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The Cumberland Islander Nov 6, 1925

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Array •ss,
... Jl±£j
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated tbe Cumberland News.
\si
FORTY-FOURTH  YEAR—No.   45
CUMBERLAND. BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6. 1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
A'Eli Of A Way   j|l
To Treat A Lady J
There has never been a more hum- j =
an, pulsing story than "The Lady" - §§:
which will be shown at the Ilo-Ilo j =5
Theatre on Monday and Tuesday, j sjs
November 9 and 10. It begins as an | s
account of her life, told by Polly; i=
Pearl in the Havre cafe which she j |||
Is cond.icting tn the maturer years =
of her life, but it has nothing of the §=
"dream" character, as you will see ~
when you have comb to Its end. S3
Polly Pearl Is telling' this story |||
to Mr. Wendover, an Englishman, =s
while the tables about ber are crow- =
ded with the women habitues of the H
place and the male guests. It is thc §5
resort frequented by the lower class §**|
of a port such as this French city. =|
As Polly Pearl sketches her life, the =3
story unfolds on the screen. ss
But the spirit of the Btory that Is g|
to follow is told In the first few titles. ***=
Among tbe men in the bar are an ==
English and a French soldier—the =
action being In Ihe period just after =
the war. The Frenchman Is careless *§**=
wltb the seltzer bottle and the con- Hi
tents are squirted Into the face of §§|
Mme, Polly, bringing the remark:      j§=
"That's a 'ell of a way to treat a 9g
lady." =f
To which one of the women retorts =
"Imagine, Mme. Polly Pearl—a lady! IB
Then we go on with the story which . =§
is Inspired by the fact that Mr. Wen- SB
dover has told her that he was born Is
In the same English village as she, I =
which haa "started her a-dreamlng." IB
Then start's the action, in the sec-|s|
ond class English dance hall with i =
Polly Pearl the souhrette in "The, E
Olrl with the Glad Eye." She wears §=j
a rather daring costume, with skirts I§H
to tbe knees and an expanse of back,i *****=
about the sort of costume that we J g=
would associate with our own bur- j B
lesqne. §f=
Norma Talmadge has the name! ■**=:
part In "The Lady". **§=
EMORY i
'rmistice 1)ajrt925   I
fjif
if}) x
EVEN years ago the din of battle was hushed!   Men taxed almost beyond human endurance, laid aside the armament of devastation glad to return to their families and
their former occupations.
Next Monday, on the occasion of this momentous anniversary, this nation will pay homage
to the men who fell upon the field of honor.
Those men did not die or suffer in vain, for
since that memorable November day of 1918
great strides have been made toward universal
peace.
Let us be happy in the thought, that while
I our sacrifice was severe, the marks of battle were
j not indelible.      Canada has risen from the blow
of Mars!
WATER SUPPLY OF
COURTENAY ASSURED
Suitor Ball
For Cumberland
Jnhn   Anderson,
S. Cameron,
S. Connors,
T. Carrlck.
John Olover,
A. Haywood,
E. W. Jackson.
J. Milligan,
J. Mcintosh.
A. Pickard,
J. Spears,
D. Waldon,
J. Whyte,
William Wright,
and District
C. T. Armstrong,
Wm.  Campbell,
J. Dempsy,
J.   M.   Gillespie,
W. Halcrow.
Harry Hlllier,
T.   Marsumura,
J.  Mclnulty,
R. Norman,
A. Slaughter,
Harry  Urquhart,
Albert  Ward,
B. Williamson,
M. Yamada.
In Flander's field the poppies grow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place and in the sky
The larks still bravely singing, fly,
Scarce heard amidst the guns below.
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset's glow,
Loved and were loved and now we lie
In Flander's field.
—From "In Flander's Field."
COURTENAY, Nov. 4—A most Interesting narrative was heard in the
council chamber on Monday nlghl
when Mr. ('. S, Wood, the city clerk. *
reported on his findings as to the -
source of Courtenay's water supply
In Brown's River. The report shows
~ i that tills river which has continued
— tn supply llie city with an abundance
3= j of tiie purest water ull through what
S**5 has been the longest dry autumn on
S I record, is supplied from a large num-
***= her of lakes Which are fed by many
S3 streams frnm the heart of the inoun-
S tains towards the center of the Island.
B§' Owing to the presence of what are
2s! believed to lie rich mineral deposits
|Sja good pack trail has now been
^[blazed and constructed right Into
|§! this hinterland, and according to Mr
j"**"""! [ Wood, tho going ls now comparatively
B' easy. Indeed, thc party that made
=| Hie trip at tlie end af last mouth.
3= which consisted of Messrs. Blalock,
**""= j Brown, Wood and Dennis, who took
*§H' a pack horse with them, returned lo
Hf j Courtenay in tlio day. From thc description of the country traversed ii
is clear Uiul  as aldermen  McKenzie
HALLOWE'EN MASQUE
AT MINTO SCHOOL
sfated "Wc have a veritable Garden
nl' Eden at our elbow which is all
bu! unknown. The views from the
points of vantage (it this vast area
are superb, and the preat open stretches between the mountains and the
can yon fl are iu many places like a
beautiful park land with practically
no underbrush to impede the Knlns
or   tho   view."
Mr. Wood thin its that as soon as
the beauties of the place begin to be
realized it trip iuto the mountains
per pack ponies will become very
popular. One lake alone up there,
bu.vh Mr. Wood, Is well worth the
trip lo see.
In ihe past it has boon difficult to
obtain reliable information ns to the
source of Brown's River so thut the
opportunity to get first hand information was eagerly taken. In his
report, Mr. Wood says. "While a description of the country traversed
would he very interesting, it would
perhaps be out of place in a report
on Brown's Itiver. I will confine myself to saying that our route led ln
a westerly direction from Bevan, and
after crossing over what is known as
Quartz Creek Mountain almost paralleling the main stream of Brown's
Biver for about five miles and about
two and a half miles west of the
river.    About   five   miles   from   Bevau
Rest ye in peace, ye Flander's dead.
The fight that ye so bravely led,
We'll not forget and we will keep
True faith with you who be asleep
With each a cross to mark his bed
And poppies blowing overhead,
Where once his own life's blood ran red,
So let your rest be sweet and deep
In Flander's field.
—From "America's Answer."
tributary  of
(Continued
Brown's  Kiver.  and
in   Page  Five)
I.
Children's Dance    lllllllllililllllllM
Successful Affair j     SCHOOL REPORT FOR MONTH OF OCTOBER
--Pretty Costumes
The Chldren's Hallowe'en and Fairer Dress dance held last Friday under
auspices of the Women's Benellt
Association of the Maccabees was a
huge success, the numerous young- j
sters in their pretty costumes enjoy-1
Ing themselves as never before. !
Little   Bessy   Carney   was   greatly
applauded for her Irish jig, and Miss ,
Wilda Handlen In her Orchid Flower
dance  and   Bow  and   Arrow   dance j
made a great hit.
The winning number for the baa-
ket of candy waB 21, being claimed I
by Mrs. Oeorge O'Brien.
Division 4, Miss C. MacKinnon's, The P. T. A. attendance contest
class In the Cumberland Public, waa is causing some Interest and at pres-
last month's winner of the atten- ent two divisions are tied for the
dance shield, October's report shows. | lead, these being: 7. Miss Bickle;
Thc percentage of attendance for,and 1, Mr. Murray,
the whole school was 94.7, a very The report In full follows:
creditable figure.   In all there were| DIVISION 1, ORADE 8
459 pupils attending and out of that i    Enrolment 25.     Percentage of nt-
number 292 had perfect attendance.' tendance, 95.9.
HONOR ROLL
StepVn J:,ckson,  Robert Osborne,
Norman  Frelone, Jack  McLean.
Perfect attendance, 21.
H. E. Murray, Teacher
al
C. S. WOOD SUBMITS
INTERESTING REPORT
i
FLAPPERS ATTENTION
32 YARDS OF MATERIAL
USED IN GOWNS FOR PLAY
DIVISION 2, ORADE 7
Enrolment  .16.     Percentage of
tendance 98.
No. of lates 0.
HONOR ROLL
Tadao Dol, Oswald Read. Ping Low
Edna    Read,   Ilena   Bonora.   Sadako
Iwasa.
Perfect attendance 28.
T. A. Galllvan, Teacher
Bat Sift tn Grandma's Day Cost One
Dollar a Yard— William Fox Screen
Version of Celebrated Melodrama
Shows Economic Finery nf thn
"Oood Old  Hays."
COURTENAY, Nbv. 3—In the absence of his worship Mayor Duncan,
i Alderman T. Pearse was elected aa
; chairman    at   last    night's    regular
: council meeting at the city hall. The
aldermen present were Messrs. E. L.
I MacDonald, J. W. McKenzie, F. Field
! nnd   Heber  Cooke.
! From the report of Alderman McKenzie. chairman of the Works Committee. It is probable that the very
: necessary   fill   to   front of the old
: post office on Union Street will soon
he In the hands of contractors, as
satisfactory arrangements are being
completed with the Provincial Public
Works  Deparlment  and  Mr.  Joseph
, McPhee, the owner of the property
adjacent. The matter ls now In the
hands of Alderman McKenzie who
will probnhl.. call for tenders for
this work  which  would be laid be-
; fore the next regular meeting of the
j city  fathers.
!    Mr. J.  M.  Mitchell,  city  solicitor,
WARNING
Men who patronize the motion pictures of today and incldcntly worry
about the cost of the wife's gowns,
will get considerable kick from the
costumes worn ln (he William Fox
Screen production of "East Lynne"
which will be seen at the Ilo-Ilo play
house, Cumberland, on Friday and
Saturday.   Noxember   20th   and   21st.
They will among other things, sec
visualized, what grandpa hud to put
up with In the way ot cost of grandma's wardrobe. The only silver lining to the dark cloud of dress goods
of half a century ago was the low
cost of silk, which, at that time, was
purchasable as cheaply as $1 per
yard for medium quality, while the
heavier grosgralns, moires and brocades were priced at from $1.25 to $3
per yard.
