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The Cumberland Islander Feb 6, 1925

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Array THl^SJMBERLAND ISLANDER **
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News,
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No.  0.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, W^T
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
CUMBERLAND HOSPITAL
TO HAVE NEW WING IS
DECISION  OF BOARD
For some time ln the past lt hus i r~I:
been found that the Cumberland Hos-. CHESS CLUB IS
pltal, as It now stands, ls not large I , ENTERTAINED
enough to comfortably accommodate I 	
the various patients and at the same J COURTENAY, Jan. 31.—On Friday
time provide adequate living room for j evening Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Gregson
the nursing Btaff, so it has been vir-1 wel'c hosts to a number of the mem-
.    ss     s   ., a .s. .. i..      .is, i hers   of   the   Courtenay   Chess   Club.
tuallydecided that •_ new wing will | Among  thosc  pre8ent/wej,e  Mra   £
Tull, Miss Every-Clayton, and Messrs
G. B. Capes, H. Mauro, B. Pearse, G.
W. Stubbs, R. Thompson, H. Tull, H.
Smith, F. Wood and J. W. Young.
Some of the guests took advantage of
the occasion to engage in battle their
opponents 1„ the cliess tournament
whicli Is progressing in a very Interesting manner. At the present time
Mr. Clinton Wood is In the lead.
PEDDLER IS FINED
COURTENAY. Jan. 31.—On Thursday night before Magistrate Hames
at the City Hall, George Weaver plead
ed guilty when charged with peddling
within the city without a license. He
was fined five dollars and costs. For
driving an automobile without number plates, W. G. Geidt was fined a
like amount. >
be built to the present quarters at an
estimated cost of in tiie neighborhood
of $11,000.
At least, such waB the decision arrived at at the annual meeting of subscribers to the hospital which was
held ln the City Council Chambers on
the evening of Saturday last when
about thirty members were present.
The gathering was brought to order
by President Charles Graham, Secretary T. Mordy then reading the minutes of the last meeting which was
held on May 3rd, 1924, the same being found correct and were adopted
aB read. As there were no communications the President read his annual
report tor the year ending December
31, 1924 (a copy of which will he
found further on in this column) and
the secretary read the treasurer's report and also the report of the auditor, Mr. G. Curwen. All three were
received and adopted.
Election of Officers
Mr. George O'Brleu and Mr. Charles
O'Brien were appointed, pro-tem, to
All the offices of president and secretary respectively until the election
of officers was concluded. This was
found to be an easy task, the same
members as last year being returned
to office. They are: President. Chas.
Graham; Secretary, Thos. Mordy;
Vice-President, R. H. Robertson;
Treasurer, C. J. Parnham, and E. IJ.
Pickard, Thos. Bennet, Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, James Quinn aud A. J. Taylor as Board members. President
Graham then took the chair and thank
ed the meeting, on behalf of himself
and the others, for returning them to
onlee.
Report of Building (onimlllre
The report of the committee on pro_
posed new alterations was then rend
by the secretary and those present
were invited to inspect the plans of
the proposed new wing. The report
follows:
"Your committee appointed to confer with the committee appointed at
the last annual meeting to consider
ways and means for an addition to the
hospital to provide more private ward
accommodation beg to submit as follows.
"The committee met antl discussed
various plans and Anally agreed nn
the plan as submitted as one best
meeting the requirements.
"This gives 10 private rooms and
provides living room accommodation
for the nurses. This eliminates any
necessity for a nurses' home.
"It is proposed to remodel tho
fronts of the main building and the
Alexandra ward to give a symctricnl
appearance to the entire front. We
think the architect has achieved this
in the plans submitted.
"The proposals for raising the
funds submitted by the special committee were received too late to be
considered by your committee.
"We would recommend that tills
plan be presented to tlie general
meeting as being approved by tlie directors as fulfilling the requirements
for additional private wards.
"Respectfully submitted, Chas. Grn.
ham, T. Mordy, G. K, McNaughton,
M. Brown, Matron."
In reply to a question raisecl by J.
L. Brown the president stated that
the government would probably donate a substantial sum toward the
cost of the building if it were brought
to their notice thnt a greater part pf
the necessary amount was raised locally. Dr. MacNaughton and R. II.
Robertson were of the opinion thnt
the Ladies' Auxiliary would be willing
to help as they had an amount of approximately $4800.00 In hand. At
any rate the meeting decided to begin work on the new wing as soon
as finances were assured. Mr. Brown, j ^ Over fifty Welshmen were present
who seemed to have a penchant  for nt a meeting held in the Athletic Club
BATTLE OF BATTLES WILL
BE STAGED IN SOCCER
GAME HERE SUNDAY
What promises to bo a most interesting Soccer
game is the one scheduled for Sunday, February 8th
on the Recreation Ground, Cumberland, when the fast-
stepping Nanaimo City team visit here in the replayed
Semi-Final Davenport Shield game. The last meeting of these two teams in the shield competition produced a most sensational soccer game, ending in a four-
all draw. Mr. J. Quinn, the Cumberland representative on the Upper Island Board made an eloquent appeal for the game to be replayed in Cumberland. His
appeal carried weight and the game was ordered for
the Cumberland ground and to be played last Sunday.
GRADUATED SCALE OF
BEER LICENSES FOR
COUNTRY ANNOUNCED
Comox Lake
Is Re-stocked By
Fisheries Dept.
.Mr. G. F. Morgan of the Dominion
Fisheries Dept., with headquarters in
New Westminster, aud Mr. Alex Dunbar local Fish Warden, have been
spending a busy week placing the recent shipment of Sockeye Salmon
eggs that have just arrived from the
Anderson Hatcheries situated on tho
west coast of the Island. This lot
of Sockeye eggs some 500,000 in number, have been placed in tlie Crulk-
shanks Creek near the mouth where
It empties into Comox Lake. This,
the third setting that has been Hber-
aetd in that locality in the last three
y.ears nr.:! so far as can te ascertained
have produced excellent results.
The eggs were shipped from the
hatchery iu five boxes made of wood
two and a half feel tall by one foot
square. Each box contained 14 trays,
the trays containing between 7,000
antl S.Oilll eggs each. The eggs were
placed in the creek and will remain
in that stage for about a month before
they hntch out, the length of time depending upon the temperature of tlie
water. After the eggs hatch the fry
remain in the gravel of the creek for
about another month before they go
Into the lake. The Mali then remain
In the lake for a year until they aro
about four inches long, then they
leave the lake and head for the ocean.
In this caBe the young salmon will bo
leaving by wny of the Puntledge River
It is a peculiar characteristic of the
salmon that tliey again return to their
original spawning ground In four
years, this time to spawn themselves.
Many Attend
Third Club Dance
The Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall was the
scene of a most enthusiastic gathering Inst Friday evening when the
Linger Longer Club entertained somo
two hundred guests at another of their
enjoyable dunces. At 11:30 dainty
refreshments wore served by the club,
after which dancing was continued
until 1:80 a.m. The hall was prettily
decorated, and music was supplied ln
n most pleasing manner by Messrs.
Robertson. Roy, Newman, Potter and
McLellan,
WELSHMEN TO
CELEBRATE ON
ST. DAVID'S DAY
asking questions, was entirely snti..-
fled when the president Informed him
that "Yes, the question of a larger
heating plant was taken care of in
Ihe estimate of $11,000" E. Hughes
moved that the Hospital Board, with
power to add to Its number, be autli-
on Saturday evening at which the
main item of business was to decide
whether to. or not to, celebrate thc
day of Iheir patro,, saint, David, on
March 1st. As was to be expected
everyone wns for tlie celebration
which is to take the form of a big
The local ground, being in such
a poor shape after tlie recent heavy
frost, it waB decided, so as not to
hold up the competition, to play the
game in Nanaimo. The team travelled down to the Hub City on Saturday afternoon last but on Sunday,
the Nanaimo ground was In such a
terrible condition that it was impossible to play, consequently the
game Is still Cumberland United'*
home game. Tlie management of
the local team could have offered
to play In Nanaimo again, thus enriching the coffera of the treasury
which are very much depleted. Tho
management thought fans were entitled to a game on the local
grouuds and In ncceedlng to their
desire, confidently expect the fans
to reciprocate on Sunday by attending this important game and giving
liberally at the collection at the
gate. It costs a lot of money to run
a team In the Upper Island, especially a team like Cumberland
that has to do such a lot more travelling than any other teams in the
league. There Is sure to be a large
contingent of Nanaimo Soccer fans
present, if the weather here is favorable, and we understand that a
large number of the boys from the
comps are going to be present. Enquiries have been received from as
far away points as Campbell River
and Parksvllle as to the time of the
kick off of this Important game.
Mr. Thorburn ot Nanaimo will referee, and promptly at two o'clock
the ball will be set In motion. The
following will do duty for Cumberland: Blair, Mortimer. Stewart.
Monoliau, Conti, Brake, Bannerman,
Plump, Giuliani. Fowler. Hitcliens,
All other players, act as reserves.
Prizes For Strut Scorer
All fans at this game will watch
witli tense Interest for the man who
scores the first goal, for the lucky
one who does so will be the recipient of a set of one half dozen
knives and forks to be awarded by
Mr. Rai* Colclough. the Hardware
and Sporting Goods man of the
Victoria Crescent, Nanaimo. This
is a very sporting offer on the part
of Mr. Colclough and you cau bet
that tho boyB will have their scoring boots on to try to cop the prize.
VICTORIA, Feb. 8.—Regulations
for the sale of beer by tlie glass were
announced today by Hon. A. M. Mdn-
son, attorney-general. Provision Is
being mado for sale of beer In tlie
"wet spots' only of those electoral
districts which voted for beer In the
June plebiscite.
No  License  In  Dry  Districts
The reBUlt of the June plebiscite
over all the province was that twenty,
three electoral districts voted "wet*'
and seventeen "dry." There arc no
provisions In the regulations for tlie
issue of licenses in any of tlie seventeen dry districts though there were
some definitely "wet."
OPENING DANCE
Don't forget tlie opening dunce to
be held lu the G.W.V.A. Hall, Saturday. February 7. 1925. Mixed dancing from 9-12 p.m. Come one come
all. Everybody welcome. Admission, Gents. 50c. Ladies 10c. 0.
Open Badminton Tournament
Nears Finish; Finals Wednesday
The Open Badminton Tournament
which Ib in progress at tlie Anglican
Hall has produced some excellent
games. The Comox Club are ruti-
nlng their tournament off on the American Plan while the local club decided on the straight knock-out. J.
Vernon-Jones and Mrs. L. R. Finch
vs. T. H. Mumford and Mrs. Spicer
had the honor of starting the games
on Saturday evening last playing two
games of eleven points each. In the
flrst game, .Mumford and Mrs. Spicer
walked away at the start, eventually
winning the initial game by a score
of eleven points to eight. On change
of ends, a change of play was introduced, Jones and Mrs. Finch going
after their opponents in uo uncertain
manner, and at one stage ot the game
led by a score of ten points to one.
