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The Cumberland Islander Apr 30, 1926

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
0
^fln
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
*•«*.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—bit
■fa,,
'"/UD
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1926.
.SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Eight Trophies To
Be Presented On
Friday, May 7th
The tournament committee of the
Comox District Badminton Clubs
held a .meeting at Courtenay ou
Tuesday evening and completed arrangements to present the trophies
won In the recent very successful
Badminton tournament. The presentation will be made at the Community
Hall, Comox, on Friday, May the 7th,
and will take the form of a whist
drive and daiice, with the trophies
being presented by Aid. T. H. Mumford Immediately nfler the whist and
prior to the dancing. A flrst class
orchestra has been engaged for the
dance, and the refreshments left "in
the capable hands of the ladles of
Comox. The celebration will be open
to all Badminton players ond their
friends ond to anyone interested in
the game. A nominal admission fee
of fifty cents will be charged, twenty-
five cents of which will go towards
the Community Hall ot Comox.
The following will receive trophies:
Max Blunt (lien's Singles Champion),
Mrs. F. R. Shenstone (Ladies' Singles
Champion), Ash and Idlens (Men's
Doubles Champions), Ash ond Mrs.
Ash (Mixed Doubles Champions).!
Mrs. Cokely and Mrs. Ash (Ladies'!
Doubles Champions). ;
The trophy for men's singles was
presented by Lisle Fraser Sporting
Goods house, of Vancouver, and tlio'
ladles' doubles trophies were presented by Tarbell's Hardware Store, Cum-:
berland. The remaining trophies.
except the ladies' singles, were doll-
ated by the tournament committee,
The ladles' singles trophy, we ore
given to understand, was donated by
a Cumberland business mnn, who,
desires   to   remain   anonymous
Business Change
Messrs. Wilcock Brothers, Meat
Purveyors of Cumberland, have purchased tho business and good-will of
A. G. Slaughter, of Courtenay, and
will assume active operations in the
near future.
Tax Rate By-Laws
Pass Final Reading
General Rote By-Law No, 09, setting tlie general rate at 18 mills, and
School Rate By-Laws No. 70 and 71,
setting the school rate at 9 mills,
were given their final reading at
Monday's council meeting and were
adopted without any changes. The
new rates, though higher than last
year's, will benefit the taxpayers as
a whole, most of whom will And a
saving of from fifty cents to one
dollar over the amount paid in 1925.
This Is caused by the fact that improvements aro to be taxed only on
50 per cent of their assessed value.
Logging Accident
[ Early Today Had
Fatal Ending
Egg Weighed Five
And Half Ounces
It was quite n pleasure for a representative of the Islander to be able
to cast his optics Tuesday morning
last, on a monster egg. weighing 5V4
ounces. Mrs. John Thompson, corner of Third Slreet and Derwent
Avenue, Cumberland, received the
egg from a friend who keeps White
Wyandottes, and Iho egg wos laid by
one of this class of birds.
As noted, lt was quite a pleasure
to be able to view It, as tbo eggs
we have been In the habit of viewing
at the breakfast table ror these past
few weeks convey to us thc suspicion that someone's canary has been
doing duty for the hens.
Alex W. "Scotty" Duncan met his
death early this morning, being hit
by a falling snag on the workings of
Major Hilton, who is logging near
the mouth of Black Creek. Up to
the time of going to press very few
details of tho accident could lie ascertained other than that at an eirly
hour a number of Ihe men were
standing near the landing stage when
a falling snag caught Duncan on the
head, crushing the skull. Death was
Instantaneous. There will be a coroner's   inquest this  evening.
"Scotty" Duncan, as he was commonly known throughout Ihe district,
was known and liked by everyom
with whom he came iu contact and
liis death came as a blow not only
to his fsmlly but to a large circle of
friends. He leaves to mourn his loss
a wife and* daughter, residing at
Grantham, and other relatives in tho
old country. Funeral arrangements
will be - announced later.
RIRTHDAY PARTY WAS
COMPLETE SURPRISE
Great progress is being made by
City workmen on Allan Avenue lu
their work of widening and grading
the road. It Is expected to have this
avenue in flrst class shape before
many days have passed,
Cumberland In
Connaught Cup i
Competition'
The   entry  of  Cumberland   United j
football club did  not leave the city I
until thc 20ih. of April, by registered |
mall.    The  press of   the   mainland
expressed aulte a lot of surprise that!
Cumberland had not entered for Iho,
National  soccer    cliinnpionshlp.     As
entries were due lo close on the 22ud>
Ihe   financial   mon   uf   the   footbull |
world   ot   iho   mainland   began   to |
realize that the premier soccer club
of B. C. wns nol omong Ihe entries.
However, all's  well  that ends  well, |
and thc local clubb's entry wns re-(
celved at the lust minute.   The draw
was made lasl Saturday night, nnd the
Varsity   team   will   oppose   Cumberland In Ihe second round.   The full j
draw   Is  announced   In   another  col-1
unm.    It will bo noticed thai neither |
Nannlmo, Ladysmith, nr Cumberland I
get choice of ground In the opening'
round.
COAST LEAGUB STANDINGS
Goals      |
P. W. L. D. F. A. Pt.
Cumberland     M 10   2   2 54 28 22
Ladysmith    H 10   3   l 37 10 21
Nannlmo     14   8    I   2 IIS 23 IS
Westminster    .    I!   7   3   4 SS 20 18I
Varsity      14    5   7   2 2.i 31! 12
St, Andrews   1">   4   S   3 21 30 11 :
St. Saviours   11    4   0   1 10 32   0 1
North   Shore   ...   12   3   s    1 10 22   7
Victoria Vets .... 12   1 11   0 21 64   2
The above table Includes ibe North
Shore-St.   Andrews   gume   played   on I
Wednesday, North Shore winning 1-0.
A   delightful   surprise   party   was
given at the home of iMrs. Cavallero
on Wednesday evening ln honor of
the lAiricontli birthday of her daughter, Miss Beatrice. Games and songs
were indulged In and excellent refreshments were served by Mrs. Cavallero, Mrs. Thos. Baird, and Mrs.
Richard McCIuskey. Everyone had a
wonderful  time.
Those present were Miss Barbara
Grant. Miss Edith Cavallero, Miss
.Mary Gn*:ano. Miss Margaret McDonald, Miss Harriet Horbury, Miss Dorothy Gordon, Miss Kathleen O'Brien,
Miss Jean McWhirter, Miss Emma
and MIsb Lillian Pickettl, Miss Bar-
bora Westfield, and Miss Annie Beveridge.
Advocates Best
Varieties Of Tubers
COURTENAY, April 28.—What wllj
probably be the last lectura ot the
season, undor the auspices of tbe
Comox Agricultural and Industrial
Associations was delivered In thc
Agricultural Hull here Monday night.
Although tho season Ib now far advanced, especially on account of an
early spring, there was a good attendance, interest in these lectures having
boon woll sustained all through the
Winter months. Capt.G. R. Bates,
secretary of the Provincial Potato
Growers' Association, was asked to
toko Ihe choir and briefly introduced
the speakers.
Mr. E. R. Ile well, the first speaker,
whose remarks were largely confined
to potatoes, reviewed the situation for
1920. He said In part that following a large crop In the East two
years ago, the last season's crop had
beon short nil over North America.
Consequently, there had been higher
prices tills yoar. no imported potatoes,
o good demand, In fact, large quantities had been shipped South. He
pointed out that,Mr. T. Bain, fruit
and vegetable Inspector, predicts
short crops fii the Interior this year
owing to light snowfall; Chilllwack
growers bad therefore been advlBed
to Increase their acreage and tho
speaker thought the Comox growers
should do tho same with the object
(Continued on Page Five)
VICE-REGAL PARTY IS
WELCOMED TO CITY
Will Be Guests Of Lieut-Col. C. W.
Villiers At Beaufort House
Their Excellencies, Baron and Lady
Byng, of Vimy, arrived on Tuesday
as the guests of Lieut.-Col. Charles
W. Villiers, of Beaufort House, general manager of the Canndlan Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited. The Vice-
Regal party was met et the corner*
of Fifth Street and Dunsmuir Ave.
by bis Worship, Mayor Maxwell, and
the City Council, with ex-service men
lined up on both sides of the street.
The children from the public schools
and a large number of the citizens ot
Cumberland were also present to extend a welcome to the city of Cumberland.
Upon the Governor-General leaving
his car, the children all moved forward to meet him. The city had
erected an immense arch decorated
with flags for the occasion. Dunsmuir Avenue was also dressed in its
best with numerous lines of flags
across the street. At the welcome
arch the Mayor made a few brief remarks of welcome and extended the
freedom of the city. His Excellency
said a few words to the ex-service
men, the children gave three hearty
cheers for the King and the City
Band struck up the "Maple Leaf Forever." After asking the Mayor to
grant the school children a. holiday
on Wednesday, his Excellency and
porty took their departure for Beaufort House, the residence of Col. C.
W. Villiers. The Bond played the
National Anthem as the car began to
move through the arch.
"The special train, consisting of
seven cars, that conveyed the Governor-General's party across the continent, was brought over from Vancouver by transfer to Nauoose Bay and
then up the E. and N. Railway to the j
interchange of track at Royston. The
Canadian Pacific handed the train
over to the Railway officials of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
with D. R. MacDonald, tralllc manager, and Engineer W. Woods In
charge. The special train arrived In
Cumberland at noon Wednesday and
is now standing in the yards of the
Canadian Collieries at the edge of
tbe City limits. It ls the first Vice-
Regal train that has ever arrived in
Cumberland and it Is said that there
were doubts entertained as to whether the local Railway officials would
be able to take the train over the
grade from Royston to Cumberland.
Engineer Woods, under Instructions
from Traffic manager MacDonald,
took hold of tbe special train with
engine No. 20 and brought it right
through' to the City. The train now
stands ready when their Excellencies
are prepared to depart.
Today (Friday) the Vice-Regal
party, accompanied by Lieut.-Col.
Villiers,' are visiting the Comox Logging Railway camps and will view the
loggers taking off the tops of British
Columbia trees and dump them Into
the water. In the evening the party
will dine with officials of the Comox
Logging Company,
Sailed For Canada
LONDON, April 26.—Sir Edward
and Lady Anson, Sir William and
Lndy Glyn Jones, Lady Kathleen
Villiers, Hon. J. G. Coiville and Lady
Nanton are among those who have
sailed  on the Montcalm for Canada.
