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The Cumberland Islander Nov 19, 1926

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Array THE, ^CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
I*3 With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
rft
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 47.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1(1, 1926.        <2*SKn^Mi|E> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Local Intermediates
Gave Brilliant
Exhibition
Courtenay Defeated  In Pacific
Coast League Game
Second Division Leugue Standings
Goals
P. W. L. D.  F.   A. Pis
Cumberland   .. 5   4   0   1   17     4   9
West Coast U. 5   3   2   0   23     4   0
Courtenay  5   2   2   1    8   10  5
Qualicum   5   0   5   0     2   32   0
Credited with ono drawn game and
four consecutive victories out of their
live starts In the Pacific Coast Second
Division league, Cumberland now
heads the table with the substantial
margin of three points over their
nearest rival, West Coast United. The
two points this week were garnered
Sunday afternoon at the expense of
Courtenay, the game resulting In a
clear win for the locals by 4 to nil.
It was Courtenay's home match, but
the boys from the farming centre
chose to play here for the reason that
their own field was more suited for
swimming than for soccer.
Fans from both towns turned out
in force, lending the impression that
a big senior match was In progress.
And no one could honestly assert
after the game that he hnd not beon
amply repaid, for the quality of play
was erslly on a pnr with any senior
match. Mr. «A. S. Jones, of Union
Bay, was in charge as referee.
Goals Irme Early In Came
Cumberland, winning the toss, elected to defend the West goal, und Inside of eleven minutes had notched
the first counter, Alex. Auchlnvole
converting nicely. Just nine minutes
later the same player duplicated his
feat, making the score 2-0 at this
early stage of the game, and practically putting the result on Ice. The
Courtenuy forwards were trying hard
t ■ break into the scoring column, but
found thc combination of the Cumberland forwards too hard to solve.
Even when they did get by the front
line tbe local halves and full backs
had no difficulty In getting the upper
hand. About seven minutes before
the end of the period, Jock Stevenson
got away nicely nnd converted from
a difficult position, but Jones ruled
off-side and the point was therefore
disallowed.
Courtenay Player Scores
Courtenay took charge of play at
the commencement of the second half,
but could not get near enough to goal
to give Stewart any trouble. The
locals gradually settled down to thc
fast combination pluy they had used
to such telling effect In the previous
half, and soon Campbell took a nice
cross from McLeod, beat both backs,
and scored without the goal keeper
making any attempt to come out and
meet him. Not long afterward Jackson converted a beauty, but tlle point
wns again disallowed as Auchlnvole
spoiled tho play by getting off-side.
The fourth and last goal came from
the boot of Scuddn Nakamura, the
Courtenay Inside left, who accidentally diverted a corner kick Into his
own goal.
The teams fielded the following
line-ups: Courtenay—Piercy, Damonte, W. Auchlnvole; Wilcock, Buckley,
Bowie; Strachan, Dargle, Robertson,
Nakamura and Cummings.
Cumberland—Stewart; Blc'.sie and
Marshall! Little, Weir. Gibson; .Mc-
l.cod; Stevenson, Campbell, A. Auchlnvole and Jucksoii.
Comment! on the (Jump
"Hud" Gibson wasn't on Cumberland's llna-UP for the reason that his
knee Is sl'll bothering him. so he ns'iit
his big brother along In his place,
"Glbby' took the left-half position and
(Continued  on  Pa^o  Four)
TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT!
Tonight's the night when the Boy
Scouts aud Wolf Cubs will hold their
Camp Fire Sing Song in tho Parish
Hall at 7:30. p.m. Members of the
Troop and Pack are asked to parade
at The Hall at 7:00 p.m. sharp. A
varied and interesting programme has
been arranged to which a welcome is
extended to those who are interested
in Scout and Cub work. There ls no
charge for admission, but a collection
will be taken up to defray expenses
and to pay off some old bills. Next
Tuesday Mr. G. E. Stubbs, the Scoutmaster of the Courtenay Troop, has
kindly consented to give a talk on
"Scouting in America." He spent
several weeks In the Slates during
the last Summer and was much Impressed with the progress this great
game is making across the border.
The Troop will meet on Tuesday as
usual at 6:00 p.m.
MR. GEORGE E. APPS
HEADS COMOX DISTRICT
TEACHERS' INSTITUTE
AND   STILL   THEY   COME!
Urge Company
To Set Rates For
Large Consumers
COURTENAY, Nov. IG—Those present at the regular meeting of the
Courtenay City Council on Monduy
night were "Mayor McKenzie, and Aid.
W. Douglas, Wm. Fielder. F. Field,
Theed Pearse and E. L. MacDonald.
A letter from the assistant district
engineer (W. P. Beavan) informed the
council that the estimates for the next
fiscal year were being prepared and
he would be glad to know what worn
the city wos contemplating on the
primary and secondary roads within
the city. Mayor McKenzie explained
that he had heen pressing for the
completion of the fill on Union St, on
a fifty-fifty basis with the Department.
He hoped to see an improvement to
the approaches of the steel bridge
and to the Lake Trail side walk and
the turn at the Lake Trail city limit,
it was for the council to say what
was required. Aid. Douglas felt sure
that they could find lots that needed
doing. On motion of Aid. Field the
letter wns referred to the Board of
Works, whose chairman (Aid. Douglas) will prepare a list ot the proposed work for further consideration.
Regarding hard surfacing, the Mayor
•explained that this could be included
In the supplementary estimates which
are made In April or May.
The Comox Water Co. wrote formal- \
ly delivering possession of the new
Comox pipe line to the city of Courtenay for administration. Mayor McKenzie, In explaining the communication, said that he understood tbere
had been dlfflculty In arriving at an
agreement as to the water rates for
some of the larger consumers at
Comox. These Included the hospital,
thc school and the hotels. Thc pipeline had not yet been completed to
Ils proposed limit; the company however, had Ihe necessary funds on
hand but were held up for pipe. At
a recent meeting at Comox he hail
suggested that the company had better get busy and set the rates for
these institutions ln order that they
may be contributing to Ihe revenue,
as private consumers were already
paying for their supply of water. Tho
communication wns turned over to
the Water Committee and a report Is
to be mode nt the next meeting.
Another communication from Mr. P.
Philip, deputy minister of Public
Works, drew attention to the need of
uniformity in the matter of highway
signs. Eleven different signs accompanied Ihe letter, which requested cooperation of nil municipalities by con-
[ forming ns  fnr as possible to these
I standard  signs.     On  motion  of Aid.
; Pearse, Ihe city is to express Its desire to oo*operate In the matter and
i will polnl oul tbe advisability of the
removal of obsolete logging and other
i signs ulong thc highway, and thereby
I make the new signs more effectlvo.
COURTENAY, Nov. 13—Sixty delegates from all over the district, from
Qualicum Beach north to Campbell
River, attended and registered at the
annual convention of tho Comox District Teachers' Institute, which came
to  a  close  here on  Friday  evening.
|     In his address on Friday morning.
j the president (Mr. O. W. Stubbs, of
Courtenay), welcomed the visiting
delegates and took for his subject the
•much discussed question: "What ls
wrong with education?" His contention was that education had not been
"sold" to the fathers. Regarding the
Parent-Teacher movement, Mr, Stubbs
maintained that In reality there are
no such Institutions, and a more
appropriate name would be "Mother-
Teacher" Associations, for generally
speaking, the fathers were not taking
any interest In the matter.   So long
he gave many examples, defining objectivity In exams as being thc degree
to which the examiners' prejudices
were eliminated In marking the
papers. While Mr. Stewart was
speaking to the senior teachers, Miss
L. A. Burpee gave a most helpful talk
on changing alms in primary hand
work. Miss Burpee Illustrated hor
talk witli a large number of specimens which she hnd brought witli
her from Vancouver.
Mr. E. R. Bewell, district representative of the Dept. of Agriculture,
stressed the Importance of nnture
study and elementary agricultural
training In the school with a view to
Interesting pupils in farming as a
profession.
'After the luncheon adjournment.
Mrs. G. Mugford. with a class of six
pupils  from  the ungraded  school  at.
ns this apathy was manifested It j Oyster River, demonstrated the value
would be up-hill work. He called the ; of dramatization in teaching composi-
delcgates' attention to exhibits of \ tion, literature, spelling, geography.
writing which had been sent by the j history and self-confidence. Mrs.
Normal Schools of Vancouver and Mugford was most enthusiastic and
Victoria. These included specimens her enthusiasm reflected Itself in the
of work marked and criticised by the . class, showing what could be nccoin-
instructors at the Normals and had pllsbed in a school which is without
been of much assistance to teachers.' any of the advantages of graded city
Preceeding the most Interesting lee-, schools,
ture by Professor Soward of the U. B. Inspector J. M. Paterson followed
C„ which is published In another, the demonstration by outlining othor
column, the Courtenay Boys' Band, I projects which he had seen in the
under the very able leadership of Mr.: district. He cited the Courtenay Boys
H. E. Murray, of Cumberland, gave a ; Band ns one of the finest school pro-
most pleasing concert which showed jects that he had seen undertaken,
that the band had advanced consider- j Mr. Leslie Buckley, of Courtenay,
ably during the year. I In ljls address on school sports, urged
Inspector A. Stewart spoke on the that an organised policy be recognized
new examination standards. He gave ' as a school subject. He deprecated
an outline of how entrance examlna- j physical drill and cadet corps as at
tions were judged and marked at the ' present carried on, and expressed
present day.   He strongly favored the : himself ns being in favor of mimetic
new objective type of exam of which
(Continued  on  Pago  Four)
Local Racket Weilders Defeat Team
From  Comox; Many Close Games
Some twenty members of the Comox I 	
Badminton Club were the guests last ■ gi", JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL
.Monday  evening  of the  Cumberland |
Club,  when   an   enjoyable  series  of: BENEFIT NIGHTS
matches were played oft*.   The local' 	
players turned out In force, so that'' Meraber8 of t"c Ladies' Auxiliary to
In all there were well over fifty In- St* J°8eI>n"s Hospital, (Comox), are
tcrosted competitors and spectators, ivery bus'r tlle8e da>'s selll"s ,iukots
and, despite the fact that thc home '.for the evening performances, with
club has only one court, everyone! tombola prizes, to be hold in the
came In for a good share of the play-10alely Theatre, Courtenay. on Monday
Ing. The final result was a close one, . and Tuesday evenings, Nov. 22 and 23.
