BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander May 9, 1930

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342656.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342656.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342656-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342656-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342656-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342656-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342656-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342656-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342656-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342656.ris

Full Text

 I
*********^***^***4**9****^***4>**^
"Hollyw<RP|,u
Revue"
r
Y AT r        ;>ti     »J
rt
tknberland Islander
i**************0*00*************
at the Ilo-Ilo
this week-end
i 5/
**00*******000****00*+***004+0000
WITH  WHICH  IS  CONSOLIDATED  THE CUMBERLAND  NEWS.
#
FORTY-NINTH YEAR.—No. 20
Ul'.MUEKI.AND. IilUTISH COLUMBIA       FRIDAY,   MAY  9th,   1930.
SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS  PER ANNUM
First AiH
Results Are
Announced
LARGE NUMBER OF PASSES
RECORDED
MERRY MA'-ERS TO
I TRAVEL VIA SEAPLANE
The Merry Makers' Orchestra,
'•ip'sied' of Messrs R. T. Brown, S.
-II    I '^bertson,  A.  Pilling,  and  Mrs.
'' W. Hudson supplied the music at
the bdg dance held at Campbellton
on Saturday last. This coming Saturday, the Merry Makers travel to
Elk Bay going from Campbell River
via seaplane and on Saturday, May
24th, the orchestra has been engaged
to play at Quathiaski Cove.
The result of the recent examinations in first aid have just been announced and show a remarkably long
list of passes, The examination'
covered every class and the names
are published in order of merit:
Ladies' first year- -Miss B. Taylor,
Mrs. M. High, Mrs. N. Pearse.
Second yenr—Miss H. Littler, Mis'
A. Brown, Miss N. Jackson, Miss M.
Harrison, Miss I. Frew.
Third year—Miss E. Hilton, Mis-;
B. Westfield, Miss E. Waterfield.
Junior   Girls—Miss   E.   Watson,
Miss M. Westfield, Miss C. Robertson
Miss Margaret Beveridge, Miss B.
Martin, Mis;- May Beveridge, Miss
L. Picketti, Miss E. Brown, Miss J.
Harvey, Miss D. Bickerton, Miss D.
Hunt.
First year—J. Pritchard, W. Davis
S. Williams, J. McQuinn, J. Weir, T.
Shields, W. Jackson, J. Monks, J
Lockner, W. Mossey, R. McGrath, W.
Johnston, J. Flinton, W. Littler, B.
Churchill, T. Tinga, P. Limare, T.
Hobbs, R. Brown, E. Edwards, A.
G. High, D. Morgan, H
jr.,  R. Martin, J.  Mc-
ycar—B.    Horbury,
Taylor, S. Hunt, jr.,
Dunsmore,
Waterfield,
Laughlin.
Second
Bennie, J.
Hnrvie.
Third year, medallion—W. Whyte
J. Taylor, J. D. Robertson, R. Bonora
J. Fellows, J. Buchanan, J. Watson.
R. Bennie, H. Watson, T. Robertson,
M. Brown.
Fourth nnd fifth year labels—J.
S. Brows'. H. Waterfield, M. Brown.
Junior boys—W. McNaughton, J.
Marpole.
A CORRECTION
The benefit whist drive and dance
held in the Memorial Hall on Saturday, April 26th was held by a few
friends and neighbors of Mrs. Robertson and not under the auspices of
thc W.B.A. ns reported in our issue
of May 2nd.
Eagl
es'SoccerTeam
Wins In North
Cumberland, May 5.—The
football eleven went north in search
of honors on Sunday when they journeyed ta Compbell Piver to play a return mctch with a team from Quuthi-
askl Cove who were guests of the locals
on Easter Sunday. A very interesting
and exciting game was played which
was not without its humorous aspects.
The Eagles were returned victorious,
the score resulting 4-2. The following
represented the local Eagles' team:
Combs, McFarland, McNeil, Conn, W.
Davis, Bates. B. McLellan, J. Campbell, W. McFarlane, O. McLellan and
O. Brown.
A large number of Cumberland people motored to Campbell River to witness the game. Among those making
the trip were Mr. and Mrs. J. Watson
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Weir.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Herd, Misses Margaret Herd and Nina Shields, Mr. and
Mrs. J. D. Davis, Mr. and Mrs. J,
Monks and Albert, Messrs. T. Robertson Jr., A. Walker, A. Hunter, Andrew
Brown, W. and G. Brown.
First Game Of
Season at Nanaimo
LOCAL   CRICKETERS   TO   OPEN
AT HUB CITY SUNDAY
Victor Bonora
To Give Cup For
Quoiting^ contest; Athletes In
High School
Victor Bonora, proprietor of thc
King George Hotel has promised to
donate a cup at the end of the summer for competition amongst the
quoiting players. The manner of
arranging the contest will be left
entirely in the hands of a committee
but the donor .insists that contest be
open to any resident in the Comox
district.
Mr. Bonora has also donated two
prizes for this Saturday, a first prize
of $3.00 and a second prize of $2.00
to be played for according to rules
Inid down hy a committee of the
Cumberland United Quoiting Club.
A double hcacdr game played on
Saturday last resulted in a win for
H. Ellis, Sr., and J. Murray against
R.  T,  Brown  and  W.  Mossey, the
The Cumberland cricketers journey to Nanaimo on Sunday for the
first game of the season.   The local
eleven  have  not  yet got  down  to
proper  practice  but hope  by next
weel: to have all members out. Na. I ^e being 31-15.
naimo are about in the same position u !" a rfngle^ game, J. T^ Brown
aa Cumberland, so far as players go.  ^ J- Bond'   *"14 and H- Ellls beat
.Joee Hines, one of the Hub City's.J* Br°wn' x{*U'     L    M
strongest  and  popular  players will    / double header handicap will be
not be seen  in  action  this season. I played thls Saturday commencing at
Just why Joe decided to call it otF
could not he learned. Arthur Leigh-1
ton will also be missing from their
I:
1 o'clock when a player and novice
will be drawn together. Mr. Bon-
ora's prizes will most probably bc
ine up and possibly Victor -Eccles! Put »* for ""Petition in this handi-
Uthough in the case of the latter Icap'
itrong hopes are entertained for his *•**• vr*     t	
ippeftrance with the Hub caty team. C^# Willi?  I O Lc&VC
Cumberland during the close season I
suffered the loss of Harry Taylor
vho hns left for England.   His place
-111 be hard to fill. Two or three
of the local team are busy practicing with the ball in an endeavor to
ssist the few bowlers Cumberland
posses. The game on Sunday is
■ 'hoduled to start at 11 a.m. and the
lowing will do duty:
F. V. HALL (capt.), J. Idiens
(viee-capt.), J. Vernon-Jones, J. L.
Brown, S. Gough, P. McLaughlin, J.
Andrews, C. V. Dando, J. Vaughan,
A. J .Taylor, G. I. Guy.
The First Aid Whist Drive and
Dance advertised for Friday, May
9th, in the the Memorial Hall has
been postponed until Friday, May
lfith.
Mother's Day
Service Sunday
C.G.I.T. Will Take Charge of Service
at United Church
The Mother's Day service at the
Cumberland United Church on Sunday May 11th will be taken over by
the C.G.I.T. with May Beveridge,
president of the senior group in
charge. The girls will also form the
:holr and the service will commence
it 7 p.m. A cordial invitation to
be present at this service is extended
to all.
COAST SMELTER
THE KING GOT
HIS FEET WET!
Remember the story of King Canute who stood on the beach and for-
bade the tide to come in? All he got
for his pains was a salt water footbath.
You might as well try to stem the
onrushing tide of ncwsreel-conscious-
ness in Canada's theatre-going public. All over the land they're demanding more newsreels In their
film fare.
Cumberland theatre-goers can see
the best newsreel in the world at
the Ilo-Ilo Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday of next week. You Willi
see "Happy Days in Italy," natives'
and visitors fling care to the winds'
as carnival opens at Vinreggfo. .
"Polling the Nation on Prohibi-i
tion." Literary Digest sends out
twenty million ballots in biggest vote
by mail ever undertaken. "This man
would Itct'p ycu dry," introducing
Fred A. Victor, or Yonkers, the new
head of the New York Antl Saloon
league. "This little girl is a bird,"
Betty May Neidfelt, four of Centralis, Wash., can whistle with her
tonsils. "This man is after auto speed
mark." Kay Don and Silver Bullet.
"Girls are stepping high these days".
In California they go up nn the air
trying to learn Fanchon and Marco's latest dance.
Development of your copper properties tributary to British Columbia
tidewater has not yet produced
enough copper ore t6 justify the
construction of a copper smelter or
refinery. If all the copper ores/concentrates produced on the British
Columbia coast were available, the
building of a smelter and refinery
would be warranted, but as practically all of these ores/concentrates
are tied up in contracts {made in
good faith) with United States smelters, having some years to run, nothing can be done in the meantime
or until your development work (being vigorously prosecuted) puts the
necessary quantity of ore in sight.
It must be said that the B. C.