According to."Oodey's Lady Book"
the arbiter of fashion in 1875, from
28 to 32 yards of material were necessary to complete an ordinary gown.
If grandma wore a party dress with
a long trnln, then so stylish, another
half-dozen yards had to he added when
tho goods were purchased.
But grandma only paid the dressmaker from $8.00 to $12.00 for the
making of a gown; In fact, thc modiste who asked $15.00 for thc mak-1 It would seem" therefore, that b,
Ing of a single dress or wrap wns, :orae peculiar sense of Inverted reconsidered enormously high and only tions, women's clothes have expanded
vory exclusive fashioners of women's In price as rapidly as they bave
clothes could demand this figure.   I shrunk ln material.*
attended and reported on the matter
of expropriation of part of Mr. D.
Roy's property at the back of Union
Street for the purpose of widening
the lane at the rear ot the Booth
Block. A definite offer had * been
made to Mr. Roy amounting to 700
dollars. This offer had been refused
however, and a special meeting of
the council will probably be called
on receipt of further Information by
Mr. Mitchell.
A proposed cement sidewalk between the Royal Bank and the new
Post Office was discussed.   Alderman
.ol
DIVISION 3, ORADE 7
Percentage of attendance 9
lates 0.
HONOR ROLL
1. Sarah Lawrence, 2. Aida  Mltsu-
IJie, 3. Jean Brown, 4. James Dell. 5
(Continued on Page Four)
■"Si \    Minto  BChOQlhouse   was   the  scene
jgj) of a festive occasion on  Friday eve-1 we crossed the read water of a south
51 ning.  the thirtieth of October, when I
s5' the   parents   and   friends   were   the I
**==  giiesi-   of   the   teachers,  .Miss  Mac-i
=*==  Nuughtnn and Miss Calnan. assisted
5== j hy  their  pupils.
~ j Entering the hall, welcomed hy a
*S smiling Jack-o-hiuieni donated by
= ;Mrs. Monks, approximately fifty persons signed the visitors honk.    Other
pumpk|ns   were   donated   by    Mrs.'
Ocnge  nnd   Mr.   Williamson.
The  programme opened  with  tlle
singing of "O Canada". Miss Calnan
acting   ns   ai-companisi.     This    was
followed by a  eeadlllg on   HalloweVn
by Stewart  Hutton.   Seasonable recitations and class songs followed.
Tho Masquerade Waltz, which was
beautifully performed hy (he children
was   greatly   enjoyed   hy   all.   Annie
Hutton  and   Fanny  Morgan   winning
tlie  prizes.   Trustee  J.   Stalker   and
Mrs. Shaw acted as judges.
The   next    Item    was    the  'Grand
March,   for   which   prizes   were   alsoj
awarded. Dora Davies being the heal I
dressed   lady   ami   Stewarl    Union. |
posing as llie sheik, the best dressed
gentleman;     .Margaret   Monks,   as   a [
nurse,   was  Ihe   best   sustained   lady
character.   John Piercy. as a tramp.
was   the   host   sustained   gentleman
I character,   The   judges   were    Mr.
Shaw  and  Mr.  E.  Bayly.
:    A laughter provoker was the apple
NO.  eating    contest,    Ifonald    anil    John
Piercy and  lone Morgan  and  James
Calnan  winning Hie prizes.
The   honors   of   the   Peanut   race
were carrie.l off hy Donald Piercy and
David Mnrgnii.   James Calnan. acting
as a wKoh, now proceeded to stir up
the witch's brew ami distributed corn
PARENTS!    ATTENTIOKT
Will parents of hoys and girls in
Cumberland who wish to take a
commercial course, kindly communicate wilh Mrs. F. \V. Tull, of the
Courtenay Commercial School. Arrangements' can probably be made for
transportation nf pupils to and from
Courtenay. Fees fm* full course are
$I2..*1II per month. Text hooks $2.95.
Full particulars on application. Telephone 229, Courtenay.
USUAL DANCE WILL
BE HELD SATURDAY
The usual weekly dance of the
Cumberland United Football Club
will hi' held this Saturday night In
the llo-llo Hall commencing at 9.30
uml continuing until midnight at the
popular price of Gents, 60c, Ladles,
l"e. Good music, good crowd, good
11 nor.
Mrs.  W.  Cordon  ami   Miss  E.
don   have  returned   to  Curobe
frnm a short  visit  in His- Slates.
Gnr-
-laii'l
ROYSTON  PLAYERS
TRIM CUMBERLAND
AND  COMOX  TEAMS
Inli-i-l lull llailiiiiiilnii Produces Some
Hurd (lames Willi II")-Ion Tnklnif
Ml The Honors.
I.
MONSTER CARNIVAL
DANCE WILL BE HELD
.Im-    Idlens     Imperial    Pavilion   al
cobs  and  lortuncs.
Royston presented a very lively scene
Miss   MacNaugbton's    refreshment on We(ll)Mda, ,:ist „„ „„. (,,,.„sin„
committee, composed of [one Morgan L, „,„ ,nter.club  „ ,,,„,„,, „„„,„,
THANKSGIVING NIGHT jEllie •""' Mary Hutton ...iiiaiy wii- j h(,lW(,r||
Comox
Hamsnn, capably
. A monster Carnival Dance, under
McKenzie quoted the estimated cost | ,lUiip|coa ot the Cumberland United
as being $1.50 per lineal foot, six {pootball Club, will bc held In thc
leet wide. Alderman Cooke wanted! ,,„.,,„ Hall on Monday, Thanksglv-
to know how such walk would com-1 ,ng  n|ght    Wc aro glvcn  l0 mAeT.
ed  III  serving, i
A   young   people's  dance   followed, j
the music being supplied   hy   Krusei
Carter's    gramophone.   Aboul    mid-1
niglit the singing nf the National Anthem,  played hy Miss  MacNaughton,
lin
riiuiherluiiil    and
The water situation In Cumberland
Is a serious one and will be throughout the winter months unless rain
Is secured very soon. The fire mar-
shall has therefore Issued a warning
to householders ot this cily to be
very careful with their fires, espec-j
tally at night for in the event of a
conflagration the necessary water
might not be forthcoming. In their
own interests, all precautions for the
pieventlon   of  Are  should   be  taken IPW shoul(1 be encouraged
hy  the  householders. Iearllcr ln ,hc vear' he thouSht
pare with a wooden side walk, and * „,„„,
was Informed that the coat of cement
would be approximately double It
waa explained that the Dominion
Government had gone to a great deal
of trouble ln constructing cement
walks round the post office, besides
laying lawns and the least the city
could do would be to provide an approach ln keeping with the new building. On suggestion of Aid. Cooke
tenders are to be called for this
work.
Aid. Field brought np the matter
of tax penalties. He thought that
ten per cent Imposed on the Ilrst nf
! concluded what was voted by all
ut ihe jollies! lime Hi- y Over
had.
Elghl player:
four ladles and
owing in a largi
s-iii from Cumbc
were  formed,
constituted  a   side,
four gentlemen, bul
number being pres-
liiml. A ami It tenuis
men's  slnglos,  men's
pres
i have
that this special Carnival Is
going to be the best ever attempted
In Cumberland and you will certainly
bc sorry It you mis:.' such a good time j
at so little cost-whlch has been set j R, KAPLANSKY CHANGES
at one dollar for men nnd fifty cents
for ladies. Dancing from 9 p.m. tn
1 a.m. to music supplied by Plump's
Orchestra. Special novelties will be
Introduced.
HIS OFFICE HOURS
TEACHERS TO HOLD
ANNUAL CONVENTION
HERE NEXT WEEK
July was a hardship and mentioned | -—a—
the   fact  that  there   was   a   further:    The Comox Teachers' Annual Con-
five  per cent If the taxes were not j ventlon will be held  In Cumberland
paid   by   the   flrst   of   October.   Tax: next   Thursday and  Friday.   On  the
to pay  first named evening, at 8:00 o'clock,
and   (plnce   announced   later)    Dr.   Weir
some   Inducement   should   be   offered I will   address   a   public   meeting   to!_
them to do so rather than penalize, which   nil   Interested   are   cordially
them   at  a   later   date.   Unpaid   taxi welcome.   Dr.   Weir   Is   a   co-author  nn    Friday,
money-  often   had   to  be  borrowed;of the School Survey Report.   If ynu  C.  II.   Wood
when interest hnd to be paid on the  arc Interested In education, come and I Visitor
I;. Kaplansky, who ims just returned from Ihe west coast of Vancouver
Island and who Is at present In Cum-
. herlnnd. will nut he able to meet his
patrons this Monday, owing to ii being Thanksgiving Day, hut will he
Int his office In the;Medical Building
on Tuesday ul the usual hour. Alter
this week. Mr. Kaplansky will he In
I attendance   every   Monday   evening.
Miss Ethel Junes, nf Nanaimo,
in Cumberland nu a visil In her s
ter. Mrs. II. Devlin.
money.   If  tlftre   was   any   Inlerost!
(Continued on  Page Five)
hear Dr. Weir.
Sessions will be held In the school
Inspector  Stewart,   Mr
and others will Bpeak,
are welcome tn attend,   A
1111(1    ihlllee    lilts    lllsn    heel)
ha liquet
arranged fnr the evening
doublos, ladies' doubles und mixed
doubles being played The Royston
team, captained hv Capl Ash. wera
mosl successful,  winning the major
POrttOll   nf   theil    H.'ltlle-
The teams were:
Cumberland: T ll. Mumford. (captain), i Vornon-Jones, n I-: Murray,
11-', it. Shenstone ll lir.mn uml A. It
' .Nunns. with Mrs. Spicer, Mrs. Shen-
isione. Miss c. MacKinnon uml Miss
T. A. (siilllvau comprising the ladles*
team.
Royston: ii   A   Ash. (captain), ll.
