BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Nov 5, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342591.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342591.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342591-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342591-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342591-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342591-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342591-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342591-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342591-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342591.ris

Full Text

Array .W
At
TK, CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 45.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1926.
-57
Agfe, SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
School Report
For The Month
Of October
During the month Div. 1, Entrance
ClasSi Mr. Murray teacher, had a perfect attendance—no lates or absentees
and In honor ot the occasion a class
photograph was taken.
For the third time in succession
the Chief of Police has sent a congratulatory letter to the pupllB of the
School, complimenting them on their
exceptionally good behavior at Hnl-
lowe en. We are glad that the pupils'
behavior ls appreciated and appreciate
the olllcial recognition of it.
OEO. E. APPS, Principal.
DIVISIONAL REPORTS
DIv. 1.—No. on roll, 29; lates, 0;
percentage of attendance. 100..
Honor roll—Mlnoru Tahara, Tadao
Dol, Sadako Iwasa, Isabel Brown,
Beatrice Cavallero, Oswald Reid.
H. E. MURRAY, Teacher.
DEMPSEY - TUNNEY   FIGHT
PICTURES TO BE SHOWN
IN CUMBERLAND
llo.llo on Thursday, November 25th,
nnd Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay,
on November 26-27
The management of the Ilo-Ilo and
| Gaiety Theatres beg to announce that
J they have secured at enormous ex-
; pense the authorized and olllcial plc-
i tures of the recent Dempsey-Tunney
fight. The pictures will be shown In
Cumberland on Thursday night, Nov.
25th, at a price nf 25c for children
and SOc for adults. To give all a
chance to see these pictures a special
show will be held on Flrday morning,
November 26th, commencing nt 10:30.
Friday and Saturday nlghtB the pic-
lures will be shown at the Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay.
DIv. 2—No. on roll, 35; percentage of
attendance, 96.19; lates, 0; perfect
attendance, 25.
Honor roll, Grade 8—Hatsuml Muja-
hraa, Matsoyo Abe, Magnus Brown,
Roslna Thompson, Thomas Robertson,
Rudy Bonora. Grade 7—Cazuko
Iwasa, Nina Shields? Muriel Partridge.
Catherine Brown, Sbcllab Conway,
Cyril Davis.
T. A. GALLIVAN. Teacher.
DIv. 3—No. on roll,'34; lates, 1;
perfect attendance, 20; percentage ot
attendance, 91.05.
Honor roll—Norlo Herose. Mary
Small. Alden Francescini, Takeru
Kawaguchi, Hlroshl Okuda. Archie
Welsh.
C. MacKINNON. Teacher.
DIv. 4—No. on roll, 34; perfect attendance, 19; lates, 3; percentage of
attendance, 96.08.
Honor roll—Klyoko Abe, Willie McNaughton; Clinton Harrison, Alfred
Jones; Choo Foo Lung, Donald Graham.
V. J. ASPESY, Teacher.
Div. 5—No. on roll, 31; lates, 3;
perfect attendance, 21; percentage of
attendance, 94.1.
Honor roll, Jr. 6—George Snlto,
John Earl Bannerman, Barbara Martin. Sr. 5—Lem Hing, Jackie Morrison, David Hunden and Johnny Robertson, equal.
E. C. HOOD, Teacher.
Div. 6—No. on roll, 41; lates, 0;
perfect attendance, 32; percentage of
attendance, 97.04.
Honor roll. Gr. 5 Jr.—Rhoda Walton, Madge Bryan, Josie Wong. Gr.
4 Sr.—Ada Tso, Elizabeth Brown.
Alice Brown.
B. M. BICKLE, Teacher.
Div. 7—No. on roll, 37; lates, 0;
perfect attendance, 31; percentage of
attendance, 98.7.
Honor roll, Sr. 4—Audrey DeCouer.
Kiso Sora, Teruko Kiyonaga. Jr. 4—
Haruo Nakano, Wong Ying, Jean
Dunslre.
E. M, HOOD, Teacher,
DIv. 8—No. on roll. 40; lates, 4;
perfect attendance, 28; percentage ot
attendance, 95.1.
Honor roll. Jr. 4—Rose Marocchi,
Tommy MacMillan, Mary Baird. Sr.
3—Freddy Martin, Lily Tobacca, Mlt-
suru Herosi.
O. McFADYEN. Teacher.
Div. 9—No. on roll, 43; lates. 4;
perfect attendance, 26; percentage of
attendance, 88.54.
Honor roll, Sr. 3—Gladys Collings,
Susumi   Uchldn.   Mabel   Somerville.
Jr. 3—Masako  Iwasa, Hanuyo Naka-
yulchl, Jean Somerville. Betty O'Brien.
C. CAREY. Teacher.
Div. 10—No. on roll, 37; lates, 2;
perfect attendance, 24; percentage of
attendance, 96.58.
Honor roll, Sr. 2—Horuheko Tateishi, Lem Quia, Masaka Hara. Jr. 2—
Albert Hicks, Keen Mali, Norma Cav-
ellero.
P. HUNDEN. Teacher.
Div. 11—No. on roll, 38; lates, 1;
perfect attendance, 14; percentage of
attendance, 89.8.
Honor roll, Jr. 2—Kensle Uenohu,
Tltsuo Aokl, Uerlle Marshall. Sr. 1—
Dorothy Lobley. Lizzie Baird. Graham
Holland and Marcus Grant, equal.
J. E. ROBERTSON. Teacher.
Div. 12—No. on roll. 28; Inles. 0;
perfect attendance, 22; percentage of
attendance, 95.75.
Honor roll, Gr. ln-Mnb Hoi, Annie
Tong, George Ognkl. Gr. lb—Mlnoru
Uchida, Hideo Mnisukura. Sawako
Ikegaml.
C. RICHARDSON. Teacher.
DIv. 13—No. on roll,'40; lates. 3;
perfect attendance, 21; percentage of
attendance, 93.0.
Honor roll—Evelyn Stacey. Dennis
Shields, Christine Robertson, Guy
Curwen. Hazel Gordon, Hugh Strach-
EVA G. DRADER. Teacher.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Hard Time Dance given hy the
Badminton Club nt Headquarters on
Saturday, Nov. 6th, Jacks Melody
Joy Boys in attendance and llnest
coffee In the district. It will be well
worth your while to come as we will
assure you of a good time.
Retiring Manager
Honored At A
Farewell Social
The .Memorial Hall last Saturday
presented a bright and lively appearance on the occasion of the farewell
social tendered to Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
Walker by employees of No. 4 Mine.
The early part of thc evening was
devoted to cards, winners of the magnificent prizes donated being: Ladles'
first, Mrs. McKenzie; ladles' second,
Mrs. McNeill; gents' Ilrst, Mr. G.
Healy; second^ Mr. A. Lobley. A
short concert followed the cards, the
best of local talent entertaining the
assembly, with well-rendered vocal
and musical selections. Mr. A. J.
Taylor was In the chair and during
the progress of the concert called a
halt for a specific purpose.
"Ladles and gentlemen," he said,
"we are gathered here tonight to do
honor to Mr. William Walker, who
has just recently resigned his position as manager of s\o. 4 Mine. During the several years of his management he created a prestige which has
been responsible for tills gathering
tonight, and when Mr. and Mrs.
Walker move to new fields of endeavor, we sincerely hope that they will
have the best of success and continued
good health." On behalf of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association he presented to Mr. Walker a
fountain pen and pencil set.
Mr. Taylor then called upon Dr. G.
K. MacNaughton to say a few words.
The genial Doctor paid a glowing
tribute to Mr. Walker, and during the
course of his remarks, which were
interspersed with bubbling humor,
Dr. MacNaughton sketched the football history of "Big Bill" and how he
come to be known as the "penalty
king," saying thnt when goalkeeper
Walker got between the goal posts
thero was no room for a hall to pass.
On behalf ot thc employees of No. 4
Mine he had much pleasure ln presenting to Mr. and Mrs. Walker a
handsome fitted travelling bag each,
and us a sort of a side gift to Mr.
Walker from his colleagues at No. 4
a suitably filled wallet.
Mr. Walker, oil rising to reply, was
visibly affected. He thanked them
sincerely for their kindness to Mrs.
Walker and to himself, and no matter
whore he roamed In the years to come
he would always remember with a
kindly feeling the many good friends
he had left in Cumberland.
Refreshments were served and after
ull had been satisfied, dancing was indulged In until midnight, to music
supplied  by Plump's Orchestra.
BADMINTON STILL
POPULAR INDOOR
WINTER GAME
Badminton, locally, is still as popular as at the commencement ot the
season. Two clubs are operating In
the city, one at the Anglican Hall and
the otlier in tho old Grace Methodist
Church. The Imperial Club at Royston is si ill going as strong as ever,
and some really excellent players are
being developed. II is no secret at
all, that the silverware which Will be
competed for In the new yenr will
llnd new resting places, with probably
the exception Of the ladles' singles
trophy.
The Imperial Badminton Club will
forsake badminton on the night ol
Friday. November 26lh, as ll Is Intended to' hold a large invitation
dance at the Pavilion, Royston, on
thut evening.
Jlrrmsttee Ttfty
fmuir K0II
John Anderson,
S. Cameron,
S. Connors.
T. Carrlck,
John Glover.
A. Haywood,
E. W. Jackson,
J. Milligan.
J. Mcintosh.
For Cumberland and District
A. Pickard,
J. Spears,
D. Woldon,
J. Whyte,
William Wright,
C. T. Armstrong,
Wm. Campbell,
J. Dempsy,
J. M. Gillespie,
W. Halcrow,
Harry Hilller,
T. Matsumura,
J. Mclnulty,
R. Norman,
A. Slaughter,
Harry, Urquhart,
Albert Ward,
B. Williamson,
M. Yamada.
Principal Apps
Granted First
Class Certificate
Local Intermediates [Head
Second Division League
Second Division League Standings
Goals
P. W. L. D. F. A. Pts
Cumberland    3   2   0   1 11   3   5
West. Coast U... 3   2   1   0 13   2   4
Courtenay   3   1115   5   3
Qualicum   3   0   3   0   1 20   0
HAY.SEED BALL TONIGHT
After woeks of preparation und
boosting, the big Hayseed Ball under
the auspices of the district Welsh
Society will be held tonight In the
Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall. Cumberland.