Government are most solicitous to
have the copper ores of the province
carried to metal by the province of
British Columbia workmen and they
have offered every reasonable induce
ment to bring this about. Your directors are in complete sympathy
with the Government's policy, and
are doing everything possible to put
It into effect, but of course this cannot he done unless and until the existence of tonnage of ore has been
established.
■From the Annual Report of the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Cnnnda Limited for
1929.
"Unemployment insurance is insurance not only against unemployment but against something else—it
is insurance against sovietism."—
A. W. Neill an House of Commons.
T. A. SPRUSTON IS
LEAVING FOR CALIFORNIA.
Mr. T. A. Spruston, for many
years connected with the local mining industry on the Island left Nanaimo on Tuesday for Southern California, where he has accepted a position. Mr. Spruston came to the
Island from Michel, coal mining centre of thc Crows Nest Pass Coal Co,
where he had charge of one of the
Royston for Africa
The many friends of Mr. C. Wing,
the popular proprietor of the Royston Auto Camp will be sorry to hear
that he will be leaving the district
at tho end of the month for Northern Rhodesia, where he has accepted
a position which will necessitate him
being absent from the district for
th next three years. During residence at Royston, both Mr. and Mrs.
Wing have made a host of friends,
nnd whilst sorry to see Mr. Wing
go, are congratulating him on  re-
elvlng sueh an important position
in the dark continent.
Mr. Wing in his new appointment
will be connected with the Newmont
Mining Corporation of New York,
this corporation controls the McKann
oncession in Northern Rhodesia and
are said to be developing what will
probably be one of the largest cop-
ner mines in the world.
CLIFFE LOSES
CAR BY FIRE
Percy Cliffe of Courtenay lost his
ear by fire on the Cumberland-Cour-
tenay road at the beginning of the
week. Cliffe was answering a service call near the traps of the Cumberland Rod and Gun club and when
near that point had the misfortune
to ditch his car which took fire. A
passing motorist turned in the alarm
the Cumberland Fire Department responding with the chemical truck.
The blaze was soon put out, but not
before the car was practically ruined.
Mrs. Harry Parkinson and Mrs.
Fraser Watson were hostesses at
three tables of whist on Wednesday
evening, in honor of Mrs. Nellie
Pearse, who is leaving in the very
near future for England . A very
jolly evening was spent and Mrs.
Pearse presented with a beautiful
personal gift from a few of her
friends. During the evening the
hostesses served delectable refreshments and announced the winners at
whist as first, Mrs. Woods, second,
Mrs. G. High, consolation, Mrs. W.
Lewis.
HOSPITAL DANCE
LARGELY ATTENDED
The Ilo-Ilo dance hall was the
scene of a very jolly affair on Friday last, thc occasion being the annual ball of the ladies' auxiliary of
the Cumberland General Hospital.
The spacious ball room had been
beautifully decorated for the occasion, red nnd white streamers being Distance,
Third Place
LOCALS MAKE POOR SHOWING
AGAINST COURTENAY
Agricultural
Conditions In
Comox
Valley
i L. FRELONE CRACKS
! 24 OUT OF 25 BIRDS
Some very good shooting was wit-
i nessed at the traps of the Cumberland Rod and Gun club on Sunday
last when Louis Frelone headed the
shooters by tracking 24 out of 25.
Scores   were   as   follows:
L Frelone, 24; D. Francioli, 22;
Joe Gordon, 19; V. Bono, 19; B.
Horbury, 19; P. Francioli, IS; W.
McLellan, 17; H. Wilcock. 17; J
Bono, 17.
The proud boast of Cumberland-J
ers that their athletes were second f
to none was rudely shattered on Sat- i
urday last on the occasion of the,
Inter-High School sports meet held!
nt Courtenay. The Courtenay stu-1
dent-athletes carrjed all before themj
and more than doubled the number j
of points piled up by the local stud-!
ents. The defeat suffered, however,'
has not dampened the ardor of our
athletes, It has had just the reverse |
for the Cumberland boys and girls'
have gone on record as this being
the last time such a trouncing will
be administered. Training will bej
the order of the day, as the locals I
figure that on May 24th they willj
have a chance to at least retrieve
some of their lost laurels. The reverse has spurred the Public School
boys and girls to further action and i
each night numbers of the scholars!
can be seen training, ready for their
sports on the 28th of May.
The sports last Saturday were well
conducted and reflected great cerdit!
on  those  responsible.
Following were the winners;
Gold Medals—Junior girls, Joy McKenzie, Courtenay, 12; Junior boys. I
George McKee, Courtenay, 18; Ssnlorl
jirls, Kay More, Courtenay, 20; Senior)
boys, John Tribe, Courtenay. 16,
Championship cup—Courtenay.
Victoria Colonist cup for boys' senior
relay, Courtenay; Cumberland High
Scliool cup for girls' senior relay, Cour- j
tenay; Dr. Briggs cup for boys' Junior!
.■ejay, Courtenay; Joe Idlens cup fori
unlor girls'  relay,  Courtenay.
50 yards, girls under 10—1st, Joy Mc- J
Aenzis, Courtenay; 2nd, Muriel Part-i
ridge, Cumberland; 3rd, Margaret
imith, Comox.   Time 7 seconds.
100 yards, boys under 18— 1st, Henry,
McCabe, Tsolum; 2nd, Howard Button,
Courtenay; 3rd. K. Okuda. Cumber-j
.and.   Time 11 4-5 seconds.
100 yards, girls, op;-n—1st, Kay j
'Moore, Courtenay; 2nd, Margaret'
Jroakett, Tsolum; 3rd, Catherine i
drown, Cumocrland.   Time 12 j-5.        |
100 yards, boys, open—1st, John |
Tribe Courtenay; 2nd, G. Brown, Cumberland; 3rd, Harold Baker, Tsolum. I
Time, 11 3-5 seconds.
High jump, girls under 16—1st, |
Betty Muir, Tsolum; 2nd, Edna Wat-1
son, Cumberland; 3rd, Lettie Swingler, I
Jomox.   Height, 3' 10".
Broad jump, boys under 16—1st. (
Howard Sutton, Courtenay; 2nd. K.j
jkuda. Cumberland; 3rd, Geo. Sur-
jenor, Tsolum.   Distance, 16' 9¥t".
Basketball throw, girls, open—1st,
Catherine Brown, Cumberland; 2nd,
Gwen Fairbairn, Comox; 3rd, Bertha
Altonen, Tsolum.   Distance, 68', 10 V.
Pole vault, boys, open—1st, Robert
Bowie, Courtenay; 2nd, Bill Piket, Comox; 3rd, Francescine, Cumberland.
Height, 9'.
75 yards, girls, open—1st, Kay Moore,
Courtenay; 2nd, Margaret Crocsett,
Tsolum; Srd, Gwen Fairbairn, Comox.
Time,, 9 4-5 seconds.
220 yards, boys under 16—1st, Henry
McCabe, Tsolum; 2nd, Howard Sutton,
Courtenay; 3rd, Hibbert McLeod, Comox.   Time, 25 1-5 seconds.
75 yards, girls under 16—1st, Catherine Brown, Cumberland; 2nd, Joy McKenzie, Courtenay; 3rd, Lettie Swingler, Comox.   Time 9 3-5 seconds.
220 yards, boys, open—1st, G, Brown,
Cumberland; 2nd, Harold Baker, Tsolum; 3rd, John Tribe, Courtenay.
Time, 25 seconds.
Basketball throw, girls under 16—
1st, Bertha Altonen, Tsolum; 2nd, Margaret Smith, Comox; 3rd, Florence
Hagarty, Courtenay.   Distance, 64' 1".
High jump, boys under 16—1st, Geo.
McKee, Courtenay; 2nd, Douglas I'air-
balrn, Comox; 3rd, J. Whyley, Cumberland.   Height, 4' 10".
Broad jump, boys, open—1st, John
Tribe, Courtenay; 2nd, T. Wawaguchi,
Cumberland; 3rd, Henry Ellis, Comox.
17' 6".
The weather during the month of
April was very changeable, there being clear, warm days but there were
also cooler days with considerable
rainfall and wind. Even althcugli
the weather has been very catchy,
it is felt that more plowing has been j
done this spring than usual, For
the most part, the early vegetables, I
grains and potatoes have been p ant- >
ed on the higher lands. In various
place, oats and spring wheat aro j
showing up well and with favorable!
weather with ample moisture, should [
produce un exceptionally good crop. I
The fruit trees are showing good
blossom now and show every indica- \
tion of a good crop of fruit. Straw-1     Victoria,   Mayfi.—British   Colum-
berries   are   looking   excellent   andjbia's proposed tax on fuel oil  may
Tax On Fuel Oil
May Be Cancelled
SOLUTION  OF  COAL   PROBLEM
WOULD MEAN SCRAPPING
OF NEW LEGISLATION
Programme
For May 24
Drawn Up
MISS MAGNONE OF UNION BAY
TO BE QUEEN OF MAY
some plantations show every evidence of careful attention. Most
farmers are now busy on their land.
Grass and pasture lands now provide
excellent feed for stock turned out
with the result that they show signs
of improvement.