City Donates $100
For Celebration
Because the citizens of Cumberland
seem whole-heartedly Interested In
the coming May 24th. celebration,
the city council Monday night decided
to back the project to the limit and,
In response to a request from Alderman Mumford, donated the sum of
$100.00 toward the celebration. Aid.
Parnham suggested this amount and
tiie motion passed without a dissenting voice.
TICKET NO. 27 WAS LUCKY
Ticket No. 27 was the lucky winner
of the Radio raffled last Saturday
night by Mr. John Cameron of the
Cumberland Motor Works. Mr. V.
Marinelli, of the Vendome Hotel, held
the lucky- number.
Baron Byng, Of Viiny, Guest
Of Canadian Club At Well
Attended Banquet
GOVERNOR-GENERAL HEARD IN NOTABLE ADDRESS
The banquet of the Canadian Club
tendered to his Excellency, Barou
Byng, of Vimy, at the Hollo Hall on
Thursday evening was on unqualified
success, about 175 members of the
recently formed Canadian Club being
Iu attendance. The catering was ln
the very capable hands of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Dallos, of the Waverly
Hotel.
After the singing of the National
Anthem the assembly became seated,
doing full justice to the excellent re
past. Lady friends of the members
of the club were entertained during
the banquet by Mr. Edward W. Bickle
In the Ilo-Ilo Theatre, adjourning
afterward to the hall below to hear
the address of the Govenor-Gonoral.
At the conclusion of the banquet,
the President of the Canadian Club,
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, called for
order and in a very able manner
outlined the activities whicli led to
the organization of the Club in the
Comox District. The speaker said he
would not take up too much of their
time, as all wore anxious to hear his
Excellency, but he could not lot the
occasion go by without thanking
Baron Byng, on behalf of all present,
for so graciously acceding lo the request to address them.
His Excellency, on rising, was
greeted with continued applause. "Mr.
President, ladles und gentlemen," he
said, "allow me to thank you most
sincerely for jour kindness In Invltl-
ing me to be present with you this
evening." He thanked them all for
their loyalty to thc King and expressed thc fervent hope that Ile, as
governor-general, had not failed In
his duties. He knew absolutely
nothing about the duties ot u governor-general when he accepted thc position—he was a governor but did not
govern nor wns he a general. One
thing, however, ho had found out.
and that was that lie Is not allowed
lo talk, yet In the course nf his travels over this vast country ho had
been called upon to mnkc hundreds of
speeches and they had all been about
the same thing—nothing.   "If any of
you ladles and gentlemen," said his
Excellency, "are called upon to make
a speech, pray for two things—something to say and the power to say it."
He also dwelt on the "unity of Canada," which, whilst he would not say
was growing by leaps and bounds,
was nevertheless making groat headway. Canadian unity first came to
his notice, he safd, in 1917 when as
commander of the Canadian Corps,
he saw men from the nine provinces
of Canada go shoulder to shoulder
up the Vimy Ridge, where they conquered and were unconquered. He
sow men from the province of British Columbia shaking hands with the
men (rom Quebec. He saw men from
the mouth of the Fraser shaking the
hands of men from the mouth of the
St. Lawrence. "That," said his Excellency, "was true unity."
On coming to Canada he had looked forward to cementing and renewing the friendships he had made
whilst privileged to command the
Canadian Corps. It had been his
good fortune not only to realize this
ambition but to form other acquaintances and ties which bad become
very strong. Indeed. The Ideals of
the Canadian Club In furthering the
spirit of a UnitA Canada were heartily to be commended. He wished tho
Club thc very best of luck In Its
efforts and bis sincere wish to tho
people of Canada was the greatest
measure of happiness and prosperity
It was possible to have for tho present and In the years to como.
Mr. B. S. Abrams, of Union Bay,
rose to move a vote of thanks, which
was seconded by Mr. F. Brock, of
Courtenay, for speaking to thom that
evening, and concluded his remarks
wllb the hope that his Excellency
would soon have fully recovered from
his Indisposition, whicli had developed
on Ills journey to Ihe Coast.
The singing of "O Canada" brought
a very successful meeting lo a close.
Musical selections, rendered by n
hidden orchestra during Unserving
of tho banquet, wore very much appreciated.
Draw Announced
For Connaught
Cup Competition
First round games in the Connaught eup series will be played on
Saturday, May 15. This was decided
by the executive of the B.C.F.A. on
Saturday night when the draw for
the first and second round was made.
First Round Draw
Esquimalt vs.  St. Andrew's.
Junkins vs. Stevensons.
Second Round Draw
Engineers vs. Nanaimo.
Shelly's vs. Esquimalt or St. Andrew's.
Victoria Veterans vs. South Hill:
Junkins or Stevensons vs. Sapper-
ton,
Empire Stevedore vs.  Ladysmith.
Westminster  United  vs.  Creamo.
St. Saviour's vs. North Shore
United.
Varsity vs. Cumberland.
Transfers will be open on May 1
and clubs liking part in the first
round will only bave one day to obtain transfers as all players must be
signed fourteen days before taking
part   In this competition.
It was decided to play the provincial championship final in Vancouver, probably on May 8. It all depends on how the Cumberland appeal
to the D, F, A. goes. Joe Craig will
referee.
Chinese\Centre
Forward May Be
Played Saturday
The fast-stepping Varsity team of
Vancouver, will be seen in action on
the local grounds tomorrow afternoon
(Saturday) at 5:30, In a Pacific Coast
League game. Owing to tlie reception at Beaufort House, where ex-
service men, their wives and lady
friends are meeting their excellencies,
Baron and Lady Byng, of Vimy, tha
kick-off has been set for 5:30 instead
of 4:00 o'clock as previously announced.
The local team Is favorably placed
at the head of the league table with
one point advantage over the Ladysmith eleven. There will be no
chances taken with the Varsity team,
the local boys are out to win and
as the students enjoy the reputation
of being the fastest aggregation In
the league, a very keen and Interesting encounter should be tbe result.
The Cumberland team will be chosen
from the following: Orr, Mortimer,
Stewart, Gough, Monaghan, Ferguson,
Brake, Fowler, McDonald, Campbell,
Plump and Hltchens. A. S. Jones, of
Union Bay, will be In charge and an
admission fee of 25c. will be charged,
with 10c. extra for the stand seats.
In all probability Vorsity will have
the Chinese boy. Queue Yip, playing
center forward. He ls rated as one
of the best in the province, but In
former games has not been given a
square deal both by players and by
the spectators. Let us hope that Cumberland will be the exception and
will treat him not as a Chinese but
as a clean player and a worthy opponent. Give hlm thc applause his fine
play merits.
TO DEMONSTRATE
CHARLESTON DANCE
Fishing Contest
Being Arranged
At a fairly well attended meeting
of the Cumberland Rod and Gun Club
held last Monday evening ln the G.
W. V. A. Hall, It was decided to bold
a fishing competition at Comox Lake
on Sunday. May 9th. A committee
to make arrangements for this event
was appointed and also given Instructions to procure suitable prizes for
the various sections. Members of
tlio Courtenay Rod and Gun Club are
Invited to compete" In Ihis competition und it is hoped lhat there will
be a large turnout.
The committee Is nt present working on conditions or (he competition,
etc., and these will be published in
the Islander next  Friday, April. 7th.
.\ dance will be given in the
Courtenay Hall on .May 6th, when [
the Radio Four Orchestra, of Vancouver, under tho management of
Clnnsey and Murphy, ol Vancouver
Island, will supply the music. Cash
prizes will bo given for the first and
second best In thc Charleston and
also for Ilrst and second in Waltzes.
The Charleston will be demonstrated
by one of the Radio Four. All the
latest music, up to date, snappy and
full  of pop.   Dancing commences at
At thc evening service In St.
George's Church Sunday. Mr. Corner
Harding, the noted Welsh tenor, will
sing a solo. An anthem will also
be sung by Ihe choir.
Come and spend an uplifting and
helpful hour of worship, from 7:00
to 8:00 p.m.
9 p.m. and continues to I a.m. or
longer. Admission, Ladles 50c, and
$1.00 for gentlemen. It's a treat to
listen  lo  the  Radio  Four.
Mr. Gomer Harding Pleases Veterans
At Smoking Concert
The first of a proposed scries of
"smokers" to be given under the
auspices of the Cumberland Brunch
of the Canadian Legion of tbo B. K.
S. L. was held last Saturday evening
In the Memorial Hall. Dunsmuir Avenue, when some forly ex-service
men wore In nttendoncc. A splendid
programme bod been mapped out for
tho evening, furnishing entertainment
of a quality rarely heard at such
events and tbe audience was not lax
In expressing its appreciation of the
efforts of (hose Inking part.
Excellent refreshments were en-
Joyed by the men and "smokes" were
supplied lu abundance, both for thc
cigarette or cigar lover or the In-
vetorols' pipe smoker.
.Mr.   Oeorge   O'Brien,   president   of
the Cumberland Branch, occupied the
choir in on efficient milliner and also
replied to the toast lo Ihe Canadian
Legion of the B. E. S. L. Those taking part In the programme, following
Iho tons! to the King, wore: C. Edwards, pianoforte solo: R. Goodali.
song. Ed. Morris, song; W. Jackson,
haiijn selection; Gomer Harding,
song; Geo. Brown, recitation; songs
hy F. Court, H. Docherty, W. Beveridge, J. Walton. 0, O'Brien. W. Williams and Mr. Stalker.    Frastr Wat
son also mado a big hit with a recitation. Several of (he above singers
compiled with repeated requests for
additional songs.
Mr. Comer Harding was. however,
the feature of thc evening and was
called upon repeatedly for bis vocal
select inns. Ho arrived In the city
only Saturday night but ls not a
stranger bore os be was ono of the
artists taking part in tho Welsh confer! given here on St. David's Day.
ll Is lo be hoped (hot he will remain
in Cumberland, The vide range that
Mr.    Harding    encompasses    without
'apparent    dlfllculty    or    appreciable
I variation In tone quality, together
wllb a marked fervor wllb which his
efforts   are   instilled,   places   him  on
I a high plane In bis art. which should
make hlm a valuable addition lo the
iniisisls.il  commitnlts.
i The smoker ended promptly at
midnight with the singing ot the
National Anthem,   liefore dispersing,
I.Mr  O'Brien reminded everyone of the
i Invitation  extended  by  Lieut.-Col. C.
