
beseeched.      1    was    obdurate.      At
last,  though, a woman's    tears won
tho    day.     She's still    pretty,    you
know,  and only  2,j.    The price was
to be uny amount I chose to name-
fancy naming   a    price    tu   Madge
Browne.   'Well, thc lung and short of
it was that I promised    to do    my
best."
He paused to fill his pipe and tako a
sip at tho punch before continuing.
After a few preliminary puffs at the
long-stemmed "church warden" he
pencecded.
"I went to Browne's bright and
early this morning. The blinds were
alt down, crapo on the door, widow
unable to leave hor room, servants
walking about liko ghosts, and that
sort of thing. The undertaker had
just put Browne in his coffin, nnd ho
was tho ouly man I could get to help
me stand the silver-studded sarcophagus pn end against the walnscot-
ing. The lid had been screwed down
and tho glass front removed, exposing
the face and throat of tho dead man.
There was a very good light on it
from tho large window on the right,
nnd I began to see that after all I
might bo able to get something worth
while. The face looked wonderfully
litelike, and I commenced to tako a
real Interest In tho work.
"Tho undertaker had withdrawn,
anil I was alono with my model. I
had just Batched fn the outline of the
face, whon thero was an occurrence
that congealed the blond in my veins
and made tho skin creep up on tho
back of my neck, A tearing, splitting
noise seemed to come from tlie coffin.
I looked up, and���well, you can Imagine the horror of it���I saw the body
of old Browne coming toward inc. Tho
noxt instant my model fell heavily
forward to tho flour, the coffin overbalancing nnd (ailing with a crash on
top of tho corpse*,"
"Good Lord!" I gasped.
Collins wns pacing thc floor again,
his faeo twitching with nervous excitement ns ho recalled tho details uf
his adventure,
"Thc body lay face downward," ho
went on. "I wns bo paralyzed with
tho ghastllness of the wholo proceeding that for a moment I stood rooted
to the floor. Then It suddenly flashed
across my mind that tbo affair would
bo a terrible shock to the widow,
and, overcoming my repugnance, I set
the cotfin right side up and mado a
desperate effort to raise Brown into
it without alarming anyone. Suddenly I felt something warm trickling over my hands. I looked���it was
blood. Thoroughly terrified, I dropped
tho body, rang the bell violently, and
then run for a doctor.   Wheu I left
the house hall an hour later Browne
was verv much alive. Thoy were
feeding him stimulants through n
tube. A case ol catalepsy, the doctor
called it."
During the recital of this strange
adventure I had been subject to conflicting sensations- At first I telt
sorrow and alarm for my friend,
whom 1 supposed demented, as the
method in ins supposed madness became apparent, and lastly I could not
help feeling amused at his fear of having transgressed the unwritten tenets
of the profession.
"Why, mnn,*- I exclaimed, "its thc
greatest thing that ever happened to
you. You'll bo advertised all over
tho country." i
'��� True,'' -ua groaned, " but tho wiong
sort of advertising."
Just then the clock began to strike
HIR BOUDOIR  CALISTHENICS,
The Exercise That Makes the Thin
Girl Plump,
Beauty Fr tlie Broom.tlck���How La.-k-
litlalsll'txl M!iW!,-ii��;.Vltli  ll Tendency   to
BomwniaeM Mny  ReUae tne uuld of
Their Good Look.,
12.
" Quick," I said, hastily filling the
glasses,    " let,'a drink to     tlie     New
Year, ami loug life to old Browne."
The glasses wero ralseil to our lipa
when again there waa a rapping   at
tho iloor.     Collins    gave   a    violent
start anil stood listening.
" What is if.'" I called.
" Please,  sir,'*  answered    a   l:oy s
voire from without.     ** M"r.    Browne
died at 11 o'clock and the    niiidaine
want.-: Mr. Collins to come down in tlie
morning.'*
"Tell her," said the artist, with a
look of unspeakable terror, " tell 'her
I wouldn't come for a uiilliou dollars
cash."
Since that night Jayne Collins lias
become a very successful painter.
There is a sign painting establishment In the oltt Studio, and things have
altered a good deal all round. My
friend lias gathered flesh with the
years and tuere is not a trace of tlie
old time nervousness remaining. "We
/have often asked about .old Browne s
portrait. I,itt recently I discovered in
liim a little sontitlvoness on that subject, ami alsn recently I learned from
the column9 o: a Xew York art jour*
nal the reasons for it. The notice
in the paper read :
"Jayne Collins, the American portrait painter, whose picture, "A Society Model." attracted bo. much favorable notice at the Columbian exposition, is shortly to wed Mis. Browne-
Bailey, tiie well-known western art
���Jatroness, There is said to lie a
romantic story behind tidi alliance,'-
And this is the story,
A (HJItll! TO GIULS.
for tlm Uso of Young  Men Who Aro 11c-
Klntitng in Society.
It has occurred to me. says a writer
in London Truth, to compile ai "Guide
to Girls," for tlie use of young men
who are beginners in society. Tol givo
somo idea of tlie scope of that work
1 submit tho following extracts:
"Not Exactly Pretty, imt Such a
Good Daughter."���l'lain lieyoud description and as tenacious as ai barnacle. To lie scrupulously avoided.
"Knows Everyone and Goes Everywhere."���Middle-aged and unprepossessing; has beeu hawked about for
years. Not only knows everybody,
but knows more about them than
they do themselves.
"So Clever,"���Clear eyes, high forehead, masterful. Talks pretentiously
upon pretentious  subjects.
"Very Artistic."���Untidy, unwholesome, unkempt; voico whicli sounds
as if it came from hen boota. Too
much "soul" and too little "body."
To be well shaken before taken*
"So Good-Xaturcd."���Chatters unceasingly; agrees with 'everybody.
Looks stupid and amiable, but is
shrewd and selfish.
"An Heiress."���imperious and superfluous ; forehead generally shiny.
Needs tlie fortune aud more to make
her not only presentable, but bearable.
"Wrltesl"���Affects a far-away, preoccupied air; dresses curiously, and
talks riskily. Depreciates the work
of others and by inference magnifies
tlie excellence of her own. lias nothing more original iu her than original sin,
''Slugs Beautifully."���Bursting with
trills nnd trolls ; with the slightest
encouragement would set to singing
oven in tlie middle' of dinner. Hovers
(hungrily around tho piano. To be
taken iu homeopathic doses.
CURES CATARRHAL DEAFNESS,
Btroug nnil Unreserved Testimony ol' the
Curative Powers ol' Dr. Aguew'8 Ciitiir-
rlilll Powder.
Actions speak louder than words.
Mr. Jolm Maclunis, of Wasliabuck
Bridge, N, 8., made use of Dr. Aguew's
Catarrhal l'owder and says: "I used
the medicine according to directions
and found it to bo a wonderful cure
for catarrh and deafness, 1 can hear
as good ns ever. You will find 00
cents enclosed, for whicli please send
mo nuother bottle. After recommending tlie catarrhal cure to my
neighbor, and slio, seeing tlie wonderful goud it lias dune me, wants a bottle, so you will please send a bottle
and blower to her also."
Ono short puff of the breath
through the Blower, supplied witli
each bottle of Dr. Aguew's Catarrhal
l'owder, diffuses tills powder over the
surface of the nasal passages, rainless aud delightful to use, it relieves
in ten minutes, and permanently cures
Catarrh, Hay lever. Colds, Headache,
Soro Throat, Tonsllltls and Deafness ;
00 cents.
Sample bottle and blower sent ou
receipt of two tliroc-eeat stamps, **.
ll. Detcliou, 1A Church street, Toronto.
CHOOSE YOUE TREES.
The following is a list of trees whicli
tlio different people might plant. The
funny boy will appreciate It:
Tlio wagon maker���An axle tree.
The blue bloods���A family tree.
The shivering poor���A fir tree.
Tlie carpenter���A piano tree.
Tho epicure���A splco treo.
Tho summer girl���A beech tree.
Tho victim oi stale jokes���A chestnut tree.
Tho college athlete���A rowau tree.
A dude���A spruce tree.
The school teacher���A birch tree.
Tlie politician���A plum tree.
The old folks���A roof tree.
Married couples���A pear tree.
Tlie melancholy���A pine tree.
Tho children���A Christmas tree.
If you should chance to know* of a
girl who a few months ago was thin
and almost consumptive-looking, but
wlio is now full-chested, rounded perfectly in arm aad leg, square of
shoulder and graceful of carriage, and
if you know she has not attended a
gymnasium, you may depend upon It,
says tlio New York World, that slio
has practised boudoir calisthenics.
Tlie chances are that as soon as
sho is out of bed iu tho morning a
loose-flowing, chemise-like garment ia
put on, belted at the waist by a ribbon. The bed is pushed to one corner
to give plenty of room, and her exorcises begin. The only gymnasium-like
Implement she uses is a stick about
five feet long and one inch in diameter; possibly ut oue time if did duty
nan broom handle. With this she goes
through a series ot gentlo but
Strengthening exercises. A window is
raised, if the weather is not too cold,
to admit fresh air.
THE FIRST EXEIUTSE.
Her first cxerclso is filling nnd expanding tlie lungs. She stands perfectly erect, heels together uud arms
extended straight to tlio front, palms
touching. The palms aro now separated and the arms sweep backward;
at the same time she draws ia a lull
breath, When tlie arms arc thrown
as far backward as convenient, nnd
the lungs are expanded, the operation is reversed, the arms being
brought to tlio first position nnd the
breath exhaled.
"LHUBEEING DP "HER ASMS.
After this Is repeated several times
slio varies tlio exercises by dropping
the arms closo to her hips and raising them abovo her head without
bonding' the elbow, drawing in tho
breath all the while, nnd letting it
out as the arms nre dropped to', the
hips again. Now sho doubles lier
lists and draws them towards lier
until they strike her shoulders, tho
elbows being close by her sides; then
she extends them full to the front, n��
though striking at an imaginary foe,
inhaling and exhaling her breath with
each motion,
THE NECK EXERCISE.
By tills time tlio muscles of hor arms
are limbered, her lungs expanded with
fresh nir, auu tlio blood Is tingling in
lier veins. She la now ready for 'tho
nock exercise. In tills shu simply lets
her head drop forward as though tho
muscles of the neck had lost their
power. The head is then rolled with
a circular motion from sido to side,
aa though she woro trying to see Jiow
large a circle she could describe In the
air witli the crown of lier head us a
marker.
Ia tlie course of tho moving ot tho
head in this manner every nitisclo of
tho neck is brought Into action at
somo point of tlio circle. This Is ��
favorite exercise of actresses and
society girls, and Is productive ol
full, well-rounded necks.
PLAYING WITH BROOMSTICKS.
Tho next boudoir exercise is that
with the broomstick, Tlio first
movement Is. to extend tlie arms at
full length to the front, grasping tho
stick witli both hands; tlio young
woman then raises them slowly to
a position over tlio head, and then
down behind, keeping the arms rigid.
At first lier bauds had to be widely separated on the stick to enable
lier to do this, hut as she progressed
it was uot long beforo tho feat
could be dono with the bauds no
more than two feet apart. This exercise develops tlie muscles of the
anus, chest and back.
She begins another exercise by
holding the stick iu the same manner
und putting iter font through without removing either hand, lier
dainty toes got many n crack before she could put lier foot over the
stick without striking it, but per?
severence conquered, and now she
puts either foot over and back again
equally well without touching the
stick with 1ier toes. She will soon bo
able to Jump through it, both feet at
once, quite us easily as sho skipped
a rope at chic 11. in this movement
the muscles of the arms, logs, hips
und hack are brought into action,
und It requires just enough vigor to
create bodily warmth.
SHE IS SUPERIOR TO MAN,
Another    movement    that     gives
strength and suppleness to tlie back
is   that   of    leaning    forward   until tlio tips of tlie fingers touch   tlio
toes.     Iu tills woman shows her superiority over man, fur no Adam can
compote with an Eve  iu  tho    ease
and grace with which she cun execute this movement.      A  woman Is
equally adept at leaning  backward,
and the trained athletes among them
can catch hold of their heels    before
a man can recover from ids lirst effort at the backward bend.    There
Is no cxerclso that the athletic young
woman takes to more easily than the
forward and backward bend.
TIIE LEG  SWING.
Tiio young lady at exercise   Is now
ready for the leg swing.   In this she
tries'to seo how largo a circle she can
describo in tlio air with   lier    great
toes aa markers, by swinging    first
ono leg und then the other.     As   a
developer ot tho thigh    this    movement boats high kicking, ns it brings
into action all tbo muscles of    tbo
leg from the nnklo to tho hip. Sometimes she may vary tills movemcat
by balancing on ono foot and describing a circle on tlie   floor   witli    tho
other, nnd she may enliven it with
a littio high kicking and other ma-
neuvres whicli   Bho    would consider
quito improper outsldo the precincts
of her own snnctum.
In tliese exercises she Is careful   to
avoid over-exertiou, and with equal
care she endeavors to develop all
muscles equally. Her aim is physical culture, and not merely thnt sho
may lie ablo to perform particular
feats of skill and strength.
DIALOGUE   Ol    THE HORSE,
FIRST HORSE.
We are the pets oi men���
The pampered pets of men.
Thero Is naught for us too gentle and
good,
In tlio graceful days uf  our    babyhood ;
We frisk and caper in childish' glee���
Oh, none so pretty and proud as we '.
They cheer aud cherish us    ia   our
Play���
Oh, uotio so smilingly sweet as they I
And when  a  littio our    lives     had
grown,
Each has table and room ot his own,
A waiter to fill his bill of fare,
A barber to clean aud comb his hair.
Yes, we ure tho pets of nieu-
The pampered pets of men.
They show us,  gaily    dressed     and
proud,
To the eager eyes of tlie clamorous
crowd;
They champion us In   the    rattling
race,
Tliey praise our beauty    and    cheer
our pace;
They keep for us our family trees���
They trumpet our names beyond the
seas;
They hang    our    portraits   ou   the
walls,
And paint and garnish nad gild our
stalls.
Yes, wo nre the pets of men���
The pampered pets ot men.
SECOND HORSE.
We are tlie slaves ot men���
Tlio uienial slaves of men.
They lash us over the dusty road.-,
Tliey bead ils down with murderous
loads ;
They (ling vile Insults on nur track,
And  know that we cannot    answer
back :
In winds of winter, and summer sun,
Tlio tread of our toil is uever done ;
Aud when wo are weak, and old and
lame,
And labor-stiffened, nud bowed with
siliame,
And lmrd of hearing, and blind of eye,
T'iiey drive us out in  tlie world to
dio.
Yes, we nre tlie slaves of men���
Tlie slaves of selfish meu.
They draught us into their    bloody
spites,
Tliey   spur   us   bleeding   into   their
fights;
They poisnu  our souls    witli    their
senseless ire,
And curse us into a storm of fire,
Aud when to death wo aro bowed aud
bent,
And take thc ball that for them was
meant,
Alone tbey  leave us to  groan    and
bleed,
And dash  their spurs into    another
steed.
Yea, we nre. the slaves of men���
Tho slaves of brutish men.
������Will Carloton.
t
V
CHARACTERISTICS of. -woods.
Tbe strongest wood which grows
within thc limits of tlio United States
is known na " nutmeg " hickory, which
nourishes on   the   Lower   Arkansas
The most clastic Is tamarack, the
black, or slicllbark, standing not [ar
below.
Tho wood with tho least elasticity
nnd lowest specific gravity is Fiscus
a urea.
Tho wood of the highest specific
gravity is the bluo wood of Texas
and Mexico.
Tho heaviest of the foreign woods
are the pomegranate and the lignum
vltne, and tho lightest is cork.