It looked an easy thing for Jones ami
Mrs. Finch, but, evidently Buffering
from nerves or a certain amount of
over confidence, allowed the opposition to run out winners by a score of
eleven points to ten. Scores up to
date are:
Ladles' Singles, first round—Mrs.
Mordy beat Mrs. Clinton 11-0, 11-0;
Mrs. Spicer bent Mrs. Shenstone 11-7,
11-5; Miss McKinnon beat Miss Treen
11-2, 11-5.
Second round — Miss Richardson
beat Mrs. Mordy 15-13; Mrs. Spicer
beat Miss McKinnon 15-9; Mrs. Leversedge beat Mrs. Apps 15-3; Mrs. Bryan beat Mrs. Finch 15-9.
Semi-final—Mrs. Spicer heat Miss
Richardson 15-5; Mrs. Leversedge and
sMrs. Bryan to play.
Ladies' Doubles — Mrs. Shenstone
and  Mrs. Spicer bent Miss Richard
son and Miss McKinnon 9-11, 11-4;
Mrs. Apps and Miss Treen beat Mrs.
Clinton and Miss Galllvan 24-20; Mrs,
Brian aud Mrs. Mordy beat Mrs. Lev-
erseci(je and Mrs. Pinch 11-6, 6-11.
Semi-final—Mrs. Shenstone and Mrs.
Spicer beat Mrs. Bryan and Mra.
Mordy 15-6.
Men'B Singles—Mumford beat Strachan 11-8, 11-4; Mordy beat Bryan
10-11, 11-8; Shenstone beat Symons
11-7, 11-8; Murray and Leversedge
still to play.
Second round—Vernon-Jones beat
Leversedge, F 15-6; Nunns beat Robinson 15-11. Jones and Nunns meet
in semi-final.
Men'B Doubles—Nunns and Bryan
heat Shenstone and Symons 11-7,
11-9; Leversedge and Leversedge beat
Murray and Vernon-Jones 11-4, 7-9;
Robinson and Strachan beat Mumford
and Mordy 11-7, 11-9.
Semi-final—Leversedge and Leversedge beat Robinson and Strachan
15-13.
Mixed Doubles—Symons and Mrs.
Bryan beat Bryan and Mrs. Clinton
11-6, 8-11; Mumford and Mrs. Spicer
beat Vernon-Jones and Mrs. Finch
11-8, 11-10.
Second round—Murray and Mrs.
Apps beat Mordy and Mrs. Mordy 15-fl
Leversedge and MrB. Leversedge beat
Shenstone and Mra. Shenstone 15-1:1;
Leversedge, F. and Miss McKinnon
heat Robinson and Miss Treen 15-3;
Symons and Mrs. Bryan beat Mumford and Mrs. Spicer 15-2; Leversedge
and Mrs. Leversedge heat Leversedge,
F. and Miss McKinnon  15-11.
Play will be resumed nt the Anglican Hall On Saturday evening at slx-
(Contlnucd   on   Page   Eight)
OLD TIME DANCES ENJOYED BY
LARGE THRONG MONDAY NIGHT
orlzed to carry out building and ftnan-i Banquet nnd Concert to be held on
clal arrangements iib were necessary cither Friday, February 27, or on
but no seconder could be found. Dr. Monday, March 2. Tlie actual date
MacNaughton cnine forward with the has not been decided upon yet as
suggestion that tlie mutter l.e brought \ March 1st falls on a Sunday, but it
up at the Old Timers lie-Union on will be either one of the above. Full
Monday evening with the Iden of ap- particulars will he divulged later,
proaching Lady Dunsmuir for a suh- • Never before in the history of Cum-
stantlal donation, but this also was berland have there been so many
not acted upon. It wus finally moved . Welshmen In tlie city at one time ns
(Continued   on   Page   Flvo)       i there are at present.
Dancing scenes of a quarter of a
century ago were brought to Cumberland of the present generation on
Monday niglit when several hundred
old timers and their friends met at
the Ilo-Ilo Hall and tripped the light
fantastic to the music of nn orchestra
in which the leading figures were Mr.
David Roy and Mr. Harry Murdock.
violinist and cornet 1st, respectively, of
the musical organization that twenty
five years ago made dancing the pleasure it was In the early days of
"Union." They were assisted by
Mayor Charles Parnham, at (lie piano,
substituting for Mr. John Baird, who,
through Illness was unavoidably absent: Mr. R. Robertson, Mr. T. McLennan, Mr. Leslie Moody and Mr.
Herbert Roy.
Long before the hour sot for the
beginning of festivities the hall presented a lively scene ns pioneer after
pioneer entered, and, meeting a friend
of by-gone days whom ho or she had
not seen for "ages" shook hands, chatted and declared that tho event certainly renewed memories of the days
when Cumberland was In the making.
The Intlal item on the program was
a waltz, followed by an address hy Mr.
John Thomson, chairman of the committee of management, ln which he
expressed his great pleasure at seeing present so many of the people
whom he had known for many years.
He regretted the absence of some who
had attended thc function last year
but who had since crossed tho great
divide and who were greatly nC.sed.
Among these he mentioned Mr. Daniel
Stewart antl Mr. Thomas Hudson. He
expressed the regrets of his committee at the absence through illness nf
Mr. George Clinton, Mrs. J. Bruce and
Mr. John Baird, feeling that In spirit
these hardy old timers were with
tlieir friends on the occasion of this
second annual reunion.
Tlie grand march wns led by .Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas White, residents of
Cumberland In the early clays, but
who now make their home In tlie
("edar District. Nanaimo. They came
up the Island specially to attend the
(Continued   on   Page   Threel
Health Officer
Makes Complaint
To City Council
The regular meeting of    the    Cily
Council   was   held    in    the   Council I
Chambers last Monday evening. Mayor
Parnham presided and all Aldermen j
with the exception of Alderman John I
J. Potter, who Is still confined to the |
hospital, were present.       The    Cily
Clerk read a communication from tlio
Bourd of Police Commissioners, stnt-'
Ing that W. II. Cope, Chief of Police,
would be granted permission to act tn
the capacity of Cumberland City Clerk
Dr. E. It. HickB, Medical Health Officer, communicated with regard to
the unsanitary condition of the premises occupied by thc Pastime Club,
antl the Board of Health was Instructed to interview the proprietor in tills
connection.
All accounts received were referred
to the Finance Committee to he paid.
If found correct. The acting chairman of the Board of Works reported a
general cleaning up around the city.
Considerable discussion took place
in connection with city hydrants. Ten
dollars per annum was paid to '.lie
Cumberland & Union Wnter Works
for the use of these, and the Aldermen
were of the opinion that tlie Water
Works should keep these in repair.
Tlle installation of electric lights
on Dunsmuir Avenue was reported in
the chairman of thc Light Committee.
New Clii'inlcal Truck
In connection with the new chemical truck which is to be completed
shortly, the chairman of the Firemen's
Committee was Instructed to make
provision In the Fire Hall.
To Represent Cltj
Alderman T. II. Mumford was appointed city respesentatlve on tho
Board of Directors of the Cumberland
General Hospital.
Owls Lost Game
To Rangers, 25-19
What was undoubtedly the best
basketball game of Die season was
played last niglit in tlie Band Hall he- j
fore a packed house when the Owls j
received their second defeat in two 1
straight games, this time nt the hands
of the Rangers, but by a close score,
the final result being 19-25. Both
teams played real basketball, not tlie
wild-throwing kind but short, snappy pnssing, and therefore there was,
and could he, only one result, a fast
game, free from fouls. Watson was
the shining star light of Ibe evening,
scoring 12 points for llie losers, while
"Peanuts" Robertson secured the remaining 7. For the Hangers, Hunden scored 9 points, Aitken (1, Dallos
4, Walker 4, and Weir 2.
Before the Men's game, the C.G.I.T.
antl the Public School Girls clashed
lu a league fixture whicli went 5
minutes overtime beforo the latter
team finally won by the score of 10-
8. Heck Stewart refereed both
games In a satisfactory manner.
As the new beer regulations wero
not gazetted until Thursday of this
week advertisements of application
for license muy not appear until aftor
that date.
♦IIKHI License Pee In Vancouver
Vancuuver liotelmen will have to
paj $1000 each for beer licenses. Exactly bow many will be issued ln the
Terminal City will not be determined
until applications have been received.
Unofficial estimates run from 30 to
70.
Nanaimo.Kernlc In film Class
Victoria, New Westminster and
Kamloops voted against beer, and will
not have any. so that the next class
of city to obtain the glass system will
include Nanaimo and Fernie. They
will pay $500 for license privileges.
How many will lie issued In these two
cities will be determined In much the
same way as in Vancouver. The $300-
lincese class will include Industrial
towns up to a population of about
2500. Then there will be the "hamlet" class, where the fee will be as
low as $150 per year; as a matter of
fact only $112.50 may be required for
the current year.
High Lights lu Beer Rules
Licensees to be British subjects only
Licenses not transferable.
Beer salerooms to he open to vlesv
from outside.
Beer rooms to be on ground floor,
completely cut off from hotel roomB.
Liquor Control Board to direct
equipment of fixtures.
Hours: lo a.m. to 11 p.m. Closed
Sundays, also on Good Fridays Christ
inns Days, polling, days nnd other days
if the Board so directs.
No cigars, soft drinks, foodstuffs to
be sold.
No games, sports, dancing permitted
Notorlociy bad cha -actors to be
excluded.
Beer must be pure, containing not
more than four and one-half per
cent and not less thau three and one-
hair per cent of alcohol.
List of employees to be filed with
Liquor Control Board.
License fees, $100(1 to $150, based on
population  and  licenses lu areas.
No females to be employed.
No person under 21 allowed on
premises.
Encumbrances on licensed premises
to be recorded with Board.
Licensees to buy from one designated
government liquor vendor, where his
entire account will be kept.
Open to police inspection at all
times.
Tipping prohibited.
Beer cellars to bc immediately below sales room.
Hoard to supervise alteration and
reconstruction of premises.
Women eligible for license but no
women to be employed.
Liquor advertisements  prohibited
For 1026 minimum license fee shall
bc $112.50 instead of $150, the rate
thereafter.
AFTERNOON TEA
AND HOME COOKING
The Ladles' Aid of SI. George's
Presbyterian Church will hold an afternoon ten at tlie Manse. Wednesday,
February Uth from 3 to 6 p.m. Sliver
collection. On Saturday. February
Slat u sale of home cooking will be
held In tlio church basement from
3 to 6 p.m.
FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH
This Is the date set for a Valentine
Dance to bc held under the auspices
of St. John's Ambulance Association
in the llo-llo Dance Hall. The Association is already famed for Kb successful dances, and with Valentine attractions, In connection with Plump's
famous Orchestra, next Friday's
dance should have them all beat. Keep
the dale In mind and prepare for one
of Hie best ever.
Mr. Jack Bird, who was operated on
in tlie local hospital last week, is progressing very favorably.