Cumberland  taking  12  games  to  11 ; why?   Because   the   management  of
^.^T'll"1^1.1 P°',ntS '° "le Visit; the Gaiety has ollered then, the whole
ors   183.   Refreshments  were served
during the evening, the new kitchen i ot the S'*03s Proceeds from these two
in   the   Anglican   Hall   proving   Its j nights to nld their local institution.
worth In this respect.   Following are |    Mr,   Bickle   has-  gone   to   much
the    complete    results,    Cumberland 1 trolll)le  ,„  mamre  .,..„  nf th„  i,„,t
, players being mentioned first in each ltr uule  t0 D10cure  two "r u'°  "cst
I respect: pictures possible for these evenings.
|    Robertson nnd Miss Richardson lost j On  .Monday niglit will  be  presented
I to Pollock and Mrs. Falrbalrn, 10-11:   "Tho Savage," starring Ben Lyon and
1 Miss  Robertson  and  Miss  Mort  lost
May McAroy. This play, which has
drawn crowded houses ill many of the
largest cities nnd has won the highest
of criticisms, Is sure to be muoh en-
Ploughing Match Won By J. Murray
COURTENAY, Nov. 17—The ploughing match under the auspices of the
Comox Agricultural nnd Industrial
Association war held on thc fnrm of
Mr. R. U. Hurford on Wednesday.
Ploughing commenced nt ten o'clock,
the large sod field having been marked out the previous day under the
supervision of Mr, E. R. Bewell, of
tlle Dept. of Agriculture. Although
arrangements for thc match were only
made at n late date, the field presented a very busy appearance with teams
nnd traotora going up nod down, turning Ibe furrows. By the afternoon a
good number of spectators were on
hand to sec the finish and hear the
results ns given by Mr. S. J. Holland,
of Royal Onk. the Judge.
The winners In the walking plough
lug match were: John Murray witli
Mr. C. H. Hughes* team, Ilrst; Mr. W,
A. Urquhart, second; and Mr. Edward
Clark, third. Thc tractor ploughing
went to F. Copp with Mr. Urquhart's
Fordson outfit Ilrst, and B. Harvey,
also with a Fordson tractor, second.
After thc match tho judge gave an
cxplunatory talk on how nnd why the
points hod been won, nnd gencrnl
satisfaction seemed to be ln evidence
as to tho awarding of the plnces. A
hearty vote of thanks was proposed
by the Agricultural Association's secretary on tlio grounds, who said that
It was good lo seo a revival of interest In ploughing nnd he hoped that
more time would be taken for preparation for a match next Fall, nnd
that the entries would bo much more
numerous. In the evening a most
Interesting picture show was put on
In the Agricultural hull under the
;iusplces of thc Association and the
co-operation of the Ford Motor Co.
through the local agents (Corfleld
Motors Ltd.) The pictures were most
Interesting both from nn agricultural
and an historical point of view, and
no charge was made for admission.
'to  Mrs.  Cliffe  and  Mrs.  Steel, 1-11J
I Symons aud Stewart beat Thornbert
land 1'lercy, 11-4; Dando and Miss L.
Sheppard   lost   to   James   and   Miss
'Wood, 6-11;   Mrs.  Conway  and  Mrs. I,      ,       , ,   ,        .,   ,
Finch lost to Miss Leitch and Mlssj]oyccl and appreciated by all local
Corker, 5-11;  Bryan and Miss Katie  residents,   When It comes to Tuesday
! Richardson beat Steel and Mrs. Ed- evening we will live again through the
I wards, 11-u; Mumford und Miss Lock- I „,„,ly trlala a„d tribulations of Mary,
hart  beat Corker  and  Mrs.   Pollock,   ..     ,      .        . ,  ,,      ,,
11-10; Robinson and Robertson beat I,ne lleroi"c of one of Mra' ''innces
Pollock and Thornbert, 11-2; Miss C, Hogan Rice's most amusing stories.
Richardson lost to Mrs. Falrbalrn, "Lovey Mary," with Bessie Love In
7-0; Treen and Miss C Carey beat U, u„c r(,,c „,,,, ,,„,,,„„.,„, hv Wnl
James and Mrs. Steel, 11-5;  Miss K. I ,, , , ,,
Richardson  nnd  Miss Robertson  lost  "Bines nnd Mary Alden.
I to Mrs. Cliffe und Miss Corker, 6-11; | In addition to these films will be
Lockhart and Mrs. Conway beat Mr. ■ run Ibe usual news and comic reels.
.Piercy and Miss Leitch 11-10; Mum- u„ ,„ „„ mehUoned, but by „„
ford and Bryan beat Parkins and 1). ! , ,,,
Downey, ll-l; Stevens and Miss Mort means lenst, nre the splendid prizes
beat Parkins and Mrs. Pollock, 11-8; 'to be drawn from the numbers on the
Robinson und .Mrs. Finch bent Mike tickets sold. Whether the holders of
Downey and  Miss  Wood.  11-1;   .Miss ,  , k ,
Sheppard und Miss Richardson lost io '
'• Mrs. Falrbalrn und Mrs. Edwards, ii- j numbers tnko the prizes.
\ 11; Robertson and Miss Lockhart lost ;    Tickets for these two evenings may
I to Thornbert aud Mrs. cliffe, !-H; be prooured from any member of the
Bryan and Miss K, Richardson beat I. ,,„„, ...-.h-.,, „, ,., ,, ,„„,,,. ,,„,
Corker and Mrs. Falrbalrn, U-;i; Les I ,'a,llca Auxiliary of St Josephs Hos-
Dando nnd Miss 0. Carey beat Downey * Pltftl, or ui the box office on Monday
and Mrs. Edwards, 11-8; Stewart and I an Tuesday nights, Nov. 22 and 23.
Symons lost to M. Downey nnd Thorn- \ Prl(.es are th(! „„„,„ os uaimI
bert, 9-11; Treen and Miss Lockhart,
lost  to Steel and  Miss  Leitch, 2-11;
It has been said that the old-time
dances every Saturday night in the
Ilo-Ilo hall would not lie a success-
for the reason that the young people
would not attend. This has been
proved a fallacy, for the younger
generation, who nre supposed to despise barn dances, reels uud circles,
have taken to them like a duck to
water. The crowds at these popular
affairs nre getting larger all the tlm;
nml the enthusiasm is not any more
marked In the old folk than It is i:i
tlle young. Attend tomorrow's dance
from 11:2(1 to midnight und seo for
yourself. Gents., ode; ladies, 10c.
Tho best of old time music is played
by u popular orchestra.
"Main Currents
In Post  War
Europe" Is Theme
Interesting  Address  Given  By
Professor F. VV. Soward
Texada Takes
Its Place In The
Commercial World
Texada, sometimes called the mystery lslnnd. is beginning to uncover
some of ils resources and join the
over increasing number of Industrial
communities on (he British Columbia
coast. Mineral claims and tiniboi
have, in the past, brought the Island
Into prominence, but It has remained
for tlie lime deposits to give it a permanent place In Ihe commerclnl
world.
Snuggled away ou the north end of
Texada Island, at the bend of Blubber
Bay—so called from the fact that a
whaling station was once in operation
(Continued on Page Two)
FOOTBALL CLUB WILL
RUN HOLIDAY DANCES
The management of the Cumberland
Intermediate Football Club has been
successful in securing the Ilo-Ilo hall
on the evenings of December 17th.
24th, and 31st, and on each of these
three Friday nights will bold monster
public dances. Arrangements have
not yet been completed, but It is already announced that the Christmas
Eve dance will be a novelty affair,
while the dance on New Year's Eve
will take the form of a grand carnival. The hest orchestra In the Comox
District   will   be   engaged   for   these
dances, so that patrons tire assured I
COURTENAY, Nov. 13.—The annual
convention of the Comox District
Teachers' Institute opened here last
Thursday night with a remarkably
interesting address by professor F.
W. Soward, of the University of B. C.
The subject of the lecture was "Main
Currents In Post War Europe." Combined with u comprehensive knowledge of his subject, the speaker displayed a keen insight to the future
European and World conditions. The
audience which filled the Booth hall
was very attentive.
Prof. Soward described the colossal
loss of human life In the World War,
wblcb amounted to ton millions, also
pointing out thai an additional ten
millions of the civilian population
were killed through starvation, massacres, air raids, submarine attacks,
etc. The total financial loss had been
837 billions, which li.'iil meant a waste
of $800,000 for every hour of the duration of tlie war. Truth had boon completely knocked out, and a state ot.
propaganda bad been created, result-
"ig In a definite lowering of moral
values. Four nations bad heen dismembered. Montenegro, und Austria-
Hungary had disappeared. Europe
bas only three monarchies left and
has more Republics today than has
South America. Russia, lie considered, would regain her place If encouraged with financial backing und the
necessary stability.
Professor Soward pointed out thnt
tho financial positions of Europe and
America had been reversed. The era
of European domination of the world
was passing, aud the Puciflc powers
wero gaining. lie referred to the rebirth of Poland, which was formerly
j surrounded by three enemy nations,
ns being only possible by a miracle.