Four hundred and thirteen different
Bpecles of trees grow in tlie various
States and territories, and of this
number IG, when perfectly seasoned,
will sink In water.
Thoso woods of hi��k specific gravity
grow mostly in the arid regions of
New Mexico, 'Arizona and Nevada.
"WISDOM OF THE FUNMAKERS.
Truth was stranger than fiction to
Ananias,
A sido show attraction���-A pretty
profile.
Monumental liars���A good many
grave-stones.
Repairs���Second  marriages.
Iu what month do women talk
least? In February,
Many a man is expected to be the
architect of  his son-i^-law's fortune.
l'.lobbs���Why do you call ouo ot
your relatives aunt and the other
awnt ? Slobbs���Well, tho other has
money.
Elderly Lodger���How did you sleep
last night, Professor? Professor Lar-
kins���Lying down, ma da me.���Wheeling (AV. \'a.) Corner stone.
now Tin: chimney drew.
Walking along a road in Lanarkshire, two tourists were passing ono
of those houses which In novels nre
culled "woodland cottages" but
which nre better known In tlio country as ���'shanties."
The chimney of the house referred
to was constructed of sticks and
mortar, aad possessed a spiral form
presenting a comical appearance.
Tipping his friend a wink, ono of
tlio tourists thus nccosted a curly-
hnired youngster upon the fence: "I
suv, my boy, does that chimney draw
well ?"
"Ay. gey weel," was tho   urchin's
reply. *'It draws the notion o'every
tale  that passes    by."���London Answers. _ ______
Another DamUton Clttxen Oured ofBheo-
mutism in '1 lireo Dnyg.
Mr. I. McFarlane, 210 AVellington
street, Hamilton: ''For many weeks t
have suffered intense paiu from rheumatism���was so bad that I could not
attend to business. I procured South
American Rheumatic Cure on the recommendation of my druggist ami
wns completely cured In three or four
days by tho use of this remedy only,
It'is tlio best remedy I ever sawi" THE WEEKY  NEWS.    JULY _    ifoa
THS IBKLY IlfS
Published Every Tuesday
At Union, B. C.
M. Whitney Editor
TEAMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
IN  ADVANCE.
One Year     J'.'O'I
gis Moulin      1 li
.���JinKle Copy    0 W
RATKS OF AOVERTISINO;
One inch per year Jli'inj
..   ..  tuontli      I -in
eighth col   per yt-ur     2.'iinj
fourth      ;��il��l
nook. .. line            Willi
Loeal notleos.uor line         *"���
Notices   of  Uirlhs,   Marriages   ami
Deaths,  50 cents each insertion.
No Advertisineni inserted for less than
50 cents.
LP. FISHER, NEWSPAPER AD
��� vertieing Apent, 21 Merchants'
Exchange, San Francisco, is our authorized agent. This papor is kept
00 file in his office.
of midnight   The expense has necess-
arily been great, and much larger than it I
nould have been if a coroner had been'
stationed here,   When a vacancy occut
red in  Nanaimo it lasted only, if   we
remember correctly,    three  days,   but
here in tliis district proper cases fnr in-
vesication must go without enquiry, or
await the arrival of a coroner from a
point 60 miles away, between which and
this district there is only a weekly means
of communication unless a steamer can
be chartered to bring up ,1 cargo of beer
and coroner, as the Esperaiua did.   The
midnight inquest was a fitting clinm.
we
under
Tuasday, July 9, 1895,  j
OUB DANGER.
The great danger of this place, as in
fact of all new places, is fire. The majority of new towns of this size are
burnt down; then for the tirst time the
people awaken to the importance of ma
king some reasonable provision against
such disasters. Like all new towns the
���buildings are of comiiustihle material
and we lack a water supply And il
will be some time before the proposed
supply of water from Hamilton Lake is
provided. We may not expect it in
time to benefit us this season. We
must therefore make some other provision if we would save our town. This
summer is a crucial time. The fallen
timber is all about us and the stumps
and dry logs extend right into the
heart of the village. Tlie danger from
fire is great, much greater than it will
be in another year. The escape of the
school house from conflagration the oth
er night was very fortunate. It was
what may be called a close call. If
Constable Smithers had not been walking by just at that time, if he had beer,
three or four minutes later, it wou'd
have gone up in smoke. Only last week
thc Fan building was destroyed, and on
Wednesday the house of Mr. John Smith
crs caught fire and was saved by the
forethought of the occupant in having
two barrels filled with water close at
hand. The Presbyterian church was in
danger at one time within a week. All
this shows the necessity for action, and
we are glad to see that a few at least,
are altve to the danger. An evidence
of this is the number of new force
pumps being put in, some having hose
attachments, A large circular tank, ap
parently 25 feet high is being erected
by Grant & Mounce in the rear of their
new boarding house building. This
same enterprising firm propose to erect
on tresssel work a large frame tank on
the corner opposite Mr. Clinton's" residence for the purp >se of supplying water to the buildings fur a considerable
distance therefrom on Dunsmuir Ave.
There should however be ;��n effort made
to complete thc work begun last year
in constructing a large tank at the corner of Dunsmuir Ave. and First St.
We are informed that Grant & Mounce
will lay pipes from the saw mill and
pump the water so as to keep the tank
always full without charge. Everything
is ripe for action. Some funds, say
Irom $roo to $150 will be needed, This
it should be easy to raise. Supplies for
a hook and ladder company are essential. If enough money can be raised
place another tank at the corner of 2nd
and Ounsmuir Ave. Let us have no
petty selfisheess about this. Place the
tanks where Ihey will clo most good
and let all help. Of course, those most
jfreatl> benefited will be expected to and
we are sure wdl contribute most freely.
A G0ULI8H INQUEST.
The verdict of the Coroner's jury holding that Edward Hifield's death at Comox
was Irom cerebral irritation caused by the
combined results of a fall from a window
nndei excitement and the result of a former fracture, was expected. The jury
might have truthfully added that liquor
was the immediate cause. The investiga
tion was justified and has set at rest some
idle rumors; but it is a shame nevertheless
that it shnuld be necessary to send to
Nanaimo for a coroner, and that an inquest should be held at the ghoulish hour!
THE  COMOX   RANCHER'S
HAYING SONG.
Ily the author of A bull Song.
Oh! blazingly hot are these days of July,
Down herein this dale of ihe West;
Not a breeie in the trees, not a cloud iu
lhe shy,
Not a break on the Hay's calm breast.
Ohl how line it would be in the shadow
to lie
Where the pine throws its wide-spreading
branches on hi.Ji,
Uui mosquitoes and gad flies hum rousing
ly ���>>',-
And July is no time for rest.
Weeds, weeds must be slain; and the hay
mown down,
Tossed, raked, cocked antl pitched on
the wain,
And all must  be done 'ncath the Sun's
fierce frown
While the sweat pours down like rain.
Ve miners and clerks, who are sick ol the
town,
And for sweet smelling clover do hunger
and groan,
Come work bui a day in the hayficld so
brown,
And you'll wish for your dens again,
ABOUT THE SAMC AS A  P1RE SALE.
The rush since  we started our big  Clearing  Sale is very similar to the Salvage Sale
had last fall.    We have far too much stuck���over $30,000.    We must bring it down ur
$20,000, and to do so, the prices have been slashed right and left without regard for the cost,
The goods on our Bargain Counter are going ofl rapidly, and 1 ustomers are surprised at the
low price we are selling stuff.	
No Goods will be charged at the reduced prices   Cash  only   in every instance.    Kindly
bear this in mind.
SLOAN & SCOTT.
ACCIDENT  FUND
Mr. Editor: I havu noticed with great
satisfaction your efforts to revive public
interest in the organization of :i brass
band and other projects calculated to be
ot much bcnei.t lo the public. Allow me
to express the wish that you may meet
wilh ihe hearty support and co-operation
of every public spirited citizen in our
town in your undertakings, There is
however another mutter, Mr. Editor, ol
very great importance in my estimation
of which I have heard no mention and to
whicli 1 wish to draw die attention ol my
fellow workmen through the medium of
\otir valuable paper for their serious con-
sideralion, and that is the advisability ol
organizing an Accident Fund or Mutua.
Aid Association. The necessity and
desirability 'if such an organization must
be apparent, in my opinion to every serious thinking wage-earner in this community, particularly to those engaged in
and about the mines. It would re
quire an extra assesment, possibly of
50 cents per month per capita, probably
not thai much, lo maintain this lend; but
considering too, the amount of good ii
would do il seems nothing, comparative
ly speaking. We have under existing
conditions a Medical l-'und which is necessary, and a hospital winch Is a credit
able institution and worthy of all the support it receives Uul even this, Mr. Edit
or does not fully meet in my opinion,
with ihe requirements ot a case where s
in.111 meets with an accident at his work
and is compelled to be idie possibiy for
two or three months. If there be a time
when he needs assistance il must be then.
And jusl Ihink, fellow laborers, what a
slight effort it would cost us to render assistance 10 one so unfortunate, and save
him from being compelled to accept aid
at the hands of charily as is often llie
case, which is a liale distasteful to most
of us, to say the least, Mr. Editor, looking at this plan Irom every point of view
I think it commends itself. There is already one organization of this kind in existence in our province, and my fellow
workmen, do we wish to be behind in this
kind of work; or can it be that we have
drifted into a state of indifference ? I
hope and trust not; furthermore I do not
think so. 1 believe all that is required to
make tins Accident fund a reality is to
draw it forcibly to your notice, hence my
appeal lo ynu in this manner. I have no
doubt there are many men in our colllinu
nity who h.ive seen such organizations op
erated with satisfactory results elsewhere
and I feel sure lhey will do all in their
power to further this movement and
bring about the desired result. Ancl as
it is the dutv of eveiy man to secure him
self against the result nf future accidents
to the best of his ability, I see no easier
or more effective method for those who
have not already done so, io accomplish
lhat object, thnn III lhe manner to which
1 have alluded. Of course it would require a mass meeting to consider this
matter and I have uo doubt the management of the Colliery Co. would be willing
to leave the mines idle some Saturday
afternoon iu aid of such object In conclusion I appeal to every serious thinking
workman who feels that this letter is for
the general good, lo agitate this among
the working men, and induce them to
look al it in the proper light, and interest
themselves in it to such an extent that
the movement may be pushed as speedily
as practicable to a successful issue.
Thanking you Mr, Editor for space in
your paper, I am,
Yours truly
Union Miner.
It is understood that Mr. Ralph Smith
wiil not consent to be a candidate for the
Dominion parliament.
The rebellion in Cuba is at last making rapid progress. The garrisons of
two towns have lately surrendered the
towns burnt, and the victorious insurgent Maximo Gomez is still "marching
Summer Neckwear
in all the Latest Styles
Summer Shirts
in Great Variety
Summer Suiting
The latest in English and Scotch Tweeds.
LAWSON *t McLEOI), dunne block.
Tailors and Gents Furnishers
OOUHUAT HOUSE,
C-*>-tTIilTE*-TJi.-5r, B.C.
The lending hotel in Comox district,.
New and handsomely furnished,
.'xeellont hunting and fishing close
to town. Tourist3 can depend on
flrut-clase accommodation. Seasonable ratos. Bar supplied with the
choicest liquors and cigars
R. Graham, Propr,
Robert J. Wenborn.
Ilachine Works, Nanaimo
Dealer in lhe following Bicycles -
H. 1'. Davis of Toronto
English Wheels, Ileaston, Humber,
Rudge, New Howe and Whitworth. Will
sell on installment plan or big discount
for cash. Parts supplied ��� Repairing a
Specialty.   Creat Reduction i,. Prices.
R. B. ANDERSON.
Watchmaker and Jsweler
General worker in Metals
Jobbing ot all kinds
Office and Works   'K^E; "*""'
���C71TI03ST B.'C.
J. A. Oa**thew
ARCHITECT and BUILDER,
TJ-KTXOJT, S. C.
Society    Cards
I. 0.  O. F., No .11
Uninr. Lodge, I. O. 0. F., meets every
Friday night at 8 o'clock. Visiting brethren cordially invited to attend.
Wm. Wright, R. S.
Hiram Lot.ge No 14A.E .& A.M.,B.C.R
Courtenay B. C.
Lodge meets on every Saturday on or
before the full of the moon
Visiting Brothers   cordially requested
to attend.
R. S. McConnell,
Secretary.
Loyal Sunbeam Lodge No. 100, C. O.
O. F��� meet in thcit lodge room over
McPhee's store, Courtenay, every second
Saturday at 8 p. in. Visiting brethren
cordially invited to attend.
W.Duncan, Sec.
Cumberland Encampment.
No. 6,  I. 0. 0. F.,   Union.
Meets first and third Wedneseays of
each month at 8 o'clock p. rn. Visiting
Brethren cordially invited tn attend.
K, Gourlay, Scribe.
TIIsT   SHOP.
I  HAVE OPENED A SHOP
On Dunsmuir ayb��� Union
OPPOSITK THK NEWS OFFICE
Where I am prepared to do ail kinds
���OF���
Tin work
Sheet-iron work
Roofing
Job work
ANn    Repairing
And will endeavor to give satisfaction and
hope to receive
a fair share of /-   O   Tit-KpH
public patronage.**-** * *��� "���"*��' '-'*-''
*3
******
e*-l-
CS
Eiverside Hotel*
Courtenay, B. C.
Geo. Dunbar, Prop.
Best of Liquors
Finest of Cigars
Good Table
ancl
Courteous Attention
The Famous
DOMINION  PANTS CO.
Sil St. Mi St. .Trium St.
MONTREAL.
SUITS
To order
PANTS
K       ��-
n
C
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03
PI
7C
r
>
p
CO
o
CD
���*-*��
-s
*=-l
CO
CD
CO
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CD
CUMBERLAND
MEAT MARKET
OHOIOBST
FSBSH
&
F Ja.-Rj-ML
PEiODUCE
Lowest CASH Price
A. G. FULTON.
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Ry.
Steamer Joan
l. P. LOCKE, MASTER.
On and after Mar. 22nd, 1893
The Steamer JOAN will sail as follows
CALLING AT WAY PORTS aB liasMllgera
and freight tmy offer
Leave Vlrtoria, Ttiosdny, 7 a. m.
"   Nanuimo for Coniox, Wednesday, 7 ft. m
I.oavo Coniox for Nanaimo,      Fridays, 7 a.m.
"      Naiiaiino far Victoria    Sftturdey. 7ft.ni
For freight or state rooms apply on
board, or at thc Company's ticket office,
Victoria Station, Store street.
Sit Scu.l for Samples.   Prompt dcllvory.   I'M
tccl tit KUariuiU-ed,
Union Saw Mill.
LUMBER
All Kinds of Rough and
Dressed lumber always on
ha:-.d and delivered at short no
tice.
MOULDINGS.
Also all kinds of sawn and
split shingles ai-.d dressed pine
and cedar.
STUMPING.
Stumping done at reasonable
rates by our Giant Stumper.
WOOD.
Coal, brick and lime on
hand and delivered at short
notice.
R.Grant & I.. Mounce, 1'roprs.
IVERY-l
I am prepared to
tarnish Stylish Rigs
and do Teaming
At reasonable rates.
D. KHpBtrlck.
Union, B. C
EAM1NG-I
^J
=^ THE WEEKLY   XEWS,   JULY q,    ri
���*)*i-
t
LOCALS
For summer scarfs go to Lawson & Mc
Leod's.
Two business buildings will be erected
this month on Dunsnuiir Aw.
Shun the man who has no visible
means of support.
Photos for a number of people have
been left hy the photo gallery people at
Thk News Office. Please call and get
them.
For sale.- A pair of heavy three year
old mares, well broke; have been working
all spring on farm. Easy terms if reijir-n
ed. ApplY to (ieo. A. Heaiherbcll, Horn
by Island.
