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BC Historical Newspapers

The Weekly News Jan 31, 1894

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Array G. A. McBain Co
Real Estate Brokers
Nanaimo,  B. C.
NO. 64.
f/^y^ifiA^cfv **" /
G. A. McBain * Oo.      |
Real Estate Brokers
.A Nanaimo,  B. C.
COURTENAY; COMOX DISTRICT, B. C. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31, 1894.
$2.00 PER YEAR
TJ3**TI01*T, ~B- O-
has a fine assortment of
Oils,
Paints,
Crockery,
Hardware,
Glassware,
Gentlemen's
Boots,
Shoes,
Tobacco,'
Clothing,
Groceries,
Furnishings
And so on
We also take orders for custom made suits.
Give us a call and we will try and please you.
UFA I. ESTATK
MARCUS WOLFE,
financial and General Commission Broker,
ROOM  II, JOHNSTON  BLOCK, NANAIMO, B. C.
AGENCIES REPBESLNTED,
Canada Permanent Irfian and Saving*. Compano, Toronto,
Citizens' Bqilding Society of Nanaimo,
Scottieh Union and National Ineuranca Company.
Hartford Fire Insurance Company.
Union Fire Insurance Company of London, England.
Eaatern Fire A.aurauce Company, of Halifyx.
Great Western Life Assurance Co., of Winnipeg, Man.
Money lo Loan on Improved Farm Property.
The EpitaMe Life Assnranee Society,
120 Broadway, New York,
The largest  and strongest Company inthe
World.
<t 153,080,062 00
-P    31,189,015.00
Assets
Surplus over all Liabilities
INSURES THE LIVES
OF
MINERS.
In event of death undei anv circumstances, llie heirs receive full face value of policy.
At the end of io, 15 or 20 years, the money paid is returned with larue interest
A. W. Taylor. Victoria, B. C. Special Executive.
Charles St. Morris, Victoria, B C. Provincial Manager.
Son Life Assurance
HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL
One of the Largest and Strongest Companies
in Canada
Gives the Most Liberal Contract and Pays the  Largest Dividens
Assets $3,403,700.00
Reserve lor the Security of Policy Holders    $2,988,320.28
Surplus over all Liabilities $307,428.77-
J B. Crane, Oen'l Agent, Victoria, B. 0.     L. W. rauquier.S) olsl Agent
We Carry the Largest Stock
���   of   ���
erctadise
in British Columbia.
Simon Leiser, Proprietor,
Miss M. Roy has charge of our dress De.
partment. All work clone in this Department guaranteed to give satisfaction.
COMOX, BO.
0��kU Furnishings
Pattnt Medicine*
Stationery
Wallpaper
Importers &
Flour 4 Peed Dry Good.
Farm Produce Boots ft Shot.
Fancy Groceries Hardware
Crockery ft 01aeawo.ro Paint ft Oil.
Sportsmens Supplies a Speciality
J". ABBAMS
Union Clothing Store
Union,  B. C.
Has Just received a fine Assortment of English Worsteds for
^uitings.    Also Keep Ready Made Clothing, Hats, Shoes and
GENTS FURNISHINGS.
"Ea, The Tailoring Department is in charge^ of D. McLeod,
which is a guarantee of perfectly fitting garments and the best
of workmanship.
Wm. K. Leighton. I
Fire and Life Insurance Agent.
Royal London und Canadian
Plienix of Hartford
London and Lancashire
Confederation Life.
Green Block, Nanaimo.
Society     Cards
I. 0. o. F., No .11
Union Lodge, I. O. O. F., meets
Friday night at 8 o'clock. Visiting
ren cordially invited to attend.
Wm   Writ
every
breth-
Wm. Wright, R. S.
Hiram Locge No 14 A.I* .& A.M.,B.C.R.
Courtenay B. C.
Lodge meets on evety Saturday on or
before the full of thc moon
Visiting Brothers   cordially requested
to attend.
R. S. McConnell,
Secretary.
K. of P.
Comox Lodge No 5, K. of P., meets
eyery Saturday, after the new and full
moon, at 8 p. m. at Castle Hal, Comox.
Visiting Knights cordially invited to attend.
John lUird
K. R.S.
C. O. O. F. .
Loyal Sunbeam Lodge No. 100, C. O
O. F. meet in the old North Comox"
school house every second Monday at 8
p. m. Visiting brethren cordially invited
to attend.
J. B. Bennett, Sec.
H A Simpson
Barrister and Solicitor.   Office in 2nd
flat, Green's Block,   Nanaimo,  B. C
Will be in Union every Wednesday and
Courtenay on Thursday.
R. B. Anderson,
Practical Watchmak
Worker in Light Metals and
Gunsmithing
Present offlco Elk Hotel
Cci*ox, B. 0.
Dr W J Curry
(DENTIST.)
Green's Block���near Post Office ���Nanaimo. Any number of teeth removed
without pain and without the use of
Ether or Chloroform.
Th�� <lr*at Hudf-iii In the j-arwt wendsrAil
-Uit-overy nl*thft age. Eudoit-i-d by -wlcnUilcwon
1 fKuiopeand America.  Hndjab, purely vejjo-
table. Stops
ITeroaiir-n.).!
of'hed.rc-htvge
mMdi.ji-.ciir-rft
Lost
.-JA�� Manhood
K^'i^m]Si^omitiiAtlon,i
���Su** M&sStEi Dlnf new, F��u- f
NnftBcniatloiu;
lstrengthenB,ln-4 .
vlRoraies and
DKi'oiti ton.8tlm entirosyrteni. _-....
fTudy-in curMPehlllty, NerTmime-��,fim.rtow*,
and devd 11,0aand r-Ntores wim k organ**. Fnln��
in the tuck, Io-mm by (My 01 nleht are .-topped
qU'okly, Ovor f^OM private endnr*��ra��ita.
Premnt-ureiifM means Impotent'-** lu tho first
rt*,*<.. IicaHbefltoiii'Oillii'JddayHbyUiouMof
liuuyan.
T!ii*iiow(ll*ir**-irory*-riiflmBd8 by tbeBpodol-
lit-ofthe old fmiMiniMmMon HMfOM ZBlU*
iitt��. ItHtheitrougett viuilaor n**de, hli
T��ry powurful, b-.it harmless. Bold fnr 11.00 a
pankageor 6 packign f ��� 16.00 (plain actdrd
boxen). Written gnaranl--*< t-lven frr a cur*, If
yoabuyilxlioxcaand r-" not entirely cured,
Hi Binre will bawnttojoa free of aUehargM.
Send fur clreu.i-.-ii and tcaUmonlala. Addrea
HUIMON HXDIOAL 1H8TITOTK,
��M2 Market fit. -tan Francisco, OaL
irnta
4ill
Notice to Taxpayors,
Assessment Act and Provincial
Revenue Tax
Notice is HEREBY given, in accor-
d.incc with thc Statutes, that Provincial
Revenue Tax and all Taxes under the
Assessment Act -ire now due for the
year 1894. All ofthe above named Taxes collectible within the Comox, Nelson,
New Castle,and Denman and Hornby
Island Divisions of the District of Comox are payable at my office.
As-tescd Taxes are collectible at the
following rates, viz,:���
It paid on or before June 30th, 1894.���
Provincial Revenue, $3.00 ber capita.
One-halt uf one per cent on Real Property.
Two per cent on Wild Land.
One third, of one per cent on Personal
Property,
One-half of one per cent on Income,
If paid after June 30th, 1894���
Two-thirds of one per cent on Real
Property.
Two and one-half per cent on Wild
Land.
One-half of one per cent on Personal
Property.
Three-fourths of one persent on Income
W. B. Anderson,
Assessor and Collector.
Comox, Jan. 2nd, 1894.
E. Pimbury & Co.
Wholesale and Retail
Druggists  and stationers
Commercial St, Nanaimo, B. C
Rami for Sale,
For Sale two f ne young Rams ( South
Downs).
Apply to
Geo. Howe,
Comox, B. C.
Hornby and Denman.
Jan. 17 -- The sloop Fawn, during last
week's gale purled her cable at Goose
Spit. She now lies on the beach a tot.tl
wreck.
Mr. Graves, employed on the Dominion Telegraph line reports that large mini
ber of trees fell across the wire during
thc late wind.
I an.24th. ���A terrific gale raged here
last Wednesday morning, trees were uprooted and some fences blown down.
One or two row boats got loose, and only ,1 few splinters found of them.
It is reported that a sloop freight laden from Victoria, and bound for Hornby Island got stranded at Dodd's Narrows, but finally got off without anv serious damage. At lasl account she had
safely arrived in Baynes Sound.
Michael Watts is building himself a
snug house on his place. Robert Scott
ts also building a house on his ranch.
Thus the inarch 61 improvement gees on
here notwithstanding thc dull times.
There is snow enough for sleigh ing, and
on Denman Island roads the merry
round of the sleigh bells is heard. Last
Sunday nearly all"of the big buys took
out thfcir best girl, and nf course cupids
darts have pierced many a heart.
Union   Flashes.
The Mineola left Saturday for San
Francisco with 3100 tons of coal.
On last Wednesday the str. Comet left
for Vancouver with 200 tons of coal.
The str. S-affa also left on Wednesday
with a cargo of coal.
The ship Richard Third is due from
'Frisco.
Another ship is on her way here for a
cargo of coal for the American navj.
And still another ship is on her way
here for a ctrgo to go to Honolulu.
Steamship Mineola will be due here a*
gain next Monday.
And the San Mateo will be due here a
week from to-day.
Saturday the Thistle was at Union
Wharf on her second trip during the
week. She took a cargo to Esquimalt
for the British Navy.
Ed. Wood, the lover of fine horses and
rescuer of fair women went below on the
last trip ofthe Joan.
R. Grant was a passenger on the Joan
on her trip to Victoria,
Ed. McKim left for Victoria on the ss.
Mineola on Saturday morning.
Autliur Dick, inspector of mines, sailed
for the Capital ou Wednesday.
Mrs. J. Piket of Denman Island is a
guest of Mrs R. Grant.
Mrs. Freeman, wife of the captain of
thc Glory of the Seas is visiting with her
daughter, Mrs. F. D. Little.
Mr. A. W. Taylor, Executive of the
Equitable Life Assurance Society, with
his wife have been guests during the past
week at the Cumberland Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Ellis of lecture
fame have been staj ing at A. Lindsay's
popular hou*��e.
Robert Vass on Tuesday of last week
met with an accident in slope No. 4,
breaking the small bone ol one ol his leys
He is nu expected to be laid up long.
Tenders are again asked loi* to complete the new Methodist church. It is to
be hoped a contractor will be found this
tunc who will mush his contract.
A petition lus been presented to F. D.
Little Supt, of the Colliery Co. asking to
have llie trains run Irom the Lake as far
cast astne mid for the Mccummudattun
of Cumberland townsite people. A favor
able answer was given.
by a new mechanical contrivance the
breaking uf the car cable in No. 4 slope
witi not result iu ���ny damage as it
will not allow the cars lo go rushing
back down thc incline as tormcrly, but
will huld tliein in their position.
Mrs. Ellis has been instructing and entertaining large audiences with her delineation**, ol character. Saturday evening all the marriageable young folks ol'
both genders were in attendance to listen
lo her lecture un love, courtship and mar
Huge.
On Saturday evening, Feb. 3rd Dr.
Lawrence v. i.i deliver an address at the
kt.-L.iitg K-Jum Hall on Moderate Drinkers. There wilt be uo charge fur admission, nor will a collection be taken up.
Ail are invited.
Grant & McGregor's Blazers are getting in their work und hence the moderation of the weather They say that lhey
arc buund to close out their present stuck
ut stoves, no matter il they don't make a
shilling, and no matter if wc are compelled tu exchange our thick woolen clothes
for summer -resort fabrics,
"Who's that gentleman with that ele-
gantlv fitting suit on?
"Thai's���. He got them made at J.
Abrams. That cutter of his is a dandy;
but then he inherits his talent. His father, McLeod, was tailor fur years to the
Prince of Wales, the best dressed man in
Europe,
Passing by Grant & McGregor's furni-
tcre establishment we noticed Mr. Grant
with an assistant busily loading a largo
furniture cart on runners with a general
assortment, of elegant furniture
"Say���Mr. Grunt, wc exclaimed, Who's
that tori1"
"Oh, for a party down at thc Bay"
Yes, but we detect an odor of orange
blossoms?"
"Well, I shouldn't wonder."
"Hut who is the happy man?"
"You wan'l light on���"
"Oh, its L��� "the village���"
"Yes, if you must know, and he deserves every bit of it."
Comox Items.
The Joan arrived on the 24th inst. at
4 o'clock, p. in. Mr. Harney and wife,
II. Beadnell, Mrs. Beadnell and Mr.
Peck were passengers. Consignees���
McPhee and Moore and J. H. Holmes.
Our last week Tuesday, there were no
less than five vessels in Comox Harbour
seeking shelter.
La-it Friday Mr. Carscaden, teacher nf
thc Comox school, left for Vancouver, to
lake charge of Mt. Pleasant school in
that city.
Mr. William Cheney won the prize of
a dinner service of 97 pieces nt McPhee
& Moore's.   The lucky number was 25.
Thc Government Naphtha Launch lias
been anchored in the bay thc last few
days. She is taking a look around in
the interest of the revenue department.
She sailed for the north Friday.
Men,youth, or maiden am-itui-ei pose���
Si'unou of snow, storms, tliiiuofit-t-roflo-���
Tia tho Borne Btory nil have to to.l,
Nut even Kii'HnK'fl go linlf ao woll:
('rl-.-kfters. (-oli-hcr**, foot bui I ont, all
Ono pur-suit follow atUt Llie bn.lL
Punch,
The  Famous McLary Stoves.
We have just received direct from the
factory of the above firm a large consignment of their celebrated stoves, suitable
for either coal or wood or both. We got
these stoves at a bargain and intend to
give our customers the benefit. Come
in and see them and we will quote you
prices that will astonish you. Remember these stoves must he sold within thc
next th weeks at no matter what sacrifice.
,, Grant & McGregor,
Specials to the News.
In the local Legislature, on Thursday
last, Dr. Wall moved that an address be
presented to His Honor, Lieut-Governor
Dewdney praying hini to move the Dominion Government to increase the per
capita tax on Chinese coming into the
Dominion, $100 each, at the tame expressing the opinion strongly of the
House that all moneys received at B. C
ports from proposed higher tax, if such
be imposed, *hould go to this Province.
The resolution was unanimously agreed
to.
Brown asked for a return in regard to
appointments and salaries under Provincial Health Act.   Agreed to.
Sword asked upon what terms the
time to construct the Canadian Western
Central Railway was extended to Aug. ist
1894. Premier Davie replied: "No new
terms-" Sword then enquired if funds I
given by that company as security for
$50,000 to be expended with n t year had
been declared forfeited. Turner answered that no steps had beon taken.
The Witness and Evidence Bill passed
its second reading.
On Friday, private bills were presented consolidating ihe Vancouver and N.
VV. Electric Railway and Lighting Co.,
and to incorporate the Great Western
Telegraph Co. and the Tramway to the
Silver Mine**.
The Lodgers Relief Hill passed its
third reading.
Keith asked the Attorney-General if
thc amendment to Coal Mines Regulation, Act 1890, was constitutional and if
it was the intention ofthe government to
enforco it.
Premier Davie introduced a bill creating Nanaimo a separatejudici.il district.
It passed a second reading.
Cotbett and Mitchel have beeu arrested and put under $11,000 bunds. Jackson will challange Corbett to fight in
June.
A halfbreed girl from Vancouver has
been sold to a resident of Port Moody
for $150 cash.
D. Morrello, living at Nanoosc Bay,
while out hunting accidcntly shot him.
self and died shortly afterwards.
Bismarck has hecome reconciled tothe
Emperor William and visits him.
London,���The British bark Port Yarrow went ashore in Brandon Bav, Ireland. A heavy sea running made a clean
break over her. Her crew id in all were
swept overboard and perished.
Victoria.��� -A. Strocble was hanged this
morning at 8 o'clock.
Corbett Wins.
Mitohel's Name in Dennis.
Special to tho News.
Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 25th��� The atten at the f';ght bids fair to be the biggest
ever seen at a gathering of this kind.
The people are now pouring in, in droves
An offer to het loo cattle against $5,000
that Corbet would win created a vast
deal of sport, and shouts to bring on the
cattle.
There were 1,000 people in the arena,
and rain fell heavily when the principals
entered thc ring. At 1: 30 p. in. the
men were ready.
First round. Corbett hit with his left
on Mitchell's chin. This was followed
by a clinch and exchange of blows. Jim
readied Charley's left eye heavily, and
Mitchell responded with a blow on the
ribs, Anoiher exchange ot blows and
Mitchell clinched. Mitchell now got in
a blow on Corbett's neck. Corbett let
Mitchell have his right and left when
Charley succeeded in landing a good body blow. Honors were considered easy
in this round.
Second round. Wild exchanges and
a clinch. Corbett upper- cuts his man
as they come together. Mitchell lands a
hard one on Corbett's ribs, and as Mitch
came up Jim caught him on the head
with a staggerirg blow. Corbett upper-
cuts Milchell again and lands with right
on his chin A sharp rally follows in
which Corbett has all thc best of it, but
is hit twice nn the neck by Mitchell,
Twice Corbett knocked Milchell off his
pins, and then floored him cleanly, and
as he was rising knocked him down a*
train. The gong here saved Mitchell
from being counted out.
Third round. Mitchell coincs up grog
gy. Corbett rushed at him, rattling with
right and left on ihc neck. Mitchell was
then knocked down and took the full lime
allowed when he rushed at Corbett.
They clinched, but Corbett threw him
off and then floored him with a blow in
the face. Again Mitchell took all the
time allowed to rise. When he advanced
Corbett swung his right and Mitchell fell
helpless on his face. The referee counted 1 to 10 in the usual wav, and Mitchell
not coming to thc scratch it was declared
a knock-nut,and thc referee formally pro-
claimed Corbett ihc winner ofthe match
and champion of the world. Mitchell's
face was covcrd with blood, and he was
carried helpless lo his corner. Thc fight
lasted nine minutes.
Sad  Intelligence,
A letter from the east announces the
death on the nth of this month, at Nnol,
Nova Scotia of Mrs. Margaret Ann McPhee, mother of Mr. Joseph Mel'hee of
this place. She was 74 years of age and
had been active up to her last illness
which was quite brief.
School   Names Changed.
Changes have been made in the names
of the following school districts to take
effect at the begining of the next school
year:���
North Comnx to Courtenay, South
Comox ti Comox, and Courtenay to
Grantham.
Union  Presbyterian  Service.
Sunday, Feb. 4*h���Service at Reading
Room Hall at eleven o'clock a. in.
Evening srrvice at 7 p. m. Sunday
school and Bible class at 2 p. m. Rev. J.
Higgins, pastor.
Notice.
All persons interested in the organisation of a n**w lodge of the Independent
order of Odd Fellows arc requested to
at'the K. of'.P.- Halt, Coniov, at 7:30 on
the evening of Wednesday, January, ll]je
31st. -
Local Brevities
For Sale. A new milch's cow. Enquire of A. Urquhart.
New garden and all kinds of grass
seed at McPhee & Moore's.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Ellis were guests
on Mond;iy and Tuesday at the Riverside Hotel.
Last Wednesday Grant & Co's team
took down through Courtenay to ihc H;iv
3.000 feet of lumber, at a single load.
It is le.irncd that the people of Salt
Spring Island are making an effort to
have a physician located there.
Duncan Bros bought thc Jersey bull,
and Adam McKelvey the HoUtein bull,
brought up here by E. Goudy of Ladners
Landing.   They are fine animals.
Thirty-three new books have just been
added to the library of the Courtenay
Athletic Club. They are of the best
authors and well bound
E. Goudy of Ladner's Landing came
up on the last steamer, bringing with him
some fine thoroughbred stock���Jerseys
and Holsteins and some fill vs.
Mr. Ellis with young Lindsay of (he
Mines drove down to the Indian cemetery nn Monday and secured some skulls
lo enrich their collection to illustrate the
science of Phrenology.
The Equitable Life Assurance Co. of
New York, of which an ad. appears on
this page, probably the storngest company in the world.
All those interested in the organization
ofa lodge of Knights of Pythias at Court
enay arc requested to meet at the Club
Room on Saturday evening of this week
at 8 p. m.
Mrs, J. M. Ellis lectures Tuesday
night at the school house, Courtenay,
Wednesday and Thursday night of this
week she will speak at the Bay. See her
advertisement on fourth page.
In making up our forms two of the
short articles among the editorial notes
got intermingled, and the muddle was
not discovered until that side of tf.e paper had gone through the press.
There was quite a crowd at the hntelu
here on Thursday night last to read the
account wired this journal of the Corbett
and Mitchell prize fight, which were there
bulletined. Poor Mitchell's b.ickers
wore long faces and nothing to gingle in
their pockets the next day.
Mrs. Ellis'  Lecture
Mrs. J. M. Ellis lectured on Monday
evening at Courtenay, in the school
house, to a large audience. Her subject
was Phrenological Adaptation in Business, which she handled in an interesting
and instructive manner. At lhe close of
the lecture proper, she gave public examinations 10 Mcsdames R. Graham, J. W.
McKenzie, and Messrs. John Grant, J.*A
Halliday, and J. VV", McKenzie, who were
selected from the audience for the purpose. That she hit them about right is
the general verdict. In the course ol the
evening she uttered thc following nuggets
Referring to onc she was examining
she said he would nut care to go to heaven if there were no women there.
Speaking of the picture of Michael Angelo, which hung on the wall, she told
the story of his being offended at a priest
and of having in his great painting of thc
Lost Spirits, reproduced the features ol
the priest in one of the group. The horrified man complained to the Pope, who
replied tint while he save one in purgatory that when onc got into hell he would
have to stay there.
Describing thc necssary mental quali
ficationsof an editor, she spoke of one as
having gained admittance to the blest n-
bttdes, but when it became known, they
Bought for a lawyerto assist in expelling
him but as one could not be found the ed
itor was allowed to remain.
At the ri.ik of appearing ungallant we
would remind thc fair lecturer that Swe-
denborg was permitted a view of heaven
and has recorded at length what he snw
yet lie nowhere speaks ofhaving seen a
phrenologist there.
Midwinter Fair.
From OurOwu Corroflpondont.
The 27th da"V of January, inst., is set
for the opening day of the California Mid
winter Fair. There has been a good
deal of extra dump rain lately with a
young "shycone" for comfort; hut they
didn't have much effect on the Exposition
only a few windows being blown in. The
most ofthe work now being inside, there
is no doubt but what everything will be
in readiness on the opening day. Thc
exhibits arc pouring in, in a steady stream
but lately there has been some kick about
unloading thnn. Thc Southern Pacific
Railway Co. don't seem to be in any hurry about it, so they say; but it surprised
many yesterday and to-day by making
up for lost time. All thc foreign exhibits
are here including those of Germany,
France, Austria, Switzerland, Great Britain, and Italy; out the Russian's "dudv'
are a little late. The attendance just
now is rather slim, although good enough
what is lo be seen aud the weather. The
'49 Mining Camp is about thc must prof*
i.ablc show running. Thc. workmen nn
the German Castle went on a strike fur
a couple uf days, because they didn't get
their pay regularly; but thcy'<e got it
now and will go to work immediately or
sooner.
The principal topics of interest being
discussed here just now are Evans and
Morrcll who are yet ar large; Corbett
and Mitchell's scrap which hasn't come
off, and the California Midwinter Fair
which hasn't really opened yet.
American Traveler.
THE SOUBRETTE.
Henri Lynn has buen engaged by Hyda
& lleliniiui to appear lu "Comrades."
Kdwiml Vernon, an English actnr. has
Ix-ui* engaged to support ttottiua Vokes,
Olive Berkeley litis been npeciolly en*
gugiil to play Hose lu "The Masked BhII."
Mark Diirrim fans iK-en engaged by L. It,
Stooiewell for his sux-k company at Sun
f'ratielBOo.
Vtvd Krwir will originate the part of Bt*
Kln'ru'-i in '-SiiiiiK-Chiug," Richard Stakl'o
liew^oiuicoptfrfc*
Phw'iI-- llt-rtiiurl has signed with Fruiter-
Con I.----I U�� |ilny ShakwpNUtt Jarvls in "Th*
Uh*u-*�� o' Loudon." UNMVELUN8 k MYSTERY
A Singular Hurler Oase m India*
i ���
| of the bribe its the rest, anil uot the
I quarter share to which lit- would other wise,
1 by the diatom of i hu i\nmi. have been entit-
: led, provided ihu lte might bu allowed to
j denouuee a private enemy of his own, as
I well its the three persona indicated by the
'merchant. After some demur this was
1 agreed tc, and the wounded man according-
j ly laid his information as against four
! iustead of
ii.irt   the r-iiit" Laat rfcemselvei to a
Cquaplraej*,
A singular murder plot was recently unravelled at Sural, in India. At one -*i the
gates of the city (onco a rival to Bombay),
Mldttknlj-b-, two H.rai,���ii. up. >'����8:1Bomb,y an iutiniatio,. wa. given to th.
.Hindoo  whomtti.y  1...1   ouud  lying. .       ,���        P 'b,
wounded   and  bleeding,   on  tne. raudsule I . > ���". .....
about a mile- from the sate.  The policeman >        .   ,  ,     ,   ,     ,      ,    ,. ,
oaduy took th, woEl m.n.nd the **���****����� Udy. de��-ured to be hi. wife, and
Hul, to th. Fog-ibr, or uhlcf native police ! f���<��\ ��P *��W* r'���' >y*��r* <**-*'
o.li,,.r, oi the city, to whom, when he h.d , Su,r."h"!?S? ^."..'.".'S.,0.* ���T*
recovered  a little strength,  he  told his
sUny.    He said Un was a merchant at Hominy, and that lib had started   that morning   - .   , , , ,
hy train from Bombay, with live htuulrafl Jur{,0*?" 0l *"'*����*(��� *���*���.**1�� l���.r'��y'"8."��'l
rupees in cash, to make soma purchases at | Pro"*l*,,,_
a fair iu IC-KlUM-,  whleh he  intended to i ""P*""'! 'hat no peraon.
tueh hy the ferry from a point .bout 18 , n< detnU'bl. a jowpinoy , but here
miles north ol Surat-,   In tie carriage witn���     ,        .      ...       ,,    t        ���       .
him were [our parson, whom he knew l,y , wo have tho pamful.peoUolo of experienced
eight, although lie  was not otherwllfl ac.
' of their European superiors, lending thorn-
THIU'E ASSASSINS.
I But wheu tlie three men wero arrested in
Bombay an intimation waa given  to the
i fourth man, the special objectof the wounded
J man's jealousy, that trouble was   iu store
| for him unless he renounced all claim to a
| certain lady, declared to be his wife, a
j gave her up to his rival lying wounded
' "hi rat, a Inn:' with a Bum of money.
It is still more terrible to contemplate
i the unquestioning rcadinesB with whicli the
I police seem to have lent  themselves to  the
jurveyiiiL ....
| providing evidence "for them.    It would  be
with the sense of
right and wrong, eould view wit limit abhor*
A CANADIAN LEAUVILlE.
SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY.