1 Idlens. ||. Tarbell. F Brock, J. Idlens
nml .1   II   Mclntyre  with   Mrs. Ash.
1 Mrs.   Cokely,   Mrs.   Mclntyre,   Mrs.
Cooke uml Mrs.  Bayly
Comox:  Miss-   Downey   (captain).
' ami   Messrs.   Longland,   Pollock   and
. Steele, with Misses Wnnil. Lyche, Mrs.
: Falrbalrn ami  Mrs.  Ted Cliffs,
During   lin-   past    wnok   both   the
ICumberland nml Royston t'luhs have
I Joined ihe ii. c. Badminton Association, automatically being affiliated
with tin- Canadian Badminton Assoc*
I la tion. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, NOVJfpBER 6, 1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBi^ISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD'W. BICKLE
FRIDAY.  NOVEMDER 6,   1925
THE GOOD NAME
OF   WOMEN
utation, she still trods the thorny path of Mag- the possibility of substantial pay-
dalene. : ments in goods, and suggest that the
Even in this gaudy age of furs and furbelows,   longer  the  United   States   maintains
rags are still royal raiment when Worn for vir- an export surplus, the more difficult
tue's sake and the man who would besmirch a I the eventual payments win become,
woman's character is a coward, a sneak, and ai   On the whole it seems thm none
blackguard, | ot the negotiations with the  United
 ; States  have  laid  sufficient  emphasis
OF SCHOOLS AND     The streak of the con-' upon the fact that these loans were
FASHIONS ventional    Which    keeps i made at the time when prices were
men    from    expressing high, or what is the same, when gold
their own ideas for fear of seeming peculiar is had a comparatively low purchasing
never responsible for any of the great creations power.    Thinking of these matters
or accomplishments in the world's history. I In terms of commodities helps clear
Fashions in art, music, dress, and the like do the situation.    Owing to this very
One of the saddest features of the divorce evil is
the smirching of women's i not fo^r individual genius, but serve rather to difference in price level, the repay-
Often it occurs when there is no
reputations
just cause nor excuse.
A New York court took cognizance of this
fact a few days ago, in a manner which, while it
may not be legally authorized, deserves the applause of all decent men. A husband who was
sued tor divorce, instead of confining his efforts
to defending himself against the charges made
againsh him by his wife, sought to prove that
depress and engulf it. J. G. Huneker went so far ment by Europe of commodities at
as to say that "There are no schools in art or liter- their present gold value would imply
ature, only good writers and artists. There are the return of a volume of goods near-
no types, only individuals."    This is a cheering ly twice as great as the volume of
word from one who  was well able to pass an 0- the same kinds of goods secured from
pinion on the subject; and it may serve as a warn- j the united states with these loans.
ing to those enthusiasts who are all too eager to when one considers the obvious re-
follow the hue and cry of a new fad in the fine arts luctance of the united states to ad-
The attractive thing about a fashion is that its mlt imports other than row mater-
she was of immoral character. The judge stern- j features are plainly apparent to the one who tais, tropical fruits and manufactured
ly stopped him and severly took him and his j would follow it, and he has to do little or no think- Roods which cannot be produced in
attorney to tack for their attempt to blacken the i m8 on ^e subject himself. It is clear, therefore, the United states, it is not surprls-
reputation of the woman whom the evidence I tj,at th0Be who shrink from mental activity and ing that debtor countries feel that
he had "failed to treat as a human being." ! creative thought will be found among the ones most obvious channels of payment
No doubt it would be impossible to apply any; wy,0 most closely cling to the accepted "school" have been blocked by  tariff walls,
general rule to this matter; each case must of ior fashion. \   What is to be the ultimate solution
necessity stand on its own merits. But judges j f^e individuals who have reached achievements is a matter that must be decided in
could take the position of the New York justice jn ^eir chose field have done so because of patient the United states, but it is quite en-
oftener than they do. They can also, in this j unrelenting toil, together with the conviction that couraging to realize that business
connection, do much, as far as the good name of their message is peculiarly their own and hence men aud bankers in the United states
women is concerned, to modify the practice of, worthy of beautiful expression. j are giving these economic factors a
asserting in petitions and answers not only what l  _,  | careful consideration which may lead
it is reasonable to believe can bc proved, but as j Laboring under a delusion does not beget a pay to new developments In the whole
much more than that as may, by the remotest j envelope. I debt situation.
possibility, be brought out in cross-examination1  ,  Had Prance and the United States
and from new witnesses. ' Few good cookg can y^fo Bhorth»nd or use a ""ansed » permanent settlement, it
And is not this also a matter of professional, types^ter ils almost a certainty that it would
ethics with lawyers?     Why can it not be reg-;
Loafing is hard work.     Very few people have
have been accompanied by the revaluation and stabilisation of the
Franc. Without such an arrangement no settlement would have been
considered satisfactory, and It might
completely futile. Should the present arrangement result in a five years
determent of stabilization, and should
ulated by bar associations?     The need is appar-1 , mil".! *"*"
ent      The world condones in a man what it will j    Thf.™*? owes you 8 llvm« but you "»ustlhTw
not forgive in a woman.     Her good name once11 wnal Ior-
called   into  question,   there is put upon her a
blight which is often impossible to remove. ,      ol,„„aao    ....   ..
Woman  has  travelled far in the matter of imade 8 8Uccess w,th "•
emancipation.     She is admitted to the profes- j ——
sions; she has many equalities with man, but |    All people have something for a rainy day, but the uncertainty due to the outcome of
the present conference result in so
undermining the credit of France that
further inflation follows, the result
must  be considered  unfortunate.
Without financial stabilization, certainly there can be little industrial
improvement, and without increases
in production there can  be neither
when it comes to fighting on with a soiled rep-too many have rheumatism.
THE FRENCH DEBT
NEGOTIATIONS
Extract from the Monthly Letter of
The Ro*yal Rank of Canada.
The failure of the United States to
reach an agreement with France produces wide spread disappointment
since there Is now general appreciation of the necessity of for the return of France to a condition of financial stability. Whatever merit is
attached to the plan that France
shall pay 140.000,000 a year for five
years with tho remission of further
Interest during the period, lies ln the
suggestion that both countries are
now more nearly ready to face the
almost as much a step In advance as
for the United States, possestng. half
gold ln the world, to recognize the
real conditions in Europe and the necessity for the adjustments necesary
to permit her to begin to receive the
goods In which ultimate payments
must be made. Like the " Dawes
Plan," this interim agreement bridges
an awkward situation, and permits a
lapse oftime In  which both peoples'
to secure a settlement together with
credits which would stabilise ber finances and her money. At the laat
Mr. Caillaux offered much more than
most Frenchmen felt France could
pay, and it iB quite possible that the foreign payments nor Internal liar
ultimate settlement will bs tn some  mony.
such termB ae these which now seem I =====
too large ln France and too small _ .
In the United States.
The fact that many financial and
may grow accustomed to the Idea that business periodicals such as the
further concessions are necessary, j Chase Economic Bulletin and the
That France's capacity to pay may; Magazine of the American Chamber
be even smaller than her own states-; of Commerce, are beginning to give
men are willing to admit, constitutes' serious discussion to the possible
one possibility which should be given ; methods of receiving payments from
careful consideration. So general Is! Europe, leads to the hope that this
the recognition that France requires | question will soon receive general
true situation. For France (n reach i stabilization of her credit, that many: serious consideration in the United
the point where she is prepared to  well   informed   people   thought   that I States.     All  of  the articles  ot the
she   might   promise   more than she I type point out that the present tariff
could ever hope to perform In order | barriers are so high as to preclude
recognize her debtB as far as her resources   will   permit,   will  constitute
COMOX BUTTER
YOU ARE INVITED TO INSPECT OUR MODERN
PLANT AT COURTENAY. COMOX BUTTER IS
CHURNED DAILY FROM FRESH GATHERED PAS-
TUERIZED CREAM.
PRACTICALLY ALL OF THE PRODUCT IS FROM
JERSEY COWS, AND INSPECTORS STATE THAT
THE HERDS IN THIS DISTRICT ARE THE HEALTHIEST IN THE PROVINCE.
OUR   GUARANTEED  PRODUCTS
Comox Butter, Comox Eggs, Comox Potatoes
Comox Whole Wheat Flour
Comox Creamery Association
CAR
(Alt
Mason's Taxi
24 HOURS SERVICE
At Very Reasonable Prices
I meet all trains and boats.
A few cents extra will bring
you at your house or from your
house to the station iu Comfort
and Style.
ANTWHEKK at ANY TIME
See Geo. Mason
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
CAR
CAR
FLORAL TRIBUTES
WERE NUMEROUS AND
VERY BEAUTIFUL
A profusion ot beautiful flowers,
sent by many sympathising friends
of the deceased girl and her bereaved
parents, were in evidence at the funeral on Thursday, October 29th, of
the late Miss Eleanor Davis. The
pall bearers were six friends and
school mates of Eleanor — Harold
Conrod, Jack Sweeney, Jack Hill,
Andrew Brown, Victor Marinelli, and
Bert  McLellan.
The following list contains the
names of those who sent floral tributes:
Pillow—Papa, mamma, sister and
brothers.
Broken Wheel—Grandpa, grandma,
uncles and aunts.
Crosses—Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Wood.
School staffs.
Wreaths—Aunt Martha, Uncle Dan
and cousins; Aunt Lizzie, Uncle Sam
and cousins; W. B. A. of Maccabees;
Welsh Soclet,; Schoolmates of thc
Cumlierland Public School; Classmates; Thora and Dudley Kleeler;
Mr. and Mrs. T. H, Mumford; Mrs.
B. S Robertson. Royston; C O. I. T.
and Sunday School of St. George's
United; Mrs. H. B. Conrod and Mr.
P. Bannerman; Mr. and Mrs. A. R.
Kierstead. Port Alberni; Chum Emma.
Sprays—Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Shearer
antl Aunt Liz; Cousins David and
William Hunden; Mr. and "Mra. T.