First-class music and prizes for the
best Hayseed costumes.
OLD TIME DANCES AT
ILO-ILO DANCE HALL
ARE WELL RECEIVED
The old time dances being held nt
the Ilo-Ilo dance hall every Saturday
night are being exceptionally well
received. Large turnouts have been
the order so fnr. and with the music
In the capable hands of Bob Goodall's
orchestra there Is no reason why the
attendance should diminish. Remember this Saturday night nt the Ilo-Ilo
dance  hall.   Gents,  50c;   Indies,  10c.
Cumberland Is sitting pretty at thc
top of the Second Division league, anil
although only one point separates
them from West Coast United It is a
point to be mighty proud of, for lt
was secured only after a hard fight
against a heavier team on a fleld to
which the local boys were not accustomed. The place: Port Alberni; the
time: last Sunday; the teams: West
Coast United and Cumberland; the
score: 2-1 for Cumberlund. That
would appear to cover the whole subject, yet It barely touches It.
It is not usual for a winning tenm
to grouse about the manner In which
the game was refereed. but even at
this late date the local players aro
doing just that. Mr. Smith, thc rcf.
in question, is one of these not unusual
ollicials who. however hard he tries,
cau seo only one team—and that team
Is West Coast United. Dissension already exists amongst both Cumberland and Courtenay plnyers over tills
official's actions and unless something is done nbout It tho league is
going to become disrupted, and that
very soon. Mr. Smith's apparent
favoritism of the home team Is not
Intentional, but nevertheless lt exists,
and it Is only justice to tlle visiting
teums that West Coast United should
make au attempt to llnd another and
fairer arbiter.
However, Cumberland won, and the
players came home happy, albeit badly bruised, lt was a hard fought
match and a very even one. Cumberland's two goals were Ihe result of
well thought out combination and
even the team's most bitter opponents
could not cull Ihem flukes, while Ihe
only tnlly scored hy West Const was
registered from a glaring off-side
position.
These two teams meet again here
in Cumberland on Sunday at 2:30 and
the result cannot be foretold, for the
teams are about evenly matched. At
any rate, the game will be well worth
coming miles to sec and the local
players only hope lhat Cumberland
fan • will turn out In a great a number ns did those at Port Alberni.
The home team will present the
sc._;.' llr.cup as last week.
High School Report
Grade  XI,    Iliilriculnllon
II Rank: Helen Parnham. Jessie
Brown, Isao Nakano, Sam Davis.
III Rank:    Leland Harrison.
Grade XI, Normal Entrance
II Rank: Irene Bates, Evelyn Carey, Minnie Harrlgan. Myrtle Calnan.
Grade X
I Rank: Jean MacNaughton, Jack
Hill.  Walter Hughes.
II Rank: Tatsumi Iwasa. Archie
Dick, Marjorie Brown, Norma Parnham, Joe Freloni. Alastalr MacKinnon, Gordon Walker, Mary Little.
Victor Marinelli, Annie Mann, Nina
McKee, Nobuo Hayashl.
III Rank:    Lillian Grant.
Not ranked:   Jessie Grant, Claudia
Harrison, Jack Horbury.
Grade IX
I Rank:   Stephen Jackson.
II Rank: Norman Freloni. Marlon
Brown. Mary Gozznno. Jack McLean.
Josephine Freeburn. Andrew Brown.
Kathleen Emily, Dick Marpole. Emma
Pickettl, Edna Conrod.
III Rank: Hnrold Conrod. Barbara Grant, Gordon  Horwood, Annie
Beveridge, Norman Hill, Robert Coiling.
.Vol runked: Margaret Hughes and
Margaret Richardson,
.VOTE—I Rank means Hu". or over.
II llaiili menus under 809S and ovor
60%.   Ill Rank means under (in'/i.
Names are In order of merit,
THE CHS. "CHRONICLER"
(Cumberland High School)
KIRT YEAR WINS DERATE
The second Inler-cluss debate held
last week between lsl and 2nd year,
was one of the most healed and closest debates we've had so far. The
negative, representing First year, and
ably upheld by Edna Conroif and
Norman Hill, triumphed over llie
affirmative, representing .Second year,
supported by Victor Marinelli and
Jeon MucNauglilon, by half a point.
The subject chosen wns: Resolved
that Ihe pen Is mightier than the
sword. Edna wns the host speaker
during thc debate lis regards conviction and expression; Hill proved the
most aggressive, and did most of the
refuting.     Although    Ihe   affirmative
possessed excellent material nud
were more experienced, yet they were
nol able to withstand the "pugnacious
attacks" of the negative. As regards
the subject, tiie negative maintained
thai the progress of civilization which
we enjoy today, -was the result of conquests by the sword. It has made history and moreover because of its
power kings were forced to deal more
leniently with their subjects. They
further stated thai Germany was
forced back by the conquering sword,
and 'the teachings of Christ spread by
means of It. The Pence Conference
today, they said, proved the futility
of doing away with the sword. The
(Continued   on   Page   Six)
With thc full Board ill attendance
at Tuesday's meeting of the School
Trustees it was expected that the
business would be transacted In short
order, but this was by no means the
case, for the agenda sheet was so well
filled that It was very close In ten-
thirty before the meeting adjourned.
Throe communications were dea'u
villi, the firsl being an application
from Miss C. Bannerman for a posi
tion on tlie public school staff. As
there are no vacancies, the letter was
filed for future reference. The Royal
Colonial Institute, an organization
founded fm- the purpose of Instilling
in the young a wider knowledge of
the British Empire, Informed the
Trustees that in 1H27 an Empire-wide
essay contest will be held amongsl
school children, with medals and various other awards for the best essays.
The Board deemed this a matter to
be dealt wilh by the principals and
handed over the communication for
their perusal. The remaining letter
was from the local P.T.A., noting thn!
the Association lias gone on record
as being in favor of dental clinics In
schools. This was ordered filed, as
the Board already has this question
under consideration.
Interesting Report
The  report  of  Principal  Apps  for
1 the month of October was an extremely interesting one. drawing very favorable comment from the members of
the Hoard. Trustee Mrs. McNaughton,
In  expressing her  appreciation,  laid
i stress on the fact that under Mr. Apps
I the   percentage   of   attendance   has
j risen (o and remained at a more than
gratifying average, being 94.64% for
, October,   The attendance shield was
| won  by Mr.  Murray's  class  with  a
: perfect   percentage,  there  being  not
'one late or absentee.   This is a re-
i inarkable   achievement.     Tlle   report
went on to show that the library Is
being put to advantageous use. over
700 books  per month  being "on  the
move."   The  Canadian   Legion  asked
permission, through Mr. Apps, to have
l tlie pupils Bell poppies for Armistice
I Day, and a request for the use of the
school   for  ibis  afternoon   (Friday)
I for the purpose of holding a sale of
work. etc.. was also mnde.   The board
granted both requests,
!    Perhaps the most gratifying pari of
the report, however,  was that  contained   in   -hi   attached   note,   which
staled  thai   ihe  worh  done  by  Mr,
Apps   al   summer  scbool   during   Ihe
(inst three years, had earned fur hlm
a   (Irst-class   certlflcnte,    This   was
greeted with applause.
IsOWCSl   lender Nol   tcccplcd
Twu tonders were received lor the
transportation   of   the   Trent   Road
school  children   i"  and   from  their
homes dining the winter mouths, that
of Mr.  1*.  McNtVen's  being accepted.
This was in the umount of $75.nn per
month,  nml  the  tendered  agreed  to
take out a $10,000 blanket Insurance
policy ns well as a $5,000 Individual
policy,   Tlie oilier lender, though $10
lower  tban   Mr.  McNIven's,  did  nol
meet with the lavor of the Board for
the reason that no mention was made
of the Insurance required and of the
'tact that the contracl  would nm Include the two weeks holiday at Xmiis.
.Mrs. Hanks, delegate from Cumberland at the recent Trustees' convention at Vernon, submitted her report
I of tiie proceedings In a very Inlorest-
| lug document,   This will he read at
! the forthcoming meeting of the P.T.
i .Association nml nil members of tlmt
May Install New
Lighting System
Courtenay Streets
COURTENAY, Nov. 2.—The Mayor
and all aldermen were present at
Monday night's regular council meeting. An offer of $I0U for two small
lots (1 and 4 111 Block 3) on Warren
Avenue from .Mr. Charles Wllden
brought some discussion. Aid. Pearse
opposed acceptance of ihe offer but
Ihe oiler was accepted with .Mayor
.McKenzie casting tiie deciding vote,
liis Worship pointed out that the lots
In question were smnllcr thnn tne
usual und were practically useless
except to the applicant whose house
Is situated on lots between the property under consideration.
Aid. Douglas* report included details
of construction of cement side-walk,
housing of weigh scales, appointing
of .Messrs. J. Parkin and H. Smith as
official weighers, and the Creamery
to be credited with 25 per cent of
receipts,
Aid. MacDonald, reporting for the
electric light committee, said that the
present strei-t lighting system bad
Just about served lis term of usefulness, and tlle city would have to consider making a change. He had lu
mind Ihe Installation of light standards on Union St., which would form
the nucleus of a permanent street
lighting system. This swould do
away with Ihe overhead wires, to bo
replaced with an underground wiring
system. His department had sufficient
funds ou hand to commence the work
hefore llie bad weather started. He
hoped to have had somo particulars
of lighl standards, etc., to put before
Ihe meeting. On the suggestion of
Aid. Field, further Information will
be obtained, to be considered at a
special meeting of thc council.