Tho miracle bad happened, and at
last Poland, with her three millions
of people, bad been rc-estbllshed. He
explained bow Czecliu-Slo\akla had
come out of the ruins of Autsrta-
Hungary, and is now the pivot of
central Europe.
It was probable that the European
of   nn   excellent   time.
further announcements.
Watch    for
LOCALS l'LAY QUALICUM
states would form a confederation
within the next few yenrs. He referred to the spirit of moral superiority of Ibe United Stntes as a stumbling block to the gaining of the
friendship of Buropoan peoples, and
•otning to be considered
Cumberland  Intermediates  pluy  al
Qualicum on Sunday, and will present ll wa* "ow
the following line-up: J. Walker; Ed. better to be a  good  European  than
Bickle, Marshall; Little, Weir and It. merely a good Frenchman or a good
M^^V^^I0"-*   ™< «— «*-«« <*
above   plnyers,   with   McNeill  ns  re- : I»c-wnr time had changed to nu era
serve, arc nsked to meet at the Royal , of revenge and recompense, in which
Candy at 11:80 Sunday morning.       i inter-allied debts had played an lm-
Nn. 20 Wins Phonograph j POrtant part  and bad been  followed
,,.     ,, ,     „, ,.,   ., ,   . .„.   by the great problem of national sc-
Miss Helen Shearer, with   Icke   20,        ,.,,,,.,
"    „   .,,   ,„ ,     _, .  curlty.   He referred to the sums ask-
won the Portable Phonograph raffled i   , ,
ed from Germany us reparations, as
out of ull proportion of her ability to
I pay. and showed bow. out of necessity
by Ihe Intermediate Football Club.
Armistice Service
At Memorial Hall
the Dawes Plati, which was successful, had been Instituted. He pointed
out tlte Impossibility uf America's de-
imuiiK explaining that (lie American
debt would be n burden on tbe next
two generations of tbe British people
—a thing thai they would not endure.
He hoped thai son;,, day a statesman
would come forward In America broad
enough to show charity to all and
malice to no man, but ut present such
:i one wns nol in sight
In   two   years   time   there   would
probably be called a world conference
i'l r  i be  whole  auoiUon of
reparations,   'flic League of Nations
was tie mosl hopeful sign for world
landmark in
A short and Impressive service was
held under the auspices of the Canadian Legion nt the Memorial Arch on
Sunday. Nov. I4th. lu commemoration
Of Armistice Day. Members of the
City Council were present as well a.i
representatives of the Returned men,
The Boy Scouts nnd Wolf Cubs were
under the charge of Mr, F. Martin, the
assistant Scoutmaster. A large number of citizens were ulso present.
'I in- local band, unjler Mr, Jackson,
played the hymns, "0 Ood, Our Help I to
in  Ages   Past," nnd  "Jesus  Lover ol
My   Soul."   The  prayers  and   lesson
were read by the Rev, E. O, Robathan
and the names ol the Fallen read oul  '"'    I'"''*"'"" "M
by the Rev, .1 I! Hewitt, who nlso j the armed peace, and would be such
gave the address. Mr. Hewitt ro-1In the real peace which was to folium Isiil   that    Armistice   Day   could j |mv
never come round  svitlioul  reminding 	
us of those days of tho Great w.,r      '" ll'1*' " "" '' «"""< <" "urope
Ile,   Iii   his   service   overseas,   bad : had amounted  to 8,788,    In 1U22
brought away some vivid recollections 4,4lY ; In I92E   8,947 , showing
chief amongst thorni being Uie; wonder- 	
till   spirit   in   comradeship   that   bail ' '
prevailed Bmongsl the men, mid theli ! lh'"  Bnrope is disarming,  but the
marvellous optimism even ln the very I situation was nol good enough yet.
Remember there nre three excellent  'larkost days.   It was this '.nine spirit   |s,.,lf  toward thought thai world dls-
■ Lockhart and Miss Robertson lost to I reasons for Investing In these tickets; \ ^oalTllt^teKt"^ carry Ml In the  '"•""■■»""'   v"""'1  """" "*,uut ln ,he
j Pollock and Miss Corker, 2-11; Stev- ; first, enjoy a whole evening's excep- days of peace.   Hu asked that ibis day j yenr II,2S'   Things were distinctly on
ens and Miss Mort beat Jnmea and tlonally good,  wholesome -entortaln- should be one on which our thoughts  the   mend   In   Europe,   with   hatred
| Miss Wood, 11-6.                          I ment;   second, hold  one  or moro of "nd  prayera specially centred  round  dying   down.     For   the   future   thc
'.,        ,    ,      ...               .,        ,     .., those who were bereaved nnd periiiaii- , „„,„,, _. ,„.,, .,,,„„, .,„,, „.,,„„„, ,„,,,_
■        ,                   ,    L     ,.,   is           ! the w nn nir tickets for   he si, em id .,    ,         ,,.,,,     ....       ,..      sp r t of finish tal and n.tionnl toler-
I    In order not to clash with the an-,1"1-  """""'« "L«eiu iu.   me di>i<juusu rhl]y |njlm.,| |„ t|„, Qroll| w.ir  After
Inual Ball of Cyrus Royal Arch Chap-1 prizes to bo drawn;  and third, help the address the Benediction wus pro- »Uon wai all Important   Much also
Iter,  No.   10,  tlio  Invitation  dance  of]out a most worthy and necessary In- nounced nnd the Lust  Post  sounded depended   on  education,     Mr.   II.  G.
j the Imperial Badminton Club will 1)e ■ stitutloii l)y  ^'l'*  Jackson.   Wreaths  from   the \\'(,||s has snid' "It must be rnlnstro-
held on Wednesday, Dec. 1st. " *  City Council, the Ci dlan  Legion,      .    . ,„,„„„,„,,.   ,,,„.,„   the spirit
  the Seouis ami cutis, and relatives 01 ' • 7.
le Bad- ■ LEGION SiMOKER FOR the Pollen, wero placed around the ot   co-operation   waa   essential-the
> Memorial Arch. spirit  of bearing one  nuntbers' bur-
vSATURDAY NIGHT     in the evening a special Armistice lWm
~ , , Day sri-sice wns held In Holy TrinJt]
Club on the courts of the latter at I    The Cumberland Post of the ('una    Church,  which  wus attended by tie
the Imperial Pavilion, Royston. Play U- • - ..,..,....,.  I Veterans,   Scouts   und   tubs.
A  team  from  tho  Parksvllli
mlnton  Club  will  visit  the  district |
tomorrow   (Saturday),  and   will  play
a team from the imperial Badminton I
Mr. G. W. Stubbs, president of the
Teachers' Institute, wus In the chair
will commence nt 2:30 o'clock.
The  event of the Season 1—Moose
Carnival lianco, Friday, Dec. 10th.
The Cumberland Post of Ihe Conn-, ,,
,,     t    ,       ,,,,,, ... Veterans,   Scouts   und    tubs.
dlan Legion will hold ono of Ils popu-   „,„,„ Ulemo o( „,„ BdarBi, was „,,„.  „,,,, „ vorv honrlv v„u, „, t|„„,|ts wn3
inr smokers tomorrow  night   tSatiir-
da
Av
dollar. ($1.00)
r smokers tomorrow  night   [Stttur-  tlve to "Our duty to the dead, to the   m„V(,(| ,,v Ml.   Williain Duncan, which
iv), In the Memorial Hall. Dunsniuir I living, nnd  to tlie unburn."   Mrs.  L. ", ,  . .,   „ ,.   „.  ,„„„„„,„. .
pi.   Admission has been fixed at one   Finch   played   us   a   voluntary.   «ln  waa seconded by School InapMtor J.
illnr. ($1.00). i Plunder's Fleld." jM. Paterson. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 19r6.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY  KIODAY AT CUMBERLAND,  B.  C.
EDWARD W, BICKLE
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 11120.
THE MENACE The week-end list of killed and
injured in automobile accidents
reads like the casualty report after a minor military engagement. There is no legitimate excuse
for the maiming* and .tilling of people and the
loss of property, which happens every week on
the public highways. An analysis of these reported incidents discloses that in almost every
case, the trouble could have been avoided, the injury and damage prevented, by the exercise of
reasonable care,
The unfortunate fact is that practically few
people at all times really do exercise the fullest
measure of reasonable care; and even those who
do bend every energy to protect themselves and
others are in constant danger at the hands of
reckless and irresponsible drivers.
Condonation of these violations of all rules of
prudence, and of most of the restrictive rules of
the law, has reached its limit. Greater safety to
the public, both drivers and pedestrians, must be
assured. Porgetfulness, careless driving, like
ignorance of- the law in perpetration of crime
should not excuse one who indicts injury on person or property through improper use of his car.
Tlie road hog should be made to feel, through
the application of an effective punishment, that
the time has come for him literally to "get in the
clear." The punishment of intoxicated drivers,
and of drivers who make a practice of "stepping
on it," regardless of consequences, should be so
intensified as to make all such menaces to the
public well-being think twice before risking its
infliction. The imposition of a line seems not to
help much in the matter. Add a stiff jail sentence, where deserved, and perhaps we may have
greater security. For the man who injures another and drives off leaving his victim lying in
the road, there should be given the fullest measure of punishment possible under the law. The
man who kills another through carelessness, or
recklessness, or other faults of his own, should
be held to answer to the charge of manslaughter,
and upon conviction be compelled to serve the
maximum penalty for that crime.
EXPERIENCE     There is no doubt that experience is a great teacher, but
what does it teach?
Suffering and failure happen to us for some
good purpose, to be sure, but what is the purpose? Who shall translate the pain of all this
unintelligible world? Poets have to learn in suffering what they teach in song. Only the suffering is always so much clearer than what it teaches them.
After some thousands of years, man still is
guessing at the unsolved riddle of the universe.
The bereft mother today utters her wild cry of
"Why ? Why ?" And is no nearer a solution than
was Eve when she mourned with the dead Abel's
head in her lap.