COURTENAY BOARD
OF TRADE DANCE
A grand Valentine Dance under the
auspices oi* tbe Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade will he held in tho
Gaiety Theatre on Wednesday next.
February Uth, commencing at 9:00
pin. Admission prices Including
supper are Gents $1.50, Ladies SOc. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
INTERESTING BABY BOOK
Undoubtedly the most interesting
reading for tlie young mother Is that
which deals witli the care and feeding of babies, particularly if the sullied is treated In simple language for
all to understand clearly. We bave
just received a booklet, "Baby Welfare." which Is one of the most Interesting and Instructive we have seen
in a long time.      1|  has chapters on
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
pre-natal care, Feeding of Baby, Bottle Feeding Supplementing Breast
Feeding, Diet After First Year, Food
Formulas, Sleep, Fresh Air, Exercise,
Bathing, Clothing, Baby's Weight and
Measurements, witli sundry hints as
to safeguarding of baby's health
against common ailments. There is
also a page devoted to Baby's Biography, which should be an interesting record of thc little one's activities when It is filled In. and a Weekly
Record for Baby's Weight und Height,
which tlie mother can (ill in. In th.j
introduction tlie publishers say that
tliey have purposely omitted suggestions pertaining to medical treatment, knowing lhat such information
should properly come from the family physician when such advice Is
needed. Mothers desiring a copy of
this most helpful book can obtain
one. free, by writing to The Baby
Welfare Department of the Borden
Company Limited, 180 St. Paul Street
West, .Montreal, mentioning this paper.
[ the result of this contest and Mesdames W. J. Carroll, Atkinson and A.
M. Stark, who acted as judges, required the skill and technique of connoisseurs in tlie performance of their
task. Other competing patrols were
the Violet patrol, led by Muriel McPhee; the Swallow patrol, Kathleen
Halley, leader; and the Wren patrol
under the leadership of Eileen Clark
"SPEEDWELL" PATROL
ADJUDGED WINNER
COURTENAY, Feb. 3.—The result
of the Girl Guide inter-patrol competition 'or the best six articles made
from grain, flour or sugar sacks was
made known nn Tuesday afternoon at
the Guides' headquarters in town.
The "Speedwell" patrol (Dorothy
Sutherland, leader) was adjudged the
winner.     Some very good work was
nm
Jumble   Auction
Agricultural Hall
Courtenay
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25
f What will you give f
. A iii
i
.>**S
mi
-    ^"•-^•7*S*s,=j^<,^ V*'£*f''*??Li'rs.rj
'tmmmzt
FINEST PRODUCTS OF THE BEST LUMBER
MILLS  ARE  ASSEMBLED  IN   OUR  YARDS
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
COURTENAY, B. C.
P.O. Box 62 Phone 17
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
Eat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives
the poison from the system,     He that is hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should he shunned like tho
devil and lo ent the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
WOLF CUB PACK VISIT
H. M. CANADIAN SHIPS
COURTENAY, Feb. 2.—On Saturday
last ten small hoys of the Courtenay
Wolf Cub Pack paid a visit to H.M.
C.S. Patrician and Thiepval lying at
Comox wharf. Most of the little fellows had never before been aboard
a real ship and were very Interested
in all they saw. Of particular attraction to them were the guns and
the engines. The "Cubs" nre indebted to Mr. Frank McPherson for the
enjoyable excursion by motor to ibe
war ships at Comox.
CHORAL SOCIETY
PLAN FOR SECOND
HALF OF SEASON
COURTENAY, Feb. 4.—On Tuesday
evening there was a good attendance
at the meeting of the Courtenay Choral Society. Mr. J. H. Maclntyre, the
president, was In the chair and plans
for the second half of the season were
made. A fine selection of general
choruses was outlined for the remaining portion of the season. These Include some excellent male choruses.
The good attendance of members at
lant nights meeting goes to snow that
Interest in thc Choral Society Is well
sustained. No changes were made
The society la still fortunate in having
Mr. C. W. Sillence for its conductor
and Mr. J. R. Denholm as accompanist. Mr. A. Burnett, Courtenay, is
the secretary.
Football Is played by the Idaho University eleven without the services ol
a regular team captain. The coach
names a field captain before the start
of each game.
SYNOPSIS OF
UNDtlGTAMEMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be preempted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, eondl-
tlonsl upon residence, occupation,
and lmprovemest for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions ls
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Serin,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
wblcb can be obtained tree of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lauds, Victoria, B.C., or to toy Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only Und suitable for agricultural
purposes, tnd which ls not timber-
land, 1.., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of tbe Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of tbat
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions ara
to oe addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, ln whlcb tbe land applied for
ls sltuaUd, and art made on printed
forms, copies of wblcb can be obtained from tbe Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Iv* years and improvements made
to valus of |10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least Hv*
acres, before a Crown Grant can bs
received.
For more detailed lntoimation see
'Jis Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Und."
PURCHASE
Applications are received lor purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being Umberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-clan (arable) land Is 15
psr acre, and second-class (grating)
land 12.50 psr acre. Further Information regarding purchase or leass
of Crown lands is given ln Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease ot Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
Umbsr lsnd, not exceeding 40 aores,
may bs purcbassd or lessed, the conditions Including payment of
ttumpage.
HOMESTEAD LIASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 2!)
acres, may be leased as homesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grating and Industrial purposes areas not eiceedlng 640 acres
may ba leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Orating Act the Province Is divided into grating districts
and the range administered under a
Orating     Commissioner. Annual
grating permits are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-ownsrs
may form associations tor range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
DEAN CLEMENT OF U.B.C.
DELIVERED INTERESTING
LECTURE LAST THURSDAY
COURTENAY, Jan. 30.—The lecture
of Dean Clement of the University of
British Columbia, on "Co-operation
and Economics", which was delivered
in the Agricultural Hall on Thursday
night, waa one of the most interesting
agricultural discourses evevr heard in
this district. The subjects touched
upon were both diversified and very
numerous; and when question time
arrived a great number of extremely
interesting Interrogations wero forthcoming from the somewhat Bmall but
keenly interested audience.
In his opening remarks, the
dean explained liow that addresses
over the radio in Vancouver had
already made a successful start. Referring to a shipment of potatoes from
the Atlantic to tlie Pacific coast, via
'.he Panama Canal, with a freight
rate of $12 per ton, and which will
be sold In Vancouver at $3G or $37
per ton, the lecturer said "The important question is, "Why Is it?' What
makes It possible to bring these potatoes here at the price? He at once
answered hia question by saying "Because those potatoes came from where
potato production is organized. Potatoes were raised there in enormous
quantities by expert growers." What
a pity we hadn't the potatoes in the
Comox Valley to supply the demand.
Some of the main features on whicli
the  lecturer dwelt were,  "The over
expansion of the farming Industry of
recent yearB," "Organized production
aud organized Bale' and "The necessity of bringing about a higher state
of productivity with the acre, the cow
or the hen as the case may be." Increasing productivity of the unit wus
! of much more Importance than tlie
1 expansion into more acres, larger
herds or flocks. He showed very
clearly how that the most Btaple of
the dairy Industry has proved to be
the raising of butter fat with tlie
bacon-type of hog as a supplementary
as carried on in Denmark and elsewhere; and lt was necessary to bu
an expert In lite handling of both
cow and hog to lie really successful.
Dairy farming is thc most complicated
and hazardous business. Exports iu
one department of farming are few,
but experts in more than one phase
are very much fewer. It Is necessary to have a main objective with a
by-product or side line as an auxiliary
to the mainstay. Such aB Dairying
combined with bacon hogs, berries
with poultry, and high productivit..
of the individual unit counted before
everything else. Profit was made
from the efficiency and quality rather
than from the many less productive
units, whether acres, cows, hens or
otherwise.
The agricultural situation wns
showing basic indications of improvement. There is an upward trend owing to the farmer becoming convinced
that the farming business Is today
keener than ever before. The high
average price of buttcrfat of 76 cents
during 1919 had declined to 60 cents
WHY
PAY MORE FOR A USED FORD CAR?
ASK FOR
FORD USED CAR
GUARANTEED PRICES
from
Corfield Motors
Limited
FORD DEALER
Phone 46
Courtenay .B.C.
in 1920, and in 1922 and 1923 had remained at 49 cents. During the years
ot higher prices, more than 20 per
cent ot the farmers had been forced
out of business largely owing to the
expansion of farming over too many
acres. That the profit was on the
extra few pounds of butter tat per
cow, or eggs per hen, was shown In
a very clear manner. The feeding
and housing of the dairy cow is a
science in each case, and consequently the successful farmer needed a
greater amount of science knowledge.
It was pointed out that the development of every industry In a like ratio was necessary to avoid over-production ln any one of them.
The marketing problem bad been
over estimated, the speaker said, and
it ls impossible to have organized sale
without organized production. Attempts to limit production ln commodities such as cotton and corn had
led to record crops caused by the
knowledge of the attempt to limit
Prospects of good prices being tho
reason. Three distinct phases of
farming endeavor were pointed out.
The first of these was what the lecturer termed "compounded tradition"
or that which had been handed down
from father to son. Thank goodness
we have this, the speaker said, It has
been the mainstay of farming. The
next stage was "The collection of experiences" which was made possible
by agriculturalists getting together
and discussing the results of their experiments and work. The third stage
wns "The findings of science."
Among a great variety of other subjects discussed were small fruits, including logan berries and wine, fodder crops, silos, ensilage, wheat, egg
production, canneries, markets and
many other subjects. The many questions asked the lecturer were answered in a complete and very lucid
manner. At the close ot the meeting
much appreciation waa voiced by
those present and a hearty vote of
thanks extended to Dean Clement for
coming to Courtenay. Mr. D. Patterson, president of the Comox Valley Fruit Growers' Association was In
the chair.
NATIVE SONS STAGED
ENJOYABLE  WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE
COUnTENAY, Jan. 29.—A good
time was enjoyed on Wednesday evening at the Native Sons whist drive
nnd dance held in the Booth Hall.
Card playing was ln progress st twenty-four tables. The winning ladies
were Mrs. E. L. Macdonald flrst, Mrs.
Spragge second, and Mrs. J. Annand
won the consolation prlte. Gentlemen's prizes went to Mr. A. Martin-
ich first, Mr. T. A. Berkensell second
ond Mr. Mitchell Moncrleff secured
the booby. The Native Sons orchestra, composed of Messrs Jack Carwithen, Wm. Booth, A. Martlnicb and
J. Wood dispensed sweet music for
the dance which followed the whist
drive. During the Interval refreshments were served and greatly appreciated.
ADDITIONAL COl'RTKNAY NEWS
ON PAGE SEVEN
French scientists have invented a
radio receiving set that can be carried in an umbrella.
The average depth of the seas is
two and one-half miles, while the average height of land Is one-half mile.