Live Stock
The sheep on the higher land and
that which is comparatively dry, look
in very good condition, whilst those
on the wetter places and swimp
lands show injury due to paradtes
of different types. In some c ises,
the result is that these look in very
poor condition. Different cases have
also been recorded where cattle have
shown signs of poisoning from poisonous weeds.
Town Topics
Miss Alma McKnight of Britannia Beach arrived Monday on a visit
to her aunt, Mrs. J. Marpole.
* *        Hr
Mr. Gower, the public school inspector for this district was in town
during the week in his official capacity.
* +    *
A. J. Taylor, of the government
mine rescue station left this morning for Nanaimo where he will attend a meeting of the mine rescue
department.
* *    *
Mr. Ross Hocking, of Peden Bros.
Victoria was a visitor to Cumberland
on Wednesday last.
* *    *
A news item from Comox conveys
the information that Mr. L. H. Finch
of Cumberland has completed building operations there and returned to
his home. Mr. Finch is said to bo
anxious to make a home in Comox.
* »    *
A roof fire shortly after Bo'clock
on Monday morning caused only
slight damage to the roof of the
Fraternal Halt, Dunsmuir, avenue.
The blaze was first noticed by Mr-
George Henderson of Henderson Motors who turned in the alarm to
central.
* •    *
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dallos, of
Portland, Ore., arrived in town on
Monday on a visit to relatives.
* *' ■*
Mrs. George McKeen, of San
Francisco is visiting her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Frame.
never be enforced. Its inauguration
has been postponed until after Premier Tolmle's conference here in
June, and if that meeting of experts
can devise some other means of assisting the coal industry, the government will be prepared to consider the
cancellation of the projected levy
altogether.
This wds made known officially a-i
the government continued its preparation for calling together next
month leading figures in the coal
mining and railway world. Premier
Tolmie has been informed by heads
of the two transcontinental railways
that they will send to the meeting
some of their chief officials to discuss the transportation aspect of the
present coal problem, while many
leading coal operators will attend.
The railways, it was explained, are
vitally concerned with the outcome
of the conference, in two ways. In
the first place, they would pay a
large percentage of tho proposed
levy, expected to amount to $550,-
000 in its first year. If the tax can
be cancelled .it will be of great benefit to them. Secondly, increased
consumption of coal means increased
freight for them. Having learned
that the enforcement of the oil tax
largely depends on the success of
the conference, the railways are particularly interested in seeing that
success is achieved.
Tea Toper Taver ,i
Proves Popular
THREE-ACT COMEDY-DRAMA BY
YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETY
.MUCH ENJOYED
the predominant colors whilst sea-i High Jump, girls, open—1st, Kay
sonable flowers were used in profu-, Moore, Courlcnay; 2nd. Lettie Sv ing-
sion. There was a very large at- [ ler, Oomox; 3rd. Margaret Isenor, Tuo-
tendance and many beautiful gowns,lum. Height 4' 3".
were in evidence. Mr. J. H. Cam- Belay, girls under lfl-lst, Courte.iay;
2nd, Comox;  Srd, Tsolum.    Tim-' 46
eron acted as master of ceremonies j
and music was supplied by Jimmy
seconds.
... ..    ,   c, .,        ,    ,       ..       i    Relay, boys under I6-~lst, Courtriay;
Walker's Sunnyside orchestra. About 2nd Ts0,um; 3rd Cun)bcrland. rime
midnight bounteous refreshments'
were served hy nn energetic committee of the auxiliary, after which
dancing was continued until 2 a.m.
The proceeds will be devoted to the
funds of the auxiliary.
46 3-5 seconds.
Relay, boys, open—1st. Courtenay;
2nd, Cumberland; 3rd, Tsolum. Time
1 minute, 46 3-5 seconds.
Pole vault, boys under 10—1st, Geo.
McKee; 2nd, Douglas Fairbairn.   7' fi".
Relay, girls, open-1st, Courtenay;
2nd, Tsolum; 3rd, Cumberland. Time,
51 4-5 seconds.
High jump, boys, open—1st, Arthur
Searle, Courtenay;  2nd, Joe Downey,
Advices from Victoria state that j Comox.   Height, 5' 1".
Short Session
Of City Council
NOTHING OF IMPORTANCE AT
REGULAR MEETING OF
COUNCIL
There was very little business be
fore the city fathers at the regular:
meeting held on Monday night wilh!
His Worship Mayor Maxwell in the j
chair and Aldermen (,'. J. Parnham,
T. H. Mumford, J. Ledingham, W. ]
Henderson and J .Williams, I). Bannerman presenl.
Alter the adoption of the minutes
ol the previous meeting, a communication, the only one placed before
tiie council, from the Hayes Manufacturing Co., of Vancouver, convey-j
ml the information that the price:
quoted un the new flre truck was
$ii2uU E.O.B. Vancouver. The letter
was in reply tu one sent by tne city
clerk re iiuigiit un truck from Vancouver iu Nanaimo.
Bills and accounts presented wer-;
referred iu Lho finance committee!
and ji found correct ordered to be
paid.
Repoits ui' committees were received, Alderman Parnham on behalJ!
ui the finance committee reporting
favorable bank balances. For the I
Health committee Alderman Williams |
reported one case of scarlet lever, j
there being no new cases since the !
last meeting. Alderman Bannerman
lur the water committee reported:
the cleaning out of tho city dam ami,
a goud supply of waler. Chan man'
ol' the light committee, Alderman}
Mumford reported everything as sat-
isfactory, Chairman Henderson oi
the board oi works reported that the
city teamster was in thc hospital ami
he luul found it necessary to engage
the services of another teamster.
Alderman Mumford reported on
tho result of tho delegation Irom tin
Board oi Trade with reference tu
the limber al Ihe Lake. This was
reported fully in last week's Island*
A full meeting of the sports committee held in the City Hall on Tuesday night, drafted up the programme
for the big celebration. It took the
committee upwards of three hours'
careful deliberation before the programme was finally adopted. That
it will surpass last year's goes without saying. Races and competitions
have been arranged for the younger
element of all ages, which will occupy the early part of the day.
The usual parade, of course, will
be held, magnificent prizes being donated for best decorated floats, cars,
bicycles, etc., with special prizes for
classes of public school children joining the parade. In the afternoon
and evening ,the major portion of
tho sports will be devoted to the seniors, with a cricket game between
Courtenay and Cumberland taking
place on the "Y" ground. So as not
to interfere with the sports on the
2-lth of May, the competition of the
Rod and Gun club, for which the
celebration committee donated the
sum of ?30.00, will bo held at the
traps on tho Courtenay road on Sunday, May 25th. Arrangements are
also being made for a big soccer
game to be held on tbe Sunday and
a special invitation has been sent to
the Nanaimo champions to come to
Cumberland on the 25th. This will
give practically two days celebration
and the committee looks with confidence to it being the best in the
history of Cumberland.
The Union Bay community has the
privilege of appointing the May
Queen for this year and during the
week voted on Miss Alma Magnone
for the honor, For her maids she
will have Dorothy King and Emily
Bowden and page boys will be Kenneth Brown and Alvon McKay.
The Union Buy contingent will
also look after the May Pole dancing and a -special feature of the
celebration ihis yeflr will ue the exhibition dances io be put on by the
pupils of Miss Gwen Noel. There
will also be dancing competitions,
prizes being awarded for Highland
fling, Irish jig and Sword dances.
The newly organized Cumberland
United quolting club will also be in
on the sporting end this year as a
special donation has been granted
the club for quoiting competition,
the semi-finals and finals to be staged
on the sports field on the afternoon
of the 2-lth. The elimination games
will be played on the courts of the
club.
Local Students Pass
Exams. At U.B.C.
A.J. TAYLOR IN
CHARGE OF GOVT,
MINE RESCUE STATION
::„„,, For Bome time after his ar- Abraham 1. Taylor, of the Civil I Half mile, boy* under |^ Doug-
rival on the Wand he held an of- Service, haS been appointed „ -^ &'S^?^i.1^cE
ficial position at Cumberland. He | porary inspector and caretaker of ^^ Timi\ 2, 21 2.5 aeconds
was later transferred to Extension I the Government Mine Rescue Sta-, Half ^ ^ open„j8ti Cecil Car-
where he was general superintendent: tion at Cumberland. We are given j^ courtenay; 2nd, David Guthrie,
until a short time ago. During his to understand that the appointmentlComox; 3rA, Calnan, Cumberland,
long residence on the Island, Mr. I is a temporary one, for two months, I Time, 2 minutes, 30 seconds.
Spruston made a host of friends and: Mr. J. Thomson being given leave ofl 440 yards, boys, open—1st, John
their best wishes will accompany him absence for thut period on account:Tribe, courtenay; 2nd, Harold Baker,
in his new venture in California.       of ill health. Tsolum.   Time, 1' l 1-5".
The United Church Hall was packed to capacity on Wednesday night
on the occasion of the presentation
of the 3-act comedy-drama, "Ten
Toper Tavern", by Young People's
Society of the Cumberland United
Church. The success of tho play
was established from the first moment and tho whole of the play under the direction of Mrs. H. Treen
left nothing to be desired.