.Meiers Inspected
The eiiy clerk reported that the
meler inspector had recently Inspected sixty electric light meters, which
showed only one lo be in any way out
of order, nnd that one being 18 per
cent slow. Since 1914 only two meters had been rejected by the Inspector,  both  of  whicli  were registering
low. Tlie clerk also reported on the
proposed city water area, and advised
taking in a six-mile radius from Jho
post office on all quarters of the
circle except the Royston quarter,
where he recommended a four and a
half mile radius. He had prepared a
map for convenience. The matter
was referred to tbe water committee
with power to act.
Alii. Field brought up the matter of
advertising, and Mayor McKenzie
gavo some Interesting Information he
had acquired at the recent Vernon
convention, In the course of a gen-
*al discussion, It was brought out
that Courtenay would get bettor results by doing tlieir own advertising,
which would Include Campbell River,
Comox Lake. Forbes Landing and all
lurrounding territory.
Hallowe'en Surprise
On Hie i-ve of Hallowe'en Miss Mary
Pickettl was taken by surprise by a
number of her friends. The evening
vas spent In games, dancing and
Inglng, nfter which dainty lefresh-
inenls were served. The guests who
arrived in costume were Misses Josie,
Katie nml Victoria Bono, Katie Bartholin. Lena and Jennie Bogo, Jnslo
Plrozzini, Mary Francioli, Helen Gordon. Vi-ni anil Kiiimn Pickettl, and
Mesdames .1. Monaghan, L. Frelone,
W, Gordon, T, Brown, a. Bogo, F.
Bobba, and S. Conti,
Th,. Rov nml Mrs. J. It. Hewitt hnvo
as their guest mis. Hewitt's mother,
Mis. Ireland, of Toronto;
organisation    nie    herewith    warned
(lint n rare treat Is lu sloro for them.
Salary Question Again
Miss B. Bickle, one of the teachers,
Is now In charge of a higher grade
than she had Inst term and according
n> the wage schedule, should receive
n $60 Increase in salary. Iiowever,
in Hie last meeting, a motion was
passed to the effect that Miss Bickle
receive no Increase, but the Board has
since found that this move v/ns out
of order, and nl the request of the
original mover and seconder tho
motion was rescinded. This means
Hun the salary of the leacher 111
question will conform to the wage
schedule adopted In May, thc $5 por
month increase being mnde retroactive to September 1st. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5,  1926.
IN St. Paul's letter to the Ephesiiins one will read these
words: "Speak to yourselves in psalms and hymns
and spiritual songs, and make melody in your heart
.to the Lord, GIVING THANKS ALWAYS FOR ALL
THINGS UNTO GOD." Paul was a man of many parts
one of the most outstanding being his disposition to be
grateful and thankful. Over and over ngain in his letters
we come across the exhortation "TO GIVE THANKS."
Even in the most depressing of circumstances we find
him cheerful and happy, as for example on the occasion
when he and his companion Silas were in prison. We
are told that they "prayed and sang praises unto God.
nnd tho prisoners heard them." We also read that "the
doors opened and everyone's bands were loosed."
It is here that we find the physcological effect of
Thanksgiving. II has the effect of opening our minds to
wholesome thoughts and ideas, and of loosening the bands
with which circumstance and condition try to dishearten
and encourage us. "The mental act of Thanksgiving
seems tn carry the human mind far beyond llie region of
doubt Into the clear atmosphere of faith and trust where
'all things are possible.'" It Is in this spirit that the
Nation should commemorate Thanksgiving Day, it should
be something more than a mere occasion of "eating,
drinking and being merry." It should he a day on which
each one of us asks and answers the question, "whal have
I to thank God Ior?"
We live in an age when things arc so easily taken for
granted, and so Hie habit of giving Ihmiks goes by the
hoard and is forgotten. Paul's exhortation was based on
a sound principle lo "GIVE THANKS ALWAYS FOR ALL
THINGS I'NTO GOD." To come down to a final analysis
we have to thank ourselves for very little, but we have
to lhank God for a great deal. The Pharisee's form of
Thanksgiving was "I thank God I am not as otlier men
are." but the publican's was "God be merciful to me n
sinner," and It wns the latter who went down justified.
TRUE THANKSGIVING IIKLPS US TO REALIZE OUR
DEPENDENCE ON GOD. We bless Him for "our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of this life*' and
we pray Him to "give us that due sense of all His mercies
that our hearts may be unfeignedly thankful, that we may
show forth His praise not only with our lips but in our
lives."
If more of us were to start each day with a note of
"Thanksgiving" Instead of a "grouse" we would llnd and
make tlie world a far happier place than it is. Thanksgiving Day gives us the opportunity In put Into practice
the sound and old advice of St. Paul: "TO GIVE THANKS
ALWAYS." or. lo use the advertising phraseology of
modern times, lo "SAY IT WITH THANKS."
—E. 0. ROBATHAN. Vicar.
Holy Trinity Church, Cumberland.
Peace
And Thanksgiving
"In Flanders' field the poppies blow
"Between the crosses, row on row,
"That mark our place and in the sky
"The larks still bravely singing fly
"Scarce heard amidst the guns below.
"We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset's glow,
"Loved and were loved, and now we lie
"In Flanders' field."
From "In Flanders' Filed.'
"Rest ye in peace, ye Flanders dead,
"The fight that ye so bravely led,
"We'll not forget and we will keep
"True faith with you who be asleep
"With each a cross to mark his bed
"And poppies blowing overhead,
"Where one his own Life's blood ran red,
"So let your rest be sweet and deep
"In Flanders' field."
From "America's Answer."
A PECULIAR solemnity is attached to Thanksgiving
Day because it forms the one link between Church
and State. It ls the day set apart hy the government of Canada for national gratitude and thankfulness fo Almighty God for the mercies and blessings
of the past year, and not only that, but it is also an
acknowledgment of the existence of God and the imminence of. a Divine Providence over the affairs of men and
nations.
By It we acknowledge we are a Christian nation and
tbat in God we live and move and have our being, that
He rules over all, that His presence and guiding hand is
everywhere to be seen and that every good and perfect
gift cometh down to us from the Father above. If we are
to catch its spirit and realize its significance, this day
should leave a tenderness, a sweetness and charm surpassed only by the glad joy of Christmas and the victorious hope of Easter.
As Canadians we have every reason for thankfulness.
Ours is n hind of plenty; prosperity reigns throughout our
Dominion; all this Is the gift of God. We plow, sow and
reap, While God shines upon our faith in sun and shower,
Dins under his direction, from nature comes tile harvest,
which nourishes our lives, rejoices our hearts and Inspires
our griilltude. For tliis und many other blessings, as
health and strength, the privilege of living In a Christian
land with Its Christian homes, Institutions and Ideals.
blessings so many and so great that our memory falls to
recount them, wc give thanks.
We nlso return thanks for tlie freedom and liberty we
enjoy, as we keel) In memory on this day those who made
the supreme sacrifice. May we never forget the heroism.
tlie self-sacrllire, the consecration of lite by which these
liberties have been retained to us. We thank God for the
broader vision of life which came to those who lost sight
of the petty, commonplace things of life in tlie larger
vision of the world's need, and with this there has come
a new standard for the valuation of all things, and In the
spirit of tlie poet we can say:
".Measure thy life by loss and not by gals.
Not by the wine drunk, but by the wine poured ou*.
For love's strength standeth lu love's sacrifice,
And he who giveth mosl hath most to give."
From these brighter altitudes, with saner thought and
clearer vision than ever before, let us confront wilh new
courage the tremendous problems that face us as a nation
and carry high the standard they have entrusted to our
hands.
—J. R. HEWITT, Pastor,
Cumberland United Church.
Special Sale of
Corsets at
A full range
of sizes in the
popular well-
known make
of "C. C. a la
Grace"
CORSETS
on sale for
3 DAYS
i
Excellent
garments  for
medium and
stout  figures.
high and low    '
bust.   TJiey
come  in  front
and
back  lacing  styles—some   with   good
quality elastic sections
Values to .$6.00,
Special price 	
Values to $3.50,
Special price 	
$3.90
$1.50
Rayon Lingerie
A fine line just in of beautiful
Undergarments in Rayon Silk, In
Nightgowns, Princess Slips, Rayon
Combinations, Step-ins and Bloomers,
Can Cumberland Radio Fans Help
This "Comrade In Distress"?
WHAT'S wrong iu this hook-up? Perhaps you can aid tho
Philadelphia fan who sent this letter to the chief of a
Government radio office in Washington:
"I wish to describe my broadcast receiving set and ask your
advice for getting better results.
"I Imve a rubber aerial 674% feet long (not counting the
Insulators), but this stretches and touchess the roof in the middle. I think this maybe grounds the signals. I am not using
any lend-in because 1 bring my aerial to the edge of the roof
and lei the signals slide down the lightning rod to my window.
A friend of mine loaned me a wave-length last week, as mine
isn't working so good, and 1 wired It up iu series with tlle grid
of my tube; but even this doesn't work so well. I was advised
to use a set of vernier binding posts and 1 went all over town
trying to get them. In each store thc salesman looked funny
when 1 nsked him. Do you think thut maybe 1 was too tech-
nichiil?
"I even tried grounding my aerial, but that doesn't do auy
good at ull. It even weakens the signals I get. For a time I
thought 1 didn't get enough filament voltage, so I hooked up
my U. battery to the filament. The tubes Ut up fine for a minute and then went down. Do you think the B battery is dead?
it  won't light them any more.
"1 have tried the tubes out with a magneto and they spark
fine. 1 put a wire from the primary of megohm to the rotor of
my microfarad and even punched the latter full of holes. Even
this doesn't do any good.