Art, literature and religion all play upon the
heart strings and awaken those strange currents
of wonder, love, fear and courage that go to make
up life. But the tragedy of mankind is that mosl
of us stumble through our days only to find ourselves at the end of them wondering what it is
all about. Most of us confidently believe that the
answer, postponed through life, will be found
after death.
Experience, it is said, is the best teacher, but
most of us are rather dull pupils.
The safest conclusion is that we are soldiers
under orders and must march here or there, must
tight or bivouac, in accordance with a plan oL
campaign which it is not given us to understand
We are workmen, each doing his part toward the
construction of some great edifice. But we do
not draw the plan upon the trestle board. We
are but laborers by the day.
Fortunately experience at least teaches us, or
the most of us, that if we do our work well, at
least we shall receive our pay at sundown. That
means if we are brave we shall be strong and contented, and that if we learn and keep the rules
in the great game of life, at least we shall have
our part in its pleasures and rewards.
Specials in
Quality Silks
At Campbells'
CHIFFON  TAKEETAS-Most popular
fabric   (or   evening   wear.   36-lnches
wide,
per yard 	
$2.75
SHOT   TAFFETAS   in   lovely -color
combinations in good quality; tomes
in   Mauve and  Silver and   Hose and
Grey, 36 inches wide
per yard 	
$3.95
SATINS ot a rich finish and of splendid draping quality To evening wear
dresses. Comes in black, orange, sky,
pink, peach, white, etc, 'M\ Inches wld
at per yard
$1.95 tg	
$3.95
SPUN SII.K, 29 inches wide. Soft and
reliable silks for evening or dny wear
in white, peach, NMle green, orchid,
helio, sand, navy, cream
etc., at per yard 	
THE STREAM     The daily newspapers are like
FLOWS ON the swift flowing currents of a
river, rushing ever onward.
The deatli of a man of prominence is like dropping
a stone "into the stream. There is a splash, an
eddy of ripples, then the swirling waters close
over the stone and the stream flows on. The
great as well as the small must go down, and
life flows on. None of us would be missed long.
One may drop out of his place, a few friends will
mourn him, a few will notice his absence, and it
will cause temporary sadness.
But in a little while he is forgotten. The life
of the community is like a resistless tide. Notlt
ing can stop it for any length of time. Fires,
floods, storms, epidemics of disease, crime, sorrow and death are but stones thrown into the
stream of life. In a short time the ripples die
uway and the stream flows on.
811.K GEORGETTE C1UEPES in line
weaves and lovely shades in powder
blue, sand, grey, peach, sky, rose, etc
40 inches wide, nt
Per yd. $1.95 lo
$2.50
SILK   CANTON   CREPE—A  splendid
dress fabric in black, "3 inches wide,
per yard
$2.50 to
$4.50
AN  ALL-INCLUSIVE  DEFINITION
Taxation: The process by whicb
money is collected trom the people to
pay the salaries of the men who do
the collecting. The surplus is used
to pay the salaries ot the men the
people elect to decide bow much shnll
be collected from them.
AT THE FIUST STAGE
Jock met his friend Sandy in tbe
street.
"Sandy,*' he snid, "I wonder if you
could oblige me wi' a cigarette?"
"But I thocht you said you'd stoppit
smokln.'?" said Sandy, reluctantly.
"Aye, weel," replied Jock, "Ive
reached the flrst stage. "I've stoppit
buytn'."
TEXADA ISLAND TAKES
ITS PLACE IN THE
rock on Texada Island and a company
is in process of formation, in whicb
residents of the Island are interested,
COMMERCIAL WORLD j '" onen "P a second plant to be located  at   Marble   liny,  close  to  Van
(Continued from Page Oue)
there—Is the plant in* the I'aciiic Lime
Company,   'ilie  plant is one of the
largest on tlie I'aciiic Coast and tlle
largest and must modern iu Canada,
'llie company maintains oliiees in the
cities   of   Vancouver,   San   Francisco
anil Xew Vork.   Its product is shipped
to many American ports, as well as to
Australia, New  Zealand,  llie  Philippine nnd Hawaian Islands.   Economy
of   operation   is   one   of   the   chief
characteristics of the plant and wantage litis been reduced to a minimum,
There are  live  kilns,  und others  iu
the course of construction, producing
six   hundred   barrels  of  lime,  each
weighing list' pounds, iu a day.   The
kilns nie Located almost on tlie shore
line, Uie lime rock is quarried out ofj
a low mountain and the present workings me only u lew feet dlstunt frum
Ihe kilns.   While the supply uf natural lime ruck apparently ls Inexhaustible, siiiuu ol it hns been taken from'
as  tar as thirty-five  feet below the'
level of the sea.    Fluxing material
loi  use in smelting ores is produced
and   much   ol   the   ruck   that  is   too
mall   i'ii   any   other  use  is  Bnaly
ground and iii po ed ot In agricultural centres tor ust  on tho land und tor
poultry gt i'.   in connection with the
plant, b modi ru 11 : mill, capable ot
Hitting  Ihlrty-flvo  thousand  tool   ol
lumber a dny, turns out matorlsl tor
Iht   manufacture   ot   barrels  in   tlie
company's oun cooporngo,   Tbe recti i   Hum Uu  mill is used to innnu-
lai ture power, and all slabs used In
tiie burning process ure kiln dried, us
it bos been tound thai dry fuel gives
bitter  results  than   wet.   Laths  are
also manufactured by this ent. .prising
Iirm.   As lain ami lime nro extensively used In Interior finishing, It can be
readily observed Unit both can be procured to advantage ut Blubber Uny.
Thero ure nearly two hundred persons employed and i um,- picturesque
homes have boon built along the arbutus-lined  bunk^  ui   Uir   bay,   Tlie
Pacific   l.itne   Company   net   ns   tlieir
own distributors, owning the Kings- j
ley   Navigation   Company,   operating
the Canadian Steamers K. D. Kings-
ley und the Undue   A regular service is maintained by those boats between  Blubber Bay,  Vancouver nnd;
otlier coast points,   Mr. li. P, Mather
Is general manager with nn office in
Vuncouver, and Mr. Arnold Wnlker is
plant superintendent.
Thero  uie  other  deposits  of  lime
Anda and about live miles from Blubber Bay. Tbe latter place is six
miles distant from Powell River aud
in almost direct line between tbe
paper town antl Comox.
CREPE DE CHENE—Beautiful quality ciepc de chene. US inches wide and
comes in peach, sand, grey, rose,
blnck. mauve, etc, at (Ps***)
per yard. $1.95 '" ■- «&•«
(TT VELVETS in lovely designs and
tone effects.   36   inches   wide.
SILK   VELVETS  in  alludes of Grey.
Navy. Brown, Alice Blue, Black;  scinches wide, at per yd
$3.00 '"
SPECIAL
Sale of Used Cars
McLAUGHLIN MASTER SIX in perfect     COCA
3
mechanical condition; new Duco paint job....'
CHEVROLET 490 TOURINGS in good con- <I»7E
dition, self-starters, good tires, etc; each..*D I O
5ia>jwawa!*s«a*a»»rt
REPUBLIC 2-TON TRUCK, $QP\ft
Good Rubber; overhauled  «JJt/i)U
(We have a 5-ton Trailer suitable for use with this
Truck.)
CHEVROLET F.B. TOURING, good paint, d»07K
tires, and mechanically O.K tpO I O
5K«»5-**M**a»W»^
McLAUGHLIN 4-passenger COUPE,
Duco finish, runs and looks like new.
;«;.i-a,3»rtKS*»*a*W^
s EASY TERMS ARRANGED
$1000
MANN'S BAKERY
as
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
Delicious Appetizing Dainties.
also
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
Mann's Bakery
Cumberland
:' M*' r.'! '-.*: :*v !> >*,*: "j i7MMSMM^M!>J!!JW^WmTJ-SM
BS'i
You Can 'Phone
To Kamloops Now
A long-distance telephone service is now available
between Kamloops and coast points.   Ask
"Long Distance" for the rates.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
ii ,'u iSiiii jL&i, i*ii ii&ifil iuiiui ill^S&&illl&&iR\w£iiAi^ii sSriiuuair: **S**5j!jj51g
BATON LINGERIE—A largo assortment of beautiful and well-made Rayon undergarments, in Nightgowns,
Step-ins, Princess Slips, Combination j
Step-ins nnd Bloomers. All well-1
made and well finished at special |
prices.
UlUSSIEHES—A  splendid   range  of
Brnssieres    in    popular   styles   and
novelty patterns, all
sizes, at from 75<^ t0
Weeks Motors
Limited
NANAIMO
1 STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
$1.90
LADY'S HATS, dressy nnd ready-to-
wear  styles,  in  Velvets,  Foils,  and
Velours, all specially priced.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
lien's   nnd   Young   Men's   Suits   and
Overcoats,   all   well   tailored,   from:
$17.50 ° $35.00
Phones 4 and 61
nmm.*iti
Cumberland, B. C.
i^A^mS£MM&i-jmfflAV.\
«s
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to'give the best in Material, Workmanship antl
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
r~?