Lewis. .N'anaimo; Mr. and Mrs. Jackson and family; Mr. and Mrs. Oeorge
Johnston and family; Mrs. H. Parkinson; Mrs. Wm. Potter; Mr. and
Mrs. T. H, Carey and family; Mr.
and Mrs. C. Whyte and Doreen; Harllng and Ledlngham; a Chum; Mrs.
Andrew Gibson; Mr. and Mrs. V.
Marinelli; Mrs. Saunders; Mr. and
Mrs. J. D. Sommerville; Mr. and Mrs.
3. L. Robertson; Mary Clark; Mr.
and Mrs. T. Richards; Mr. and Mrs.
Aida; Mrs. W. C. Whyte. Minto; Mr.
and Mrs. J. Hill.
Cumberland
DRY  GOODS   DEPARTMENT
Famous "Northway" Garments
in Ladies Coats and Dresses. ,
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style BOc
Children's hair cut any style 3&c
Qfi CI l:1I
There's nothing puzzling
about the quality of the
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cer. 5th mil Bansmulr.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lauds may be pre-empted hy
British subjects over 18 years of ate,
and by aliens ou declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
ind Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Pull information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given lu Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
hy addressing the Department ot
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 5.000 board
t'eet per acre west et tke Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east ot that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed te the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division. In which the land applied for
Is situated, and are nude ou printed
forms, copies ot which cau be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and Improvements made
to value of J10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before a Crown Grant can he
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received tor purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lauds, not being timherland.
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class 'arable) land Is J6
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands ls given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Viirchase nnd
Lease of Crown Lands''
Mill, factory, or industrial sites en
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment cf
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may he leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the flrst year, title being
obtained afler residence snd improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 840 acres
may be leased ky one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based in
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. 8tock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
CURTAIN  MUSLINS
Special value in Madras Curtain
Muslin, at ^\A*»
per yard  0\/\/
Newest Patterns in Chintz and
Creton and Terry Cloths.
Newest   Novelties   in   Ladies'
Sweater and Sweater Coats.
Newest Styles in Ladies and in
Misses striped, plaid and plain
flannel Dresses, from
$3.75to$12.50
54 inch Dress Flannels
all shades      tf»i
per yard  «P JL
wis in I
£iy>
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Clothing
A complete stock of Men's Fall
Suits and Overcoats in the newest prevailing shades, at popular
prices.
Special value in Boys' School
Suits in all sizes, 24 to 36.
I P. P. HARRISON
I  BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - • - B.C.
■Bi
New Fall Styles in Men's ud
Boys' Sweater Coats, Sweaters
and Knitted Vests. „
New Novelties in Men's Crepe
Neckwear and Scarfs.
TRUNKS. SUIT CASES, AND
CLUB BAGS.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Sweet Pickles, Smoked and Cooked
Meats, Swift's Peameal Backs, Side
Bacon, Boned and Rolled Hams and
Bacon, Ayrshire Roll and Buts, Baked
Ham with Dressing, flat cooked Hams,
Head Cheese, Meat Loaf, Cooked
Corn   Beef,  etc.
SMOKED FISH
Kippered Herring and Cod, Fillet of
Haddie.  Smoked Cod, etc.
Cumberland rttiftAY, NOVEMBER 6,  1625
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND.B.C.
PAGE THREE
M
Every Woman
Deserved One
The SMP Roaster is a fine time saver. You put
the roast~"or fowl in the oven. The roaster does
the rest, bastes, roasts to perfection. It roasts with
very little shrinkage, thus saving dollars every year.
None of the tasty meat juices are tost; all the rich
ia retained. .Besides you can buy cheaper
cuts, for it makes cheap cuts taste
like choice ones.
The clow fitting cover fceepi all the
cooking odori and the grea* inni<U the
roaster—the smell of cooking doesn t nil
the house, and the oven is kept sweet
and clean. -Best or all, it cleans out in
a jiffy after the roasting. These are
.pfendid vessels. Price 85c. to $3.50
according to sin and finish. Sold io all
hardware stores.
SMP m
£nxune£ed
ROASTER
HOLD HY MATT llltOWN'S   GROCERY, CUMBERLAND.
Dffllllllllllllilllllll
Getting Facts Quickly
WHEN INFORMATION IS REQUIRED FROM
A  DISTANT  POINT, THE  LONG-DISTANCE
TELEPHONE   PROVES   ITS   WORTH   AS A
SPEEDY, PERSONAL, DIRECT SERVICE.
NEW MARKET FOUND
FOR B. C. DOUGLAS FIR
VICTORIA—Through the efforts of
the Minister of Lands another new
market has heen found l'or British
Columbia lumber. This is the state
ance service on the island of Mauritius. Hitherto only European woods
have been used but when Hon. .Mr.
Pattullo learned that the government
railways were in the market for a
cargo timber be cabled the general
manager stating the qualities of the
Douglas fir and the excellent results
obtained from its uie on the British.
Indian and Egyptian line:". The outcome is "that the first shipment of
Douglas fir ever made to Mauritius
is now being loaded at B. C.  ports.
be nl least approximately $<ki,000,000,
or nearly one-fourth more than in
1924 which was a record output. The
value of mineral production last year
was $48, *4. 604, while for the first
eight months of the present year the
production has totalled approximately $41,000,000. The production of
gold shows a large increase, and n
grealer oul put Is also seen in coal
and zinc, while smelter activity is
evidenced b.. a big increase in the
output ot* coke.
/
MINERAL OUTPUT THIS
YEAR WILL DE RECORD
Figures prepared by the Provincial
Mineralogist and preaentd to Ibe Minister of Mines show that the mineral
output of the province for 11)25 will
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY       ii
E. L. SAUNDERS
111'TO DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have > nir shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing itian when new.
I aim to give t'u best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
IQng baby-
deserves
thebes^
POTATO SHOW ENTRIES
CLOSE NOVEMBER 18
. VICTORIA—Tho fourth annual
British Columbia potato show and
educational seed exhibit will be held
ut the armories In New Westminster
November 25 to 28, with entries closing on November 18th. There are 8
classes, including Women's Institutes
ipliool children, gardeners, certified
s'od, commercial, district displays,
.md ij.cpaicd dishes ol* potatoes.
The provincial department of Ag-
riculiure will pay the transportation
charges on iho exhibits, which should
be sent by freight or express colled.
IN HONOR OF
A GREAT EVENT
Birthdays are always important
occasions, especially If one Is very
young or very old. Before long The
Youth's Companion will be a hundred
years old. and the event Is going to
be maiic a memorable one for the
Companion's many friends. So. al-
I hough the date is not until April 16,
1027. preparations will begin with
1926.
In honor of Its birthday The Companion will come to you next year
ut Iho new low price of $2. It will
be dressed ln Its party clothes, with
new cover designs, enlarged Illustrations, new brilliantly clear type,
over 200 pages more than last
year. It will contain 0 book-length
serial   stories,   fascinating   mystery
'stories, tales ol* adventure on land
jam! sea, the new "Makc-ll-nud-Do-I;"
i Pages, radio, games, books, antj. puzzles, interesting special articles, and
the ever-delightful Children's Page.
Dont miss this great year of The
Youth's Companion'] subscribe now
and  receive:
1. The Youth's Companion—52 Issues
in 1026. and
2. The remaining Issues of 1925.
All for $2.
2. Or include McCall's Magazine, the
authority   on   fashions.     Both
publications, only $2.50.
THE   YOUTH'S   COMPANION
S  N   Dept.,  Boston.  Mass.
Subscriptions Received ut  this Ollice.
COMPASS POINTS IN
DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS
S.,.SSS»    SSSSH
msE
i^'jobs^--* >t_« : ■Z**nw!V»sT».-»*
?7T^
i^mm
SATURDAY
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PATiTsY
BUTTER HOPNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pics.
DR. MIDDLETON'S 100 PER CENT
WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
I
SOI£X  LAMPS
%   Electric Lamps of Quality
Tungsten and Nitrogen
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
15 watt "B" lamps 32c.
25 watt "B" lamps 32c.
40 watt "B" lambs 32c.
50 watt "B" lamps 32c.
GO watt "B" lamps 32c.
NITROGEN LAMPS
75 watt "C" lamps 55c.
100 watt "C" lamps 65c.
150 watt "C" lamps 85c.
200 watt "C" lamps $1.15
300 watt "C" lamps $2.00
Sold By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
J	
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/2-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Compass Inventor I nkniiwii
Tin.' Invention of the compass Is
lost In the dawn of history. It Is
first mentioned In a quaint Chinese
legend which relates that the Emperor Ho-ang-tl In 2634 B.C. led forth
his army and attacked Ihe rebel
Khlang on Ihe plains of Tchoulou.
Hut Khlang, getting thc worst of the
conflict, called the wizards, magicians and sorcerers to his aid who
raised a great fog to hide Khlang
and his army. Then the Emperor,
not to he outdone. In his turn used
the greater magic of llie compass,
which led his army through the fog
so thai he was able lo overcome the
rebel  Khlang and capture him.
Led  tt'nj  to New  World
The cumpass appears to have been
brought to Europe in the twelfth, century, most probably hy the Arabians.
as il Is known that the Arabian and
I Chinese traders met in the Persian
gull'; and on account of Its very great
practical value as a guide in all
weathers, it rapidly came into general use nnd enabled Christopher
Columbus to sail straight west from
Spain, by day and night, through fair
and stormy weather, to llie discovery
of 1 Ise Xew World. I
Does \ol Point North
I'm contrary to story book report.
Iho   compass   does   not   point   north
' but more or less to the east or west
iv.   different   places.   Scientists  state
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
siiiH-'i'S'BEfc^'E^^^^
BUILDING
MATERIAL  OF  ANY  DESCRIPTION
Call and See Our Stocks——Get Our Figures
EDWARDS LUMBER, COMPANY LTD.