! W, Villiers io be present nt a reception nt Beaufort House from 3:30 to
6:00 p.m. next Saturday (tomorrow)
In lienor of their excellencies, Baron
nnd Lndy Byng ot Vimy, 'AGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1936.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,  APRIL 30,  1926.
national president of the fraternity, w*s invited
to deliver an oration. In introducing him, Mrs.
H. H. McClure, the National War Mother, stated
to the distinguished assemblage that the Fraternal Order of Eagles was "the first organization
to conduct a national campaign for the observance of Mothers' Day, and Mr. Hering, as spokesman for the Fraternity in those early years, deserves the credit of being called The Father of
Mothers' Day.'"
MOTHERS' DAY The observance of Mothers'
Day is really a very old
custom, one that seems to have been brought
over to this country from England. There, centuries ago, young men and women would "go
amothering" on Mid-Sunday in Lent. The
youth or maiden who had "gone into service",
or had married, would return home to call on!
Mother and take her some small gift, perhaps
a piece of "simnel," or sweet cake. ;
In America the earliest crusaders for ai
national Mothers' Day were the Eagles, who began the campaign in 1904 and 1905 in the club-
house of Kansas City Aerie.' In their official!
magazine, The American War Mothers, the organization of women whose sons served in the
World War, has recently given marked credit
to the F.O.E. for its sponsorship of the movement.
In 1908, United States Senator E. J. Burkett,
of Nebraska, offered a Mothers' Day resolution
in the United States Senate. This was the first
bill ever introduced by a member of Congress,
for the legal recognition of such day. Senator
Burkett's resolution was not passed.
In 1912, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, at its
national convention in Cleveland, Ohio, passed a
resolution which provided that every lodge in
the jurisdiction should set aside one Sunday in
the year as Mothers' Day.
Two years later, in 1914, Mothers' Day was
officially recognized by act of Congress. Senator Thomas J. Heflin of Alabama fathered the
bill which resulted in this homage paid to the
motherhood of Aemrica. The act provided only
for the display of the American flag on all government buildings, on homes, and at other suitable places. All other methods of honoring
"Mother" were to be a matter of individual taste.
One of the most popular customs has been that
of sending letters to be delivered to mother on
Mothers' Day. The wearing of a flower, a carnation, in honor of "Mother" is another way of
observing the day. This charming method of
paying tribute to mother is almost universally
practised.
On Mothers' Day, May 10, 1925, the American
War Mothers had charge of the exercises at The
Tomb of The Unknown Soldier, at Arlington
National Cemetery. As a tribute to his efforts
and to the Eagle3, Frank E. Hering, a former
DON'T THINK, KNOW It would be a good
thing if we all, every
once in a while, sorted out the things we know
from the things we think we know. Do you
get that? Most of us would be painfully impressed by the meagre supply of real knowledge.
We would find that we had been taking for
granted that many of our beliefs and fancies
and thoughts were real facts. But it would be
good for us in the end because realizing that
one does not know is, usually, the best thing
toward starting us to really finding out.
A big business man once asked a young bookkeeper for information regarding a certain account. The young bookkeeper replied, "I think
—" "Don't think, know," snapped the big business man. He was not paying the bookkeeper
for thinking.    He was paying him for knowing.
Every man listens to things which other
people tell him for facts. Upon strict investigation he finds that what is being told him is
only what someone thinks, because a third or
fourth person gave out the information. Very
often when you hear an ugly story "about a
friend and pin it down by demanding if the relator really knows the story to be true, you will
find that he only thinks it is true because someone else told him.     Don't think, know.
Prejudice, intolerance and almost every other
form of bitterness of spirit are usually the outcrop of beliefs and suspicions and faiths. They
rarely spring out of clear knowledge. Someone says the basement of the chureh is filled
with rifles to be used at the opportune time to
overthrow the government, and some ignorant
mind after a moment's thought, goes out and
says he knows it is so.
The individual who proclaims that he knows
that his religion, his country, his government or
his standard of morals or ethics is the best, is
ignorant to start with. Because religion is
purely a matter of faith, government is a problem which the whole world is striving to solve
and all standards of personal conduct are created
by thought and experience, both of which constantly change.
Read—and think about what you read. Study
—and digest what you study. Learn—and
make what you learn your own. Then you will
find that your hatred and the notions you have
absorbed from your neighbors will vanish, just
as the morning fog vanishes when the sun ries.
Cumberland
Just received another shipment
of the newest Spring Styles in
Ladies' Silk Crepe Dresses.
Exclusive   Patterns   in   Dress
Lengths in the Season's newest
Fabrics.
Novelty   Patterns   in   Crepes,
Silk and Wool Mixtures and in
Bordered Voiles.
Special values in Beaded Voiles
at special price fift/»
per yard UUC
Venus Chiffon Silk Hose in all
the newest Shades.
"Gold Dollar Brand" Pure Silk
Hose in all the leading shades.
Special price
per pair 	
OtRBEACTlFUL   LANGUAGE
A boy who swims may say he's
swum, but milk is skimmed and
seldom skum, and nails you trim,
they are not trum.
When "words you speak, these
words are spoken, but a nose ts
tweaked and can't be twoken, and
what you seek is seldom solum.
If we forget, then we've forgotten,
but things wo wet are never wotten,
and houses let can not be lotten.
The goods one sells are always
sold, but fears dispelled are not dis-
poled, nor whot you smell ls ever
smoled.
A MOMENT Of  SUSPENSE
A New Jersey judge imposed the
death sentence upon a negro. One
day he was in an Atlantic City barber's chair.   Tbe barber was a negro.
"You sentenced my brother, Phil
Battles ,to the chair," was the conversational opening, as he stood with
ra:or poised above the judge's lathered throat.
The judge, by an effort of will,
remained in the chair and tried to
seem cool. The barber, applying
tho razor to his chin In the approved
manner, continued, "He was no good,
anyhow."
$1.00
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
B.D.V. No Button Underwear
in white Nainsook, d»i AA
per suit $1.50 and.. <tpl.»UU
Balbriggan Underwear, 2 piece
Suits and Combinations; special
per suit    «pl»DU
Men's Sport Sweaters in
Jacquared Patterns.
"Fashion Craft" Made-to-measure Clothing.   The New Spring
Samples.   Style and Fit
Guaranteed.
Newest Spring Styles in Boys'
Tweed Suits (J»10 Kt\
@ $8.50 to   tpl4»9U
Boys' Bloomers in Tweeds and
Serges from 26 to 36, from
$1.75 to $2.50
Boys' Oxfords in Brown and in
Black Calfskin, <J»y|  P7P
Special value @ .... «IV*» I U
Special values in Boys' Heavy
Tan School Shoes.   Sizes 1 to 5.
Special price
per  pair	
$3.50
Boys'   Pullover   Jacquared
Sweaters  and  Golf  Hose.
Cumberland Supply   Co.
Rickson's Old Stand — Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland
WHEN WORK IS CJOOB AND YOU RECEIVE YOl'lt HAKIl-
WOIIKEO-FOK WAIIES-110NT THROW AWAY YOUH MON-
EY HY PAYING A 1IHIH PRICE FOR GROCERIES WHEN
YOU CAN BUY THE VERY BEST FOB LESS AT THE €UM-
HEREANB SUPPLY. IF YOU EARN 1100.00 PER .HON I'll,
AND SAVE $5.00 ON YOUR GROCERIES, YOUR EARNING
'POWER IS 1105.00 PER MONTH. HEAD OUR PUKES AND
COMPARE THEM WITH OTHERS. ALL THESE ITEMS ARE
CASH AND CARRY.
SPECIAL TODAY, Brookfleld Butter, per Ih * .40
Canadian Cheese,  %  lb. boxes, 2 for 45
Pure Cane Sugar, 20  lbs  1.45
New Zealand Butter, 2  lbs. tor   .85
Comox Creamary Butter, per Ib  ,45
Small White Beans, 4 lbs. for  25
No. 1 Jap Rice, 3% lbs  s25
Fels Naptha Soap, per carton   .79
Old Dutch Cleanser, per tin   .12
5 lb. tin Lard, $1.20; 3 Ib. tin   .70
Bon Ami Powder, per tin  .IS
Palmolive Soap, 3 for   .25
White Swan Soap, 5 for  .25
Heinz Baked  Pork and Beans  (flats), 2 for  24
Van Camps Pork and Beans, 2 for   .24
Libby's Stuffed Olives, 8 oz  .25
Standard Oat Meal. 10  lb. sack   M
Toilet Paper, 6  rolls    .25
Corn on Cob, large tins    -il
Choice Raisins ln bulk, per lb  .15
St. Charles  Milk,  (tails), per can   .12
Heinz's Tomato Soup, (medium), per tin  .17
Canned  Tomatose,  2's,  14c;   2%'s     .10
Peanut Butter in Cups or Pails  .28
Old Colony Maple Syrup, 32 oz  .78
Rowntrees Cocoa, per tin   .24
Fry's   Cocoa,   per   tin     .20
H. P. Sauce,  per bottle   .82
Quick Quaker Rolled Oats  Jll
AGENT FOR SHELLY'S BREAD AND CAKES.
ORDER YOUR NEW SUIT TODAY. SEE OUR SAMPLES -
they are the best we have seen for a long time.   $27,511 to
$80.00.   The   International Tailoring  Co.,  Montreal.
See our stock of Master Mechanic Work Punts, Overalls and
Shirts.
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY CO.