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
fl-
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
BIG SALE
Commencing SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30th, on
Electric Irons, Liberty
Hotplates & Lamp Shades
St35=MHSffl=fffl=ffl3M»!=S3S=SMS^^
Only seven BERSTED Irons left to clear at ea. $1.25
LIBERTY HOTPLATES, to clear at each     3.00
Any Lamp Shade, to clear at each 75
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
i
W. P. Symons
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vis-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Proprietor 0 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1026.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
m
Gaiety Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Eric von Stroheim's" Greed"
Monday, November 22 Ben Lyon in
** A lirtt IlaiioaeT'j 'icture^-u5
Tuesday, November 23 Bessie Love
in "Lovey Mary"
The gross receipts of the programs
for Monday and Tuesday go to
the St. Joseph's Hospital Fund
Wednesday-Thursday, Nov. 24-25
"The Palace Of Pleasures" and
Se«>«Rim;THE 5TORM ESREAKEBVABaiHoHOySE PETE.BS
Friday-Saturday November 26-27
The Dempsey-Tunney Fight
also
!*>2>V
Movies
lO&i—1—1—1—I—1—1—1—1—>—)—>—)—>—I—1—1—)—)—1—1—>-!—>—1—1—>—1—1—1—1—I
Attractions for the
Coming Week
FIND THEIR NATIVE
CITY MILES FROM
WHERE THEY LEFT IT
About a score of homesick Viennese
university students, who are studying
American business methods here,
strolled through the main thoroughfare of Vienna and sat at the tables
of Its foremost cafe the other day,
despite the fact that they were many
thousands of miles from home.
The seeming miracle happened at
First National's Hollywood studios,
when they walked right onto a set
being used by June Mathis for her
production of "The Greater Qlory,
which has Just sheen completed. It
will be shown at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Friday and Saturday of this week.
Miss Mathis welcomed the delegn
tion of Viennese and invited them to
have tea with her at the "Cafe Bristol," famous rendezvous of the gsy
Austrian capital. Miss Mathis had to
apologize for being able to serve only
tea. realizing that at the real Cafe
Bristol much stauncher refreshments
are procurable. However, her guests
owned themselves well satisfied If
only to have gotten a glimpse of their
native cl(y.
In the cast of "The Greater Glory'
are Anna (J Nilsson, Conway Tearle,
May Allison, Ian Keith, Lucy Beaumont and Jean Hersholt.
"DESERT GOLD" COMES
TO ILO-ILO NEXT WEEK
Zane Grey's latest "Western" comes
,to town next week. "Desert Gold,"
as It Is called, will be shown at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre Friday and Saturday,
November 26 and 27.
The picture was directed by George
Seitz, the man who made "The Vanishing American." And lt is only fair
to say, that while "Desert Gold" Is
not done on the enormous scale employed In the former production, it
can be favorably compared without
losing any of its glamour.
A splendid cast has been given the
director and scenarist, Lucien Hubbard, with which to work. Shirley
Mason is a pleasing picture as Mercedes, the little Spanish senorlta; and
Nell Hamilton, the young cavalry
soldier, contributes greatly to the
action. RoheV Frazer, who seems to
have struck his stride, is admirable
as the happy-go-lucky Easterner; and
William Powell makes a dastardly
villain.
Briefly, the story In concerned with
Nell Hamilton who loves Shirley. The
time is the close of the nineteenth
century and the location, this side of
the Mexican border, on the edge of
the Painted Desert. Law and order
is represented by Hamilton, the lieutenant of a small troop of cavalrymen. But the country is over run
with a gang of desperadoes who rob
and kill at will. They are captained
by William Powell.
One day the latter happens to see
Shirley and wants her for his own.
Then when Nell goes off to his patrol,
Powell and a bunch raid the hacienda
and kill her uncle. But Shirley, disguised ns a young boy, escapes on
horseback with her faithful Indian
servant.
They reach town and hide away.
Hamilton discovers what has happened and goes to a hotel, where, If he
shows his uniform, a fight Is sure to
start. At the psychological moment
In walks Robert Frazer, and eastern
friend of Neil. He promises to help
his pal out by aiding In the rescue of
the girl. Then the fun and action begins. And you'll never guess who
wins Shirley until the last minute.
STAR SPORTS NEW FRENCH
BOYISH BOB
Bessie Love, the pocket-edition star
who plays the lead ln "Lovey Mary,"
coming to the Ilo-Ilo next Monday
nnd to the Gaiety on Tuesday, came
from Europe and the Atlantic Coast
to Hollywood recently, displaying the
last word in knock-'em-dead hair cuts
—the "Parisian boyish bob."
ips^s^-pt^i^
Bessie had the locks trimmed by
one of Paris' most noted trimmers.
They collaborated on the design, and
lt Is Indeed unique. She looks for all
the world like a good-looking boy of
about thirteen or fourteen. The
crowning glory is shingled close to
the head, parted on the side and is
slicked down Just like a shiek's.
"The only thing I dislike about lt,"
said Bessie, "Is thst my earB are always getting cold. I would wear ear
muffs only some horrid person would
say I did it just to be photographed."
William Haines supports Miss Love
ln this film
BEN LYON FINDS IT HARD
TO KEEP CHAUFFEURS
OUT OF PICTURES
When it comes to holding chauffeurs in his employ Ben Lyon, First
National featured player, ls one of
the world's most unlucky men!
A year ago Ben had an excellent
chauffeur. Ben liked him and saw to
It that he had a chance to do little
bits and extra work in Ben's pictures,
to please the young man's fancy nnd
Increase his income. One morning
said chauffeur announced lie was
through chaufteurlng—he was going
to devote all his time to the pictures.
Ben secured another chauffeur—a
colored man this time, and he thought
his troubles were solved. Lo. during
the filming ot scenes ln "The Suvage,"
which is coming next Monday to the
Gaiety Theatre and to the llo-llo on
Tuesday, Nov. 23rd, with Ben in the
title role, Director Fred Newmeyer
asked for a big colored man to piny
the part of a cannibal cook. He began to look around and spying Arthur
the chauffeur, he asked for him.
Ben agreed and Arthur broke into
the pictures, but he did not seem to
please Newmeyer, who told him he
was a "third rate cannibal."
"Well, sir," said Arthur, "Mr Lyon
is over there watchin', and he told
me-not to be too realistic. He said
he didn't want to lose another good
chauffeur."
SCREEN STAR ADORES
RAGS AND TATTERS
Nina Romano, in private life Mrs,
Lou Tellegen, who ls sharing llie
feminine honors with Ruth Clifford
ln "The Storm Breaker," in which
House Peters Is starring, has found
ln Judith Nyte a character type which
she has long wanted to play.
During her stage career Hiss Romano says she always seemed doomed
to play the part of thc well-groomed
lady, either the "vamp" or the demure
heroine, but always clad ln the very
height of the fashion prevalent In
whatever period the character happened to be living. When she was
selected to play ln "The Storm Breaker," Miss Romano feared that the
same fate that had followed her on
the stage was going to cling to her in
pictures. Hence sho wus greatly
pleased when the director described
her costume.
"Tho Storm Breaker" will he at the
Gaiety Theatre next Wednesday nnd
Thursday, In conjunction with "The
Palace of Pleasure"
NEW YORK OF 70"S IN FILM
The most romantic period of New
York City's history forms the hack-
ground of "Lights of old Broadways"
Marlon Davies' a Cosmopolitan production for Metro-Goldwyn-Mnyer.
directed by Monta Bell nnil soon to
be seen at the Gaiety Theatre. Conrad Nagel has the leading male role
and the supporting cast Includes a
large number of character artists.
The period of the picture Is lu the
seventies, whon New Vork wns jnst
emerging from the old-fashioned over
grown village class Into n modern
metropolis.
On the same nights (Friday nnd
Saturday, Nov. 20-27) the olllcial pictures of the recent Denipsey-Tunney
prize light will he Bhown nt Iho
Gaiety.
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
Monday, November 22 Bessie Love
■       in "Lovey Mary"
Tuesday, November 23 Ben Lyon
in 'The Savage"
Wednesday, Nov. 24 House Peters
in "Prisoners Of The Storm"
Thursday, Nov. 25 House Peters in
"Prisoners' Of The Storm" also
The Dempsey-Tunney Fight
CHILDREN  25*
ADULTS 50*
Friday-Saturday, November 26-27
Double Program
JAMES OLIVER OJRW00DS
MIGHTY DRAMA OF THE SNOW COUNTRY
WHEN
THE DOOR
■J.
QPENED
DRAMA
OF THE
HANGERS
OFUOVB
dcendtio ly
BRAOLtY KING
REGINAU) BARKER
production
with.
JACQUELINE  LOGAN
ROBERT CAIN
WALTER- Mc GRAIL
FR/VNK. KEENAN
MARfJ/kRET LIVIKCSTOB PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1926.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
RE-UNION HELD
EX- SERVICE MEN'S
COURTENAY, Nov, 13. -The annual
re-union ol" ex-service men of the ilis-
trlcl tooh place in the Agricultural
hall "ti Thursday evening. Mr, W, A
Paul, after giving the word for a two
minute silence, introduced comrade
Lieut.-Col. ('. W. Villiers us i halrman
for the evening. 'Ihe rum Issue in
the form oi a bottle of beer per man
was then nerved and tlie toast "The
King" was proposed hy the chairman,
followed by the old favorite "Pack all
yoar troubles," in which the entire
crowd joined.
"Cook House" was sounded and thc
company fell In to draw rations at
8:45, comrade W. P. Ueavan acting as
orderly officer, with comrade it. K
Ault as orderly sergeant. To the
question, "any complaints?" comrade
li. S. Baker wns Uie only one to
answer in tlie affirmative, and showed
good cause for so doing. Thia resulted in an orderly room case, where
Company Sergeant-Major McMonules
held court, assisted by Q.M.S. J. W.
Hough. The complaint regarding the
rations (beans) was investigated and
finally the run of beans, which had
presented a very lively appearance,
exploded. At this minute comrade II.
K. Midwinter was brought in under
arrest, charged with being absent
without leave.
Soloists   during  tlio   evening   were
, comrades v. W. Tull, a H. Kirk and
Football from p. 1
proved the sensation of the game. His
knack of being in the riglit place at
the right time had Hughie Strachan
completely buffaloed.
ss     ss     ss
Bill Marshall lived up to his reputation of being "the daddy of Ihem all."