"Mr. Foster told me a negative bias on the grid would help
llie set. I could not locate any in the city, but tbe telegraph
operator in New York sent three of them to the telegraph operator in Philadelphia, who gave them to me. I connected the
three in scries and put them on the grid, but It produces an
awful howling.    Is that what It Is supposed to do?
"For a time I (bought the diaphragm on the phones kept the
Bound from coming out, so I took them out. This gave me no
results cither.
"If you could only make my set work 1 would do for you
almost anything.
"P. S. Uo you think a radio frequency ammeter in the plate
circuit, or some Pnnnestock clips in the ground circuit would
Improve the reception?" —From "Greater Washington"
Millinery
Ladles' Hats In Velours, Fells and
Velvets; all styles and Full shinies,
specially priced.
New Suits and
Overcoats
A large range of patterns in llllle,
Browns and Grays and novelty shades.
Styles for Men and Young Men, all
sizes.   Values from
$17.50 ° $35.00
Boys' Suit Special
Long Pants made In American style.
single nnd double breasted.all wool
fancy Tweeds, well made and lined
and nicely finished. Sizes from 26 to
34 and specially priced al
_J15.50
Boys' and Youths' Overcoats. Fox
Serge Reefers with scarlet linings
and brass buttons; also Boys' School
Pants made of good quality Tweeds.
.'■jy*™ 3.1' !•.! (ij! OTs-jjassBi&E
I
Jimmy Walker and his
'Paramount' ORCHESTRA
—NOW OPEN FOU ENGAGEMENTS—
Orchestras supplied for ail occasions including old-time dunces
Phone 153L &  I7M Cumberland   or   48L Courtenay
™ IB 'J'i 'iPB srajjj
SATURDAY SPECIALS
1      MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
I Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
1
j Marocchi Bros.
I      PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
Large Attendance At Annual First
Aid Whist Drive And Dance!
j    The usual large  crowd,  well over.
1 two  hundred,  was  iu  attendance  at
I the annual whist drive and dance of
'the Cumberland First Aid Association,
|held In the Ilo-Ilo hall Friday night.;
i October 22nd.   The early part of the '
levelling  was  pleasantly  passed   with
! whist,    108    players    participating.]
I Prizes were awarded as follows:   lsl.
lady,   Mrs.  J.   Monaghan   (152);   2nd
ilady, Mrs. James Walker (Mil.   Mrs.!
I W. Hudson and Mr. G. W. Brown (led
for   the   gent's   first   prize   with   146:
I each. Mrs. Hudson winning on the cut
of the cards, with Mr. Brown taking
second prize.
Following cards, dancing was indulged In until 12 o'clock, when refreshments were served Ihe huge
crowd which was then present. During the Interval Mr. A. J. Taylor, the
president of the Association, preaentod
the various prizes nnd certificates to :
the first aid classes as follows:
First year certificates—Mrs. F. It.
Shenstone and Mrs. A. It. Stacey; and
Messrs. F. R. Shenstone. Cyril Neil.
Frank Martin, Wm. W. Brown, George
W. Brown. Andrew G. Walker, Archibald Dick, John G. Richardson. Mr.
and Mrs. Shenstone, who made, respectively, highest marks in the men's
and ladles' classes, were also given
special awards.
Second Year certificates- Thomas
Brown, Adam Monks, Christopher
Edwards. A medallion nnd label, for
Mr. Brown and Mr. II. Waterfield respectively, had not been received by
the Association at the time of the
presentation, nnd will he given nl
some future dulc. They nre third
and fourth year awards.
Junior certificates- Robt. Osborne,
Qiiiiitmi Whyte, George Miller, Frank
Read. Richard Marpole. Magnus
Brown, Thos. II. Robertson, Andrew
Brown, Jack Horbury. Jack McLean
and Maurice Brown.
Hr. E. R. lllcks. Instructor of the
First Aid Association, was given u Hue :
surgical bag, and Dr. tl. MacNaughton,
lecturer,  was  the  recipient of two |
volumes by Sir Wm. Osier, the eminent brain specialist. Mr. Taylor, for
his hurd work as president, was given
an order for a blood pressure machine.
making the presentation to himself in
a very witty speech. The adresses of
both Dr. .MacNaughton and Dr. Hicks
were in a particularly happy vein.
Mr. Thomas Brown, energetic secretary, was the recipient of a handsome
kodak.
Dancing was resumed immediately
fulluwing the presentation, and was
kept mi until 2 a.m.. Plump's Orchestra supplying excellent music.
The SS. Clansman went aground iu
llie Courtenay River on Sunday, but
got safely off and landed forty tons
of hay for the Royal Standard Feed
Co. the following day.
ruNARn
^sV Anchor-Donaldson  s»ss^
Christmas
SAILINGS
KIIOM HALIFAX TO
Plymouth, Havre & London
S. S. Aiitonln December 13.
lb lfn*t, Liverpool & Glasgow
S. S. Letltia December 12.
FROM ST. JOHN. N. II.. to
Belfast, Liverpool St Glasgow
S. S. Letltia,  December 11,
FIIOH  NKW  VOIIK to
Cherbourg & Southampton
S. S. Berengarla, December 15,
S. S. Aquituiilii,  December 8.
Plymouth,        Cherbourg,
Soiilhumpton
S.  S.  Mnuretanlii,   December 1.
Qlieenstotvn mid Liverpool
S. S. Scythln,  December 4.
S. S! Alaunla, December 11.
Full Information from local
Agents or Cunard S. S. Co., 622
Hastings St. W., Vancouver, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND   SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
'Si\TBiSMisWl!3MBJ!W-^mSM!m.W^ SJS-SJ5-S
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Si iuiius jL^flK'. ■ qui 11**111
Cumberland, B. C.
I BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST  POSSIBLE   PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby's face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERY STORE
Cer, fith nnd Dunsmuir.
Phone 122 Cumberland
\     1 FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1926.
A SMOKER
will be held in the
Eagles' Home
on
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH.
commencing at 8:00 p.m.
EVERYBODY WELCOME!
Se^tttr^*^^^
BIG SALE
Commencing SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30th, on
Electric Irons, Liberty
Hotplates & Lamp Shades
Only seven BERSTED Irons left to clear at ea.. $4.25
LIBERTY HOTPLATES, to clear at each     3.00
Any Lamp Shade, to clear at each  75
T!(r«3!3S3WS3S3eS"*M=8=ffiSeir^^
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
American   College -Of
Surgeons' Annual Congress
HOSPITAL STANDARDIZATION AND WHAT IT MEANS
TO THE PEOPLE OF CANADA
V
V
PAGE THREE
Dr. Franklin H. Martin, Director
General of the American College of
Surgeons, addressing one of the largest assemblies of surgeons and hospital people on record, at the Hospital
Standardization Conference of the
Clinical Congress of American College
of Surgeons which opened last week
in Montreal, stated In part:
The American College of Surgeons
greatly appreciates this opportunity
of officially presenting to the people
of Canada and the United States the
list of approved hospitals of 35 beds
and over. These hospitals have adopted the fundamental requirements tor
the right care of the patient and the
broadest community service, as provided for in the minimum standard
requirements laid down by the American College of Surgeons, nn International organization charged with the
responsibility of the great movement
known as Hospital Standardization.
The right core of the patient comes
first in every hospital. Years of Investigation and study has proved to
the Americel College of Surgeons thot
this can only be assured through the
acceptance and carrying out of the
principles as laid down In Hospital
Standardization, embodied ln which
are the six great fundamental principles upon which rests our responsibility to the patient—organization,
coordination, cooperation, efiiclency,
economy and service.
It is true that the hospital has become a part of the social life of our
people, ft is becoming increasingly
used from day to day, and 12,000,000
or more persons are hospitalized annually. The demands made on tbe
hospital have increased correspondingly through the more discriminating
public, the to-be nurse and the Interne
when choosing a hospital, and educational,   financial    and   glvernmental
organizations   when   seeking   adulations or financial support.
It Is hardly conceivable that any
community should be content with u
hospital which has not been awarded
this recognition as a public assurance
that it fully recognizes its responsibility to the patient, the student nurse,
the young doctor, and the community
ot large. If every hospital in Canada
und tlie United States were operated
strictly under Hospital Standardization requirements there would be ut
least a saving of 24,0UO,OOO hospital
days for the 12.000,000 putlents, as
compared with conditions prevailing
prior to 1918, when tlle Hospital
Standardization movement commenced. Further, the hospital death rate
under the same conditions would bc
reduced on tlle average 15 to 20 per
cent. Both from the economic and
humanitarian standpoints the citizens
of two greut countries cannot turn a
deaf ear to this movement, and each
community must assume the responsibility of seeing that Its hospital ls
meeting the requirements and on Unapproved list.
During the year the services of Dr.
,\I. T. MacEachern, Associate Director
of tiie American College of Surgeons
and Director of Hospital Activities,
were loaned to the governments of
Victoria and New South Wales, Australia, and the New Zealand Branch
of the British Medical Association
with the approval of the New Zealand
government, for a survey of the hospitals of these countries. The American College of Surgeons should profit
through the opportunity afforded its
Director of Hospital Activities of
studying widely differing systems of
hospital organization, management
and control, unique and remarkably
effective in many respects. And it is
hoped that the College may say with
entire modesty  that It  was able  to
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/2-in. valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Waer and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. VV. CLINTON, Managing Director.
MANN'S BAKERY
QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
—SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY—
Lemon and Custard Tarts, Cream Lemon Slices,
,   Delicious Appetizing Dainties.
nlso
Doughnuts, Scones, Meat Pies, etc.
I assist the hospitals of theso greal
countries in the solution of some of
their problems. Apart from all this,
however, there is another aspect not
to be overlooked, and that is the
cementing of bonds of fellowship between the countries visited and North
America, seeking in spheres remotely
distant to perform a common service
to humanity. This was more .significant than any practical gains resulting from the visit and was a major
factor in making the work in Australia and New Zealand so interesting
and pleasurable.