Miss Evelyn I.aing as Marion Day,
a canny chaperon, was excellent, but
perhaps the two actors to take the
fancy of the large audience most
were Jack Auchterlonie ns Harry
Reid and Alastair MacKinnon ns
Archibald Perry, pastor of the village flock.
So well was the play received that
it will be repeated next Tuesday
night. The cast of characters in
order of their appearance was:
Marion Duy—A canny chaperon      MISS EVELYN LAING
Rosamond  Reid—Her neice just out. of college—MISS C.  MncKlNNON
Sally Lee Dixon—Dixie, from the Sunny South—MISS PEARL HUNDEN
Ann Annesley—a social service fiend MISS ELLEN HUNDEN
Larry Reid—Rosamond's freshman brother—MR. JACK AUCHTERLONIE
Harriet Annesley—Ann's younger sister   MISS JESSIE BAIRD
Tess— Ann's protegee from the village  MISS MAUD BAIRD
Mike Ryan—a susceptible policeman MR. GORDON HORWOOD
Brian Pierpont—a brilliant young lawyer      MR. GEORGE BROWN
Archibald Perry—pastor of the village' flock—MR ALASTAIR MncKlNNON
Dallas Thornc—owner of the Tavern MR. CLIFFORD HORWOOD
John Sedgwick—an old flame of Miss Day   .    , MR. STANLEY MOUNCE
Gloria Sherwood Jerome—a fascinating widow    MISS EDNA DEAR
Celeste—Gloria's maid   MISS VINCENT AUCHTERLONIE
Results of the final examinations
were announced at the University of
British Columbia on Wednesday
morning, following a special meeting of the university senate. More
than 1801) students were successful
in the various years.
Cumberland students successful in
passing were:
Passed in certain subjects (third
year),  Thomas T.   Nakano.
Passed with su|iplementn]s (2nd
year), Victor V. Marinelli (Fr. 2)
Passed with second class honors
fist  Year). Stephen J.  Jackson.
Passed, (1st year). Norma I. Parnham, Jean K, MacNaughton. Passed
with supplemental (1st year), Archibald N. Dick  (Chem. 2).
Total points earned by compet-        Tsolum 	
In; schools: Cumberland
Courtenay,  W        Comox
TEA TOPER TAVERN
TO  BE  REPEATED
Hy special request, the players of
the Young People's Society of Cumberland Unit id Church will repeat
the .'{-Act Comedy Drama, "Tea Toper Tavern" at the United Church
Hall Cumberland on Tuesday next,
May 18th at X o'clock.
No one likes to hear of tbe miners
and their families suffering from
lack of employment; nor yet to see
business in Nanaimo languishing, to
say nothing of the shareholders ol
Canadian Coll lord ea Limited. But
when it comes to a mailer of L.S.D.
or dollars and cents, the race from
which Lt -Col, Villiers springs—as
well as the Nanaimo miners and most
of the rest of us—has beeu remarkably deficient In sentiment, even
when bubbling over with sentimentality. Business is business. Deliver
the goods. Huy in thc cheapest
market anil sell in the dearest!
These maxims, based on centuries
of experience have made the Empire
what it is. In business life, sentiment has a small place. That it has
any place at all is wbut redeems
our modern business life from absolute drabness.
—Mining and Industrial Record. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FRIDAY,   MAY   9th,   1830.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED  EVERY  FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND,  HP.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
MAY  11th—MOTHERS' DAY
WE KEEP many anniversaries.   We celebrate
in pride and thankfulness, the birthday of
DON'T WASTE YOU11 ASHES
TOWN and city farmers—those lovers of the
soil who live in or near towns or cities—
should think carefully before disposing of
their ashes.
Coal ashes aerates the soil, cracks even the
= j sickiest clay, and will go a long way toward
making the little plot of ground fit for cultivation.
A city farmer, located near Philadephia, Penn-
sylvania, had a piece of ground about forty by
forty feet, which consisted of red clay on a bed
of shale. The ashes of no less than one hundred
and twenty tons of coal were thoroughly worked
those who served the nation well, of into this clay, the proper fertilizer added, and
soldiers and statesmen, of poets who are immort- for, several years this piece of ground has pro-
al authors whose messages remain for the ages, duced vegetables and flowers which amazes the
Sunday, May lith is a different sort of anni- neighbors,
versary.   As the editorial writer in the Indian-     Fifty-two bushels of tomatoes were grown last
apolis 'Times said in February of this year, "It year on sixty-five vines, while corn, peas, canta-
is the birthday anniversary of an idea which loupes, pole limas and other vegetables took up
became an impulse; an impulse that became a  most of ths remaining space.
great movement." An expenditure of less than ten dollars m tools
On the night of February 7th, 1904, Frank E. enabled this city man t< secure the healthful exer-
Herring, in a burst of oratory, traced all the eise and the pleasure in producing that comes
goodness of men to mother love, all the advance- from cultivating the lap of Mother Earth. A
ment of civilization to the sacrifices of mother- few cents for seeds each year spent at the store
hood, all the hopes of the future lo tiie influence around the corner enables him to continue with
of mothers,    Frank E. Herring was a prominent   his hobby.
******* ^****************^**^******,t
******** •*********..**************.
member of tbe Fraternal Order of Eagles and h
urged that in every Eagles' lodge, one day be set
aside each year in which men would remember
their mothers, and in that memory lift themselves
from sordid thoughts to higher planes of action.
The idea caught and held attention. It was
an appeal to something fundamental. It tapped
the wells of inspiration. An idea once started
does not die. It grows. Today we see in every
hamlet on the North American continent the
celebration of "Mothers' Day".
But Mother's Day, well, that's different. Tlie
only fault we can find with this day is that no
one thought of it centuries ago. '
Mother's Day is not old—in many cases far;
younger than Mother herself. But Mother's
Day stands for something that plays softly even j
around heartstrings that seldom give off musical j
strains.
Remember Mother on .Mother's Day. Give her ]
any gift you choose—fruit, confectionery, money,'
or at least a wrtiten or verbal token of your love'
and admiration for her. She may nol be with you '
next year, but Opportunity today stands knock-,
ing at your door.
MY MOTHER
You are so brave, My Mother,
You meet the daily challenge fearlessly,
You never pull life's threads impatiently,
You smooth thom out for others and for me.
• My Mother!
Y'ou are so kind, My Mother,
The faults of folks your eyes refuse to see . . .
You trust them and that trust all magically
Makes them live up to what they long to be,
My Mother!
Y'ou are so wise, My Mother,
Unfretled by the barriers life may rear,
Y'ou move as if to music, high and clear . . .
And where you are, is comfort and good cheer,
My Mother!
If I am brave, My Mother,
Or kind or wise as down life's way I go . . .
It will be that I but reflect the glow
That fills my heart, 0 dearest heart I know,
My Mother!
—By M. A. H.
REMINISCENCES
■*00****00**00 00v
By an old Cumberland sport
***** ************ 0*1
IL0=IL© THEATRE!
This Week End
Something" for every taste
Cumberland
Women! Arise!
**************** *********** -j
25
STARS
with
MARION DAVIES
NORMA SHEARER
JOAN CRAWFORD
JOHN  GILBERT
WILLIAM HAINES
ULSTER KEATON
BESSIE  LOVE
CHARLES KING
CONRAD  NAGEL
LIONEL BARRYMORE
MARIE  DRESSLER
JACK   BENNY
GUS  EDWARDS
DANE and ARTHUR
LAUREL and HARDY
UKELELE  IKE
ANITA   PAGE
POLLY  MORAN
GWEN LEE
BROX  SISTERS
ALBERTINA   RASCH
BALLET
NATACHA NATTOVA
and COMPANY
THE ROUNDERS
A galaxy oj famous stars
giving you their best!
"It was a pretty duel between
Tuffy' Davis and Racci Conti.."
Doesn't that bring back memories
to you? Doesn't that recall to your
mind the great soccer duels of a
former day in Cumberland? In tjie
last year I have witnessed that same
"pretty duel" on some three occasions. Not in the Upper Island, of
course, but in thc peculiarly strange
surroundings of the Civic Auditorium, Seattle. The above quoted line
was written by a Seattle sport scribo
after a recent game.
Cumberland folk need never think
they are strangers in Seattle when
they attend a soccer game in which
the Black Diamond team is playing
And no wonder! A group of the old
Cumberland boys have banded themselves together to form the nucleus
of the Diamond team—nnd admittedly one of the greatest teams that
has ever performed in this state.
Blnck Diamond has accomplished
the unprecedented feat of winning
the three big football events of the
state in the same season. First they
won an open tournament open to
any team in the northwest audi believe they carried from the tournament the Pacific Coast Coal Cup;
next they won the state championship and finally, just a few days ago,
they cinched the senior football
league in the state. It goes under
the name of the Northwest Soccer
League. I understand Black Diamond is the first team to have crowded these three big shots successfully
in the same season.