The great Duke ot Cambridge is going
to retire, which is tidings of comfort and
of joy; and somebody else will be shifted
up higher which is tidings of comfort and
of joy.
Mr. Henry Wakey will open up a harness and saddlery shop in Union about
the iir��l of the month. This will lie appreciated by our farmers, leiuristers, and
others.
Mr. A.C. Fulion received the sad intel
licence, lasl \Vednesea>, lhat his hroiher
Mclvin Fulton a young man of 21 had
been killed at Castlcrctgh, N.S. by thc
falling of a tree.
THB   CHIVALKIE.
There is a custom in backwoods places
of "chivalrytng" a newly married couple.
Long afier the decent people adar.don
the practice, the bummer element cumin-
ue to torment the newly married couple
by the din of tin pans, the firing of guns,
shouting, hooting etc. until they are
bought off with a keg or two of beer or
the money 10 purchase a plenty of ardent
spirits. In this district the bummers
are the "Knights of Chivalry". They say
they want some fun, that is whiskey, and
being loo mean to pay for it themselves,
like .1 pick ot hungry wolves, go howling
about the abode of the married couple
in hopes to he able to guzzle at their expense. List Wednesday night about 40
gathered about the residence of Mr. H. H.
Hoyd, supposing he had lh tt day been
married 10 Mrs Ii. Johnson, which turn
ed out to be a little premature. Then-
was the usual din and rattle of tin ware
and volley of objug.nim. A piece of tini
b.r was whacked upon the roof, stone*
were thrown against the building, a wheel
taken from Mr 11 iv.l's carl ami carried
otf, some of the panels of the front door
broken out, and as a climax, excremenia
thrown down the well. Mr. Hoyd naturally c iiivil due I to Magistrate Abrams
who summoned such of the culprits as
had heen identified, before him on Thurs
dav evening, read to ihem the law and as
tliis was the first prosecution ir, this district for such an offense, dismissi d it upon
condition that lhey, cic tiled and limed
the well, brought back the wheel, and re
paired the door and p nd the costs. This
condition h is betn fulfilled, and we there
fore wilhold the names, trusting that until
ing so disgraceful will ever occur here
again. The custom must he abolished.
People muit he permitted to get married
without heing subjected tn such annoyance and expense. The bummers masquerade as knights ol"chivalry, cannot be
longer tolerated. The law forbids it and
pibhc opinion will support the officers
in the execution of their duly.
KE*VAH.D
A reward of $25 will be paid for information leading to the conviction of the
person who recently killed a steer belong
mg to me on Rabsou's ranch.
Simon Leiser.
APPOINTMENT.
Mr. David Jones, Courtenay, has been
appointed by ihe board of directors ofthe
Comox Agricultural Society, to can. as for
members and collect fees, and all members are requested to pay their fees over
to him.
TENDERS.
Will be received by the undersigned
until Wednesday July 17th for the purchase or lease of The Wav.-rly House,
Cumberland, Union Mines, B.C.
This House being on the principal business street in a good location, offers a
good chance for investors, as the future
of the Union coal mines is assured.
The highest or any tender not necessa
rily accepted.
for particulars apply bv letter or per
sonally to A. Lindsay,
Sec'y Waverly House Co., Ltd.
P.O.Hox 103, Union, P.O.
FOR SALE OR LEASE.
My ranch of 160 acres, one mile ftom
Comnx Day. It has a good house, barn,
chicken house, and 20 acres of cultivated
land, all in good condition.
j. VV. McKenzie, Courtenay
CUMBERLAND   SHOE   SHOP.
1 have moved into my new shop on
First St. next tothe Customs off.ee, where
I am prepared to manufacture and repair
all kinds of men's, women's, and children's
shoes.   Give me a call.
Nelson Parks.
NOTICE.
Courtenay, May 13th, 1895.���To all in
terested: I have this day appointed Mr
Tom Heckensell to collect all outstanding accounts due to the Anlev estate during my tempory absence from tbe district
W.A. Mathewson, Assignee.
CEMETERY FUND.
Cash subscrihtions received so far are
as follows:
Sam Davis, $10; Simon Leiser, $5:
W. Gleason, $51 W. Roy, $-,; Dr. Lawrence, $5i L Mounce $5; J. McKim &
Sons; $2.50; A. C. Fulton, $2. E. Pimbu
rv & Co. 2.50; O. II. Fechner, $j; T. D.
McLean, $2; W. F. Lawson, $1; R. Sau-
ser, $1; 0. H. Scott,$l- Thos. Horn, $1
Cash, $2
This list will be kept standing until the
canvass is closed, and will be added to
as subscriptions are received. Help
along the good Aork.
H. A. Simpson
Barrister & Solicitor, No's 2 & 4
Commercial Street.
Walter Harvey.
Notary Public. conveyancer
Accountant Estate Agent
Private tuition.
Offlco over Mcl'htu fc Mooro'i itoro.
Miss BB. Williams,
Teacher of Music,  Shorthand
ancl Typewriting
Pupils can have free use of Typewriter
antl Piano for practice.
BARKER | POTTS,
BARRISTERS,
SOLICITORS, NOTARIES, Ste.
NANAIMO. B. C.
1'. o. iiiiawkii  18.
fk. Paf e
PRACTICAL ARCHITECT
-AND-
BRIDGE & WHARF
BUILDER.
UNIO\ Bisk ry
UNION, B. C.
riest of Bread, Cakes and
1'ies always  on hand.
The Bread Cart  will   be a
Courtenay and Coniox  Tuesday-! and Fridays.
Adderton & Rowbotham, Prop
HOTEL DiCKSON
TJiTIOlT 3.
Dickson & Co.,   Props,
9   9 %    \
This Hotel is fUtetl up with
a decree of Kk'^incc ;ind
regard to Comfort and Convenience hitherto unknown
outMde of the large cities.
t
t   i
���CHOICEST���
LIQ,lJOE,S - + + + -
-JA.TXJD   CIO-APo'?
Table Unsurpassed
ire I and P, Co,
A. C. Theob&ld, Manager.
1'. 0. Box 161.
House, Sign' and
Ornamental
Painters
Wall paper kept in  stock
Sole Agents for
White Enamel
and   Gold
Signs.
Waverly
UNION,
B.C.
A  LINDSAY,
LESSEE.
6USE.
now ready for the reception 01
guests. First class accommodation
for thk travelling public, kates
keuuceu to regular  hoarders
By the month, $25.
By  the  week,   $6.
Single meals, 25 cts.
Tickets for   21    meals,  85 OC
EVERY CONVENIENCE
FOR   MINERS
Nanaiiun Saw Mill.
���AND���
Sash and Dooi
FACTO   R Y
Union Mines
Furniture    Store.
A   Full Line of Everything
Including Curtains, Carpets
and   Rugs,  and  our
Celebrated
woven wire
Id Separate
Apartment
���o -:e :o���o���
A. HASLAM, Prop
(OFFICE-MILL   STREET.)
(I'. 0. Drawer :IB.   Telephone Call, 1-0)
NANAIMO, ll. C.
JE******"- A complete stock of Rough and
Dressed Lumber always on  hand.   Also
Shingles, laths, Pickets, Doors, Windows nnd Blinds.    Moulding, Scroll
Sawing, Turning, and all kinds
of wood linishing furnished.
Cedar.  White Pine.   Redwood.
H, J, Theobald.
House and Sip Painter,
Paper-Hanging, Kalsomining
and Decorating.
GRAINING A SPECIALTY.
All orders Promptly Attended to
Union, B. 0.
A FINE STOCK
ot Clocks, Watches, Books
and Stationery.
T. D. McLean
TTISTIOIT, ���. c.
! �� 1 �� 1 �� 1 �� i �� * �� 1 �� i
iiii\    Manufactured
--{and j���
Wood
Turning
by Bennett # Grant
Union, B.C.
I o I o j 0 I 0 I o I o I o I
Cumberland Hotel,
Union, B. C.
The finest hotel building
Fixtures and Bar
North of Victoria,
And the best kept house,
Spacious Billiard Room
and new
Billiard and Pool Tables
Best of Wines and Liquors.
J. l'iket, Prop.
wc keep
���ficond Hind
UNDERTAKING
DEPARTMENT.
Wecrul uct every branch of the
Undertaking   Business   including,*
Embalming, and keep all necessa'
ry supplies
COlTT-RJL.C'-COI-iS ASTZJ BU1LDESS
Grant & McGregor
��� ��������� ��� - ���       , ��� ��� ..  ���   - .���>  ... ���   iii ���    _���.
Puntiedge Bottling Works.
DAVID JONES, Proprietor,
MANUFACTURER OF
SDOA WATER,  LEMONADE, GINGER ALE,
Sarsaparilla, Champagne Cider, Iron Phosphates and Syrups.
Bottler  of Different Brands of   Lager Beer,   bream Beer and Farter
Agent for tho Union Brewery Company.
KEG- EBES SOLD -PO*"***- CASH CNTJ~
COURTENAY, B. C.
Livery
L. OTJ-RTEITJv.'Z', B. O.
Fine Rigs at Reasonable Rates Always on Hand,
,'.   Teaming Promptly Bone,  ,',
I presume we have used over
one hundred bottles of Piso'a
Cure   for Consumption  in  my
family, and   I   am   continually   advising  others
to get it.   Undoubtedly it is the
I ever used.���W. C. Miltenbeboer, Clarion, Pa,,
Dec. 29,1894. 1 sell Piso's Cure for Consumption, and never have any complaints.���E. Shorey, Postmaster,
Shorey, Kansas, Dec. 21st, 1891.
sraxisra* sfoe-tis-to* goods.
Spalding's  Iinse  Hall Supplies.
Park's Golf Clubs nnil Silvertown Bulls,
Cricket Bats,
Balls, Wickets,
Batting Cloves,
���ano-
Leo Guards.
Ayn-s'   Lawn Tena's.
Not*, Hulls St. ItnckoW.
liliic Hack Traps  aod
('Iny   I'lKOons.
Lally'u Lucross Sticks.
Immense Variety of Fishi.ig Tackle,
Goods the Best    "tt-**.    Prices the Lowest
WIIOLKSALK AM) KKTAIL
CHAS.    E,    TISDALL,   Vancouver.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given tliatjthc parlner
ship heretofore existing between Lawson
& McLeod, merchant tailors, lias this
day been dissolved by iniiual consent.
The business will hereafter be conr'neted
by W.F. Lawson who will pay all debis
and collect all accounts due ihe firm.
William K. Lawson.
Dan McLeod.
Union  B.C.
ist. luly 1895.
Nanaimo Cigar Factory
Phillip Gable and Co., Prop's
Baston Street      ���    Nanaimo B. 0.
Manufactures the finest cigars and
employes none but white labor.
Why purchase inferior foreign cigars,
when you can obtain a SUPERIOR ARTW
cix for the same money '
"THE WEEKY NEWS,    JULY g,    18<**5.
m weekly rare
Published Every Tuesday
At Union, B. C.
M. Whitney Editor
TERMS OK SUBSCRIPTION.
IM   Aj-VANCE.
One Year    f!��l!
8U Mouths       1'-'   j
SliiKle Cony    0 M I
RATES OK ADVERTISING:
One Inoli per yoAt   $1:'IW
..   ..  month      1 *>ii
eighth col   per ri-ur     26 00
fourth      -">"��
week, ., Uoo            1X110
l.ow.1 nolldus.pur line         **'
Notices   of liirtlis,   Marriages   and ]
Deaths,  50 cents each insertion.
No Adverlismenl inserted for less than
50 cents.
--���=-���^������.^���������^��������� !
LP. FISHER, NEWSPAPER AD I
<    vortising Agent, 21  Marcliante'
Bxchange, San Francisco, ia our authorized agent.   Thia paper is kept
on file in his office.
of midnight Tlie expense has necessarily been great, and much larger than il
viuuld have been ifa coroner had been
stationed he:e. Wher a vacancy occtu
red io Nanaimo ii lasted only, if we
remember correctly, three days, but
here in ihis district proper cases fur investigation must go without enquiry, or
await the arrival of a coroner frum a
point 60 miles away, between which and
ihis district there is only a weekly means
of communication unless a steamer can
be chartered to bring up a cargo of beer
Tuesday, July 9, 1895,
OUR DANGER.
The great danger of this place, as in
fact of all new places, is fire. The majority of new towns of this size are
burnt down; then for the first time the
people awaken to the importance of nn
king some reasonable provision against
such disasters. Like all new towns the
buildings are of combustible material
and we lack a waler supply And it
will be some tjme before the proposed
supply of water from Hamilton Lake is
provided. We may not expect it in
time to benefit us this season. We
musl therefore make some other provision if we would save our town. This
summer is a crucial time. Thc fallen
timber is all about us and the stumps
and drv logs extend right into the
heart of the village. The danger from
fire is grea', much greater than it will
be in another,year.- The escape of the
school house from conflagration the otli
er night was very fortunate. It was
what may be called a close call. If
Constable Smilhers had nnt been walking by just at that time, if he had been
three or four minutes later, it wou'd
have gone up in smoke. Only last week
the Fan building was destroyed, and on
Wednesday the house of Mr. John .Smith
crs caught fire and was saved by the
forethought of the occupant in having
two barrels filled with water dose at
hand. The Presbyterian church was in
danger at one time within a week. All
this shows the necessity for action, and
we are glad to see that a few at least,
are alive to the danger. An evidence
of this is the number of new force
pumps being put in, some having hose
attachments. A large circular lank, ap
parently 25 feet high is being erected
by Grant & Mounce in the rear of their
new boarding house building. This
same enterprising firm propose to erect
on tresssel work a large frame tank on
the corner opposite Mr. Clinton's residence for the purp ise of supplying water to the buildings fur a considerable
distance therefrom on Dunsmuir Ave.
There should however be ?n effort made
to complete the work begun last year
in constructing a large tank at the corner of Dunsmuir Ave. and First St.
We are informed lhat Grant & Mounce
will lay pipes frnm the saw mill and
pump lhe water so as to keep the tank
always full without charge. Everything
is ripe for action. Some funds, say
Irom $roo to $150 will be needed. This
it should be easy to raise. Supplies for
a hook and ladder company are essential. If enough money can be raised
place another tank at the coiner of 2nd
and Dunsmuir Ave. Let us have no
petty sclfisheess about this. Place thc
tanks where lhey will do most good
and let all help. Of course, those most
greatl> benefited will be expected to and
we are sure will contribute most freely.
and coroner, as ihe Esperaiua tlid.   The
midnight inquest was a lilting climax.
THE  COMOX   RANCHER'S
HAYING SONG.
By the author nf A Lull Song.
Oh! blnzingly hot are these days of July,
Down here in this dale of ihe  West;
Not a brceiti.- in the trees, not a cloud 111
the sky,
Not a break on the Hay's calm breast.
Ohl how line it would be in the shadow-
to lie
Where the pine throws its wide-spreading
branches on high,
But mosquitoes and gad flies hum rousing
ly *���)',���
And July is no lime for rest.
Weeds, weeds must be slain; and the hay
mown down,
Tossed, raked, cocked and pitched on
the wain,
And all must he done 'neath the Sun's
fierce frown
While the sweat pours down like rain.
Ye miners and clerks, who are sick nt the
town,
And for sweei smelling clover do hunger
and groan,
Come work bui a day in the hayfield so
brown,
And you'll wish for your dens again.
ABOUT THE SAME AS A PIRE SALE.
The rush since we started our big Clearing Sal** is very similar to the Salvage Sale we
had last fall. We have far too much stock���over $30,000. We must bring it down under
$20,000, ancl to do so, the prices have been slashed right and left without regard for the cost.