Ml**.   *-���"���  ' ������-�����������   MPtroitalls  ��r  lhe(    According   to statement!* made in   tho:
Koitleu.il it-���ilon. f Southern journals, tho exter.sivo introduc-
The opening of navigation on the Koote- [ tion of the Talbot opon-uoarth basic steel i
nai Rivartrnm Bonner's Ferry, in North- j procosa in that section seems quite probable. !
era Idaho, to thc southern end ot Kootenai This prooess eliminates most of tha silicon
Lake, says a corespondent of the St. Louis 1 by poi*riog the molted iron through basic
aiobt-Dcmocral, brings within easy and i "lug, which ia low in silicon and high In
comfortable travel a region which contains ' lima and oxide of iron. The ailioon which
probably the most   important   deposit of ] has been reduced in tlie smelting furnace
policemen   of long aud approved nervi-
qulnted wit', them.    In tho course of oo,,.' I *.��". P.*''!."'"1 "W��II ',��" <���� ?-**���}.������>
ver-iation   it nppiarod  that these  -i.Tsnns
solves for a miserable bribe to a scheme of
dark en me, coming for war I as wit coases.and
urging (others to do ttie same, misleading
their superiors, and allowing threo innocent
1 idmlo'������""���t( ���!*������ �����r ,,ia,iy lionths.    This
'oase has exposed some dark and gloomy
corners of native life and society in India,
and presents a true but sad picture of the
evils to lie eradicated ami of tho tools wc
have to work   with
PERSONAL.
were alio to leave tho train at Sural, and
that thoir destination was in tlm samu
dlreotloQ as his, They offered to aoconipaiiy
liim a** far as llm forty, lo Whtoll tliey said
tbey knew a short road, aud advi:
stay with them, ai a respectable lodging-
house near the station, till the cool ofthe
o/eniiig, whan they would start together.
SaspectlnR nothing! and trusting to the
respectability of Ins friends,   wlm were got
up in lho pto^er style nf Hindoo tradors,
tlm poor man fell into tlm trap, and no
sooner had tliey cleared the city gate on
their way to the ferry than the pretended
merchant** set ou him,demanded his money,
aud one of them Struck him with a knifo in
thc chest, indicting
A TKKKIIU.r. U'ol'NIi,
from tha ofTeot of whlt.ll ha sank seiisolcss, invitation. He showed great interest in tbe
and was brought in, robb,.,! and bleeding, j oW tnwn HI1(1 vigitod tllu homes of Goethe
by the lirst passer- -by. m] Sc|uller a number of times.
This was lua story aa told to the city
Foujdar, who lost no time in inform lug tho
superintendent of police, and sent the
wounded man lo the hospital,    Tlio neigh
The Nabob of Kampur, ono of the Indian
princes, lias been in Berlin recently. Ho
was received with groat distinction and en
tertaiueil by the highest people in the city.
Weimar   by t'
Grand Duke and cheerfully accepted  the
He  I
invited to visit   Weimar   by tht
The first lady who ever gave money to
Harvard College could not have fancied in
her most imaginative moment that more
bourhood was scoured by mounted police I llm�� f��� J?*" 'ater !|er K-J*��<-0<-''- name
during the night, but no trace of the rob- > ���oM bo glve�� t(> a ��?.����? *.or vmnm.  at
hers was   found,   ami   it   was  evident I Harvard.   AnneRadollfle, who was after
that they had not a me on towards the ward Dame Moulaon, sen her hunderd
forry. News was sent Lo Bomluy, where j I���*-*---*- ov�� '-J0 �����* ^nihnglam to aid in
the police were ...ore sitocesafui, and on the cause of education She cast her bread
the indications given by tlio wounded man,! "I""1 tho water, and it s returned to her
three out of th. four criminals were arrest- i l"emory ���-> hon*?r aflcraU J��� "ian/ ^"l
ed and brought to Sural, where tliey wore | "����� A8��6SIZ- the president of the Harvard
confronted with thoir victim, and at onco Alnnex' ,B congratulated on this most
identified, and kept in close arrest, not-1 <**-*-.��*����B ���**���-* suggestive choice of a name,
withstanding their protestation**: that tliey Princess Sybil la of Hesse-Casnel, future
had not left   Bnrn'my, and knew nothing; i'-mprcss of Russia, is now a slender, grace-
oftbecomplainant.liia woundB or hla money,  f-*;,:'-' ��� -:"' --' ���������-������ :*��- * - ���������*��� -���
lu the conn'* of tin en weeks tlio wound
was sufliciently healed Lo admit of his ap
hit'h grade silver-bearing ores that lias been
opened up in the past tweuty years on tlio
North American Continent. This is what
is known as the Kaslo Slocan district, situated ia the lower end of the Selkirk Mountains, in the Province of British Columbia,
about 10U miles due north of the international boundary line and about an equal
distance south of Roger's Pass,
This now KI Dorado is at present almost
iuaccesHible from the north, the distune*..
lying for the most part through an unexplored wilderness uf lofty mountains, deer
canyons aud dense forests. From the aontl
the ease is entirely different, The traveler
from the oast, reaching St. Paul by any
routo lie may choose, haa only tu stop into
a (treat Northern sleeping coach, and in a
trifle over tidy hours is landed at Bonne)
Kerry, where lie ia promptly transferred
to a stateroom on a steamer lying nt her
dook on tlie Kootenai River. The steamer
ia now and fast, built expressly for this
tratiie, with a speed of twenty miles an
hour. If lio cares more for scenery than
fur sleep tho touriat will limit his nap to
two or three hours, ami then go on deck at
daylight and enjoy the pleturesqito route
followed by the deep, broad river as it
threads its way northward between two
mountain ranges, with an intervening
valley four or live milea iu width. Thi
valley is crossed and recrossod foiirthn's
in the ran of aeventy-fivc miles to Kootenai
Lake, tho river preferring for tho mosl part
to hug the base of tlio mountains on either
aide.
Breakfast timo or thereabouts finds tho
steamer entering into Kootenai Lake
perh body of crystal water, about ninety
miles In length, from one to five miles in
width, and of unknown depth. Its shores
on both aides are the abrupt slope of mountains 4000 to 7000 feet high, while in the
distance are to bo seen the loftier peaks of
the Southern Selkirita. In all the 2',w
miles of ahore line there are not more than
a dozen level apots suitable for town
On her way northward the steamer
touches at a fow small settlements established with reference to mining nnd hnnI���*.���]���
industries. Among thesie is Pilot Bay,
whore a large nuiclting plant ii- iu courae of
Gonstructiun, and Aiiisworth. the county
aoat and location of the only jail in all that
vast region.
THE SEW   I.EAIIVIM.E.
pear iii g before tiie magistrate, when a main
of evidence wai forthcoming to confirm his
statements. The keeper of the lodgittg-
Iii-ihc was a friend of his, the policeman at
tho gate by which they left Sural, potter
at, work near tho roadside, a labourer returning from the lioiils, all c uitributcd
evidence  of  the   moiL convincing   nature,
and tho three culprits were duly committed to take their trial at the Criminal Sessions.
There arc two ways of trying sessions
fid little girl of sixteen, with Urge,deep eyes
ami lloating hair. Tho C/arewitch in nine
yeara older than hia betrothed. The Prin-
coass' younger brother ia married to the
Kmperor William's youn .est sister ; and, as
she is a niece of the Queen of Denmark,
the young Sybilla ia the cousin of tho Princess of Wales. This pretty girl is uot only
pretty, she lias intellectual tastes and uncommon talent in music. She has not yot
entered society, and has lived a very quiet
country life with her mother, the widowed
Landgravine of Hesso-Cassel,
When tho late Lucy Stone started to lecture on equal laws ahe had no co-operation
cases in India. In some districts, where j and no backing, and started out absolutely
educated natives are numerous, cases are atone, So far aa sho knew there were only
tried ly a jury, whoso decision la final as to a few persons in tin
the gilt or binooenee of the accused. In had any sympathy with the idea o'f equal
other districts the judge is assisted by three J rights. She put up the posters for her own
assessors, who are selected by lot from a meetings with a little package of tacks and
list of the respectable inhabitants, and who ft 8t0,l0 picked up from Lhe street. Some-
deliver theiropinion at the close of a trial times the boys followed her hooting and
aalo llm guilt of the accused. The judge is preparing to tear the posters down. Then
not, however, bound by the opinion of lho she would slop and call the boys about her
aaiessora, but after receiving it ho dolivers [ and hold a preliminary meeting in the
his own judgment: and if he finds Btreot, until alio bad won thom all over aud
the AOOUSBn QUILT? persuaded thom lo let her poalers alone,
he passes sentence according to law. In , "The dream of three score ycarB and ten
tho ease in point, tbo assessors, notwltll* hai come true< Hai(i Dr- Roll0rt Collyer at
stamliug tbo convincing evidence for the * colebration of Ins seventieth birthday,
pro-eoution,   and  the breakdown of  the "ond during all thattime I have never heen
Before noon you aro at your journey's
end, the new and thoroughly uniijito town
of Kaslo, the metropolis of the Ka-do-Slocan
district, occupying a pretty and picturesque
site an the shore of a small bay on tho
western side of Kootenai Lako. Kaslo con*
taina about 200 buildings, all of them frame
structures finished in natural pine inside
and out. There may be three or four with
painted exteriors, but nol moro. Kalso
contains perhaps 1(100 people, 95 per cent,
of them maloB, It is a serious and actual
fact that iu rcapect of security of property and life this raw and un-
painted mining camp is almost ideal. Crimes
or olfensca involving physical violence are
virtually unknown, and there is no auch
thing aB robbery or larcency. During my
- i ten days' Btay at Kaalo I did not once aee a
���T i hlX ��L ��� �� I woaPou of IU1V *���'--*��� dloplaycd, nor hear of
"' "���������"" a street or saloon altercation. My vest
with watch and pockbt-book. hung on a
chair by my bed,and except for the poaiibil-
ity that aomo belated lodger might dia'.urb
me by entering tho room by mistake, 1
should not have taken tho precaution of
turning the key in tho lock. This, too.
among a population ton considerable ex tent
made up of the off-acourings of the rocont
riotous clement in the Idaho mines,
alibi aet up by one at least of tlio accused,
unanimously declared that the accused
were not guilty. On the judge fell the mini
of a deciaion. With a sagacity that doos
him credit, as the sequel will show, tlio
judge stated in his finding that the evidence
was too good for him, that every link in
the chain was so thoroughly completed as
to fill him with suspicion, which thc wound
and the wound alone, was ablo to remove.
He could uot get over the patent fact of
this wound, tho severity of which was so
great that a European officer, uot unaccustomed to such scenes, fainted at ihe sight
of it. The accused were, therefore, convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for a
term of yeara, and duly incarcerated in
Surat gaol, where we will leavo them for a
time,
In the spring of IS7'2 aomo prisoners were
being tried before a judge of tho High
Court at Bombay for a con a piracy, when
certain revelations wero made by an approver which led to the judge addressing
tha Government of Bombay, and orders
were issued for a thorough inquiry inio the
caae tried at Surat aome months before,
These inquiries wore made, and re.utlied in
tho threo suppoaed crimiiia's being aet at
liborty.and a number of persona being tried
tor a detestable conspiracy. It was proved
at the trial that lhe man who was
WOUNDED OUTSIDE TIIK OATHS
of Surat belonged to a gang who were in
the habit uf lotting out their services to
gratify tho vengoauce or the hate of any
individuals rich enough to hire tliein. Tii's
waa effected not iu employing Llie stiletto
of the aaaaaain or tho match of tho incendiary, but by misdirecting the course ot Brit*
inh law and British justice, and making it
an awful inatrutneut of wrong and injury.
The four men who travelled witli tlio
wounded victim were fellow-members with
him ot the aamo gang, but dresaod in the
coaLume of thoao who woro lo bo implicated
in the protended crime. The parly left
Surat after duak, and when they reached
a lonely place one ut them submitted to bo
wounded in hi.'di a manner as to produce a
terrible gash and a great flow of blood,
without fatal consequences or permanout
injury. Tho others than made Llie heat of
their way hack to ihe railway siation, and
theiini lo Bombay. And some of the gang
returned in a few days t > Surat with a sum
of money, bymeanaof which the necessary
witneasos, including at least two policemen
were suborned and prepared fur tho trial of
the innocent victims whom the wounded
accomplice bad denounced.
It appeared that the man who allowed
himself to lie wounded had died of fevor
soma time before tha discovery of his guilt,
aud one or two other.- of the conspirators
had abasonded and avoided arrest \ but -villi
these few exceptions, all the actors
IN Tills TRAOEDY
agaiiiBt whom tho charges of conspiracy o
perjury could be brought with roasouahii
hope of success, were committed for trial
before the High Court at Bombay, and it iB
satisfactory to know that all who were ho
committed have been convicted by a jury
and sentenced to seven yeara' imprisonment.
Native society iu Bombay was thus freed
from a dreadful scourge, as the gang was
proved tu have undertaken at least three
other enterprises similar to the Surat one,
and there waa reason to suspect their connection with even a greater number of
ca-es.
The trial elicited some curious facts
The poraon at whoso instigation tho Surat
case was got up waa a wealthy Hindoo
merchant trading in Bombay, who had
aome apite against the throe men who wore
imprisoned on fal-ie evidence. Ho seams
to have known of the existence of tho gang,
and to have found no dilliculty in placing
himBolf in communication with the in, and
for two thousand rupees paid down the
chiefs of tho gang undertook locany out
his wishes. Whon it came to settling
which of the gang wiih to be wounded, om
absent from my pulpit on a single Sunday
from sickness, und 1 have never been sick
in bed one day in my life. I would not exchange my lot with auy human creature I
know. Nor would I havo chosen any other
seventy years for my lifo. None of the
great erasof the past would I havo exchanged for this present one. There ia none so
beautiful in the way of great accomplishment. I am glad to look back on all theao
years; gad that I was born in the good
mother land, Kngland, and glad that, I was
born again in this beautiful America."
Amusements in the House of Common*-]-
Games of ovory kind, wilh one exception
only, aro cither rigidly or passively forbidden in the British Ilouse of Commons,
Thia exception in tho way of games is chess,
which somehow or other has worked its
way into a sort of passive toleration, owing
probably to tho silence which, as a rule, is
observed by all lovers of chess when engaged
on thoir favorite game. The theory of the
Legislature is legislation, and that everyone who enters Parliament ia supposed to
havo only one object nt heart���work. So
the lighter forma of amusement have never
entered the House of Commons lifo of the
Member of Parliament, An attempt wa**
made some time since to havo a billiard
table aet up in ono of thc spare rooms at
St. Stephen's, but the project waa ruthlessly crushed by Mr. Speaker. Card playing,
even in Lhe form of whist at threepenny
points, is strongly forbidden under aerioua
penalties supposed to exist in the plenary
power of thu Speaker, There is a reading-
room whero a certain number of newspapers
are provided, subject to the approval of the
Serjeant-at-Arms, who in this, as in more
serious matters, exorcises a sovereign censorship. There is also a library of dry
reading matter, which doea nol contain,
like the French Logialature'a library, all the
latest novels, In the way of refreshments
the members are able to amuse themselves
by entertaining   friends or constituents
either ill tllO tea-room over meagre and
sober fare, or in the dining-rooms on something moro subitaittiat, with liquors to each
one's taste, (if lute, the presence of Imil
on lhe terrace on the fine summer evenings
has proved one of lhe chief forms of enjoy,
mem chosen by weary members to lighten
tho prendre of the ovorlosttng drone of tho
prosy ones upstairs.
ItESl'KCTED LAWS.
Tlio Eight Poople-
Wilson : "The reatoti these ArcLio expeditious fail is because they don't take tho
right kind of men."
Watson .    " Whom  would  you   take?"
" Teh-graph opsratora- of course,1'
"And wtiy them ?"
" Ueoiitso lhey can got from pole to pole
in a jill'y.''
Of Course flot-
"Who is ho?" sail a pa?aor-hy to a
policeman who was endeavouring to raise an
intoxicated person.
" Can't say, sir," replied the policeman :
can't givo an account of himself."
" Of course not,'' said the other; "how
can you expect an account from a man whi
has lost his balance?"
AWeekofWoil-Doin-r-
Sunday School Teacher: "I told you
last Sunday that I wished each of you
would try to make at lo-ist one person
happy during the week.   Did you ?"
Boy : " Yos'in, I mado grandma happy."
"��� That is noble. How did you do
it ':"
" I went to visit her, and alma alwaya
happy ������v'cii she sees I've got a good appetite."
Tho cost of au Armstrong stool gun Is
estimated at $500 for each ton of weight;
of them offered to undertake this disagree- of a Krupp gun, 8000; of a SVIlltworth gun,
tble role, receiving only  the samu share, '$020,
A curious example ot th�� self-restraint
practised by a class of men among whom
the fist, lhe knife and the revolver is the
customary argtimenlum and Imminom oc-
ciirrcdono night ns I pasaed through the
bar-room of the Palace Hotel and called for
my key, Two miners, perfectly matched
iu their brawny proportions, had easually
met and wero rehearsing on old-time grievance ; a bitter grievance it was too, judging
from tho inten.se malignity of look and
speech aa Ihoy confronted eaoh other. 1
waited to see the outcome, fully expecting
a bloody one, .lust at a point in the dispute
when it seemed as though thc two men must
spring at each other's throats ina deulh
struggle, each paused ami drew back n
step.
" Bill," said one, iu a voice of suppressed
excitement. " you know d���d well I ain't
afraid of you, aud I know d���d well you
ain't airaid of me, but wc can t pettlo this
thing hero. You know what we'll get if
we do.    Some other timo,"
Without another word the enemies turn
ed and separated. What waa it that kept
theae fierce fellows apart ? Simply thu al).
solute certainly that a fist fight meant sixty
days in jail tor both nf them ; the show ot
a weapon, six months ; the uao of a weapon
from one yoar to a life'a sentence, or possibly banging, und with it the certainty that
trial nnd conviction would follow inside of
twelve hours, uud that the sentence would
be executed without n particle of delay. No
chance for lawyers to iuterpose a technical
defence ; no Blraw bail ; no appeal, supersedeas, or arrcKtof judgment. 'J he jurisdiction of the local magistrate in crimea of violence ot- theft ia final and conclusive, aud
the execution of tho lav/ ia swift, Blcrn and
inexorable. That is why Kaalo ia a veritable Arcadia an regards the safety of life
am) property. If the United States is not
yet ready to absorb the territory of ita
northern neighbors, it might ilo worse than
to immediately annex eorno of tho British
Columbia laws and method*- of enforcement.
The compulsory repression of fierce im-
pulses hai an admirable ollecl. It promotes
a crndo sort of politeness, aud at tho aamo
timntond-i to lihcralizospoechand action, to
Cultivate ft Spil'it of toleration, end tu enlarge
tbo latitude of verbal givo-and-tako. Whon
a fellow is resolutely determined to keop
outof trouble he will stand a groat deal of
dialling. With it all ia developed a freedom
of apeech ami a rough, nil'hand humor that
is a bit slanting to unaccustomed ears.
Thore isn't much culture among tha broad-
chenlod chap who work underground and
handle a guu powder candle with as liltlo
concern as they would a tallow dip, but
t hei e is a deal of manliness and good sense.
Spinning y-irns in their houra of rest and
relaxation is a passion with them, but woe
betido tho llllluoy narrator who springs--a
chestnut or fails to bring his story to an
effective period.
Defining tho Word  lvera��e-
Not long sinco a New Hampshiro committeeman was examining an infant-school
class,
"Can any little girl or boy give thn definition of the word average?" he asked.
For anme timonoone replied, but finally
a little girlhesitatinglv answered:
"It'a a thing a hen lays an ogg on, sir,''
"No; that's not right."
"Yes, sir; my book aaya so."
And she trotted up to her questioner, and
pointed to this sentence iu her reading book
MA hen laya an egg every day on an
average."
along with tho iron, apparently lakes up
oxygen from the oxide of iron iu the Blag,
staying iu the sla.-, and the latter alao
takes up some of the phoapborua aud
little of the sulphur, while at the aame time
the deoxidized iron of the slag ia added to
the charge, so that there ia a sain of iron
instead of a loss as by firat blowing the
charge in a Bessemer converter. Thia desil-
iconized mota) ia then ready for treatment
in an ordinary basic open-hearth furnace in
the ordinary manner, and Ihe savings thus
effected over lhe old basic open-hearth pro-
ceia aru said to be some fourfold. Further,
by this method tho cheapest iron-grey
forge.���can be used, and, as there is no
necessity for the use of scrap when dosib
iconised metal js used, and the latter can
be put into the open-heart li furnace hot, a
large percentage of the time required to
melt a cold charge is aivcd. If tho basic
slag doea not contain iron, it ia enriched by
adding the necessary amount of brown
hematite ure. The resulting steel ia reported lo be of excollcut quality.
One ot the most ell'eclivo methods for
preventing whilo olllircscence on brick
walls, when caused by lime, ia, aaya
Thouindtiatric Xeitung, that of dipping the
bricks beforo burning iiitodiluto acid. I'or
this purpose tho BLrcngth of tho acid ia to bo
detorminod by the amount of lime present
in the clay, tho greater amount nf clay the
moro dilute the acid. Thus for ordinary
clay a snlnt ion a composed of forty quarts
of waler to one of hydrochloric acid
is found BOeoially adapted to the purpose,
and is sullicient for dipping somo .100 bricks,
aud thon the solution ia to ho renewed.
Having been thua dipped nnd thoroughly
dried in the sun the bricks arc to bo dipped
and dried again just before burning. The
additional cost of lids treatment is very
alight,
A serious objection to the system of
silent machinery running, as proposed
recently by an Austrian manufacturer,
consists, as mentioned, in the considerable
additional expense which the plan involves,
The article, which ia claimed to realizo the
desideratum in question, consist a of cog
wheela made of pressed rawhide, which arc
intended to work in conjunction with
wheela of cast-iron, steel, and other metals.
Tho wheels made of this material are found
to possess not only great strength, but,
they require no lubricating, are very clean
in operation, and, it is c'aimed, substantially reduce tht vibration ofthe machinery
in which they aro used. They aro supplied
ready mado, or iu tho form of rawhide
disk-., to be shaped as may be necessary
for the use intended, Tliese hide pieces, it
ia further slated, have to be supported by
a wooden framework, and, after cutting,
tini wheel is covered with a shellac solution.
Might Have Heen Worse
A Liverpool mi.kmau was going down
the Btreot ouo afternoon during the recent
froaty weather, when ho aaw the inspector
coming, a*id somehow or other slipped and
tipped the can over, spilling all the milk
juat as tbe inspector came up,
" Bad jib, sir," aaid the milkmtn.
" Yes," Baid the inspector, meaningly,
but it might hove been worse.'
He . "My angel, there ia one thing I
lave to tell you. When wo aro married I
must have my mother to live with us, becauso I can't afford to keep two establishments going. Ynu will find her very helpful. Sho ii always sewing and kniltingand
mending. I do hopo, my darling, you will
not object.''
She: "No, indeed) I'll just bo delighted
to have her help; aud now if wc can only
persuade my mother to come and do house*
work, we'll he really comfortable.."
A Celebrated Commercial and Shorthand
College-
For nearly thirty years in commercial
circles the namo of the British American
Business College of Toronto haa beon associated with high-class training and ttinr-
ouglmess in the mon and womon thoy turn
out na assistants and principals in the dill'cr-
cut branches of commercial life ; and to-day
among tho successful men of the Dominion,
in the varioua branches of our commercial
industries, their graduates can be counted
by the thousands. When in Toronto recently wc had the pleasure of visiting their
magnificent premiaia in thc Confederation
Life Building, which occupies the whole of
the fourth floor in the western section of tho
uilding, comprising Hie most magnificent
suite of rooms ever devoted to tho purposes
of business and shorthand education in
Canada,
The portion occupied by the College fronts
on Yonge and Richmond Sts,,aiid comprises
an area of about li.'iOO aquaro foet which has
boen divided into six magnificent rooms
opening from spacious and imposing corridors. Theso are beautiful ly lighted, and ventilated by air exhaust tapa driven by
electricity, supplying hot air in winter and
cold air in summer, besides constantly
drawing oil thc vitiated air. The building
is heated with steam and lighted by both
electric light and gas whilst the lavatories
are perfectly arranged rooms floored and
fitted up in white marble.
There are four large electric elevators of
the most recent and improved make, oue
of which is for the special uao of thc pupils
and patrons of tha college. Kvery thing to
insure the health, comfort and convenience
of tlie students has been carefully planned
and arranged and every room has been
filled up in a style superior to anything of
its kind in Canada,
In the front part of the building facing
.'onge St., ia a room in itself ai large aa
that occupied by the average college, is
situated Lhe commercial department, in
here ia "taught what formerly constituted
the entire curiiciilum of a commercial
school. Leading from thia department ia a
special drill room for commercial and cash
book work, where classe* of about twenty
at a time -ire put through a special drill on
thoir work. Out, of ibis roam we go into
the typewriting department ; thia Is tho
room whore scholars d.i legal and commercial typewriting from their own notes,
which is revised by the head teacher in this
branch of study.
Opposite this room accross tlio cort-'dor
is tlie stenography department ; this iaa
very important branch of a commercial
education and ia presided over hy a vory
efficient and painstaking teauhtr. This is
alao a very large and well arranged room
with all the aids in it which a truly modern
school could obtain,
Mr. Connor O'llea has been connected
with thia college for over thirty yoars und
is well known throughout. Canada and the
United Slatee as one of the greatest experts
in ponmonahip uu the continent, and
thousand* nf young men attribute much nf
thoir success in business to tlio proficiency
they attained in thia respect while at tho
British American College. Mr. David
Hoskina lias been ou the stall' of tho
British American college sinco lSS'2, during
which time ho haa had charge of the junior
commercial department, and has auperin-
tended thc work of tho shorthand and typewriting departments, Tho Toronto Mail,
which in its issue of April -2'2nd ol this year
published his portrait, speaks of him as
follows: "Mr. Hoakins is a thoroughly
trained accountant, a first class penman,
a skillful shorthander- and is conceded to
be one of tho ablest all round commercial
teachers in tho profession.
This old and reliablo institution number.'! among ita former pupils auch men ob
W, I). Mu thews, ex-president of Toronto
Board of Trade; K. T, Coady, Toronto City
Treasurer : Kmerson Coatswoi-lh, Chester
aud R H, Maasoy, 0, W, Kiety, Hugh
Blaln, S. B. Beak, manager London Street
Railway ; and hundreds of prominent and
successful business men throughout the
Dominion,
Wo wero informed by Mr. O'Dea that
lhey wero completing a very aucceasftil fall
term, having un exceptionally large attendance of both young men and women, "but,"
continued be, "our system of instruction
is suoh lhat pupils may enter at any date,"
When wo took our leavoof the principals of
Ibis excellent, school WO were thoroughly
convinced that no bolte,' existed in any
country,
CANADA AHEAD IN fJSH-
Tln* Brat Exhibit nl Ike World's Fair.
An Ottawa special aays :���Information
haa been received at the Department of
Marino and Fisheries that three awarda
have been granted to the department for
tta cxhibita atthe World's Fair, the jurors
pronouncing tho Canadian Government's
fishery exhibit the beat iu the entire build
ing. Mr. J. W. Collins, ohief of the de
nartment offish and fisheries at the Chicago
Exhibition, has written Mr. Larke, the
Ctnadian commissioner, at the olose of their
official intercourse, expressing his hearty
appreciation of the part taken by Canada
in making the fisheries department at the
Fair successful. He continues : " I
sure that the great collection Bent here hy
your country, and so fittingly installed,
muat result materially to the advantage of
those of your citizens who are engaged in
commercial fishing, fish culture, or otherwise interested iu fiah or fisheries. In no
other direction, perhaps, has Canada oc*
caaiou for greater pride than alio can feet
in connection with tho representations
mado of her fishing interests."