YOU GET THE
BEST
WHEN ORDERING OF YOUR GROCERIF YOU SPECIFY
Comox Jam
Comox Creamery Butter
Comox Creamery Potatoes
"LOOK FOR THE TAG ON THE BAG"
Comox Creamery Eggs
THEY ARE GRADED
AND HAVE YOU TRIED OUR WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR IN 10, 24 & 491b SACKS
mm
Comox Creamery
Association FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6. 1924.
THE
OLD TIME DANCES
ENJOYED BY LARGE
THRONG MONDAY NIGHT
(Continued From Page One)
big annual party. Other pioneers in
the early life of the district who were
present were Mrs. Florence Cliffe, first
white girl to come to Como.*; District,
It will be interesting to the present
generation to know thnt Mr. Samuel
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
 ss       *    . —
fl
the opening up of the Cumberland-
Royston wagon road. -Mrs. Cliffo's
eldest son Lucius and wire were also
present. "Lu'" as as he la popularly
known throughout the length and
breadth of Comox, was the first white
boy to see the light of day in this district.
Other pioneers present and who enjoyed the dancing as greatly as somu
of the younger members of the party
were: Mrs. Samuel Piercy; Mrs. P.
Beveridge, (formerly Mrs. R. Shorn
who came from Prince  Rupert;   Mr.
Cliffe was one of the contractors on   and Mrs. Matthew Piercy; Mr. Thomas
Mann's 'Bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
Taste Teasing  Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
Ripley; Mr. and Mrs. James Potter;
Mr. and Mrs; Edward Calnan; Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Hornal; Mr. Rupert
Shaw; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mus-
cliamp; Mr. Frank Dallos; Mr. Robert
Vass; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dowdall;
Mr. and Mis. Abraham McLaughlin;
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Johnston; Mr. and
Mrs. W. Hudson; Mr. Sam Franclola;
Mr. and .Mrs. Nell McFadyen; Mr.
Robert Grant; Mr. Richard Hudson;
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Robertson; Mrs.
Thomas Bennett, son and daughter;
Mr. John Bennie; Mr. and Mrs. Albeit
Walker; Mrs. Thomas Carey; Mr. and
Mrs. J. N. McLeod; Mr. and Mrs. D.
Somerville; Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
White; .Mr. and Mrs. Thomas PearBe;
Mr. John Fulclior; Mr. John Struthers; .Mr. R. Struthers; Mr. J. Lockner; Mr. Samuel Vass; Mr. Hugh
Mitchell; Mrs. A. McNeil; Mrs. W.
Melhindo;   Mr.  Thomas   Piket;    Mrs.
DR   R. ..B.   DIER   AND   DR
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office: Cor. ot Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite llo-llo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
j P. P. HARRISON
I   BARRISTER   mill   SOLICITOR
I XO'MIIY PUBLIC
I CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
I Robert Cessford; Mrs. Bono; Mrs.
Horwood; .Mr. and Mrs. A. .Maxwell;
Mrs. A. Maclntyre;. Mr. and .Mrs. B.
S. Abrams; .Mr. Robert Abrams and
Mr. F. D. Pickard.
Others, younger in years, but not in
spirit, who, by virtue of tlie fact that
they had been born in Cumlierland,
were entitled to be present, intended,
but even though they added to the enjoyment of the night, it was certainly
the real first-comers to the district
who provided most of the thrills. All
the old dances were on the program,
lancers, jerseys, quadrilles, schotl-
isches being entered into with great
zest and In these the old boys and
girls were envied hy the younger jaz-
zers.
Mr. Thomas Pearse. of "Hamiy Valley" pleased with several well rendered songs, proving conclusively thai
In otlier days at least one of the residents was no men,, entertainer. Supper was provided by a ladles' commit-
jtee comprising Mrs. R. Robertson
Mrs. J. Lockner, Mrs. J. Derbyshire
Mrs. F. Slaughter, Mrs. C, Macdonald,
Mrs. J. Thomson, Mrs. A. Maclntyre,
Mrs. S. Davis, Mra. J. Aspecl, and Mrs.
A. Maxwell.
The men's committee was comprised
of Mr; John Thomson, Mr. R. Robertson, Mr. W. Whyte and Mr. Wm.
McLennan.
Mr. James Walker acted as floor
manager and Mr. J. Struthers was nt
the door.
LLOYD'S FUNNY CAR
ONLY ONE IN WORLD
Harold Lloyd introduces a new typi!
of light automobile to the screen in
ills lutest comedy. "Hot Water." shoving Friday and Saturday. February
13 und 14 at the llo-llo Theatre, lis-
is the sole creator, llie Inventor, und
the producer, it Is the "Butterfly
Six," (no advertising Intended) and
If, through lt, you don't receive moro
laughs than you huve had for many
a day. there Is something wrong with
your sense of humor.     Vour fuiiin
bone needs chiropractic treatments.
For tlie "Butterfly Six" is the center of one of the swiftest and funniest factious that hus ever been seen
in one of Harold Lloyd's comedies.
There are iwo other rib-tickling sentiences in this picture that are guar-
I anteed blue-chasers, but for originality and cleverness the one Involving
the "Butterfly Six" is the equal of
either.
Haruld takes Ihe family out for n
ride in liis new cur. or rather his
wife's tamlly takes him out In his
car, and II there is anything that
could happen to a new automobile,
and doesiil iu thia picture, Mr. Lloyd
will give tbe remains lo the one telling what lie torgol to put Into the sequence.
This pari nl "lim Wuter" wns developed in .Mr. Lloyd's mind, and Is
the consequence of a trip tlle noted
comedian took in Big Bear Valley several years ago when tlie machine in
which lie was riding was involved in
every kind of an accident, broke every part imaginable, and wound up
by going up in smoke coming down
oue of tlie worst grades on tlie mountain road. Lloyd never could forget
this incident, and In "Hot Water" he
found just llie spot to relate what was
actually si it experience of bis own.
Friday  and
Saturday
Feb. 6
Feb. 7
lEEPS
•VKUtllO COUTH
twist owssm
HMUIVNWIIIUMS -.
n|puHUE(oiiU'sj     M
A JAMES CRUZE Mtux/cmm
\\h\j/li
- - AW^
HERE'S A DRAMA OP NIGHTTIME NEW YORK WITH A STRIKING NEW STORY. A TYPICAL
CRUZE CAST OF FAMOUS PLAYERS.
ALSO A SIDE-SPLITTING
COMEDY.
"Her Fortune Face"
AND AN
International News
Reel
ADULTS 500      CHILDREN 25c
Saturday Night
DANCE
FROM 9:30 TO 12:00.    GOOD MUSIC—GOOD TIME ASSURED.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
2 SHOWS NIGHTLY AT 6.45 and 8.45        MATINEE SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 2.30
Feb.
9
Monday  and  Tuesday
A PICTURE YOU WILL NOT FORGET!    ONE THAT COMES ONCE IN
A LIFE-TIME.     WARNER BROTHERS PRESENT
Feb.
10
u
BABBITT
n
BY SINCLAIR LEWIS, AUTHOR OF "MAIN STREET." "BABBITT"
PROVED THE SENSATION OF THE YEAR IN FICTION, BECAUSE OF
ITS STORY THAT REFLECTS THE LIFE OF EVERY TYPICAL
AMERICAN
DIRECTED BY HARRY BEAUMONT WITH WILLARD LOUIS, MARY
ALDEN, RAYMOND McKEE, CARMEL MYERS, CISSY FITZGERALD,
DALE FULLER AND A TYPICAL WARNER CAST.
Wednesday and Thursday
February 11
and
February 12
fit
WORLDLY GOODS
M
a picture you won't forget because of its vivid portrayal
of events in this, the "Flapper Age"
ALSO CHAPTER V OF
"The Ghost City"       ....       "Foiling The Rustlers"
and a good Comedy:- "SHOULDER ARMS"
SUNDAY EVENING, FEB. 15
at 8.30 o'clock sharp
"J Trip J cross Canada
ILLUSTRATED WITH 200 LANTERN SLIDES, AND A MUSICAL PROGRAM BY THE CU.VIBERLAM) CHORAL SOCIETY.
—SILVER COLLECTION—
99
Friday  and
Saturday
Feb. 13   -.   Feb. 14
Harold Lloyd, in
"HOT
WATER"
t>7s..
7»\    A.*i><>>> A-vA
firrr 7'-'x rf
*a-!il': ,i '      ^v.j
Zt toteeltf
i^Wf ill o??M,/| PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
THEREFORE, BOOST.
If you want to live in the kind of a town
Like the kind of a town you like,
You needn't slip your clothes in a grip
And start on a long, long hike,
You'll only find what you left behind,
For there's nothing that's really new,
It's a knock at yourself when you knock your
town,
It isn't your town—it's you!
THE FARMER AND HIS PROBLEMS
Carlyle said, "He only is wise who knows that
he knows nothing." Most thinking men agree
that they have lots to learn. Life is in fact, a
continual acquisition of knowledge. Does the
farmer of the Comox Valley believe this? It
would seem that some of the farmers in this district are satisfied that they, at least, have nothing more to learn. And yet there does not appear to be a general atmosphere of prosperity
among our farming community. The fact remains, however, that when the head of the faculty of the university of B.C. delivered an address on farm co-operation and economics in Courtenay recently, there were just seventeen members in his audience. On the other hand, a one-
man nigger show, a few days previously, drew a
crowd of hundreds. We often hear that the
farmer has his problems; and no doubt he has.
Dean Clement's lecture was not only intensely interesting and instructive, but it also turned some
of those problems inside out and must have been
of immense value to those few who availed themselves of such a valuable opportunity.
COMOX VALLEY FRUIT GROWERS
On Vancouver Island alone there are 639
growers of small fruits and rhubarb, occupying
1,091 acres with small fruits. Here are the figures according to a report recently issued by the
Provincial Department of Agriculture. There
are 567 acres of strawberries, 156 acres of raspberries, 254 acres of loganberries, 26 acres of
blackberries, 38 acres of black currants, 5 acres
of red currants,. 16 acres of gooseberries and 29
acres are devoted to rhubarb culture. The whole
of the province of British Columbia, however, devotes 2,386 of its acres to the cultivation of Strawberries, 764 acres to loganberries, 239 acres to
black currants, 251 acres to blackberries, 96 acres
to gooseberries, 182 acres to rhubarb and 59 acres
to red currants. The lower Fraser Valley represents about two thirds of the British Columbian
total of small fruit lands. This is because of its
large raspberry acreage of 1,846 acres. Strawberry growing in the Lower Fraser has greatly
increased of late and there are now 1,273 acres
devoted to the popular berry in that district.
Other important small fruit acres are Kootenay,
Creston and Wynndell, Salmon Arm and the Okanagan. Strawberry planting shows a decrease,
but the planting of logans has made a marked advance. This applies particularly to Vancouver
Island. The small fruit industry in the Comox
Valley is rather more than holding it own.
and the way is being paved toward a genuine
brotherhood of man.