The goods on our Bargain Counter are going eft rapidly, and tustomers are surprised at the
low price we are selling stuff.	
No Goods will be charged at the reduced prices Cash only in every instance. Kindly
bear this in mind.
SLOAN 8c SCOTT.
��� Summer Neckwear
in all the Latest Styles
Summer Shirts
in Great Variety
Summer Suiting
The latest in English and Scotch Tweeds.
LAWSON $ McLEOD, dunne block.
Tailors and Gents Furnishers
A O0ULI8B INQUEST.
The verdict of the Coroner's jury holding that Edward Hi lie Id's death at Comox
was Irom cerebral irritation caused hy the
combined results ofa fall from a window
undei excitement and the tesult ofa former fracture, was expected. The jury
mitfht h;ive truthfully added that liquor
was the immediate cause. The inveslitfa
tion was justified and has set at rest some
idle rumors; but it is a shame nevertheless
that it should be necessary to send to
Nanaimo for a coroner, and that an inquest should be held ai the ghoulish hour
ACCIDENT  FUND
Mr. Editor; I have noticed with great
satisfaction your efforts to revive public
interest in the organization of ;. brass
band and other piMJecs calculated to he
of much bctiei.tto the public. Allow tne
to express the wish that you may meet
with the hearty support und cn-i-peution
of every public spirited citizen in uur
town in your unrlei takings. There is
however another matter, .Mr. Editor, ul
very great importance in my estimation
of which I have heard no mention and to
which 1 wi**h to draw the attention ol my
fellow workmen through the medium of
jour valuable paper fur their --eiiuus consideration, and that is the advisability ul
organizing an Accident Kund or Mutua.
Aid Association. The necessity and
desirability of such an organization must
be apparent, in my opinion to every serious tiimkiug wage-earner in this community, particularly to those engaged in
and about the mines. It would re
quire au extra asst-sment, possibly of
50 cents per month per capita, probably
nut that much, to maintain this tund; but
considering too, th.-: amount of good it
would do it seems nothing, comparatively speaking. We have under existing
conditions a Medical Kund which is necessary, and a hospital which is a credit
able institution and worthy of all the support it receives Hut even this, Mr. Edit
ur does not fully meet in my opinion,
with the requ.reinents ot a case where a
man meets with an accident at his work
and is compelled to be idie possibly for
two or three months. If there be a time
when he needs assistance it must be* then.
And just think, fellow laborers, what a
slight effort it would cost us to render assistance to one so unfortunate, and save
him from being compelled to accept .lid
at the hands of charity as is often the
case, which is a little distasteful to most
of us, to say the least. Mr. Editor, looking at this plan trom every point of view
I think it commends itself. There is already one organization of this kind in existence tn our province, and my fellow
workmen, do we wish to be behind in this
kind of work; or can it ba thai wc have
drifted into a ."late of indifference? I
hope and trust uot; furthermore I do not
think so. I believe all that is required to
make this Accident Kund a reality is to
draw it forcibly io your notice, hence my
appeal lo you in this manner. I have no
doubt there are many men in our commu
nity who have seen such organizations op
erated with satisfactory results elsewhere
and I feel sure they will tlo all in their
power to further this movement and
bring about the desired result. And as
it is the dutv of eveiy man to secure him
self against the result of future accidents
to the best of his ability, 1 see no easier
or more effective method for those who
have not already done so, to accomplish
that object, than in the manner to which
I have alluded. Of course it would require a mass meeting to consider this
matter and I have uo doubt the management ofthe Colliery Co. would be willing
to leave the mines idle some Saturday
afternoon in aid of such object In conclusion I aopeal to every serious thinking
workman who feels that this letter is for
the general good, to agitate this among
the working men, and induce them to
look at it in the proper light, and interest
themselves in it to such an extent that
the movement may be pushed as speedily
as practicable to a successful issue.
Thanking you Mr, Editor for space in
your paper, I am,
Yours truly
Union Miner.
Eiverside Hotels
C0UM1AI HOUSE,
CO-t*-ETElTJi.-3r, B.O.
The leading hotel in Oomox district.
New and hfindsomely furnished,
t'xcellonr, hunting and fishing close
to town. Tourists cen depend on
first-class accommodation. Seasonable rates. Car supplied witb the
choicest liquors and cigars
R. Graham, Propr.
Robert J. Wenborn.
Machine Works, Nanaimo
Dealer in the following Bicycles'
H. 1*. Davis of Toronto
English Wheels, Beaston, 'lumber,
Rudge, New Howe and Whitworth. Will
sell on installment plan or big discount
fur cash, l'arts supplied ��� Repairing a
Specialty.   Great Reduction ii, Prices.
R. B. ANDERSON.
Watchmaker and Jeweler
General worker in Metals
Jobbing of all kinds
TIlsT   SHOP.
1  HAVE Ol'KNI.Il A SHOP
On DunsMir Ave., Union
Oi'i'osm: THK NEWS offick
Where 1 am prepared to do all kinds
Tin
work
Sheet-iron work
Rooting
Job work
AND    Repairing
And will endeavor to give satisfaction and
hope lo receive
a fair share of   *"*   O   "Tirllpll
public patronage.*������ el, 1 ciriJLll
3-3
J******
K-S-
Courtenay, B. C.
Geo. Dunbar, Prop.
Best of Liquors
Finest of Cigars
Good Table
ancl
Courteous Attention
The Famous
DOMINION PANTS CO.
3111 & :m SI. Juror* 8*.
MONTItEAl..
SUITS
To order
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Office and Works
Ttlrd St-nr.*, notir
Nkivs ollice.
T71TI01T S.-C.
J. A. Ca**thew
AHCH1TECT and BUILDER,
Society    Cards
I. O.  O. F., No .it
Union Lodge, I. O. O. F., meets every
Friday night at 8 o'clock. Visiting brethren cordially invited to attend.
Win. Wright, R. S.
Hiram bocge No 14 A.F .& A.M.,B.C.R
Courtenay B, C.
Lodge meets on every Saturday on or
before the full of the moon
Visiting Ilrothers   cordially requested
to attend.
R. S. McConnell,
Secretary.
It is understood that Mr. Ralph Smith
will not consent to be a candidate for the
Dominion parliament.
The rebellion in Cuba is at last making rapid progress. The garrisons of
two towns have lately surrendered thc
towns burnt, and the victorious insurgent Maximo Gomez 19 still "marching
Loyal Sunbeam Lodge No. 100, C. O.
O. Fm meet in theii lodge room over
McPhee's store, Courtenay, every second
Saturday at 8 p. m. Visiting brethren
cordially invited to attend.
W.Duncan, Sec.
Cumberland  Encampment.
No. 6, I. O. 0. F.,  Union.
Meets first anil third Wedneseays of
each month at 8 o'clock p. m. Visiting
Brethren cordially invited to attend.
K. Gourlay, Scribe.
CUMBERLAND
MEAT MARKET
OHOIOBRT
PH,ESH
MEATd
rSc
FARM
PBODUCH
Lowest CASH Price
A. 0. FULTON.
���t-cr-SxRiirnrSiuiiploii.
rvct fit KUiinintre't.
PANTS
$3
Prompt dcllT-srjr.   I'm
Union Saw Mill.
LUMBER
and
All   Kinds of
Dressed   lumber
hai-.d and delivered at .short no
tice.
Rough
always
MOULDINGS.
Also all kinds of sawn and
split .shingles ar.d dressed pine
and cedar.
STUMPING.
Stumping done at reasonable
rates by our Giant Stumper.
WOOD.
Coal, brick and
hand and delivered
notice.
lime on
at short
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Ry.
Steamer Joan
L. P. LOCKE, MASTER.
On and after Mar. 22nd, 1893
The Steamer JOAN will sail as follows
CALLING AT WAY PORTS as imsserigura
and froight nny offer
Leave Virtoria, Tuesday, 7 a. m.
"  Nanaimo for Coniox, Wcdnetdiiy, 7 a. m
Leave Coniox for Nanaimo,      Fridays, 7 a.m.
"     Xatiiiimofor Victoria    Snhirdry. 7a.m
For freight or state rooms apply on
board, or at thc Company's ticket office,
Victoria Station, Store street.
R.Grant & L. Mounce, Proprs.
IVERY*
I am prepared to
furnish Stylish Rigs
and do Teaming
At reasonable rates.
D. Kilpatrick,
Union, B. C THE WEEKLY   XEW3,   JULY q-    tl
#
LOCALS
For summer scarfs go to Lawson & Mc
Leod's.
Two business buildings will be erected
this month on Dunsmuir Av.*.
Shun the man who has nn visible
means of support.
I'hotos for a number of people have
been left hy the photo gallery people at
Thk News Office. Please call and get
them.
Fou sale.- A pair of heavy three year
old mares, well broke; have been working
all spring on farm. Easy terms if reijir-o
ed. Applv to (ieo. A. Heatherbell, Horn
by Island.
The great Duke nt Cambridge is going
to retire, which is tidings of comfort and
of joy; and somebody else will be shifted
up higher which Is tidings of comfort and
of joy.
Mr. Henry Hlllkoy will open up a harness and saddlers' shop in Union about
the nrst of the month, This will be appreciate'! by our fiirmt'Ts, teamsters, and
others.
Mr. A.C. Fultnn received the sad intel
ligence, last Wednesea,, that his brother
Melvin Fulton a young man of 21 had
been killed at Castlerc.igh, N.S. by thc
falling of a tree.
THE   CHIVALRIE.
There is a custom in backwoods places
of "chivrtlrytng" a newly married couple.
Long after the decent people adandon
the practice, the bummer element continue to torment the newly married couple
by the din of (in pans, the tiring nf guns,
sli.utiiig, hotting etc. until they are
bought off wilh a keg or two of heer or
tbe money to purchase a plenty of ardent
spirits, in this district the bummers
are the "Knights of Chivalry". They say
1'iey want some fun, lhat is whiskey, and
being loo mean lo pay for ii themselves,
like a p-tck of hungry wolves, go howling
about the abode of the married couple
in hopes to lie able lo guz'le at their expense. List Wednesday night about 40
gathered about ihc residence of Mr. H.H.
Hoyd, supposing he had lh it day been
married to Mrs II. Johnson, which turn
e.1 out to be a little premature. There
wus the usual din and rattle of tin ware
and volley of objugatim. A piece of tim
b.r was whacked upon the roof, stone
were thrown against the building, a wheel
taken from Mr 11 ivd's can and carried
off, some of the panels of lhe front door
broken out, and as a climax, excremenla
thrown down the well. Mr. Boyd naturally c impl doe I to Magistrate Abrams
who summoned such of the culprits as
had been identitied. before him on Thurs
dav evening, read to ihem the law and as
this was the first prosecution in this district for such an offense, disinissi d it upon
condition that lhey, cieiued and limed
the well, brought back the wheel, and re
paired the door and pud the costs. This
erudition his been fulfilled, and we then-
fore wiilnild the names, trusting that noih
ing so disgraceful will ever occur here
again. The custom must he abolished.
People muit be permuted to gel married
without being subjected to such annoyance and expense. The bummers mas-
querade as knights nf chivalry, cannot be
lunger tolerated. The law forbids it ami
public opinion will support the officers
in the execution of their duly.
REWARD
A reward of $25 will be paid for information leading tothe conviction ofthe
person who recently killed a steer belong
lug to me on Kabsou's ranch.
Simon Leiser.
APPOINTMENT.
Mr. David Jones, Courtenay, has been
appointed by the board of directors ofthe
ComoX Agricultural Society, to can* as for
members and collect fees, and all members are requested to pay their fees over
to him.
TENDERS.
Will be received by the undersigned
until Wednesday July 17th for the purchase or lease of The Wavvrly House,
Cumberland, Union Mines, B.C.
This House being on the principal business street in a good location, offers a
good chance for investors, as the future
uf the Union coal mines is assured.
The highest or any tender not necessa
rily accepted.
For particulars apply bv letter or per
soimIIv to A. Lindsay,
Sec'y Waverly House Co., Ltd.
P.O.Box 103, Union, P.O.
FOR SALTS OR LEASE.
My ranch of 160 acres, one mile fiom
Comox Bay. It has a good house, barn,
chicken hnuse. and 20 acres of cultivated
land, all in gnnd condition.
j. W. McKenzie, Courtenay
CUMBERLAND   SHOE   SHOP.
I have moved into my new shop on
First St. next to the Customs off.ee, where
I am prepared to manufacture and repair
all kinds of men's, women's, and children's
shoes.   Give me a call.
Nelson Parks.
NOTICE.
Courtenay, May 13th, 1895.���To all in
terested: I have this day appointed Mr
Tom Beckensell to collect all outstanding accounts due to the Anlev estate during my tempory absence from thc district
W.A. Mathewson, Assignee.
CEMETERY FUND.
Cash subscribtions receii ed so far are
as follows:
Sam Davis, $to; Simon Leiser, $5:
W. Gleason, $5i W. Roy, $r,j Dr. Lawrence, $5; L Mounce $5; J. McKim **:
Sons; $2.50; A. C. Fultnn, $2. E. Pimbu
rv 4; Co. 2.50; O. H. Fechner, Si; T. D.
McLean, $2; W. F. Lawson, $1; R. Sau
scr, $i; G. H. Scott,$l; I'hos. Horn, $1
Cash, $2
This list will be kept standing until the
canvass is closed, and will be added tn
as subscriptions are received. Help
along the good work.
H. A. Simpson
Barrister & Solicitor, No's 2 & 4
Commercial Street.
2-TJLITJi.XliO,    23.    O
Walter Harvey.
Notary Public.        conveyancer,
Accountant estate Agent
Private tuition.
OrTtco over Mcl'htu *c Mooro'e store.
Miss BB. Williams,
Teacher of Music,  Shorthand
and Typewriting
Pupils can have free use of Typewriter
and Piano for practice.
BARKER I POTTS,
BARRiSTERS,
SOLICITORS, NOTARIES, &C.
NANAIMO. B. C.
r. o. oiiawkk 18.
/L Pare
PRACTICAL ARCHITECT
.���/n -AND-
BRIDGE & WHARF
BUILDER.
UNIO\ Bile ry
UNION, B. C.
Rest of Bread, Cakes and
Pies always  on hand.
The Bread Cart  will   be a
Courtenay and Coniox Tuesdays and Fridays.
Adderton & Rowbotham, Prop
HOTEL DiCKSON
Dickson & Co.,  Props.
9   9 4    ��
This Hotel is fitted up with
a degree of Elegance and
regard to Comfort and Convenience hitherto unknown
outside of the large cities.
��   !- t   i
���CHOICEST���
LldTJO-R-S -+++-
~JA.TS*~~    CXCJtJa.'SiI?
Table Unsurpassed
ire P. and P. Co,
A. C. Theobald. Manager.
P.O. Box 151.
House, Sign' and
Ornamental
Painters
Wall paper kept in stock
Sole Agents for
White Enamel
and    Gold
Signs.
Waverly
UNION,
B.C.
A IKE MOOSE.
NOW READY FOX  THK   RECEPTION   01
GUKSTS.   First class accommodation
FOR THK TRAVELLINO PUBLIC.    KATES
REDUCED  TO   REGULAR   HOARDERS
By the month, $25.
By  the  week,   $6.
Single meals, 25 cts,
Tickets for   21    meals,  85 OC
EVERY CONVENIENCE
FOR   MINERS
Union Mines
Furniture    Store.
A   Full Line of  Everything
Including Curtains, Carpets
and   Rugs,  and  our
Celebrated
woven wire
Nanaimn Saw Mill,
���AND-
Sash and Door
FACTO  R Y
���o -:e :o���o���
A. HASLAM, Prop
(OFFICE-MILL   STREET.)
(1*. 0. Drawer .'lit.  Tulophono Call. Ill)
NANAIMO, B. C.