A Quionly Head
can never rest on a body frail from disease
any more than the- lovely lily can grnw in
the sterile soil. When Consumption fastens
ita hold upon a victim, the whole physical
st met lire commences it- decay. -At such a
poriod, beforo tho diueaae is too far ad vane
ed. lb*. I'lerc/s I 'o'deu Medical Discovery
will arrest and cure it. So certain ia this
that an offer ia made to refund the money
paid for it when afailure can be found under
tho condition nf a fair trial.
Once tisod, Dr. Pierce's relicts arc always
in tavur. Specific lor constipation, piles,
biliouanesa, ami headache.
Ono Too Many for Him-
A beggar accosted a gentleman, and
whined, " I'm paralysed in both
'alula, mister, an' can't work, fcr I can't
grasp anything with 'em, Could you a pare
me a trilie, mister?"
" I'm deaf," replied the gentleman,
"you'd better writo down what you have
to say. Here's a pencil and a piece of
paper."
"Deaf, ia 'o ?" thought tho beggar;
--then he didn't heir about the paralyais.''
So ho wrote down :
'* I've got a wife and six children starving at 'onio, mister. I've bin out o' wurk
for six mnnths, an I am iu a droH'ul state
ofdesteitualiuu."
' He handed the paper to the gentleman
who read it, ami aai i:
" I thought you aaid you were paralysed
in both handa and couldn't grasp anything;
and yot you can writo."
" Did���didn't yer say yer was deaf
stammered the beggar, who now really did
feel paralysed.
" Yes, just to find out if you wero an
impostor, which you are, as I auapucted,"
replied the gentleman,
"Well, of all the bloomin' frauds, yor
tbe biggest!" exclaimed the beggar ; "ih��
hldoa of yer sayin' yer was doaf, an' tryin
to Empoge on a poor feller."
And he shuttled off, anilling the air with
righteous indignation,
A Wedding Present
Of practical importance would he a bottle of
the only sure-pop com cure��� Putnam's
Painless Coin Extractor���which oan bo had
at any drug store, A continuation of th
honeym-mii and ihe removal of corns both
assured by its use.    Beware of imitations,
 *e��
Queen Liuokalaui   (gazing!ongiugly    -
the   governmental   chair)-���" Its a shame
that none of theso rude men will get up to
givo a lady a seat I"
(With tho exception of Bolgium,whoae doLt
lias been incurred for   internal   improve.
moot!   every European national debt ia in
great part a war debt.
A. P. 39:
���QSDOSESgS'f
rSHILOH'Sj
CURE.
��� --���-nflgp
Cures Consumption, Coughs, Group, Sore
"i',-1 or.t. Sold by all Diut-gUts on a Guarantee.
Fora Lame Sido, U-ink or Chest Shlloh't. Porous
Piaster will give great fa ti? fact ion.���15 cents.
.CATARRH
REMEDY
If eve you Catarrh ? This Itcmcdy will relieve
nnd Cure you. Price dicta. This Injector lor
its Biicueasfu! treatment, free Itemcmbcr,
tiulIoh'a ltemcdicrj oro sold on a guarantee.
BAND
SAWS
In Cutting 3 Millions SAVE th* En*
tir�� COST out of*
Clroulat*** tmwfutt
Th* Change Is
Inovltabla.
ORDER NOW AND DE IN TIME.
WATEROU8, Brantford, Canada.
SIGNS or IIK A Mil  .  .
nro brig h t eyon and clear complexion from
tho USO of I ir. Sloeum's Oxygenized
Emulsion of Fare Cod Liver Oil.
Kftsy to take, nnd n Ureal Floafi Producer.
ASK your druggM for it, und take no
olher.
Manupaoturbd HY
T- A SLOCUM & OO-
Toronto.
Not Much ofa Chance-
Manager: " That young woman whom I
placed #t thia counter a year ago already
knows more about the buaineaa than you do,
and 1 find that I shall have to put her at
the head of tha department, thoiiQ-h I fear
it will be rather unpleasant for you to be
under her ordera."
Clerk : "Ob, no, I am getting used to
that.   We were married last spring."
A fetrifyin-*; Biver.
The Tintu river, in Spain, possesses remarkable qualities. Ita waters are yellow
aa the topa**, harden the saud,aad petrify ic
in a most surprising manner, if a stone
fall into the river and reat upon another
they both become perfectly uuited and coo-
glutinated in a year. No fish live in ita
stream.
Nerve Fain Cure-
Poison's Nerviline cures flatulence,chills,
and spa-mis. Nerviline cures vomiting,
diarrhn-a, cholera, and dyaentcry. Nerviliuc
������nre* headache, sea sickness and summer
complaint, Nerviline euros neuralgji .
tcotliache, lumbago, and sciatica. Nerviline
ernes sprains, bruises, cuts, &C. PoIbou's
Nerviline ia the boat remmly in the wnrld,
and only costs 10 ami LTi cents to try it.
Sample and large bottles at any drug s'.ore.
Try Poison's Norvilino.
In     TpfrMQ?r
BHJb
#0!
You noerl n't go to Florida, but take'
SCOTT'S
EMULSION
Of  Pure  I brwegtan  Cod Liver
Oil and Hypophosphites.
It will STREN0THEN WEAK LUNGS,
STOP THE COUQH, AND CHECK all
WASTING DISEASES. A remarkable
flesh producer and it Is almost as Palat-:
able as Milk, Be sure to get (he genuine
put up in salmon-colored wrappers.
Prapaml onlr >y Scott t Bcmtio. l!allo,!l!o.
I.10MOXTON. Alberta, N. w. T��� Farms nnd
,.,;*,,.T?"'.n I'roporly for sale by COWIE &
HOUND, Haul Estate .'unlit,..
DONT lSuy �� Watch pr any Jowoir
���     ��� . . .���       iHtraroficuinn;i��n
on���JS:W!?����...IT:8.FKEK.   �����,��������� ,���,
PINTO
.     'Ktie.   IT'SFHKK.   Write for
on ttjo**:*jU^*m^
The most fnlerontinj*- Parlor
Game over invented.
Only ��K eta. Address Pluto,
BO Yortgo St. Arcade,Toronlo.
ASISTO- M.W,10!' W-Smnanthn at
J^L^M J*-**?"1 ?#^**tr* SP'Ofta** Aliens Wifo.
OvorlWIllusimtion*-. Nearly it'tu nan-)-*. No
Torrttory assigned. Bond $i.m for vrospeetua
and miHh tho eunvasH if y0u want to make
money. WIUIVU It HI <;��.���., TemperanceiSI.
or on to,
IT IS A GREAT MISTAKE
To think that you must
wear  wide,   ill-looking
ahoca to havo comfort.
Our shoea  are  both
easy and elogant
nice to look at
aud
com*
fort*
able-
while in wear,
Tlie J. D.  KING CO.
79 KINO HAST.
Ltd
HOVAL IMKMMOI (!()FM !
1-t deliclotirianil nmtrlHhlng, Hhthly rocom-
monded by the leadliiK Phy-dciim-i. Hit
up In Tin-, only-ami Hold hy all thole tiding
Uroccra,
Ellis & Kelghley,
Solo Manu'noturors,     ��� 8 Bay 8t��� Toronto
sxvrBxizxarG-
lann Indication of
COLD IN THB HEAD.
It la tho boslnninfi* of Catarrh and frequently
���\ids to Consumption.   Avoid these by using
CLARK'S CATARRH CURE, Price Boc,
Ono bnitlo will work wonder*.   If your drug
-���ist. dooH not keop ll nddroxa
T A SLOCUM & OO,
180 Adelaide, St. W. TORONTO.
MUSIC !
Kvery Muslo Teacher lu l to*
iiadaKiioulil know where tliey
can got thoir Muslo cheapest.
Writo un fur ('ataloKuoa; uIm*
sample copy of tho Canadian
Musician, a livo monthly
journal with $1,00 worth of
music in oueh lssuo.  S'i to?']
6or day mado hy canvassers.
oo premium lint. Wo carry
verylhlnic in the aIuhIc line
WHALEY.ROYOE & 00
158YONCF ST. TORONTO, ONT
MONEYMAKER
Knittingmachine
>NLY
10
ASKVDUR SEWINGMACHINEAGENT ���
FOR IT, OR SENDA 3CENT STAMP ���
FOR PARTICULARS.PRICE LIST,  .
SAMPLES,COTTON YARN.&c.  ~
eTHlS IS GOOD FOR $(".. SEND!
REELMANBROS.Wfr
-   GEORGETOWN,ONT' '
"August
Flower"
There is a gentle-
Dyspepsia,    man at Malden-ou-
the-IImlson, N. Y.,
lamed Captain A. G. Pareis, who
jas written us a letter iu which it
�� evident that he has made up his
mind concerning some things, and
this is what he says:
"I have used your preparation
called August Flower in my family
tor seven or eight years. It is constantly in my house, and we consider
it the hest lemedy for Indigestion,
and Constipation we
Indigestion,  have  ever  used or
known. My wife is
troubled with Dyspepsia, and at
times suffers very much after eating.
The August Flower, however, relieves the difficulty. My wife frequently says to me when I am going
to town, 'Wc are out
Constipation of Ainjiist Flower,
and I Ihiukyou had
belter get another bottle.' 1 am also
troubled with Iddigestlou, and whenever I am, I take one or two lea-
spoonfuls before eating, for a day or
two, and nil trottble i.-i removed." 9
SAUSAGE CASINGS J'/'Cr'C
IIhIi, ci'i.tintiy n-i hnnd also prime American
HoK'.-ii'iniiiK-*.   Full   linos Nuw HanH, Limi*
Otearuaoon, (tolls. Oltaoae, Lard, etc  Pakk
BuaKwau-JsOo. I/m, Successors toJAMis
Pakk ft Hon, Toronto.       	
A Far-Famed College���
Hcrniuda. Nova Sootlft, Now RrtinswioK, Quo<
boc. Alhorta. llritUli Colntiiliia, .���dn-^icliu-
fetlK, New York and a*l parts of Ontario*
aro TO-DAY re tiro*'* n ted at
ONTARIO  -  BUSINESS - COLLEGE,
itriXK-iiii.t;, ��*T.
For the 25th annual cnlalorfiio, aitdrof-*-���
Robinson ft Jolm<*ou. BallovlUe. Oi
OIL
Your machinery with etc., standard and
roliahte,
Peerless
Machine Oil
Wc will i*ive a Btihatantial reward tn Hiiy-
one bringing ua profit oi other oil 1-eiug
aold as our peerless machine oil.
None genuine except Irom |-a-*kag��s
heariug hill liraiul, and ono name, ami aold
only by rulniblo mid regular tlr-ileru.
Sole manufacHirers.
SAMUEL ROM & CO.
TORONTO
���ESTABLISHED   1871
OXFORD HOG
cadldronTurnace
ADAPTED FOR EITHER
, Hard or Soft Goal.
BAS INDIRECT DRAFT
Heats Quick.
Made In 6 Sizes. 20, 30,40,
60 and 60 Gallons.
The' Gurney Foundry Co,, Ltd..
TORONTO.
The Curnoy, tyatsey 0)., Ltd,, ^oi\lre��l
GRANBY RUBBERS.
Tliny givo porfcet mtiafiwtion in lit, stylo and finish, and it has boooino ii byword thut
"(Iiiashv Kl'lilii.ii.H wonrliko irjn,"
Foresi��;lit I
Foresiglit
The Latest Parlor Qamo, Two, four nrcinhlpor-inns can play.  In InuuiHoino
no**, cards and rules complete,
Price - - is Cents Saoh,
On receipt of price wo will forward post-paid.
THE COPP CLARK CO, LTD.,
  TOiROHSTTO,  OISTT
Fac-simile of Mammoth Quartette Bar.
The Best Soap in the World. A COMEDY OF ERRORS.
CHAPTER 11
THAT MISS  WILLIAM**..
Jessica bewailed ber fate greatly to her
confidante, Flora Williams, the "woman"
four years her teiiior, who had been to Girton, and whom .Tessioa exhalted to a throne
in her little mind. Flora was handsome,
with masses of golden hair. She wore
tailor's dresses, talked a Little slang, smok-
ed an occaiioual cigarette, and spoke of her
collegefrienda by their surnames unprefixed.
She alfecte.i eyeglasses, too, and kept a
number of heavy tomes iu a locked bookcase. Otherwise there was nothing very
learned about her, nor was she half so keen
for culture and superiority as was Jessica
Nevill.
"I admire old maids loss than I did five
yean ago," she confessed to bor friend ;
���ind Jessica, hardly grasping tho profound
bearing uf this remark, replied frivolously
(for even Jupiter nods sometimes):���
"1 lupitoM, Flora, ft** Girton you sometimes saw too many women 1 I admit 1
like men best. All i object to is tho Bup*
position that wo must want to marry
them."
"Hut wo do," said Flora ruthlessly ;
"you yourself, .loss, you wanted to marry
Mr. Hobson."
"Oh no, Only just whilu ho was asking
me. And I shouldn't fool like that again.
It was only that I was sn unaccustomed to
that kind of thing. Noxt time when a man
makes love to mo I shall dislike it."
"Are you sure*;"
"Ib is just what I dread about John. He
will think it proper to make love to mo,
and then I shall hate him. If I could only
���ee liim without his knowing mo, Flora!"
"But, judging from Mr. Hobaon'sexperience when he made love to you "
"Oh, doBtnp about Mr. Hobson ! And
you know,Flora, this talking of lovers makes
me sick."
" Ves, dear," aaid Flora ��� " you blushed when mamma read us thoso lovo scones
from tbo novel. 1 saw you. Don't you like
reading them to yourself oven, Jessica I"
"That's different-"
" No, you goose, it's all of a ploce. You
don't, publicly and iu the abstract, approve
of love-making, Joss ; but when Mr. Hobson
got down on bis knees before you "
" Flora, how can you V
I' "It is only that I am olrtur than you, dear.
-1 shouldn't dislike tho idea of your John so
muoh, Kugaged ! And with a man coming
in three mouths to mako lovo to you I I
dare say he'll do it better than Mr, Hobson;
eo -beer up, Jessica, and come and see my
new dress."
" You do yourself tbe greatest injustice,"
Baid Miss Jessica, " talking in that silly
way. Hut oh, Flora, what a vory beautiful
dress 1"
Considering how strong-mindsd theso two
young women weie, their interest in more
olothes was perhaps excessive. Hooks and
lovers weru unite secondary to-day, aud
every day.
Next month Mr. Nevill had to go away
to Wales on business, and ho was exercised
in hia mind about leaving Jessica, the betrothed heiress, bo noar Mr. Hobson; for
the good curate being of nervous tempera*
ment, and apt to be precipitate, might
easily stumble into love-making again, and
Mr, Nevill, unable to distinguish among
girlish caprices and fancies, had always
considered his daughter a little sentimental
about her rejected suitor. So this person
and that of her aunts and elderly cousins
did her father suggest as a visitor during
his absence, but Jessica would none of them,
and Mr. Nuvill's alarm about Mr. Hobson I,
increased.
���'Go to town to your grandmother,
Jessica, and buy some new gowns."
-* Thank you, papa; I havo just laid in a
���took."
" Then begin your trousseau."
" I will wait, papa, till I sou how I like
Cousin John."
"Tut, my doar, tut I"
*��� Papa !" exclaimed Jessica Buddcnly,
" it has just struck me I Do you remember
that John belongs to your generation, not
to mine 1"
" But ho is your ago, Jessica. Near
enough."
" Papa, people alwavs belong to their
generation, I am Hiiro John is quits.- old in
bis mind' and in his ways. 1 havo heard
you say, papa, you don't approve of
marriages between persons of dill'orent generations."
"Tub. my dear 1"
"Hut, indeed, papa, I can't begin my
troubscau till I have Been him."
"Then go to Aunt Lucy at Bourne*
mouth,"
" Sho has not invited inc."
"Or to Miss Snow at Hankside."
" Her spare rooms aro full, papa."
������Well, whero will you go'!" asked Mr.
Nevill, in despair.
Jessioa answered that question a few days
later. She came running to hor father one
morning witb sparkling eyes -nd a pretty,
f'leading look ou bor face. Ho knew that
ook ; sbo wort; it whon she had set her heart
on some innocent pleasure which it would ba
his delight to grant. He smiled encouragingly, and held out his baud ; for Jessica had,
naked nothing of him since her betrothal
nor been like Ids merry, sweet little Max
at all.
" Oh, pip i 1 dear pupa 1 do say yes I Do.
���Tust while you are away 1 Think how Stupid
for mo all alone bore. I>> say yes ! Do let
me go 1"
"Why, to he sure I will. It's what l'vo
lieen looking for���a pi toe to seed you to
whilo I'm away, Wliorcdo you want to
got"
"It's a letter from Flora, papa."
"Ohl That Miss Williams. Woll, r
suppose you must go if you wish it,"
" They are going abroad, papa, and want
ma to go with thom,"
" Blots me I Who are ' Ihoy ?'"
"Flora and  her  friend   Miss  Talbot,
papa."
"Who is Miss Talbot, and bow old is
sho?"
"A little younger thin Flora. She is
atiil ut Girton. And her mother is tho
Dowager Viscountess of Monastoroven.
"Dear mo! Hut who is thechaporon of
thii party!"
" Flora, papa."
-��� But she's only a young girl Ilk" you.1
"Pupa I Why, shu's years older than I.
And ��o aensiblu. Sho and Talbot���1 mean
Miss Talbot���wont to Vienna last year
alone. Girton girls, papa, don't require
chaperons. Oh, pleaso, let me go. Vou
forget what a dull life I am going to havo
with only that elderly cousin of yours I Do
give me ono littio month of fun -int."
" Mr. Novill hadn't tlm heart to say no
atraight oil'. "Ask Miss Williams to
lunch," ho said, "and let mo soo if sho is a,
proper person to take charge of yon," For
Flora lived at a place three stations down
the line, and Mr. Nevill (being inclined to
despise her) had not made her acquaintance.
Jessica wrote to Miss Williams that whm
she came to be inspected she muBt try to look
liko a chaperon. Consequently Flora was
hardly rocognizab'o. Slio had left her smart
spy-glasses at homo with her tailor-mado
frock, She wore round blue spectacles, a
gown of her mother's, a long mantle, a
bonnet, antl a thick veil. She talked gravely on serious subjects ; and Mr. Nevill was
delighted with her, and began to reconsider
his opinion of Girtonians, Jessica was Hying about iu a white serge frock, rather too
ihort for her, and wore a broad hat with
streaming ribbons. She looked a child,and
Miss Williams surveyed her benevolently,
like a mother. Mr, Nevill withdrew all
objection to the proposed trip, and promised his daughter as much money as sho requested.
"And whero, Miss Williams, do yon propose to go 1" ho inquired of tho chaperon.
"Oh, toKomo. Tal������ Miss Talbot is thero
already with her molhor. Lady Monaster*
'jVcnlmsto return aoon,and then Jessica and
1 will stay on with Miss Talbot at tha samo
hotel. After about a month, we three will
travel home together,"
" It sounds suitable," said Mr. Nevill;
and began looking up routes in the Continental Bradshaw.
" We will do exactly what you advise,
Mr. Nevill," Baid Flora meekly; And
JesBica jumped into her father's arms and
kissed him. She had not been so gay for
weeks. She was going on a frolic, and a
first frolic, Is highly exciting to a young
person.
At the eleventh hour, however, the plans
for the journey of the two ladies was all
overturned. Mr. Nevill was packing, and
rather in a fuss preparing for his departure,
when Jessica burst inio his room, crying
out that ii most shocking thing had occurred. Miss Tabot bad got Roman fever, and
all Kome was full of fever, and Mrs. Williams positively rofusod to let her daughter
go there on any account. Mr. Novill was
in dismay, remembering tho inflammable
Mr. Hobson.
But Flora and I might go somewhere
dse, papa," suggested Jessica.
"\cs,   yes, of course,"   U8>
assented Mr.
Novill roa'dily. " Keep --.way from tho
fover. Go somewhere olio. And he
proposed Florence, where was .lo-iaica's
unolo with nine daughters ��� or Cannes,
whore ono Mrs. White and her grand-
iiiooo would befriend tho lonely travel-
lern.
sfoBsica pouted. "Wc can make up our
mind as wo go along," sho said. " Paris is
tho first stage to either places."
" Vory well, my lovo (fold tny dressing*
gown, pleaso, dear child}, and you had hotter koop your monoy as much as possible in
Knglish gold (that box of collars, please,
Jessica), It pauses everywhere (don't
tumble ovor my boots!. And write to ino
very often, my doar."
"Papa," said Jessica, packing busily,
"you know you never got my letters when
you aro in Watos,    I shan't writo often."
CHAPTER IU.
WILLIAMS AXl��TAI,nOT.
So Mr. Novill went to Wales, and on
the same day the two young ladies crossed
to Calais. Flora declared her opinion that
to bo "at a looso end" was the pteasanteac
way of travelling, and that Abraham was
tho wiso man, who wont out not knowing
whither bo went. It Is needless to remark
that Miss Williams had restored the flopping mantle and the poke bonnet to her
mother's wardrobe. She and ber friend woro
dressod alike in dark blue, with smart little
felt bats aud Kton jaokots. Thoir follow-
passengers lookod admiringly at the two
pretty young creatures and wondered who
they wore.
Their ultimate destination atill undecided
they stayed two days in Paris, and camo to
' tho conclusion that Frenchmen woro sometimes rather staring and nolo. Then ono
evening Flora wroto tho names of several
countries on slips of paper and jumbled
thorn in a bat, and Jessica put in her hand
and drew ono out. Spain was written on it,
and the younger girl, cried "Hurrah I" aud
waved the piece of paper above hor head,
and jumped and danced hilariously about
the room.
" Are you so pleased, Jess ?" said Flora.
" I havo a scheme in my head," replied
Jessica.
But neither on that night nor tho next
oould the maiden lady (so Mr. Nevill had
describe! Miss Williams to his mother-in-
law) extraot from hor charge what manner
of Bchemo it was.
Thoy t ravelled straight to Madrid, and
from thence each wrote homo, Thia duty
accomplished, Jessica pulled a wiso face
and addressed her companion in tbe following manner:���
" Flora, it is getting lato in the soason,
d Madrid is farther north thau Seville
and Granada. Lot us go to those places
while the woathor is still cool. And, Flora,
let us steadily sot our face agaiiiBt bullfights, fnr, in my opinion, English peoplo
should always sot a good oxamplc. And,
Flora, don't you think we ought to see the
Rook, which is auch a remarkable placo in
Knglish history ?"
" And whore Captain Farquhar is ?" said
Flora,with a cough.
"John Farquhar is not at tho Book,'
said his betrothed ; "ho is at Tangier���on
leave, I suppose. That kind of man is always on* leave, Have you beard much of
Tangier, Flora?"
"Not much."
"1 have read it up in Murray. Itis
about three hours from Q ibraltar, and is a
ery old-world place, which reminds ono of
the 'Arabian Nights.' But there ia a
French betel. Would yon like, Flora, to
sec Tangier?'1
''Jessica," said Flora, "can you lie yearning for the commencement of  the  lovo*
iking!"
Jessica took a ohfttr, aud lookod graver
than ever.
"Flora, how much monoy have you 7
What is your fortune V
"My fortune t Oh, a competence, Six
hundred a year now, and eventually two
or threo hundred more."
'Then aren't you nearly as rich as I am ?
Flora, it seems to ma tho greatest pity you
arc not going to marry John Farquhar,
when you can endow him nearly as well as
I can."
"Not quite ; and besides, I couldn't re*
store him Ida house."
" I would givo you that for a wedding
present. 1 assure you, Flora, I should be
really glad to make up the trilling hundred
or two by which you aro poorer than I, as
a reward to you for taking this man ofl' my
hands."
" Vou aro most kind. Hut why should
I do with him any better titan yoursolf?"
asked Flora.
" 1 soo excellent reasons," replied Jessica,
counting on her Angers. " First, you want
to marry, and I don't. Then you like tho
account** we have had of John, and I don't.
You think the position romantic and pleasing. You do not apparently disapprovo of
inconstanoy, Flora, to the ideal, nor consider it desecration to marry an unknown and
commonpUcn man. And as you aro handsomer aud nicer than I am, John is more
likely to fall in love with you than with
mo. And if bo's incapable of lovo, why, ho
will nt ill got monoy with you, and wo have
no i-oason for supposing ho wanlu anything
else. Pray induce him to lave you Flora.1
And do I understand, -Icssica, that you
aro taking mo to Tangier tu inttoditcu mo
to Captain Farquhar t"
it is one of my reasons forgoing (here,"
And the others?"
I expected you to guess, Flora. Men
aro bo stupid that it is just possible'Jobn
may still wish to marry me. But I altogether object to marrying a man I do not
know. And bow, I ask you, Flora, oould I
possibly learn to know n man who was try*
lug to make love to me? What I want is
to sec this John beforo ho arrives at home
as my fiance, I want to catch him unawares at Tangier, and see what lie is liko
when he is himself���not disguised in the
airs of a pouter-pigeon."
"But, Jessica���will not tbo airs ofa conk
pigeon be assumed whenever and wherever
you appear ? And doos it not occur to you,
my dear, that he might think it a little
superfluous, even a little bold, yonr seeking him in this manner in the ends of tbo
earth ?"
"I have thought of that. Flora, John
must not know it is I."
Flora started. " The plan is great," sho
said, " but it staggers mc. May I ask, Jessica, if you will appear under an assumed
uamo t
"That is what I propose to do, Flora."
" But when Captain Farquhar comes to
Nevill Lodge, he will recognize you, Jess ;
what will you say then t"
" Most likely I shall bate bim so muoh
that I will ntver allow bim to como to
Novill Lodge at all. If, by extraordinary
good fortune, I lind him comparatively unobjectionable, why, I shall explain to bim
what I did, and why."
"Woll, ho may foel flattered ; or he may
not, Jessica. What would Mr. Novill say
to you plan, doar t"
" 1 don't suppose papa would like it at
all. But 1 do not feck bouud to consult
papa's tastes now that he has become a
tyrant, Flora."
" The plan is great," repeated Flora,
" but are we clever enough to carry it out?
Shall we dross aa young men, Jets, to perfect our resemblance to Rosalind and Imogen?"
"No," Baid Jessioa, laughing ; " I should
not know how to behave as m young man.
But I can behave very nicely as���
Talbot for instance."
Whereupon Flora jumped up and clapped
hor hands. '
" The very thing \" she cried ;" you shall
pose as Talbot tho Uirtonlun I For Jessica,
if you tried passing yourself off as a wholly
imaginary person, you would say that you
had six brothers to-day and to-morrow sixteen I But you know oxaotly how many
brothers Talbot hay. Represent her, Jet'
siaa."
"Miss Talbot might nit like it I" said
Jessica, breathless with excitem-mt.