Many European music programs have been
heard recently by radio in this country. They
were heard from Berlin and Spain. Also the
Japanese fans reported in a cable from Tokyo th.it
they had picked up Station KGO, in Oakland California. A message launched from Long Island
on the air, intended for Honolulu, brought an answer from Constantinople, 'round the world the
other way.
These are straws which show which way the
wind is blowing. There is no doubt that in time
to come radio is going to bring the peoples of the
earth all in speaking distance. When it is possible to hear Japan, Americans speaking in America; when it is possible to hear Montreal, Italians speaking in Italy, the world will in reality be
but a small neighborhood.
With powerful airships flying from Europe
to this continent in a few hours, and men racing
from coast to coast between sunrise and dark,
we will not look upon our hitherto far-away
neighbor as a stranger.
After all, humanity is much the same ami
people in foreign countries are striving for thc
same things. We are all trying to make a better living, seeking for greater happiness, and facing the other serious problems of life in a practical way. Most of the differences and hates between nations have been the result of political
fomentings.
When we come to understand and know each
other better, our common interests will have
greater weight. Every means of rapid travel
and the rapid tranference of thought and speech
from one country to another does good. We an;
closing the gaps across the earth.
DROSS
FROM THE MELTING POT
BY SCOOP
CLOSING THE GAPS
Distances are rapidly shrinking; the world
is fast becoming a neighborhood. Science, within the last few years, has made rapid progress toward bringing the nations of the world together,
If love is bliss, marriage Is the blister.
...
Are all radio fans liars or all liars radio fans—which'/
...
It is all right to knock at the door, but quit when you
get ln.
...
The biggest room In the world is the room for improvement.
* •   •
The less a man has in his skull the more he needs
in his pocket.
* *   •
The toreadors ln Madrid have eone on strike and now
there ls no one to throw the bull.
...
Burmese girls can't enter society without ear plugs.
Canadian boys can't enter without spark plugs.
* .   .
What bas become of the old-fashioned man who could
not sleep after five o'clock on Sunday morning?
...
Coats will be worn longer this Spring.     Pants will
be worn longer by the husbands who buy the coats.
...
A woman doesn't think her dinner party a real success unless she feels incapable of gettting up next morning.
...
This old world needs less war and less war talk ami
more righteousness, Christian charity, chicken pie and
strawberry shortcake,
...
An Illinois genius has Invented a sled with one runner.     Why doesn't he do something worth while and invent an automobile with one tire?
...
Because his wife "imported" into their household her
mother, her stepfather, her brother, three step-sisters and
an uncle for him "to support" and made him get his own
breakfast and supper, besides Insisting he turn over his
pay check "in full" every month, are claims made by a
Bucyrus, 0., man in support of his application for a divorce.
EARLY
SPRING
r
Shown this
week
DRESS FLANNELS, NOVELTY CHECK AND STRIPED SPORT FLANNEL, CHECK
AND PLAID GINGHAMS, NOVELTY OVERCHECK GINGHAMS, ANDERSON ZEPHYR GINHAMS, COTTON CREPES, MARACON CREPES, PRINTS, LAWNS, PLAIN
AND CHECK, NAINSOOKS, CHILDREN'S DRESSES AND BLOOMER SUITS.
MONARCH   WOOLS
The balance of our stock of Monarch Wools at the old prices
Monarch Dove, per ball 	
Monarch Down, in 2 oz balls, in a good assortment of shades.
Special Price, per ball 	
25c
35c
Gent's Department
Special Sale Men's  Tweed   Pants,   in   a!i
sizes, Values to $4.75 (j*n  nr
Special Sale Price  tytU.KjO
Men's Heavy All Wool Work Socks, Values to 90c jr
Special Sale Price per pair  Trtlv
Men's Brown Wool Ribbed Work Socks,
values to $1.00
Special Sale Price per pair
Men's   Ileavv   All   Wool   Grey   Flannel
Shirts. Reg. to $2.75
Special Sale Price	
.Men's Heavy Brown Calf Blucher Work
Shoes, with outside counter, Regular
price $6.50 &A  OC
Special Sale Price par pair .... tyHt.uO
60c
Flannel
$1.95
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Del Monte Peaches, 2's tins   30r
Quaker Pears, 2" o's, 2 tins 95o
Black Cherries, 2's, 3 tins   $1.00
Empress Bramble Jelly, 4's tins      $1.00
Hamsterly Farm Strawberries, 2's
2 tins   75c
Del Monte Pineapples, 2 tins   45c
Evaporated Peaches, 2 lbs  4JSt"
Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs  45<i
Fancy Bulk Dates, 2 lbs   35o
FRESH FRUIT AND
Aunt Dinah Molasses, HVs, 2 tins 35t?
Aylmer Canned Corn, 5 tins 95c
Heinz Pork & Beans, 7 tins $1.00
Clark's Corn Beef, I's. 3 tins  $1.00
C & B Sweet Pickles, 9-oz jars   50<>
Libby's Prepared Mustard, 2 jars .... 35<)
2 in 1 Shoe Polish, 2 tins 25<*
French Castile Soap, 5 cakes  45tf
Witch Hazel Toilet Soap, 12 bars .. $1.00
Zebo Liquid Stove Polish, 2 for   25<?
VEGETABLES
fit-
New Car Service
CAlt FCIt HIKE DAY OK NICHT
1 TELEPHONE-—IWO
Cumberland Hotel
Lumber
In every sorts of building material*,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOM,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARQHS.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONFS fN'ght ""': 1MX Cottrt,IU>r
I Office: 169 Cumberland
Car  For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Ror.il Candy Or Reeldence
25 22
CUMBERLAND
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT  EYAN8
Praotleal Barber,  and  Halr-
dreeser, Shampooing, Singeing.
Managing,    Soalp    Treatment.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comtort   and   Homelike   servloe.
26   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent oulslue—
For reservations Fbene 16
R. YATIS, Manager.
}eBeerwithoutaPeef
and
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
U.B.C. Beer
Rich, creamy beers with body
and strength that find favor
with thousands. They're good
—always good!
Products of
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
When you are in need of a
rinniliiiiK A Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON   !
Phone 124 Phone 157
Courtenay or Cumberland
Your   needs   will   receive   Immediate
attention.
s.
DAVIS
UP-TO-DAli
SHOE REPAIRER.
It pay
s to have your shoes repaired as they wear
longer
after
'epairing than w
hen new.
I aim
to give the best
in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address—
Opposite the Drug
Store. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
4
PAGE FIVE
CNRC HEARD IN FIJI
The radio voice of Canada continues to make itself heard in far away i
places and in this respect the broadcasting station of the Canadian Nn- ]
tional Railways at Calgary,* CNRC, has j
performed what might well be In- j
eluded in the great radio feats ot* the
world in making Itself heard in the
Fiji and Samoa Islands. This almost equals the stations lone distance
reception record, which Is New Zealand. The applause sent to CNCR
shows tbnt the November 10 broadcast from Calgary was picket up nine
thousand miles away at 5.80 o'clock
on the afternoon of Nov. 20 '.;.,■ Rev. j
Richard Piper, in charge ol ihe .Methodist Mission of tlie Fiji [stands, and
M. 0. James, at Apia. Samoa, The
difference In time accounts for the
difference in date.
I railway  ties  to be delivered  by  the
end of March.
B. C. DELICACY
BEING EXPORTED
RAILWAY  TIES
FOR   BRITAIN
A further order for 8,000.000 feet of
railway ties or sleepers has been received by British Columbia sawmills
trom buyers in the British Isles. At
the present time snwmills ln the province have on order 20,000,000 feet of
Cuts of canned whale meat are considered a great delicacy in West Africa, according to tlie London Board
of Trade Journal. Practically the
Whole ol Ihe whale meat canned In
Britlsii Columbia last year was sold
in the settlements between Liberia
and tlie Congo. West Africa hns
thus solved the problem of finding a
market for whale meat after the oil
has heen extracted, for whale steak
lias become a really popular viand iu
that pait of the world.
Montreal, director of immigration for
tlie Canadian National Railways, at
tlie Fort Garry hotel, Winnipeg, a few
days ago. He declared that Canada
stood higher than ever in Great Britain in spite of the anti-Canadian ptili-
Uclty In a certain section of tlie press
; ft!>5,347 in cash and $344,151 In value j
j ot* effects.     During 1923 $1,875,786 In !
| money  and  $496,053  in   effect I   were
| brought in from the United Slates.
Vancouver now has elevator storage and handling capacity for 6.000.-
000 bushels of grain.
NEW RACE AT THE PAS
TELL TRUTH
ABOUT CANADA
"Our policy is to tell tlie absolute
truth about Canada with no attempt
at camoullage, and our officers have
orders to explain to prospective settlers that no great wealth awaits the
average settler In Canada, but thai
what docs await hlm Is more than a
good chance of making a home for
himself and family and with wonderful opportunities for tlie children to
make good." asserted Dr. W. J. Black,
A work dog race, confined to teams
of five dogs each, wth tandem hitch
and flat toboggan, will be an innovation at The Pas this year in con-
iitction with tlie eighth annual 300-
mile dog derby. The work teams will
carry 100 pounds of frloght for a distance of HO miles, to be run on tw >
consecutive days. The dug races will
he run oil during thc winter carnival
which opens on February 2.
UNITED STATES SENDS
G.477 .SETTLERS
The United tSatcs gavo 6,477 settlers to western Canada during the
year 1924. according to figures announced by the Winnipeg office of thi'
Dominion department of immigration.
Immigrants from tlie republic to west
em Canada for 1923 totalled 8,704.
! The wealth brought iu by these set-
i tiers  during  1921   amounted  to  ?t.-
One thousand men are employed In
connection with the fisheries, and two
thousand me,, are working in tbe lumber camps operating in northern Saskatchewan this winter.
RUSSIA   BUYS
CANADIAN WHEAT
Within the past four weeks the So-1
viet government of Russia has placet)
orders for a total of Suu.OtW  barrels
of flour for immediate shipments  to
j Russian ports.    Of this amount 20,000
j tons, or approximately 200.01111 barrels
I was  placed  in   the United  Kingdom.
I and   Uie   balance  of  Co0,:ioo   barrels
! was taken In North American mark-
1 els.      The   placing   of  such   11   huge
! amount of business is a mos, significant development, especially i.i view
. of tiie fact that Russia was one of tlio
j important exporters of grain in prewar  days.      The  original  order  for
1 120.000 barrels was placed   with   a
j Canadian mill in mid-December. This
was followed hy additional orders for
4SO,000 barrels, a large part of which
was secured by Canadian mills.
CUMBERLAND HOSPITAL
TO HAVE NEW WING IS
DECISION OF BOARD
(Continued From Page One)
by .1. L. Brown and seconded by E
D. Plckurd that a committee be appointed lo consist of the hospital executive and the committee appointed
last year witli Mr. George O'Brien In
the place of Mr. T. Scott, and with
power to add to Its number, to take
the necessary steps ln this matter
Tills motion was carried. The ic-
port of the Building Committee was
ilien adopted and the members thanked for their services.