ITS'* A complete stock of Rough and
Dressed Lumber always on  hand.   Also
Shingles, laths, Pickets, Doors, Windows and Blinds.    Moulding, Scroll
Sawing, Turning, and nl! kinds
cf wood finishing furnished.
Cedar. White Pine.   Redwood.
E. J, Theobald,
Eouse and Sign Painter,
Paper-Hanging, Kalsomining
and Decorating.
GBAIWNG A SPECIALTY.
All Orders Promptly Attended to
Union, B. 0.
A FINE STOCK
of Clocks, Watches, Books
ancl Stationery.
T. D. McLean
���UEWELEU:���
-cr-tsriOiT, b. c.
I �� I �� I �� i �� i �� f o fo"|"
r-rlil
|rl\    Manufactured
Wood
Turning
by Bennett Sf Grant
Union, B.C.
In Separate
Apartment
wc keep
'-flcond Hand
Furniture
UNDERTAKING
DEPARTMENT.
Wecnd uct every branch of the
Undertaking   Business   including^
Embalming, and keep all necessa
ry supplies
GOlrTT���jA.G'FD���S
.a-isrr-
���etjil-zj-biis
Grant & McGreyor
Puntiedge Bottling Works.
DAVID JONES, Proprietor,
MANUFACTURKR OP
SDOA WATER,  LEMONADE, GINGER ALE,
Sarsaparalla, Champagne Cider, Iron Phosphates and Syrups.
Bottler  of Different  Brands  of   Lager Eoor,   bceani Beer and Porter
Agent for the Union Brewery Company.
KEGr BEB2 SOLD POE Cxi-Sxi ClTILiTjr
COURTENAY, B. C.
and Livery
L. OJJ~IT^1>TJa.-~, b. c.
Fine Rigs at Reasonable Retes Always on Hand,
,'.   Teaming Promptly Done,  ,',
^cQUILL.A.l-T & GILMOBE.
J Tho Bwit Cough synlp.
jTn-lcs UikkI. rt-e In time.1
IlSokl by JJrngglgtg.
I presume we have need over
one hundred bottles of Piso's
Cure   for Consumption  in  my
family, and   I   ara   continually   advising  others
to get it.   Undoubtedly it is the
I ever used.���W. C. Miltenberoer, Clarion, Pa.,
Dec. 29,1894. 1 sell Piso's Cure for Consumption, and never have any complaints.���E. Shorey, Postmaster,
Shorey, Kansas, Dec. 21st, 1891.
SIE-iR-HsrO- SFOR/Tl^a-  GOODS.
Spalding's  l'.ase Hall Supplies.
|  O  |   O  | 0  |  0   |   O   | O  |  0  |
Cumberland Hotel,
Union, B. C.
The finest hotel building
Fixtures and Bar
North of Victoria,
And the best kept house.
Spacious Billiard Room
and new-
Billiard and Pool Tables
Best of Wines and Liquors.
J. Piket, Prop.
s Golf Clubs mil Silvertoivn I; ills
Crickkt Bats,
Balls, Wickkts,
Batting Gloves,
���ANII-
Leo Guards.
Ayres'   Lawn Tennis,
Nui a, liull.1 St. Itncketa.
Bluo Il.ii-k Trillin  nod
Clii)-   PiKOons.
I .ally's [.across Sticks.
mmense Variety of Fishi.ig Tackle,
Goods the Best    -��-*"��.    Prices the Lowest
WHOLESALE AM) 1IKTAIL
CHAS.    E.    TISDALL,   Vancouver.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given th.-ttjthc partner
ship heretofore existing between Lawson
& McLeod, merchant tailors, has this
day been dissolved by mutual consent.
The business will hereafter be conr'neted
by W.Fi Lawson who will pay all debts
and collect all accounts due ihe firm.
William K. Lawson.
Dan McLeod.
Union  B.C.
ist, July 1895.
Nanaimo Cigar Factory
Phillip Gable and Co., Prop's
Baston Street      ���    Nanuimo B. 0.
Manufactures thc finest cigars and
employes none but white labor.
Why purchase inferior foreign cigars,
when you can obtain a SUPERIOR ARTI-
CLlt for the same money
mm
-rrrrrrrrrrrrrr-M
���H THE IMASIOE OF AFRICA, I
| oi contiintion between   England   nnd
France.
Beside the large region-- referred to
  I above, England has liuui^n.us smaller
nud less elastic ones.       They    are:
Territorial Ambitious of France ana l10^c^TMaai0B,chS1mSiauiana5
*-,__*,���,,,* I Iroui aotu-Iou to Mauritius.    These
iillglcUlU, ! aro more for strategic purposes than
lor commercial prolit.
the   schemes    of
An American View���Having Head o on
Other limits. These Two Qroat Powers
Will so,,,, Conic lutu Collision In Carry*
in},' Out Their Land-Grabblug Schemes
���Big Domains Already Acquired.
(Boston Sunday Herald.)
With tlio Monro.; doctrine barricading tho Americas, and with practically all the desirable and obtainable tracts ol Asia and Oceaulca ul-
reudy occupied hy themselves or other
powers, the territorial ambitions of
England and France are now being
directed witli greater energy than
ever before to the vast African continent, where millions oi square miles
of rich country, Inhabited by barbarous or Beml-clvllised people, oiler to
European cupidity an inviting Held
lor conquest, eitlier euiuuierolul ur
martial.
The extent to which British and
French cuntrul lias permeated Africa
is uot generally appreciated by Aineii-
can��s, but even a cursory glance at
tho map will convey some Idea of
the scale upon whicli the Dark Continent has been invaded.
For tho present tlie areas occupied
by Germany, Italy and Portugal may
ho omitted from discussion, altliougli
they are by no means Inconsiderable,
fcuilico It to say that the steady incursions oi England and France for
generations have resulted already In
their possessing between them au
ackiLOWleiiged area amounting to
nearly, If nut quite, hall that of the
whole continent outside of the great
Sahara desert. They are now reaching forth more avariciously, the regions coveted boing Madagascar ami
the great country of tho Mululi, lu
the Koudun. Egypt, tuu, is looked
at wistfully by both.
Tho present British African possessions include somo of tlie must desira-
blo parts of the continent, as may be
seen from the following brief description of them:
First, perhaps, Is Capo Colony,
which was captured from the Dutch
in 170G, at which timo it extended
eastward unly as far as the Great
Fish Elver, only 500 miles to tho eastward ot Capo Town. With steady
strides, however, characteristic of
the British occupations of foreign
soil, its boundaries have been enlarged, until now, with Natal and Zulu-
land, the coast line extends from Orango ltlvcr on tlio west nearly to
Delago Day on tlie east, a total seaboard of about 1,70U miles.
Nor was the expansion of British influence lu tliis part oi Africa confined
to the littoral. It was directed Inland
as well, until it now includes Basuto-
land, a relatively small region west
of Natal; Bechuanaland, direotly
north of Cape colony, between Duinn-
raland and the South African republic; and, latterly, Zambezla and British Central Africa, vast regions extending Into the richest nnd must fertile part uf the continent. These last
two territories were definitely established by the Anglo-German aud
Anglo-Portuguese treaties of 1S90 and
1881, and hero may be seen plainly a
masterly scheme of British invasion,
aiming at Central Africa.
Whilo other nations, except France,
have been lor the most part confined
to tho coast, England has attacked
the continent much niter the manner
ol a general Cuiiducting a campaign.
A Iouk at the map Will show the
broad stream oi British Incursion extending northward from the Cape of
Good Hope toWard tho heart of
Africa.
Meanwhile, on tho east coast, another advance in tiio same direction
has been made by tlio establishment
of British East Africa. The first foothold of this movement was made ia
1U88, when tho Sultan of Zanzibar
granted tho uso oi a part of his territory to the Imperial British East
African Company fur 50 years. The
first step forward was lu 1S89, when
still further concessions were made,
and this Was followed iu 1891 by a
still further expansion. Ample coast
lino having beeu now obtained, the
movement toward tlio Interior was
prosecuted with vigor, until it now
reaches tho eastern boundaries of the
Congo Freo State.
A third poiut of Invasion was found
on tlio west coast, where a huge
tract ut land In the vicinity of the
Niger was placed under a protectorate in 1884. liero again the march
inland was commenced, until now tho
Niger territories bid fair iu time to
join the westward advance of British
East Africa.
Here may now be seen tlie evident
aim of England's ambition, Her
sclieinu wus evidently tu attack
Africa from three points, extend her
Influence Inland therefrom, form a
Juncture nnd thus control the enormous region of Central Africa. Tho
invasion from South Africa was proceeding with gratifying success until
tho formation of tho Congo Free
State, and the spread of Germany and
(Portugal un tlm east const culled a
halt. A barrier Impassable without
conflict witli European powers was
thus interposed, and tlio southern
foray, if nut repulsed, was apparently at least arrested.
A Juncture uf the Invasions trom the
west aud east, however, still remained. The presence to tlie south of the
German Ciinieroons, tho French Congo
territory, the Congo Freo Stato nud
tho German East African territories
form a continuous transcontinental
licit, upon which tho British dare not
intrude with Impunity. North of
this belt, however, the path offers no
obstacles, save those of topography,
climate and tho opposition of natives.
Here is whero the British energies
aro now being concentrated. Between the two converging British possessions is a vast region covering 20
degrees of latitude. This is the country of tlie Mahdl, whose warlike
hosts, however they may have been
temporarily defeated In Individual battles, have never boen conquered. Here
It Is, too, that  Is found the great bone
On the surface,
France for territorial aggrandizement in Africa seem to be less elaborate than those oi England. Indeed, it looks as ii tliey had beeu
prompted hy the latter, and undertaken more ia self-defence than
otherwise, The earliest French entrenchment ou African soil was Algeria, hut expansion of this was limited by tho proximity of other Bar-
bury States, an appropriation of
which might have caused European
interference, although Tuuls was
placed under a French protectorate lu
188:;, ns a result of military Invasion.
Upon the Inauguration of energetic
British steps towards the appropriation of African territory, France itself took a hand in it. Southern Af-
rlca offering do opportunities fur acquiring new colonies, Northern Africa became the victim of French
cupidity, and, as a result. Sencgum-
bia and the eastern Soudan were
selected as the field ol colonization,
Steadily eastward tho tide flowed, until, by 1890, Great Britain acknowledged ns French soil the wholo territory smith of Algeria nnd Tunis,
north of a lino from tlie middle Tsigli
to Lake Tchad, and, to the south oi
this line, west of about the second
meridian to east longitude, except
Liberia, Sierra Leone, Gold Coast and
a few minor settlements. Fully 1,-
000,000 square miles of this Is desert
land, In the western Sahara, but it
Includes the valuable markets tributary to Timbuctoo. Then, iu 1894,
France partly established her claim
to tlie great area between the Congo
Biver and the German Carneroona
territory.
Here, then, is presented the spectacle of England aud France, already
occupying enormous tracts uf terrl-
tory, each advancing from tuu directions toward a common gual, the vast
regions, vaguely explored, in the
heart uf Africa. Eacli lias headed uli
ull uther rivals, and the two itineraries aro sucli that tliey are hound
tu intersect, ur, rather, to interfere
with each other. Both have experienced more ur less friction with the
efforts in tlie same direction uf Germany aud Portugal, but these disputes have, fur the present at loast,
boen settled, and France uud England arc the only cuntostants, now
iu the field, fur the coveted central
Suudan and country uf the Mahdl,
Already the collision of the two
double invasiuns is pending. Exception has been taken by France tu tlie
westward march iu tlie Upper Nile
valley, and already has tills interference beeu resented in England. Each
cuuutry wishes to gain tlie ascendancy in tills region, but England appears to be gaining gruuad at a
swifter pace than France, to the hitter's chagrin.
In the Houso of Commons recently
Sir Edward Grey stated that an encroachment by France upon tho British sphere of influence on tho Upper
Nile eould not but be regarded by
Great Britain as au unfriendly act.
Replying to tliis iu the French Senate, M. Hanateanx, in a lengthy address, denied British claims iu that
quarter. He asserted that what
England called a sphere of Influence
wus not a fully defined territory, und
that, even It it had been recognized
by other powers, it hnd never been
admitted by France that Euglacd
had any better rights than any other
power, lie further held thnt the region in question was under tlie remote
sovereignty of tlie Sultan uf Turkey, and directly under that ot the
Khedive.
While these schemes are being developed on tlie mainlaind, France is,
nnd has for many years, been aiming
at tlio acquisition of the island of
Madagascar. As far back as 1715 she
seized the island ot St. Mary's, and
In 1708 established a station on the
southeast extremity of tho Island. She
still holds St. Mary's, as well as the
Islands of Diego-Suarez and Nossl-Be,
the last on the west and the other
two on the north coast. Reunion
islands, nenr by, have also long been
a French possession.
These efforts on tho part of France
to gain control of the Island have
long been obnoxious to the Hovas,
wlio are the ruling tribe, and when
Franco proclaimed n protectorate
their Ire was aroused. As a species
of retaliation, they proceeded to
grant concessions to commercial
rivals of tho French, until the Freuch
Government forbade the granting oi
further coiicessiiiiis wltfliout nutliortty
from Paris. Then followed a boundary dispute, which served as a pretext for the expedition that France
has lately despatched to Madagascar.
It seems only a question of timo when
Madagascar will follow in tho train
ot Algeria, Tunis and Senegambla.
It Is well known that England and
Franco have for years sparred fur tlie
possession, or at least the cuntrul. of
Egypt The rebellion of Arabl Bey
furnished nu opportunity fur ouo uf
them tu step in, nnil this England,
by superior astuteness, did. What la
more, she bids tnir, in spite ui French
protests, to remain In Egypt, which
although nominally an Independent
nation, is still supported by British
liayunets. Had it been possible, upper
Egypt would have furnished tlie base
fur the Invasion of the Suudan, which
England has now succeeded in securing in the British East African territory,       	
VERSATILITY.
Jess���Well, I must go and take
off my bicycle bluumers,
Bess���What tor?
Jess���I've got to attend a mooting
of tho Society for tho Introduction
ot Dress Skirts Among Turkish Women.���Now Orleans   Times-Democrat.
Nasrulla Khan, the second son ot
the Ameer ot Afghanistan, was received in state by the Queen at Windsor Castle this morning.
The United States Supreme Court
to-dny affirmed tho constitutionality
of the supplemental Chinese Exclusion Act ot 1S9L
A CARL1T0H 00, IIHACLE,
Back to Health After Years of- Extreme Suffering.
Yielded t��� ir.e Advice nt u Friend and
Obtained lU'snli- Three Doctors Had
Failed lo Soouro.
U-'rom the Ottawa Journal.)
Mr. Qeorge Argue s - ne oi the best
known farmers In tlie vicinity ui
North Gower, Helios passed through
au experience a.- painful as it is remarkable, nud his story as told a
reporter will perhaps be of value to
others. " I was bum i:i the county of
Carletou," said Mr. Argue, " and have
lived all my life within twenty miles
of the city of Ottawa. Ten years ol
that time have been year- uf pain and
misery     almost     beyond   endurance.