"Talbot? My dear Jess," cried Flora,
who had now thoroughly entered into the
jest, " it is the kind of thing to delight
Talbot immensely. I never knew a girl so
fond of a naughty joke. Oh I I'll undertake
to square Talbot. One condition though,
my love: that while you are personating
her you do nothing scandalous. Don't for
instance, olopo with Captain John. In fact,
I ahould say permit no love-makiuo."
" i���permit love-making I taid Jessica,
in tones of tbe greatest disgust; and they
discussed further details of the scheme, deciding that Miss Williams might retain hor
own name, as she was unimportant and the
name was oorninnu, und tho wearer's con
tidonoe in it would gain oredit for them
both.
" My dear," said the chaperon, " this
whole plan is vor*,' naughty. Are you serious about It ?"
������ 1 am most serious," replied Jessica,
" I mean to do it."
Flora looked hard at ber friend, and then
thoy both dissolved into delightful laughter;
under the influence of which tho plan be-
uame a resolution fixed as the law of the
Medesand Persians.
Three days later the maiden ladies wbo
called each other Williams and Talbot
crossed from Kurope to Africa. They had
slept one* night at Gib, in tho hotel
at the Kuropa Point, and had walked
about that queer medley of a town, and
bought lace from Kmilia Birch, and sought
in vain for the tailless monkeys. Talbot
had a notion that John Farquhar might
have returned to the Kock, and whenever
tbey passed a haughty Knglish officer, she
pinched Flora's arm and whispered, "Oh
dear 1 Williams, could that be he?" And
Flora, being young herself and as yet rather
starved in the matter ot love affairs, was
secretly much excited too, and would not
for the world havo abandoned the search
for tho captain.
At last they embarked in thn Hercules
paddle-boat, and steamed away to Tangier;
and the voyage was not pleasant, for the
sea was rough, and tho Hercules is small,
and on thiB occasion crowded with Moors
and Jews, all very seasick. Some first*
class passengers there were, however ; an
elderly lady with a husband ; a lonely man
ina slouch-hat; a thin and strong-minded
Mrs. Geoffrey Cobbe, whose name was emblazoned on all her luggage; and lastly, a
young officer from Gib, with whom she
conversed persistently. Jessioa was rather
seasick, and noticed none of these people
much.
The landing at Tangier was a little
alarmiug to tbe two English girls, unprepared for the half-naked and noisy Moors,
who bustled them into a boat, rowed violently ashore, and incessantly clamored for
"twelve dollars." Presently they were
dragged before a superbly robed, white-
bear ded-and-turbaned gentleman, presumably a customs officer, who tat in the mud
and ordered all portmanteaux to be opened
and instantaneously shut up again. His
perceptive powers must have been phenomenal in quickness; supernaturally quick
also were the five men who, the moment
the perfunctory examination was over,
snatched up tho portmanteaux and ran away
with tliein through tbo town and up the
hill of the Soko, pursued by the panting
maidens under the noisy escort of an enormous negro. Williams and Talbot nearly
fainted with relief whon they found themselves and all their goods deposited in
unexpected safety on the floor of Hru/eaud's
Hotel; where rooms were awaiting them,
and Knglish was spoken, and five o'clock
tea was the order of the day. Anomalous
civilization 1
I have it 1" gasped Flora, "that black
cannibal and hiB hordo were sent by Monsieur Bruzeaud to meet ns 1 Why couldn't
they say so!"
Jessica was leaning out of the window,
smiling at the purple sea and the flat white
town and the aloes and the cactus on the
slope below the hotel,
" Do you know, Williams," sho said, " I
lure say papa would not like our having
come alone to a place of this sort."
" Have you only juat thought of that,
my dW Talbot ?" said Flora,
(to uk continued.)
MIGIISTB A SEAPORT
The Great ship Canal*
Saw Am Accoaipllsheil n.,-1.
Manchester has just been celebrating the
completion of its ship canal, a great water*
way giving it direct access to the Irish *jei,
and thence to the Atlantic Ocean, and with
the completion of this work the realization
of a scheme which, in one form or another,
has been discussed at intervals for more than
a century and three-quarters. It ii popularly
supposed that Manchester ba- always
quietly acquisecedtn tbe growth and development of Liverpool, and has been content
that Liverpool should receive toll ou ihc
ootton and other raw materials imported
largely from this side tbe ocean which are
used in suoh immense and increasing
quantities in tbe industrial region lying
within a cricuit of twenty miles from
Manchester, Thia is a mistake, Manchester
has always boen jealous of Liverpool, and of
her position oo tho estuary of the Mersey,
and hasagain and again contemplated calling
in tho aid of the engineer to right her wrongs
with Liverpool,
Long before Liverpool bad begun to draw
to herself tho trado with what were thee
the American colonies, when Bristol had
still the monopoly of tho
OOMUB8010�� THK WK-tT,
and Liverpool was but a small plaoe (owning somo eighty or ninety ships), Manchester
was moving with a view to scouring somo
of the advantage which it was felt ought to
accrue to ber, owing to hor nearness to tho
seo. Manchester stands on the Irwoll, a
tributary of the Mersey, and the Mersey is
navigable for ships of three or four hundred
tons burden as far as Warrington, which is
exactly midway botween Liverpool and
Manchester, ana olghtoon miles from either
Jilace. Liverpool constructed her first dock
n 1708; and in I7I2 tho engineer who was
responsible for this work devised a scheme
under which the Mersey and the Irwell
were to be made navigable to Manchester.
Nothing camo of this scheme, but in 1720
works wero carried out which gave Manchester a water communication with Liverpool, whicli was partly tidal and partly
canal. This waterway waa in uso until
about seven yeara ago, when the ship canal
works interfered with it, It was, however,
never
AVAILABLE S*OR VM8KL8
larger than barges of seventy or eighty tons
burden, and never began to meet tbe needs
of Manchester after the era of tho cotton
factory had commenced. Forty years after
this waterway was made. Brindloy, with
the aid of the Duke of Hridgewator, con*
struCcd the picturesque canal which is now
known by the name of tbo Duke. It ia
twenty-one miles long, and joins tho estuary
ot the Mersey at Runcorn, within half a
mile of the point at which the first water*
way was connected with the tidal portion
of the Mersey.
Like the waterway constructed in 17*20,
tho Bridge water Canal is for barges only.
It doubled the means of communication by
water between Liverpool and Manchester,
and aloug these two old waterways millions
of bales of cotton have beon carried from
Liverpool through
TUB (IAKDEN COUNTY
of Cheshire into the heart of the cotton
manufacturing district of Lancashire. But
Manchester has always desired something
more than barge canals, and varioussohemes
for ship canals were discussed boforo Parliament gave its sanction to tbe construction
of the canal which iB now nearing completion.
There was a long, bitter, and wearisome
fight in Parliament boforo tho scheme for
the present canal was adopted. Liverpool
was strongly opposed to tho canal, and
fought the promoters it. overy point. Tho
Liverpool City Council, tho Liverpool Dock
Hoard, and the railway companies whose
lines connect tho two cities spent about a
quarter of a million starling iu lawyers'
fees and in foes to expert witnesses in en*
doavorintz to defeat tht proposals for tho
waterway. Nevoriu the history of private
bill legislation was there a bigger or a more
costly fight in the committee rooms of the
Houses of Parliament, and nover beforo
wero two Knglish cities set in antagonism
as wore Liverpool and Manchester in the
early eighties, when the Ship Canal scheme
was beioro Parliament. In 1883 Liverpool
was triumphant. Parliament threw out the
Ship Canal bill, Two years later a new
and greatly amended Bchmio was submit,
ted to Parliament. Agaii the fight between
Liverpool and Mnnchestir was waged for
nearly half the sessioi, but this time
victory rested with Mamhester, and Parliament, passed a bill omjowering the construction of the canal.
Life aad Health.
VALUABLE HECl.'K FOB lUniTHKRIA.
The Scientific American gives thia recipe
for diphtheria,which all the world ought to
know:���At the first indication of diphtheria
in the throat of a child mako tho room
close, then tako a tiu cup and pour into it
a small quantity of tar and turpentine,
equal parts. Then hold tho cup over the
firo so as to fill tho air with the fumes. The
littio patient, on inhaling the fumes, will
cough up and spit out all the tu.mibnineoiis
matter, and the diphtheria will pass out,
The fumes of the tar and turpentine
loosen the matter iu tho throat, and thus
afford tbe relief that has balllei the skill
of the physicians. Cure should be exerctscl
to avoid setting fire to tho mixture, but
the risk is small as only a small quantity
need be placed in the cup at a time.
TRUE POSITION IN BLKIl'.
Concerning the natural postion of the
body in sleep, Or. Charles 0. Files has this
to say :
Complete relaxation of theentiro muscular
system is the first, great essential of sound,
healthful sleep. The limbs should bo slightly
flexed or bout, and tho body so dliposod
that overy muscle will be in an easy, com
fortablo position. Tho body itself should
rest on the right side, wilh a slight inclination forward rather than backward.
It is not well to sleep either on the back
or directly on the chest. In nolther position
can the limbs be properly flexed. Sleeping
on the chest and lace, with mouth and nostrils obstructed in the least hy tbe pillows,
is very injurious.
During sleep thc free ingress of air to tho
lungs should he an object of tho greatest
solicitude, The objections to sleeping on the
left Bide may be clearly apprehended by
calling to mind the relativo position of tbo
stomach and liver.
The greater portion of the liver is to the
right of the median line of the body. The
greater pouch of the stomach is on the median line, while the pyloric end is on the left
side of the body. The weight of the liver
is about four and one-half pounds, or about
one-thirty-second of the weight of tho
body.
If the stomach contains much food, when
one is lying on tho left side the weight of
tho liver resting on the stomach is apt to
causo uneasy slumber. This weight at
least will interfere considerably with tho
process of digestion-
Very great care should be exercised in
placing the body iu suoh a position that the
movements of the chest may bo perfectly
tree. Tho shoulders should be thrown
back and the left arm should be placed on
the left hip or partly behind tho body. It
should never bo allowed to roBt on tho
chest,
I havo noticed that thero is a tendt-ncy
iimong those of fooblo constitution, and
especially thoso having affections of lho
lungs, to sleop with the lungs compressed
by the arms and thn mouth aud tioBlrih
partly covered with the bed-clothes.
THE DEADLY FCt-DlNG-BED-
Within tho past fev weeks the folding-
bed has achieved a mos unpleasant notoriety, aud the catalogue if accidents duo to
its irrepressible interna contortions seems
almost to justify the Bupieion that a carnival of folding-bed cakmities has set in.
Either by reason of an mtbreak of tho innate depravity ot this nr-clianisal mahogany
hybrid itself, or becausethe (esthetic daimou
wishes to teach us to gr. hack to the decent
and invertebrate bedate-d, we appear to be
at the mercy of an .utonntic impulse
toward the wardrobe Btlte which threatens
those who confide thomelves to tho treacherous engine with suiiicattoii, if not con-
etission of the spine, vlmr-us nightmare
was really the worst tilt was to havo been
anticipated.
Thero is something -pculiarly Bhooking
in such behavior on thepart of a bed. Bed
has been the friond of nui sinco timo immemorial, and not only dun it speak to us of
rest,stoep,fi-ot-dom from larc,and the peace
ful h-ime,but it is most ntimoly connected
with the great drama f birth, life, and
death, Thc vcrydiH'ereitialion of civilized
man is that bodies in be. That bod should
kill him is an atrocious timing of the slats.
A man might as woll diewith his hoots on
as be telescoped in a fohing-bed collision���
the fact tlmt fan is in hit night-gown is no
consolation to those whmiight separate his
out raged remains from to spring mattress.
It is this iniquity iu tc folding-bed ao-
cidont that) encourages th siirtuiso of a latent deviltry in thn macbie, Tho addition
of the principle of the leer to a pioco of
furniture which our nncoiiors rightly constructed on simple, codling, and reposeful
lines���to which tbey gavo'he stem solidity
of a night's slumber aud to airy hoight ol
a fair lady's dreams���migt have been ox-
peoted to develop in it a taste for impish
nocturnal saltations Th mediieval bed,
with its massive column and spreading
canonic*-, was built to * proof agaiiiBt
witchcraft. But this mourn bed, with its
stomach full of springs ail chains, would
have been banned by the ihtirch in older
days, and no ono would lira looked to be
safe in it nt midnightcveniad It boon riveted to the floor.
Tho worst thing lhat ci. In said against
tbe folding-bed, however is that it is iu
bad taste. It is not whoy a modern invention, to bo sure, as it ad ils predeces.
Bor in the famous "bed li night and ohest
of drawers by day," Andu so far as it is
designed to economize spat it is pardonable. But, lil.o so many aother invention
of ours, it cannot rcstsaUscd with boing a
convenience, but must tryto phbs it off by
a cheap assumption of bcin something else,
Tho-folding bed ohooi-oa tjassume to be a
wardrobe, and people wh-je ideas aro no',
nice believe it to be a veryolined thing to
keop such a vulgar thingtis a bed out uf
sight during tbe day, Jushow much moro
prudish a wardrobe is thn a bed It is difficult to say, Perhaps M. Ntx O'Rnll might
calculate tho degree. Hi it Is a curious
faot lhat wherever vou Iii a tolding.bed
you almost always find th earners ol tho
room unnwnpl, so porhapthc recent carnival nf calamities is inthepturo of a judg
ment.���[Harper's Weekly,
i    In somo partssof Horlinnoroato spooia
1 publichousefl for women.
EAGER FOfl A TE8T OF SFEED*
in i:n-*lltl. toromollvr Rr-.<Tv la Knee Ibe
Sew.York Central - '���tiw."
There left for Chicago Inst week an Kng-
lish engineer and railroad builder who has
designed and completed a four-cylinder locomotive, which he claims can run at a
greater speed and carry heavier loads than
any other locomotive in the world, not
even excepting the record-making engine of
the New York Central, "999."
The engineer in question is Mr. Frederick
Charles Winby of London, and his locomotive, which was on view at the World's
Fair, aud jb still stalled in Chicago, is the
"James Tolemau," One of the avowed
purposes of Mr. Winby'a visit here is to
prove the capabilities of his engine, and, In
sporting parlance, he is " spoiling " for a
race with the iron horse he considers his
only rival, "999." Mr. Winby, needless to
remark, says that he will back his engine
to any amount.
The "James Tole-nan" was built last
year in six months, in the workshops of K.
ft W. Hawthorne, Leslie & Co. of Newcastle on-Tyne, one of the oldest firms of
locomotive builders in England. The
chief point of excellence that Mr. Winby
claims for his design is that it gives greater
boiler power than has heretofore been ob*>
taiuod in any locomotive, without lifting
the centre of yi.wity to a dangerous height.
The heating surface of the "James Tolemau " is 2,000 square foot, oue-third greater
than in any othor English locomotive,
while the area of the grate, 23 foet, is also
larger in tbo samo proportion. The boiler
in constructed in two cylindrical segments,
superposed. The chord stays are common
to tho two segments, bo that, while the
lateral diameter of the boiler Ib not greater
than will pats between a pair of driving
wheels of largo diameter, the verticil diameter is greater, tbe tube plates deeper
and of greater area, and the tubes themselves larger and more numerous than iu an
ordinary cylindrical boiler placed between
driving wheels.
There are two pairs of driving wheels,
eaoh 7 feet I) inches in diameter. Tho
leaders'are driven by a pair of inside
cylinders 17 inches in diameter, and with a
stroke of 22 inches. The trailing driving
wheels, of tho same si/.*, are driven by
cylinders 16-1 inches in diameter, with a
stroko of'24 inches, Thc "bogie" wheels
are 4 feet in diameter.
The weight of the engine, loaded, but
without tender, is sixty tons. It bas, so
its designer claims, a tractive power of
143.8 pounds for evory pound of effective
pressure and will work to 200 pounds on
the square inah.
No encouraging assurance has come from
the Now-York Central management that
the famous locomotive, "999," will be pitted
against auy other locomotive in any test of
speed for stakes or otherwise. Third Vice
President H, Walter Webb roooived a proposition somo time ago from persons who
desired to back an English locomotive
against tho New-York Central's wonderful
flier, He replied chat it was not the desire,
of the New-York Central to race its locomo
tive against locomotives of other manufacture. The engine "999," he remarked, had
made a Bpeed record of 112^ miles an hour,
.Should any other locomotive equal or excel
that record au opportunity would undoubted
ly be found for "999"to show bow muoh
better she could do.
Lord Lanadowne in Burmah-
Lord Linsdowno, the viceroy of India
bas just been on a visit to Burmah, whose
people gave him au exceedingly warm welcome, in which they referred gratefully to
all that had been done for them,   but their
f;ratitude was not altogether free from that
tvely seuso ot favors to como, of which
gratitud generally is said to be largely
composed. The favors the Burmese ask are,
happily, of a kind which Great Britain
ought to be proud to grant, and they are
likely to be granted. Burmah is at present
ruled by a chief commissioner; its government is in commission, aud is more or less
despotic. The Burmese want their country to
be erected into a province, with a lieutenant
governor, a high court, in which natives
will bo represented, and with a representative in tlie viceroy's legislative council.
The reasons tlm- givo in urging their petition arc good. They point out that since
)8S(i,v,hen Upper Burmah was annexed, the
Commissioner of Burmah rules a country
twice aa largo and a population twico more
numerous, with a doubled internal trade, a
sea-borne commerce increased to sixty mil
lions of rupeos, and a doubled revenue
reaching titty -fivo millions of rupses. Upper Burmah is now as peaceful and almost
as prosperous, and is troubled with, if anything, less brigandage or dacoity than Lower
Burmah Under these circumstances itis
not wonderful if the old administrative
machinery of Burmah has become somewhat
unequal to the task imposed upon it. Lord
Lansdowno was able to promise that the
country would bo made a province, but be
thought some time would havo to bo given
for tnooreotion of the high couit and representation in the legislative council.
THE FROZEN NORTH-
Where Explorer Nnn*en l�� Wintering-
The Latest \>w�� From lhe Travrllrr.
A London despatch says t���The interesting question, ai to where Nansou iB wintering is most probably answered by thc following important communication just at hand.
It may be remembered that he intended to
winter iu the Now Siberian islands, north
of Capo Tstjoljuskiu, tho northernmost
ptomontory of Asia. The arctic skipper,
Hans Johannesson, uf Hammerfest.Norway,
wbo, in I87S-1), simultaneously witb the
Vega's voyage round Asia, commanded the
steamer Lena to the Lena rivor, and who
remained iu East Siberia several years,
states in au interview that old Vakutsks
told him that from thc highest parts of the
northern shores of the New Siberian islands,
which tbey had frequently visited in order
uolioct mammoth tusks, they could in
fine weather distinctly discern a lofty land
to the northwost. The distance is estimated by the Norwegian skipper, from the
statements of these natives, at aliout fifteen
nautical miles. From this lofty land, too,
ilohantiesson luiilod a larjc iceberg, whioh
in IS78 was seen ashore cast of Capo Tstjol-
juskin, a berg which could not have bad its
origin from auy part of tho coast between
tho northernmost capo of Asia and Boliring
strait, nor could it have -onic from the low
Now Siberian islands, Johannosscn was
surprised that there wore currents which
could have carried the berg south, but this
was also almost tho only real jce-berg seen
aloug tho coast of north Asia iu )87H.
Should, therefore, Nansou, he constdcrs,not
steer too close lo the coast, it is probable
that bo might discern this lofty, unknown
land from tho masthead if lho weather was
clear, And shor.'.d tiu state of tho ice be
at all favourable there can bo no doubt but
that he would attempt to reach it this year
and tako up his winter quarters at this
unnamed polar terra nova.
WHAT THE WOftLD EAT3.
Suuic l'urloif- mnl Inl-rrMliiis I Ittarei
Aim-it ihr I'roiiHrin-- antl < ontumlHs
Power oT mn-'rciil Salicm-..
The world's crop of ciauamou is 111,000
tons.
Over 2003 tons of snails are annually eaten in Paris.
France raises aud eats every year 5000
tons of radishes.
Last year the Italians exported 480,000,*
000 dozens of eggs.
Paris killed lost year 11,862 old horses
for roasts and soup.
The world's oat crop every year exceed
15,000,000  tons.
The English eat every year 95,000 tons of
American apples.
The restaurants of Paris sold in 1891
18,000 dozen frogs' legs.
Thu world raises and oats evory year
29,000,000 tons of rye.
The average man ubbs twenty-nine pounds
of sugar per annum. *"
Europeans ev-ry year eat 0,4/0,000 tons
of boef, mutton antl pork.
There are r-0,000,000 bushels of peas
annually eaten in this country.
The grocers'journal estimates the world's
crop of cloves at 5000 tons.
The French raise and consume evory yeir
.T-0,000 bushels of mussels.
The annual value uf the world's cocoanuts
is estimated at $00,1H)0,001>.
One district in Now Vork raises 20,001)
pounds of parsley every year,
The world annually makes and cats
1,94(1,000 tons of butter and cheese.
Lost year London consumed witb more or
ess relish 20,000 tons of fruit.
The almond product of tho world is estimated to be worth $5,000,000.
The value of the cinnamon which annual*
ly goes into preserves is $200,000.
The world puts on its victuals every yea
$,1,000,000 worth of black pepper.
The English use most salt���40 pounds
apiece every year ; the Americans uso ,19.
The American breath is annually scented
with 15,000,000 bushels of onions.
Over 12,000,000 bushels of buckwheat
were last year manufactured into cakes.
Russia raises 1200 pounds of grain and
51 pounds of meat to eaoh inhabitant.
One district in Tennessee exports annually over 10,000 quarts of blackberries.
France and Italy raise 3.-I,���00,000 bushels
of chestnuts for home use and export.
The world's sugar plantations produce
every year 6,000,000 tons of sugar.
Over 600,000 cattle are annually slaughtered to make beef extract for soup.
One county in New Jersey sends to New
York ten car loads of lettuce a day.
A Gorman at home eats an average of 68
pounds of beef and pork per annum.
The American sweet tooth is annually
satisfied with 20,000 tons of maple sugar.
Paris in 1890 perfumed its breath with
6000 tons of onions and 700 tons of garlic.
In Italy last year 10,000 tons of cheese
wero devoured, with 16,000 tons of coffee.
Switzerland sends to France every year
26,000 tons of milk and 13,00.) of cheese.
One firm of oyster packers at Baltimore
claims a capacily of 75,000 caus a day.
The Germans collectively refresh them
selves with 83,000 tons of rice  every year.
There are 2,500,000 pounds of red snappers sent from Flordia to New York every
year.
Canadian hens lay every year 152,000,000
eggs, to be made into omelets and egg-
nog.
In France 67 per cent, of the people live
on rye bread, only S'i per cent, on wheat
bread.
The American people last year drank the
decoction from 610,000,000 pounds of coffee,
The United States aro said to have 140,-
090,000 geese of the kind which aro used
for food.
One district in Florida sends annually to
the New York market 50,000 crates of
fruits.
The world's yeast powder is estimated lo
amount to an annual valuation of $2(1,000,*
TOO.
The walnut trees iu oue section of California furnish the trado with 1,000,000
pounds of nuts.
The consumption of moat in Kurope now
averages 61 pounds per inhabitant per an*
num.
The English are tho greatest grain eaters,
eating nearly evory year $50 worth of grain
each.
It is said that 500 tons of cotton-seed oil
are annually refined and Hold under other
names.
The fruit cakes ot lho world aro dotted
with 56,000 tons of currants, all exported
from Greece.
There are in Florida 600,000 oocoanut
trees, whose fruit is all sent to the New
York Market.
Tho Danes are the champion cheese eaters,
devouring 22 pounds annually to each inhabitant,
Greece, Portugal and Turkey furnish a
part of the world'** dessert by supplylug
15,000 tons of figs.
The Hollanders raise 45,000 tons of beet
sugar and import20,000 tons more to satisfy
their needs.
The wheat product of the world is45,-
000,000 tons, whioh is mostly devoured before lhe next crop.
The world's herring catch every year is
,190,000 tons, which is all consumed beforo
thc next season.
The people of lire \t, Brit tin ara depend
ont on imported Biipplios of fool for ova'
one-third of the year.
The world's pastures every year produco
and the world conmuios l.yi'iii.o')') tons o
beef and mutton.
Proba big that Wasn't Truo.
A certain clergyman in early life had
met with an accident which left him with a
broken nose, u deformity about which in
spite of his piety, he was known to be a
littio sensitive, Ono day a now enquirer
propounded the old question :���"How happened j on to break your nrse*" The minister answered solemnly :���''To tell the
truth my friond, the accident w,is caused
by my poking my uoso into other people's
business."
Getting  Gfijoent Medical Attendance.
As soon as tbe Emperor of China is sick
it is a notification to his physicians that
their salary Is cutoIV till he is perfectly
\vy!l again. The passionate/,cal with which
tlio regulars got his majesty back whero
their salaries will begin again is said to bo
something astounding. Tho result is that
the omqoror is about tho healthiost man
standing on Llui planet, and his physicians
seldom lose a day's salary.
TheOowioan Olao.
The ('nrslcao loves not work, neither ir
he groody for gold ; but ho is ambitious, an
eager politician, keenly desirous of place
and powor, of anything, in short, that may
sat htm above bis fellow-men. Tbo word
-'politician," however, must bo understood
in a local sense. Tho questions that agitato
the Continent have small concern for him;
his politics begin and end wilh the triumph
or aggrandi/.mont of bin clan. Tho chief of
a clan has uo sinooure. He is expected on
all ocasioiiH to exert himself for the interests of bis clients.
If an adherent wishes for a post, it Is tho
duty of tbe chief to obtain it for bim ; if be
has incurred some fine or penalty, the chief
mustiwo his influence to gat It remitted. His
clients, in return (as to public malters) will
obey his lead implicitly. He may be a
republican to day, ho may turn monarchist
to-morrow, but it will mako no dilleronco
in thoir allegiance, nor will be loso a single
follower thereby; it is an understood thing
that what ho has done ho baa done for the
good of tbe clan, and as in former timos
thoy would havo followed him tothe battle,
so they will follow him to lho ballot-box
today.
This spirit oi " clan " first took its rise
during centuries of Abominable inisgovern-
ment, Under the infamous rulo of lho
Genoese, justice was not administered, it
it was sold, For an isolated individual
thoro was no security either for lifo or property ; ho had no chance iu tho battle of
life savo by allying himself to some power-
ful family that could matte his interests
respected. The moro numerous the clan,
tho more ils Influence would Im felt; thoro-
fore tho Corsican glorins in tho number of
h|l cousins tt he would in tho strength of
his right arm.
Tha angols sing Irs in.in ��� above,
Aud crown lit* > name with  deathless
glory,
Who, list'nlng all the ov'niug through,
Is not reminded of a story. |
A SHIP'S 6HAVEYAED.
The Last of tbe Swedish Arotio Expedition-
Where BJorlliii* and His �� omitunloas Met
Thi-lr Palc-Ulere-allns UueameaU IH***
revered la a Calra an Carey I* la nil.