Hospital Standardization is a great
responsibility, ami it should appeal to
everyone   who   is   interested   in   the i
better care of tbe patient, The smaller
hospitals have been seriously- handicapped because the College lin* been
unable, for financial reasons, to survey them and give them the advice
and assistance they so much desire.
Tlie College must  continue its  work
among the larger hospitals, but must
also endeavor In soma wny to ft nance
the survey of the smaller Institutions.
Their importance in Canada and tht
United   States  is   shown   In  the  facl
that of the hospitals between A. find
fiU  hed  capacity,  more   (ban   IfiOO  In
number, represent   17 per cent of Hi.
total active hospitals,  with  beds aggregating 48,728. .Many of these could
easily qualify as approved hospitals.
The only reason they are not on tin
list is because of the  Increased expenses that would be Incurred hy tht
survey.   This, as everyone connected
with a hospital that is on the list can
realize, is a  tragedy  that cannot   he
overestimated.     Is   there   nol   Bome
one, among  tlie peoplo  of means  it.
the  United  States  or Canada  vitally
interested in hospitals, who wouhl be
willing  to  finance   this  great   work?
The survey of tbo larger institution,-:
must   go   on,   with   its   considerable
overhead that is already assumed and
which could not he increased materially by the added  cost necessary to
visit the smaller hospitals.   The College is in a position to do this additional work with the greatest econo
my  and   efficiency,   having   now   the
entire field set-up, if the means for
financing the work  are available.
In   assuming  the   responsibility   of
providing   a   minimum   standard   for
hospitals   the   American   College   of
Surgeons  fully  realized  that  it  was
undertaking a task  which   would  bo
of   universal   interest   and   benefit, j
based, as it was, on improving hospi- !
tal service for the patient.   This has j
happened.   Today every citizen of the I
United States and Canada is directly !
or   indirectly   benefiting   from    this
movement.     No  task   has  given   tin
Board of Regents more genuine satisfaction   than   carrying   the   standard
into effect.
|yjJkaMjy*MMMJJl^jliJi^
DROSS \
FROM THli MELTING POT
ju, .:■*. ii .1S1 ii .'riiAiiruijg^ii.r'aiiWsffll
A FLAPPER'S LAMENT
I'm tired of wearing little hats
To suit my bobbed-hair beauty;
I'm tired of being called "the cat's",
Or else a "Bweet patootle";
I'm tired of boys In Oxford bags
Who 'round my neck do cling,
Of  trying   (o   smoke   their   wretched
"fags"
Because It la "the thing."
I m tired, us tired as I can be,
(if lieinK 0 "perfect riot";
I'm tired of whole wheat bread and tea
That make my meagre diet;
I'm tired of being a flapper, too—
Sborl   skirls  and  sticky  paint—
Tin tired, so tired of trying to be
Just something that I "ain't."
—P. F.
The annual survey embraces active
general and special hospitals of 35
beds and over in Hie United States,
Canada and other nUntries, numbering I his year 2..**i2S. This group lll-
•Indis the federal hospitals of the
United States Army. Navy, Public
Service, Veterans Bureau, National
Homes tor Disabled Volunteer Soldi' rs, ami a number of institutions ln
oilier countries, The list as announced, shows a healthy growth from 692
hospitals surveyed iu. 11)18. with only
S!) or 12.D per cent approved or meeting the requirements, to 2.528 surveyed in 1920 witli 1,731 or 68.5 per
cent approved   a most grailfying re-
Sllll.
The following hospitals In Ihe province of Uritish Columbia have been
awarded full or conditional approval.
The asterisk Indicates that certain
hospitals have accepted the requirements which result In the host scien-
itifle eare of the patient, but are not,
for the luek of time or other acceptable reasons carrying them out ln
every detail:
11)11 ur mure beds
Provincial   Royal  Jubilee  Hospital,
Victoria.
•Koyal    Columbia    Hospital.   New
Westminster.
Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops.
St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook.
Rt. Joseph's  Hospital. Victoria.
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver.
Shaughnessy .Military Hospital, Vancouver.
Vancouver General  Hospital, Vancouver.
sill In 100 bed*
Queen Victoria Hospital, Revelstoke.
Ml
PETER McNIVEN
TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND        Phone 150
Coal Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
Orders left with Mr. Potter at the Jay-Jay Cafe will
receive prompt attention.
Mann's Bakery
„i,„..i...,,i _. tf
Cumberland
Phone 18
Courtenay Sawmills Ltd.
$35,000
7 per cent, (closed) Mortgage, 5 year bonds, dated
1st Sept., 1926.   Due 1st Sept., 1931.
This Company will romnicnre operations on or' about Ihe 1st
October.   Capacity of Mill: .'0,000 Ind 11.11. per dny
We offer these bonds to Investors nt 100 and accrued Interest to
yield 77c.
Full particulars on rcuuost..
PEMBERTON & SON
(Established 1887)
Investment Banker's, Victoria, H.C.
Phone 344 11. S. Malice, Manager Bond Dept.
CUMBERLAND
TAILOR
MEN'S and LADIES' SUITS
MADE TO MEASURE
Through  years  of experience  we
know  how   to  fit  you,   how  you
should wear your clothes—and we
are ready to sorve you.
CLEANING    —    PRE.SSING    —    REPAIRING
We are specialists in this line and guarantee your
Clothes to look like new when returned.
Enamel
(baking Utensils
rsMp! Geaii as China
\^/  Sf nrngj as .feel
Sold in best stows everywhere
*"• S»iCtT Mem   Products   Co  IttHf* 213
E. Aida, Merchant Tailor
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
fllBllIM^^
1       E. L. SAUNDERS
§ UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
**H It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
§s longer after repairing than when new.
If I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
jl Service at—
m THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store. PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1826.
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY OF THIS WEEK
lichtra. forthelmess M Dorothy Dunbar ;a'7lnJmiitetir GtAtUtmtt
and "As No Man Has Loved"
Monday, Nov. 8 Rod La Rocque in
"Bachelor Brides"
Tuesday, Nov. 9 Bebe Daniels in
"The Splendid Crime"
Friday-Saturday, Nov. 12-13 Madge
Bellamy in "The Golden Strain"
one of Peter B. Kyne's greatest, also
•THE
BUND foOID
VICTOR FLEMING
PaODUCjlON
with.
JACK HOLT
ERNEST TORRENCE
ESTHER. RALSTON
LOUISE DRESSER
0. Qarctmount (picture
Coming, Thursday, November 25
The Dempsey-Tunney Fight
Movies
Attractions for the      I
Coming Week
WIVES ARE RENTED
IN "WATCH YOUR WIFE"
Gaiety Theatre
THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Reginald Denny in
"Rolling Home"
Monday. Nov. 8 Bebe Daniels in
"The Splendid Crime"
Theatre this Friday and  Saturday,
I    Gene  Delmont donned  the  plctur-'
j esque garb ot tbe Regency period and j
grappled   with   Richard   Iliirthelmess!
A social service bureau with a sec-  ,-  Ms pdlui.e    m^m{ WM km)wn|
Hon devoted to supplying unattached | n8 "Gentleman" Oene In the ring and
men with a female escort or compan-' was tamed for his gentlemanly Union, and at the   same   time   barring  "c"'
love. Such ls the unique Idea behind; Mickey McMln trained Iliirthelmess
"Watch Your Wife," co-starring Pat'for the "S1" wlth Joh" Barty. who,
O'Malley and Virginia Valli, and being '.in the slory ol Jeffrey Farnol. was
screened at the Gaiety Theatre next!'ho form'*r champion pugilist of Eng.
Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 10-11.1lan(l- McM1" was a contender for the
"Watch Your Wife" places romance j HghtwiegM championship for yenrs
on a business basis, and is a mostiand is credited With fighting Johnny
appealing domestic comedy drama. It! Kllhane five times,
is featured by many striking sets and 1 Director Sidney Olcott encountered
handsome gowns. Among the players 18eri01,s difficulty In locating Harry
are Helen Lee Worthing, Nat Carr, Al-  Gllmore,    ex-champion    bare    fisted
bert Conti, Aggie Herring, and Nora
Hayden.   Svend Gade directed.
FIFTY ROUGHNECKS
fighter of the world.
After   considerable   scouting,   however, Olcott found Gilinore leading a
quiet, uneventful life in I.os Angeles.
He was engaged to train .1. Edwaid
ACT IN PETERS FILM I Davis, who portrays the role of John
  I Barty.
Fifty of the roughest, toughest men j    G,lmore   po99e9ses,   with   110   llttle
In motion picture captivity worked ^ a 90,|a g0,(, medaj w)lidl ,9 |n.
with House Peters In making "Com-18crlbed wUh the |eg(J|1(|. „Harry „„;
bat" at the Universal studios. This more, 126 pound champion of the
picture will have Its local premier at Aorld| Bo8tonf Ma9a _ 18s7 ., Ho waB
the llo-llo Theatre next Wednesday ohamplon ,„ the daV9 when pl.ize
and Thursday. November 10-11. | flght,ng wa3 done „,„, to,.c |isl9  .,„„
Besides   the   tough   characters   to  nc heW h,9 crown aga|nst a„ wejghts
play lumberjacks that were taken to for flye yearg
tbe Northern part of California when
"The Amateur Gentleman,"  one of
the   company   left   for   location,   an i ,he be9t p|ctures ypt ,0 9tal. RU,ha..,
additional  ten   backwoodsmen   were U,^,,^,, confaigs a cast ot super
lative merit.
PRIZE BEAUTIES CAST
IN LATEST PARAMOUNT
brought to the studio to finish the pic
ture.