Mill Street, Courtenay
Phone 17 P.O. Box 62
ilii!M"2"3EEKlls*^^
Courtenay Commercial School
Individual Tuition in
SHORTHAXE - TYPEWRITING — BOOK KEEPING
» HUSINESS METHODS
New Location Opposite Corfleld's Garage.
Something
elsetobe
IhaTiMfir
ShocRolish
-^
Preserves Shoes
LEONARD
EAR OIL
.EAF"ESS
a«oistsi
Hf™fricehzs
■pon'tp'' MM druggists
poJP' mm nmt'tWIUii'm BtBufSt.
I'niisl league Standing
■III
DONT SHIVER
EAT MORE MEAT DUKINti THE COLD WEATHER
AND KEEP'WARM.     MEAT IS A HEAT AND
ENERGY  PRODUCER.
We handle only the best.
Our prices are right.
A trial will be appreciated.     =
Wilcock   Bros,
«CUNARD1
J ANCHOR-DONALDSON $
§|  Back Home foi  $
I CHRISTMAS 1
I
j Cumberland
! Westminster  .
! St.   Andrews.
' Ladysmith
j Nanaimo 	
I Varsity   ...
j Victoria    	
SI.   Saviours.
North   Shore
7 2
4 2
C 2
5 2
IJ 1
Goals
I) P A  Pt
1 2i*>   9 13
2 21 13 10
2 12 12 8
n 17    8
2 12 18
11   7 11
0 14 23
1 6 15
I) 11 13
"ATHENIA"
From   Halifax   to   Londonderry
ond Glasgow,  sailing  Dec.   14.
*       "ASCANIA" I
Vj| From    Halifax    to    Plymouth. *j
a£ Cherbourg and London. Special *:
rA excursion,   personally   oscortod H
%tf by Dkk K. Wlnthsm.    Sail.,.* Aft
& Dec. 14. ^
/JX Full  information   from  agents, %t
J*T or Company's offices, 622 Has- J9.
%J tings St.  W.,  Vancouver. \f»
\uuusVUiUsmmiiiinniiiill)l///////sW/////
KEATINGS
KILLS
BURN IT TO KILL >
=      MOSQUITOES AND FLIES
,4
that this Is because the magnetic
poles of the earth are not situated
at the geographical pules as shown
on our maps of the world; that in
fact the north magnetic pole is near
Boothia Felix on the Arctic coast of
Canada, and the south magnetic pole
in Souih Victoria Lund south from
New  Zealand.
Surveys   Necessary
In order that the compass may be
used with reliance, therefore, the
different countrries of the world carry
out magnetic surveys to measure its
direction, and picture the information
on magnetic charts for the compass
users.
First Work Jn Canada
Compass information is particularly valuable in such a large new
country as Canada, and it is interesting to note that Champlain measured
its direction at Halifax about 1604,
John Davis in Davis Strait in 1585,
and Capt. HaMln in Matliu Land 1616;
while Capt. Cook in 1778 and Capt.
Vancouver in 1792 measured it along
the Pacific coast. Later Sir John
Franklin 1819-26 and Sir John Le-
frey 1843-46 made some measurements
but comparatively little was done in
Canada  before  1S80.
Canada'"  Magnetic  Survey
Since 1880, however, the Topographical Survey Department of the In-
I terlor, has carried on a most extensive magnetic survey in thjs country
in  conjunction   with   its  other work,
j al   practically   no   expense,   because
'the compass  direction  can  he meas-
: ured in a few minutes when the sur-
; vey parties are already on the pround,
! until   it   now   possesses   more  than
■ 20.000   measurements,   and   regularly
publishes magnetic  maps  which  picture all this information for compass
users.
Leads Wny Today
In spite of the fact that the compass has heen known for so long, tt
is today more widely employed than
ever before; it is the sure pathfinder,
the cloud by day and the pillar of
fire hy night to the sailor ailoat on
the heaving main; the airman above
tlie hiding clouds: the miner far underground in the deepest shaft; the
explorers, surveyors, hunters, trappers, prospectors, pioneers and travellers penetrating tho trackless forest
the jumbled mountains, the virgin
wilderness, and  the  far north.
Kiddles Yet Unsolved
Out  the compass  still  has  hidden
secrets.   Elusive   earth   currents   and
Stubborn static  still  act the  part of
highwaymen and hold up our friends
the telegraph and wireless and radio.
We  know   these   highwaymen  are   in
' the   nature   of   flrst   cousins   to   the
dancing northern lights aud magnetic
storms   that    torture    the   compass,
black  cyclonic  sunspots   that  try to
rob us of our light and heat, but all
! these  things   are   still   seen   through
i a   glass, darkly,   and   scientists  be-
i lieve they never probably can be forced  to take Ihe  stand  and   lay  bare
, their inmost  secrets until the direc-
I tion  of pointing of  the compass has
; heen   properly   mapped   all   over  the
I world.
"Spike, dear." pouted the bootlegger's wife, "it's getting awful hot here
In town. Haven't you decided where
we will spend  the Summer?"
"Not yet," said her fond husband.
"Dat all depends on Louie. Dey
pinched him yesterday."
"Hut," demanded his storm and
strife, "whal has Louie's arrest got lo
do   with   where   we spend our Sum-
mer?"
"It's got pletit> to do!" was the reply of the family breadwinner. "If he
stands pat we spend the Summer wit
your Uncle Henry, but if he squawks
we spend li wit Cncie Bam."
A WAY TO SAVE IT
"You're looking bad, Wuliie."
"Aye, I've been  in  the hospital an'
the doctors have tooken awa' ma appendix."
"These dnclor'll tak' onything, it's
a peely ye dlnna have it in yer wife's
name.",
When It's an uphill light a man can
only  do  his  level   best.
If you meet all things with kindness
you will find this a pretty fine old
world.
The wny lo escape limitations is to
simply outgrow them. PAGE FOUB
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND.B.C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER «,  lttt
asata
asv.
Less
onsm*
AUCTION
BRIDGE
I SCHOOL REPORT
|       (Continued from  Page One)
-jiisuit   loung,  <i. Hataumi  Mujahara.
Perfecl attendance 21.
I. .McFadyen, Teacher.
New Series by WYNNE FERGUSON
(Author tfTergiuon on tfucritmlMdff
CwmSulH5toBs^«!]K
ARTICLE No. 1
Auction h a game ol contraiti. Om
hand wilt play well and the next one
badly;,that ia, on on* hand you will get
all the "breaka," and on the next, everything will go wrong. It is a game of auch
infinite variety that no player can ever
hope to maater all ita qulrka and turna.
Even the best ol players lose their judgment at times and allow their own hand
to influence their bidding to their disadvantage when they ahould realite
that their partner bas sn unusual or
freak hand. Tha other night, the writer
noticed two examples of this failure to
be en the lookout for the unusual or
freak type of band.
The dealer with ths following hand:
Hesrts—A'
Clubs — A, 9,4,2
Diamonds —A, Q, J, 8
Spades —A, K, 4
bid one no trump. Second hand pasaed
and the dealer's partner bid two hearts.
Fourth hand passed snd the dealer bid
two no-trump. When hta partner bid
three hearta, the dealer failed to realize
that il his psrtner had s justifiable three
heart bid, they had a sure game in
hearts, and bid three no-trump although
there was no sure game in no-trump.
The 100 aces were too much for his
judgment and as a result he went flown
three tricks undoubted, a net loss of 50
points on a hand that would have scored
game at hearts. Hia partner'a hand was
aa follows:
Hearts — Q, J, 10,9,6,4
Cluba —Q, 6, 3
Diamonds — 10, 9, 7
Spades — 5
Don't allow 100 aces to impair your
judgment.
Tne same player made a similar error
on the following hand:
Hearts—A.Q.10
Clubs —none
Diamonds—A, Q, 10,9,6
Spades—A. Q, 10,4, 2
His partner dealt and passed, second
hand passed and he bid one spade.
When hia partner overbid with twu
cluba, he correctly bid two diamonds.
His psrtner bid three clubs snd he bid
three diamonds. This bid is doubtful
but when his partner bid four clubs, he
should certainly have passed. He never
stopped to realize that such bidding by
his partner indicated a most unusual
hand, one of the freak type and that his
high cards in three suits would be of
greet help to his partner and that his
partner'a clubs would be of little value
to his own hand, if he should obtain the
bid at diamonds or spades. In spile of
all these cogent reasons, however, be
bid four diamonds and all passeil. Hie
partner's hand was as follows:
Hearts —8
ClubB-A,Q, J, 10,9,7,5,4,2
Diamonds — 8,7
Spades — 3
At clubs, they could have made five
odd, losing only one club and one diamond trick; while at diamonds they
went down two tricks. It is a fine example of what not to do with a big
hand. Play for the game, first, last and
all the time, whether the hand is played
by yourself or your partner. Always be
willing to concede the bid to your partner when the bidding indicates that he
has a freak hand. In the hand just considered, the dealer could have saved a
lot of trouble by making an original bid
of five clubs. It is a perfect example of
the preemptive or shut out bid. If the
bid fails, it will certainly aave game; so
that, in either event, it is a winner.
As a contrast to his bad bidding, the
player whose bida have just been criticised played the following hand very
cleverly:
Hsarta-S.4,8
Clubs — A,Q,7.S
Diamonds — 4,4
Spades -1, f, 5,1
Hearta— K,Q,7,6
Clubs — 10, 4 2
Diamonds — K, 9,3
Spades —A, 6,4
)A
Hearta —8, 2
Cluba —J, 9, J
B :    Diamonds — Q, J, 10, 7, 2
:    Spades — K, Q, 10
Hearts — A, J, 10,9
Clubs —K, 8,6
Diamonds — A, 8, 5
Spades —J, 9, 3
2, tht player to qmsstJon. dealt snd bid
no-trump, All passed and A opened the
five of clubs. Z won the trick with the
king and led four nunda of hearta. B
discarded two diamond* on the lut two
rounds of hearts. 2 wu now ln a position where he could make two odd but
figured that if he could force B to make
another discard, he might possibly make
three odd by making three diamonds or
two spades. At trick five, therefore, he
led the ten of dubs, forcing A to win
the trick, wbo thereupon led three
rounds of clubs. B wu now forced to
make another discard. He could hsve
discarded either a spade or diamond. If
the former, Z would discard a diamond
and make two spade tricks. If the latter, Z would discard a apade and make
three diamond tricks. It is a perfect
example of the "squeexe" play. Study
the play of this hand carefully for it
wu cleverly thought out. It ia very
unusual to win a game by leading your
opponents' suit.