Oo the 17th of June, 1993, Captain McKay, of the SS. "Aurora," visited Carey
Island for the purpose of finding traces, or
tidiugs, of the Swedish party. On approaching the island Captain McKay (who wu in
the crow's nesl) discovered a small schooner lying ashore. He despatched search
parties to the island. The schooner (a
small "fore and after ") was found partially
buried in the ice. She was lying heeled
over very much to the starboard, and with
ber stern landward. Some manuscript
notes on natural history���portions of scientific books, etc.���were picked up, and subsequently brought on board the "Aurora,"
and delivered to Captain McKay, The dead
body of a man some .'12 or 3>'l years of age,
was found s short distance oil, on a stony,
elevated region behind the vessel. The
dead man was carefully covered over with
stones, but no mark or inscription waa observed, Tho stones were not removed from
the body whito I waB present, but there
were indications that the decoaNod waa
clothed. A stone' was stuck up at his bead
hy visitors from the "Aurora'' and a red
handkerchief wan tied to it to serve a* a
guide to subsequent visitors. In the meantime papers bad been discovered at the cairn
and these, together with the articles previously mentioned as having been picked up
at the vessel, wero duly delivered to Captain McKay in accordance with the wish expressed in Mr, Bjorling's letter addressed,
"To tho visitors of S.E. Carey Island, 18D.V'
Captain McKay steered for Clarence Head
with the intention of trying to loam something further regarding the fate of the
party. But on the 10th of June, when
within about thirty mites of Clarence Head,
ice was encountered, which tendered a
close approach to the land impossible, and
Captain McKay, was, to his great regret,
compelled tu turn back,
TIIK IlKi-'iVKKKI) DoiT.ilKSTS.
The following notes have been copied
from visiting cards bearing the name .1. A.
Bjorliog, Fil Stud, Stockholm. These cards
and a letter were found in the cairn on
Carey Island.
'6
WHERE TI1EY KOl'SD MUIR ARTIC GRAVE.
Written in ink: " Visited S. E. Carey
Island, Kith August, 1802. I left Oodhavn
on the second in this month, and sailed
along tho ieo in Baffin Bay to the ihirlcctb,
when I, on only one day, sailed over Mel*
villa Bay lo Cape York. Au easterly hurricane near that place drove me to the west,
and I was at noon near Cap Parry, from
which point I sailed over to Carey Islands
in order to supply me with some provisions
from the English station."
Another written in pencil :���- "17-8. Aftor
having taken on board the provisions from
Nares' depot, the achooner " Ripple" went
on shore on tbo South sido of the island,
where you will find us in a small tent, A
new report will be left hero bofore we leave
tbo island. 17th August,  1802."
The third card written iu pencil:���"After
having lost tho ship, thus obliged to winter
over, I left this island on the20th of August
for Foulke Fjord. If I thenco should be
compelled to go to another place, further
notice will be laid down in cairn at Pandora
Harbor. Together with tho provisions from
Nares' depot here, I hope to havo food
enough to help mo and my four companions
until June month, 1803."
IUORLIKQ's   LAST MFHSACK.
Tho following is a copy of tho letter:
" To the Viaitors of S. E. Cary Island,
1803. As you of my notices here, I have
alter the loss of my vessel tried to reach
Foulken Fjord in order to winter over
there ; but after reaching Northumberland
Island I must ot several causes give lip this
voyage and return to Cary Island.
"Compelled by bid weather to be a
longer time on this island, I start now for
the Eskimo at Clarence Head or Cap Faraday on Ellesm-ji'o Laud. As I hopo that a
whaler will visit Cary Islands next summer
in order to rescue me and my party, I will
attempt to reach this island before the 1st
of July, Should nono be here to the 15th
of July. I must if possible, go to the
Danish settlements, therefore,if you visited
this island later than Ist of duly, and
found no notice from me concerning my
voyage to the Danish settlements I should
be very much obliged if you would go to
Clarence Head (fifty miles herefrom),
where I, in a cairn on the most eastern
point, shall leave a notice concerning my
and my party's fates during the winter.
At last I will beg you to aend all notices
Irom me to Professor Baron A. E. Nordon-
skield, Stockholm, Swoden.or lo thc nearest
Swedish consul, with statement of time and
place where they were found. Our provisions wiil, if 1 cannot reach the Esquimos,
not last longer than to tho Ist of January,
without supplying from any depot. Party
now consisting of five men, of which one is
dying.���S. K, Cary Island, 12th of October,
IHD2. (Signed,) I, A. llJORMMtl, Swedish
Naturalist.
Not hli Fault-
11 This is tbo third limn you have soiled
your waistcoat and torn your trousers,
Osgoodsou," said his mother, putting bim
acroK*- her kucc, " and I shall have to pun-
Uh you,"
" 1 protest aguinst such treatment,"
responded the juvenile Bostonian with as
much dignity ih he could demand undor the
circumstances,    " Tho abnormal-������"
Whack !
" Development of the organs of "
Whack !
"Desiructivencsa does not arise, aa you
can ascertain by "
Whack I
Consulting lhe authorities, from a deliberate purpose to "
Whack !
" Do evil, but solely from "
Whack !   Whack !
" Heredity. Ouch I Murder I Croat
Soott! Stop, darn it, stop ! That's
enough I"
A fair Bargain- indeed-
A Scotch minister is said to have rebuked
bis wife for sleeping during his sermon in
this fashion: "Susan," ho exclaimed from
tho pulpit, in a voice thnt wakened ber, as
it did all the olher sleepers���" Susan, I
didtia marry yo for yer wealth, sin ye had
none And I didna marry yo for yer
beauty���that the whole congregation oau
see. And if yc hae na grace, I hae madu a
sail* bargain iu ye, Indeed,'
An Hotel Incident.
Any letters for me to-day 1" asked the
professional chair-boarder as he briskly
walked up to tho desk at tho Rotsln house,
Toronlo.
" What is your room, sir T" returned lho
olerk without raising his head.
" Tho reading room," replied the professional chair-boarder, Willi Asperity, as l.o
moved towards thu fire. I>)it he still patronizes the house. UNnAVRT-T-lNfl  4   MYSTERY !��f th0 bribe *��������   *����������������*. and not tbo
unnatCLbirtL a  m i ai r.ui ��� *qiurterHlmr0t0wWohbawoui(iotherwise,
  ! hy the custom of the gang, havo been entit-
. : led, provided thit be might be allowed to
A Singalar Murder Oase m India-       [denounce a private enemy of his own, as
, I well as tho throe persons indicated by the
I merchant,    After some   demur   this   was
II..-**    the   roll-SB IBM   TfceiiMOlve-  lo  a  agree(i tc, and the wounded man according-
r,,ii-,plr��i->. j |v   |Aj,i   hjj  information as against   four
A singular murder plot was recently un- j instead of
ravelled at Surat, in India.    At one of the i
TURKS assassin-*.
gates of the city (once a rival to Bombay),. fi       fa     ft    fa were arrMled jn
s came up, bring* |
irlV Ml
Hindoo   whom thuy  had
iduk night, two
inu with then ih^ nei
r,     , -     '��� lint when the three mon  were arrestea in
r-arsiscaniL-up onng-|Boml)ay  fto   -.lt-rnat-0[1  wai given   tothe
-Mii ���!-i. ���-.--i�� mijyo  | t*ourth man, the special objeetof the wounded
,[���:?'   man's jealousy, that trouble was   in store
' for him unless he renounced all claim to a
id
wounded   and bleeding,   on
���boat . mil* iron, lhe R.to.   The ,,TiMm-r, I Z'ruii!Hy."^^^^ hi. wlh,'
or. duty took lh. wounded nun nr.a tho, J ,       wounded at
Pa,,.!, tr, the Foujd.r, orohlel native polio. ; * V n        '   *
tho elty, to whom, when   ho had , ��� y ���������������,���,����
I   a little strength,   ho   told his :     ' ,'���',,
offiser, of
reoovore.l a little .trength,   ne  ���.. .,�� i ,   anquMlionta8 r0adino,a with whioh tho
.lory.   He-.id be tya. a neroh-nt at 11, ra- | i , ��   ,      thetmelve. to tho
jay, aud that bo had .tutted that morning, \mrpMe, 0, ,,,��� ������, t0 putvayi���f .���,.
idonco for thom. It would be
i th** sense of
���it bout abhor
biy, and that no nan Btartea wm luonum* (��� ,
l,y\rai��� fromI Hominy    . 1th fl.e h^|JSS��'i*��      1.
toee, In oa.h, to make .on,. pniehMea a , 1 fUmt JO      , h,
fair n Kattlawar, whioh ho intended   o,    W     , ^11,d vi,w wi���
�����oh hy the ferry from a .point about 18 ,   * ,i���,.,.Sl. . ������������i,�����.
re'Oh hy tho ferry
miles north ol Snr.it.
.     , .  : ronoo so detestable a Jonspiraoy ; but here
"' "'" ,"rr""*�����'": W1, hnvo the pailiflilsneotaolcof oxnoriencod
bin, were four person, whom no know hj ,    ��� ', ,      ���',���, ,���.��������, ���.rvic0,
eight, althouoh he was .mt otl.onr.-o ������ . J����� pM ���,���, ^j,*,^ ���,���' {������ 00���8c|enM
of lheir ICui-op--ri.il suporiora, lending themselves for a miserable bribe to a scheme of
dark crime,coming forward as witnesses,and
urging (others   to do the same, misleading
i-uaintod will tliein.    hi the course of con
venation it appoarod that theso p-rsons
were also to leave ihe train at Surat, and
fiat,   their   destination   was   in the same
dlroctlon as Ins. They offered to MMmpMJ ���    -   iVporiori, and allowing threo innocent
him as far as tllfl furry, I" whleh they said | ,,. \iit .��� .* ��� , .,,,*��� ha    -,..,;���
they knew a short road, tl&dadvised liim to
stay with thom, at a rospootablo lodging
men to lio in jail for many months, Thii
case has exposed some dark and gloomy
corners of native life and society in India,
,     ** ,       ���      .. ,. ,   ,. ,      -.,        comiTi oi nailVO llie aim   *-<ii:,iii,y    in   iimn-,
house near the nation, Ull the oool ottlio,    , ���   trM bul ���,���,   Mm ���, tll���
evening, when they wood .tar  '08���"-1 ovl|, to be eradloated and of the tools we
l'ERSOIIAL.
SuapectltiB nothing, and trailing to the , .     ...
rospeetahilily of his friends,   who Were got  l'"v'"*' """   ,ul"
lip in the proper style  of Hindoo   traders,
the poor iimii felt into the trap,  and no
sooner had   they olearod the. olty o,alo on
their way to tlio ferry than the pretended ,|.jie fjalioh of liampur, ono of the Indian
merchants set on him,demanded hi. money, ' ]lrjllc<)B> haa boon in llorlin recently. He
ami one of them struck linn with a knife III I WM r0OB|v0(l with great dialiliolion and on
tho cheat, inllieting I turtuisiiMl by the highest peoplo in the city.
, TRItlttm.R WOUND, He was   invited to viait   Weimar   hy tin
Grand Duko and cheerfully aeceptod tho
from the offoot of whiih he sank BeiisoleBB, t jnv|(at|on. Ho showed great interest In thc
���nd was brought In, rohhod and ��'��*n!ng, I 0j,i town and vlaitod the homos of (lootho
hy lho lirst pa����or>.by. 0Illl Schiller a uumbor ol timca.
This i.a�� his story ae lold to the olty ,   ���     , ,     , (
Foujdar, who o,t no lime In Informing he , , &||6*     ,d ,10t fMn fanoiB��, ,���
.upermtoml.,,,    o    police, ���,d    en     the tmaflnativo moment thnt more
wounded man to the hospital. The neigh- U' m �� , , g,rlhood'�� namo
bourhood was aeo .red hy mounted police ,,   v; ���   ��,
during the night, but no trace of the rob. ; *        R d ��� .��    ho f
hers   was     0. nd,   and    it   ,.,     ov.lont: , aont   hw   ^^
that thoy bad not gjM o   towards the]       ,,, over th8 ,0M from England to aid In
orry.   News was  out   o lt,m ay, whore jn      sho cast hor bread
the  police   were more a. ecosalul,  and on ,      , d       fc
th. imiioatio��given by tie wounded man, ��� , ���,���������,,,���,,
three out of tho four criminals woro arrest- I'" .' ��� .. ���. ,, .���, ���, ,l. S'_' i
ed and brought to .Sural, where they wero ""��� A&*���*> t,,c��*"JJ** ltht*?a���1
confronted with their victim, and af dbbo ���*�������*��� lfl TB ? ! LT�� .Zf
identified, and kept in close arrest, not* *=h��W��tag -*n-> ���K����l>��� oho.ee o a name.
Withstanding lheir protestations that they Princess Syblllft of Hesse-Oawel, futuro
had not left   Huiu'my. and knew nothing ! Kmpress of Russia; is nowa slender, grace-
ofthe complainant,!!!*! wounds or his money,
In the cotir.*'* of thico weeks tho wound
was sullicietitly healed io admit of his appearing before the magistrate, whon a inas-j
of evidence wai forthcoming to confirm his
statements, Tho keeper of tho lodging-
houso was a friend of his, the policeman at
tho gate hy which they left Surat, potter
at work near tho roadside, a labourer returning from the fields, all c uitrihuteil
evidence of llie moit convincing nature,
and the three culprits   wore duly commit-
t*i.l    In   t-tlr..   f lulls-   Ir!.,]     ill-    ll,,,    t V I ,,| i,,   , 1    Sls.J.
ful little girl of sixtocn, with Urge,dcepcyes
and floating hair. The Czarewitch is nine
years older than his betrothed, The I'rin-
cosss' younger brother is married to the
Kmperor William's youngest sister ; and, ns
sho is a niece of the (Jueeti of Denmark,
tho young Syhilla is the cousin of tho Princess of Wales, This pretty girl is nol only
protty, she has intellectual tastes and uncommon talent in music. She has not yot
entered society, and has lived a very ijuict
country life with her mother, the widowed
ted to take their trial at lho Criminal Sea- j Landgravine of Hesso-Casscl.
sions. When tho late Lucy Stone started to Ieo*
There an: two ways of trying sessions \ ture on equal laws Bhe had no co-operation
cases in India, lu some districts, where . and ul> backing, and started out absolutely
educated natives aro numerous, cases are j alone. So far as she know there were only
tried I y a jury, whose decision is linal as to ' a few persons in the wholo country who
iho gilt or inoouonoa ol the accused. In ] had any sympathy with the idea of equal
other districts the judge is assisted by threo J rights. She put up the posters for her own
assessors, who are selected by lot from a j meetings with a little package of taoks and
list of tlie respectable inhabitants, and who a stono picked up from the street. Some*
deliver their opinion at tlio olose ofa trial J times the boys followed her hooting and
as to the guilt of the accused. The judge is preparing to tear the posters down. Then
nol, however, bound hy the opinion of the . Hhe would stop and call the boys about hor
u-it-ssora, but after receiving it ho delivers [mid hold a preliminary meeting in the
his own judgment: and if he finds ��� utreot, until alio had won thom all over and
persuaded them to let her posters alone,
"The dream of three snore yoars and ten
has come true,'' said Dr. Robert Oollyer at
a celebration of his seventieth birthday,
"and during all that time I have nover boen
absent from my pulpit on a single Sunday
from sickness, and 1 have nover been sick
iu bed ono day in my life, I would not exchange my lot with any human creature I
know. Nor would 1 havo chosen any othor
seventy years for my life, None of the
great erasofthe past would I havo exchanged for this present one. There is none so
beautiful in the way of great accomplish,
ment. I am glad to look back on all ihese
years; gad that I waB horn in the good
mother land, Kngland, and glad that I'was
born again in this beautiful America,''
Till*. ACCUSED ("UII.TV
he passes sentence according to law. In
the vase in point, tho assessors, notwithstanding the convincing evideuco for the
pro-iecutiou, and tho hroakdowu of the
alibi set up by one at least of tho accused,
unanimously declared that the accused
woro not guilty. Ou tho judge fell the onus
ofa decision. With a sagactly that does
him credit, au Lhe se<-uel will show, tho
judge stated in his finding that the evidence
was too good for him, that every link in
the chain was so thoroughly completed as
to fill him with suspicion, which the wound
antl the wound alone, was able to remove.
He could not get over the patent fact of
this wound, the severity of which was so
great that a Kuropean olliacr, not unaccustomed to such scenes, fainted at the sight
of it. The accused were, therefore, convicted and sentenced to imprisonment for a
term of years, and duly incarcerated in
Surat gaol, whore wo will leave them for a
time.
jn the spring of 1S7- some prisoners woro
being tried before a judge of the High
Court at Bombay for a oonaplraay, when
certain revelations woro made hy au approver which led to the judge addressing
the Government of Ifoinbay, and orders
were issuod for a thorough mr-uiry inio the
ease tried at Sural some months before,
Theae in'-uirios wore made, and resulted in
tho threo supposed critniua's boing set at
liberty,and a number of persons boing tried
tor a detestable conspiracy. It was proved
at the trial that the man who was
WorviiKD 00T81DB THK 0ATB8
of Surat belonged to a gang who wore in
the habit of lotting nut their services to
gratify the vengoauco or tho hate of any
individuals rich enough to hire them. Til's
was effected not in employing the stilotto
nf the assaBsin or the match of tho incendiary, hut by misdirecting the course nl Brit*
iih law and liritish justice, and making it
an awful instrument of wrong and injury.
The four men who travelled with the
wounded victim were fellow-members with
him of lhe same gang, hut dressed in lho
costume of those who wero to he implicated
in the protended crime, Tho party loft
Surat after dusk, and when they reached
a lonely place one ot thom submiitod to bo
wounded in such a maimer as to produce a
terrible gaah and a great How of blood,
without fatal coiiBctpicnces or permanent
injury. The others thou mado tho bust of
thoir way hack to tho railway station, and
thence to Itomhay. And some of the gang
returned iu a fow days l, Sural wilh a sum
of money, hy means of which the necessary
witnesses, including at least two policemen
were suborned and prepared for the trial of
th* Innocent victims whom the wounded
accomplice had denounced.
It appeared that tho man who allowed
himself to he wounded had diod of fnvo
somo time before tho discovery of his guilt
and one or two others of tho conspirators
had absconded and avoided arrest; hut with
these few exceptions, all thc uctors
IN THIS Tlt.MlKliV
against whom the charges of conspiracy or
perjury could be brought with reasonable
hopo of success, were committed for trial
before the High Court at, llomhay, and it is
satisfactory to know that all who were so
committed have boen convicted by a jury
and sentenced to seven years' imprisonment.
Native society in Itomhay was thus freed
from a dreadful scourge, as the gang was
proved to have undertaken at least three
other enterprises similar to the Sural one
and there was reason to suspect their con
miction with even a greater number of
c��<es.
The trial elicited Bomo curious facts
Tlio person at whoso instigation tho Surat
oase wab got up waa a wealthy Hindoo
merchant trading in Homhay, who had
Home spito against the throe men who woro
imprisoned on fal-io evidence. He scams
to havo known of the existence of the gang,
and to have found no dilliculty in placing
himself in communication with the m, und
for two thousand rupooa paid down the
chiefs of tho gang undcrlook to carry out
his wishus, When it came to settling
which of the gang was lo be wounded, one
of them offered to undertake this disagree- I
able role, receiving only  the samu  share,
Amusementa in the Aonse or Ooiumoan-
(James of overy kind, with one exception
only, aro cither rigidly nr passively for-
hidden in the liritish House of Commons.
This exception in the way of games is chess,
which somehow or other has worked its
way into a sort of passive toleration, owing
probably to the silence which, as a rule, is
observed hy all lovers of chess when engaged
on thoir favorite game. The theory of the
Legislature is legislation, and that every.
ono who enters Parliament is supposed to
havo only one object at heart���work. So
the lighter forms of amusement have never
entered the Houso of Commons life of the
.Member of Parliament, An attempt win
made somo lime sinco to havo a billiard
table set up in ono of the spare rooms at
St. Stephen's, but tho project was ruthless*
ly crushed by Mr. Speaker. Card playing,
even in the form of whist at threepenny
points, is strongly forbidden under serious
penalties supposed to exist in the plenary
power of tho Speaker, There is a reading-
room whero a certain number of newspapers
are prodded, subject to the approval of the
Serjeant-at-Arms, who in this, as in more
serious matters, exorcises a sovereign censorship. There is also a library of dry
reading matter, which does not contain,
il;c the French Legislature's library, all tho
latest novels. In tlio way of refreshments
the members are able to amuse themselves
hy entertaining frionds or constituents
uilher iu tho tea-room ovor mcaure and
sober fare, or in the dining-rooms on something moro Buh-Uautiat, with liquors to each
one's taste. Of lute, the presence of ladies
on tho terraco on tlie lino summer evenings
has proved one of the chief forms ��f enjoyment chosen by weary momhor-i to lighten
tho prcNSino of tho everlasting drcue of tho
proiy ones upstairs.
Tlio Right People.
Wilson: "Tho reason those Arctic expeditions fail is because they don't take the
right kind of mon."
Watson .    " Whom would you  take?"
" Telegraph opnratars, of course.1'
*'And why thom 1"
" Because they can got from polo to pidc
in a jiffy.''
Of Course Not-
"Who is ho?" sail a pa-isor-hy to a
policeman who wai endeavouring to raise an
fntoxicatod person.
" Can't say, sir," replied tho policeman ;
can't give an account of himself,"
" Of course not,1' said the other ; "how
can you expect an account from a man win
has lost his balance?"
A Week-of Well-Doing.
Sunday School Teacher: "I told yon
last Sunday that I wished each of you
would try to make at least ono person
happy during the week.    Did you V
Hoy : " Yes'in, I made grandma happy,"
" That is noble. How did you do
it ?"
" I went to visit her, and she's always
happy wen she sees I've got a good appetite."
Tho cost of au Armstrong steel gun is
intimated at$AOO for each ion of weight;
of n Krupp gun, ��'ii)ii; of a VVhllwortli gun,
���51)23,
A CANADIAN LEADVILL&
hii-.li*. tin* itiiomiiii! Metropolis t>r lhe
Koolcii.il Kc-iloii.
The opening of navigation on the Koote-
nai River Irom Bonner's Ferry, in Northern Idaho, to the southern end ot Kootenai
Lake, says a eorrAsponJent of the St. Louis '
tilok'Dtmoemt, brings within easy audi
comfortable travel a region which contains ]
probably the most important deposit of
liii'h grade silver-besriugores thai has been
opened up in the pasl tweuty years on tho
North Ameriuan Coutinent. This is what
__ known as the Kaslo Slocan district, situated in the lower end of the Selkirk Mountains, in lhe Province of British Columbia,
about 100 miles due north of the international boundary line and aliout au equal
balance south of Roger's Pass.
This new KI Dorado is at present almost
inaccessible from the north, lhe distance
lying for the most part through an unexplored wildernessof lofty mountains, deep
canyons and dense forests. From the south
tho caso is entirely different, Tho traveler
from the cast, reaching St. Paul hy any
routo ho may choose, has only lo slop into
a Great Northern sleeping coach, and in a
trillo over fifty hours is landed at Bonner's
Kerry, where he is promptly transferred
to a stateroom on a stoatner lying at her
���lock on tho Kootenai River- The steamer
is now and fast, built exprossly for this
trallic, with a spaed of twenty miles an
hour. If ho cares more for scenery than
for sleep the tourist will limit his nap to
two or throe hours, and then go on deck at
daylight aud enjoy tho picturesque route
followed by the deep, broad rivor as it
threads its way northward between two
mountain ranges, wilh au intervening
valh-y four or livo miles iu width. This
vulloy is crossed and rucrosiod fourtini's
in the run of seventy-live miles to Kootenai
Lake, the river preferring for the most part
to hug the base of tho mountains on ei<I,
aide.
Breakfast time or thereabouts finds tho
steamer entering into Kootenai Lake, a superb body of crystal water, about ninety
miles in length, from one to fivo miles in
width, and of unknown depth. It.-- shores
on both sides are the abrupt slope of monii
tains 4000 to 7000 feet high, while in the
distance are to bo scon the loftier peaks of
the Southern Selkirk:*. In all the
miles of shore lino there ate not more than
a dozen level spots suitable for town sites.
On her way northward the steamer
touches at a fow small settlements established with reference to mining and lunibor
industries. Among these is Pilot Bay,
where a large smelling plant '.'������ in course ot
construction, and Ainsworth, the county
seat and location of the only jail in all that
vast region.
TIIK NEW   LBADVU.LIS.
Beforo noon you aro at your journey's
end, tho new und thoroughly unique town
of Kaslo, the metropolis of tho Kaslo-Slocan
district, occupying a pretty and picturesque
���site ou ihe shore of a email bay on tho
western sido of Kootenai Lake. Kaslo con
tains about 200 buildings, alt of Diem frame
structures finished in natural piuo insid
and out. There may bo threo or four with
painted cxleriors, but not more. Kalso
contains perhaps 1000 people, 03 per cent,
of tliein males. It is a serious and actual
fact that iu respect of Eccurity of property and life this raw and un*
painted mining camp is almost ideal. Crimes
or ollenscs involving physical violence are
virtually unknown, and tlioro is no such
thing as robbery or larcency. During my
ten days' stay at Kaslo I did not onco see a
weapon of uny kind displayed, nor hear of
a street or saloon altercation. My vest
with watch and pocktt-book, bung on u
chair hy my l*ed,and except for thc rosiibil-
ity that some belated lodger might dis'tiri:
me by entering tho room by mistake, I
should not havo taken tbe precaution of
turning thc key in thc lock. This, too.
among a population toaconsiderablooxtent
inn de up ol the olf.scourings ofthe recent
riotous clement m the Idaho mines.
IlKSl'I'CTKD LAWS,
A curious example ot the self-restraint
practised by a class of men among whom
the fist, the knifo and the revolver is the
customary argument um and Imminent occurred onc night as I passed through the
bar-room of tho Palace Hotel and called fo
my key. Two minors, perfectly matched
in their brawny proportions, had casually
met and were rehearsing nn old-time grievance ; a bitter grievance it was too, judging
from tho intense malignity of look and
speech as thoy confronted each other. 1
waited to see the outcome, fully expecting
n bloody onc. -Just at a point in the dispute
when it seemed as though the two men must
spring at each other's throats ina dcalh
itruggle, each paused and drew back
stop,
" Bill," said one, in a voice of suppressed
excitement. " you know d���d well I air'
afraid of you, and I know d���d well y
ain't airaid of mo, hut we can t t-->ti|o this
thing hero. You know what we'll get if
we do.    Some other timo."
Without another word the enemies turned and separated. What was it that kept
theso fierce follows apart ? Simply the absolute certainty that a fist fight meant sixty
lays iu jail tor both of thom ; the show ot
a weapon, six months ; the uso of a weapon
from ono year to n life's sculcnce, or possibly hanging, aud with it the certainty that
trial and conviction would follow Inside of
twelve hours, aud thai tho sentence would
be executed without a particle of delay. No
chance for lawyers to interpose a technical
defence ; no straw bail ; no appeal, supersedeas, or arrest of judgment, Tlm jurisdiction of the local magistrate in crimes of violence or theft is final and conclusive, aud
the execution of tho lav/ js swift, stern and
inexorable, That ia why Kaslo is a veritable Arcadia as regards tho safety of life
and properly. If tho United States is not
yet ready to absorb tho territory of its
nurt hern neighbors, it might do worso than
to immediately annex somo of the British
Columbia laws aud methods of enforcement.