Phone 155 P. O. Box 205
COMING
Under the Auspices of B. P. O. ELKS, COURTENAY LODGE No. 60
Conklin and Garret's
ALL CANADIAN  SHOWS
A collosal combination of all that is great in amusement features, embodying and exhibiting only what is
new and great in the amusement world
i;;:!il!!i!;il
■ilium
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Illlllllllllllll
12-
BIG  CIRCUS  SIDE  SHOWS
4 - BIG NEW THRILLING RIDES - 4
-12
!f!."' IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIII M
AGRICULTURAL GROUND
COURTENAY
May 10th to 15th inclusive
The Biggest Show ever brought to Vancouver Island
ELKS'  CIRCUS
AGRICULTURAL GROUND
COURTENAY
DIRECT FROM VANCOUVER
[iii;i!ii[iiiiiiiiii]iniiii iniiiiiiniiiiiii: Hiiiiiiniiminiiiiniiiintfiiiiiiiiii iihiiiiiiiinnHiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiii FRIDAY, APRIL 39, 1926.
, .—___,	
I   THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 105
Don't  lose  me,  friends,  though  day
and night
I mock the swiftest bird ln flight.
I'm murdered by mankiud at laige,
Reverse me—auickly I'll discharge.
Transposed, I'm ln a bill 'tis clear
Once more, an Insect will appear.
GKU N A R D
^''ANCHOR
ANC'HOfc DONALDSON
CANADIAN SERVICE
"FROM MONTREAL
To Plymeoth-Clierbourg-London
Alatinia May 8. Antonia May 14.
To Liverpool
Auranla June 4, July 2, 30.
To Belfast and Glasgow
Athenia May 14.        Letltia May 28
FROM NEW YORK
To Qoeenstown and Lirerpoul
Samaria May 15.       Scythla May 22
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Berengaria May 12, June 2. 2*1.
Mauretanla May 19, June 9, 31).
Aquitania May 26,  June  l(i, July 7.
To Londonderry and Glasgow
California May 8. Camnronia May 22
To Plynioutli-Hnvrc-Iiondiin
Carmania May 8.    Tuscanla Hay 14
To  Plrmoath-Chcrbourg-Ilamburg
Andania May 22, June 30, July 31.
FROM BOSTON
To Queenslown and Lirerpoul
Samaria May 16. BYanconla May 30
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Pull Information from local agenta or Company's Offices. 622 Hastings St. W.,
Vancouver. B. C.
PuZZle'No. 106 il ■8»Ined  one  minute
regular time, while
clock hobbled along so slowly that
lt lost two minutes per hour. The
race ended today when the alarm
clock struck 8 simultaneously with
grandfather's clock striking 7. Now,
who can tell at what time yesterday
morning the race started?
A REBUS
Short was my life, and brilliant my
career;
Bebead me, I In lovely green appear;
Behead again,  I once  was made to
save
My  chosen   Inmates   from  a   watery
grave.
Puzzle No. 107
CONCEALED AMERICAN TOWNS
A raven named Peter" gathered ten
pence.
We bet he loses, but hope he will
win.
He-bore the rebuff a long time before the relort courteous.
Drink freely of the Juice before it
torments.
At sight of the mob I left hurriedly
on business.
When the stock is at par is a good
time to unload.
Puzzle No. 108
Yesterday morning my two clocks
started/a race. The alarm clock became excited and went so fast that
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND. B. C
i ._ijj „LL_'Ji-^a ■ ■■„ajutijBjiiii!.MJ.. .
per  hour  on
grandfather's
PAGE THREE
if
CROSSING ACCIDENTS
PROVE LARGELY FATAL
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladies' hair eut, any style SOc
Children's hair cut any style tit
*^£i^Mil^^^:MS5M£k,«
*5&
AT every price, from 75c
. to #2.00, Monarch-Knit
Hosiery presents uncommon
value. Here's one example
—Monarch Green Stripe at
•Jl.00. Pure silk, for rich
sheen and lasting smoothness
—reinforced with fibre silk
for long wear. Every newest
color—and if a "run" should
start it cannot pass thc second "stop run,"
MONARCHES
Head Office
Punnville, Out.
'■ 9 WW***
Puzzle No. 109
s
DOUBLE   DECAPITATIONS
Behead a weapon a'ml leave a truit
again behead and leavo what Polon-
ius bade Laertes give c\»ry man.
Behead a drowsy wink and leav»
part of a chain; behead again and
leave a liquid In universal use.
Behead a virago and leave frigid:
behead again and leave ancient.
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
ln this column next week.
Answers to Last Week's Puzzles
No. 100—The problem Is solved by
a rule which produces a right-angled
triangle—the given side being an odd
number, viz.:
Square the number—47 times '47
equals 2,209. This separate into two
numbers—one a unit greater than
the other.   Answer, 47:  1,104, 1,105.
No. 101—The word SPECULATION.
No. 102—Hare, Date, Temple, Tulips, Neck, Brow, Lid, Lash, Mouth,
Copperhead and "One cent by U.S.A.
No. 103—The word LIAR.
No. 104—Cab.   Fed.
THORNTON GIVES NAME
TO BABY STREET
The shortest street In western Canada, which opens onto tbe longest
main thoroughfare ln western Canada,
is to be named Thornton Court, according to an announcement by the
Edmonton city council. Sir Henry
Thcrnton, president of the Canadian
National Railways, has agreed to
allow his name to be used for that
portion of the street opened from
Jasper Avenue and running through
to the paved lane at the rear of thp
Macdonald Hotel In Edmonton. It ls
less than 100 feet long and is to be
paved immediately. Sir Henry wrote
the council that he would be highly
honored to have his name on the
shortest street in the world.
FRESH MILK
Delivered to
the  District
all parts of
twice   daily.
PHONE ORDERS
receive prompt attention.
Phone 127-M
HUNT and STEWART
FARMERS & MILK DEALERS
Marconi Radio
Figures compiled by the operating
department of the Canadian National
Railwyas show that during 1926 on
the lines of the system there were
65 grade crossing accidents to vehicles in which 40 pepole lost their
lives and 61 were injured. In" only
nine cases were there no fatalities
or injuries. All but twelve of the
accidents happened to automobiles or
motor trucks. While it is difficult
to place tbe blame in all cases, subsequent investigations rigorously pursued by the company showed that
In 98 per cent of these accidents the
railway company was not at fault,
every precaution having been taken
by it to prevent such occurrences.
Proof was found that in a large number of cases, the accidents were due
solely to carelessress on the part of
the drivers ot the automobiles. Listed among the accidents were two In
which autoists drove their cars Into
the tender of engines, three where
the automobiles bit the second or
third car back of the engine and one
where the driver actually crashed into the twentieth car back of the engine and did It with sufficient force
to bruise and somewhat injure the
occupants of the car as well as
damage the machine. No one month
was free from crossing accidents,
but October led, which might indicate
that towards the end of the motoring
season drivers become more careless
ln approaching railway crossings.
COAL INDUSTRY
PAYS $4,500,000.00
YEARLY IN WAGES
According to the "Mining and Industrial Record," February coal production in the Island Sollierles was
86,177 long tons. That for Coalmont
was 11,782 and for Crows Nest Pass
54,311. In addition 15,466 tons of
coal was made Into 10,239 of coke
at Coal Creek and Michel.
"PROVINCIAL ELECTIONS
ACT"
Comox Electoral District.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I shall, on MONDAY, the 17th. day of
May, 1926, at the hour of ten o'clock
in the forenoon, at the Court-house,
Cumberland, hold a sitting of the
Court of Revision for the purpose of
revising the list of voters for the Baid
electoral district, and ot hearing and
determining any and all objections
to the retention of any name on the
said list, or to the registration as a
voter of any applicant tor registration: and for the other purposes set
forth In the "Provincial Elections
Act."
Dated at Cumberland, B. C. this
6th day ot April, 1926.
JOHN CONWAY.
Registrar of Voters
15-18 Comox Electoral District.
In its issue of Thursday, April 22,
the Vancouver Dally Province Included a "mining section" that contained a wealth of Information for
those Interested in this almost province-wide Industry. Of the numerous
articles, one especially would Interest
local residents, as it dwelt upon the
coal mining Industry In this part of
Vancouver Island, the huge sums
paid by the Collieries in wages, and
the wide range of uses to which the
products of the various mines can
be put. Following are a few excerpts
from the article:
"According to figures recently compiled 1,171,927 gross tons of coal
were mined on Vancouver Island in
1925, representing in round figures
15,500,000.
"It is authoritatively stated by cost
accounting experts that approximately 80 per cent of the cost of coal
mining Is represented In wages paid
out. This means that nearly $4,500,
000 is paid out annually by the mining Industry on Vancouver Island In
the way of wages to the employees.
"At the present time the following
companies are operating coal mines
on Vancouver Island: Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, at Cumberland and Ladysmith: Western
Fuel Corporation of Canada, at Nanaimo; Nanoose Wellington Collieries
Limited at Lantzvllle; Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting & Power
Company, at Cassidy; Messrs. King
and Foster, at Wellington, and the
East Wellington Coal Company at
Wellington.
ISLAND COAL FOR
ALL Pl'KPOSES.
"The coal from the Wellington,
Ladysmith and Nanaimo districts
comes from three different seams,
known as the "Wellington," "Douglas" and "Newcastle" seams. The
product of these mines is In great
demand as a domestic fuel through-1
out the Coast cities of British Columbia and Washington. j
"The coal mined at Cumberland,
known as "Comox" coal. Is high grade
steam coal and Is used extensively
for ships' bunkers, railroads and industrial plants. Of late years it has
come rapidly Into favor as a furnace
coal. It has the highest carbon content and calorific value of any coal
mined on the Pacific Coast.
"An erroneous idea seems to prevail that the greater part of the coal
mined on the Island ls exported to
the United States. This Is not the
case. The percentage of coal exported across the border is only about
10 per cent, of the total commercial
coal marketed. A great compliment
has been paid" to Vancouver Island
coal by British, United States and
Japanese navies, which have successfully used both Comox and Wellington coals for their ships.
"It is interesting to note that recently a substantial market for Comox coal bas been developed in Mexico and recently several large shipments have been made to that
country.
"By reason of the unusually mild
winter, the domestic trade has fallen
off fully 60 per cent. This has greatly affected the prosperity of the mining cities of Nanaimo and Ladysmith,
but Cumberland relies on tbe steamship, railway and Industrial trade
oud has not felt the slackening off
to the same degree as her sister
communities.