The story is a typical out-of-doors
he-man picture of the type that has
made Peters famous.   It is said to be
so tough  that even  the  film  won't | 	
burn, with a thrill In every toot. Th<" tw0 most* beautiful girls in tlie
At Ilrst Reynolds thought he would | Unlt<*'l stnte« appear In tbe cast of
have difficulty rounding up sufficient, "The Splendid Crime," William de
mean looking character actors but j MUle's newest Paramount production
when the call for unshaven back-! "tarring Bebe Daniels. At least, they
woodsmen wus sent out he was sur-1 were so voted ln a nation-wide con-
prised at the large number of appll-1te8t-
cants for the roles In his picture. The-' ore Florence Vnndiver, a bru-
Those he chose were thc most typical nette beaut"* fr0,n Spartanburg, Sth.
from several hundred seeking parts. | Carolina, and May Betteridge, a gold-
Wanda Hawlcy plays opposite Mr. jen halre<1 8irl whose home ls in Los
Peters, while others in the cast are , Angeles.
Walter McGrall. C. E. Anderson and I    M'88   Vandlver,   one   of   the   most
Steve Clemento. noted beauties of the South, and Miss
Betteridge, winner of numberless pulchritude contests, were victors in n
magazine beauty contest ond as a reward were given parts in Mr. de
MUle's picture. Each showed excellent ability, the producer-director declared.
The featured players iu "The Splendid Crime," which ls an original
crook comedy drama by Mr. de Mille.
Include Nell Hamilton. Anne Cornwall and Anthony Jowltt. Violet
Clark wrote the scenario.
DENNY DISCOVERS
NEW THRILL RIDE
A new thrill has been devised for
Hollywood, by none other than Reg
inald Denny, Universal star. He dis
covered it at Catalina Island, during
thc production of "Rolling Home." the
Universal production coming to the
Gaiety Theatre Ihis week-end.
It was while cruising around the
lslnnd in Denny's private yacht, the
"Molly-O" one evening after the day's
filming was over, lhat he formulated
the Idea.
The waters around Catalina Bay
abound with luno. the gnmest, llght-
ln'est, shrewdest llsh thai ever lived.
Denny hnd halted n heavy line, nnd
thrown It overboard and wns Idly
proceeding up Ihe channel, when suddenly he felt u monstrous tug on the
fishing tnekle. Sportsman thai be Is,
he recognized a tuna strike.
He commenced lo light the huge
(ish, wben ho was struck by nn original Idea. Culling to one of his seamen to fasten the Hue he brought up
from below n surf board. This he
proceeded tn fasten on to the line, and
then be threw the board over the side.
The line was then loosed uud then
began one nf the most thrilling rides
that DOnny had ever undergone, a
surf-board -pulled by u giant tuna.
Round nnd round the hay raced the
great llsh with Denny hanging on to
the hoard, followed at a cautious distance hy the yacht. When he had
hnd his All of the ride, he signalled to
the bont whicli come alongside. After
forty minutes of strenuous battle, thc
tuna was landed. Unfortunately It
weighed 08 pounds, which barred Denny from membership ln the Catalina
Tuna Club, the requirements for membership In which ls the cnplure of a
tuna whose minimum weight is 100
pounds.
NOTED PUGILISTS
TRAIN FILM STARS
Three famous prize-fighters played
an important part in "The Amateur
Gentleman," starring Richard Bar-
thelmeBB, to be shown at the Ilo-Ilo
HAROLD LLOYD FUN
HIDES TEAR IN LAUGH
Take your work seriously, but
never yourself! That is the motto
Harold Lloyd has followed to success,
and It is entirely typical of the Lloyd-
ian outlook on life.
Much bas been written about the
seriousness of comedy mulling. Sometimes it is a heart-breaking task to
make one picture better than the
other, and even Lloyd Is n bit puzzled
to liow it is nccnmplished.
it cannot be proven by nie," be
says. "We Just plunge Into whal we
have to do. put the best we have In us
Into our work, und then hope the
results will meet with the approval
of the public."
In making "The Freshman," Harold
Lloyd's newest feature, which is to be
shown at the Gaiety Theatre Friday
and Saturday, November 12 and 1,1.
Lloyd, his slory and gug writers, and
his directors, were concentrated on
making a picture worthy to he classed
with "Grandma's Boy"--n comedy thai
would give an added kick to the
laughs because of the tears behind
It—a comedy that had a vital dramatic interest and a thrill faction.
By taking for his hero, u youth who.
In IiIb first year nt college, tries so
hard to be the most popular boy In
the school that he becomes only the
butt of all of thc jokes and tricks of
upper class bullies, Lloyd has a characterization that offers us many opportunities   for   humor,   pnthos   and
Weds, and Thurs., November 10-11
Pat O'Malley and Virginia Valli in
"Watch Your Wife" also
THE S1W OF A COWARD WHO MADE THE SHADES
OF HIS FIGHTING ANCESTOR STAND UP AND CHEER. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 5, 1926.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
The Discriminating
Housewife
Demands Reliable Products
Goods that have merited the confidence of the
purchasing public—
COMOX POTATOES "look for the tag on the bag.'
COMOX CREAMERY EGGS.
COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM.
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER.
COMOX WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR.
Comox Creamery
Association
Courtenay.
COURTENAY LOCAL NOTES
COURTENAY, Oct. 30.—The. Rev. J.
W. Fllnton leaves on Friday to take
over his new duties on Salt Spring
Island. Mr. Fllnton has been In
charge both at Courtenay and Sandwick for the past six years, coming
here from Victoria. Presentations
have been made to both him and Mrs.
Fllnton from various parts of the
diBtrlct, showing the esteem in which
they are held In the community.
Archdeacon Laycock, formerly of this
parish is coming here for a few weeks
and together with the Rv. Corker, of
Comox, will officiate until a permanent appointment is made.
Mr. W. A. Paul Is leaving for Victoria and Vancouver. He will meet
his sister from England, who is coming to visit Mr. and .Mrs. Paul at Lazo.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Wm. Sutliff have re-
«
-* -b»
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
EAT McBRYDE'S PREMIER WHOLE WHEAT
BREAD AND LIVE IN THE PATHWAY OF
HEALTH
PURCHASE  YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
29R —PHONE— 29R
COURTENAY, B. C.
Dempsey-Tunney Fight Pictures at
Courtenay, Fri.-Sat., November 26-27
Lumber
In'every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, IJOOHS.
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND   FURNISHINGS.
we deliver to anywhere in short
notice With reasonable charges.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
| Night cnlls: 134X Courtenay
PHONES |onloe, m Cumberland.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDACTAMENDMENTS
PBE-EMFTIOJiS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given lu Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to'Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing tbe Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of tbat
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
Is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of (10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of llrst-class (arable) land Is ib
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land 12.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lauds In given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, ths con-
di.lons including payment of
sturapage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in'the Ilrst year, title being
obtained after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company,
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations tor range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
STANDARDINE   Ci-JS
5  TUBE  RADIO   «P I D
Const to Coast—No idle boast
400 Installed in Biltmore Hotel,
New York.
D.X. Engineering & Sales Co.,
Ltd.
20 Bloor St. W.
Toronto
ySordms
ST. CHARLES
EVAPORATED|
MILK
Much
better
for every
milk burfrose.
Never Tails-
idwaros ready.
Pure and
l»tst»fl —
rich.-
StC2S-26
Use it
wherever the
recipe Calls for milk
turned from a month's holiday. They
went over the road as far as Salem,
Oregon, making the return trip by
motor also.
Mr. W. J. Hagnrty lias gone to Vancouver on a business trip.
The Remington silver medal for
sustained typing at the rate of fifty-
three words u minute lias been
awarded to Miss Frances Smith of the
Courtenay Commercial School.
Mr. Thos. .Menzies, Supt. of Neglected children, arrived In town Wednesday evening in connection with his
work.
Mr. Jackson, of Messrs. Sandllands
& Jackson, of Duncan, lias been In
town on business.
Mr. Edward Navey Is back from
New .Westminster on a business trip,
His farm near Royston lias been purchased by Mr. A. C. Cole, of l'nion
Bay, who will make his future home
ut Royston. The salo was effected
by Mr. Felix Thomas.
Mayor McKenzie
Makes Full Report
On Transportation
COURTENAY, Nov. 2.—Two very
interesting discussions took place
after the routine business had been
done at the Cily Council meeting on
Monday night.
One of these culminated in a decision to construct n temporary dam
as an experiment at Douglas Lake
one of the lakes in the Goose group.
The work will be commenced during
the present week nnd will lie of an
Inexpensive nature. Tlie dam will In
made of logs cut at the lake, roil;
and otber material. Douglas Lake,
which covers a large area, being a
natural basin In the mountains, will.
it is hoped, be thus raised two feel.
Next Summer at the low water period
the dam, which is only u short one,
will be demolished and careful observations taken of the effect on the
water supply at Courtenay. thousands
of feet below the lake.. The inexpensive experiment should prove the
advisability of constructing a permanent dam at the source of Courtenay's
water supply. Aid. Douglas, after
whom the lake was named, asked  ii
steps hail heen taken to have these
waters stocked Willi (ish. It was
found that enquiry was being made by
the city clerk to see what could be
done iu this/bonnection, A letter was
being sen! to Air. John Babcock, asst.
commissioner of fisheries, asking for
information as to the possibility of
making a start with "Kamloops" trout
fry in* eggs for tlie lakes, which vary
from ,*10ii to luii acres Iu extent at an
elevation ol' three to four thousand
feel. Il was thought best to concentrate on one or two of the lakes for a
start. Other lakes in the group are
named McKenzie and Pearse, after the
Ilrst three Aldermen to set eyes on
them,
The Transportation Question
Mayor .McKenzie reported fully on
whal hail taken place regarding the
transportation question. The pros-
pectlvi operators nf tlie Powell River
boal were in touch with the Courtenay authorities. Captain Itooke, of the
Vancouver-Courtenay Transportation
en. hail interviewed the officials, and
Uie condition ut* the Courtenay River
hnd been freely discussed. Mr. F. B.