Eleven years ago li tracted a cold
which resulted in pleurisy and inflammation oi tho lungs, other complications then followed, and 1-was confined tu my room for five years. The
doctor who attended me through that
lung illness said that the reason I waa
unable to move about was due tothe
JTV
I Could Hobble
md  un Crutches.
contracting uf the muscles and nerves
uf my hands and feet through long-
confinement to bed. 1 could bubble
around a little uu crutches, but was
well nigh helpless. At this stage a
second duetur was called in, whu declared my trouble was spinal com-
plutnt. Notwithstanding medical advice and treatment I was sinking
lower and lower, aad was regarded
as incurable. 1 was uow in such a
state that I was unable to leave my
bed, but determined to fiud a cure if
possible, and sent lur uae of the must
able physicians iu Ottawa. I was
under his care and treatment for
three years. He blistered my back
every three or four weeks uud
exerted all his skill, but iu vain. I was
growing weaker ami weaker and began tu think the end euuld uot be
far off. At this Juncture a friend
Btrongly urged me tu try Dr. Williams' I'ink Pills. I yielded tu his solicitations, aud by the time six
boxes uf pills wero used I found myself getting better. 1 used iu all
thirty boxes, nud they have accomplished what ten years uf treatment
under physicians failed tu du. Thanks
to tliis Wonderful medicine, I am able
tu attend tu my duties, and am as
free frum disease as any man lu ordinary health Is expected to be. I
still use Dr. Williams' Pink I'ills, and
they are tlie medicine for me, and su
long as 1 live I sliall use no other.
If 1 had got these pills ten years ago
I am .satisfied I would nut have suffered ati 1 did, and would have saved
sumo hundreds uf dollars doctor bills.
It is ouly thuse whu have passed
thruugli such a terrible siege as I
have dune who can fully realize tlie
wonderful merit of Dr. Williams' Piuk
Fills."
Sir. Argue's experience should convince even the most skeptical that
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills stand far in
advance oi ntlier medicines and are
oue of the greatest discoveries of tlie
nge. There is no disease due tu puur
ur watery blood or shattered nerves
whicli will not speedily yield tu this
treatment, and In Innumerable cases
patients have been restored to health
and strength after physicians had
pronounced the dreaded wurd " incurable." Sold by all dealers in medicine or sent by mall post-paid at 50
cents a box, or six boxes for $2,50
by addressing the Dr. Williams* Medicine Co.. Brocliville, Ont., or Schenectady, N. V. Refuse imitations and
du not lie persuaded to try something
else.
A ClOOD USE FOR THEM.
Young Wife���How awful I The paper says a young man whu had only
liech married three months went to
liis room and committed suicide.
Young Husband���Eh I  How?
"He hung himself with his suspenders."
''Well, I suppose his buttons were all
off and he hadn't any other use (or
suspenders."
un vi dis mmi.
A Well-Kiiown Peumarb Nobleman Makes
:, Statement Which will Prove nl Ureal
Interest uml Value to Many,
I nder date of September 1st, 1901,
('mint de Dory writes as follows Trom
Neepawa, Man.: "1 liavo been ailing
constantly fnr six or seven years with
severo kidney and bladder trouble. I
have doctored during ail this time
witli physicians iu different countries
without any relief. During my travels
I was induced to try South American Kidney Cure, from whicli remedy
I received instant relief. I most heartily endorse this remedy, as I do not
think It has nn equal." South American Kidney Cure Invariably gives relict
within six hours after first doso is
taken.
CRETONNE AS PAPER.
The papering ot rooms In cretonne
���to make a bull���Is tho latest bedroom fad. Mrs. Frances Hodgson
Burnett's room In her Washington
house Is being decorated In this way,
tho walls and doors being lined with
quilted cretonne.
VALUABLE STAMPS.
A  London; Firm  HuyB  TWO of   Them   fnr
Which it rays coso.
Philately has scored ouo of thoso
records which make prosaic people
open their eyes lu wonder, for tlie
well-known stamp dealers, Messrs.
Stanley Gibbons (.Limited), have Just
paid tGSO���the highest price ever
given fur any two stamps���tor tlie
penny (redl aud two-penny (blue) Mauritius stumps, issued iu 1S47. They
wero first acquired by Madame Dubois, of Bordeaux, having been found
in a merchant's office there. Madame
Dubois sold them tu M. E. Lalanue In
18(17. The latter gentleman has just
sold his culiection fur 00,000 francs
(��2,400) to M. l'iet Lutaudcrio, a well-
known French collector, from whom
Messrs. Stanley Gibbous havo purchased the two "Stamps lueutioned.
As far as Is known, ouly two other
copies of theBe rarities exist In England���namely, iu tlie Nation's Stamp
Collection, bequeathed by Mr. Tapling,
at the British Museum. Tho penny lu
that collection is obliterated, and tho
two-penny unused is not su fine a copy
as the present. In tho whole world
only thirteen or fourteen copies of
theso stamps are known.���St. James1
Gazette.             	
KLV. 1.. W. SlIOWLKS
Gives Hts Experience With Organic nonet
IllBeuso���The    llread   Malady   tm^llin
Iucrease,
For many years my greatest enemy
lias been organic heart disease. From
an uneasiness ubuut tho heart, with
palpitation more ur less severe, it
had developed Into abnormal action,
thumping, fluttering and choking sensations, Dull paiu with a peculiar
warm feeling were ever present near
tlie heart. 1 have tried many physicians and taken numberless remedies with very little benefit, Seeing
Dr. Aguew's Cure fur tlio Heart advertised iu the Kittnnning, Pa., papers, I purchased a buttle and began its use, receiving almost instant
relief. I have now takeu several
bottles of tho remedy nnd can speak
most highly lu its favor. Tho ehok-
iug, abnormal beating, thumping nnd
palpitation have almost entirely disappeared, The remedy is certainly
a wuiHler-wni'ker, for my caso was
chronic. Kev. L. W. Showers, F.liler-
tou. Pa.
CONCENTRATED EXTRACT.
Pineapples bring 25 cents a hundred
in Madagascar.
Tho men who make history have
nut time to n rite it.���Metternich.
Texas porterhouse steaks cost mure
in Chicago, New York and Boston
than they do m London, Paris and
Berlin.
Wedding comes trom nn uid wurd,
"wad" or "wed," a pledge ur token,
still used in Scotland tu denote a ball
or surety.
Edward Atkinson says 10,800,000,-
000 eggs are laid in the United states
in a vcar. They are worth 814,0,000,-
000���O8 much as tlio pig iron and
wool crop.
Tho highest salaried employee lu
tlie United States is supposed to be
the president of the Equitable Life
Assurance Society, Henry B. Hyde.
Ho receives annually $100,000,
Probably few people in tliis vicinity
realize the proportion which the
baked bean industry has assumed lu
Boston. One establishment ou Shaw-
mut avenue, Known as the "Boston
Baked Beans Company," has a daily
bako ot 1,500 pots, holding from two
to eight quarts of beaus. The bake
begins at about 2 p. m��� and at i.HO
a. m. the steaming pots are loaded
upou wagons and delivered to hotels
and residences in all parts uf the
"Hub."     	
TOBACCO DESTROYS VITALITY.
Nervous system paralyzed by nicu-
tino means lost manhood, weak eyes,
and a general all-gone look nud feeling that robs lifo uf Its pleasure. Tobacco is the root of many an impotent
symptom, nnd No-Tu-Bac a guaranteed cure that will make you strung.
vigorous and happy in more ways
than oue. No-To-Bac guaranteed and
sold by druggists everywhere. Book,
titled "Don't Tobacco Spit or Smoke
Ynur Lite Away." Ad. Sterling Remedy Co., New York or Chicago.
WESTERN FORETHOUGHT.
The collection was being taken up
in a small western mining town when
an awkward deacon let the box fall.
Tho sudden Jingle of mouey ou tlie
floor caused a dozen of tho red-
shirted parishioners to mako an Instinctive movement towards the coin,
but quick as a wiuk tlie preacher had
pulled out his shooters.
" Brethren, you had better sit down,
l'vo got yuu covered. If any of you
move toward tnat money there will
be somo free funerals la this parish.
Deacou, pick up tlie money."���Judge.
Catarrh���Use Nasal Balm. Quick,
positive cure. Soothing, cleansing,
healing.
A TRAGEDY.
That's him thar,  on his    coffin,    iu
the cart,
And that's his wife ii-ercepin
Iu tho crowd, 'way off, and weeplu.
Oh, the law Is Jest n-breakln oi her
heart 1
That's hlui thar, uu the scattol. Seel
Ho speaks.
Thar's a woman thar a-lioldln
Of tho hnnds they'll soon be foldln',
An tho tears Is Jest a-rainiu    down
her cheeks.
That's him thar,  in the coffin,  lyln
low,
An'  the woman���first to  love  him
And tho last to bend above him
Is his   mother���but   I   reckon   you
would know.
" Good-night I" sho said in parting,
"I hato to go away."
'Twns ten whon she wns starting,
Sho left at break o' day.
$80   PER   MONTH
And stencil* employments
Do You Want Work
For the whole or part of your time I   If ao |
write   THEQt'EKN'SlLVEUWARKCO,,       j
Moutreal, Que.
"ISSUE NO. 24 1895.
NOTE
In replying to nny of these advertise
ments, pleaso meution thU papor.
Rob
��� Roy
Cigar
I: s no because
I'm Scotch but
you c a n n a
smoke a bettet
Cigar than
II "If!
*t'J
BOY,"
Iii' cist 5c.
, i*. 1 got sax
. !* 'hem foi a
juartcr.      ��
IMPinC TOBACCO CO , MOHT.U,.
WARNING.
$100   r*T3>^WA.Ft.I3.
W8 are Infonnod than uuKcrupulous dealer*
am in the habit of Collins plogfl and pArtfl of
iliiRs of inferior Tobaoeo, rcprus-imtjlnK thom
te the Ronuino
r-%  m
((
Myrtle Navy,
Tin* Ronuino plus in utaniued wlvh the letter
"T, A* 13. " in bronze. Purchasers will confer %
favor by looking at tho trade mark when purchasing.
f-B-A reward of ON *-*; HUNOHKI) DOL1-AK1*
will bo given to anyono for information lpudlns
to the conviction of any person guilty of thfl
abovo fraudulent practices or infringing on on:
trade mark in any manner whatsoever.
The Geo, E, Tuckettdc Sou Co,
Ltd,, Hamilton, Ont,
IGENT3  WANTffD-ONE   0001)   LIVE
-V   aijo.it.  wantod  in  evory lonility 111 tho
Domimoo to sell our wire fanning nnd metallic
Bliiufjle*-).   No tronlil.* in *t;iIu* SIM a week.
THE COLLINS MFG. CO..
lili E*-pliiiiada west,
Toronto, Oi.t.
AGENTS-" STOIl* OF CHINA AND
.Japan." beautifully Illustrated, i-* iIn-
book io push just now. Outiti only iocs. Don't
delay in Ordering, Hunter. Iloso Sc Co.,
Toronto,   Mention this paper.
OLD CANADIAN POSTAGE STAMPS,
PARTIES HAVING OLD LETTERS
In original envelopes ot the dates
1851 to 1870 with postago stamps
thereon will get good prlcoe tor the
stamps by applying to Box 195, Hamilton, Out.
Strengthens Digestion
wonderfully ��� ADAMS'
TUTTl FRUTT��.
f*��lU50 ti^b-ltori*.
NINE YEARS   A SUFFERER
FROM SMI-RHEUM.
Thin la to certify thnt Eby's Electrlt
Salve and Eby's Butternut Bitters
hare cured a severe case ot salt rliena
on a young person, who had been
troubled with this terrible disease tor
nine years. It Is now three years slnae
we need the salve and bitters, and
there has not been the least sign of
the disease reappearing since. I heartily recommend it to those eutterlng
trom this loathing disease.
John McConnell,-
Queen Hill, Out., January, 18GB.
KMINSLOW'S nwu'H
'. -    rttn childmn TIITHIM    ��� 1
FOR TWENTY FIVE TEARS
i*��i
BAKING
POWDER
THECOOKSBESTFRIEND
LARGEST SALE IN CANADA,
Michigan Lands.
10,000 aerer, of tlio boat UnA I :h�� fltnue., t.
(nm 12 io ?5.00 por aon, Ik *mi whmWm an'
ps Md D6M lho Mloh. 0.*atiml, twteolt ft Ai
in* A Loon Luke Fty*. '.''*;���' *��mi ud boa
WsAtA Apply U>
R. M, PIERCE, Agt. West Bay City,
OR i"0 d; W.CURTIS,
"Whittemore, Mich.
1
"CURES WHbffi ��LL EISE FAILS.
t Couiih Srruv. TftsL"'UuiiO. use|
In time.   Bultl bj ilniiiKiath THE RAGE FOR FANCY WAISTS,
The lore Fanciful, tlie
Their Popularity,
Greater
Plaid Silks, Plftld Velvets aud Cheeka ot All
bizeti mucin In l*'n��hiuii���A New Model
fur a Waist���Methods ��r Keeping the
Sleeves out to Their Euormous Size.
Fancy waists continue to be as
popular aa ever, and tlie more fanciful they are the greater Is" their popularity. Every known and many an
unknown material is used in their
composition, and the seven primary
colors are nowhere in the kaleidoscopic effects which this Benson
aro the desire of every woman's heart.
The costume wherein waist and
skirt are of tho same material is
rarely to bo Keen, and even whon a
gown haw a waist of the same goods
thero aro also mado other waists to
wear with the same skirt. Often ono
skirt will liavo threo or four waists,
each and every one quito different.
The plaid silk waists which were occasionally to be Been last winter aro
more commonly worn, aud extraordinary are tho plaids. A bright canary colored silk will havo Its plain
surface crossed, barred aad intersected by bright bluo and white, and tho
whole combination will look well.
Theso plaiu silk waists aro not handsome unless made of tho heavier qualities ot silk; taffeta Indian silks aro
extremely ugly, and look thin and
poor. Tbe plaid velvets are also
used, but will soon bo laid aside.
Cheeka of all sises are much the fashion. Tliey aro made almost invariably in one pattern, with full overhanging box pleat iu front, otherwise
quite plain.
A new model for a waist is made of
six Inch gros grain sash ribbon, a pale
heliotrope covered with small bunches
of flowers. There is a seam in tho
middle of tho back, whero the pieces
of ribbon are joined. The front effect of this waist is exceedingly
smart. The ribbon forms a jacket effect ; Is shirred iu irom the side and
shoulder scams and stands out In
��� front. Between tlio two sides is a
- full fall of applique lace. The sleeves
are mado ol two pieces ot the ribbon
sowed together at tho edges. A
satin collar and belt of tho deepest
shade or heliotrope gives a touch of
darker color, which is most effective
and "becoming. To make a waist
after this pattern it is best to use
the etlffest ribbon possible, as tho
softer kind will need to be stiffened
by canvass or wire, and that Is never
so satisfactory. Theso ribbon waists
are novelties and aru difficult to find
ready mado In tho ordiuary largo
shops.
The prlco of silk waists for sale In
tbe Shops vary astonishingly. Of
course, ready made garments or any
kind do not fit so well as those made
to order, but this season many of tlie
largo establishments will make alterations at a purely nominal charge, and
bones and steels, which aro never to
be fouud in ready made waists, can be
added. These cheap silk waists aro
made witb plain backs, the front with
a turned over double box pleat and
large sleeves. They are lined with
coarse white muslin, nnd aro not well
finished, but are effective and smart
looking.
Some of the newest waists are very
simply trimmed with a box pleat of
fine tucked muslin, with rows of narrow yellow Valenciennes lace. The
collar matches the pleat, uud there
are narrow turned over cuffs of the
same. This is an exceedingly dainty
trimming, and looks wtll on any
waist, whether of plain or fancy silk.
The muslin is unusually sheer, and thc
tucks are placed very closo together.