Bill was always on deck uud never
made a mis-kirk. Courtenay could
sometimes beat the Cumlierland half
line, init they were up againsl a stone
wall when they came to .Marshall. His
partner, Bickle, played a sterling
game also, the pair making ti back
line hard to beat.
* *   .
Jock Stevenson was in his element
Sunday. McLeod, on tbe riglit wing,
makes a line partner for him and between Uie two they practically broke
through at will. Jusl before the final
whistle, Jock put in a, parting shol
that caught the Courtenay goal-keeper amidships and almost bowled hiin
over.
* ss    *
A number of tans were hoping for
penalty kicks to see if Matt Stewart's
fi :u of last week In stopping two sucli
■hots was just luck or good judgment.
They were disappointed, however, for
Matl handled the ball only three times
nnd booted it  ie.   He had nothing
iu do, except maybe catch a cold.
* •   *
Amelia Damonte played a line game
for Courtenay In tlie opening period,
lint when his wind petered uut like-
wlse did Amelia.
* *     ss
ii un!, A. S. Jones' decisions
were beyond question. Alberni went
wild "ver him l;i-i week. No wonder,
for they had never seen ii real referee
In oi tlo
rCold  Relieved  ^f!§
or Money Back     Nj
.    ■ • -t- men. women und children
ttani relief frnm Coughs
■    I   ■:   .if nil kinds by tiikinn Buck-
1 ■:. orywhen drusrwinta ar«
ii   ng ■ >■;.,:!. -v undor poaltivt bum*
Unto*.    Iii-  lir t   ili'c  provei  how  dlf-
fi || i*i l   '   i ■ nre iu ilnips in a
lt| '.'■■>, r   Ih;   without   this
i , hi ror of colds.
W.   !•;.   Hini.Irv,   Limited,
Ul   Mutual  Bti  Toronto 2
Rtais,  • iimic .ip wo™ u /MSm
B. Hurvey. Alter the Issue of u second rum ration, a tousi was proposed
in the Cumberland Post of Ihe Legion
and nt a later hour as many cars as
possible were requisitioned und about
a hundred of the comrades journeyed
tu Cumberland under the command ot
"Field Marshall" linker, resplendent
iu military uniform, where they were
received by members of the Cumberland Post. After putting his troops
through military drill, Including the
"goose step," the nature of their visit
wits explained, this being found to be
u desire for closer union between the
Courtenay and Cumberland Posts.
The Courtenay contingent was well
received and members were asked to
attend at the memorial service at tiie
arch on Sunday, and at the service to
he held at the Anglican Church In the
evening.
Comrades W. 11. Cooke, J. Hornby,
A. C Slaughter and J. Yates, assisted
by others, were in charge of the com-
mlssarlat,
COURTENAY  NEWS  NOTES
During the week several well-
known people have left for extended
trips. Mr. ill. Lloyd has started for
England, accompanied by his daughter. Nina, He expects to be away
several months. Mr. George Tarbell
nnil Mr, Dan Kilpatrlck are leaving
to connect with the Empresc of Scotland ai .New York for a round-the-
world trip.
.Mr. It. U, Hurford, president of the
British Columbia Dairymen's Association, lias left to attend the National
Dairy Council convention at Toronto.
Mrs. Hurford is accompanying him.
Mr. L. D, Piket has taken over the
business of Messrs. Graham and Mon-
crleff. Mr. Mitchell Moncrleff Is leaving to join his  lamily in Vancouver.
\3   babies
are contented,
well-fed babies.
Three (fenerations
of them have been
nourished on.
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk 9
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE  PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cor.
51 ll und  Dunsmuir.
Phone 122
Cumberland
•TUNAR£)»
TWsV Aiicliiir.llniiuld-iin  *•*    [!
Christmas
SAILINGS
riMMI HALIFAX  in
I'limiitiili. Ilmrc A London
S. S. Antonio D mhor 18.
Bolfnil, then I S Glasgow
8  8, Letltia Ut ci ml 11 12,
FltOll NT. .IIHIV V II- I"
llell'tist. Liverpool A (llnugow
s. 8, Letltia, Decemhi r 11,
[KIMI   Ni:W   IfOIlK  In
Cherbourg A Sontlmniplon
8. s. Berengarla, Daoen her ID,
s  8   Aiiiiliniiiii. December 8,
I'ljniiiulh.        (hcrl rtr,
South tampion
B,  8, Mauretnnla,  December 1.
(jn stown nnd Liverpool
8. s   Bcythla, Deoembor 4,
B, 8  Alaunla, December 11,
Pull   Information    frnm   local
Agents or cunard 8, s. Co., OM
Haattnga St. w.. Vancouver, B.O
P. P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Alain Ollice
Courtenay           Phone 258
Local  Odlco
Cumberland Holel In Evenings.
Telephone   115M  or   24
The Agricultural hall was the scene ;
of a stiff basket-ball encounter oil ]
Saturday evening when the Comox
team defeated the Courtenny High
School boys. A second game between
the Comox players and a scratch
Courtenny team resulted in an easy
win for the former. L. Hardy, of
Cumberland, refereed both games.
MR. GEORGE E. APPS
HEADS COMOX DISTRICT
TEACHERS' INSTITUTE
(Contiuuod from  Page One)
exercises and truck events for public
school  physical  training.
Mr. H. E, .Murray outlined the Up-
Island School sports organization and
suggested some improvements in this
connection.
The election of olllcers for the
coming year resulted us follows: Hon.
President, Dr; s. J. Willis. Supt. of
Education, Victoria; President, Mr,
G. E. Apps, Cumberland; Vice-president, Mr. G. \V. Stubbs, Courtenay;
secretary-treasurer! 'Air. L. Hardy.
Cumlierland.
The following resolutions were
adopted by tlie convention:
(1) That drawing lie removed n,:
an entrance examination subject.
(2) That Governor Generals' medals be awarded on a basis of size of
schools, and not by geographical districts.
(3) That a definite sports programme he substituted for the present physical  training course.
The convention terminated with .a
banquet served by the Ladies Aid of
St. George's I'nited Church und a
social in the Booth hall. A capital
programme was contributed by the
Courtenay, Cumberland, Sandwick
and Royston schools, and was brought
to a close wilii a dance.
OAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
■J1!
EDWARDSBURG
CROWN
BRAN
Vurest and Best
CORN SYRUP
THE CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED - MONTR^L
The Analyst says:
....An excellent
wholesome beer
PORE uiul wholesome beers ure made for fhe
people <if British Columbia by the Amalgamated Breweries. They are vitalizing, refreshing und healthful. McDonald und McDonald,
Analytical Chemists, of Vancouver and Victoria,
in their recent report on beers analyzed by them,
say:
". . . The sn tuples prove to be excellent
beer. Tliey are high in phosphoric acid, while
the acidity is low and the volatile acidity is
practically nil, proof that tlie beer is a wholesome
and nutritious beverage."
BUY   BEliR   BY   THE   CASE   FROM   TIIE
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR STORE.
FREE DELIVERY.
ASSOCIATED In tha Amalgamated Brewer lea of British
Columbia aroi Vancouver Browoflw l.ui., Westminster
iii.vmi. Ltd., Silver .Spring Brewery Ltd., Rainier Brewing
Co. of Canada Ltd., Victoria Phoenix Brewing Co, Ltd.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
1 'ontrol Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
Outward appearance reflects the character of yuur businoss.
BE NOT
MISJUDGED!
Your printing tells others what you
think of yourself and your business.
It is to your advantage to seo that
the impressions created are not ail-
verse. Be particular about your
printing. Have it done by particular
printers.
The CUMBERLAND
ISLANDER
TELEPHONE 86
CUMBERLAND
Impressions are formed Hint Influonce yuur future relations.
^v^i'vi'WJi'srsviOHn:^?^
if
SATURDAY SPECIALS       j
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY     [
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi  Bros.
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
1
CUMBERLAND
TAILOR
MEN'S and LADIES' SUITS
MADE TO MEASURE
Through   years   of  experience   we
know  liow   to   lit  you,   how  you
should wear your clothes—and we
aro ready lo serve you.
CLEANING    —     PRESSING     —     REPAIRING
We are specialists in this line and guarantee your
Clothes to look like new when returned.
£. Aida, Merchant Tailor
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
33
'.\ "il^*0i i**1!'.'**.
cy*::':;"R
Jimmy Walker and his
'Paramount' ORCHESTRA
—NOW OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENTS—
Orchestras supplied for all occasions Including old-llmo dances
Phone 153L & 47M Cumberland   or    181. Courtenay
uSxiuTiXiiiliJiif„TlfffiJ' >j*»»*IWg%WsWI*M^ FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
The Discriminating
Housewife
Demands Reliable Products
Goods that have merited the confidence of the
purchasing public—
COMOX POTATOES "look for the tag on the bag.
COMOX CREAMERY EGGS.
COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM.
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER.
COMOX WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR.
CUMBERLAND MEN'S CLUB
Last Tuesday night there came our
way.
The Cribbage team of Union Bay,
All ready for the light;
Last Tuesday night there went away
The Cribbage team of Union Bay
Expressing tlieir delight;
Alas!  Alack!  we rue the day
When we were swamped by Union Bay
And fell liefore their might;
But someday we will have OUR say,
Tbe Athletic Club will come our way.
We will THEIR record blight!
And Bevan too we will waylay
When we go over there to play,
Ou some  fine  winter's  night.
But we should worry, win or lose,
To play tho game is what we choose,
And do just what is right!
i:,:
The Fall Of
The Mighty
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BREAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
JOHN INGLIS 1
; The Practical White Tailor |
! 29R —PHONE— 29R
COURTENAY, B. C.