Hearta — none
Cluba—Q.7.J
Diamonds — 7, S
Spedae-J.M
Problem No. 1
Hearts — none
Clubs —8,5,3
Diamonds — 6,4
Spades —Q, 8, 6
I
lA
I
Y
Z
Bi
Hearta-K.l
Clubs — J, 9
Diamonds—K
Spsdee-1,1,1
Hearta — A, 10,9
Clubs —K, 4
Diamonds — Q, J
Spades —9
There are no trumps and Z is in the lead. How can YZ win six of tbt eight
I ricks against any defense? Solution in the nest article.
SPECIAL
TRAINS
: '-""I ' i.
IN  CONNECTIQH   '-
WITH
SAILINGS
WINNIPEC^SofHALIFAX
Carrying Through Tourist Sleepers from Vancouver
and Connecting With
DROTTNINOHOMI to     Oothmbnnr
December 6th
»0»K' lo   (Jurawtown, Lherpool
December 7th
MEGANTIC to   Belfast, tilanffow, Liverpool
December 13th
ASCAN1A to Plymouth, I'hrrbnnnr, London
•MMENIA m   Gtanrow
OKBITA to   Cherbourg, Southampton
December 14th
For Information, rates and reservations apply
EDWARD VV. BICKLE, Agent
Cumberland, II. c. Telephone SS
i Kiyonaga, progress, Wardena Thomp-
jflOO.
|    Jr.   3.   1. Harue   Okata,   2. Mary
[ Read,  progress,  Arnold  Bonora.
Perfect attendance 21.
C. Carey, Teacher.
DIVISION 4. ORADE 6 SENIOR
Enrolment 35, percentage of attendance 94.45, lates 0.
HCNOR ROLL,
1. Katherine Brown, 2. Nina Shields
j 3 Muriel  Partridge,   4. Mary  Small,
Cazuko   Iwasa.  Cyril  Davis,   (equal).
Perfect attendance 24.
C. MacKinnon. Teacher.
DIVISION 5, GRADE 5 JUNIOR
Enrolment 35, Percentage or attendance 96. Lates 1.
HCNOR ROLL
1. Nellie Jackaon and Lorna Osborne (equal). 3. Jennie Lawrence.
4 Muriel Harrison. 6. Mary McMillan,   6. Irvin   Banks   (improvement)
Perfect attendance 22.
E. Hood. Teacher.
DIVISION   6,   GRADES   JUNIOR   6
AND JUNIOR 6
Enrolment 37, Percentage of attendance 96,5,  Lates 0.
HONOR ROLL
Jr. 6.   1. Tommy Adamson, 2. Malia Tomassl. 3. Robert Marshall.
Jr.   5.   1. Chrlssle   Robertson   and
Shigera   Kujona    (equal),   2. Kloshl
. Nakumura,   Progress,   Bryson   Parn-
' ham and George Saito.
j    Perfect attendance 23.
V. J. Aspesy, Teacher.
DIVISION 7, GRADE 4
Enrolment 38.     Percentage of attendance 91.7.   No of lates 2.
HONOR ROLL
Senior   grade—Len   Hing,   Harold
Hughes, Willie Logan.
Junior grade—Rhoda Walton, Madge Br,an, Letle Surngler.
Perfect attendance 22.
B. M. Bickle. Teacher
DIVISION   8,   GRADES   3   SENIOR
AND 4 JUNIOR
Enrolment 36.     Percentage of attendance 93.2.   No of lates 2.
HONOR ROLL
Jr.   4—Margaret  Drummond,   Kate
Oyama, Robert Logan.
Sr. 3—Margaret Marpole, Ada lso,
Gee Doon.
Perect attendance 25.
G. M. McFad..en, Teacher
DIVISION 9, GRADE  3
Percentage of attendance 96.7 ,No.
of lates 3.
HCNOR ROLL
Sr. 3.   1. Yashl Kawata, 2. Teruko
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Ollice Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
ciniium, b. c
Comfort  ana   Homelike   asrvlse.
tl  room, eleetrleol.fr  keeled
■sullen! eulsine—
for reservations Pfeoao 11.
L TATM, !
When yoa are In need of a
Plwhhf * Heottaf BHtaMr, lee
R. RUSHTON
Phone 114 Phone 117
Coirtnay or Cumberland
Tear  Mods   will  receive  Immediate
tttantlon.
BOOK
NOW
DIVISION   10,   GRADES   JUNIOR   3
AND SENIOR 2
Enrolment 38. Percentage of atteu-1
■laiirc 92.34, Lates 2.
(No Honor List)
Perfect attendance 22.
P.  Hunden,  Teacher, i
  I
DIVISION 11
Enrolment 40, Percentage of attendance 91.74,   Lates  3.
HONOR ROLL
Sr. 2.   1. Margaret Home, progreas
Gladys Colling and Hugh McWhlrter.
Jr.   2.   1. Patsy  Anderson,  2. Jean
Sommerville,   3. Shunkn   Saito   and
ilannye Nakagulchi.
Perfect attendance 25.
J. E. Robertson, Teacher.
■DIVISION 12
Enrolment 31, Percentage of alten-
Jancc 92.2, Lates 2.
(No Honor List)
Perfect attendance 15.
Carrie Richardson. Teacher.
DIVISION   13
Enrolment 37, Percentage of atten-
dance 92, Lates 1.
HONOR ROLL
1. Albert   Hicks,   2. Betty   Brown, i
3. Sakae Aida. 4. Ronald Spooner, 6.
Willie  Ramsel,  6. Lilian Docherty.
Perfect attendance 23.
Eva G. Drader, Teacher.;
Union Stage
Co., Ltd.
Stages leave from the
CUMBERLAND HOTEL AND
WAVERLY HOTEL
for Nanaimo and all way points
at 8:00 ar.d 9:45 a.m. daily.
TRAVEL BY STAGE
T. D. Coldicutt,
Manager.
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WW MKHHIKIKI l>    1'i.^ii.loi
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT   CUISINE
DuasRiHir Avauue, Cumberland
TAXI TAXI
Safety andComfort
Day or Night
CAR  SERVICE
94 TELEPHONE 106
Cumberland Hotel
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at  1:08   o'clock  every   Sunday
morning   and   meets   boat   at
Unfon Bay.
TOURING PARTIES CATERED
TO AT REASONABLE RATES
ASK FOR
Charlie Dalton
TAXI
TAXI
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE m
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Evory Description
At Reasonable Prices.
^SM
Can You Afford to Lose ?
When you buy Speculative Shares which have no earning record and no Market Value you are simply GAMBLING with the overwhelming probability that you
Will LOSE YOUR MONEY. Why take this long
chance when you can INVEST your SAVINGS IN
SOUND Dividend-paying Securities of Known Value
and Earning Power (always readily marketable) and
be safe.     You can do this by availing yourself of our
" PAY IN A YEAR PLAN "
Example $500 Initial Investment
$500 Invested (Pay in a Year Plan) will buy outright
ii SHIRKS HELL TELEWIOSE Blrlden* rate if.
10 SHARES STEEL 01' CANADA Dlrldead rut* If.
10 SHARES CANADIAN CAR FOUNDRY I'M   Dividend nito If.
The above investment securities are long cstab-
lislied dividend payers and possess an unusual degree
of taujty plus extraordinary prolit making possibilities
on market advances,
(Other Investment Group Selections for Smaller
or Larger Sums on Request).
Our new investment, booklet "The Road to Financial Independence" gives a complete record of Canadian
Dividend Paying Securities with their high and low
market prices and explains how you can start investing small or large sums with absolute safety by our
"Pay in a Year Plan". Send for it today. No obligations.
Representatives wanted to act as
our Local Correspondents
MAIL THIS COUPON
Date..
Burnett Salute Clair & Co.,
Investment Bankers.
Canada Cement Bldg.,
Montreal. Que.
You mny send me details of ;.our "Pay In a Year Plan" and
your booklet without obligation on my part. I am Intereated
in the following Securities: —
Name	
Address..
City	
Dept. D. S.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS.
WINDOWS. DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KII-N  DHIBD FLOORINGS,
AND    rUHNlUIINOa
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGE*
Royston Lumber Co.
Linltti.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES
I Nlgkt calla: 1I«X Courtenay
| Office: 161 Cumberland
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWBLL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
MANN'S BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
SEE OUR WINDOW
Specially Made for Saturday's Selling
Something Different
Delicious Cream Puffs, Cakes, Rolls and Buns.
Golden Brown Doughnuts, wholesome and nutritious,
just what the kiddies like.
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls, once you try them, you
always prefer them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed—Orders Delivered
Phone 18 Cumberland, B.C. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 6, 1425
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
P
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
legrfSj
OBTAINS GOLD MEDAL
COURTENAY, Nov. 3—Miss Catherine Singleton of the Courtenay
Commercial School haa been succea-
ful in obtaining the gold medal trom
Ihe Underwood Typewriting Co. for
typing at the rate of sixty-three net
words per minute for fifteen minutes. Miss Agnes Williams has obtained the Underwood certificate for
typing at the required speed necessary. The school now presents a
very busy appearance with its numerous pupils occupied ln their various studies of business courses.