Rattenbury, of Victoria, was nlso In
communication on the subject. The
Mayor thought that ihe present was a
big opportunity for the city and that
everything possible should be done.
Aid. MacDonald could see great possibilities from the Powell Itiver boat
service anil would like to see some
definite action taken. The matter of
a plebiscite in connection with an investment by the cily in tlie boat service was discussed, tlie Mayor giving
it as his opinion that a by-law would
now puss. All ibe Aldermen were in
favor, apparently, of assisting tbe
commencement of the service as far
as possible.
aei^-yoti
KDWARDSBURG
CROWN
BRAND
CORN SYRUP
-^
THE CANADA STARCH CO, LIMITED - MONTREAL
IWO BLAZES STARTLE
COURTENAY FOLK
COURTENAY, Nov. 2.—Two blazes
oecured on Sunday, the Ilrst at about
live o'clock a.m. when Mrs. Willard
Fielding awoke to llnd ber dwelling
near tlie Post Ollice In flames. After
going lo ihe dunce at Royston the
previous night, she returned and lit
the lire to warm the liouso. Mr.
Fielding had gone on a hunting trip.
Tiie Courtenay Fire Brigade made a
quick response and extinguished the
lire, but Hie small house was badly
gutted. Some of the contents were
saved, and the rest wns covered by
Insurance, ii is said. The other Are
oecured on Sunday evening when Mr.
Wm. A. Mutberson'ss barn containing
I some sixty tons of hay, and some outbuildings  were destroyed.
* . •
In trying to avoid a collie dog be-
! longing to .Mr. T. Prelsel. Mr. M. B.
I Tribe had the misfortune to overturn
I lii» ear on the Lake Trail on Tuesday
I afternoon. Two ol* his children were
I with him ut the time, but fortunately
no one was seriously hurt.   The car
wns badly damaged.
zJ*
DINING ROOM
Our Dining Room offers good food,
good  service,  reasonable  charges
King George Hotel
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber & Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any style 60c
Children's hair cut any style 35c
-TBIiEPHONE-
-100
TAXI
ASK FOIt CHARLIE  DAMON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
nt 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets   boat  at   Union   Hay.
UNION   HOTEL
Cumberland, 11. ('.
First-class throughout
Excellent Cuisine
Electrically Heated
Phone IS Phone 15
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence I'hone 22
See Geo. Mason
P.P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay             Phone  258
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel in Evenings.
Telephone   115R   or   24
| GREAT VEARS IN HISTORY
Interesting things have happened In
1026.   Coinin |er Hvrd iu a Fokker
airplane, circled tlle North Pole.
Photographs taken In Kurope were
transmitted on radio waves lo America, and published in newspapers a
few years later. Gertrude Ederle,
daughter of a New York butcher,
swam the English Channel one hour
faster than any of the live men who
had swum it before her.
Is anything Interesting going to
happen In 1927?
For one thing, the Youth's f'om-
panlon on April 16, will celebrate its
HUNDREDTH BIRTHDAY. During
1927 the Companion will contain more
Interesting reading than ever before
during its century of succesful life.
Consider what vou will get for $2.00:
i>- Issues, containing '■) book length
serials, 260 short stories by the most
popular, authors, more than 100
special articles, a weekly section for
IngenloUB hoys, called the "Y. C. Lab,"
a thorough girls' department and 52
pages for children, Also in each
issue, aii extensive survey of current
events, making li easy for you to follow the affairs of this busy world.
Don'l miss the greatest year of a
greal magasine. Subscribe now, and
receive:
1. The Youth's Companion—62 Is-
' sues iu IM". and
2. The remaining issues of lli26.
All for $2.
3    Or  Include  McCall'i  Magazine,
the   monthly, authority   on
fashions.    Ilolb    publications,
only $2.50,
THE  YOUTH'S COMPANION
S N Dept.. Boston, Mass.
Subscriptions  received nt  this offlce.
DARING THE JOYRIDER
A junk shop near a railroad crossing in Denver carries a sign with
ihis hint to motorists: "Go ahead;
take n chance,   We'll buy the car."
WtMMSJSfS/BJSl
I (^iii|l)eHtind
(] Loll) III*.
Dllendq
ri Hotel
Kales
Kei.oniMc '
| ACCOMMODATION THK BEST
i;' Rooms Slcnui  Mental
I        IV.  MKlillll'IKLO, Prop.
^SiEfflWdlc'j'aaKEIa PAGE SDL
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1926.
New Fall
Novelties
LADIES' UMBRELLAS—
Gift Umbrellas have arrived and are now on view. They are
some of the smartest and best it has been our pleasure to offer
for sale. The handles are very new and will appeal of the lady
of taste, while the covers are made of taffeta and also of silk.
A full range in stock.
LADIES' SCARVES—
Our selection of choice Scarves will prove an attraction and
a drawing card to those Interested in looking for gifts for Xmas.
We cannot describe tbem. but sufficient to say that if you givo
us the opportunity to show you our assortment you will bc
agreeably surprised, as we really have a worthy choice that
ought to meet with your approval.
LADIES' CHAMIOSETTE GLOVES—
A shipment of Ladies' Chamiosette Gloves In a number of thc
new colorings and styles, 10 dozen In all.   They are specially
priced at 75^ I>er Palf'
LADIES' FANCY BEADED BAGS—
A new line of beaded bags suitable for presents. They come
In four styles and are really artistic. The prices are 95<S
91.50 and $1.95
Children's Beaded Bags—
About three dozen to choose from, assorted colorings. 45^
and QOtp each.
WHIST DRIVE PRIZES—
A delivery of celluloid cases ln a varied assortment of styles.
Something different.   See them.
NEW SHOT TAFFETA SILK—
A few colorings in shot taffeta just arrived. They are smart
and are widely used at present.   Make smart dresses.
DRESS GOODS—
Ten different colorings ln Dress Tweeds, fully 36 Inches wide.
A splendid quality for Ladles' or Children's dresses and all at
one price.   Q5t} P" yard.
DRY GOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr, J. Walton left by motor for Victoria on Thursday morning, where he
will make his future home. !
Mrs. P. J. Hackwood and son, of
Nanaimo, who have been the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. E. L*. Saunders for
the past week, returned to their home
In the Hub city this morning.
SMOKER AT EAGLES'
HOME ON SATURDAY
A grand smoker will be held at the
Eagles' Home, Dunsmuir Ave., on
Saturday evening (tomorrow), conj-
mencing at 8:00 o'clock sharp, good
time  assured.   Everybody  welcome.
BIG MOOSE CARNIVAL
DANCE DECEMBER 10
A monster Moose Carnival dance
will be held under auspices of the
local Moose Lodge In the Ilo-Ilo hall
on Friday, December 10th. Watch
for it. Something unusual in store
for those who attend.
CAUSE FOR THANKSGIVING
On this day of Thanksgiving, Canadians may perhaps give a thought to
the part which the Post Office Is playing In the welfare of the Dominion.
The year has been one of substantial progress and has been marked
especially by thc restoration of two-
cent postage.
This should serve as an impulse to
the public to make still more extended
use of the malls. The Post Office is
for use, and the more lt ls used, thc
more Its operations can be extended
and Its services improved.
P. J. VENIOT,
Postmaster General of Canada.
AUXILIARY TO HOLD
WHIST DRIVE FRIDAY
There will be a Whist Drive and
Social Evening in the Anglican hall
on Friday. Nov. 12th, at 8:00 p.m.,
under auspices of the Women's Auxiliary.
IN MEMORIAM
In loving remembrance of Louts
Francescini, who departed this life on
November 6.  1921.
"This dny brings back sad memories
Of a loved oue gone to rest;
Those who think of him today
Are those that  loved him best."
Ever remembered by his loved ones.
I
Cumberland Supply Store
Nekton'* Old Stand Dunsmuir Ave.
-T-'"rr'*r<rq-*r"-<>'"-"-^^
Thanksgiving
SPECIALS
Cranberries, per lb $ .25
Apples, extra special quality, 3-Ibs. for 25
Apples, choice Jonathan, per case   1.75
Fancy, Cleaned Currants, 2-lbs. for 25
Seedless Raisins, bulk, 2-lbs. for 32
Choice Prunes, per lb 11
Cocoanut, bulk, per tb 25
Choice Bulk Dates, 2-lbs. for  25
Lemons, Sunkist, per dozen  30
Vancouver Butter (none better), 2-lbs. for  85
Heinz Topiato Soup, 2 for  25
Clark's Potted Meats, 3 for 25
Heinz Pork and Bean:;, 2 for  25
Heinz Tomato Catsup, per bottle  33
Nabob Tea, per lb 75
Blue Ribbon Tea, per lb 75.
Extra choice Fresh Ground Coffee, per lb 55
Extra fine Grapes, per Ib 25
Canada Corn Starch, 2 for 25
Palmolive Soap, 3 for  25
Old Dutch Cleanser, 2 for  25
Heinz Bulk Vinegar, per quart  25
CUMBERLAND SUPPLY STORE
"Building for Greater Service"
Store will be closed Monday, Thanksgiving Day.
Shipping Man
Visits Cumberland
F. Lefeaux, representing the Cunard
Anchor and Anchor-Donaldson Steamship Lines, Vancouver, was a visitor
to Cumberland on Thursday and paid
a call on Mr. E. W. Bickle, who acts
as agent for these Lines in the Cumberland district.
Mr. Lefeaux reports that the Christmas bookings to the Old Country are
coming along very nicely and recommends that persons contemplating a
trip to Europe get in touch with Mr.
Bickle, who can complete through
booking arrangements by rail and
steamer.