The -stiff taffetas and all the silks
which are in fashion this year are
peculiarly well adapted to very elaborate waists. The silks in them are
so stiff that tho big puff sleeves and
the various elaborate trimmings can
bo made of them without using stiff
linings. But there Is ouo serious defect
that people who consult economy will
do well to beware of���some of the
very prettiest of the stiff Bilks do not
wear at all well, but crack long before tbe first freshness and beauty
are gone. The fancy ribbon collars ol
various colors aro still used with silk
waists, and It makes a nico change
and variety to liavo two or three collars for each waist. Must of the silks
havo several colors iu them, so that,
if tasto bo used, it is an easy matter
to get ono or moro fancy ribbons to
match. Tho lining for all tlio silk
waists should bo carefully fitted and
boned, and then tho outside can be
put ou iu whatever way is desired.
The stretched back, as dressmakers
call thoso backs which aro made
without seams, nro stretched tightly
from sido seam to sido seam over the
lining, which lias any number of
seams iu it. For those whu prefer it,
tho backs of the waists are often laid
in tiny pleats towards tho waist line,
or shirred into place. This gives a
look of fulness across tlie shoulders,
and yet keeps tlm lines ul tho figure
very distinct.
A plain silk waist mude shirred on
tho shoulders and drawn In at tlie
belt is a Capital starting ground for
any amount of elaborate effect. Valenciennes laco Is used to trim batiste
and sheer organdy muslin collars
made into irregular yokes, short
capes and fichus. AU theso can bo
worn with tho waist, which Is mado
plain to start with, and a woman
can become "genteel at a slap"
by adding ono or these elaborately-
trimmed uffairs with a bright collar.
Extra yokes aro also made in black
lace and black so that it is possible
to look very soberly and demurely
dressed in tho very same waist that
doea duty for even a small dinner.
The making of theso yoke collars is
quite possible for an amateur, provided sbe has a good pattern to
copy. They must fit smoothly and
well over tho Bhoulders and around
tbo neck, and aro not necessarily expensive If mado by one'B own fingers,
for there is not a great deal of material used, and the narrow lace is
quito  as  fashionable now    to    trim
them with as the wider laces and embroideries.
Light silk waists are generally
made with puffed sleeves coming just
below tho elbow, and finished with
a row of the silk aad a tightly tied
bow and ends. This is a very unbecoming fashion to almost every
woman, for not one woman in ten
thousand is the happy possessor ol a
handsome forearm, and it has been
a hard matter In consequence to introduce this style into- general wear.
The smart women at Newport were
the fint to appear in these waists
last summer, but they Invariably
wore, even In their own houses, tlie
long gloves which covered up tlie
arm an(l did away with the ugly Inappropriate look that a short-sleeved,
high necked gown Is bound to have.
Persistency, however, lias won the
day, and there is a perfect epidemic
of these elbow sleeved monstrosities.
The silks used are generally light iu
color. There la somo ono prevailing
tone, but nny number of other colors
aro lu tbo different patterns. A pale
pink or pule blue ground will bo entirely covered with a pattern of conventionalized flowers, or even of the
Dresden china flowers, lu all tho
strange colors In which Dresden china
flowers havo tlielr being. The waists
aro finished with the samo roll
around tho waist line as around the
sleeves, but thero is now, ins tend ol
a small knot, which generally finished
tho row at the back, a double bow
made ol tliree-lnch wido ribbon, tied
very tightly and standing straight out
from tho liguro. Wherein the beauty
of tho bow lies has not yot been determined. It Is tho fashion, and that Is
sufficient. Homo of the newest waists
aro made of eutro doux of insertion
aud ribbon, or ribbon velvet. The
lining of the waist, which shows
through the insertion and tho
sleeves, is of somo bright color. For
instance, a palo blue chine silk will
have lining und sleeves of tho silk,
and tho eutro deux of whito molro
ribbon aud heavy white laco. The
laco and ribbon fit smoothly, as far
as tho bust Une, and also keep to the
lines of the figure at tho sido, but
hang over tho belt both in tho front
aud tho back. It is an odd stylo, but
ou somo women looks very smart. It
iu also made perfectly tight-fitting,
und this last shows off to perfection
a fine figure. Iu black and white it is
extremely smart, particularly when
tho sleeves and body of the waist are
mado of black. White and black lines
aro Invariably becoming, and never
more so than when they are fitted to
tho lines of a handsome figure.
Tho sleeves aro kept out to their
enormous size by two or threo different methods. A lining of stiff taffeta
is generally perfectly eiiicacious, particularly if there is an inner lining
almost tight fitting. Some dressmakers always make tight sleeve lining
and then hold out the outor material
with a thia canvas. The very newest
sleeves, shirred down the centre, have
wires to keep them in place, but
wires aro very uncertain things to
depend on, as they bead very soon
quite out of shape.
Even when an entiro waist lining of
silk is nob possible, itis well to have
tho sleeve linings mado of It, for it is
always more satisfactory in the end.
When tho sleeves are not made short
to tho elbow, they aro made quite
long, to come well down over the
wrist, aud for most of the waists are
finished without any trimming whatever, whleh is a pity, as the hand
looks much better whon there is something soft, like a ruffle, ubout the end
of tho sleeve.
GARTER BUCKLES.
It is too bad, writes Mary Belrne
in tho at. Louis Republic, that tho
prettiest of the newest novelties is
oue thut will never come Into general
view. The public Is entitled, therefore, to a description of���the garter
buckle.
Every little while there comes a
passiag craze for these pretty and
useful littio ^trifles in expensive
shapes, and milady gay insists upon
possessing a pair. With all consideration for these treasures in gold,
tho eternal fitness Is more fully carried out when designed In sliver.
Silver, with a bluo enameled conventional border, in the centre of which
a silver cupid rests on a tiny blue
cloud, makes a charming little clasp
to the broad black silk elastic band.
A single filigree silver daisy, with a
deep yellow centre, is pretty and artistic, too. Violets are equally as
popular in garter designs as for decorating hats or gowns, and the plain
silver square, with a single violet enameled on each, aro protty novelties.
The little four-leaved clover is a
dainty suggestion, and with the good
luck symbol attached is doubly desirable.
Suggestive of a dainty Ilttlo woman
Is an oval-shaped clasp of dark bluo
enamel with a tiny bunch of diamonds
iu ono corner, whilo Inscribed underneath Is tho toll-talo Ilttlo word,
" amour.*'
Bluo enamel and silver seem to bo
generally accepted for gifts, aud few
uro tho Jewel-loving fiancees who
would reject a gift of this kind.
Thero aro dragons and bugs in most
elaborate enameling.
Horseshoes make such huge clasps
that they scarcely seem desirable, although they are somewhat In do-
mum!. Clasps in gold aro becoming
moro gorgeous than over,
SHIRT WAISTS IN DEMAND.
It requires unusual strength of
mind, much patience and a decisive
character, to say nothing of the
money, to buy a shirt waist theso
balmy summer days, Tho average
amount of time consumed In purchasing a shirt waist, whether it costs
8(1 cents or $5, is an hour and ahalf.
This fact has been learned by actual
experience.
Among the most effective shirt
waists are those made of swivel silk.
They have the same glossy sheen as
silk, and are altogether charming.
They are seen In an aesthetic green,
a pretty shade of lilac and a soft rose
pink. These waists sell at $4.25.
The checked shirt waists In fine
Scotch gingham are selling more
rapidly than any other design. The
green and white checks are extremely stylish, Black and white checked
shirt waists are a sensible Investment. The percale shirt waists,
with stiff white collars and cuffs, are
not as popular aa they were when
the shirt waists first appeared.
Charming shirt waists aro seen made
of dotted Swiss, with broad sailor collars, trimmed with three narrow frills
of yellow Valenciennes laee.
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL,
GOUD PKtiACHlNU.
"KDoxoalan" ou Whnt Constitutes a Good
Seriuou To-dny.
More than ever am I convinced that
on an ordinary text, on au ordinary
occasion by an ordinary preacher
half aa hour is quite loug enough for
a sermon. There aro exceptions, no
doubt. A Scotch or Irish 'congregation in the country that has only
one service in the week, and that
really enjoys good preaching, may
be an exception. Special occasions are
exceptions. Eminent preachers who
aro strangers may be exceptions.
But for ordiuary occasions and ordiuary men half an hour Is quito
long enough. There is no earthly use
lu hammering away at a congregation after a preacher has lost his
grip of their attention. On a very
hot day twenty or twenty-five minutes may bo better than even half
aa hour If tbe preacher has his matter la good shape.
Moro than ever am 1 convinced that
the textual sermon sueh as John
llall preaches and Spurgeon preached,
or the topical sermon with a clean
cut proposition such as Uushnell
preached Is the truo ideal of a sermon. Tho essay style, so popular
with many American preachers, is a
downright failure; It Is worse than
a failure; it is a fraud. It Is no sermon. It is weak. It is a molluski it
has no back bone, no ribs, uo nothing.
It is unfit for manly delivery. A morbid fear of being considered old-
fushloned drives too many preachers
Into dawdling over a weak essay
that is no sermon and can never take
the place or do the work of a sermon. This subject Is so large and important that it will stand moro discussion than can be given to it here
but it will keep.
More than ever am I convinced that
the right kind ol preaching for a
Canadian congregation lies midway
between the frigid "high und dry"
and the sensational. I heard the
"high aud dry" in abundance during
Lent, and I heard a sermon in which
the preacher declared that some
pillars of tlie church are caterpillars
and In which he found a place for
the Scotch elder wlio said that
though he could do nothing else he
could object. Between these ex*
tremes tbe best pulpit work can bo
doue. A sermon may be grave, sol-
emu nnd instructive without being
heavy or dull; it may be bright
without being sensational In the bad
sense of that word.���''Knoxonian" in
Canada Presbyterian.
INTERNATIONAL
JUNJS :
UESSON-
1805,
' Mark
vi. 1*8
A TRUTHFUL FORTUNE TELLER.
Even in this Intelligent age of the
world there aro too many poople who
believe in the humbuggory of " for-
tuno telling;" but If eo called " fortune-tellers" were as frank as tbe
ono mentioned In the following story,
they would havo fewer patrons than
they now have:
A book agent was having his fortune told. " 1 see," said the -seventh
daughter of tho seventh daughter,'
contracting her eyebrows, " I see the
name of John."
" Yes," said the book agent, Indicating that he had heard the name
before.
The name seems to have given you
a great deal of trouble."
"It has."
" This John Is  an  Intimate friend."
"That's so,' he  said, wonderingly.
" And often leads you to do things
you are sorry for."
" Truo; every word."
" His influence over you Is bad."
" Right again."
" But you will soon have a serious
quarrel, when you will become estranged."
" I'm glad of that. Now spell out
his whole name."
The fortune-teller opened one eye
and carefully studied the face
of tho visitor. Then sho wrote some
cabalistic message and handed it to
him in exchange for her fee.
" Do not read It until you are at
home," shesaid, solemnly; "It is
your friend's whole name.'
When he reached home he lit tho
gas and gravely examined the pnper.
There ho read, In picket-fence characters, the namo of his friend. "'Demi-
John 1"
CATS IN EGYPT,
first   peoplo known
The first peoplo known to have
domesticated cats wero the ancient
Egyptians, on whoso monuments representations of theso animals arc
found as curly as 1G00 B. C. It Is on
a tomb erected about 1300 B. C. that
the cat first appears unmistakably as
a domesticated creature, being shown
seated beneath a chair. In ancient
Egypt the cat was an object of rellg*
lous worship, and was even an inmate
of tlie temples. There was actually a
cat goddess, named Bubaslls, who was
always depicted ns having a cat's
head. Behind the temple dedicated to
her nt Beal Hassan, groat pits have
beea found containing multitudes of
mummies of cats. Tho cat was also
regarded as au emblem of tlio sun,
its eyes being supposed to vary lu
color with tho progress ot thnt- hunt
nary through tlie heavens. Likewise
Its eyes aro believed to undergo
chango each lunar month, and for this
reason tho aidmal was also sacred to
tho moon.   _
STRAWBERRY PIE.
Line deep pio dishes with good
plain paste, fill them nearly full of
strawberries, sprinkle over two largo
tablespoonfuls of sugar and dredge
this lightly with flour. Cover with
the upper crust rolled out as thin aB
possible, turn the edges neatly with
a sharp knife; make a rent In the
centre, press the edges tightly together so that Juices of the fruit may
not run out while baking. Serve the
same day as baked or the under
crust will be heavy.
" The Resurrection of Jesui
Golden Tuxi, Lukoxxlv, M��
Time���A. I). 20,   1-laee--Jerusalem.
Persons,MarcMagdaleno; Mary, tboMother
of Jet-us; Sakuue, the angel.
Commentary.���1. When the Sabbath was past���Saturday evening after sunset. It would seem by Luke
xxiii. DC, that the women prepared
spicos and ointments ou Friday evening after returning from tne sepulchre.
2. Very early In the morning���They
began their journey to the sepulchre
While it was only twilight aud they
came to thc sepulchre as the sun began to rise���Whitby. They came
unto the sepulchre���Not iu superstition but piously.
������>. Who shall role its -away the
stone, etc.���Read Matt, xxvill. 2, 8,
Probably the earthquake meant the
confusion caused among the guards
by the angel's appearance. All this
had taken place before the women
reached the sepulchre. It is likely
that the angol had descended, rolled away the stone, and was sitting
ou it before the women reached the
tomb.���Clarke.
-1. When they looked���When they
reached the place where they expected difficulty"! they saw that the stone
was roiled away.
5. Entering the sepulchre-Far
enough to discover that the body of
Jet-siLs was not whero they left It.
Thero was no occasion for embalming now. Tliey saw a young man-
Tim angel appeared In thc likeness of
a youug man; for angels, though
created in the beginning, grow not
old but jaro always ia the same perfection of beauty anl strength ; and
so shall glorified saints be when they
are as the angels.���Com. Com.
0. Me salth unto them, be not affrighted���Even though the appearance of this angei caused the Roman
guard to shake and become as dead
men. the loving women might find
comfort, for tliere was a groat contrast between their motive** iu being
there. Yu seek Jesus of .Nazareth,
which was crucified���Matthew says,
" I know that ye seek." AVc may
notice that the angel speak*; of Jesus
as Him who was crucified; as though
He would say, " That scene Is now
over; ye must dwell so much upon the
sad circumstances of His crucifixion,
but believe now tlie joyful news of
His resurrection.' He is risen; He is
not here; behold the place where
they laid Him���He was crucified, but
Is risen. It was good news the angel brought.
Go your way, tell Ills disciples
and Peter���It was a dismal time with
them. They thought of their Muster as dead and their hopes and joys
burled in His grave." They look upon
their cause as sunk and themselves
freudy to fall au easy prey into the
hands of their enemies so that there
remains no more spirit in them.--Com.
Com. This message would discourage
them. " Peter Is especially mentioned here. Some suppose because
ho is the most eminent of
the apostles.'��� Weldon. Tell 'Peter
that Jesus is risen from the
dead and le ready to' heal 'his
backsliding and love him freely; bo
that, after being converted, he mny
strengthen his brethren.���Clarke. Ho
goeth before you into Galilee���As 'He
had Himself promised. Matt. xxvl.
32. Thus these faithful women proclaim to those who were afterward
to be the teachers of the whole human
race.' Behold what honor Cod puts
upon those who persevere la His
truth and continue to acknowledge
Him before men.���Clarke. There yo
shall see Him as He said unto you���
This must refer to those more public
manifestations of Himself to large,
numbers of disciples at once which He
promised only in Galilee; for individually He wns seen of some of those
very women almost immediately after
this. Matt, xxviii. 9-10.
8. They went out quickly and fled
 for they trembled and were amazed
���Matthew says they " departed from
the sepulchre with fear nnd great joy ;
and did run to bring His disciples
word." Tlio clause may lie rendered,
" for terror and ecstasy possessed
them" ; and the ecstasy may signify
the mingled affections of astonishment and joy in their greatest excess.
Terror and joy held them.
QUQBtions.-MVhon did tho Sabbath
end? Who came to the BBpulChre?