ELECTION POLL
COPIED RECENT
DOMINION APPEAL
COURTENAY, Nov. 4.—An unusual
' but nevertheless valuable educational
'.feature was Introduced ln the Courtenay public school at the time ot
the recent Dominion election, when
Principal O. W. Stubbs announced
that there would be an election for
the office tit! school secretary-treasurer, to succeed Agnes Sutherland
who has been promoted to the high
school. From 12:30 to 3:30 on Thursday afternoon the voters were lined
up outside the ballot room.
Wilfred Anderton, of Orade Eight,
was appointed returning officer, with
David Smith as his deputy. W. Morion, Warwick Revle and Alice Hurford were scrutineers; and the office
of registrar was filled by Dorothy
Fletcher. Only grades seven and
eight were allowed to vote. Clifford
Laver and Muriel Leighton were the
duly nominated candidates at a meeting held for the purpose on the previous day, when both candidates and
others addressed the electors. The
result of the polling was: Clifford
Laver elected with thirty-five votes;
Muriel Leighton received fourteen
votee. Mr. Stubbs congratulated Wll-
ffed Anderton heartily on tbe manner
ln which he conducted his ollice,
Wilfred having given an address to
the electors explaining the correct
method ot voting and enumerating
the duties of the various election
officers. The law was represented at
the polling booth In the person of
"Constable" Arthur Quinn.
C. S. WOOD SUBMITS
INTERESTING REPORT
(Continued From Page One)
Men, like trains, are at their best
when they are on the level.
BRIDGE BY RADIO
Bridge hy radio ls the latest feature to be Inaugurated by WSAI, Cincinnati, Ohio, and associate stations
for this tall and winter, according
to announcements made by officials
of the leading broadcasting stations
throughout America,
Plans have been completed to have
bridge hands played over the radio
by leading bridge experts ln the principal cities In America. The flrst
bridge hand to be broadcast was put
on the air on Tuesday, October 27th,
nine to nine-thirty o'clock, Central
Standard Time. As the hand was
broadcast hy the experts the plays
aad bids were explained ln detail so
that the llsteners-in were able to
play the entire game as broadcast by
the experts. Each bid and play was
explained ln detail.
The bridge hands are being prepared hy Milton C. Work and Wilbur
C. Whitehead, Iternatlonally known
bridge authorities of New York. Both
Mr. Work and Mr. Whitehead will
choose experts from cities where the
stations are located which broadcast
the hands, thereby putting what ia
known aa "the supreme court of bridge" against local talent throughout
America.
The following Is tbe schedule and
time for the broadcasting of the
bridge game:
WSAI, every Tuesday 9-9.30 p.m.
(C.T.) starting October 27; WEAK,
WEEI, WFI, WOR, WWJ, WOC, and
WCCO, alternate Tuesdays, 10-10.30
p.m. (E.T.) starting October 27; W8B
KPRC, Waa, WMC, WDOD, alternate Tuesdays 9-9.30 p.m. (C. T.)
starting November 3; KFOA, every
Friday, 8.30-9.00 p.m. (P.T.) starting
October 27; KHJ, every Tuesday 3.30
•4 p.m. (P.T.) starting October 27;
WOY, every Saturday 9-9.30 p.m.
(E.T.) starting October 31; WON,
every Wednesday 8-3.30 p.m. (C.T.)
starting October 28 and KOO every
Tuesday 9.30 to 10 p.m. (P.T.) starting November 8.
The arrangements are to have WS
AI broadcast over a period of twenty-
four weeks while on alternate Tuesdays the other stations will broad-!
cast Ih conjunction with the Cincinnati station. By this arrangement,]
every section of the United States j
and Canada will be reached.   Eachi
to be paid the taxpayer should have
the opportunity of receiving the benefit In the form of an inducement
to pay hia taxes earlier ln the year
as there are many who. would be
glad of the chance.
City Clerk Mr. C. S. Wood submitted a most interesting report ot his
findings when on a recent trip to the
source of the city's water supply at
the head of Brown's River. He had
taken advantage of an opportunity
to accompany Messrs. Blalock, and
Brown and had gone in with a pack
horse, Mr. Dennis also accompanying them. He regretted that Aldermen McKenzie and MacDonald had
found it impossible to leave on the
day that the start had been made.
It was evident from Mr. Wood's report that there is a wonderful park
like territory amongst the mountains
at the back ot Courtenay, with some
of the most gorgeous scenery to be
seen anywhere in British Columbia.
There Is now a good trail right into
the heart of the country. The report
indicates that there is an inexhaustible water supply for the city from
this source, and suggests that the
city should endeavor to effect a reserve on all the timber In the Brown
River water shed as It could probably be done much easier now than
at a later date.
The secretary of the Armistice Day
committee wrote Inviting the civic
authorities to attend the parade to
the memorial cairn at Sandwick on
Sunday. Alderman Pearse reported
on  the  Better Housing scheme.
that on the west side and high above
the valley we had seen the day before
were a large number of small lakes
which all discharge into Brown's
River. The quality of the water In
these lakes was exceptionally good
and without doubt are fed by melting
snow on the mountains which rise
to the west. Brown's River takes a
course almost directly north through
the valley mentioned in the proceeding paragraph, for about four miles,
turns east for about a mile and then
pursues a south-easterly direction
towards the Puntledge Itiver. Except ill the higher altitudes the slope
of Brown's River which nro deep valleys between Ihe mountains, and of
the two tributaries which come In
from a westerly direction, aro all
covered with timher. While It ls
likely that this will bc undisturbed
for a good while yet. I think thut the
council would be wise to endeavor
to leave a reserve placed on all timber in the Brown's River watershed
as lt could probably he done much
easier now than in a few years when
the timber may be In' demand. I
am more convinced than ever before
as a result of this trip that the possibility of Brown's River going dry
Is very remote indeed,"
{AMERICAN HUNTERS
BAG TEN GRIZZLIES
i Ten grizzly bears and a dozen of
I the black and brown species, one of \
j the grizzlies measuring over 11 feet'
I In length, were among the trophies i
: taken home recently by a parly of [
j United States hunters, headed by R.
S L. Riley, of Willlamspov!. Pa. The
i party spent forty days in Uie moun-:
, tain   territory   of  British   Columbia.
WATER SUPPLY OF
COURTENAY ASSURED
(Continued from Page One)
a couple of miles farther on came to
where we could see what I believe
to be the source of the main stream.
Wte could see the river flowing in a
snake-like course through a meadow
a thousand feet below us. As it
was necessary to make Goose Lake,
our camping place that night, we had
no time to further explore that day.
On arriving at Goose Lake which Is
about eleven miles north west of Bevan In a direct line, we found a cabin
built by a former trapper who once
used to frequent this little known
portion of Vancouver Island, so we
were able to make ourselves quite
comfortable for the night. On • the
following morning, which waB Friday,
October 23rd, we set out to further
explore   Brown's   River,   and   found
The  days  are  never  long  for  the.
man  who is in  love  with  his  work.
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND COURTENAY
TEA ROOMS
The Home of Whole Wheat Bread in the Comox District
EAT COMOX WHOLE WHEAT BREAD
the most nutritious loaf manufactured in B. C. today
OTHai'SffillHIBIEB^
Eat Whole Wheat Bread and assist kind Nature in
keeping you fit.
game will be complete within itself
and will Illustrate one or two salient
points in conection with bridge.
The following explanation waa giv-
en by Paul A. Greene, Manager of
Station WSAI, as to the details of
the plan.
"The plan Ib to have four experts
play a deal of Auction Bridge and
to broadcast each bid and each play
of the deal, together with the reasons for each bid and each play. Prior
to each broadcasting, listeners-in will
be Informed as to names of the participants so that on the night of the
game any four may play the deal
and each player be named after one
of the four experts and take the same
relative positions at the table aB that
occupied by his expert namesake.
The players will be told to have a
pack of cards divided Into suits, so
that the cards as they are dealt and
broadcast may be quickly selected
from the puck. The result of the
draw for partners nnd deal will he:
announced, nnd then the cards dealt
to each expert. The bidding will then
follow, after which eacli play will
be announced so that the players con
play the same cards thnt the experts
do.
In other words, Ihe Auction Bridge
players of Ihe country who have radios will have Uie opportunity to actually play the same deal played by
four experts, nnd to learn the rous-
oiis for each hid ami play when hoi- j
(ling end  playing the snme cards.
The first piny took plnce with C.
Work, C. Whitehead, B, V. Shepard
and Sidney I.enz as the participants, j
on the evening of October 87lh, Different well-known players from various sections of the country have been
invited to take pari In the scries."    '
a Ilo-Ilo Theatre est
w     Cumberland    ^
Friday and Saturday
NOVEMBER 6 and 7
A THUNDERING MELODRAMA THAT ROARS THROUGH A STORM OF SIZZLING
THRILLS
MONTE BLUE
IN
"The Limited Mail"
ADULTS 50.?
CHILDREN 250
Monday and Tuesday
NOVEMBER 9 and 10
C^fte 6mprQ.?r of emotion
in UorFiiTt Cockney Role
ADULTS 350
CHILDREN 150
Wednesdey and Thursday
November 11 and 12
BUCK JONES
IN
Dupand of the
Bad Land
A GREAT WESTERN ROMANCE
ADULTS 350
CHILDREN 150 f AGE SIX
THI CUMftHLAND 1SLANMSR
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1825
ss
5
1.
Hosiery
Department
Ladies Silk and Wool
Hose in the leading
shades made from fine
Botany yarn with silk
twist, guaranteed to
give you satisfaction.
Hose for the small
ones in all wool Circle
Bar yarns; the quality stands out; every
pair will give value
for your money. Let
the next pair be Circle
Bar and see the difference it will make in
your Hosiery bill.
Personal Mention
Wear a Pair and
Compare the Wear
Four-ply strength is woven into
toe. and heels. Double strength
into solei. Extra strength in the
elastic knit tops to avoid garter
runs. And the "Tapering Toe"
gives just enough extra "big toe"
room to prevent "stretched
stitches" the main cause of big
toe wear.
Made for men, women and children in
Pure ThreaJSilk.Silkand Wo.l Com-
binations, Botany Wool, M.rcerir.ed
Lisle and Cashmert.