"THE SCARLET STREAK"
At the approach of the ninth episode of Jack Daugherty's thrilling
adventure picture, "The Scarlet
Streak," which will be shown at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre next Wednesday and
Thursday, many of tho fans have undoubtedly developed gooseflesb in
waiting, with' quivering nerves, for
the outcome of the last big fall of
Jack Dougherty Into the raging current. It Is certain that nobody but
a movie hero could survive such a
test of strength, but past experience
with serial pictures makes It reasonably sure that the doughty Daugher-
ty will live to fight through the remaining two episodes.
SALES AGENTS FOR
Chevrolet & cMcLaughlin
WE   SPECIALIZE   IN
AUTO REPAIRS
Cars
HONING
A SPECIALTY
USED CARS—Fords, Chevrolet, McLaughlin
Sole Agents for
FIRESTONE and GOODRICH TIRES and TUBES
Harling & Ledlngham
Cumberland
FOR THREE YEARS PEOPLE HAVE DEMANDED SUCH RADIO
RECEIVERS
Ua.        4-U rt ACHIEVEMENTS WORTHY OF THE FATHER
flCrC tflcy are "OF RADIO SEE THEM!   HEAR THEM!
Buy them
KNOWING YOU ARE ACQUIRING PERFECT RECEIVERS THAT WILL GIVE
YOU YEARS OF SERVICE
L
CANADIAN MARCONI COMPANY
Sold by the
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co., Ltd.
Buy Comox
GRADED
PRODUCTS
and avoid waste
If you want to know how carefully the public is protected against inferior quality you should see how
carefully every egg at the Creamery is candled and
weighed before it goes into the case.
BUTTER
COMOX
EGGS     POTATOES
Ask for them at your grocer.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B. C. PAe«>*oi*;'
THI CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMB1RLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL SO, UM.
SOLEX  LAMPS
Electric Lamps of Quality
Tungsten and Nitrogen
TUNGSTEN LAMPS
15 watt "B" lamps 32c.
25 watt "B" lamps 32c.
40 watt "B" lambs 32c.
50 watt "B" lamps 32c.
60 watt "B" lamps 87c.
NITROGEN LAMPS
75 watt "C" lamps B6e.
100 watt "C" lamps «6e.
150 watt "C" lamps 86c.
200 watt "C" lamps $1.16
300 watt "C" lamps $2.0©
Sold By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
"The Radio Detective"
CHAPTER V
The Mystery Craft
FOR some time Ken and Dick stood
on the landing stage, debating.
"Of course we want to And out
about Hank and that 'Scooter,' " considered Ken. "But then yo tiremer-
ber the other day, betore he told up
about buying this radio, he said bc
was buying a flivver, and paid a deposit of a hundred dollars on it to
Charley Rahdell? I'm going to take
the Parr's rowboat that's here and po
out to the 'Scooter.' But you, Dick,
go on up to the village and see what
you can find out about Randoll and
the flivver, see if It la true, and. ii
you caii, And out where Hnnk got
his money. I'll gamble he nevor ro:
it from his folks."
"That's all right. Ken, but how are
you going to get away with It, when
yon get out to the 'Scooter'? What
are you going to tell them?"
"The truth, of course—at leasl us
much as I want them to know. My
allowance Is shot. I'll tell them I
want to earn some money just like
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Va-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
LimlWd.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
THEY GO
ZIPPING OUT!
Our Auto Service puts the
"Zip" in cars when they're
not behaving. No matter
what your motor problem
—we can solve it.
—*—
Our highly expert service
is the most moderate in
town. Try us today and
be convinced. You'll find
our prices very reasonable.
—*—
Ask for
Walter Hudson
at
The Cumberland Motor Works
77      -PHONES-      1«1*'
Hank. Maybe they'll let me on, give
me a job, and I'll learn something
about them. The thing looks suspicious to me—this mystery craft anchored out there."
Kon stepped ln the skiff and started. "So long, Dick."
"So long, Ken. See you later."
Ken pulled lustily at the oars for
he was a born water rat, had been
raised about Rockledge harbor, knew
swimming and bolts from almost his
baby days. It was not long before
he was approaching the converted
cruiser.   No one seemed -on deck.
"'Scooter' ahoy!" shouted Ken as
he rowed about it looking for sonic
signs of life and how to get aboard.
"Whatcher want?" A rough-neck
sailor had come on deck and was
answering the boy ungraciously.
"I want a job," returned Ken,
"You do, eh!" The sailor reached
down to the deck, seemed to pick up
something, then to turn a valve. "You
wan a Job, do you? Well, take that!'
He straightened up and as he did
so he pointed a hose connected with
a powerful pump, full ut Ken. Kon
was resting on bis oars. He received
the full force of the water and It almost bowled him overboard. It wns
not the drenching that Ken feared
It was the rapid filling ot the skill*
He would soon be sunk. He seized
Ihe oars and ln three or four strokes
wss well beyond the range of the
hose. As he puUed oft, Ken heard
a raucous laugh from the hold. He
could have sworn It was the voice
of Hank Hawkins.
Chagrined and wet, Ken bailed out
the skiff, then pulled back to shore
He sat down on the landing stage to
wall and think. He had time. He
would wait until Hank came ashore.
It was well that Ken had time
Hank was ln no hurry to come
ashore, But the morning sun was
sultry and the time was not wasted.
At least Ken was drying out after
his drenohlng.
It was the better part of an hour
before Ken could descry a boat
lowered from tho davits of the 'Scooter" and then make sure that it waa
Hank putting oft In It for shore. Ken
kept on tbe side of the dock where
the sun shone hottest but where
Hank could not sec him and through
the piles he could watch the progress
of the boat from the cruiser to tho
landing stage.
Just ns Hank moored the rowboat
to the float and turned to ascend to
thc dock, Ken emerged. Ken was
quiet but there was a look gleaming
In his eyes that boded no good for
Hank.
Hank   laughed    In   his    Irritating
SATURDAY SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
14-—TELEPHONE IM
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 8:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets  boat at Union  Bay.
H=
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service ai—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
ffniiiit Aleck manner, Still Ken restrained himself. Quickly Hank
glanced about to make sure that Ken
was alone before going further. He
was satisfied. Then he laughed ln a
contemptuous manner that set Ken's
blood boiling. His righteous anger
was  mounting by the moment.
"Say!" taunted Hank, with an exasperating bravado. "Was that rob-
,bery an inside job?'
Ken was no loss angry at Hank
for what had happened, for he knew
the sailor had been put to it by Hank.
It was conduct clearly unbecoming
a scout. But here was a new issue
injected Into the matter by Hank.
"What do you mean—inside job?*'
returned Ken.
Hank laughed in a superior manner. "You don't know, but*I konw.'
He lowered his volsjo. "Your sister,
Ruth, and the bunch—all of them
Ruth, Vira, Glenn, Rae, Dick, Pro
feasor Vario—lost a lot of money last
week "betting on the races at Belmore
Park. Some sports! You didn't
know that—but my folks wero ovor
there, saw'em, told me!"
You cannot rub things in on a boy
of Ken's temperament nnd get away
with lt.
Without warning Ken sailed in. It
was some scrap, for Hank had thc
advantage In age. But Ken had lived
soneibly and clean aud his motto for
trouble was "be prepared." He was-
a splendid boxer. Easton had taught
him some football and wrestling, too
Ken had expected It and was no
disappointed—Hank was not one to
fight fair. When one encounters bis
like, one must be prepared for al
sorts of mucker tricks. Ken was
prepared for it and the bully wa
worsted.
Kon had him begging for mercy
He had won any way you looked at
It.   He let Hank get up.
Hank edged away, then suddenly
started np the dock running as lie
caught sight ot one of his cronies,
the town bum. He turned, still
taunting Ken.
"It was an Inside job! You tcl!
Ruth to watch out for the ponies!'
Ken did not pursue. There was no
percentage in such a fight. lusl ead.
he turned swiftly and started along
the shore to tell us.
Since early In the morning. Ken
nedy, Huston Evans and myself had
been in the Radio Shack of Evans
in the hope that during the day there
would be some response to the alarm
that Kennedy had broadcasted the
night before.
Tho Radio Shack was a most interesting place, lt bad been tlio old
boathouse ou the Evans place, bul
Easton had taken it and had hull,
it over so that tlio upper part war
his laboratory. Tills was on Ibe cllfi
side and entered from the level of the
Cliff Rond. Below the old boalhousc
part had been entirely cleaned ont
nnd refitted and in it Easton bad
built some radio levlces for hydroaeroplanes. He had built a skidway
and converted this part Into a regular hangar.
It was upstairs now thst we were,
waiting, Impatiently.
"We ought to be getting some reports from somewhere, I should think,
about the yellow racer," 1 remarked.
"We'll get them," returned Kennedy.
"You never send out a message on
thc air like that that you don't get
a result."
Easton was very quiet. He was
taking no chances. On one sldo he
had a radio with an indoor aerial.
Kennedy was tinkering with the radio
with an indoor aerial, while Easton
himself was adjusting his Evansite
Cold    Tube    apparatus.     Everything
was tuned for reception on the wave
length accorded Easton.
"If there's anything to say around
hore, we ought to get it," remarked
Easton, curbing bis Impatience.
"Everybody has my official wavelength and number." He glanced out
of the window. "There goes that
scout cruiser that's been lying about
here. She's weighed anchor. I'd Intended to see If I could listen in on
her wave-length, discover lt, get
some information. The thing doesn't
look right to me."
"Hello—look!" Kennedy glanced
out of the window ot the Radio Shack,
We looked also. Down the cliff
road we caught sight of Ken Adams
coming along in a most disheveled
condition.
A moment and Ken, minus a couple
of buttons on bis. coat and with a
fine bruise on his cheek bone under
his right eye, stood ln the doorway
of the-Shack.
"Fighting   again!"    Easton. Evans
took no pains to conceal his disgust
at   Ken's  conquest   of  his  primitive
instincts.   "What  about,  this time?"
Ken was silent.
"What about?" repeated Craig.
"With whom?"
"Oh," avoided Ken, "Hank Hawkins
—that mucker."
"Why, he's much bigger than you
—and almost a year older."
".Maybe he thought he was bigger.
He doesn't think so now!' was Ken's
quiet comment.
"Too bad you didn't have the
gloves—and the other boys as a gallery to cheer you on," cut in Easton
with a touch of sarcasm. "What
was It about?"