A smiling round dozen of Cribbage
fans from Union Bay drew first blood
in   the   Cribbage   tournament   when
they  visited   the   Cumberland   Men's
Club lust Tuesday and swamped the
local team by 22 games to 14.    It was
| the first game In the season and there
was a splendid turn-out of members
j to see the fight.   Union Bay brought
. over with them some young fans who
are just beginners, so it augurs well
' for the Union Bay score card if the
: same speed of winning can be kept
' up through llie season.
|    Ou Wednesday evening the Athletic
■ Club had as their guests the Bevan
i tenm, but the latter were not as fortunate as the Union  Bay champions
and only notched 13 points to their
opponents  23.   The  contest  will get
more interesting and keener  as  the |
season  advances,   and   rumor  has  it |
that the Men's Club do not intend to j
he at thc bottom of the list.   The next I
games are scheduled for December 1,1
when the Athletic Club play at Bevan
and the Men's Club at Union Bay.
Dempsey-Tunney Fight Pictures at
Courtenay, Fri.-Sat., November 26-27
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONFS lN'Bht C""9: 134X Courte,my
i nurifin   0fflco, 1B9 Cuml,erlana,
SYNOPSIS or
LANDACTAMENDHENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over ls years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land,'' copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lauds, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only laud suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ls uot timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 fceUper acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can bo obtained from tho Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
live years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information seo
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lauds, not being timberluntl,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is (5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further information regarding purchaso or Iouko
of Crowu lands ln given In Uullet.si
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may he purchased or leased, the conditions      Including      payment      of
; stumpage.
JIOMESTEAB LEASES
I    Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
j acres,  may  be  leased us  homesites,
! conditional   upon   a   dwelling   being
I erected in the lirst year, title being
1 obtained    after   residence   and    lin-
Iprovement conditions aro fulfilled and
'land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For   grazing   and   Industrial   purposes areas not exceeding 010 acres
may  be  leased  by one person  or  a
company.
GRAZING
Under tbo Grazing Act the Province Is divided into grazing districts
and tlie range administered under u
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued baaed on
numbers ranged, priority bring given
to established owners. Stock-owners
mny form associations for range
management. Freo, or partially froe,
permits arc available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to len
head.
P.-T. MEETING ON MONDAY   ymz^jmmzVF-'j^'miiMM,
The regular monthly meeting of tho    B I~\ D /~\ Q C'
Parent Teachers' Association will bo   g L/1\ KJkJkJ
held in the School ou Monday, Nov.   a|
22nd„ at 7:30 o'clock. This month's §j FROM THE MELTING POT
meeting was postponed for one week
making it the fourth Monday Instead
of the third, so that many of the folk
who attend the various lodges on thai
night may be present, Mrs. Banks
will address the meeting, giving an
account of the Provincial convention
of School Boards, which took place
recently at Vernon. Everyone Is Invited to be present, and take an interest in the community work of our
schools.
— THANKS
Tlie staff and pupils ol the Cumberland Public School wish to take this
opportunity to thank all those who
helped with the Afternoon Tea ami
Sale of Home Cooking and Candy ln
the .School on Friday, Nov. 5th. The
contributions exceeded our expectations, and the attendance, In spite of
inclement weather, completed the success. For such splendid co-operation
between homo and School we are very
grateful. The proceeds will be put In
the hands of the financial committee
of the P.T.A. Sports and Grounds
committee, and will be spent on sports
equipment, etc., tor the use of the
pupils of the Public School.
Since Ihe School tea was held, the
Japanese, through Mr. Aoki, of the
Japanese School, have made a donation to the sports fund of $25.00. This
sum is made up of voluntary contributions of $1.00. Such help and cooperation Is greatly appreciated.
GEORGE E. APPS,
Principal.
Kiiiiiiii'bil Statement of Tea Held
November lith
RECEIPTS i—
Afternoon Teas  $42.75
Home   Cooking     31.60
Candy     23.05
$98,00
EXPENSES:—
Tea and Sugar  $ 1.80
Printing     4.75
Balance   91.45
iflKIMI
BASKETBALL MEETING
A Wonderful home treatment
for the healing of varicose ulcers,
running sores, eczema, etc. while
working. Write for particulars to
Nurse Dencker, lilu'.i: Portage Ave.,
Winnipeg, Man.
Mrs. H. David, llheln, Saskatchewan, writes: "1 just want to thank
you for the medicine received a
year and a half (1%) ago approximately und for the wonderful help
il has been to me. After I received
the medicine, I only used it 14
days, following the rules to the
letter, and my legs wore healed.
Thanking you for your kind assistance. You huve my permission to
uso my leiter for advertising and
If it will "help others like it did mc
I am sure their thanks will be just
as sincere.*'
All those Interested in Basketball
please attend the meeting that ls to
be held on Sunday, Nov. 21st, at 7:30
p.m. at the Athletic Club.
IN MEMORIAM
In  loving memory of Mrs.  Sophia
Lobley, who departed this life, Nov.
22nd. 1925.
Just a thought of sweet remembrance.
Just a memory fond ond true,
Just a token of affection
And a heartache still for you.
Inserted by her sister-in-law and
brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Farmer.
Si TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK  FOR CHARLIE  DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets  boat at  Union   Bay.
In the kitchen of a lonely hut in
the hIslands of Scotland, toward dusk
of a dreary day, the head of the house,
sits on a stool before the fire, his
bootless feet In the oven, his chin on
his breast, his eyos drooping shut.
Behind him, across the- cheerless
room, his wife rummages among the
crockery. She drops a pan. The
noise rouses her mate. He lifts his
head. .
"What're ye seekin'?" he demands.
"Naething," says she.
He heaves a sigh and his head drops
again. "Ye'll not find it there," he
mutters drowsily, "it's in the jug
where the whiskey was."
SOME 1'ltlNTKK
■    (By Heck.J
.May 1 prim a kiss on your lips," I
said,
And she nodded her sweet permission,
So  we  went to  press  and  I   rather
guess,
We printed a full edition.
"One edition is hardly enough,"
Said she,  with a charming pout,
So again on the press the form was
placed,
And we got some extras out.
The MILLIONAIRE'S SECRET
To be u millionaire, a man must not
only get rich; he must be able to
stay rich. A certain well-known millionaire, when asked how he stayed
rich, said: "1 invest my money in
sound, established  companies."
That man has learned a valuable
secret. But a man's money, however
much he has, is never worth so much
to him as his mind, his intelligence.
Has it ever occurred to you tnat you
should invest your intelligence just as
carefully as you invest your money?
Why not invest your intelligence in
a sound company by subscribing to
the Youth's Companion? It is the
oldest magazine for young people in
the world—and nearly the oldest of
all American magazines. It is also
one of the most interesting. Pract-
cally every famous author of the past
hundred years has written at one time
or another for the Companion. Only
this fall, for example, tiie Companion
published a new story by Jack London. Do you like stories of adventure? Mystery? Romance? They
are all  in the  Youth's Companion.
Here are the terms of an investment
guaranteed to be profitable:
1. The   Youth's   Companion—52   is
sues in  11*27 aud
2. The remaining issues of 1926.
All for only $2.
3. Or   include   McCall'S   Magazine,
the monthly authority on
fashions. Both publications for
only $2.50.
,THE YOUTH'S COMPANION
S N Dept., Boston, Mass.
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
STANDARDINE   (PrTP
5  TUBE   RADIO   *P I D
Coast to Coast—No idle boast
400 Installed lu  Biltmore Hotel,
New York.
D.X. Engineering & Sales Co.,
Ltd.
20 Bloor St. W.
Toronto
>^«'4.'ti'i'i;'i',-.'|'.".'i',i'4.'"'4.*-'i'.'•i'.';'|*,-',-,-,'i*.-.*i'.-,*^*"*i'ti*yi^'-'o''"(>'"
M
I Cumberland Supply Store
•**■">:• Rickson't Old Stand Dunsmuir Ave.
lis aatiHBsaftMBWiaHBsewaB^
Jj| Our Prices for this week-end arc as follows:
If QUALITY GOODS ONLY
tJ Heinz Tomato Soup. 2 for  $ .25
m Vuii ('limp's Pork nud Beans, 2 for 25
■M Rogers Golden Syrup, 2's,  20
$$ Clark's Potted Meats, 8 for  25
M Heinz Tomato Ketchup  35
Jjl Libby's Tomato Ketchup  24
re Blue Ribbon Tea, per pound  75
;j| Regal Table Salt. 2 for 25
^js) Heinz Worcestershire Sauce, large bottle,  45
H C. & B. Malt Vinegar, 26-OZ. bottle  40
f|| Rowntrees Cocoa, per tin  27
H Fry's Cocoa, per tin  : 29
i!j| Quick Quaker Oats (China)  45
'$& Toilet Paper (5 for  25
S Non-Such Stove Polish, per bottle  20
$' Canada Corn March, 2 for  25
|§ Unwrapped Apples, per box  1.76
•H Grape Fruit, each '. 10
iH Lemons, per dozen  30
jj| Good 5-String Brooms, each    .85
m
'i;'.-; SBr=tt'rW»'*3CB«HeHW3H»aBBBB
M CUMBERLAND Sl'I'I'LY STORE Phone 155
f'K'
iii "Dulldlng for Greater Service"
i
■jpilJSIiiys*^
GtoERberlaqd
•Hotel
ACCOMMODATION TIIE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MEI1I1IFIKM), Prop,
fflEMEHSISEISIE
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Hoora offers good food,
good  service,  reasonable  charges.
[King George Hotel!
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Oppoalte llo-llo Theatrn
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & ll.iinireBscr
Ladies' hair cut, any style 60c
Children's hair cut any style 35o
UNION   HOTEL
sl'iiniliiTluml, II. ('.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone 15
Phono 16
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Offlce Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite llo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19, l»r6.