Tho compulsory repression of fierce impulses hai an admirable effect. It promote*,
a crude sort of politeness, and at tho same
time tends to lilieralir'.espeechaiid action, to
cultivate a spirit of toleration, ond to enlarge
the latitude of verbal give-and-take. When
a fellow is resolutely determined to keep
outof trouhlo he will stand a groat deal of
dialling. Wilh it all is developed a freedom
of speech and a rough, off hand humor that
is a bit startling lo unaccustomed ears,
Thoro isn't much culture among tbo broad-
chested ohar.s who work underground and
handle a gun-powder candlo with as littio
concern iih they would a tallow dip, but
th'-ro is a deal of manliness and good sense.
Spinning yarns in their hours of rost and
relaxation is a passion witli them, hut woo
botido the tintucv narrator who springs'a
chestnut or fails to bring his story to an
effective period.
Defining tho Word lvera*e.
Not long sinco a New Hampshire com-
nii'teeman was examining an infant-school
lass.
"Can any littio girl or hoy give tho definition of lhe word average?" ho asked.
For some time no one replied, but finally
a little girl hesitatingly answered:
"It's a thing a hen lays an egg on, air.'"
"Not that's not right."
"Vos, sir; my book says so,"
Anil she trotted up lo her questioner, and
pointed to this sentence in her reading hook
"A hen luya an egg ovory day on an
average."
Perhaps-
Ho. "My angel, there is ono thing I
have to tell you. When wo are married]
must have my mother to livo with us, because 1 can't afford to keep two establishments going. Von will find her vory helpful. She is always sewing and knitting and
mondinc. I do hopo, my darling, ynu will
not object. '
Sho: "No. indeed; I'll just ho delighted
to have her help; and now if we can only
persuade my mother to conic and do house-,
work, we'll ho really comfortable.,"
SOIENOE AlUHNMISm.
According to statements made in tho .
Southern journals, the extensive introduction of the Talbot open-hearth basic steel i
process in that sec t ion scorns quite probable.'
This process eliminates most of the silicon
by pouring the molted iron through basic
i-tug, which is low in silicon and high in
lime and oxide of iron. The silicon which
has been reduced in the smelting furnace
along with tho iron, apparently takes up
oxygeu from thc oxide of iron in the slag,
staving in the sla-f, and the latter also
takes up some uf the phosphorus and a'
little of the sulphur, while at the same time
thc deoxidized iron of the slag is added to
the charge, su that there is a gain of iron
instead of a loss as by first blowing the
charge in a Bessemer converter. This deail-
iconized metal is then ready for treatment
in an ordinary basic open-hearth furnace in
the ordinary manner, and Ihe savings thus
effected over the old basic open-hearih process aro aaid to he some fourfold. Further,
by this method the cheapest iron���gray
forge���can he used, and, as there is no
necessity for the use of scrap when desil-
ieoui/.cd metal is used, and the latter can
bu put into the open-hearth furnace hot, a
largo percentage of the time required to
molt a cold charge is saved. If the basic
stag does not contain iron, il iB enriched by
adding the necessary amount uf brown
hematite ore, The roBiilliug steel is reported to he of excellent quality.
One ot the most offoclivo methods for
preventing white ollbresccncc oil brick
walls, when cuised by Hme, is, says
Thouindiistrio Xeituug, that of dipping the
bricks boforo burning iutodiluto acid. For
this purpose the strength of the acid is to bo
determined by the amount of lime present
in I In* clay, tho greater amount of clay the
more dilute tho acid. Thus for ordinary
clay a solution a composed of forty quarts
of "water lo one of hydrochloric acid
is found specially adapted to tho purpose,
ami is sullicient for dipping boiuo .".OU bricks,
and then the solution is to bo reiiotted.
Having hceu thua dipped and thoroughly
dried iu the sun tho brioks aro to he dipped
and dried again just before burning. The
additional cost of this treatment jb very
slight.
A serious objection to the Bystom of
silent machinery running, as proposed
recently by an Austrian manufacturer,
consists, as mentioned, in tho oonsidorablc
additional expense which tbe plan involves.
The article, which is claimed to realize tbe
desideratum in question, cnusistB of c.ig
wheels made of pressed rawhide, which aro
intended to work in conjunction with
wheels of cast-iron, steel, and other metals.
Tho wheels made of this material are found
to possess not only grca*. strength, but, as
they require no lubricating, are very clean
in operation, and, il is c'aimed, substantially reduce the- vjl-raliou of the machinery
in which they are used. They nro supplied
ready made, or in the form of rawhide
disks, to he shaped as may be necessary
for tho use intended. Tliese hide pieces, it
in further slated, have to be supported hy
a wooden framework, and, after cutting,
tbj wheel is covered with a shellac solution.
Might Have Been Worce
A Liverpool mi.kman was going down
tho street one afternoon during the  recent
frosty weather, when ho saw the inspector
coming, a-id somehow or other slipped and
tipped the can over, spilling all the milk
just as the inspector came up.
" Bad job, sir," said the milkman,
" Ves," said tho  inspector, meaningly,
������ lut it might have been worse.'
CANADA AHEAD IN fJ8H-
Tbe Beit Exhibit nt Ihe World's Fair.
An Ottawa special says :���Information
has been received at the Department of
Marino and Fisheries that three awards
have been granted to the department for
its exhibits at the World's Fair, the jurors
pronouncing the Canadian Government's
fishery exhibit the best in the entire building. Mr, J. W. Collins, chief of the dc-
partni'.-nt offish and fisheries at the Chicago
Exhibition, has written Mr. Larke, the
C tnadian commissioner, at the close of their
official intercourse, expressing his hearty
appreciation of the part taken by Canada
in making the fisheries department at the
Fair successful. He continues: "lam
sure lhat the great collection sent here by
your country, and so fittingly installed,
must result materially to the advantage of
those of your citizen*- who are engaged in
commercial fishing, fish culture, or otherwise interested in fish or fisheries. In no
other direction, perhaps, has Canada oo*
casino for greater pride than sbo can feel
in connection with tho representations
made of her fishing interests,''
A Quionly Head
can never rost on a body frail from disease
any moru than tho lovely lily can grnw in
the sterile soil. When Consumption fastens
ils hold upon a victim, the wholo physical
structure cominonces it* decay, At inch a
period, boforo tho diseitso is too far advanced, 1>r. Pieie-'s Co'don Medical Discovery
uill arrest and cure it. So certain is this,
that an offer is made to refund thu monoy
paid for it whon a failure can ho found under
the condition of a fair trial.
Onco used, Dr.lVrco's Pellets are always
in lavor. Specific tor constipation, pllei,
biliousness, and headache.
A Celebrated Commercial and Shorthaud
College-
For nearly thirty yoars in commeroial
circles the name of the liritish American
Business College of Toronto has beon associated with high-class training and thoroughness in tho men and woman they turn
out A3 assistants and principals in tho different branches of commercial life ; and to-day
among the successful men of the Dominion,
in thc various branches of our commercial
industries, their graduates can lie counted
by the thousands, When in Toronto recently wo had the pleasure of visiting their
magnificent premises in tho Confederation
Life lluilding, which occupies tho whole of
t he fotirt h floor in the western section of tho
building, comprising lhe most magnificent
suite of rooms over devoted to tho purposes
of business and shorthand education in
Canada.
Thcportion occupied by thc College fronts
on Vongo and Richmond Sts,,and comprises
an area of about (I50O square foet which has
been divided into six magnificent rooms
openiii** from spacious and imposing corridors. These arebeautifullylighted, and ventilated hy air exhaust taps driven by
electricity, supplying hot air in winter and
culd air iu summer, besides constantly
drawing off the vitiated air. The building
heated with steam and lighted by both
electric light and gas whilst tho lavatories
aro perfectly arranged rooms floored and
fitted up in whito marble.
There are four large electrio elevators of
the most recent and improved make, one
of which is for the special use of tho pupils
unit patrons of tho college. Kvorything to
insure lhe health, comfort and convenience
of the students has been carefully planned
and arranged and every room has been
filled up in a style superior to anything of
its kind in Canada,
Iu the front part of the building facing
Vongo St., is a room in itself as targe us
that occupied by tho average college, is
situated the commercial department, iu
here is "taught what formerly constituted
tho entiro curriculum of a commercial
school. Leading from this department is a
spscial drill room for commercial and cash
book work, whore clusse* of about twenty
at a timo are put through a special drill on
lheir work. Out of this room we go into
lho typewriting department ; this is the
oom where scholars d> legal ami commor-
���inl typewriting from their own notes,
which is revised by the head teacher in this
���ranch of study.
Opposite this room accross tho corr-dor
s the stenography department; this is a
���cry important branch of a commercial
education and is presided over by a very
ellicieut and painstaking teauhtr. This is
also a very lurgo and well arranged room
wilh all tho aids in it which a truly modern
school oould obtain,
Mr. Connor O'Dea has beon connected
with this cnllego for over thirty years and
is woll known throughout Canada and tho
United States as ouo of the greatest experts
peumnnship on tho continent, and
thousand*- of young men attribute much of
thoir success in business to the proficiency
thoy attained in this respect while at tho
liritish American College. Mr. David
Hoakins haa been on the staff of the
British American college since 1HH2, during
which time ho has had charge of the junior
commercial department, and has superintended tho wort-tot tho shorthand and typo-
writing departments. Tho Toronto Mail,
which in its issuo of April 2'2nd ot this year
published his portrait, speaks of him as
follows: "Mr. Hopkins is a thoroughly
trained accountant, a first class penman,
a skillful fihorthander, and Is conceded to
ho onoof thoauloit all round commercial
teachers iu tho profession.
This old and reliable institution niim-
Iters among its former pupils such men os
W, 1). Muthowt', ox-president of Toronto
Board of Trade ; R, T. Coady, Toronto City
Treasurer-: Kmcrson Coatsworlh, Chester
and K. H. Massey, G, W, Kicly, Hugh
Blain, S. B. Beak, manager London Street
Railway; and hundreds of promiuont and
successful business men throughout the
Dominion.
Wo were informed by Mr. O'Dea that
lhey were completing a vory successful fall
term, havingaii exceptionally large attend-
nee of both young men and women, "hut,"
continued ho, "our system of Instruction
such that pupils may outer at any date."
When wo took our leavoof the principals of
this excellent school wc wore thoroughly
onvinced llmt no belte.* existed in any
country,
One Too Many for Him-
A beggar acoosted a gentleman, and
whined, " I'm paralysed lu both me
'aud-i, mister, nn' can't work, fcr I can't
grasp anything with'oin. Could you spare
trio a trifle, misterf'
" I'm deaf," replied tho gentleman;
Hyou'd bettor writedown what you have
to say. Here's a pencil and a piece of
paper."
"Deaf, is V?" thought the beggar;
"then ho didn't boar about thc paralysis,"
So ho wrote down :
������ I've got a wife and six children starving at 'nine, mister. I've bin out o' wurk
fer six munths, an I am in a droll'ul stato
ofdesteitushun."
1 He handed the paper to tho gentleman,
who read it, and sai':
" I thought you said you were paralysed
in both bunds and couldn't grasp anything;
and yet ynu cau write,"
"Did���didn't yer say yer was deaf!'
stammered tha beggar, who now really did
feel paralysed.
"Yes, just lo find out if you were an
impostor, which you are, as I suspected,"
repliod tho gentleman,
'* Well, of all the bloomin' frauds, yer
the biggest!" exclaimed the beggar ; "th"
hbloa of yer sayin' yor was deaf, an' tryin
to impogo on u poor feller."
And ho shuflled off, sniffing the air with
righteous indignation.
A Wedding Present
Of practical importance would be a bottle of
the only sure-pop corn cure���Putnam's
Painless Corn Extractor���which can bo had
at any drug store, A continuation of the
lioueymoon und ihe removal of corns both
assured by ils use,   Bowaro of imitations,
tjueen Liuikalaui (gazingloiigingly at
the governmental chair)���" Its a shame
that none of these rude men will got up to
give a lady a seat I"
I With tho exception of Belgium,whoso debt
ha? hi/on incurred for   internal   improve
incut *  every Kuropean national debt is in
great part a war debt.
A. P. iv2.
Not Much ofa OhaiiKe-
Manager: " That youug woman whom I
placed .at this counter a year ago already
knows more about the business than you do,
and 1 find that I shall have to put her at
the head of the department, though I fear
it will be rather unpleasant for you to be
under her orders."
Clerk : "Oh, no, I am getting used to
that.   We were married last spriu^."
A J-Wifying fiiver*
The Tinto river, in Spam, possesses remarkable qualities, Ita waters are yellow
as the tupa**, harden the sand,and petrify it
iu a most surprising manner. If a stone
fall into the river and rest upon another
they both become perfectly united and con-
glutinated in a >ear. No fish live in its
stream.
Nerve Pain Cura*
Poison's Nerviline cures flatulenco, chills,
and spi-ms. Nerviline euros vomiting,
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i\ /t
A COMEDY OF ERRORS.
CHAPTER 11
THAT MISS   WILLIAM!-*.
Jessica bewailed tier fate greatly to lior
confidante, Flora Williama, the "woman"
four yeara her (senior, who bad been to Girton, and whom Jessica exhalted to a throne
in her little mind. Flora was handsome,
with masses of (/olden hair. She wore
tailor's dresses, talked a little slang, smoked an occasional cigarette, and apoke of hor
col lege friends by their surnames unprefixed.
She affected eyeglnsses, too, and kept a
number of heavy tomes in a locked liook-
case. Otherwise there was nothing very
learned about her, nur was she half so keen
for culture and superiority aa was Jessica
Nevill.
"I admire old maids less thau I did five
yeara ago," she confessed to hor friend ;
and Jessica, hardly grasping tho profound
bearing of i his remark, replied frivolously
(for evon Jupiter noda sometimea):���-
"I suppose, Flora, ft-, llirton ynu some-
times saw too many women 1 1 admit I
like men liest. All I object to ia tho Bup*
position that wo must want tn marry
them."
"Hut wo do," said Flow ruthlessly j
"you yourself, -less, you wanted to marry
Mr, Hobson."
"Oh no. Only just while ho wua asking
me. And I ��houldn't fool liko that again.
It was only that 1 wai ho iitincoiutomnd tn
that kind of thing. Noxt time when a man
makes love tn mo 1 ahall dislike It."
"Are you Burel"
"It Is just what I dread about John. He
will think it propor to make love to mo,
and then 1 shall bate liim. If 1 could only
see him without his knowing mo, Floral"
"But, judging from Mr. llubson'soxpori*
onco when be made love to ynu "
"Oh, do stop about Mr. Hobson 1 Aud
you know,Flora,this talking of lovers m,akca
me sink."
" Ves, doar," said Flora : " you blushed when mamma read us thoso lovo seone<-
trom tho novel, I saw ynu. Don't you like
reading them to yourself ovon, Jessica I"
"That's different,"
" No, you goose, it's all of a piece. You
don't, publicly and in the abstruet, approve
uf love-making, Josa; but when Mr. Hobson
got down on hia knees before you������"
" Flora, how can you 7"
* I "It ia only that I am older than you, dear.
-I shouldn't dislike thn idea of your John so
muoh, Engaged 1 And with a man coming
in three months to mako lovo to yon 1 I
dare say he'll do it hotter than Mr, Hsbsou;
so cheer up, Jessica, aud come and see my
new dress."
" You do yourself tbe greatest injustice,"
said Miss Jessica, " talking in that silly
way. But oh, Flora, what a very beautiful
dress 1"
Considering how strontj-niimtad theso two
young wotnon weie, their intercut in more
olothes was perhaps excessive. Hooks and
lovers were quite secondary to-day, anil
every day.
Noxt month Mr. Nevill had to go away
to Wales on business, and ho was exercised
in his mind about leaving Jessica, the betrothed heiross, ao near Mr. Hol-son ; for
tho good ourato boing of nervous temperament, and apt to be precipitate, might
easily stumble into love-making attain, and
Mr. Nevill, unable tu distinguish among
girlish caprices and fancies, had alwaya
considered his daughter a little sentimental
about her rejected suitor. So this person
and that of her aunts and elderly cousins
did her father suggest as a visitor during
his absence, but Jessica would none of them,
and Mr. Nevitl's alarm about Mr. Hobson
increased.
"Go to town to your grandmother,
Jessica, and buy some new gowiiB."
" Thank yon, papa; I havo just laid in a
���took."
" Then begin your trousseau."
" 1 will wait, papa, till I aoe how I tike
Cousin John."
" Tut, iny dear, tut 1"
"Papa!" exclaimed Jessica suddenly,
" It has just struck me I Uo you remember
that John belongs to your generation, not
to mine 1"
" But ho is your age, Jessica, Near
enough."
h " Papa, people always belong to their
generation, I am sure John is quite old in
his mind' and in bis ways. 1 have heard
you Bay, papa, you don't approve of
marriages botwecu persons of different generations."
"Tut, my doar 1"
"But, indeed, papa, I can't begin my
trousseau till I have seen him,''
" Then go to Aunt buoy at Bournemouth."'
" She has not invited me,"
"Or to Miss Snow at Banks!do."
" Her spare rooms aro full, papa."
"Wet), where will you go'i" usked Mr.
Nevill, in despair.
Jessica answered that question a fow days
later. She unmc running to hor father one
morning with sparkling eyes -ml a pretty,
f'leading look on her face. Ho know that
ook; she wore it whon she had set hor heart
on aomo inuueent pleasure which it would lio
his delight togrant. Ho smiled encouraging*
ly. and held out bis hand ; for Jossica had,
asked nothing of him since her betrothal
nor been liko his merry, sweat littio coax
at all.
*' Oh, pap* I doar pipi I do say yes I Do.
.Tustwhileyutiareaway I Think how stupid
for me all alone hero. l>-> say yes I Do let
me go 1"
" Why, to bo sure I will. It's what l'vo
lieen looking for���-a pUco to seed you to
white I'm away, Where do you want to
go!"
" It's a letter from Flora, papa,"
"Oh! That Miss Williams? Woll, I
suppose you must go if you wish it."
"They are going abroad, papa, and want
me to go with thom,"
" Bleu me ! Wlio are ' Ihoy ?'"
" Flora and hor friend Misa Talbot,
papa,"
"Who is Miss Talli.it, and how old is
���be!"
"A little younger thin Flora. Sho is
still at Oirton. And lu-r mother is tho
Dowager Viscountess of Monastorovon."
" Dear mo ! But who is the chaperon of
thie party?"
"Flora, papa."
" But she's only a young --irt like you."
"Pupa I Why, she's years older than I.
And so sensible. Sho and Talbot���I mean
Mils Talbot���went to Vienna last year
alone. Oirton girls, pap-,, don't rur|uire
chaperons. Oh, please, let me go. Vou
forget what a dull lifo I nm going to havo
with only that elderly cousin of yours ! Do
give me one littio month of fun first,"
" Mr. Novill hadn't tho heart lo say no*
straight off. "Ask Miss Williams to
lunch," ha said, " and let mo soe if slio in a-
froper person to take charge of you." For
lora lived at a place three station*** down
the line, and Mr. Nevill (lining inclined to
deipiso her) had not made hor acquaintance.
Jessica wrote to M tss Williams that wh m
ahe came to be inspected ahe must try to look
like a chaperon. Consequently Flora waa
hardly roooguii-ab'o. Slio had left her smart
spy-glasses at homo with her tailor-inado
froek. She wore round blue spectacles, a
gown of her mother's, a long mantle, a
bonnet, and a thick veil, She talked gravely on serious subjects ; and Mr. Nevill was
delighted with her, and began toreaonsider
his opinion of Oirtonians. Jessica was flying about in a white serge frock, rather too
ihort for her, and woro a broad hat with
streaming ribbons. She looked a child,and
Miss Williams surveyed her benevolently,
like a mother. Mr, Nevill withdrew all
objection to the proposed trip, and promised his daughter us much money ns she requested,
"And whero, Mian Williams, do you propose to go?" ho inquired of the chaperon.
"Oh, to Rome. Tal~-Mias Talbot is thero
already with her mothor. Lady Monaster*
evenhasto return soon,and then Jessica and
I will stay ou with Miss Talbot at the samo
hotel. After about a mouth, we three will
travel bome together."
" It sounds suitable," said Mr. Novill;
and began looking up routes in the Continental Bradsliaw,
" We will do exactly what you adviae,
Mr. Nevill," said Flora meekly: And
Jessica jumped into her father's arms and
kissed him. She had not been bo gay for
weeks. She was going ou a frolic, and a
tii-iit frolic, Ib highly exciting to a young
person.
At the eleventh hour, however, the plans
for the journey of tho two ladies was all
overturned. Mr. Novill was packing, and
rather in a fuss preparing for his departure,
when Jessica buret into bis room, crying
out that a most shockiug thing had occurred, Misa Tabot had got Roman fever, and
all Koine was full of fever, and Mra. Williams positively rofuscd to let her daughter
go thero on any account, Mr. Novill was
in dismay, rum umbering the inflammable
Mr. Hobson.
But Flora and I might go somewhere
Ine, papa," suggested Jessica.
" \cs,   )
yes, ot course," assented Mr.
Novill roadily. " Keep away from tho
fovor. Oo somewhere else." And he
proposed Florence, where was Jessica's
uncle with nino daughters: or Cannes,
whoro ono Mrs. White and her grand-
nicoo would befriend tho lonely travel-
lew.
Jessica poutod. "We can mako up our
���mint as wo -���<> along," sho said, " Paris is
lho first stage to either places."
" Very well, iny lovo (fold my dressing-
gown, ploasn, dear child), ami you had butter keop your monoy as much ub poasible in
English gold (that box of collars,, pleaso,
Jessica), It passes everywhere (don't
tumble ovor my bootal. And writo to mo
very often, my dear."
"Papa," said Jessica, packing busily,
"you know you never got my lcttors whon
you are in Wales.   I shan't writo often."
CHAPTER III.
WILLIAMS AND TALBOT.
So Mr. Novill went to Wales, and on
tho samo day tho two young ladies crossed
to Calais. Flora declared her opinion that
to ho "at a loose end" was the pleasantesc
way of travelling, and that Abraham was
tho wiso man, who wont out not knowing
whither he wont. It is needless to remark
that Miss Williams had restored the flop,
ping mantle and tha poke bonnet to her
mother's wardrobe. She and her friend woro
dressed alike in dark blue, witli smart little
folt hats antl Kton jackets. Their fellow-
passengers looked admiringly at the two
pretty young creatures and wondered who
they wore.
Their ultimate destination still undecided
they stayed two dayB in Paris, and came to
the conclusion that Frenchmen were sometimes rather staring and rude. Then ono
evening Flora wrote the names of several
countries on slips of paper and jumbled
thom in a hat, and Jossica put in hor hand
and drew onc out. Spain was written on it,
and the younger girl, cried *' Hurrah !" and
waved tho piece of papor above hor head,
and jumped and danced hilariously about
the mom,
" Are you bo pleased, Jesa ?" said Flora.
" I have a scheme in my head," r oplied
Jossica.
But neitlior on that night nor tho next
oould tho maiden lady (so Mr. Nevill had
describe-1 Miss Williama to hia mother-in-
law) extract from hor charge what manner
of Bcheuiu it wii9.
They travelled straight to Madrid, and
from thence eaoh wrote home. This duty
accomplished, Jcasica pulled a wise faeo
nnd addressed her companion in the following manner:���
" Florn, it ia getting lato in the soason,
nnd Madrid is further north than .Seville
nnd Oranada, Let ua go to those places
while the wanther ifl atill cool. And, Flora,
let us steadily act our tace against bull
fights, for, iu iny opinion, Knglish people
should always set a good example Anil,
Flora, don't you think we ought to see tho
Hock, which is such a remarkable place in
English history?"
" And where Captain Farquhar is ?" said
Flora,with a cough.
"John Farquhar is not at tho Rock,'
saiii hia betrothed ; "ho is at Tangier���on
leavo, I suppose. That kind of man is always oir leave. Havo you hoard much of
Tangier, Flora?"
"Not much."
"I havo read it tip in Murray, Itis
about three houra from 0 ibraltar, and is a
ery old-world place, which reminds one of
the 'Arabian Nights.1 But thore in a
French hotel. Would yoii like, Flora, to
aee Tangier V
"Jessica," said Flora, "can you lie yearning fur the commencement of the lovo*
making?"
'oBStca took a chair, and looked graver
than ever,
Flora, how much money havo you ?
What is your fortune?"
"My fortune ': Oh, a competence. Six
hundred a year now, and eventually two
or three hundred more,"
Then aren't you nearly an rich as I am ?
Flora, it seems to in.* the greatest pity you
are uot going to marry John Farquhar,
wheu you can endow him nearly as well as
I can."
"Not quite ; anil hesidoa, I couldn't re*
sto'-e him his house,"
" I would give you that for a wedding
present. 1 assuro you, Flora, I ahould he
really glad to make up the trifling hundred
or two by which you aro poorer than 1, as
a reward to you for taking this man o.T my
bauds."
" You are most kind. But why should
I do with him any hotter than yourself!"
aaked Flora,
"1 see excellent reason**,'' replied. I essie,.,
counting ou her lingers. " First, you want
to marry, nnd I don't. Then you like tho
accounts we have had of John, and I don't.
You think the position romantic and pleasing. You do not apparently disapprove of
Inconstancy, Flora, tothe ideal, nor conald*
er it desecration to marry an uiikuown and
commonplace man. And as you aro hand-
somer aud nicer than! am, John ia mora
likely to fall iu love witb yon than with
mc, And if ho'a Incapable of lovo, why, ho
will still **ei monoy witb you, and wo have
no ronton fm- BiippoMlng be wants anything
else.   Pray induce him to l,avo you Flora."
"And do 1 understand, .lossioa, that you
are taking mo to Tangior to intioduce mo
to Captain Farquhar?"
"Itis ono of my reasons forgoing there."
"And the others''"
"I expootod you to guess, Flora. Men
aro so stupid that il is just posaihle'John
may still wish to marry me. But I altogether object to marrying n man I do nob
know, And how, I aak you, Flora, oould I
possibly learn to know a man who was try*
ing to make lovo to ino? What I want ia
to ace this Juhn boforo ho arrives at home
as my fiance, I want to catch him una*
wares at Tangier, and ace what bo is liko
when he is himaolf��� not disguised in the
airs of a pouter-pigeon."
"But, Jessica���-will not tho airs ofa conk
pigeon be assumed whenever and wherever
you appear? And does it not occur to you,
my dear, that he might think it a little
superfluous, even a little bold, your seeking him in this manner in the ends of the
earth ?"
"I have thought of that. Flora, John
must not know it is I."
Florn started. " The plan is great," she
Baid, "hut it Btaggers mc. May �� ask, Jessica, if you will appear under an assumed
namo V
"That is what 1 propose to do, Flora.
" But when Captain Farquhar cornea to
Nevill Lodge, he will rocognizo you, Jess ;
what will you say then ?"
" Most likely I sliall hate him ao muoh
that 1 will never allow liim to come to
Nevill Lodge at all. If, by extraordinary
good fortune, I find him comparatively un*
objectionable, why, I shall explain to him
what I did, nnd why."
"Woll, he may fool flattered ; or he may
not, Jessica. What would Mr. Novill nay
to you plan, dear ?"
" 1 don't suppose papa would like it at
all. But I do not foel bound to cousult
papa's tastes now that be baa become a
tyrant, Flora."
" The plan ia great," repeated Flora,
*' but aro we clever enough to carry it out':
Shall we droaa aa young men, Jess, to perfect our resemblance to Rosalind and Imogen ?"
41 No," said Jes-iica. laughing ; " I should
not know how to bohava aa a young man.
But I can behave very nioely as���
Talbot for instance."