A vote of thanks was extended to
the Ladies' Auxiliary and to all other
who had assisted the hospital in tht
past year and the Board of Management was also thanked for Its services during 1924. ' The meeting was
then adjourned.
President's Annual Report
To the Subscribers to the Cumber-
laud General Hospital.
Gentlemen:—I beg to submit the
Annual Report of the Cumberland
General Hospital for the year ending December 31st. 1924.
The period covered by this report
13
246
236
9
11
$H^ZfiC J[ct>tt~
Recognized authority on household
problems pertaining to the selection,
preparation and serving of food for
all occasions.
Director of thc Maple Leaf Club and
author of a remarkable course on
Cookery Arts ond Kitchrn Management offered to you—FREE.
HOW TO   ENROLL
as a Member of I he Maple Leaf
Club and obtain this Free Course
Send only four Maple Leaf Flour
Coupons (I coupon in 24 Ib. bag of
Maple Leaf Flour—2 coupons in 49 lb.
bag—4 coupons in 98 lb. bag) to the
Maple Leaf Club. Maple Leaf Milling
Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
This enrolls you as a member of the
Maple Leaf Club and the first four
lessons of this remarkable course wiil
be mailed to you at once, the remaining
lessons—four each month—without
charge.
See your dealer about this unusual free
offer, to-day.
Even without the coupons enclosed in every
bag, Maple Leaf Flour would be more than
worth every cent it costs you. No other
Flour gives superior baking results tither for
bread, cake or pastry.
Maple Leaf Flour is made from the finest
selected Canadian hard wheat, carefully
milled and tested at every stage of its manufacture. A written guarantee of uniformly
high quality goes with every big it must
be satisfactory or you get your money back.
For the purpose of more quickly introducing
Maple Leaf Flour to the housewives of
Western Canada, we are making an unheard
of special offer for the return of coupons
enclosed   in   every   bag.     These   coupons
entitle you to a wonderful Free Course, the
equivalent of a college course in Domestic
Science, that would be Ir w-priced at $200.00.
A course by mail, written by one of the
leading cookery and household experts in
Canada- Anna Lee Scott—Director of the
Maple Leaf Club.
It is impossible to buy 1 his course, yet you
can secure it tree. All lessons are sent postpaid. There arc no examinations to answer.
The only correspondence invited is for any
help you msy desire on subjects relating to
household problems 01* tbe cooking or serving
of special dishes for special occasions—such
inquiries will be promptly answered person'
ally by  Anna Lee Scott- without charge.
MAPLE LEAF MILLING CO., LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
HAPLEL
FOR   BREAD, CAKE & PASTRY
K * H %^W#&&-*>W
ay As^BlMg W.-3LTJ!gTt?nP?TT-
a:.
mMMEMZ^M HEH
is ouly !< months, tlu* end of the fiscal
year having been changed al ihe last
annual meeting from   .March  31st to
December 31st in each year.
Statistics
In hospital April 1st, 1924	
Admitted during the year	
Discharged during the year ....
Died during the year    	
In hospital Jan, 1. 1925   .     .
No. of hospital days treatment  .5865
Average No. of patients per day   21.3
Major operations     34
Minor operations     <n;
Obstetrical cases  31
Anaesthetics       hit
X-ray examinations   106
The number Of patient days was
slightly higher than for the same period last year. The average number
of days per patient being 23.S as compared  with 22.9 last yeur.
Financial Conditions
During the year as will he noted
from the financial statement the receipts from all sources were $16126.98
and the total expenditure $15234.66,
making a net profij on the operations
for the nine mouths of $891.42.
The hospital bad a balance in the
bank to its credit at the beginning of
the fiscal year of $1842,04 and at the
end of the year $2773.46.
All the financial obligations of the
hospital have been met when due. It
was not necessary at any time to
overdraw our account.
Cost of Operation
The cost of operation has maintained practically the same level as last
year. The cost per patient day for
the nine month period being $2.69 as
compared with $2.58 for the proceeding twelve mouths.
Equipment
All equipment ifi in excellent condition. The only addition to equipment
is the purchase of an inteusifing
screen for the x-ray machine. This
has not yet arrived hut should provo
very valuable in the operation of the
x-ray.
Medical Fund Agreement
The arrangements between the Med
leal Fund and the Hospital have beeu
continued during tbe year and are. I
think, working satisfactorily to both
parties.
Repair-, to  Uuidinus
The main building was re-shingled
during the summer and a considerable amount of painting and other repairs done.
At the last general meeting tho
question of furnishing additional private rooms was taken up and a special committee was appointed consisting of Thus. O'Brien, Kdward Hughes
and T. W. Scott to go thoroughly into
the matter and co-operate with the
Hospital Hoard and draw up a scheme
which would (ill thf requirements.
This committee met and their report will be submitted to you later
for discussion. A committee from
the hospital consisting of Dr. MacNaughton, Miss Hrown. T. Mordy.
secretary and the President were appointed to meet the special enmmitee.
Several meetings were held and a
plan of the proposed addition agreed
upon. This will be also submitted
for your approval.
The plan submitted shows an addition similar in shape to the Alexandra
Ward, but is composed entirely of
private rooms. There are nine rooms
In the proposed new addition. This
together with the Clinton Ward will
give ten private rooms which is an
Increase of six rooms Hathrooms.
toilets, utility rooms and linen closets
are also provided.
The present small building which
contains 3 private rooms will be moved hack and converted into dining and
siting room for the nurses,
This arrangement will in the opinion of your committees fill the requirements, giving sufficient private
rooms and providing proper sitting
room accommodation for the nursing
staff.
It ls also proposed to remodel the
fronts of the main building and the
Alexandra ward in order to give the
whole front a symetrieal appearance.
These alterations are also shown on
the plan,
Mr. Owen has prepared a preliminary estimate and tbe estimated cost
is in the neighborhood of $11000, De-
tallefl specifications have yet to be
prepared and these may alter the cost
slightly.
Financing
The special committee in their report deal with the Question of financing the construction of the proposed
wing, This has no, had much consideration from thc hospital committee but any scheme tbat will raise
the necessary amount will he acceptable to them.
Al the last meeting nf the Hoard,
after carefully reviewing their financial position, tin- Board decided *o
contribute to the construction fund
the sum of $3000.00, This is more
than they have at present to their
redit but the Hoard feels that hy the
cxercis(. of careful economy they can
contribute this amount,
We hope tlia, the meeting will carefully consider the question nnd feel
sure that if a properly organized effort is made the necessary amount
can bo raised.
We wish to express our appreciation
of the good work of tbe Ladles' Auxiliary during tlie past year.
Wo also wish to express our appreciation of the good service rendered hy the Matron and Iter staff.
We nlso take this opportunity 10 express our thanks t" all those who
made donations or assisted tlie hospital in any way.
Respectfully submitted. Chas. (ira-
ham. President.
A Vancouver iirm of fur farmers
ha,s purchased Tumbo Island in the
Oulf of Georgia, Hriiish Columbia, for
a fox ranch. This firm has two other
ranches, one on Nelson Island, comprising abou, 1.  acres, and another
at Pitt  Lake nf 8, I  acres,      Hoth
are well stocked witli foxos and musk
rats, there being between 2.500 and
5.000 of the rodents.
Wha, is claimed to be the world's
largest tractor hns been constructed
for lumbering, being large enough to
pick up a log between ils wheels and
carry It. PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
F=
1
Marcel Waver
Nine Reasons Why You Should Buy This Waver
1.
Assures a beautiful  Marcel  Wave   in  five   (5)
minutes.
2.
lt will not burn or singe your hair.
3.
It will save its cost many times in the first month.
4.
A wave when you want it—No waiting t'or the hair
dresser.
6.
After the swim, put a quick wave in.
6.
Costs practically nothing to operate—Fits in any
socket.
7.
A quicker and better wave than is possible with
any other appliance.
8.
Your appearance depends  on  your   hair   dress.
Here is quick beauty.
9.
Absolutely guaranteed.
PRICE $3.50
1
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
BETTER MEAT
AT WILCOCK BROS' MEAT MARKET
For the better cuts of Delicious Meats, you can always
get satisfaction at Wilcock llros' Meat Market.     We
make a specialty of quality cuts at prices that mean
wholesonie saving to you.
Wilcock   Bros.
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland, B.C.
L.
WHAT IS IT KEEPS
"THE CITY THAT NEVER
SLEEPS" AWAKE?
No, this Isn't a joke!
The new James Cruze Paramount
production, "The City That sN'evor
Sleeps," playing at the Ilo-Uo Theatre this Friday and Saturday, is :i
story of New York, Broadway and the
Bowery.
"Why the title?" you say. That's,
it! How ahout a trip down to the
Ilo-Ilo to see just what It is that
keeps "The City That Never Sleeps'
awake.
The story, an adaption of "Mother
i O'Day," hy Leroy Scott, is one of
' mother-love, romance and intrigue
and features Ricardo Cortez, Louise
Dresser. Kathlyn Williams and Vir-
: ginia Lee Corliln in tlle leading roles.
: There a line cast playing in sup-
| port of the principals in this latest
i of "The Covered Wagon" and other
great screen successes.
WHO   IS   THIS
GUY    BABBITT?
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a i/o-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
^mm
EYES ILA
IRRITATED BY        ^"■">\ I
SUN.WIND.DUST6-CINDERS
I George P, Dabhltt created a great
deal of interest In Hollywood.
, Whan "Babbitt," a Warner Brothers Classic of the Screen, directed hy
Hurry Beaumont, was Hearing completion it was necessary to use a near-
] by real  estate subdivision  for "Bab-
■ blttvllle," George F. Babbitt's real es-
tate tract.
Bright colored flags were taken out
| there and signs were painted telling
' of the advantages of purchasing in
"llabbittville."     While the studio ar-
j tists were at work on the sign they
noticed two men approaching from
another real estate office just across
the street.
They watched awhile, read of Bab-
bittville, and then finally asked one
of the artists:
"Say, fellows, who is this George
F. Babbitt, anyway? We've bean
around here quite a while and w°
never heard of him!"
"Babbitt," with a cast headed by
| Willard Louis, will play at the Hollo Theatre next Monday and Tuesday. February 9 and  10.
no absentees at tlle first regular meeting of tlie new city council on Mon-
T. Malpass
GENERAL HAILING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS OIK MOTTO
OR PIIO.NE 16 UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
Your Grocer
l$AJ3cmfon,
Milkman
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Write  to  the  Borden Co.,  Limited
Vancouver. B.C.