Men's Hose, all carrying the Circle Bar label, will be easily noted as every pair is
stamped Circle Bar.
We have a great variety of Men's Half
Hose in all wool, silk
and wool, and all silk,
and the quality of
them will assure you
of comfort and wear.
Try a few pairs.
We carry many other
lines in Hose so that
we feel sure we can
ments.
Sutherland's, Cumberland
"Mrs. Willard Fielding returned on
Wednesday evening from a fourmonth
vacation spent visiting friends and
relatives in various United States
cities, principally Niagara Falls.
MrB. 1. Aspesy, Mrs. M. Stewart and
Mrs. M. Mitchell were delegates from
the local Pythian Sister Lodge to the
Grand Session which was held ln
Duncan during the week.
Mr. J. Struthers represented Uie
local Knights ot Pythias at Grand
Lodge held on Thursday and Friday
in  Duncan.
FOR   SALE-1924   Model   Chevrolet ;• LOST-A HUNTING COAT, in Cum-
berland  or  on   Cumberland-Court-
Good Condition;  $675.00 cash. This I
Is a map.    Box 36. Cumberland.    I
43-44 i
enay Road.   Finder rearded If returned to W. Hassard, B. C. Telephone Office,  Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. L. Witt and Mr. and
Mrs. W. Lobley, of Nanaimo, were the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. Farmer
last week end.
Mr. J. GUIs, ot Timberlands, was
a visitor to Cumberland during the
week. *
Mr. and Mrs. T. Graham, Firat
Street, have as their guest Mra. J.
Graham, of Vancouver.
After a short visit to Mr. and Mrs.
C. Brown on this city, Mr. C. Clark
has returned to his home In Clover-
dale.
Miss Cathie Mitchell, of Union Bay.
was the guest of her grandmother,
Mrs. T. Mitchell, last week end.
RESULT OF CONTEST
KNOWN ON NOV. 19th
Announcement of the prize winners
in the Cumberland Basketball election contest will be made on November 19th, when official returne will
be received from the returning oflicer.
VETS' WHIST DRIVE ON
ARMISTICE NIGHT
Under auspices of the Great War
Veterans' Association, assisted by the
Women's Auxiliary, a whiet drive
and dance will be held in the G. W.
V. A. Hall on Wednesday evening,
November Uth., Armistice night.
Whist commences at 8:00 p.m. sharp
and dancing from 10 to 1. Refreshments will be served. General admission, fifty cents.
Radium  Hot Springs In Tlie Rockies
BASKETBALL GAMES
FOR COMING WEEK
Nov, 9—Public School versus High
School (girls); Oo Getters versus
Yellowjackets; Owls vs. Rangers.
Nov. 12—Hornets versus Counter-
jumpers; P. D. Q.'s versus Go Getters; Doo Dads vs. Owls.
COMOX-ALBERNI ELECTION
RESULTS
Nell,
Ucluelet     36
Kildonan      76
Port   Alberni    468
Central   Lake      59
Alberni   306
Estevan       14
Ahousat       13
Toflno       66
Nootka     23
Lantivllle      39
Hllllera     39
Pachena     10
Bainbrtdge     49
Parksvllle     147
Qualicum  103
Bamaeld     63
Cumberland     484
Courtenay    *6
Comox    106
Seymour Narrows     48
Coombs       36
Sayward Wharf     17
Errlngton      36
Squirrel Cove     17
OyBter  River      18
Savory   Island   .!      6
Mervllle      45
Campbell River     72
Duncan  Bay      29
Cape  Laao       57
Elk Bay      13
Fany Bay     69
Blubber Bay     62
Van Anda     76
Manson's Landing     12
Nanoose   Bay       76
Dashwood       52 -
Union Bay   161
Royston       40
Bevan      40
Grantham      46
Headquarters      56
QuathlaBkl Cove    46
Col.;
13'.
9
149 J
9
107'
0
10
23
6
21
22
3
27
86
49
11
217
232
83
19
56
12
76
12
47
1
50
44
32
28
14
13
8
16
20
39
9
56
42
20
21
26
21
CARD OF THANKS
To all kind friends whose sympathies and services were so tenderly
rendered and for the beautiful floral
tributes sent tn our hour ot bereavement we extend our sincere thanks.
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Davis and family
Mr. and Mrs. D. Hunden and family
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mra. Sam Davis take this
means of thanking Dr. MacNaughton
for his kind and faithful attention to
their dear daughter, Eleanor, during
her last illness.
Corporation of tke City of Cumberland
NOTICE
Wednesday, November 11th, being
Armistice Day, a 2 minute silence
will be observed at 11 a.m. All cit
liens are requested to observe this
custom.
C. J. Parnham,
Mayor.
f orpontftm ef the City of Cumberland
NOTICE
Every person riding a Bicycle shall
at all times between one hour after
■unset and one hour before sunrise
keep affixed  in front thereof tn a
[conspicuous place a well and sufflc
jlently lighted lamp, and shall at all
times  refrain  from  riding  on  side
i walka within the City.
All persons not complying in future
with this by-law will be prosecuted
W. H. Cope,
Chief of Police.
Cixty-four years ac, i'*'i"n Sir
*-^ George Simpson was making
the firat overland tour around the
world, he came across some hot
springs on the western slope's of the
Koeky Mountains which the local
Kootenay Indians frequented on account of their curative properties.
As the white settlers camo in after
the Wild liorse Creek Gold Rush,
these came to be called The Fairmont Hot Springs, and became a
well known landmark on the Government road from Lake Winder,
mere to Cranbrook In 11112 an F,ng-
lish rancher, Mr. Heap Holland, purchased them ami creeled bathing futilities, and two years ago made extensive Improvements In connection
■with h'« development of a bungalow
camp. The Waters on analysis
proved to contain a higher percentage of radium in solution than ally
other Springs on tlie American Con-
•tuittiit, bighei even thau  ilium at
Arkansas, in addition to valuable
curative deposits of magnesium and
lime. The Canadian Pacific Railway had obtained right of way
through his property in consideration of calling their station Radium,
and these Radium Hot Springs now
attract many visitors, the camp having a capacity for seventy persons.
A special bath is now being constructed for the Indians, under the
superintendence of Louis Arbel, the
Kootenay Chief, while the white folk
have a spacious swimming pool surrounded by scrupulously clean dressing rooms There is a tennis court
nnd horses with guides are available
for riding the neighboring trnils,
while large numbers of automobillsts
visit the Springs during the summer
months Mr Heap Holland has the
intention of making this an all-year
resort, as ibe wuter? have a temper
Hture of 120' and never freeze
The only fly in the ointment is
that iho Government operates rival
hot Sjiiuhh  ou  in.:  Banff-Winuer-
mere Rond which are also called Radium Hoi Soringa. this being th*
post office address. These Springs
are also highly curative, and have
also s neighboring butfalo- camp
which was erected by the Canadian
Parifir Railway, and Is operated
very successfully by • the Missel
Armstrong. The Government Hot
Springs were for many years known
as the Sinclair Hot Springs, being
named after James Sinclair, an old
time pioneer, whs is the first known
white man to have crossed the Sinclair Pass In 1842. The virtues of
these Springs were known not only
to the Indians but to the animals,
and it is credibly reported that In
the old days hears used to bathe
their mws In the waters to secure
relief ."rom rheumatism. While
there is a natural confusion through
the duplication nf names, both resorts are rapidly increasing In popularity, chiefly owing to the In-
cresse In sutomobile traff> through
the Rockies.
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of a dear huabsnd
and  father,  Louis  Francescini,   who
passed away November 6, 1921.
This is a day of remembrance
Sad and bitter to recall.
When one we loved was taken
By a short and sudden call.
Sadly missed by his wife and son.
KANAIMO  LAND   RECORDING
DISTRICT, NANAIMO
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jean Trea-
nor, of Calgary, Alta., houaewlfe, Intend to apply for a lease ot the following described lands, situated ln
Henry Bay on Denman Island, as
follows: commencing at post located
about three chains north of wharf,
thence about three chains In westerly direction to low water mark, thence
fifty chains In northernly direction.
Dated Sept 6, 1925.
44-61 JEAN TREANOR
i
Large Fresh Shipment of j
MO IRS'
and Neilson's
CHOCOLATES
in Bulk and Boxes just received
WATCH OUR WINDOW
FOR SPECIALS
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS To DEAL At LANG'S"
<■ «ss—SSSSStSSSSSSSSSSSSSM  j
Apple Week
Buy them by the Box, the Cheapest Way.
Fancy Wrapped Kings, No. 1, pel* box $2.50
Choice Jonathans, $2.50 box; Fancy No. 1 §3.25
Choice Mackintosh, $2.65 box; Fancy No. 1 $3.25
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK
Robin Hood Porridge Oats, cooks in less than 5 min.
Large family package .'. 30^
New Season's  Canned  Vegetables; Peas, Corn, and
Tomatoes, 5 tins for   95<*
Sliced Pineapple, Pears and Plums, in 2 lb. tins, at
4 tins for   85£
Blackberries, Raspberries, Loganberries, Strawberries,
packed in heavy syrup, 3 tins for   85t*
BISCUIT SPECIALS
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2tbs. for  45£
Chrisp Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for 55«£
Fig Bars, 2 lbs. for   55c>
McCormack Jersey Cream Sodas, 2 pkgs, for 45.t)
Full Stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables in Season.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE. PHONE 38
RADIO!
When in need of Radio Batteries
or other Radio Supplies come in!
and see us, we handle them all.
ALL MAKES OF RADIO
(STORAGE)
BATTERIES RECHARGED
Use Storage Batteries and get
the Best Results
The Battery Shop
Cumberland, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Flsh
* HOTELS AND CAMPS T
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
* , *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   ■  •    Proprietor
| At the Ilo-Ilo, November 11 and 12
WILLIAM   FOX  <J>tesentf    '/,'.
BUCK J
mm
OF

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