Walk over to the stadium for the
Longview vs. Diamond game and
look over the teams. Wargo at right
back is an old Ladysmith man now
with the Diamond. Among the other
boys are Conti at centre half, probably the best man .in that position
in the state. Teddy Appleby is nol
far away at inside left and is still as
tricky as ever. Conti nnd Appleby!
are known as the Coa!
Mikola kind Tuffy Davis.
Does t seem possible that these
men should have been Lined up on
opposing teams for the championship
of Washington state a short time
ago? But they were . The miners
won a great game 1-0 victory. And
still we cannot get away from an
Upper Island likeness—at least in
the old football days. Yes, you j
guessed it. The game was protested I
but the protest was not upheld. I
Even on the sidelines one cannot
tret nwny from "home." There is
Jack McMillan—and Angus, too,
over from Tacoma. And then from
among the group that delightful per-;
sonnlity Jock McWhirter queries,
"How are ye?" As we head over to-1
ward the dressing room we run into
young Jack Sweeney, who is making
no mean success of the "sock 'em
and tnke 'em" game. And Jack is
very modest about his efforts in the
ring. Then along come the two I
Johnson boys. Tod is talking to ono
of the Stanoway boys as we pass by.
As you stroll around you wonder
when it ds going to end. There is a
fellow over ngainst the wall. Who?
Why it's Bobby Thompson up from
-sberdeen. He is inquiring for Amos
Farmer who plays with the Electro
Dentists but who didn't seem to be
nt to-day's game. Then Bob Good-
; 11 come*., our wny. He is in to take
in the game and also to sing over one
of Seattle's radio stations. And then
thnt short, dark haired fellow over
there? Oh yes. Why it's old "Mug-
iiins" himself and who is thore in
Cumberland who doesn't know him?
I gt™**fyl*r\\W*i\}iQmmMl\m^
L
.&.?t
!3»
"PROVINCIAL   ELECTIONS   ACT"
COMO>  ELECTORAL DISTRICT
NOTK E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
1 shall, en Monday, the 19th day ol*
May,    1130,   nt   the   hour   of   10
'flock ii the forenoon, at the Court-
Dust Twins! | house, is   the City of Cumberland.
I
SONG HITS
"Singin' in the Rain"
"Your Mother and Mine"
"Gotta   Feelin'   for   You"
"Low   Down   Rythm"
"OrniiRe   Blossom   Time"
Monday Only, May 12th
Hear New York, City Talk. . .
"SPEAKEASY"
Take A Sight-sound
Tour of New York
See and Hear ....
The voice of thc great city is
heard .... thundering subways . . . roaring traffic . . .
singing, laughing Broadway . .
racing at Belmont Park . . . .
screaming light fans at Madison Square Garden .... thud
of gloves on flesh . . glamorous thrilling . . . real
Tuesday-Wednesday, May 13-14
100$ Singing, Talking, Outdoor
Picture ALL IN TECHNICOLOR
"Under A Texas Moon"
You'll swaj to the senuous ni.Indies of Spanish guitars!
ifou'll thrill to the ravishing beauty of fascinating senor-
itas. And you'll live, love and laugh al the merry, mad
adventures of Don Carlos (Frank Kay), Ihe gay cabal-
lero who lied his way into women's hearts and laughed
hi ■ way out of danger.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
March  15th,  Kith and 17th
"Lord BYRON of
BROADWAY"
A glorious, sparkling romance of Broadway and ils people!
One of the first comments of the
visitor in  Cumberland  is upon  thu
generous hospitality of its residents;
men  and  women  who  never  spare
themselves an  making the stranger
■ feel their warmth of welcome! the
I women perhaps outshining the men
j in this respect.    Cumberland is remembered   always   as   a   delightful
spot in which to visit.
Perhaps the people of Cumberland
on the whole aro a above the average
in their living standards.    They be-
ievo   in   a   life   of  activity,   which
leaves thom little time to indulge in
pettiness.      Their    interests    being
many  and  varied, there in neither
the time nor inclination for envious
squabbling at home—or in anyone
else's   home.     Having  mind's  thus
broadened there is room to include
the stranger in their many interests.
Unlike   most   small   towns  where
life is dull, and the women through
sheer monotony quarrel and bicker,
The Cumberland women have created their own high moral plane of
laving, making sharp the contrast be-
t'.veen their town and others.    Is it
to  be wondered then that Cumber-
laud long remains a pleasant memory
to   Uie   visitor?     But   now   having
reached this altitude, these women
seem   content to   sit  beneath  their
laurel wreaths and gaze down on the
neighboring towns through the windows   of   complacency.     This   fact
came to our notice through a letter
from   the   magazine  called   "Chatelaine," asking for the name of any j \A
women,  outstanding .in  the district   V
for a line of work, bearing on the   \A
welfare of thc nation,   After a men-1 fll
tal  combing of the district, and a   El
consideration   of   many   finewomen,! w
not one of several hundred could be: fi
chosen who stood above her sisters ni
in hor efforts to benefit her country Is?
as a whole. KI
Now women of Cumberland arise, |jM
Prove to your country the ability nj|
that is within you—and ability you l^N
have, or you never could have reach- ft]
ed or held your present standards. J[M
Show that An Cumberland are women njj
remembered not only for their charm l|J
and hospitality. Your men are known
the whole world o\"er; step forth
beside tbem! Arise! Shake loose
those wreaths of laurel—strive for
halosl Let not your men alone be
Standard-bearers for your country.
N. W.
Teddy Jackson takes care of the in- i hold a si ting of the Court of Revl
side right berth regularly and I be-! ;J:°" 'or he purpose of revising the
,. t-, . , . .. i ,, - „ _■,■ list of v ters for the said electoral
lieve Forbes at right half is on old dhtrlctil| d of heiU.in!, Bnd detcrmin-
Cumbevlander. Big Jock Clark cav-1 •.,,, any . ,u| „n objections to thc scries the managerial duties lightly, tentlon o'. any name on the said'list,
he is an undoubted success in the! 0>* to ths registration as a voter of
position—and as cheery as ever.
Longview helps to  make the  pic
ture mc re weird. How many ol*
these men can you recall on thc
Longview eleven? Stan Tait, Joe
Lapsansky, Alex. Thompson, Connie
any appl cant for registration; and
for thc i ther purposes set forth in
ihe "Pro Incial Elections Act."
Dated  at  Cumberland,  B.C.,  this
7th day c f April, 1930.
JOHN CONWAY,
15-17, It-20    Registrar of Voters,
Comox Electoral District
U     The bejutilul niw ironer
Stint does til your Ironing
In lets thin a third ef tht
Lj time, while you ere com.
f     lortably seated.
SSee tht Ironcttt tt our
ihowroofn todty — or
better yet, Itt ui demon-
itratt It In your own
home.
I
Small down
payment - -
convenient
terms
Great
argain
umber
OSLI6 • • •
[Effective at Once]
Quarter Million Feet
In Various Sizes and
Grades With Following Prices While They
.Liasi • • • •
AU No. 1 Common Grade
100,000 feet 1 x 6" Shiplap, dry $15.00
G0.000  "    1 x 8" or 10" Shiplap, dry $18.00
20,000 "   2 x 4" to 12"—8' and longer, dressed $15.00
20,000   "    11/,' x 5" to 12"—6' and longer
Rough   $15.00
5,000  "   1 x 4" Flooring $15.00
5,000   "    1 x 4" Dressed $15.00
20,000  "   2x4", 2x6", 2x8", 2x10" and 12"
Dressed or Sized, in random lengths $15.00
Miscellaneous:
No. 2 Common
20,000 feet 1 x 4" to 12" and 2 x 4 to 12", rough
or dressed in random lengths $12.00
GULLS—Odd Sizes Consisted as Follows:
15,000 feet 1 x 4" to 12", 2 x2" to 12", 3 x3"
to 12", 4 x 4" and 6 x 6". Rough
and Dressed, Random Lengths  $ 8.00
I
$
The Royston Lumber Co.
Limited
—PHONES—
Office  1S9, Cumberland Night Call  134X Courtenay
l3m*Js\*'»sr»J*i.e. mimJttmm myt\llir»im*mjijli,. mrtjtl.* mtjll.i m.tJ*M,. M,p|
On Sale by
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Company Limited
'jmzfsmmmim
THOMAS D. STARK
APPOINTED
NESTLES BROKER.
Thomna D. Stark, of Stark nnd'
Sterling, has heen appointed British ;
Columbia Broker for Nestle's Con-!
densed -md Evaporated Milk hy the)
Nestle's Fond Co. nf Canada Limited. |
Neatlo's Evnporated Milk has ex-
porh'nerd such atremendous demand
from the housewives of British Co-
lumbla thai production in British Colli mbla of this popular brand became necessary some months hack.
This was a very popular move, as it
not only made Nestle's Evaporated
Milk a R.C. product, but it enabled
the producers to cope successfully
with the steadily increasing demand.
The huge expansion resulting from
thi" demand led to the further step
of appointing Mr. Stark as broker.