Still Kon did not answer.
Craig was about to repeat the question more sharply when Easton held
up his band.
A message was coming In over the
Evansite Cold Tube set.
"This Is Msyhew'e Oarage, May-
hew talking, Sinithtown. There's a
gardener here, from the Jardine
place, has a clue about the yellow
racer. Come over immediately and
get it- or transmit the news t<>
Easton Evans at his Radio Shack,
or wherever he may bc, as directed
by Craig Kennedy over the air last
night.   Hurry!"
(Continued Next Week)
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED rLOORINQS,
AND    rVRNISHINGS
WSJ DBLIVEll TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DUAMB-O |N,,kt "'"'■  U4X °««rt«»?
PHONES |0BM. j„ CttlBb,r,„4
MANN'S BAKERY
The home of high class cakes and pastries.
Large and varied selection.
Freshly baked daily.
APPLE, RAISIN, and PINEAPPLE PIES.
BUNS, BISCUITS, COOKIES, SCONES, etc.
LAND   ACT
WHEN PA IS SICK
When pa is Bick,
He's scared to death
An' ma an' us
Just  hold  our breath,
Ho crawls In bed,
An' puffs an' grunts,
An' does all kinds
Of crazy stunts,
He wonts the doctor,
An'  mighty quick,
For when pa's 111,
He's awful sick,
An' sort o' sighs,
He gasps and groans
He talks so queer,
An' rolls his eyes,
Ma jumps and runs,
An' all of us,
An' all the house,
An' peace an' joy
Is mighty skeerce—
When pas Is sick,
It's something fierce.
Try some "Golden Brown Doughnuts'* for Saturday's
dinner.   The kiddies like them.
Cream Rolls, Cream Cakes, etc., dainty looking and
delicious tasting.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
Phone 18
Laud Recording District of Nanaimo
TAKE NOTICE that I, Samuel
McLeod ot Royston, B. O, Sawmill
Operator, Intend to apply for a leaie
of the following described foreshore
ot Lots A and B Map 2243 and Lot A
Map 3261, subdivisions ot Sectioa T
situate ln Comox District tn the Land
Recording District of Nanaimo, British Columbia, described as Commencing at a post set at high tide
mark at tbe most North Easterly
corner of said Lot _A Map 3261;
thence at right angles a distance ot
300 feet to low water mark; thence
ln a westerly direcUon following the
shore line at low tide mark (and a
uniform distance therefrom) ot aaid
Lots to a point at low tide mark
directly opposite the south westerly
corner ot said Lot A Map 2243; thence
ln a straight line to said south westerly corner at high tide mark, and
containing 20 acres more or less.
SAMUEL McLEOD
Dated the 24th day'ot March, 1(26.
18-20
WHEN MA IS SICK
When ma is sick,
She pegs away,
Not much t' say,
She goes right on
A doin' things,
An' sometimes laugbs,
'Er even sings,
She says:  she don't
Feel extra well,
But then it's just
A kind o' spell,
She'll be all right
Tomorrow sure,
A good old sleep
Will be the cure;
An' pa he sniffs
An' makes no kick,
For women folks,
Is always sick,
An' ma she smiles,
Let's on she's glad—
When ma Is sick,
It ain't so bad.
■lliaiiilllBlilBlilSllllffltll Illllllllllll
AFTER SUPPER
enjoy the pleasure of a long-distance telephone chat
with a distant friend. It is a delightful way to visit.
The night rates after 8:30 p.m.  are  specially  low.
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
DNTHE
Baggage Checked
Through
EOmiiENTAL LIMITED
y^/f Steel Standard and
Tourist Sleeping'Cars, Dininb
Cars Drawing Morn-Compar?
ment- Lidmru- Observation
Cars Radio Couipped
For Further Information, Fares, Reservations,
etc., apply to
EDWARD W. BICKLE, Agent
Cumbirland, B. C. Telephone 16
CAHMP
fllfllOHM:
HAVE DAILY 950 PmI^^ ■FRIDAY, APRIL 30, 1926.
THS CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
• S»SSSSSSS—SSSHS—^SSS»S.SSSSSSSSSSSS-SSSSSS. I      I —
3
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
)F    MASTER    C.\*tf\f\K    nlsrsis.    llsssl    thc    „„„„„„„...1    „1,J..„.!„_       is s llisism s     nsrssrsrsn    .,„__„ ^^
PAGE FIVE
PLANS OF  MASTER  CROOK,about  that the successful  abduction
of the twentieth girl will mean cul-
In the sixth episode of the Patbe
Police serial, "Into the Net," featuring Edna Murphy and Jack Mulhall,
mlnation of some sinister plan of
the "master mind" controlling the
emits.   And Natalie Van Cloet ls the
and showing at the  Ilo-Ilo Theatre j twentieth   girl!   But  the  police  are
next Monday only, Natalie Van Cleef j closer and closer on their trail.
arrives at the rendezvous of the gang
of clever criminals  who  have  been
causing the police  so  much  trouble ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
in this story. I    CAMPBELL   RIVER,   April   29,
In this strange house are the kid- Contrary to reports published recent-
napped heiresBos, who    dread    what  ly In a Victoria daily,  the road to
ROAD NOT IMPASSABLE
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
their fate Is to be when the twentieth
girl arrives, It having been whispered
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
131R —PHONE— 131R
' COURTENAY, B. C.
K-SSSSKwi-
P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay             Phono  258
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel In Evenings.
Telephone   115R  or  24
Campbell River is by no means Impassable and such adverse criticism
can only tend to hurt the tourist
trade of this district. Cars from all
parts of Comox District make Campbell River their rendezvous on Sundays and no one has yet complained
of the condition of the road or "had
to turn back" as the report stated.
Our early spring and the warm
weather accompanying it has brought
the picnic parties out In large numbers aud every week-end sees their
care headed for the favorite camping
grounds on tbe shores of Campbell
and Mclvor Lakes
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Mrs. A. Beaton, of Courtenay, ls a
guest of her daughter ,Mrs. Robert
McCuaig.
Dr. and Mrs. E. T. Pottinger were
visitors to Campbell River for a few
days during the week.
Mr. Leo Salvall was admitted to
the Campbell River Hospital tbe latter part of last week. He Is suffering with a poisoned hand.
Mr. George Francis left Wednesday
for Lake Cowichan.
Mr. ana} Mrs. J. English have returned trom a visit to Vancouver and
Seattle.
Mr. G. A. McLean, of the International Timber Co., left Sunday tor
Vancouver.
Mrs. R. Pollard Is a guest of Mrs.
M. Higgins at Campbelton.
Capt. D. B. Kepler, ot Campbelton,
and Mr. J. Twadelle have returned
from a lengthy stay up North.
Mr. Chas. Thulin returned home on
Sunday from a visit to Vancouver.
Mr. Frank Cross, of the Campbell
River Trading Co., has returned from
a short visit to the city.
Miss Rose McDonald left on Tuesday morning for her home at Shoal
Bay.
Miss Alice Slavage, of Vancouver,
ls a guest of her sister, Mrs, George
Higgins, of the International Timber
Company.
Mrs, Marshall, of Cumberland, Is
a guest of her daughter, Mrs. James
English.
Mr. Jasper Sutherland returned the
i latter part of the week after having
spent a few dais visit at Vancouver.
Mr. Robert Shouse, of Vancouver,
was a visitor to Campbell River over
tbe week-end.
Mr. L. W. Weeks left on Tuesday
for Vancouver where he expects to
remain for some time,
Mr. J. G. Mlllicbamp nad Mr. Scott., could do the same, Okanagan, Inter-
of Vancouver, were guests at the ior, and Central B. C. Then a Prov-
WIllows Hotel early in the week. Incial executive, consisting of a mem-
. Mrs. M. Mowatt, of Quathiaski Cove ber of each of tlie live district associ-
is at present visiting friends at Van- attain could be formed, to look aftor
couver. [ the shipping of surplus In each dls-
Mrs. Roger Cobb and family, of j trlct to large cities or export. When
the International Timber Co., are on such an association is operating, the
a visit to Mr. Cobb's mother at Hil-; dealers will be more likely to place
Hers. orders, and  It will  be  to tbeir ad-
Miss Kathleen Hulme, of Lady-j vantage to buy from an association
smith, arrived at Forbes Landing on I as well as for the growers to sell
Friday last. {through the association, especially If
Mr.  A.   F.   Scott,  of Cape   Mudge, j dealers  can  be sure of getting first
called in  at Campbell River during
the week.
ADVOCATES BEST
VARIETIES OF TUBERS
(Continued from Page One)
of supplying Vancouver Island markets. Up to December 31, 1925, only
eight and one-half out of one hundred
and thirty-nine and one-half cars
shipped to Victoria, or six per cent,
were grown on tbe Island, the other
ninety-four per cent came from the
mainland. About two hundred cars
or four thousand tons will be shipped
to Victoria during the year. This is
a good market and can be developed.
An additional fifty cars would be required to supply the surrounding district of Courtenay.
For the growing and marketing of
commercial potatoes, Mr. Bewell advocated producing only the beBt varieties In large quantities with strict
grading, pointing out the serious loss
by paying freight ln culls, besides
the trouble caused to dealers. In
this connection he thought the Potato and Vegetable Associations could
perhaps go a step further, rent or
erect a  suitable  warehouse,  do  the
grading for  the growers and allow
MrrR!"JenkOison"met with a slight  only flr8t cla9s proiuce t0 leave the
,..,„,,, , .    '      I rtlatrlc*      Thlss    sss„ssl,l    .      .-    -
accident at Bloedel and was admit
ted to the Campbell River Hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hays, of Van
couver, were recent visitors to Camp
bell River.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTAMENDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given In Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, In whicli the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from tho Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and improvements made
to value of flu* per acre. Including
clearing and cultivating nt least live
acres, before n Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information sec
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase    of   vacant    and    unreserved
Crown   lands, not  being  timberland,
for agricultural  purposes;   minimum
price of first-class (arable) land Is i'i i —
per acre, and second-class (grazing) 1 =
land (2.50 per aero.   Further Information  regarding  purchase or  lease
of Crown lands in given lu Bullet'a
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be  leased  as  homesftes,
conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
erected In the flrst year, title being
obtained   after   residence   and   improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   Industrial   purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act (ho Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits arc Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority boing given
to established owners. Stock-ownors
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head.