Whereupon Flora jumped up and clapped
her handa.
" The very thing!" she cried ;" you shall
pose as Talbot tho Uirtonii.il 1 For Jessica,
if you tried passing yourself off as a wholly
imaginary peraon, you would say that you
had aix brothers to-day aud to-morrow sixteen 1 But you know exaotly how many
brothers Talbot haa. Represent her, Jessica."
"Miss Talbot might mt like it!" said
Jessica, breathless with excitem-snt.
"Talbot? My dear Jess," cried Flora,
who had now thoroughly entered into the
just, " it is the kind of thiog to delight
Talbot immensely. I never knew a girl so
fond of a naughty joke. Ohl I'll undertake
to square Talbot. One condition though,
my love: that while you are personating
her you do nothing scandalous. Don't for
instance, elope with Captain John. In fact,
I should say permit no love-makiuir."
" i���-permit love-making I said Jessica,
in tones of the greatest disgust; and they
discussed further detail*, of tbe scheme, deciding that Miaa Williams might retain hor
own namo, aa sho was unimportant and the
namo waa common, nnd lhe wearer's confidence in it would gain credit for them
both.
" My dear," said the ehnporon, " this
whole plan la vor;' naughty. Are you aer-
ious about it ?"
" I am most sorious," replied Jessica.
" I mean to do it."
Flora lookod hard at her friend, and then
thoy both dissolved into delightful laughter;
under thc influence of which tho plan became a resolution fixed as tho law of the
Medea and Persians.
Three days later the maiden ladies who
called each other Williams and Talbot
crossed from Kurope to Africa. They had
slept one- night at Oib, in tho hotel
at tbo Kuropa Point, aud had walked
about that queer medley of a town, and
bought lace from Emilia Birch, and sought
in vain for the tailless monkeys. Talbot
had a notion that John Farquhar might
have rotumed to the Rook, and whenever
they passed a haughty Knglish officer, she
pinched Flora's arm and whispered, " Oh
dear 1 Williams, could that be he?" And
Flora, being young herself and as yet rather
starved in the matter ot love affairs, was
secretly much excited too, and would not
for the world havo abandoned the search
for tlie captain.
At laat they embarked in tha Hercules
paddle-boat, and steamed away to Tangier;
and the voyage was not pleasant, for the
aea was rough, and the Hercules jb small,
and on this occasion crowded with Moors
and Jews, all very seasick. Some first-
class passengers there were, however ; an
elderly lady with a husband ; a lonely man
ina slouch-hat; a thin and strong-minded
Mrs. Geoffrey Cobbo, whose name was em*
blazoned on all her luggage; and lastly, a
young officer from Oib, with whom ahe
conversed persistently. Jessica was rather
seasick, and noticed none of these peoplo
much.
The landing at Tangier was a little
alarming to the two Knglish girls, unprepared for tho half-naked and noisy Moors,
who bustled them into a boat, rowod violently ashore, and incessantly clamored for
"twelve dollars." Presently they were
dragged before a superbly robed, white-
bearilcd-and-turbaned gentleman, presumably a customs officer, who sat fn the mud
aud ordered all portmanteaux to be openoil
and instantaneously abut up again. Hia
perceptive powers must have been phenomenal in quickness; aupernaturally quick
also were the five men who, the moment
tho perfunctory examination was ovor,
snatched up the portmanteaux and ran away
with them through the town and up tho
hill of the Soko, pursued by the panting
maidens under tlio noisy escort of an enormous negro. Williams and Talbot uoarly
fainted with relief whon they found them-
selves and all their gooda deposited in
unexpected safety on the floor of Brnzeaiid's
Hotel; where rooms were awaiting them,
nnd Knglish waa spoken, and five o'clock
tea waa the order uf the day. Anomalous
civilization I
" I have it 1" gasped Flora, "that black
cannibal aud hia hordo were sent by Monsieur Bruzeaud to meet ua 1 Why couldn't
they aay ao?"
Jessica was leaning out of the window,
smiling at the purple sea and the fiat white
town and tbe aloes and the cactus on the
slope below the hotel.
" Do you know, Williama," sho said, " I
laro say papa would not like our having
como alone to a placo of thia sort."
" Have you only juat thought of that,
my dear Talbot ?" Baid Flora.
(TO KB CONTIflUBD.)
Life and Health.
VALUABLE KKCll'K FOR Ull'HTIIKUIA.
The Scientific American gives this recipe
for diphtheria,which alt the world ought to
know:���At the first indication of diphtheria
in the throat of a child mako the room
close, then take a tiu cup and pour into it
a amall quantity of tar and turpentine,
equal parts. Then hold the cup over the
lire so as to fill tho air with the fumes. The
tittle patient, on inhaling the fumes, will
cough up and aplt out all the membraneous
matter, and the diphtheria will pass out.
The fumes of the , tar nnd turpentine
loosen the matter iu the throat, nnd thus
afford the relief that hai battled the skill
of the physicians. Care should be exercised
to avoid setting fire to the mixture, but
the risk ia small as only a small quantity
ueod be placed in the cup at a time,
TRUE POSITION IN ai.KKI'.
Concerning the natural poation of the
body in sleep, Or. Charles 0. Files haa thia
to Bay :
Complete relaxation of the entire muscular
system is tho first, great essential of Bound,
healthful sleep. The limbs should bo slightly
Hexed or bont, and tho body so disposed
that overy muscle will be in an easy, com-
fortublo position. The body itself should
rost on the right side, with a alight inclination forward rather than backward.
It is not well to sleep either on the back
or directly on the chest. In neither position
can the limbs lie properly flexed. Sleeping
on the chest and tace, with mouth and nostrils obstructed in the least by the pillows,
is very injurious.
During sleep the freo ingress of air to the
lunga ahould be an object of tho greatest
solicitude, The objections to sleeping on the
left side may be clearly apprehended by
calling to mind the relative position of the
Qlomtoh and liver.
Tho greater portion of the liver is to tha
right of the median line of the body. The
greater pouch of the stomach is on the median line, while the pyloric end Is on the left
Bide of the body. The weight of the liver
is about four and one-half pounds, or about
one-thirty-second of the weight of the
body.
If the stomach contains muoh food, when
one Ib lying on tho left side tho weight of
the liver resting on tho stomach is apt to
cause uneasy slumber. This weight at
least will interfere considerably with tho
process of digestion.
Very great care should be exercised in
placing the body in suoh a position that the
movements of tho cheat may bo perfectly
tree. The Bhouldera Bhould be thrown
back and the left arm should bo placed on
the left hip or partly behind the body. It
should never bo allowed to rost on tho
chest.
I havo noticed that thore is a tendency
among thoso of feoblo constitution, and
especially those having affections of tho
lungs, to sleep with lho lungs compressed
hy the arms and the mortth and nostril:-
partly covered with the bed-clothes.
MANCHESTER A SEAPORT
Tbo Great Ship Canal-
Now .in Accomplished fact.
Manchester has just been celebrating the
completion of its ship canal, a great waterway giving it direct access to the Irish t-jea,
and thence to the Atlantic Ocean, and with
the completion of this work the realization
of a scheme which, in oue form or another,
has been disaussed at intervals for more than
a century and three-quarters. It is popularly
supposed that Manchester ha- always
quietly ncquiseced in the growth and development of Liverpool, and haa been content
that Liverpool should receive toll on ihi
cotton and other raw materials imported
largely from thiB aide the ocean which are
used in auoh immense and increasing
quantities in the industrial rogion lying
within a orieuit of twenty milea from
Manchester. This is a mistake. Manehoster
haa always boen jealoiiB of Liverpool, and of
her position on the estuary of the Meraey,
and hasagain and again contemplated calling
iu tho aid of the engineer to right her wrongs
with Liverpool.
Long before Liverpool had begun to draw
to herself tlio trade with what were thee
the American colonies, when Bristol had
atill the monopoly ofthe
OOMMSBG** OF TUB WRIT-
and Liverpool was but a small plaoe (owning somo eighty or ninety shipa), Manchester
waa moving with a view to securing some
of the advantage which it was felt ought to
accrue to ber, owing to hor nearness to tho
sea. Manchester stands on the Irwell, a
tributary uf the Mersey, and the Mersey ia
navigable for ships of three or four hundred
tons burden aa far as Warrington, which la
exactly midway botweon Liverpool and
Manchester, and eighteen miles from either
filaoe. Liverpool constructed her first dock
n 170S ; and in 1712 the engineer wbo was
responsible for thia work devised a sohemo
under which tho Mersey and the Irwell
were to be made navigable to Manchester,
Nothing oamo of this scheme, but in 1720
works were carried out which gave Man
cheater a water communication with Liver
pool, which was partly tidal and partly
canal. This waterway waa in use unttl
about seven years ago, when the ship canal
works interfered with It. It was, however,
never
AVAILABLE FOR VESSELS
larger than barges of seventy or eighty toiw
burden, and never began to meet the needs
of Manchester after the era of tho cotton
factory had commenced. Forty years after
this waterway was made. Brindloy, with
the aid of the Duke of Bridge water, constructed the picturesque canal which is now
known by the name of the Duke. It is
twenty-one miles long, nnd joins the estuary
ot the Mersey at Runcorn, within half a
mile of the point at which tho first waterway was connected with the tidal portion
of tho Money.
Liko the waterway constructed in 1720.
tho Bridgewater Canal is for barges only.
It doubled the means of communication by
water between Liverpool and Manehoster,
and along those two old waterways millions
of bales of cotton have boon carried from
Liverpool through
TUB HARDEN COUNTY
of Cheshire into the heart of the cotton
manufacturing district of Lancashire, But
Manchester has always desired something
more than barge canals, and various-schemes
for ship canals were discussed bofore Parliament gave its sanction to the construction
of the canal which is now nearing completion.
There was a long, bitter, and wearisome
fight in Parliament beforo tho scheme for
the present canal was adopted. Liverpool
was strongly opposed to the canal, and
fought the promoters at, ovory point, lho
Liverpool City Council, tho Liverpool Dock
Board, and thn railway companies whoso
lines connect the two cities spent about a
quarter of a million sterling in lawyers'
fees and in fees to expert witnesses iu en*
deavorinc to defeat the proposals for tho
waterway. Nevor in the history of private
bill legislation was there ablggor or a more
costly fight in lho committee rooms of thc
Houses of Parliament, and never before
were two Knglish cities aet in antagonism
as wero Liverpool ami Manchester in the
early eighties, when tho Ship Canal scheme
was bctoro Parliament. In lKS'l Liverpool
waa triumphant. Parliament threw out the
Ship Canal bill, Two years later a new
nud greatly amended scheme was submitted to Parliament, Again tho fight between
Liverpool and Manchester was waged for
nearly half the session, but this timo
victory rested with Manehoster, nud Parliament passed a bill empowering tin*- construction of tho canal.
THE DEADLY FOLDlStfBED.
Within tho past few weeks tbe folding-
bed lias achieved a most unpleasant, notoriety, and the catalogue of accidents duo to
its irrepressible internal contortions seems
almost to justify the suspicion that a carnival of folding-bed calamities has Bet in.
Either by reason of an outbreak of the innate depravity ot this mechanical mahogany
hybrid itself, or because ilic resthetla daimou
wishes to teach us to go hack to the decent
and in vor to hi-ale bedstead, wo appear to bo
at the mercy of an automatic impulse
toward the wardrobe state which threatens
those who confide themaotvel to the treacherous ougiliu with Buff-cation, if not concussion of the spine, where:ia nightmare
was really the worst that was to havo beon
anticipated.
There is something peculiarly shocking
in such behavior on tho part of a bed. Bed
has beon tho friend of man sinco timo imnie-
m:rial, and not only does it speak to us of
rest,6leep,fret-dom from cnre,uud the peace
ful home.but it is most untimely connected
wilh tho great drama of birth, life, and
death. Theverydiirerentiation of civilized
man Is that ho dies iu bed. That bed should
kill liim is au atrocious turning of the slats.
A man might as woll die with his boots on
as bn tolcaooped in n foliling*bod collision���
the fact that fee is in hia night-gown is no
consolation to those wbo might Beparnto bis
outraged remains from the spring mattress.
It is this iniquity in tlio folding-bed accident that cucoura--es tha surmise of a latent deviltry in thn machine, Tho addition
of the principle of the lever to a piece of
furniture which our ancestors rightly constructed ou simple, enduring, and reposeful
lines���-to whicfi thoy gave the stern solidity
of a night'B slumber ami tlio airy height ol
a fair lady's dreams���might have been expected to develop in it a taste for impish
nocturnal saltutiouB The mediieval bud,
with ils massive columns and spreading
canopio*-, waa built to he proof againat
witchcraft. But this modern bed, with its
Btomnch full of springs and chains, would
have been banned by tbe Church in oldor
days, and no one would have looked to be
aafe in it nt midnight oven had it been riveted to tho floor.
The worst thing that eu\ ba said against
the folding-bed, however, is that it is iu
bad taste. It is not wholly a modern invention, to bo sure, as it had its predecessor in the famous "bod by night and cheat
of drawers by day." And in so far as it is
designed to economize apace it ia pardonable. But, lil.eso many another invention
of ours, it cannot rostsatistied with being a
convenience, but must try lo pass it ofl'by
a cheap assumption of being something else,
The-folding bed chooboa to assume to be a
wardrobe, and people whose idcaB aro no',
nice believe it to be a very refined thing to
keep such a vulgar thing aa a bed out of
night during thc day. Just how much more
prudish a wardrobe is than a bed It is difficult to say. Perhaps M. MaxO'ltell might
calculate thfl degree. But il is a curious
fact that wherever vou find a loldlng-betl
you almost always find thu corners ot tho
room unnwopt, so perhaps thc recent, carnival of calamities iH in the mil ur-* of a judgment,��� [Harper's Weekly.
In some partasof Berlin there are spocia
publichouses for women.
EAGER FOR A TEBT OF SPEiil).
An I'l-i-jiiii! Locomotive itf :������">* lo Race ihc
New.York Central*, "o-w."
There left for Chicago last week an Knglish engineer and railroad builder who haa
designed and completed a four-cylinder locomotive, which he claims can run at a
greater speed and carry heavier loads than
any other locomotive in the world, not
even excepting the record-making engine of
tbe New York Central, "999."
The engineer in question is Mr. Frederick
Charles Winby of London, and hia locomotive, which was on view at the World's
Fair, and is still stalled in Chicago, la the
"James Toleman." One of the avowed
purposes of Mr. Wiuby's visit here is to
prove the capabilities of his engine, and, in
t-porting parlance, he is " spoiling'' for a
race with the iron horae he considers hia
only rival, " 999." Mr. Winby, needless to
remark, aays that he will back hia engine
to any amount.
The -'James Toleman" waa built last
year in six months, in the workshops of K.
& W. Hawthorne, Leslie & Co. of New
cas tie-on-Tyne, one of the oldest firms of
locomotive builders in Kngland, The
chief point of excellence that Mr. Winby
claims for his design is that it gives groater
boiler power than has heretofore beon ob-
tainod in any locomotive, without lifting
the centre of gravity to a dangerous height.
The heating surface of the "James 'role-
man " is 2,000 square feet, ouo-third greater
than in auy olher English locomotive,
while the area of tho grata, 23 feet, is also
larger in thosauio proportion. The boiler
is constructed in two cylindrical segments,
superposed, The chord stays aro common
to the two segments, so that, while the
lateral diameter of the boiler is not groater
than will pass between a pair of driving
wheels of large diameter, tho vertical diameter ia greater, tho tube plates deeper
and of greater area, and tlio tubes themselves larger and more numerous than in an
ordinary cylindrical boiler placed between
driving wheels.
There are two pairs of driving wheels,
each 7 feet (1 inches in diameter. The
"leaders" are driven by a pair of inside
cylinders 17 inches in diameter, and with a
stroke of 22 inches. The trailing driving
wheela, of tbe same si/.s, aro driven by
cylinders 16J inches in diameter, with a
stroke of 24 inches. Tho "bogie" w.ieels
are 4 feet iu diameter.
The weight of the engine, loaded, but
without tender, is sixty tone, It has, so
its designer olaims, a tractive power of
143.8 pounds for every pound of effective
pressure aiul will work to 200 pounda ou
the square inch.
No encouraging assurance has come from
tho Now-York Central management that
the famous locomotive, "1)99," will be pitted
against any other locomotive in auy test of
speed for stakes or otherwise. Third Vice
President H.Walter Webb roooived a proposition some time ago from persons who
desired to baok an English locomotive
against tho New-York Central's wonderful
flier. He replied chat it was not the desire,
of tbe N ew-Vork Central to race ita locomotive against locomotives of other manufacture. The engine "999," he remarked, had
made a speed record of 112J miles an hour.
Should any other locomotive equal or excel
that record an opportunity would undoubted
ly be found for "91)9"to ahow how muoh
better she oould do.
Lord Lanadowne in Burmah-
Lord Lanadowne, the viceroy of India
has just been on a visit to Burmah, whose
people gave him an exceedingly warm wet*
come, in whioh they referred gratefully to
all that bad been dune for them, but their
gratitude was not altogether free from that
lively sense oi favors to come, of which
gratiuid generally is said to be largely
composed. The favors the Btirmeio ask are,
happily, ofa kind which Great Britain
ought to be proud to grant, and they are
likely to be granted, Burmah is at present
ruled by a chief commissioner; its government ia in commission, and is moro or less
despotic, The Burmese want their country to
be erected into a province, with a lieutenant
governor, a high court, in which natives
will bo represented, and with a represents,-
live in the viceroy's legislative council.
The reasons th"*y give in urging their petition are good. They point out that since
1886, when Upper Burmah waa annexed,tho
Commissioner of Burmah rules a country
twice aa large and a population twice more
numerous, with a doubled internal trade, a
sea-borne commerce increased to sixty mil
lions of rupeoa, and a doubled revenue
reaching fifty -five millions of rupees. Upper Burmah is now as peaceful and altnofit
as prosperous, and is troubled with, if anything, less brigandage or daeoity than Lower
Burmah Under these circumstances it is
not wonderful if the old administrative
machinery of Burmah has become somewhat
unequal to the task imposed upon it. Lord
Lansdowne was able to promise that the
country would be made a province, but he
thought some time would havo to bo given
for tho erection ofthe high eouitand repre-
seutntiou in the legislative council.
THE rHOZErl HOBTH.
Where Explorer Niinsen t<* Wintering���
The Latest \��mh From the Traveller.
A London despatch says :���The interesting quostiou as to where Nansen is wintering is most probably answered by tho following important communication juat at hand.
It may be romnmbet'ed that he intended to
winter in the Now Siberian islands, north
of Cape Tstjoljuskm, the northernmost
ptomont-ory of Asia, The arctic skipper,
Hans ilohanuesson, of Hammerfoat,Norway,
who, in lK7S-ii, siinultauoously with the
Vega's voyage round Asia, commanded the
ateainer Lena to the Lena river, and who
remained in East Siberia several years,
states in an interview that eld Yakutsks
told him that from the highest parts of the
northern shores of the New Siberian islands,
whicli they had frequently visited in order
to collect mammoth tusks, they could in
tine weather distinctly discern a lofty land
to tho northwest. Thediatanco ia estimated by the Norwegian skipper, from tho
statements of theao natives, at about fifteen
nautical miles, Emm this lofty land, too,
-lohanuosaen hailed a lar;e iceberg, which
in 1H7H was soon ashore oast of Cnpe TbIjoI-
juskin, a berg which could not havo had its
origin from any part of the coast between
tho northernmost cape of Asia aud Behring
strait, nor could It have *ome from the tow
Now Siberian Islands. ,lnhanuoascn was
surprised that there were currents whicli
could have carried tho berg south, bub this
wna also almost tho only real Ice-berg seen
along thu coast of north Asia in 1878.
.Should, therefore, Nausen, he oonsiders.uot
steer too closo to the coast, it is probable
that he might discern this lofty, unknown
land from tho masthead if tho weather was
clear. And should the state of tbe ice be
at all favourable thoro can bo no doubt but
that he would attempt to reach it this year
und take up his winter quartern at this
unnamed polar terra nova,
Probi big that Wasn't Truo.
A certain clergyman in early life had
met with an accident which left him with a
broken nose, a deformity about which in
spite of his piety, he was known to be a
littio sensitive. Olio day a now enquirer
propounded the old question:���"How happened j on to break your nrse V The minister auswerod solemnly i���"To tell the
truth my .friend, tho accident waa caused
by my poking my 110*10 into other people's
business."
Getting .Efficent Medical Attendance-
As aoon ns thc I-lmperor of China is Bick
itis 1. notification to his physicians that
their salary is cut oil' till he is perfectly
will again. The passionate Real with which
the regulars get his majesty baok where
their salaries will begin again in said lobe
aoinething astounding. Tlie result is that
thc omqeror is about the healthiest man
standing on tho planet, anil his physlcintia
ecld nn lose a day's salary.
WHAT THE W0HL1* EAT3-
Some luri-tu- ami l ni err-* 1 tug Hitares
Abuitt the Pro-Jut I nx am* CuikiuiiiIbr
Power ���rpmcrnit Natto-ss.
The world's crop of cinnamon is 16,000
tons.
Over 2003 tona of snails ore annually eaten tn Paris.
France raises and eats every year 5000
tone of radishes.
Last year the Italians exported 480,000,*
000 dozens of eggs.
Paris killed last year 11,862 old horses
for roasts and soup.
The world's oat crop every year exceed
15,000,000  tons.
The English eat every year 95,000 tons of
American apples.
The restaurants of Paris Bold in 1891
18,000 dozen frogs' legs.
The world raises and eats every year
29,000,000 tons of rye.
The average man uses twenty-nine pounds
of sugar per annum. "*
Europnana every year eat 6,470,000 tons
of beef, mutton and pork.
There are 50,000,000 bushels of peas
annually eaten in thia country.
The grocers' journal estimates the world's
crop of cloves at 5000 tons.
The French raise and consume evory yeir
.150,000 bushels of mussels.
The annual value uf the world's cocoauuts
is estimated at $60,000,009.
One district In Now York raises 20,000
pounds of parsley every yoar.
The world annually makes nnd eats
1,946,000 tona of buttor and cheese.
Last year London consumed with more or
ess relish 20,000 tons of fruit.
The almond product of tho world is estimated to be worth $5,000,000-
The value of the cinnamon which annual*
ly goes into preserves is $200,000.
The world puts on its victuals every yea
$3,000,000 worth of black pepper.
The English use most salt���40 pounds
apiece evory year; the Americana uae 31).
The American breath is annually scented
with 15,000,000 bushels of onions.
Over 12,000,000 bushels of buckwheat
were last year manufactured into cakes.
Russia raises 1200 pounds of grain and
51 pounds of meat to each inhabitant.
One district in Tennessee exports ami-tally over 10,000 quarts of blackberries.
France and Italy raise 33,COO,000 bushels
of chestnuts for home use and export.
The world's sugar plantations produce
every year 6,000,000 tons of sugar.
Over 600,000 cattle are annually slaughtered to make beef extract for soup.
One county In New Jersey sends to New
York ten car loads of lettuce a day.
A German at home eats an average of 68
pounds of beet and pork per annum.
The American sweet tooth la annually
satisfied with 20,000 cons of maple sugar.
Paris in 1890 perfumed ita breath with
6000 tons of onions and 700 tons of garlic.
In Ttaly last year 10,000 tons of cheese
wero devoured, with 16,000 tons of coffee.
Switzerland sends to France every year
26,000 tons of milk and 13,000 of cheese.
One firm of oyster packers al Baltimore
claims a capacity of 75,000 cans a day.
The Cermana collectively refresh them
selves with 83,000 tons of rice  every year,
There are 2,500,00*0 pounds of red snappers sent from Flordia to New York every
year.
Canadian hens lay every year 152,000,000
egga, to be mado into omelets and egg*
nog.
In France 67 per cent, of the people live
on rye bread, only ,1-1 per cent, on wheat
bread.
The American people last year drank tbo
docociion from 640,000,000 pounds of coffee.
The United States aro aaid to have 140,-
000,000 geese of tho kind whicli aro used
for food.
Onedistrictin Florida sends annually to
the Now York market 50,000 oratea of
fruits.
Tho world'a yeast powder is estimated to
amount to an annual valuation of $20,000,*
C0O.
The walnut trees in oue section of California furnish the trade with 1,000,000
pounds of nuts.
The consumption of meat in Kurope now
averages 61 pounda per inhabitant per annum.
The English are tho greatest grain caters,
eating nearly every year ��."-0 worth of grain
each.
It is aaid that 500 tons of cotton-seed oil
are annually refined and sold under other
names.
The fruit cakes ot the world aro dotted
with 56,000 tona of currants, all exported
from Greece,
There are in Florida 600,000 cocoanut
trees, whose fruit is all -scut to the New
York Market.
Tho Danes are the champion cheese eaters,
devouring 22 pounds annually to eaoh inhabitant,
Greece, Portugal and Turkey furnish a
part of the world's dessert by supplying
15,000 tons of figs.
The Hollanders raise 45,000 tons of beet
sugar and import 20,000 tuns more to satisfy
their needs.
The wheat product of the world ia 4*i, -
000,000 tona, which is mostly devoured before the next crop.
The world's herring catoh every year is
390,000 tons, which is all consumed before
the next season.
The people of Cro*-1 Britain are depend
ent on imported supplies of fool for ov. r
one-third of the year.
The world'a pastures evory year produce
aud the world confumus l.'-,0Qi),OQ9 tons o
beef and mutton.
The Ooraican Olati-
The Contain loves network, neither jr
he greedy for gold ; hut ho is ambitious, an
eager politician, keenly desirous of place
and power, of anything, in short, that may
flat him above Ills fellow-men. The word
"politician," however, musl bo understood
in a local sense, Tho questions that agitate
the Continent have small coucurn fur him ;
his politics begin and eud with the triumph
or aggrandi/mont of his clan. Tho chief of
a clan has no sinecuro. He Is expected on
all occasions to exert himself for the interests of his clients.
If an adherent wishes for a post, It is tho
duty of the chief to obtain it for him ; if he
bos incurred some line or penalty, the chief
must use hia influence to gat it remit led. His
clients, in return (as to public matters) will
obey his lead Implicitly, He may be n
republican to day, ho may turn monarchist
to-morrow, but it will make no dill'eronce
in their allegiance, nor will he Iobo a single
follower thereby; it ia an understood thing
that what he has done ho lias done for the
good of the clan, and an in former times
thoy would have followed him tothe battle,
so thuy will follow hiin to the ballot-box
to day.
This spirit of " clan " first took its riso
during centuries of nboininable misgovern
ment, Under the infamous rule of the
Genoese, justice was not administered, it
it was sold. For an isolated individual
there was no security either for lifo or pro
perty ; he had nu olianco in the battle of
lifo aivo by allying himself to aome power*
ful family thatcuuld make his interests
respoctod. The more numerous tho clan,
thc more Its influence would lie felt ; therefore tho Corsicnn "-lories in the number of
his cousins ns he would iu the strength of
his right arm.
Tho angels sing bis name abovo,
And   crown   his ��� name   with   deathless
glory,
Who, list'nlng all the ov'uiug through,
Is not reminded of a Btory.
A SHIP'S GHAVEYAflD.        /
Tho Last of the Swedish Arotio Expedition-
Where Bjorllnx 11 na His CorapanUB* Hei
Their Fate- luti*i-r,(lu~ OoeameaU Discovered la a Calm on Carer klaad.