CUMBERLAND
CHINATOWN USHER
IN THE NEW YEAR
During the week that closed last
Sunday night the Chinese community
celebrated the advent of their new
year. They did it as only the Chinese
can, the grand finale coming on Sunday when the Chinese Masonic Lodge
held a grand banquet in honor of the
Installation of their new officers as
follows: President, Fong Yuen; Vice
President, Long Chung; Secretaries,
Chow Loy and Mah Tom Keyes; Sup-
erintendant, Fred Chang; Treasurer
Chaw Lee. At the dinner in the afternoon twenty tables, each accommodating ten brethren were set and later
in the evening President Fong Yuen's
party entertained some of tlieir
friends at the restaurant. Firecrackers, bombs and rockets were
fired, many children taking part in
the celebration, the fireworks display
in front of the Masonic Hall being
witnessed by a great gathering of
Chinese. At about eleven o'clock all
was quiet, the Chinese being satisfied
Uiat another year had been rightly
ushered tn.
Dr.T.R.Hughes,D.CPHC.
Chiropractor
Violet Ray and Electric Massage.
9 years field experience Saskatchewan License
For treatment of all Spinal disorder and Nervous afflictions,
organic troubles whicli all arise from the spine. Headaches,
Weak Eyes, Tonsilllis. Had Colds. Weak Stomach, Constipation.
Female   Disorders,   Lumbago,   Miners   Duck,   Fallen   Arches.
Brights Disease and  numerous other troubles.
Call and be-examined.     Treatments enn be given in your own
home if desired.     Call at Room  1  in
Cumberland Hotel
From 1 to 5 p.m.     For appointment Phone 24
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIRST MEETING OF
1925 COUNCIL IS FULL
OF ENTHUSIASM
COURTENAY, Fell. 3.—There were
French Organdie
I day nigjit. On taking Uie cliair,
| Mayor elect Win. Duncan, took occasion to express his thanks to the
Aldermen t'or the honor they had done
him in selecting him for the position
of the first magistrate for the City nf
Courtenay. He assured the Aldermen that he considered it a great honor to preside over men such as formed
the present council and lo he mayor
of a progressive city like Courtenay.
The new faces at the council table
this year are those of Messrs Frederick Field, B. L, .Macdonald and John
.McKenzie, although the last named
has had previous municipal expeti-
ence. The surviving Aldermen are
Messrs Theed Pearse, Heber Cooke
and  Wm.  Fielder.
Three   well   signed   petitions   were
presmied   to   last   night's   meeting.
These documents concerned tlie opening  up  of   two   new   streets,  namely
Alice   Street   and   Walter   Street  and
the  improvement  of  the  Union   Bay
Road.     Thc present condition of the
Lake Trail  Road   was also discussed
and it is possible that  the city will
hire n  grader and   tractor from  tho
Provincial Public Works Dept. for the
improvement   of  this  and  other  city
[streets.      It is hoped that  tbe gratl-
I ing on tbe Lake Trail will be done
| without delay.
A letter from the Provincial Secretary concerning tlie Town Planning
Act, whicli received its first and sec-
; ond reading during the last session
j of the Provincial Legislature, was be-
; fore tbe council for their consideration. Tbe proposed act will have
further attention from the City Council.
The new pound by-law whicb will
prohibit milk cows from running at
large within the city received its flrst
and second reading. Tbe introduction of this by-law by Alderman
Pearse is Hie result of tlie discision of
the recent plebiscite on the question.
The Court of Revision for the assessment and taxes was set for Monday next the 9tli inst. at eight o'clock.
The whole council will constitute the
Court. Tlie appointment of tbe
standing committees resulted ns fol-
jlows: Finance: Aldermen Cooke,
j Field and Pearse; Works: Aldermen
| Fielder, .McKenzie and Cooke; Electric; Alderman Macdonald, Field and
Pearse; Water: Aldermen McKenzie,
' Pearse and McDonald; Fire: Aldermen Field. Fielder and Cooke; Better Housing and Sanitary: Aldermen
Pearse, Macdonald and .McKenzie.
Other appointments were City Auditor
Mr. M. it. Tribe and a special committee for tiie improvement of l'nion
Street, namely Aldermen Cooke, McKenzie and Fielder. Tli, Iii.! named
of the Aluermen will lie the chairman
;of tlie committee in each case.
lt was decided that the whole council should interview Mr. 1'. P. Harrison M.L.A. concerning Island Highway improvements. On invitation of
'tlie Mayor tiie civic authorities will
attend Divine Service on Sunda? next
;>t St. George's Presbyterian Church.
! There was a decidedly enthusiastic
and business-like atmosphere nt tho
lirst meeting of the 1925 Council.
"The Most of the Best for the Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
The Popular Choice!
ASK YOl'R LOCAL VENDOR AND DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER   TIIAT  NEVER  HAS BEEN  EQUALLED
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
Grand
Valentine Dance
BOARD OF TRADE, COURTENAY
GAIETY THEATRE
Wednesday, Feb.  11th
Splendid Music
Refreshments
This advertisement is not published or displayed by  thu
Liquor Control Board or by tlv Government of B.C.
PETER McNIVEN
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE 150
L
EXTRA
Vancouver   Daily  Province
ADDS SUNDAY EDITION
High Grade Magazine Section—Colored Comic Section—Numerous Special Features—ALL OF PROVINCE  STANDARD
Introductory Rate
DAILY AND SUNDAY PROVINCE
by mail to any address in British Columbia outside
Greater Vancouver
4  MONTHS,  $1.00
Yearly subscriptions not accepted at this rate.
RATE FROM AGENTS, 25c. PER MONTH
SUNDAY EDITION 5c. PER COPY
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Through local agent or Postmaster.
Special   Note—All   regular  subscribers   will   receive
Sunday edition with no extra charge.   If subscriptions
were paid in advance at 50c. per month, proper credit
will be applied to their account in due course. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN f^
A
COURTENAY-COMOX
B. OF T. WILL HOLD
VALENTINE DANCE
COURTENAY, Jan. 31.—At a special meeting of the Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade, held ln the city hall
Tasty Meat
Substitutes
We ttII you how to make
24 delicious meat subi ti-
tutediihuwilhKraftCheiu,
in the new Kralt Recipe
Book, lent free on reque st.
Send forit to-day and treal
your family to "Something
different". The children
especially will benefit by
the change in menu
Krssft-luUnis Chuu Ci. Ltd. Nosstrnl
Stsssl M Fm n«ipi Book.
Nmh   	
Alien.	
last night, witli Mr. Heber Cooke lu
the chair, the following committees
were appointed in connection with the
Valentine Dance to he held in the Gaiety Theatre on February 11th:
Advertising committeo, Messrs Ea-
die and A. Burnett; Supper Committee, Messrs Shannon, McPherson and
Capes; Decorating Committee, Messrs
Wm. Douglas, A. M, Stark ami T.
Booth; Door Committee, Messrs Gadie
Thompson and Hughes; Music aad
Program Committee, Messrs J. N. McLeod and F. Field.
The members of tlie general committee who culled tlie meeting are
.Messrs Heber Cooke, P. L. Anderton
nnd Win. Douglas. it was decided
lo appoint a committee consisting cf
twelve members of the Board of
Trade to see Unit every lady and
gentleman attending the dunce lie provided with partners. The price of
admission, which will include supper
wan set at $1.50 for gents and 50
cents for ladies.
;COURTENAY GIRL
GUIDES ELECT
OFFICERS FOR 1925
	
| COURTENAY, Jan, 31.—The annual
; meeting of tlie Girl Guides Association was held in Courtenay yesterday
j afternoon, when the officers for tho
ensuing year were elected as follows;
President, Mrs. A. E. Sutherland, Vice
i President, Mrs. Margaret McPhee;
'Secretary, Mrs. L. S. Cokely; Treasurer, Mrs. F. G. Uddle.
The Enemy of
Loneliness
No need of feeling lonely when there is a telephone
in your house. Through it you can pay a visit to your
friends, whether they live three blocks or three hundred miles away. No matter what the distance, no
"matter what, the weather—the telephone will carry
you there. If you haven't a telephone you are deprived of a great deal of pleasure.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
The annual report showed that the
Guides had enjoyed a very successful
year, which was largely brought
about by the establishment of a Summer Camp at Kye Bay in charge of
Mrs. T. J. Meredith (Capt). A resolution was passed deciding to hold
quarterly meetings of the association
for tlie future. The financial report
showed a balance in the bank of $24.
Various sub-committees were appointed, Including entertainment and finance, badge and sewing. It was
also decided to form a troop of
'Brownies" in connection with the
first troop Courtenay Guides and the
Brownies will be under the care of
Mrs. II. L. Ramsay assisted by Miss
Kathleen Halle/.
SOLDIER SETTLERS
HELD MEETING
LAST WEDNESDAY
COURTENAY, Feb. 5—At a meeting of the Soldier Settlers held in
Courtenay last night with comrade
Howard Cox in the chair and with
some twenty-five other members present, a good deal of business was trans
acted. Recent statements appearing
in the press claiming that 80 per cent
of soldier settlers had made payments
satisfactory to the S.S.B. and that
53.2 per cent had made full payments
to the Board were refuted.
It was resolved to address letters
to Premier Oliver and P. P. Harrison
M.L.A., requesting the rebate of five
years taxes in lieu of the 5600 bonus
allowed by the Provincial Government
to returned men who took up land
under the Provincial Land Settlement
Board. Letters are also to be addressed to Mr. A. W. Neill, the Fed-
I AM GOING TO THE
BOARD OF TRADE
Valentine
Dance
IN
COURTENAY
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
ESSEX-6-COACH
$1595.00
F.O.B. COURTENAY
Its Greatest Values
Cannot Be Copied
The Chassis Is Patented
As its Coach Body has changed the whole
trend to closed cars
So Essex Chassis likewise forecasts the
mechanical design of the future
Essex provides stability without unnecessary weight.
It has economy without sacrifice of performance.
It is low priced without disappointment in looks or
reliability.
It is more than up-to-date in design. It is in advance
of any car with which its price can be compared.
It is built on the Super-Six principle, by Hudson
workmen in the Hudson shops.
In quality Hudson and Essex are alike. The patents
which make the Super-Six the most enduring,
smoothest motor and give it all advantages sought
in eight cylinders, prevent any from copying its
chassis as has been so generally done in copying
the Coach body.
ESSEX HOLDS  ITS OWN EVERYWHERE
Bell-Irving Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay, B.C.
eral member thanking him for his assistance in urranging a meeting with
Premier Mackenzie King during the
premier's visit to Courtenay last November. A letter of appreciation is
also to be sent to Mr. P. L. Anderton
In connection with arranging a meeting between the Federal Member aud
the Soldier Settlers. The veterans
consider they should have first opportunity of meeting abandoned S.S.B.
farms, or purchasing the hay crops
thereon, and a resolution to tills effect was passed, a copy of which will
be sent to Mr. Neill at Ottawa.
The staging of a whist drive and
dance was discussed but il was decided that for the present the time
was Inopportune. The olllcers and
committee of the Settlers are: President. Mr. Howard Cox; Vice-President, Mr. Alex Craik; Secretary, Mr.
P. W. Tull; Executive, Messrs H. P.
lllberry, H. E. Ault, O. R, Hates, E
Bayly, J. W. Carey, W. A. Edwards
and W. R. Hodgkln.