GLENROY
Tea Garden
royston, ac.
Open for Season, May 1st
district. This would soon create a
market for all produce we could be
able to grow, Including potatoes, vegetables, fruit, etc. If each district
would organize like they are here ln
this district, then an association taking In all the associations on the
Island could be formed, with an ex-
exutive consisting of a member from
each association.   The Fraser Valley
GAIETY
THEATRE
COURTENAY
class produce, and get it when want
ed.   This would Btop the Importation
of potatoes when we have plenty of
potatoes In this district.   At present,
exact quantities are not known, and
small quantities are hard to dispose
of.   Thc   local  Creamery    is    doing
good work In looking after supplies,
but could do more efficient work as
selling  agent  if  there   was  a  large
quantity and could deliver regularly.
Mr. Bewell also spoke on growing
certified  seed potatoes,  pointing out
| that  although  the acreage  through-
' out the Province is increasing, tt is
still only a small part of the acreage
planted.     He    advocated  the  establishment  of  one  or  two  grades  of
commercial    seed    potatoes,    grown
from   certified   seed   for   commercial
seed with a lower standard than the
certified seed, Inspected, graded, etc.,
to be sold at  ?60 and  $50 per ton.
against   $100  for  tbe  certified  seed.
From appearances, the certified seed
may develop a good market in the
south, but chances are a better market can be established by growing a
good grade of commercial seed at a
lower price.
Mr. J. B. Munro, assistant agronomist of the Provincial Department
of Agriculture, the other speaker,
gave a talk on soils and fertilization,
advocating building up the soil by
natural means, by the use of any
kind of green crops, and pointed out
the value of legumes ln this connection. He stressed the necessary
drainage and the use of lime to
sweeten the soil. Mr. R. U. Hurford,
manager of the local Creamery, spoke
a few words on the growth of the
local potuto association and pointed
out thc need now of mass production
for export.
A hearty vote of thanks was passed
to  the  lecturers.
ation of the new branch of the St.
Qeorge's Society and finished with
the words "God Save the King" and
was signed "C. Qualnton."
An excellent dinner of roast beef,
plum pudding and all the frills that
go to make an English dinner, was
followed by a capital programme of
musical numbers and toasts.   Before
the programme    was    commenced a
happy atmosphere was created by tbe
singing of old    English    songs,    in
which  everyone Joined.
The programme was as follows:
Toast, "The King," by Major A. M.
Hilton; Song, "Sweet Lavender," Mrs.
Ben  Hughes;  Song, "Farmer Giles,"
Mr. G. P. Osier; Toast. "The Empire,"
Capt. J. A. Carey and replied to by
.Mr.   Theed   Pearse;   Song,   "Land  of
Hope and Glory," .Mrs. G. P. Osier;
Recitation, selected, Mr. G. W. Stubbs,
Song. "Roast Boef of England," Mr.
H.   S.   Baker;   Toast,   "Canada,"   Mr.
E.  F.  Thomas and  responded  to  by
Mayor J. W, McKenzie; Song, "Glorious Devon," Mr. G. Kirk; Violin solo,
selected,   Mrs.   J   .A.   Carey;    Song,
"Liza Jane," Mrs. H. S. Baker; Toast,
'St. George's  Day," Mr. B.  Hughes;
Quartette, Englisli songs up to date,
Mrs.  Hughes,  Mr. Osier,  Mr.  Baker,
and Mr. Kirk;  Song, "The Voice of
Home," Mrs. G. P, Osier.   "God Save
the King."
WORLD'S POULTRY
CONGRESS TO BE
HELD AT OTTAWA
ST. GEORGE'S DAY
WAS CELEBRATED
Mr. George Robertson, Assistant
Dominion Poultry Husbandman, and
internationally known poultry judge,
has been named as thro chairman of
the committee in charge of the
World's Poultry Congress live birds
exhibits. Mr. Robertson wishes to
point out that this section of the
Congress exhibition provides Canadian poultrymen with a medium by
which they can further demonstrate
to the world that they breed and are
In a position to sell, registered, record of performance ,and exhibition
stock, to breeders in any part of the
world. To Canadian poultrymen Is
given the privilege of exhibiting live
birds outside of the national exhibits.
The exhibits ln which Canadian
poultrymen can enter live poultry
are:—
1. The National exhibit where
Canada may exhibit two trios of each
variety.
The International exhibits, such
The Week's Big
Programme
Announcement
The welfare of over 100,000 Canadian employees and tbelr
dependents In our own and allied Industries, together with
our tremendous Investment In plants, equipment and organization, representing 131,000,000, allows of no alternative but
to continue operations in spite ot recent tariff reductions on
motor enrs.
For tbe present at least we bave no option but to meet the
competition of Imported automobiles. In consequence, we
announce the following price reductions retroactive to April
16th. We also declare our intention to continue operation
as usual until such time as costs of manufacture under the
new tariff can be ascertained. In so doing there will be no
compromise on our part either as regards our employees Interests or the traditional high quality of our products.
SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
America's  Greatest Actor
John Barrymore
in        '
The
Sea Beast
COURTENAY,   April   26.—For   .......„^
third year in succession St. George's | hiblt
Duy was celebrated in this district
on Friday. This year, the celebration, which ugaln took the form of
a dinner, was held at the Elk Hotel,
Comox, where the seating capacity
was taxed to Its utmost to accomodate the guests. As a result, It Is
now probable that a branch of the
St. George's Society is now likely to
be formed here; In fact, such action
was decided during the dinner when
a number ot those present signed a
memorandum signifying tbelr willingness to enroll as members. As soon
as the chairman. Major A. M. Hilton,
hnd proposed the toast to the King,
he read a telegram Just received
which conveyed best wishes for a
successful evening and for tho form
as the American Poultry Association
exhibit In which Canadian" breeders
should be willing to have their best
birds appear if called upon to furnish them.
3. Commercial exhibits which will
include exhibits from the following:
a. The Canadian National Poultry
the | Record   Association,   registration   ex-
TOUHING*
RUNABOUT*
SPORT ROADSTER
COUPE
TUDOR
PORIIOR
LIGHT DELIVERY*
CHASSIS*
TRUCK*
F.O.B. ONTARIO
Old Price      New Price
WIS
Mill
410
6*5
MS
m,
755
435
US
485
895
595
1*125
650
710
415
295
445
NO SHOW MONDAY
TUESDAY, MAY 4th.
Harry Carey
In
The Bad Lands
The Orealest Western Romance ever
Aimed.
Gmifberlaqd
Hotel
Cammercla
Headquarter.
Ratii
Reatonakle
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop.
b. Record of Performance Associations—r.o.p. exhibit.
c. Breed Associations.
d. Provincial organizations.
e. Private  breeders.
f.   Othor   commercial   organizations
not specified.
This makes It possible for any Individual, association, or firm to exhibit live poultry at the World's
Poultry Congress which will be held
at Ottawa, July 271 li to August 4th,
1927, and as already slated this is
a privilege enjoyed only by Canada
and Canadian breeders. The only
limit to these exhibits will be the
space available.
The specimens shown will necessarily be adult birds, and now is the
time to arrange fnr theso exhibits.
Young chicks may bo Included in hte
exhibit staged by the American Baby
Chick Association.
This is Canada's great opportunity.
The showing or live poultry at the
World's Poultry Congress In Spain
may he described as Incidental and
preliminary to the great showing It
Is Intended lo make In 1927. Canadian poultrymen are being provided
with a splendid opportunity to secure
further International renown, but It
will require the united efforts of all
poultrymen in Canada in order to
secure a full measure of success.
Further Information  on   these  live
I poultry exhibits will be supplied
from time to timo through the medium of the  Provincial  World's Poul-
Itry Congress committees.
"Equipped with starter, $80 extra. All
prices at Ford, Ontario. Freight and
Government taxes extra.
FORD MOTOR COMPANY OP CANADA, LTD.
Ford, Ontario
H PRODUCTS OF TRADITIONAL QUALITY
LOCXL DEALER • —
Corfield Motors, Ltd.     |
H     WEDNESDAY, MAY 5th
H Lloyd Hughes and Mary Astor
|§    Phones 46 ond 182
The Scarlet Saint
THURSDAY, MAY 6th.
SPECIAL DANCE
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
May 7 and 8
Courtenay, B. C.
| Exchange of Wives
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISUNDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, APRIL SO, 1926.
COMMUNICATION
664 at $4.B0, It is well made and has
that support that one might desire.
For the Kiddies from 1 to 3 years
we received a supply of Black Lustre
Rompers, made of a heavy grade
material, and trimmed with contrast
Cumberland, u. c.
April 30, 1926.
IVenr Mrs. Jones:
Only tlie other day we received a
few dozen House Dresses made of a
good washing quality gingham, and
in some of the nattiest st.les. As j ing colors, and tlie price Is just $1.25
the days are so bot, and you desire, per garment. It won't pay you to
to keep as cool as possible, wc would | sit down and make them when thsy
advise you to secure two or three ot; can lie got at this price,
these dresses tor summer wear. The Bordered Voile Dross lengths will
prices are I1.2E and $1.50. You will be in order these hot days, and they
really be surprised at the variety ol are so easy to make up, no two colors
styles, and the assortment at the alike and quite an assortment to
.lbove prloeB, . choose  from.   Ask   lo  see   some   ot
Princess Slips made of a good grade these new goods,
of broadcloth and siiianly  linislic.l.'    There nre many lines for the home
arc among the newest arrivals;  the|thal you will require for the summer
assortment comprises a good
of colors and we are able lo offer
thom ut the low price of $1.50 each.
Vou will be astonished at the good
value.
Wo  were  Hither
our    regular
range days, and  we especially ask you to
us a  s'isit  and see some of tho
1'u,
muny things ,sc curry for the adorn
ment ol the home,
In case we omitted to tell Mr.
horl of some of 1 Jones, you niiglii mention that we
In Corsets, but' have now received a full line of
these have conic forward and now we j Hatchways 'No-Button' Combinations,
ure in a position to show you some , sizes from 34 to 44.
of  the   new   numbers,  especially  do! Respectfully
we recommend our Belt-reducing No.'