Oo the 17th of June, 1803, Captain McKay, of the SS. "Aurora," visited Carey
Island for the purpose of finding traces, or
tidings, of the Swedish party. On approaching the island Captain McKay (who wu in
the crow's nest) discovered a small schooner lying ashore. He despatched search
parties to the island. The schooner (a
small "fore and after ") was found partially
buried in the ice. She was lying heeled
over very much to the starboard, and with
her stern landward. Some manuscript
notes on natural history���-portions of scientific booka, etc.���were picked up, and sub-
sequeutly brought on board the "Aurora,"
and delivered to Captain McKay. The dead
body of a man some 1.2 or 'til years of age,
was found a short distance olf, on n stony,
���elevated refj-iou behind the vessel. The
dead man was carefully covered over with
atones, but no murk or inscription was observed. Tho atones were not removed from
the body while I was present, but there
were indications that ihe deceased was
lothed. A stone was stuck up at his head
by visitors from tho "Aurora" and a red
handkerchief was tied to it to serve as a
guide to subaeiiuent visitors. In the meantime papers bad been discovered at the calm
and these, together with the articles previously mentioned aa having been picked up
at the vessel, wero duly delivered to Captain McKay in accordance with thc wish expressed in Mr. Bjorllng's letter addressed,
"To tho visitors of S.K. Carey Island, IHO.I,"
Captain McKay steered for Clarenco Head
with the intention of trying to loam something further regarding the fate nf the
party. But on the 10th of dune, when
within about thirty miles of Claronoe Head,
ice was encountered, which tendered a
oloBo approach to the land impossible, and
Captain McKay, was, to his great regret,
compelled to turn back.
Till*. HKi-oVKUBl) DOCUMENT!*-,
The following notes have been copied
from visiting cards bearing the name J.A.
Ujorling, Fil Stud, Stockholm. These cards
and a letter wero found in the eairn on
Carey Island,
'6
WHERE THEY FOUND 1.IU1R AUTIC GRAVE,
Written in ink: " Visited 3. E. Carey
Island, 16th August, 1802. 1 left Godhavn
on the second in this month, and sailed
along tho ieo in Baffin Bay to the thirtoeth,
when f, on only one day, aailed over Melville Bay to Cape York. Au easterly hur.
ricane near that place drove me to the west,
and I waa at noon noar Cap Parry, from
which point I sailed over to Carey Islands
in order to supply me with some provisions
from the Knglish station."
Another written in pencil:���"17-8. Aftor
iving taken on board tho provisions from
Nares depot, the schooner " Hippie" went
on shore on the South fide uf the island,
where you will find us in a email tent. A
new report will bo left here bofore we leave
tho island. 17th August,  1802."
The third card written in pencil:*��� "After
having lost tho ship, thus obliged to winter
over, 1 left thia island on the26th of August
for Foulke Fjord, If I thonce should be
compelled to go to another plnce, further
notice will be laid down in cairn at Pandora
Harbor. Together with the provisions from
Nares' depot here, I hopo to havo food
enough to help mo and my four companions
until .lime month, 189%''
DjORUKa'S   LAST MKKSAOE.
The following is a copy of tho letter:
1 To the Vinitora of S. K. Cary Island,
ISO,'!. As you of my notices here, I have
alter the loss of my vessel tried to reach
Foulken Fjord In order to winter over
there ; but after reaching Northumberland
Island I must ot several causes give up this
voyage and return to Cary Island.
"Compelled by had weather to be a
longer time on this island, I start now for
the Eskimo at Clarence Head or Cap Faraday on Hllesmore Lind. As I hopo that a
whaler will visit Cary Islands next summer
in order to rescue me and my party, I will
attempt to reach this island before the 1st
of July. Should none be here to the 15th
of July. I must if poasible, go to the
Danish settlements, therefore,if you visited
this island later than 1st of July, and
found no notice from me concerning my
voyage to the Danish settlements I should
be very much obliged if you would go to
Clarence Head (fifty milea herefrom],
where I, In a cairn on tho moat eastern
point, shall leave a notice concerning my
and my party's fates during the winter.
At last I will beg you to send all notices
Irom mo 10 I'rofesaor Baron A. E, Nordon-
ekield, Stockholm, Sweden.or to the nearest
Swedish consul, with statement of time and
place where they were fouml. Our provisions will, if I oannot reach the Kequimos,
nut last longer than to the 1st of January,
without supplying from any depot, l'arty
now consisting of five men, of which one is
dying.���S. E, Cary Island, 12th of October,
1802. (Signed,) J, A. l.JORUH'l, Swedish
Naturalist.
Not hli Fault.
" This is the third time you have soiled
your waistcoat and torn your trousers,
Osgoodson," said his mother, putting him
across her knen, " and I shall have to punish ymi."
" I protest aguinsl such treatment,"
responded the juvenile lioatoiiian with aa
much dignity ai lie could deiunnd under the
circumstances,   " The abnormal "
Whack !
" Development of the organs of "
Whack !
"DeitructivenoBB does not arise, as you
can ascertain by "
Whack 1
Consulting the authorities, from a deliberate purpose to "
Whack I
������ Do evil, but solely from "
Whack t   Whack 1
" Heredity. Ouch 1 Murder I Great
Scott ! Stop, dam it, stop ! That's
enough !"
- em
A Bair Birgain Indeed-
A Scotch minister is Baid to have rebuked
Ins wife for sleeping during his sermon in
this fashion : "Susan," he exclaimed from
tho pulpit, in a voice that wakened her, as
it did nil the other sleepers���" Susan, I
didna marry yo for yer wealth, sin ye had
none. And I didna marry ye for yer
beauty���that the whole congregation oan
sec. And if ye hae ua grace, I hae made a
sair baruain in ye, iudeeil.'
An Hotel Incident*
Any letters for me to-day I" aaked Unprofessional chair*boarder as he briskly
walked up to the desk ut tho KoFsiu house,
Toronlo.
" What ii your room, sir !" returned the
clerk without raising his head.
" Tho reading room," replied the professional chair-boarder, with asperity, aa l.e
moved towards lho tire. IJjlt he still patronizes tho house. THE WEEKLY NEWS, JAN. 31  ,1894.
I
u
���'.
m WSMLY NIWS
Published   Every Wednesday
At   Courtenay,   B.   C.
By Whitney ti Co.
TBiUlS OF SUHSCUHTION.
IN   ADVANCE.
One Yei-r       *'������*���'
8lx Montln       1 -���'���
Ring)-) Copy  ... -  . '������>**
RATES OF ADVERTISING:
One Inch per yoar $I2C.i
-     ..    Ill 'Hill          J*"'
otuhtll eol   jierjoiir     '--011
('fill: til          '*"fil
*.*-*,k.   . line              WW
Loual noticoa,por lino        -W
Notices   of llirtlis,   Marriages   and
Death3. 50 cuius each Insertion.
Nn A-lvuni-Jincnt inr-crted for less than
(.cuts.
T p FISHEK, NEWSPAPER AD
i-ii vertising Agent, 31 Merchants'
Etch-iugj, San FrnnciBco, ia our authorised agent. Thia paper ia kept
on file in hia oflko.
Wednesday, Jan, 31,1301
In looking over our books wc find that
111.111;, of our subscribers arc in i-.rrears,
some of them for many months. Newspapers can not be run on credit, and wc
must urye all who know themselves to
be indebted to us to at once forward tlie
UmouiU.
Eclitonil   Notes.
Hooper, who was recently acqtrtted in
the charge of murdering his wife, is still
in the Juliett" jail am! will have to stand
liis trial for an attempt to take her life by
throwing her into the river at Louisville
,1 few days previous to her death nn thp
railway train.
Queen Lil's crown and other royal bauble*- arc to be exhibited at the Midwinter
I'air, No wonder the queen wants the
heads of her political enemies in a basket
However they appear pretty linn on their
shoulders, and it is said ihc present is
the best government die Hawaiians have
ever had.
Canadians are naturally ivatchin**? with
a i4ood deal of interest the debate on the
Wilson tariff ��n the American Congress.
Amendments without end are adopted
but so tar they arc of minor importance.
The principle of free raw material is slill
strictly adhered to and notwithstanding
lhe assaults of the Republicans and a tew
recreant Democrats it is not likely to be
depaited from. Thc Wilson bill will
certainly become a law, and most probably, wool, lumber and coal will become
dec articles of commerce.
providing that the measurement of timber shall be conducted by officers appoint! d by ihe -t-ovtrnment.
A bill consolidating the law of evidence
a partnership act, a bill io amend ihc act
dealing with the labor bureau, and a bill
imposing succession duties, will be a-
mung the measures submitted to you.
WITH FINGEPt TIPS.
HOW HZLEN   KELLER WAS TAUGHT
THc NAMES CF THINGS.
There is no accounting foi taste. A
crow, ii is said, loves carrion and it may
be that Dr. Milne find.- in Muir's idiosyn-
tiasy an intereaiiny study; but the public���laugh!
The speech from the throne does no t
indicate a yreat deal ol legislation or a
long session. After reviewing the acts of
the Government for the past year and
-finding much in the condition ol affair.
for gralulalion, it refers to lhe Redistribution Hill and to these additional subjects of legislation:
You will be asked to consider amend
incuts to the drainage, dyking and irriga
tion act, so as to facilitate suitable guarantees being given by the government un
der proper conditions, and also an act
The question of imperial defence is occupying, to considerable extent, the attention of the Imperial Parliament. Moth
llie Conservative and Liberal parlies favor the speedy enlargement ofthe navy.
Kngland must maintain her supremacy
upon the seas, not only over one nation
but over a combination of iwo or three.
She does not requite to keep up so large ,**,
standing army as the Continental powers
but she must, if she would maintain her
piestige and influence among the natians
ofthe earth, anil lender herself iaiprcg*
liable from assault by Russia and France,
offset their land military power by a corresponding naval strength.
The great light between Corbett and
Mitchell lias resulted, as was generally
supposed would be the case, in ihc di**-
Ciijtlfiture of Mitchell. The efforts of die
Governor of Florida to prevent the light
were unavailing, The people, including
lhe courts and militia, sympathized with
the sports, and the law, if indeed there
was any law agaii.st the exhibition, was
silent. For ourselves, wc are not in favor of prize fighting with its concomitant
evils, and would be glad to see the whole
business suppressed; but as purveyors of
lhe news we are bound to publish an account of the affair tis we would of any
other matter in which a considerable por
tion ofthe people exhibit an interest.
We see that J. N. Muir has bobbed up
sercnly in the legislature again. His
grievance is introduced by a series of
questions presented by Dr. C-. L. Milne,
Of course they will be courteously answered by the Minister of Kducation, but
wc hope the farce will not be carried further. The time of the legislature is to
valuable to be fretted a-vay over any
man's crankiness. If the Opposition
members can't find any more useful work
to do than trot out this man of whom
everybody is heartily sick and tired, lhey
,hould in pity be relegated to the realm
of obscurity,
Bon-otV.n*; of tlm Method Ei plained hy
Cor TJ***clcn*l lutlrootMMf--A Pooo That
Mlrror-i n Ron I Willell uiiimvm Nttuglit of
Un- ,\|iii-'urnit��*t> of Bin.
Tlm most interesting feature of thoed-
ncatioiial congress waa tho appearance
nf Helen Keller under tho kind aieUliill-
Cnl guidance <>f Kifla Annio M< BuUirua,
her teacher. When n babe, Helen Holler
lireni-ie blind, (leaf and dumb. When
Mine f'lilii.'nti, a young WOWCtl of tim.H*
mil lit'uutv of fortn uml feature, stood
before tho muUouca berfdo 11 girl who.
(���scent for tiiuwul nign of uUuduotU ill
tho largo eyes, gave proinido of Htill
greater 1 eutity, ber fnco glistening with
ti rapture that pnlintorfl try to wcproia in
lho (-(.'xtacy nf angels, hoarta nei-tui.il to
stand 1-Mil. It ft'OBit face thut bad nover
I'onacioualy looked on the distortions of
[morion or pain���tho mirror of 11 eon!
thut fonM not imngiuo the outward uj>
[U'tirniicodf sill uor remember uny of tlio
dlscor'la of life.
In ber proaenco it was hard to appro-
clnto lho fact Unit her world lay within
oura, without (ran, lunsioorepeech, hf*i
one who uaw it will forget tho Impulsive,
fluttering of her young, tybitohandi*.**
it-ought her tonehor'a faoe or round,
white throtiti the rot...faction wheu the
contact of her delicate white finger tips
gavo her what sight given us: ti:*.! flash
i.i light over her face when, with her
forefinger resting on her teacher's lip,
nho r>-nd the answer tu th;- question Bho
had n.il'cil by the twinkling digital movements in her teacher's palm. There
wero thoao who wept when sho repeated
audibly, with a depth of fueling bho
alouuean feel:
Tell hio not t.i n-rmrnfal numb*-���
Lift1 i.i hut i-.11 t-ai'ity Urunm.
All were invited to nek question.-!, yet
not !*i;*.*7 did so, Tho occasion seemed
aacrod,
"how did you teach her the first
wordy*' some oue ventured at laat
"Her first word wns 'doll,'" was tho
answer. "I gave her the doll, placed
her linger on my lip mid spoko tho word.
When sho wearied uf thu doll, 1 took it
from her, and whon I returnud it again
gavo tho movement of tho lipn. The
second word was 'rang.' I used tbo cup
from which ahe drank, but became convinced thut fi.it/ bad not a clear idea of
tho natue, but that it meant to ber also
water or drink. Ho 1 one day took ber
to lho pt'.inp. and ns tbe water waa flowing Into her eup bad her bold ber band
in tho stream, and then putting ber finger on my lip gave her the word 'water.'
Then 1 again gave her tho word 'mug.'
The idea that evorything had a name,
tho comprehension of nouns, was agreat
revolution to hur and camo then and all
ct once. She wan greatly excited. A
nurse, with the baby Bister in her arms,
wan standing near, Helen immediately
put her hand on its faeo to know iti
namo. I told bor 'baby,' and una caught
it at once. Then alio stooped down and
patted tbe ground to know what it w as
called. Klio learned many words that
day, and thoso words Bho never forgot.1
���J!ow Boon after sbo learned words
did slio frame sentences?"
"Immediately."
"Woro verbs harder to learn than
nouns?"
"Not atall, I began with auch words
as 'sit,' -stand' ami tho like thnt wero
ea*iy to illustrate. Prepositions troubled
her most."
"How docs she got au idea of the abstract?"
"I cannot tell. It bogus to be witn
her, or it comes."
"Haa she any distinguishing sensoof
musical vibrations?"
"Yes, vory distinct. Sho likes music."
"I i ber vocabulary large?'
"Very large. HIio expresses herself
fluently and is choice of words,"
"Whnt books doea sho liko beat?"
Every now aud then tbo whito fingers
fluttered to the teacher's faeo for just
ouo delicate touch���a linger look it W03
���nnd now tbey rented ou Miss Sullivan's lip:
"Tell���tho ��� people���what���books-
yon��� like��� boflt,"
Helen's face waa an open liook of her
mental processes, Sho repeated each
word after Miss Sullivan, tmthesitatod
a littio on tbo words "tell" and "you,"
the brightness of her faeo dimming for
tho instant. As soon r..i she comprehended thu question, which aho did in till*
runcoof Its completion, the flash of Intelligence came, nud when sho turned toward tbo audience, for nho did not setftn
at any timo lo lose hor location, sho said
with spiritt
"Ob. I have read so much that it ia
very hard to flay what I liko best, hut"���
waitiijgji moment��� ������ 'Little Lord Fuunfc*
loroy'"��� And then followed rapidly
tlio names of several works, some of
whioh, it wonld iwtan, could hardly be
understood by uny uno who cannot know
sound mid color.
"How do you retuir
"By raised letters and by my teacher."
"1 noticed whon you pronoun-ted for
her ymi articulated with an exaggerated
motion of tho lips," stud one. "Is not
that necessaryr1'
"Her teaching was begun in thnt way,
I do not think it is necessary or best. 1
attribute tho peculiarity of her voice to
lhat mechanical action which she uses.
I think it would have been better and
just as easy if sho bad beon spoken to
with tbo usual movement."
In reply to tbe question-t-f her knowledge of tlio abstract, General Futou remarked that the greatest development In
the caso of Helen Keller was that of the
spiritual���Memphis Appeal-Avalaiicba,
ELECTRIC SPARKS.
f-Vwvlfn is buying Ha telephone Ijm-s.
Edison Iihk Invented a luuthod for repro
(Jtiei ni* phouotiranit* that Is said to bn very
satisfactory*.
At li'imt 120 cities In tbe United States
owu Lheir ulucli'lc lighting establishmeuta.
On** out of every 15 ulectric ll��bt plants la
a municipal itifiLlttitlon.
> new 1 m- Insulator has bsen Introduced
whioh greatly -tlaiplifl*-**. the problem of at-
tachiiiif wires to trt'tfl so that thoy may In
no way come iu contact with tbe brauehen
A New Vork el-t-ctrfclaa Is building an
ait--l.li' which hn claim* will -tolve (he
problem of nerlal nuvigatlun beyond a
doubt. He li to nun* of Its nni-ccw thnt tui
boa already salvctWl a umut. for ii���ihe p**>
giuthJpetk.
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Esquimalt  and Nanaimo Ry.
Steamer Jo m
J. K. BUTLKH,  MASTER.
On and after Mar. 22nd, 1S93
The Stenm'T JOAN will suil as follows
CAI.l,ISfiAT WAY I'DK'I'.S nt |mss,ngiir��
and fraicllt lil.r nffor
-.cava Victoria, Tlluail iy, 7 ft. m.
"   Nbr.Iidi) fur Coniox. H inliiciilny, 7 a. ni
I.o.vo L'ouiox for S'tuir. mo,      Kri'lnys. 7o.ni
'      Nanuimo tor Victoria   Sninnloy. 7 u.in
Fur freight or stale rooms apply on
board, or at the Company's ticket ollice,
Victoria Station, Store street,
Esquimalt & Nanaimo R'y-
Time  Table   No.   17,
To t��ke effect at 8.00 o. m. on Friday
September 30tU. 1882. Train, run
on Pacific Standard Timo.
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SszassqiBBl'JlsaafiB:
N.naaaa.aosoHM     m
��� .- i : : i l :   .- i -. <0^
On Sftturdayi and Sundays
Kit-am Tickets will bo Inuod hutwowi all
poliU for afai-j -uiil a imnrter. ko��1 foriw-
tvroiotUler thmv MumUy,
Kstnrn Tir-kctti for ���sn*. nn 1 a li/ilf wdlnsrjr
Ctrs majr bs pnrchaand flailj to all point*,
good for mvi-i. <U**i, inoltidlnff day ot Ismna,
Mo Rotirn Tickets i.isnwl for a faro and a
qiirtor whero ths singl-i fara la twrmif-Sra
Mats.
ThranRti ratwi botwoon Victoria and Cottiox-.
L UUVMVIR. JOSEPH HUWTlBi
f-reofdont, Oonl tnpi.
ILK. PRIOR,
H-m. Yrtifrt ax* PatMogw Aft
Riverside Hotel
Courtenay B C
J. J. Grant, Proprietor
The Hi-tut is otic ofthe best equipped
on the Pacific Coast, and is situated at
the [flouth of the Courtenay Kiver, between Union and the large farming settlement of Coniox,
Trent aie plentiful in the river, ancl
1 true gamfc abound-, in the neighborhood
The liar connected with the hotel is
kept well supplied   with  the  best  wines
uul  liquors.    Staj-c  connects   with   all
Steamers,   Terms moderate
Cumberland Hotel.
Union, B. C.
The finest hotel building
Fixtures and liar
North of Victori ���,
And the best kept house.
Spacious Billiard Room
and new
Billard and Pool Tables,
Best of Wines and Liquors.
Wood it Miller
UNION, H. C.
Having Added to their Own
the
Splendid Livery Outfit.
of R. Grant and Co
Are Prepared to furnish.  Sty-
ish  Rigsat   Reasonable Rates
Give them a cull.
T. C. Woods
Comox B.  0.
Conducts a Gr.v eral
Teaming   and Liverj  Business
Mis Stage Runs to I '"nion and
Returns Thursdays,! Saturdays.
and Sundays,
Nanaimo Machit e Works
OP
Robert J, Weato'
Fraser Street
Near Bastion Stn et Bridge
Nanaimo' B. C ���
All Kinds of Machinery ml ie to order
and rcpiiired.
Nanaimo Cigar fal tory.
Philip Gable, P* oprietor.
a.tin Str��et     ���   Nan limo B. 0.
��� Manufactures   the   finest    cignrcs,
employing none but white lab or.
Why purchase inferior for, :ign cigars,
when ymi cm obtain a SOPE| iioR arti-
CI.E for the siime money?
vVARNIIVG
All persniis driving ovi r th�� wharf
or bridge, in    Comox di: tnet f.Blei
than a walk, will ho proaec ntedaccord
ni; to luw.
8. Oiwh
(iov, Aijont.
A. C. Fultc n
Bntchei ���
Sandwick and I Jnion
Has always on 1 land a
choice stoa '<.
Fresh Beef, Mutton,' Veal, Pork
at Lowest Prl :es.
COURTENAY HOUSE.
CO'CT-RTSlTJi.ir, B.C.
The leading hotel in Comox district.
New and handsomely furnished,
excellent hunting and fishing close
to town. Tourists csn depend on
first-elads aceemmodation. Rensona-
ble rates. Bar supplied with the
choicest liquors and cigars
R. Graham, Propr.
C. H. Besvor-Potts
Solicitor, Notary Public. Conveyancing
in all its branches. Office Commercial Si, Nanaimo,
Yarwood & Young.
Hamsters, Solicitors, &c Office Cor.
Huston and Commercial St., Nanaimo, 11. C.
HILRERT&SON
Funerai, Directors and Emhai.mkrs
nrmlUAtM of tlio Orti'iiUI, Ku-i-kii,
ami (.'timid Si.u,h CoIIu-.-ch of Km-
b.ilmii.K ,
Nanaimo, li, C.
<t - $io and $20, Genuine Confederate
���Pj jliills onlv t-ve etch; $50 ;md $100
bills 10 cents each j $i ami $2 bills 2 Scents
each. Sent securely sealed nn receipt of
price. Addreat, Chas, 1). Barkkr, go
S- Fowyih St., Atlanta, Gn., U. S. A.
The Nanaimo Pharmacy
Nanaimo B. C.
W, E. Mc Cartney Chemist,
Manager.
Pure Drugs Cht-miuals und  Putprit
Mi-iltuincs.
PliyBlcatm Prasclpttom ami all onlort- flu.ii
with euro u��>l ilix-'uti'ti. 1'. 0, box 1*,
Wm Mathsv/son.
will deliver daily at
UNION
and during warm weather twice a day
Pure Milk from liis  Ranch
And also will deliver to bis cnstonie
daily Fresh Eg      Dutter, Vegetables.
Poultry, cic.
Farmers having above for sale or delivery should consult him,
Passengers carried to and from Union.
McKenzie
���and ���
McDonald
Courtenay, B. C.
General Blacksmithing
and Horse Shoeing.
Loggers' Work a Specialty.
UNION Bakery
UNION, B.C.
Best of Bread, Cakes and
Pies always  on hand.
The Bread Cart will   be at
Courtenay and Coniox Tuesdays and Fridays.
Adderton & Rowbotham, Prop
For Sale
521 Acres of Choice Land,
��� and ���
8 Horaei, 100 Shoop, and SO Oow.
together with
8 Mowing Machine., 1 Steel Roller
1 Re.pine Machine, 1 Seed Sower,
1 Drill Bower, 1 Spring wagon, and
Douhle Wagon.
Title deed! can be Man in my poe-
seaaion.
Adam McKelvey
Nanaimo  Su-to Mill
��� and_ -
Sash and Door Factory
A H.,l.m, Pr��p. Mill St.. H| ) Be�� li. Trt. I��
Nanaimo II. C -
A complete slock ofRoush and Dressed
Lumber always on hand; also Shingles,
Laths,  Pickets,   Doors,  ' Windows and
Blinds, Moulding, Scroll sa wisig, Turning
and all kinds of wood finil' ling furnished
Cerlar,     While   Pine,       Redwo.d.
All orders accompanied wit "iC'ASH orompt
ly and carefully atlended I o.
.Sieamer Kstd I
flarbor and ontside towinf done at raMon
.ble rates.
G B Leighton
At tha Bay, Oomox, B. 0.
Blacksmithing an   Repairing
of all kinds
Carriage Work and Horseshoeing a specialty
F. W. Hart
Manufacturer,   Importer, Whotaaala
and Retail Dealer   in
���r*CT3R"*TJ-J*--JI*E
uaupCTe, i.i��oi.eojc, on. cloth and
- HOUSE    FURINISHIKS ���-
19* tjugest Esta^'slnaeot of its kind.
n-n Cordon. Ut Vanvavr B. 6,
"Bargains that are Bargains."
We have a Bargain Counter that is the leadmg topic of interest among the Ladies in Nanaimo. It is really remarkable
how cheap we have put in all the goods thereon. If you want
a cheap dress, j icket, water-proof, etc., this month, you
should take the next beat to Nanaimo and look the matter up,
We are honest about this and don't want one of our customers
to neglect this special sale.
Sloan & Scott, Nanaimo, B. C.
COURTENAY, B.C.   ,
Having bought out the Stage, Team and Livery  Outfit
John \Y. Fraser will continue the business at the old stand
K**v,    We have also purchased a carload of Lake coal and wi 11
deliver it at a reasonable figure.
Orders may be left at the NEWS1 Office.
KnrwKi Thx/cplf anc- m orf*cr t0 (*�� this
mow mvseiT, comean(1 hear Mrs }
M. Ellis lecture on Phrenology and Physiology at K. of P. Hall on Wednesday and Tluirs
day evenings of this week. The first night the
subject will be Phrenological Adaptationin Bus
iness���no admission fee, but a collection taken
up. Second night the subject will be Phreno
logical Adaptation in Love, Courtship and
Marriage, and how to be on Good Terms
with your Mother-in-law. Admission, 25 cents
Mrs. Ellis will examine several persons selected by the audience each night. Second night
two couples mated on the stage at close oi the
lecture. Private examinations given at the
Hall during the day, and after evening lectures;
also photos examined.
1. D. McLean
Jeweler, Bookseller
and Dealer in
Organs, Pianos, Music
Stationery,   and   Notions ot all kinds.
Union   Mines, B  C.
Eureka  Bottling  Works,
LOUIS LAWRESTCE, PROPRIETOR,
lUtiUrACTUUBH tr
80DA   WATER,   LEMONADE,   GINGER   ALE,
Sarsaparalla and Champagne Cider, Iron Phosphates, Syrups,
Bottler of Uiffjrj.ii Bmd, of La/er l);;r Steam Bier and Porter
Agent for Union llrewery Company.
Nanaimo and Courtenay B.  C.
UNION  MINES
F URN IT URE   ES TABLISHMENT
 .,.���.,.,.  A Full  Line of Everything  	
BUILDERS   and CONTRACTOR
pr UNDERTAKING   IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
JJGrant and McGregor Props.
Anley & Smith.
COMOX and UNION B. C.
Dealtvrs in All Kinds of Meats, Vegetables, etc.
Orders Filled on Short Notice.

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