What did they bi Ing, and for what?
Wheu did these women como to tho
sepulchre? What did they say on
tholr Journey? What surprise met
them at the tomb V How does Matthew describe that scene ? Whom did
tliey see? Where was lie'.' How was
he clothed? Tell how his appearance
had affected the guard. What did his
appearance and garments Indicate?
What did hi; say to the women'.' Why
would tliey be likely to bo afraid'.'
Was lie right iu what he said? How
did he offer to convince them? What
did the angel then t.'ll them to do?
Why did he mention Peter's name?
Where WOUld they nil meet Jesus V
What promise bad ho made to them
about it? How did the women obey?
How did they feel? Hid tiu*y converse with others on their way? Had
tliese women ministered unto Jesus
before?   What   was their reward?
Teachings.��� Wo should observe the
Sabbath, Love to Jt ^-^ does imt hesitate at seeming difficulties, Lovo Una
its reward. Cod especially remembers the penitent ones. Cod sends Ills
message to the world through His
children.
Thought*-*.���Never was tlicra such a
Sabbath, idnce, the Sabbath was first
instituted, as the oue When Jesus laid
in the grave. "The walk of the three
women to tho grave is a symbol of
tho separation betweeu the old and
ncw world iu the history of tho Passover."
PRACTICAL SURVEY.
The resurrection of Christ Is tho
certain proof that Ho was, as the
Great Sucrifico for sin, accepted by
the Father, and is the foundation for
tho whole doctrine of salvation. It
Is the indispensable condition to the
foundation of the Kingdom of Cod in
general.
The empty grave was the boundary
line between the old dispensation
and the new. The sublimest expectation.*- of the Ohl Testament were
now fulfilled iu tho resurrection of
Jesus. He humbled Himself and became obedient unto death, even the
death of the cross. Wherefore God
also hath highly exalted Him, aud
given Him a name which is above
every name. That at the uame of
Jesus every knee should bow, aad
that every tongue should confess that
Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of
God the Father.    Phil. ii. 8-11.
The resurrection was a crowning
victory t<> Jesus Himself, it set seal
to the truth of all His teachings, both
nf Himself and to others, as well as
all His works. It was the decisive
step on the way to His glorification.
The resurrection morn was a time
of gladness to the disciples of Jesus,
It brought a most glorious feast, (1)
of the most glorious joy, (2) of tho
most glorious victory, ('.>) of the most
glorious faith, (*1) of the most glorious hope. It Is tho true comfort of
all believers. The Easter (resurrection) mom wns a festal day for the
angels of heaven also. How mournfully go the women to the holy sepulchre, but how joyfully they return.
COMMERCIAL SUMMARY.
There has been au extraordinary
advance in all insecticides, especially
in Paris green, which has goim up
nearly 100 per cent., and it is difficult just now to quote a price.
Bank returns show that during
April the notes in circulation dropped from $29,414,790 to $29,ir*2,i:>2.
Call loans have further decreased,
while current loans aru larger. At
the end of March the call loans were
$17,279,287, whereas at the end of
April they were $10,500,271. The current loans, according to last report,
were $199,080,112. They are now
$203,273,500.
There is not much enlargement in
tho merketlug of hogs. Western packers have handled 265,000 for tho
week, compared with 210,000 for the
preceding week, and 215,000 last
year. From March 1st the total Is
2,085,000, against 2,000,000 a year,
ago. Quality generally satisfactory.
Prices were well sustained for some
days, Imt became weaker, and at the
close tho average of western markets
Is 10 to 15 cents per 100 pounds
lower than a week ago.
The deposits in the Government
Savings Banks for the month of
April wero #201,307, und the withdrawals for the samo time were
$304,078, being an excess of $42,-
711 In withdrawals over deposits.
This reduced the balances on April
30th to .$17,055,04:4, as against $17,-
097,755 on March 31st last. On April
30th, 1804, the balances iu theso
banks at ttio credit of depositors
were $17,298,628, but at that time
tliere wero 37 branches in operation,
whereas now there are only 35
branches.
Failures during the week have been
211 in tho United States, against 219
last year, aud 37 in Canada, against
24 last year.
Tbe return of Canada's trade for the
nino months ended 31st March shows
that the imports during that 'period
wero valued at $42,979,130, and the
duty $13,278,855. For the same period last year the Imports wero $48,-
646,943, and the duty collected $15,-
302,802.
Advices from Manitoba n nd the
Northwest state that crop prospects are better than nt any similar
time during tho past ten years. The
season is fully a month In ndvanco of
last year. This is important, as nn
early season of seeding means that
the danger from frost when the wheat
is filling out will bo reduced to a
minimum. No damage has been done
by the recent cold wave, and ns late
showers have given ample moisture
to tbe ground, prospects may be
looked on as encouraging.
Ten banks in Ontario, with a total
paid-up capital of $17,500,000, on
which an average of 4 per cent, in
dividends for the half year is paid,
will disburso $700,000 In dividends to
shareholders on June 1st.
A leading bank manager said today: "In nil likelihood you will see
tho rates for money here advanced
ia a day or two. In Montreal tho rate
for .en 11 loans Is now 5 per cent,, and
I think It will only bo a question of
a day or two till tho rate hero Is
changed from 4 1-2 to 5 per cent.
Tho end of the month Is approaching
and then eight or ten of the large
banks make up lheir statements, and
as they will be desirous of showlncas
strong a position ns possible, some
loans will probably bo called.
GLASS ROBES.
Nothing is Impossible in this Inventive age. Tho latest novelty Is a
material made of spun glass, and
Which Is as bright and supple as silk,
with a peculiar sheen reminding ono
of diamond dust. In Russia there has
for a long time existed a tissue manufactured from tlio fibre ot a peculiar
Nnndrous stone from tho Siberian
mines, which, by somo secret process,
is shredded and spun Into a fabric
whleh, although soft to tho touch and
pliable In tho extreme, Is of so
durable a liaturo that it never wears
out. This is probably what has given
an    enterprising    manufacturer   the
Idea of producing spun-lass dr. -i
length-. Tho Muscovite stuff is
thrown Into tho firo when dirty,
Whence It is withdrawn absolutely
clean nnd ready for use; but tho
spun-glass silk Is simply brushed with
a hard brush and soap and water,
and is none tho worso for being
either stained or soiled. This material Is to bo bad In whit:;, green,
lilac, pink and yellow, and bids fair
to become very fashlonablo for evening dresses. It is -an Austrian who
is tho Inventor of this material,
which Is rather sostly.
POOR TASTE.
She���But how can you    think
I'm
pretty when my nose turns up so ?
Hc���V/ell, all I havo to say is that
It shows mighty poor tasto In backing
away from such a lovely mouth. ���mi
G. A. McBain & Co.,   Real Estate*   Brokers, Nanaimo, B.C.
IAXE LOCALS.
Pickson i��: Co. have received their li-
(ttnse.
The new churches as Acy approach
completion present a pleasant exterior.
New novels, plain and fancy stationery at Plmbury's.
Another livery is in town. The riifs
.came up last week. It ts located near
Piket's.
Head Constable Hutchison has neatly
fitted up Ins new quarters in the jail, ancl
>s pleasantly domiciled.
LoAn WANTED.��� About $300 on
���{nod security for a rancher. Apply at
News office for particulars.
Mr. R.IJ. Anderson, tiie metal worker,
i% improving  his place with a coat of
palm,
For Saj,"-.���Two fine young Berkshire
boars. Applv to Win. liarinistnn, Hand-
wick, P.O.
Spring medicines top cleansing
ti>e system and blood at Plmbury's
drug store.
Lost.���A black hint! bag at Coniox
wharf last Wednesday morning. The
���/iijder is requested to leave it at the
*Jkws Office: fnr the owner.
Mr. and Mrs. James Reed are install-
tr] in ckai'te of the hospital, li is believed they will do much to popularize the
jrtstitinjoj),
if any one has any flowers, magazines,
fru't, new vegetables, etc, to spare tliey
Aattnot (In better than take them tn lhe
hospital where tbey will be much appie-
ciated.
A Jap was brought before the Police
Court on Monday charged with disturbing the Sunday evening inissioii-.ti v meet
ing and was convicted. He left the court
���mom a sadder and poorer man,���poorer
hy $10 and costs.
The dance on July 4 at Piket's ball was
Attended by about 75 persons. Tne mu-
. sic was by Messrs llaird and Roy and
$>;ive general satisfaction. A neat little
sum should have been netlcd for the bene
'it ofthe Athletic Grounds.
The editor's table was brightened last
���reek by the presence of a bouquet ol
(lowersfrom Mrs. Andrews. The editor's
kitchen was much unproved by some delicious lettuce and young onions from tbe
Little River Hardens of Mr. John I.R.
WilUr,
fcliss Sarah E. Lewi.,, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Lewis, Cnurtenav, has returned
Irom Victoria the fortunate possessor of
a gnld medal, on one side of which is inscribed ilje word "Merit" and on the nth-
*r "St. Anne's Convent, Victoria, B.C.
June 28, 1895, awarded her for being ist.
Ht geography, arithmetic, plain sewing,
And fancy work, and 2nd. in good man-
pers and good conduct.
WILLIAMS I HUNTER,
NOTARIES   -3c Ja.CCOJJISTTJa.ISTTS.
peal Estate apd Jpsisfapee
Lots for Sale on Penrith and Marvport Avenues.
Houses to Rent or Sell.
The new iwo storey b'lil ding-���-the future home of THIS News���received thf.
tirst load of lumber from Grunt &
M ounce's new saw mill. A. Hate is the
architect, and it is needless to say that it
will he well proportioned and have an art'
istlc front. James Carthcw U thc con trac
tor, which means of course that it will be
well constructed, When finished (which
will be by August i,) the first storey will
be occupied hy Lang man & Co. Tin-
present Nrwk Oh ict. will furnish fine
quarters for CH. Tarhell, the tinner who
in addition to tm ware will keep a fine
lot of stoves.
THE LIBERAL 0LU3.
The Liberal Club will meet in Oiidicl-
low; hall on Thursday evening-July nth
at 8 o'clock. A full attendance i-s desired.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.
Mr. Parrot of Union left last week fit
the Hospital some very line trout. A lot
of beautiful (lowers have been rertived
from Mrs. W.K. Robb of the Bay.
VISIT   OF WAB-SHIPS.
H.M.S. Royal Arthur, Swan, and
Nymphe lime been ,it the Comos wnarf
for some days. There and in ilavne Sd.
is a favorite location for ihem. In the Iat
ter they show how ports are captured and
towns bombarded. They are England's
strong rijjht any) and make her respected
in every tjuarter ofthe globe. On Sunday every vehicle was engaged, and the
number of visitors to the Hay was very
larye. The b'ccli-'ts were aliout ,ind
not A few pedestrian-*. Thc Hay was
worth seeing, and with the warships made
a double attrac.ion.
FURS,   HIDES,   PELTS,   WOOL,   &c.
-I- SHIP ALL SUCH GOODS  TO - 1
Jas,  McMillan & Co,,
Incorporated.
200-212  FI-13t Avenue  North,
MINNEAPOLIS, -     MINN.
Goods bought right out; Shipping tags froa u:Jon request-
no commission charged* There is no duty oh Kaw Furs
Fair selecMon; immediate returns. or any of ttio coods we handle.
iS"Write fcr Circular giv-Hp; Latest jEruktt Prieos.,,*.;���
LITERARY NOSES.
A new hook on Canada by Pr. llouri*
nut, will shortly he issued. It U entitled
" How Canada is (lo vented," and gives
in plain, simple language a short account
of the Executive, Legislative, judicial
and Municipal Institutions of ihe Country, together with a -.ketch of their origin
and devclopement. Th-: book will be illustrated with numerous engravings and
autographs, and heing the work of so cm
inent an authority as Dr. Hourinni, will
be indispensable to those who wuh to 1 e
well informed about the attain* ol thc
Dominion.
The Coop, Clark Company, (Lim.) arc
the publishers.
NOTICE.
Persons tismy the mule*; nnd horses of
llu*  Union Col.icry Co. without  pernlis
siuti \*ill be prose* uii*.i according to law.
K.D. Little, Snpt.
mabrTed.
HOYD���JOHNSON.--At Union, July
3rd bv the "Kev. D. Mclntyre. Mr. 11.11.
llovd and Mrs Henrietta Johnson, both
of Union.
BED-ROOK PRICES.
On and arte** duly 1st. I will let
single rigs loi* a drive to Courtenay far $1.50.
D. KILPATRICK
ii*. F. Cur ran \
1   SCAVENGER   1
�� UNION, B C.
e/ry^s/.s. yj^'.s./tsyu.sj'y yyy'y
NELSON  OAMP.
<W**
The tirst nirrtinK ni Ne'son Ciimp No
44, (if lhe order nl' Woodmen will lake
plitre in Oddfellows hall nt 8 o'clock
VVcdnesdny itvunlnir July toth. A full m
temlttncu iu desired.
(Ieo. Hull, Secretary.
Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y
Time  Table No,   24,
To take effect at 8.00 a. m. en Fri-
day,   April   5th    1886.   Trains
run  on  Pacific Standard
Time.
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On Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays
Rut urn TickntB will he iBxuod bntwtmn till
points for a tora uml n *j.iurtri*, ��i��tid (orreturn nut lattT thnn Bumlft)'.
li'.l.nrji Ttokete Tor one aiiil a hjrdf ordiimry
lure muy bo ������������'i-IuwikV duly to all [joints,
good mr bovcii rltyj. l��rii��l!t*B il��y ot \ttvio.
No Itettii'ii Tifkoit- lifruwl tor h fnro nnd
quarter wluro lho ah'ijil*-'Mm ia twonty-iv
CClltS.
'hiMUKli rtlt.08 IvMv -.'ii Vli-toi'ln uml *'wiMtx,
Mtloaua amlCnwnnitftMoaTltiltetucnn b*ob
l iitio.1 ot�� iu'i'li��'''i" i tn 'I fe'-.ct A gout, Vi. vftrift
Dhiiwih'-j antl Naiifltmn 3-fHtlom*.
���\,DUN^-Uin, .I0-SK1MI linKTKIt,
Pi-wlrtTf. Ueu'l Hsi��t
II K.PH10K,
nim. Vr iulii ntail Pawonxur A��U
Drs  Lawrence & Wert weed.
Physicians end Surgeons.
TJlTIOiT B.C.
r*oui"��imv mul tho Bay will h�� vlflitod rivor)
Wc(*iiK'.(|iv> atti-moon for tho jmrfifM-*1 of ton,
���mHa'int*.
IMt't'iit-t at n *li-*tiiiM o *n il ri-oi-tvf wrly at
tuiitiou on roculit ui t-jlei-luic niotumi**
���ssscessaiaBa
^���f*r^ga*tar**tEg*gMUi^^^ -��
���w*fm^ns
flew Goods
w Goops
!������<,       .������;���
ew Goods
Yards of Cotton Goods received direct from the manufacturer by the last bent--Factory Cottons-Canton Flannels
���:���.���-Flannelets��� House  Lining���Ginghams���'���'���-
Bleached sheetings ���unbleached sheetings���cottonades���pillow cottons.
These  Goods  were   bought  fuilv  25%  less   than   tlie   regular   wholesale   price   and   we   are   offering   them
^CHEAPER    THAN   EVER   BEFOKE   IN   UNIONS
j A fine all cashmere vest@35 cts.���3 for$r.
Have you seen the bargains wc are offering in Ladies underwear? . A better line at 40, or two lor 75 cents,
\_W00l and silk mixed @ 50, 60 and 75 cts.
MEW GOODS
NiCEGooDS
CHEAP GOODS
tmsmmmimta���nm ****it ___)____*m

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