SUTHERLAND*.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE
This Friday and Saturday
Scene/rom^'THEl   DAD   LANDS'
liEUASCD BY .
PRODUCERS DISTRIBUTING CORF!
NO    HOW TUESDAY
Wednesday, "Palace of Pleasure"
Thursday, May 6th
CMLEI
Personal Mention
Mrs. J. MacMillan, of CMorain
Alberta, was a visitor.to Cumberland
on Monday last.
Mrs. M. Mitchell returned Monday
last from a three week's vacation
spent in Seattle and Victoria.
Mr. D. Campbell, of the Mergen-
thaler Linotype Company, was a visitor to Cumberland yesterday, leaving
for Port Alberni the same  evening
Mrs. J. Magnone left last Tuesday
to join her husband In Port Alberni
where tney will reside In future.
Frank Porter, I. A., Eng., Taxation
Accountant, of Vancouver, was
business visitor to Cumberland last
Tuesday.
Mrs. Richard .McCluskey, ot Colorado, is visiting her siBter, Mrs. Thos.
Baird. of this city.
Mr. Charles Thulin; of Campbell
Kiver. was u visitor to Cumberland
on Tuesday last.
MRS.
T. LEWIS FETED
ON 67th. BIRTHDAY
Mrs. T. Lewis, who attained i the
age of sixty-seven years last Friday,
was taken completely by surprise
when a number of friends called to
offer congratulations, bringing:as a
birthday present a beautiful rug.
Mrs. Lewis' daughters had arranged
the party so that their mother knew
nothing whatever of what was to
happen until the guests began to arrive. Much amusement was afforded
the guests by various games and also
by an exhibition of the "Charleston."
given by Mrs. Lewis' grand-daughters.
Miss Lottie and Miss Lllya Lewis, but
the greatest surprise came when
supper was announced. The guests
found the tables set and a most
delightful supper was enjoyed. Mrs.
Reecc, Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Bond assisted at serving  tea.
Those present included Mrs. .1.
Gibbs. Mrs. J. Potter, Mrs. J. Lewis.
Mrs. T. Monks, Mrs. G. MacLena,
Mrs. W. McLellan, Mrs. H. Reece, sr.,
MrB. H. Reece. jr.. Mrs. J. Stant, Mrs.
Wi Herd, Mrs. J. Stevenson, Mrs ,V.
Marinelli, Mrs. M. Wallace, Mrs. ,1.
Hill and Mrs. 0. Bond.
Mrs. M. M*. Lang will not teceive
on Tuesday, or again this season.
Mi. and Mrs. W. Adam and Miss
Jean Adam, of Nanaimo, were visitors to this city last  Saturday.
Wedding
HASSELL ■ WELDON
Trinity United Church, Grandvicw,
was the setting for a very pretty
wedding on Monday afternoon, April
26, when Miss Lillian Jane Weldon,
daughter of Mrs. Weldon and the
late Dr. R. C. Weldon, of Dartmouth,
Nova Scotia, was united In marriage
to Mr. Jim Hassell. youngest son ot
Mrs. M. Hassell of this city. Tho
bride, who was given away by Mr.
W. G. Hassell, looked charming In a
gown of Ivory flat crepe with lace
veil, and carried a bouquet of Ophelia
roses and lily of the valley. She was
attended as flower girl by her little
neice, MIsb Eileen Hassell, who was
dressed In blue organdy, and carried
a baBket of forget-me-nots. Rev. J.
Dinnage Hobden read the marriage
service. During the signing of the
register Miss Katherine Weldon. sister of the bride, sang "0 Promise Me."
The Wedding March was played by
Miss M. A. Cooper. Owing to the
recent death of the bride's father in
the East, only tho Immediate friends
and relatives of the families were
present.
On their return Mr. nnd Mrs. Hassell are taking up their residence in
the  cltv. —Vancouver  Star.
.   .   .
Miss Weldon is well and favorably
known in Cumberland, where she
resided for some time witli her sister,
Mrs. A. R. Stacey. She was also a
prominent member of tfle Cumberland Badminton Club.
SIXTH BIRTHDAY
CELEBRATED AT   t
JOLLY PARTY
Some twenty-two little girls, yerc
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
McNeill, West Cumberland, at their
home Wednesday evening, the occasion being a celebration of the sixth
birthday of their daughter, Miss Barbara. The guests arrived at Ave o'
clock and had a jolly time with
games and various other forms of
entertainment until eight o'clock came
around. The refreshments served by
Mrs. McNeill were thoroughly enjoyed
by the tiny visitors.
Those present were: Miss Margaret
MacDonald, Miss Chrlssle Robertson,
Miss Mary Jackson, Miss Alice Jack
24th. OF MAY FUND
CONTINUES TO GROW
Dentifrice?
YOU me a dentifrice to keen your teeth
white—to give health to the gums, and
cleanliness and comfort to the mouth.
Dentists sjy thia in all nny dentifrice can
eafely do. And this is what Klenzo Dental
Cren:e accomplishes perfectly. The dentifrice famous for its lingering Cool, Clean,
Klenzo Feeling.  Get a t ubc today.
35'
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store        It Pays to Deal at Lang's
son, MiBs Kitty Jackson, MIbs Jennie i O-  Curwen
Jackson, Miss Jean Quinn, Miss Dor-1 Wm'  H*1"1"9011
The collectors for the 24th. of May
celebration arc meeting with a great
deal of success, and given fine
weather, the celebration this year
will surpass anything ever attempted
in Cumberland. Following is a list
of donations up to date:
Corporation  of the  City  of
Cumberland  % 100.00
Canadian  Collieries   (D)   Ltd.     5(1.00
Ilo-Ilo  Theatre        2ii.0u
Silver Spring Brewery       25.00
Union Brewery        25.00.
Cumberland Electric Light Co.     15.00
Cumberland Water Works ....     15.00
Mr. G. W. Clinton       10.00
Dr. G. K. MacNaughton       10.00
J. Sutherland  (Goods)        10.00
Campbell  Bros.   (Goods)         10.00
A. MacKinnon  (Goods)   ...
K.  Nakanlshl   (Goods)   	
Frank   Dallos   	
W.  Hutton   	
R.  Yates   	
W. P. Symons 	
C. H. Tarbell  (Goods)  	
W.  Merrifield 	
W.  Wain  	
G. T. Cavln (Goods) 	
W.  Bruce Gordon  	
L. R. Stevens (Goods) 	
C. W. Spooner 	
Matt.   Brown   	
King Geoige Hotel 	
Wilcock Bros	
J. Mann 	
Vendome Hotel  	
W.  Douglas  	
Robt. C. Lang (Goods) 	
F. D. Pickard 	
T. H. Mumford 	
Ealda M. Shlozakl 	
othy Lobley, Miss Daphne Lobley,
Miss Irene Slmlster, Miss Agnes Stm-
liter, Miss Thelma Waterfield, Miss
Llllle Waterfield, Miss Lillian Docherty, Miss Edith Taylor, Miss Ina
Robertson, Miss Muriel Taylor, Miss
Mabel Somerville. Miss Jean Somerville and Miss  Ellon  Somerville.
E. L. Saunders
Union Tailor
7.50
7.00
5.50
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.110
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
Cumberland Supply        2.50"
John J. Potter
C. E. Beasley 	
Jos. Aspesl 	
C.   Dalton   	
H. E.  Murray  	
Mrs.  Francescini
Alhert Evans 	
J.  Ninattl  	
2.00
2.00
2.00
2,00
1.50
1.(10
1.00
1,00
WE HAVE A FEW
ONE TON TRUCKS
Which have been thoroughly overhauled and are
IN   Al   SHAPE
These are ideal for Farm uae or for a Summer
Caravan.
$275, $300, $350, $375
EASY TERMS ON ANY CAR
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALER
AUCTION SALE
ON MONDAY, MAY SRD, AT 2 P.M. PROMPT
Instructed by Mr T. S. Wilson, of No. 19, Camp, West Cumberland, we \vl|l sell by Auction: Gerard Heintzman Piano, as
new; Seagrass and Wicker Chairs, Oak Rocking Chair, Ax-
minster Carpet, 9 x 12; Brussels Kug 0 x !0:ti; Panther Rug,
Several Small Rugs and Mats, Folding Screen, Hound Table,
Extension Table, Davenport, velour upholstering; Leather
covered Lounge. Several Pictures. Quantity of Lino, Two good
Double Beds complete, three-quarter bod and spring, Handsome
Bureau with long oblong Bevel Plate Mirror, Quantity of bedding. Blankets, Sheets etc., Hut Racks and Wall Mirror, a
McLary six-hole Kootenay Range, Kitchen Tabic and chairs,
Cooking Utensils, Crockery, Blow Torch, Carpenter's Tools,
Quantity of Sundries, Well-built Garage 10 x 14,
TERMS:  CASH.   Further  Particulars may bo had from
Hardy and Pearce
AUCTIONEERS
Phone 10
Real Estate
Insurance
Courtenay
Mr. and Mrs. J. Lewis and Mrs: J
Hill motored to Nanaimo last weekend.
IN MEMORIAM
COLLING—In   loving   memory   of
William John   CoTIIng,  who died  on
April 22nd,  11122.
"Yes, we'll meet again in the morning
In tho dawn of a fairer day;
When   the   night   of   watching   and
waiting.
With the darkness has passed away."
Inserted 1).,* father and mother, two
sisters and three brothers.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Pbone li.
Comfort   and   Homelike  service.
26   rooms,   electrical!*   heated
R. YATES, Manager
Phones 46 and 182
Courtenay, B. C.
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
1CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good  service,   reasonable  charges.
King George Hotel
FOR SALE—3-roomed Summer House
situated at Comox Lake. For price
and full particulars apply A. Lobley, Comox Lake.
TO LEASE OB FOR 8ALE-87 Acres
of Land near Royston. For further
particulars apply P. O. Box 502,
Cumberland . t.f.n.
BARRELS    FOR    SALE—Apply    at
McBryde's Bakery, Courtenay, B.C.
tfn
Fresh and Cured Fish
I    HOTELS ANiTcAMPS~f
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO |
* *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   -   •   Proprietor
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1062 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.    t.f.n. Phone 122
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cor, 5th nnd Duusmulr.
Cumberland

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