Mr, Stark is splendidly equipped to
represent Nestle's, the world's largest producers nnd sellers of Condensed and Evaporated Milk, and his appointment will come as welcome
news to the trade in British Columbia.
Cumberland and Union
Waterworks Co..  Ltd.
ESTIMATES GIVEN ON ALL PLUMBING
AND REPAIR WORK.
I'hone 75
A. n. CLINTON, Manager.
^ ************************************************************** ,   |
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX MAXWELL, Proprietor.
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
. ■,, ' * ."■"■f"rfrrrtsrrfrf,fffsssj
Automobile Side Curtains Repaired
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Also Harness Repairs
E. L. SAUNDERS
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
:{l
iea=se9=8=a=*eiwte«seffiffi^
RILEY'S TRANSFER
Orders left at Henderson's Candy Store will receive
 PROMPT ATTENTION	
David Hunden, Jr.
COAL     —
GENERAL HAULING
of all descriptions
WOOD
WARNING!
It has been brought to our attention very forcibly that patrons
of the barber shops have ceased to visit the barber for fear
of infectious diseases such as Barber's Itch, Eczema, Acne, etc,
Don't take chances when your health and family are at stake.
Our sanitary methods protect you and you are absolutely safe
when you visit	
- The Central Barber Shop
We take great pleasure in announcing that we have, after
considerable expense, secured the services of Mr. Davies, who
is well known throughout the J.B.I.U. of America and from
now on will still be able to give better service as our business
warrants. I
FRIDAY,   MAY   9th,   1930.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
Cumberland,   May   5.—Mrs.   T.   H.
Carey was hostess at her home on;
Thursday evening last at a farewell I
party and miscellaneous shower in!
honor of Mrs. Andrew Thomson who J
left Sunday to make her home ln Na- j
naimo. Mrs. O. Robertson and Mrs.;
R. H. Robertson were joint hostesses:
with Mrs. Carey.
A very pleasant social time was spent'
and early in the evening whist was
played, Mrs. Whyley winning flrst
prize with Mrs. J. Marpole securing
consolation. Following the serving of
refreshments, Mrs. R. H. Robertson
and Mrs. Marpole brought into the
room and presented to the guest of
honor a lovely assortment of gifts
which were contained in a basket prettily decorated in mauve and yellow.
Though taken completely by surprise,
Mrs. Thomson expressed her sincere
thanks. A native daughter of Nanaimo, Mrs. Thomson has resided in this
city ever since her marriage and has a
host of friends here who will regret
her departure.
Quests were: Mesdames A. Thomson, J. Thomson. W. Thomson, Gray
R. A. RobertMn, Marpole, Whyley,
Stant, Mitchell, McLean, Mounce, Stevenson, Donald, Wood, McDonald, Coe,
Harrison, Cameron, Hill, Murdock,
Martin, Toman, W. Henderson, R. H.
| Robertson. G. Robertson. W. Bever-
! idge Sr., and Miss Harriet Horbury.
jntmfner't&SL
•CANADlAf Wmgl
and JASPER
•NATIONAL*
VAZM
M« lilt SCENIC route Mil
... Cinidiin Nltlonil...
«dtrivtl"<ltlii«l"
Every day the "Continental Limited", at 9:50
p.m. leave. Vancouver
for Montreal.. and, of.
feetive May 20th, the
"Confederation" at 1:35
p.m. to Toronto. . with
direct connection! to all
points in Canada and
United State,.
CommiK'ng Miy 22nd Low
Snmmtt Excunion Ticket,
will bo sn ■•!• hem Vldorii,
Vancouver, New Weitmln-
iter, Prince Rupert... alio
from Kimloop,, Vernon end
Kelownc.libcrll itopovcn.
Plan • lew deyi et Jaiper
Parle Lodge en route... golf,
■wimming, riding, motoring.
Special Feature,
L.k». .  .  . /sons P.itt
Arthur to Saraia .
ml, I10.0O e.tr..
..tag.   so
-- -.-rt. from
low.r mainland .n4
hland point, Sht. I. an
additional IIJ.WJ . . .
mrati .nd btrth IttrUldrd
on ttramrr.
You may .ho hrrok your
fournty ot Mlnoti tod...
In sh. "Lok. oj th.
rood. Country." Calf,
ooatln,, ticimniinl aad
.Italy oj swd.l ssellMls*M.
Ticket, on Sele
M.yS2
to September 30
Return limit. October 31
Boiton    •   . 157.76
Buffalo    .   • 124.92
Charloltctown 156.85
Chicago   •   ■ 90.30
Detroit    •   • 109.92
Halifax    .   . 157.75
London   •   • 116.90
Minneepolil • 75.60
Montreal .   . 134.10
New York    . 151.70
Niagara Fall, • 124.92
Ottessa   .   • 129.60
Portland  .   • 151.90
Quebec  •   • 142.60
St. John  .   . 152.20
St. Paul   .   . 75.60
Toronto  •   • 116.90
Winnipeg    • 75.60
Canadian National
9jhe Largest 'Railway System in America
For information write E. W.   BICKLE, Cumberland, B.C.
1
1
1
1
Build Now
or make those long-talked of alterations and take
advantage of the
Big Drop in
Lumber
Prices
I
1
1
1
1
1
Donations To
May 24th F
und
32.00
Balance from last year  $
Transferred from Water
100.00
C.C.D. Employees  (Est'd)
728.00
City of Cumberland 	
150.00
C.C.D. Employees Union
Bay  (Est'd)  	
90.00
Canadian Collieries 	
50.00
Edward W. Bickle 	
50.00
Royston Lumber Co Em-
40.00
Roystom Lumber Co	
25.00
Comox Creamery Association
10.00
Rod and Gun Club 	
10.00
10.00
Cumberland Electric Lighting
10.00
Cumberland and Union
Waterworks Company ....
10.00
Cumberland  Motor Works..
10.00
10.00
Canadian Legion, B.E.S.L.
Cumberland Branch 	
10.00
Tommy's Hardware Store
goods 	
7.00
City Meat Market W. Symon
5.00
Dr. E. R. Hicks	
6.00
Robert Yates 	
5.00
Mann's Bakery 	
5.00
Frelone Grocery Store	
5.00
Hariing & Ledingham 	
6.00
Alex.  Maxwell  	
6.00
Marocchi Bros	
6.00
Waverley Hotel 	
6.00
Dr. W. Bruce Gordon 	
6.00
Cavin Shoe Store 	
6.00
W. Merrifield 	
6.00
Matt Brown Groeerv 	
6.00
W. McLellan, sr., value ....
6.00
C. H. Tarbell & Son, goods
5.00
5.00
A. McKinnon, goods	
6.00
Lang's Drug Store, goods....
6.00
Mumford's Grocery, goods..
5.00
King George Hotel 	
5.00
5.00
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton ....
5.00
J. Idiens  "	
6.00
5.00
R.  Laird  	
6.00
J.  Dick  	
5.00
T. Nakano 	
3.00
Henderson Candy Store	
2.50
2.50
2.50
U. Watanabe, tailor 	
E. Aida 	
2.50
2.50
2.50
L. H. Pinch 	
2.60
W.illiam McLellan, jr. 	
2.50
Henderson Motors 	
2.50
Wilbur Hudson	
2.50
Thomas Armstrong	
2.60
2.50
Chow Lee 	
2.00
2.00
Ton Lee Club 	
2.00
Wong Wy 	
2.00
Poon Yuen 	
2.00
Chinese National League....
2.00
W.  Eadie  	
2.00
2.00
John C. Brown 	
L.  R.  Stevens  	
2.00
Edward Robinson 	
2.00
M. Shiozaki, jeweler	
2.00
D. MacLean 	
2.0(1
P. D. Pickard 	
2.00
2.00
Harry Brown (Customs) ....
1.00
J. H. Robertson 	
l.OO
Thc Gem Barber Shop 	
1.00
l.OO
Kee Fung 	
1.00
Ho He 	
1.00
1.00
Sun On Wo 	
1.00
1.00
M..S. Wei 	
.50
Wong Lee Song 	
.25
$1547.75
HEALTH SERVICE
ofthe
Canadian Medical Association
Questions concerning Health, addressed to the Canadiaa Medical
Association, 184, College St., Toronto, will be answered personalty
by correspondence.
HOW ARE YOU?
Radio link
in B. C.
telephone
service
You can telephone by
radio   now I
A radiotelephone link,
connecting with land lines
on Vancouver Island, now
gives Powell River its first
telephone connection with
the outside world. The
service is available to any
point that can be reached
by the B.C. Telephone
Company's long- distance
system.
The existence of the radio link in the new service
makes no difference to the
user. He talks in the same
way as on an ordinary longdistance call, and the transmission is just as good.
B. C. TELEPHONE CO
(.•Uiifbepland
; Commercial
{Headquarters
Hotel
Ratct
Noionahtt
Accomodation The Best
Rooms Steam Heated
W.  MERRIFIELD,   Prop.
The GEM
BARBER SHOP
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Child'n's hair cut any Btyle 35c
Ladies hair cut any style 60c
If the subject of conversation is
an indication of interest in the sub-'
jeet, then, without doubt, health j
comes first in the public interest,,
since the question most frequently
asked is—How Are You?