SALE OF
MILLINERY
For Saturday we will have on display some very
special values in Ladies' ready-to-wear Hats. We will
have laid out our complete stock of Millinery at greatly
reduced prices.   Take your choice.   Three Prices:
$3.95,  $4.95,  $5.95
Some real smart Millinery Models in the latest Velvets.
MEN'S NEW FALL SUITS AND OVERCOATS—
Our. stock of Men's new Suits is very complete, and we
invite you in to inspect our Special Worsted Suits at
$29.50 a suit, that we guarantee to give you satisfaction. Smart designs and the colorings are very good.
Give us a trial for your next suit.   Priced at $29.50
***WS'*---*s«K**3^^
FALL OVERCOATS—
We have lately received a shipment of Coppley, Noyes
& Randall's newest in Men's and Young Men's models.
They are real Overcoats, everyone a winner, and the
quality will sure give satisfaction. The tailoring is
up to their usual standard.   Special Prices:
$25.00, $29.50, $32.50
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr. J. M. Patterson, Inspector of
Public Schools tor district No. 3, was
a visitor during tlie past week.
* ss     ss
Mrs. E. L. Saunders, who has beeu
spending u vacation in Nanaimo, returned to her home last week-end.
* ♦     ss
Mr. Edward W. Bickle spent a lew
days in Vancouver during the past
week In a business capacity.
ss      ss     *
Mr.** Val Dalby. who has been spending some time assisting in the harvest
fields in the vicinity of Edmonton,
returned to .his home during the past
week.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. J. Robertson returned to his
home in Cumberland on Saturday last
after spending a considerable time
in Saskatoon.
* *   *
N Mr. and Mrs. James Murray, Dunsmuir Avenue, returned on Sunday last
after visiting the annual show of the
show resulting. Mr. Murray had instates that the show was one of the
best ever held in the hub city, over
110 dogs being benched, a three point
show resulting. Mr. Mpurray had intended showing one ot his famous
Wiro Haired Fox Terriers, but at the
last moment decided to show him
later on.
ss     ss     ss
ADDED  ATTRACTION   AT   ILO-ILO
In addition to the splendid picture
"The Greater Glory." showing at tlie
llo-llo tomorrow night, the management has engaged the services of a
first-class live piece orchestra. This
is an added attraction for tomorrow
night only.
* *   *
Deputy Supreme Commander, Mrs.
Lora Baker, visited the local review
of W. B. A. last Friday evening. During the meeting Mrs. Baker gave an
interesting and instructive address on
the work and aims of the order—tlie
strongest women's organization in
existence. At the close of the meeting, a social and program were much
enjoyed, Mrs. Hudson giving a pianoforte solo and Mrs. Davis a humorous
reading. Mrs. Baker was the recipient of a small gift from the order.
* #      ss
Mr. and Mrs. S. Alexander and family, of Lako Cowichan, and Mrs. M.
Hemmingsen and children Marie and
Bobby, motored to Cumberland 'Wednesday last and were the guests of
Mrs. Margaret Mitchell, mother ol
Mr. Alexander and Mrs. Hemmingsen.
The party left this morning and will
motor straight through to Victoria.
ss     *     ss
On Wednesday, 24th, the regular
meeting of Court Bevan. A.O.F., will
be held. All members are requested
to attend as this also will be a special
meeting of the Court.
Miss J. Balagno, who recently
underwent an operation in Vancouver,
returned to her home In Cumberland
on Saturday morning last. Her many
friends will be pleased to know that
she Is much Improved in health.
«     ss     ss
Mr. J. W. Jago, who has been relieving nt the Cumberland 'branch of
the Royal Bank of Canada during the
absence of MIsb J. Balagno, left for
Victoria on Tuesday morning last.
*      ss     *
The Juvenile branch of tiie Ancient
Order for Foresters are holding a
whist drive after the meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 23rd. at 8:15 p.m. Charge
for whist drive, 25 cents. Everybody
welcome. Members are requested to
attend the meeting and bring refreshments. Any boy or girl is eligible
for membership from 7 years to 16
years. Those wishing to join the order may obtain application forms
from the secretary or memiiers on
Tuesday night at 6 p.m. Benefits an;
sick and funeral, namely $3 per week
for sickness and $40 at death. The
initiation fee Is $1.00 and dues -lin- per
month. Come along, boys and girls,
join now!
*    *    *
Mr. Archie Lockhart. who went to
Vancouver last week to visit an eye
specialist, Is still in the terminal city.
It was found that au operation was
necessary, and although this was performed yesterday morning it is not
known yet if the sight of the eye has
been lost. Mr. Lockhart was struck
by a piece ot flying steel last week.
Llie shaving making a small gash near
the pupil of his eye.
ss     ss      *
Mr. Mitchell Moncrleff, well-known
Courtenay business merchant, has
disposed of his business and is now
resident in Vancouver. Mr. Mon-
crlelf is an enthusiastic goiter, and
for some time haa been club captain
of the Courtenay Golf Club, the members of which tendered him a farewell
banquet in the Riverside Hotel last
Friday night. Mr. Thomas Graham,
of Cumberland, was elected to take
the position of club captain left vacant by iVJr. Moncrleff.
AT HOME THURSDAY
Rev. John R. and Mrs. Hewitt will
be at home to their friends Thursday.
November 25th, from 3 to 6 o'clock.
The Women's Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Church held a very successful
whist drive and social evening last
Friday evening In theParishHall. The
winners of the prizes were: Ladles,
Mrs. Wilcock and Mrs. Conway,
Gentlemen: Mrs. Symons and Mr. H.
Treen. After refreshments were served, the evening was spent ln games
aud old time dances.
New Orthophonic
VICTROLA
Style 47
Price, $160.00
It is beautifully finished in mahog.'iny or walnut, and
equipped with a powerful motor, which plays for ten
minutes without rewinding,
The case is built with the same sound transmission
device which is used in the larger Orthophonic Vic-
trolas. As a result a marvelously clear and natural
reproduction, so perfect that instruments like the harp
and drum can now be heard for the flrst time.
TERMS ARKANGED
Lang's Drag Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
AA
The Carnival of Carnivals- -Friday,
December lolli.
The following "ml." wns taken from
a Vancouver daily of recent date:
IESS0NS 1> THE* (IAJIK OK fill,!-
HAIsK, taught by an expert. s\pply
F. J. D.. Cumberland, B. C. Twelve
thoroughly trained assistants.
NOTICE —
I FOH SAIsE—-5-Room House, corner of
j .Maryport Ave. and Second St.. Cum-
! berland. Apply J. J. Potter, nt the
|    "J. J." Cafe. Cumlierland.        47-48
ON AND AFTER DECEMBER 1ST
1926, all repairs, etc.. will lie for cash
only.
E. L. SAUNDERS,
Family Shoe Repairer.
Dunsmuir Ave.
Nov. 1(1. 11128.
PUPPIES FOB SALK-Purebred English Springer Spaniel puppies. Par-
1'iitii good hunters and prize winners. .Males, $20.00; females, $16.00.
Apply Box 01, Union Bay. 48
WANTED—Wo   waut   cars.   If   you
j    have a car and need cash, write or
I    call   n.  C.   Motor  Exchange  Ltd.,
1062 Fort St. Victoria, B.C.     t.f.n.
I, t.Vi .:i) -To hear from owner of
good Farm for sale. State cash
price, lull particulars. D. F. Bush,
Minneapolis, Minn. 44-48
Delegates from this district to the
Conservative convention next Tuesday
at Kamloops have been selected as
follows:
Courtenay: Messrs. Wm. Duncan.
M. S. Stephens and J. N. McLeod;
Cumberland: Mr. D. R. MacDonald
and Dr. E. R. Hicks; Comox: Mr. and
.Mrs. J. -McKenzie; Royston, Major A.
M. Hilton; Denman Island. Mr. Gavin
Russell; Quathinski Cove: Mr. W. E.
Anderson; .Menzies Bay: .Mr. H. Lamb
with Mr. W. E. Wastell representing
Alert Bay. Tbe delegates will leave
mi Monday's train for Kamloops, and
although tliey have not been instructed as to their candidate for the
leadership, tlie Comox Argus seems to
think that the majority have n preference for Mr. Leon Ladner.
*      ss      *
The final stages of the Mutrle cup
golf tournament have been reacfcdd,
with Mr. T. Graham out in the finals
en the one side, while on the other
Bide R. G. Laver and R. B. Dixon have
to play off to meet T. Graham, Jr.
Mr. Laver and Mr. Dixon are both
from Courtenay, while the Grahams
arc from this city, so that the tournament has devolved Into a battle between Courtenay and Cumberland.
|  " Cumberland  soccer  fans  won't  be:8=(MHH»5SS!=»ese^^
| able to sec their team in action on
! Sunday unless they go to Qualicum.
As that is out of the question, why
| not go to Courtenay and see the home
team there battle ngainst West Coast
United?   It should he a good game.
*   *   *
Mr. Thos. It. Jackson. Inspector of
Mines, was a visitor to Cumberland
last week.
BODY OF VANCOUVER
MAN IS RECOVERED
The body of M. O'Brien, who was
employed as a cook on the fishing
boat "B.U.," and who fell into the
waters of Seymour Narrows about
two weeks ago. waa recovered Saturday last by the Joyce Brothers, who
were returning after a fishing trip.
The body was found in almost the
same place as the unfortunate man
met his death.
The deceased, who was a resident
of Vancouver, leaves a wife and five
children to mourn his loss.
A Personal Test
The importance of the
many recent improvements in Dodge Bros.
Motor Cars, justifies
us in urging everyone
prospective buyers or
not, to see and drive
the car.
At Once
Touring Car   $1345
Coupe    $1410
Sedan    $15:50
.Special Sedan   $1720
Delivered Courtenay
Prices Include Spare Tire, Tube, Tire
Cover and nil equipment on Special
Models.
PIDCOCK & McKENZIE
Phone 25 COURTENAY Phone 25

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