The sailing list for next Spring and
Summer Is already published and
those who intend going home at that
time should make early application
for reservation. Services are operated from Canadian and American
Ports to the chief ports ln England,
Scotland, Ireland and the Continent,
with magnificent liners of the one-
class cabin as well as the three-class
type.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Weat wood, who
have been the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
C. V. Dando for some time past,'returned Wednesday morning to their
home in Vancouver.
ss       *       *
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Henderson left
by motor this morning tn spend Ihe
week-end in Victoria.
* ss     ss
Mrs. M. B. Stewart and son, Malcolm, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
T. Wilson at Nanaimo last week-end.
MrB. E. L. Saunders left for Nanaimo this morning on a visit to
friends.
w     ss     ss
Members of the Octagon Bridge
Club met last Tuesday night at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Cope, nn
enjoyable evening being passed. The
eight members of this newly-formed
club are Mrs. Amos Farmer. Mis. J.
H, Robertson, Mrs. It. A. Robertson,
Mrs. C. Hltchens, Mrs. J. Cameron.
Mrs. Wm. Cope, Mrs. M. II. Stewart
and Miss H. Lockhart.
* *   .
Mr. and Mrs. F. Horwood, who have
been visiting friends In England for
the past live months, returned Monday to their home at Minto. On tlie
return trip they came via Prince
George and while there were the
guests of their daughter. Mrs. A. Ti.
Moffat, and her husband.
RADIO
We wish to announce that we have secured the
exclusive agency for the
Victor Northern Electric
Radio Receiving Sets
These sets are manufactured by the makers of the
Orthophonic Victrola
Quality of tone and simplicity of operation are the
outstanding features of this machine.
Come in and let us demonstrate these new sets for you.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALLKODAK STORE
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
GIFT STALL, NOVEMBER 17
The Ladles' Aid of the Cumberland
United Church will hold an afternoon
tea, home cooking stall and "gift"
stall on Wednesday, Nov. 17th, (rom
3 to 6.   Afternoon tea, 25 cents.
Mrs. McLean' and Mrs. Symons were
joint hostesses at the letter's home
on Thursday and Friday afternoons
of last week.
.   .   .
Mrs. IT. Keeler entertained at the
len hour last Friday afternoon.
Courtenay News
COURTENAY, Nov. 5.—Guy Fawkes
day was celebrated at Mervllle today
when the dwelling house occupied by
Mr. A. Currie and family went up
flames. The property is owned by the
Provincial Land Settlement Board and
was recently purchased by Mr. J.
Blakely on the amortization plan. It
ls understood that there has been
some dispute as to the occupancy of
the premises, and the purchaser has
had difficulty in gaining possession.
The house, one of the original forty,
was situated about half way between
the Kitty Coleman road corner and
the Saunders Supply Co., and was
originally built for Mr. Cox, one of
the original Mervllle settlers. The
Provincial police were on the scene
quickly afler the lire commenced. The
house ls completely destroyed.
A breach of promise case Involving
well-known Courtenay people, it is
believed, Is to be tried in the near
future. The date of the trial in fact
is to be on the 24th of this mouth.
We hope to have a full report next
week. Advt.
A  COURTENAY  MISS  AMI  A
CUMBERLAND YOI TH
They were on the beach at Kye Bay
the other evening, sat with their
backs against a convenient log. watching Ihe setting sun. The girl took a
side glance at her companion and
thought "what a lino, handsome chap
he looks." She moved ever so gently
and let a portion of her hair brush
across his face. A little nearer to
him she moved—the boy's heart began to pitter-patter, but still no word
he spoke. The maid grew bolder and
literally threw herself ngainst him.
Still no response. Getting slightly
peeved at last she said: "Say boy,
what's the matter with you?"
"Oh, nothing, only my mouth Is full
of sand. What do you think I had
better do with lt?"
"Why. boy, eat it! If ever a guy
needed sand you do."
"Miss Audrey DeCouer entertained a
number of her friends nt her home on
Pendrlth Avenue Saturday evening
last. Hallowe'en customs were the
source of great enjoyment, apple bobbing being a favorite pastime of tiie
young guests. Games and music also
entered largely into the festivities.
During the evening Mrs. DeCouer
served delectable refreshments, the
usual Hallowe'en novelties decorating
the well-appointed table. The rooms
also presented a pleasing appearance,
black cats, witches 'n everything being lavishly scattered. The hour of
departure, nine o'clock, came all too
soon for the young frolickers, who
oue and nil expressed themselves as
having hnd a "dandy" time.
FINE PROGRAMME FOR
F.O.E. SOCIAL EVENING
THE C. H. S. "CHRONICLER"
(Continued from Page One)
A whist drive nnd soeiul evening
will be held in the F.O.E. Hall on
Tuesday, Nov. 9th. whlsl commencing
at 7:30 p.m. Refreshments will be
served and admission has been set at
25 cents.
The following nrtlsts will take pari
in the evening's programme: Robert
Goodali, Jack Stewart, Wm. Jackson.
Robt. Robertson 3-pleco Orchestra,
Mrs. Tweedhope, Ed. Morris, Hugh
Bates, Mrs. Bradley. Miss Formby, H.
Tappen. Mrs. Ed. Anderson, Gomer
Harding, Mr. and Mrs. Wm, Dnuncey,
Alex Fowler and Sam Jones. They
will oblige with vocal and Instrumental selections and recitations,
Members wives are requested to
bring refreshments.
KEEP THIS DATE OPEN!
A most enjoyable business and
social evening was Bpent by over 30
members of the Jolly Bachelors Club
of Courtenay, last Monday in the
supper room of the Agricultural hall.
The event was a novelty children's
party, and all the members of the
club came in fitting costume. Fun,
music and dancing and varied games
made a most enjoyable evening.
The Women's Auxiliary of Ihe
Anglican Church will bold their Xmas
Sale ot Work on December 8th.
nllirinalive opened wilh a description
of the horrors and cruelty incurred
by war. In contrast they depicted the
great benefits derived from books and
writings of men through the medium
of the pen strove to benefit and ameliorate thc conditions of mankind.
.Moreover they pointed out that the
preservation of valuable knowledge
and history was due to the pen. The
warrior tends to lower the nature of
•man, while the pen tends to elevate
It,
The next debate Is bebtween malrlc
and first year. If matric suffers de-
feai the editor of Ihe "Chronicler*'
Will certainly remind them of it in
tlie next issue.
EDITORIAL
Sonic parents may unthinkingly regard debating In the High School as
n waste of lime, which might otherwise   lie   advantageously   employed.
! We certainly nre not ot this opinion
for the following reasons: Debating
Is an art which develops the mental
faculties, requires the student to use
good English and furthermore In his
efforts to find material tor debate, he
will amass a considerable amount of
general knowledge. Debating teaches
one to express oneself in a clear and
comprehensible manner, to use correct grammar and enables one to
acquire a natural unaffected manner
In public speaking. Few Indeed realize tlie Importance of this and fewer
still possess these requirements. A
person never knows when they will
be called to respond lo a toast, muke
a public presentation, lo act as a
chairman, or to speak at -a farewell
gathering, lt Is u pitiable sight to
see somebody vainly endeavoring to
express their thoughts In n clear way
It Is still mole pitiable to see thc em-
barassed speakers, stuttering and
rnmuiltting glaring errors, which he
caunot very well retract, lt Is for
these reasons that the High School
debates are marked for expression,
emphasis and good English. Yet it
must not be supposed that the material Is Ignored—It Is merely given a
secondary consideration. The ability
to express his thoughts In ihe manner
mentioned is an invaluable asset to
tlie young man who aspires to a successful business and political career
today.
*    ss    ss
The person who oscillates between
good und evil Is bul the bone of contention between Satan and the Saints.
—Editor
A FEW "HOWLERS"
Shenstone: "Whal Is the product of
x times x?" (x limes x equals x
squared).
Colling:    "x scared'"!
...
Tho sweet young thing In Ihe matric
chemistry "lab" snid that oxygen wos
used In a fire extinguisher. Ye Gods,
wait till the Fire Chief and Cameron
read this!
.   .   .
We would like to know lu what
High School Is the bright and shining
pupil who wrote: "Then Ihe mnn
woke up to llnd himself asleep."
Services For
Thanksgiving
CUMBERLAND  UNITED CHURCH
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7th.
11:00 a.m.   "God's Good Gifts."
7:00 p.m.   "Count your Blessings"
Special   Thanksgiving   selections   by
the choir:
"Praise the Lord, O Jerusalem."    j
"A Song of Thanksgiving"
Everyone cordially Invited
FOR SALE—Launch and Rowboat.
For further particulars apply A.
Clarke, Box 619, Cumberland.
WANTED—We want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B. C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1052 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.     t.f.n.
WANTED—To hear from owner ot
good Form for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush,
Mlnncspolls, Minn. 44-48
l(IfqpClf4P(K^S(€«<*-
KEEP ALIVE THAT CHRISTMAS SPIRIT
9RIVJTE
Greeting  Cards
for Yuletlde remembrance
are a source of extreme pleasure to the
receiver, instilling in the heart thc thought
thai "I am not forgotten." To the sender
the result attained is more than worth while.
The Design Is-
FAHM   LANDS   WANTED   for   cash
buyers.    Describe,  give  price.    H. |
Webster, 121 Tenth St., New Westminster, B. C. 41-43
a matter of individual taste, yet there
are so many different designs from
which to choose that no one need bo
dissatisfied. We are agents for tho
lending card manufacturers of Cnn-
ada, who will either print 1 lie cards
or leave them blank. If the latter
course is decided ou the printing is
done right here In Cumberland In the
ollice of
Nearly Everyone--
has friends or relatives In the "Old
Country" to whom they Invariably
send some small gift. What could he
hotter for this purpose than Greeting
Cards? Order early to be In time for
Christmas malls; just phono 35 and
our representative will bc pleased to
call and show you our samples, or If
you are passing our office drop In and
ask to see the different designs.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342591/manifest

Comment

Related Items