What is your answer today, and
what is it going to be in the future?
Are you making things pleasant for
yourself and for those with whom
you live and work, because you are
happy with the joy of good health,
or are you one of those depressing
persons who demands sympathy he-
cause he looks so miserable?
It is surprising how much of ill-j
health is due to neglect of those essentials which can easily be secured
by most people and which do not cost
money.    The proper kind of food I
costs no more than the wrong kind.
Fresh air and sunshine nre to l.e had
for the asking. Sleep is not for
salo; it means a proper bed-time.
Exercise .rest and cleanliness can
usually be secured by making a reasonable effort.
These are the factors upon which
personal health so largely defends.
They are under our own co itrol;
nobody can help us very mu "h in
securing them. If we want to enjoy
health, we cannot neglect them.
Too many late dances which take
up the time for sleep; too much liv-
■ing in artificial light and not enough
sunlight; too many sweets between
meals spoiling the appetite for proper food; indoor instead of outdoor
exercise, are somo of the common
reasons for ill health.
In addition to neglecting them-
sel'.es, many persons are, in other
ways, particularly careless as regards
the health of others. They cough
and sneeze without covering the
nose and mouth; they talk right into your face; they kisB the baby on
fthe mouth. In fact, they do about'
j everything they can to spread toj
i everyone they chance to meet anyj
disease germs which may be present
in their own nose aud throat.
Many are also careless of them-!
selves in disregarding the limits I
within which they may expect their
bodies to function normally. The
human body enn stand up under a
great deal of wear and tear, but,
beyond certain limits, it begins to
break. It is a matter of common
sense to keep within the limits. Success is empty which is gained at tho
expense of a wrecked body. Health
without wealth is preferable to!
wealth without health.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
<#
Mr. A. R. Stacey paid a business
visit to Vancouver during the week.
,  . .
Dr. and Mr.s. G. K. MacNaughton
returned to the city on Monday last.
P. P. Harrison
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Main  Office
Courtenay         Phone 258
Local  Office
Cumlierland Hotel in Evenings
Telephone   1J5R   or  24
SCOTTISH LAUNDRY
FIRST CLASS WHITE
LAUNDRY SERVICE
Dyera and Dry Cleaners
Special family laundry rate.
Orders left at the Ritz Cafe,
phone 150, Cumberland will receive prompt attention. A trial
order will  convince you.
Telephones:
Courtenay 226
Cumberland  150
24—TELEPHONE—100
TAXI
Charlie Dalton
Meets Boat at Union Bay
Every Sunday morning
IWFHHFffi
FOLLOW   THE   CROWD   TO   CUMBERLAND
BIG 24* of MAY
CELEBRATION
Monster Parade with valuable Prizes
Watch for Further Announcements
fe     fe     IR
Sports for Young and Old
fe  fe   fe
Crowning of the May Queen
Immediately After the Parade PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FRIDAY,   MAY   9th,   1930,
M$v&#?ii
^^^'^:'Mr^rr^;.^iP.
NEWS ITEMS
from SUTHERLAND'S
Ladies' Rayon Bloomers, nicely ombriodored, good quality,
and in a good range of colors, comprising mauve, red, pin!,,
white, champagne, coral, and nile, all at one price, garm't 95c
[.allies' Rayon Vests extra good quality, the hest selling colors
each    ■    -?';2b
Pettinickers, just the garment  the  young ladies are  looking
for, each     tl.l*
Lauics'  Print Dresses, smartly made, colors absolutely fast.
and the styles are right, prices each   $1.95 and $2.95
Elastic Girdles, for those who desire something to supporl
them, yet tlo not want much honing, try au Elastic Girdle,
Price, each     ''5c and $1.25
Girls' Bloomers, An assortment of quite a few lines which
nre broken, in real gooil quality, sizes to 11 years, price pr. 35c
Children's Sox.—We have a wonderful assortment of children's
sox and we invito you to call ami see our range, anil we feel
that vou will he convinced,
FOR   MEN
Buttonlesa Combs, in all sizes,   .lust what you want for the
warm days.    Per garment $'-0°
Silk Vests, what the young men want, a very desirable garment and only                                                     $1.00
Men's Silk Combinations in white, very line quality.    Price
per suit   f\.9S
Forsyth's New Stripes, the late.'t in  men's shirts, with detachable collars as well as with collars attached.
Men's New Summer Sox, a beautiful range to select from, and
you will he surprised at selection nnd quality of our 50c line.
Men's Ties, in the lntost stripes, a goodly selection to choose
from,    Prices 75c, $1.00 and $1.50
FOR NOVELTIES
SUTHERLAND'S
***************
r000000*000**0tr***************************************  •
Personal Mention .".v."
7 i t- 0000 ******** ,*********************************************^**********
'T The memhers of the Ladies' Aux-1 Mrs. \V. Newberry, the well known
? j iliary to Comox Ae- 2 No. 19B3, Nanaimo florist was a visitor to Cum-
r i F.O.E., are urged to attend a Social berland on Tuesday.
:. Evening to be held in the Eagles' ■ Mrs, Elsie Marocchi. of the firm
! Home at 8 p.m. on May 13th. Each 0f Marocchi Bros., left on Tuesday
, ' member is free to invite her mother; for a business trip to Nanaimo.
ister, or a woman friend *o accom-j     Miss v4olefc Jones of Nanaimo vis-
, pany her.
M. JAMES, Secretary.
! Mrs. Simpson, ar Coal Creek, is vis-
ttlng here, the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
J. s. Brown.
j Mr. ard Mrs. J. Taylor and Miss
; May Taylor, of Black Diamond, Wash.,
; formerly of this city, are guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Heaps, parents of Mrs. Taylor,
| Mr. and Mrs. J. Thoburn motored to
i Nannlmo at the week-end, returning
Sunday.
ited  her sister,  Mrs.  H.  Devlin on
Saturday and Sunday.
Fire Chief Vernon Stewart and
Mrs. Stewart of Victoria were visitors to Cumberland at the week end.
Whilst here they were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Parnham.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Thompson, who recently arrived from New York city.
where they resided for a number of
years, have tnken up their residence in
Courtenay, where the former has been
appointed mechanic nt the provincial
government road office.
Mrs. J. Bor.d. Junior President, en-
; Mrs. M Watson gave her home last
j Wednesdt v afternoon for a silver tea
j tinder th- auspices of the Ladies' Aid
'. oc Cumb.. -land United church. Lovely
I .spring fl wcrs were effectively used
j on the \ ?Il-appcinted tea table and
| many gu sts called during the afternoon.
I Mrs. s D. McLeoa entertained at
her home on the Dyke, Comox, on Sat-
urday evt ting at a jolly party for re-
| latives ar 1 a few friends ln honor o.
i her neph w, Sam Davis, Jr., of Vancouver, ia no spent a few days in tht
[district.    Ciames and mmic made up
, a happy itme and the hostess servec
: a delicious supper.
TSSS
SPECIAL!
12 oz. Can Jamieson's Baking Powder 25c
2 oz. Psottlo Vanait (like Vanilla) .... 25c
50c fo
35c
For a Real Good Garden
BE SURE TO USE
James Brothers'
:-: SEEDS:-:
100%   CANADIAN
Wi1 carry a complete line ol' Vegetable
and Garden Seeds, etc.
I
FULL STOCK OK FitESH FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES
Matt Brown s Grocery
■     Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Thompson and
J family lelt on Sunday lor Nanaimo. I .^^ "^Zemhc'i" o"['junior"^
where ihey will in future make their Qourt  0l Ul..  w,  B   A   „,   .    ,,
! |h°nie Baster party at tue closo of their res
Sam  Davis,  Jr..  of  Lafe  Cassidy's UlI,.   meeunB   mst   Tue;;..;   ....
•Hotel Vancouver orchestra, Vancouver, ^jinea and music were tnjoved and
.! former   Cumberland   boy,   spent   the ■ delicious refreshments served.
' week-end lore, the guest of his par-1
* ents and other relatives.   This musical
''organization has been engaged for the
. 1330 season at Banff Springs hotel ol
! the C. P. H. and leave next week for
i that popular resort.   The visitor left
: on Sunday and was accompanied to
Nanaimo by his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
S. Davis. Sr., Gertie Davis and Miss
Ellen Hunden, motoring to that point.
There were nineteen tables in play
I at the whist drive held by the Women's
] Benefit Association, review No. 17, on
| Saturday  evening  at  Memorial  hall.
iMrs. A. Wain secured first prize for
■ the ladies, while three players tied for
(second prize, namely, Mrs. J. Murray,
Mrs. Martine!" and Mrs. Aspesy.   On
] the cut of cards the former was declared winner.   In the men's division
| F. Schmidt and VV. Younger were sue.
) cessful.   Refreshments were served by
a committee of ladies, following which
dancing  held sway  till  midnight  to
music supplied by the Sunnyside or-
chestia.
i Mr. and Mrs. J. Bennie of Na-
) naimo paid a visit to the city at the
; week, end, prior to leaving for Cal-
fornia where tbey will reside in
I fture. While here they were the
i guests  of the latter's  brother,  Mr.
Phone  38
Cumberland
xtrA SP
Crepe  Hack Satin and Georgette Dresses
Children's Corset Waists 	
Ladles' silk Bloomers           l.oo
Silk Hose          .69 Mon's Overalls     $1.49
Boys' Stockings ...       .39 Children's Socks ..
W. H. Anderson   -  Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND
D/H/H/H/H/H/H/H/H^/H/H/H/S^"
II. Devlin and Mrs. Devlin.
Mrs. W, Jackson was a passenf iv
to Vancouver Monday and on her
return on Tuesday was accompanied
by her son Stephen, who has been
attending the U.B.C.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Henderson Sr.,
of Victoria former res.aents of this
city are paying a vJsit to their sons
and daughters in, the district.
The many friends of Mrs. A. Cameron arc congratulating her on attaining her 7l)Lh birthday, Mrs. Cameron who has been an invalid for the
past thirteen years, was prior to her
illness prominently identified with
Church work. She has hosts of
friends amongst the United Church
workers especially who have been
generous with their congratulation;;
during the week.
Old Time—Hard Time Frolic will
bc held in the Native Sons' Hall on
Friday, May 23rd. Keep this date
open. The Native Sons will give
yen ;> good time.
E. R. Mallins, late of the Capito.
Theatre, Nanaimo, will be in Cum-
lerland every Friday at Mrs. J. Frizzles, Penrith avenue, teaching violin.
cello, banjo, mandolin and steel guitar.
Mr. Mallins will be pleased to de
monstrate any instrument and guarantee a practical thorough training
to all students. Terms, very mod
erate. __!*?
FOR SALE—4 ROLLER CANARIES
2 years old, guaranteed singers,
$5.00 each. Apply P. O. Box 343
Cumberland, '
*******VV >J
THIS  WEEK'S   RECIPE
We have bten a.>ked to start
publishing various reedpes and
commencing with this week we
will endeavour Lo publish at
least one a week. For the flrst
we will give you the following
on account of salads being so
much in demand at this time
of the year:
Salad  Dressing   (uncooked)
2 eggs beaten until light; \k
teaspoon salt; h>> teaspoon of ',
mustard; M> ean Eagle Brand
Condensed Mdlk; % cup vinegar. Beat the first four ingredients vigorously for a few
minutes, add the vinegar, stir
well and set aside for a few
hours to thicken. Excellent
for fruit or vegetable salad.
Will keep for weeks. For Russian dressing add Chili sauce
to taste.
********************************!.
THE MARIONETTE
CIRCULATING LIBRARY
will give you
Just the Book You Are in
the Mood !"<•
Mystery      Adventure
Romance Realism
JOIN NOW
LANG'S DRUG AND
BOOK STOSE
Phone 23        Cumberland
A
Perfect
ijumme; •
Lunch
ciui be obtained by using
our Piicecl Ham. The ham
stocked hy ua is carefully
chosen t' o r fine flavor.
Sliced ready for use, it is
the simplest sort of foundation upon which to build
a Cookless Dinner.
For Sunday's Dinner  Let
Us Supply You With
A Choice Piece of
Beef, Veal or
Mutton
Sati ifaction Absolutely
Guaranteed
Wilcock
and Co., Ltd.
Phone 66
^jmimmmimimimimimimimmmmm
MOTHERS' DAY
Sunday, May  11
i
is
1
I
I
Remember her with a gift from our varied assortment, jfl
such as Fresh Cut Flowers, Chocolates and Candies, Kl
Fancy Soap*!, Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Books, etc.    Si
I
********* 001
**************************** **0
Let Us Suggest Something
We May Be Able To Help You
*-**** ********0**r ***
-rx\
QU
-i        :   ■'..  i?  i.*S' il iU ,..'.,   i.    .**. **..
re
1
1
1
I
•■..' «->. ft        y'
n    sJ  '■ • Stjl tr-. -j^      W       «.'rw     ac     ...
-J <SaS
i>j      I um    ;    lid -- — — Plume 23
IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
ki, ^imMmiMmimjmjmimmjmiMJmjFi
I
I
I Mrs, J. Sutherland, who hus been
I spenrtm; some time in Vancouver with
I her son. Dr. Douglas Sutherland who
| has been seriously ill, has returned to
her home hore.
! Miss Harriet Horbury was a visitor
to Nanaimo on Sunday,
Mr, Brooks, a member of the Nanaimo Cricket Club was a visitor to
Cumberland  Tuesday afternoon.
Aiex. Clark spent the week-end in I
Nanaimo,
••Irs. J, CunlifTe of Nanaimo is
the guest of Mrs. W. Hudson.
Mrs. D. Morgan, president .and Mrs.
P. Covert, delegate from Review No. 17
Women's Benefit Association, lelt on
Monday for Vancouver where they will
attend the annual spring rally of provincial reviews of the association to
take place in the terminal city on
Wednesday. May 7th. Mrs. Kathleen
Manion, M.D., of Port Huron. Mich-
will be an honored guest.
*    *    *
Mrs. E. Fletcher, of Nanaimo ,is the
guest of her father, F, Hutchinson,
and her sister, Mr.s. R A, V. b irtson, of
this city.
fiUtfvM
fCC every PURSE
myourmind ism your feet
it is off your business/
Whatever your occupation, CMTCH
ctioicg uf yojjr shots.
Menial contentment is too
valuable tn be ignored Tlio
privilege >■■ iho'.vlnjj yo*J
thi Trop-r-arcii" shoe
will tu appreciated
{Surapnl on Evtry Shot]
In the "Pfop-f-areh" shoo
you have stylo, fine finish
and wear in addition to
new and unusual features
of construction, which
assures a deeree of com*
fort previously
Savin's Shoe Sutq
Cumberlani,  B.<
Ht the Ilo Ilo Theatre
Next Thursday - Friday - Saturday
I   n • ).■..■■. A   ,"
FOR SALE—12 ACRES WITH SIX-
ronnu".i house and barn nnd other
outhouses. 1 IA miles from Cumberland on Royston road. Price
reasonable and terms given. Apply Box 510, Cumberland     19-20
FOR SALE- 10-ACRE FARM; 4
acres cleared; good well. Cumberland, Royston Road. Cheap for
ctisli or part cash and terms. Apply A. R. Stacey, Cumberland.
FOR SALE HOUSEHOLD FURN!-
ture . Apply A. R. Stacey, Cumberland.
FOR SALE—LIGHT SUSSEX, FINE
Layer, good table birds, hatching
oggl $1.50 per 15 eggs. Apply
Gordon Thomiu, Royston, B.C.,
I'hone 184Q 12-2i
PHOEBE SNOW HAS
NOTHING ON US.
when it comes to spotlessnesi.
Along thc road to Wellfcdlar J
we're selling meat that's simqly
grand. And housewives now
know where to go to buy the
meats that please them so.
CITY MEAT MARKET
I'hone  111 We  Deliver
I AVE WILSON
Vaverley Holel
We are overstocked and must make *oom for shipment
uf new motleh; arriv ;ig.
SEE THESE SNAPS BEFORE
PURCHASING ELSEWHERE:
1924 Overland Tourini:     80.00
1925 Kord Touring  165.00
1925 Oveiland Touring   195.00
Chevrolet Touring   195.00
1927 Ford Touring   245.00
192B Chevrolet Touring  275.00
1926 Chevrolet Touring  300.00
1927 Chevrolet Coupe S540.00
1927  Chevrolet Coach    550.00
1929 Chevrolet Coupe (like new)   775.00
SEVERAL OTHERS FROM $50.00 UP
CISESTONE     I ires
I   are fomous everywhere  for their high
quality  and  low  cost   per
mile.   Because of their extra
strength   ard   toughness,
hold all world's records for
mileage and endurance.
No matter what price you want to pay for
tires - - - go to your nearest Firestone
Dealer. He has a Firestone-built tire for
every purse and purpose—tires that offer
the greatest value - - - that serve you
better and save you money.
Firestone Tire end Rubber Company of Canada. Limited
Hamilton, Ontario
Firestone  builds the  only  Gum-Dipped Tires
Blunt & Passie
Phone 61
Courtenay
************************..
Hariing & Ledingham. Cumberland
* ************************************000*****************
*************
In Every Family
the woman buys or influences the buying of over 85';
of everything. Often she is the one who finally decides whether a grocery store is a "knockout," or a
"flop". She . . . not the grocer is the real "boss".
Right here let us state we delight in catering to these
"bosses". After our careful service and attention
you will often hsar the "boss" say	
"IF YOU CET IT AT MUMFORD'S, IT'S COOT)"
Mumford's Grocery j
J
Phone 71
Deliveries Daily
I .„,....; i^aji; :,,1;,i:;;;i;i;!i;;;;„:;;;:!,,i;,:„„„„i„ii„i;i;i;ili,ii

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342656/manifest

Comment

Related Items