NATIVE SONS OF CANADA
INITIATE NEW MEMBERS
Courtenay Assembly No. 3 Native
Sons of Canada held one of tie biggest meetings since organization or
Thursday. All sections of Comox
District were represented and twenty-two new members were initiated
At the close of the meeting a social
was held, to which the members ol
Courtenay Assembly No. 6 Canadian
Daughters' League, had been invited
They turned out in force and when
dancing began there were nearly two
bundled persons present. The Daughters brought their husbands and thf
Sons brought their wives regardless
of whether they were Canadian borr
or not and a most enjoyable evening
was spent. Features of the entertainment were musical selections by
Masters Hlbbert and Raymond McLeod. in Violin and Cornet duets. Thoy
were accompanied on the piano by
their sister, Miss Annie McLeod.
They are the children of Mr. and Mrs.
S. u. McLeod, of Royston. Mr. H.
Blackhall did some neat stepdanclng
and the Native Sons' own orchestra
gave a finished performance during
the dancing. Refreshments were
served at eleven p.m., after whicli
dancing was resumed until one o'clock
The next regular meeting of Court-
anay Assembly, Native Sons will he
held on February 19th when another
large number of candidates will be
initiated.
DENMAN ISLAND NEWS
Dissolve Partnership
Messrs J. McNaught, D. Robertson
and J. McGee have dissolved partnership and sold out 'heir logging business to T.  Pearse of Courtenay.
Kecelve Certificates
Thc following pupils of Division II
Denman Island School were successful in obtaining writing certificates
for examinations recently sent into
Vancouver:
Grade IV. — Margaret Chalmers,
Bernice Fulton, Catherine Wood. Cyril
Doheny.
Grade III.—Thelma Swan, Beryl
Dickson.
Hard Time Hall
On January 30th, a Hard Time Bai.
was held in tlie old hall. A very largo
crowd turned oul, ubout half of whom
appeared to have struck very bard
times while the rest were somewhat
more prosperous looking. Good music
was provided by Mr. and Mrs. Chudy
playing the accordlan and violin respectively. Several songs were given
by visiting clamdlggers and were
given hearty applause, one of these
songs being sung in four dtffsrenl
languages.
Much excitement was caused by tin
appearance of Police Constables t.'i
Street and Piket. who arrested various people for luw-breaking. Mr,
A. Swan was accused of breaking ice
ln Bayne Sound but was released after
paying a line. Harper Baikie paid n
fine for attenmpting to grow a mustache. Several others were also fined
for various misdeeds. Dancing was
kept up until the early hours when
the gathering broke up after joining
hands and singing Auld Lang Syne.
INTERESTING PROGRAM
FOR MINING CONVENT'N
PORTLAND CANAL
MINING   DISTRICT
Our statistical department  has
compiled,   and   we   will   mall
FREE ON REQUEST.
a
LARGE COLORED MAP
and other voluable Information
regarding recent important discoveries and activities In this,
British Columbia's richest, gold
and   silver   producing  district.
GRANT MANHOOD & CO. Ltd.
(Members Vancouver Stock
Exchange)
522-525 Rogers Bldg. Vancouver
B. C.
A most interesting program haa
been outlined by the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy for the
convention whicli will be held at ths'
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. February 18, 19 and 20. Included in
Wednesday's program is an address
on Mineral Statistics of British Columbia by Mr. W. Fleet Robertson,
Provincial Mineralogist, also a Survey
of the Mining Situation in British Columbia by Mr, H. G. Nichols; both of
these addresses will doubtless ptow
Interesting and beneficial.
Mr. Thomas Graham. General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries here will act as chairman of Wed-
nesday's meet.
Thursday's program will include :i
symposium of Information relative to
the economics of "The Pacific Great
Eastern Problem" which is of vital
interest to British Columbia. The arrangements for this Symposium have
been made In collaboration with thf
Vancouver branch of the Engineering
Institute of Canada. In the evening
an   interesting   lecture  on   "The   In-
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
rDunsmuir Avenue
lluences of Mining on Civilization" by
T. A. RIckard promises to be most
interesting.
Friday morning's session v.ill embrace a discussion of the "Economical and Industrial Conditions In British Columbia" introduced from the
points ut* view of those engaged lu
the different industries. On Friday
evening the annual dinner will take
place, the guest of honor being Mr. W.
Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist, whose retirement is Imminent.
I\ JUK.MOKM.W
"In loving memory of John William
Whiteliouse. who was killed February
S, 1088," Inserted by his wife and
son.
IN   MK.tlOltlA.M
In loving memory of Vincent Cavallero. wlm departed this life February
8, 11123.
Ill our lonely hours of thinking
Thoughts of you are ever dear,
We who loved you sadly miss you,
As it dawns another year.
Inserted by liis loving wife and
family.
IN   JIKMOHl.tJl
In loving memory of my dear husband. Thomas Edward Williams, who
was killed  in  mine explosion No. 4
Mine. February 8. 1923.
We often think of days gone by
When we were all together,
N'o better husband ever Ilved
Now lie has gone forever.
We often sit ami think of you,
Your name we often call;
But there is nothing left for us
Only vour photo on the wall.
Sadly missed by his loving wife and
children, Courtenay Hoad.
IN  MKHOIimi
In loving memory of our beloved
son and brother Johnny Frelone, who
was called suddenly home on February S, 1923.
Nn one knows the silent heartache
Only those who have lost can tell.
Of grief that Is born In silence,
For our dearest we loved so well;
Surrounded by friends we are lonesome.
Amidst our pleasures we're blue,
A smile on our face, still a heartache,
Aching and longing for you.
Ever remembered by his sorrowing
parents, sister nnd brothers.
IN OTSMOIIIAM
In loving memory of my dearly beloved husband, Alexander Robertson,
who was killed in an explosion in
No. 4 Mine, Cumlierland, B.C.. on February S. 1923.
"Two years have passed away, with
hearts still sore.
As time goes by we miss you more
and more,
Vour memory is as fresh today as at
tlie time you passed away."
"Just a thought of sweet remembrance from a memory fond and
true.
Just a token of affection and a longing still for you,
When llie shinies of night are falling
and we're sitting all alone.
There always conies a longing, dear,
if you only could come home."
Sadly missed by his wife and little
children, also grandpa, Bevan, B.C.
Frelone's   Grocery Store
CORNER 5th ST. AND DUNSMUIR AVE.
CUMBERLAND
When in Need of High-class Groceries,
Give us a Trial
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
SHOES FOR
BOYS
A shipment of Amherst Shoes just received and are
being placed in stock.     Come in and see them.
Leckies Red Stitch Shoes for Boys in all Sizes
Ladies' Oxfords and Strap Slippers—A good assortment of styles and prices.
We are opening up many lines of new goods this week
which we will be pleased to have you inspect.
A. MacKinnon
Sold in Cumberland at
LANGS  DRUG  STORE
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Flsh
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
[ W. P. SymoM   -  -    Proprietor PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1924.
NEW SPRING MILLINERY
Although tlie season is enrly thero are always ladies who
' desire something smart in a Spring Hat, our first delivery of the
New Season's Styles are now on show in our .Millinery Department upstairs.
Small Huts are still predominant, comhined with many new
features which adds to the style and effect of the hat.
Xew Flowers—-We have a very nice and choice selection of
the newest (lowers, so that ladies who desire to change and
freshen up their Millinery may find a suitable selection.
NEW SPRING COATS FOR THE LADIES
We have just received a considerable selection of the new
Sliring Coats which are now on view.
Fawn shades are still very much to the fore, and will he
worn a great deal.
We invite you to call and see our showing of the newest in
Coats.
We havi I een fortunate in securing some real smart Coats
io ell at 515.00, $16.50, $17.r.l) aud $19,75 and we feel it will re-
na 1 vou lo make an earlychoice. We feel sure you will be
surprised   when   you   see   the   real   values   we   are
agreeablj
showing.
FOR HATS AND COATS, VISIT
J. SUTHERLAND
Cumberland
ESTIMATES FOR 1925
PASSED AT SCHOOL
BOARD MEETING
•woriM
GOODS'
0. QUrumouiu tyutun
"Worldly Goods," a Paramount picture starring Agnes Ayres. is the feature at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre Wednesday
and Thursday, Feb, 11 and VI. The
production is an adaptation of Sophie
Kerr's Ladies' Home Journal serial
and popular novel of the same name.
Paul Hern directed and A. P. Younger wrote the screen play.
Miss Ayres' role in the picture is
that of a secretary to the manager of
a large department store. She Studies
fashions when not punching her type
writer. Into Eleanor's life comes a
breezy, young auto salesman. Hopper, played by Pat O'Malley, devotes
part of his time thinking out schemes
and deals calculated to make him a
millionaire over night. He has great
confidence ln his ability to put over
the "big idea'1 and sweeps Eleanor otf
her feet in a glamour of romance.
Fred sells himself to her 100 per cent
He tells the girl of his million dollar plans and she is convinced that
her future husband ls about the cleverest mun alive. Fred promises her
automobiles, fur coats, travel, servants and every luxury and in time
they are married.
Six months later Fred is still making promises, hut the automobiles and
servants bave thus far failed to materialize. He Hits from scheme to
scheme, but never sees any of them to
a successful conclusion. In the meantime the pair begin to feel the touch
of poverty, and it is then Eleanor decides to get her old job hack. She
does so.
The "otber woman" enters the story
here just as Fred stumbles upon some
wonderful news and cleans up on his
"hunch." Instead of rushing to Eleanor with the good news, he is summoned to her lawyer's office to face
divorce proceedings. Then the story
takes another novel twist, a reconciliation is effected, and the picture
closes with every promise that his air
castles are abo'it to become realities.
r
One Aquarium Containing Two
GOLD FISH
FREE!
WITH ONE DOLLAR PURCHASE OF GOODS ON
OIIR SPECIAL LIST
ONE AQUARIUM ONLY TO A CUSTOMER
L
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL .it LANG'S"
The monthly meeting ot the Board
ot School Trustees wus held ln the
school last Tuesday evening. All
memhers of the board were present,
Chairman Mrs. Bunks presiding. The
minutes ot* the previous meeting were
adopted as read, ufter which Secretary McKinnon read communications
from Mr. U. E. Apps and Misses McKinnon. Hood, Hunden, Galllvan, I.
McFadyen and G. McFadyen expressing gratitude and appreciation o( the
recent increase in salary awarded
them.
Solicits Further Increase
A communication was received
from MIsb G. McFadyen, who was
present at the meeting, thanking the
Board for the Increase of {50.00
awarded, but stating that inasmuch
as she possessed a lirst class certificate, she considered herself deserving
of an aditional $50.00 increase. It
was true she did not nave a great deal
of experience, but while other teachers who had graduated from Normal
at the same time, had been gaining a
year's experience on the staff, she
had been spending the time at the (
University equipping herself with a
Ilrst class certiiicate. The pros aud
cons of this suggestion were fully discussed by the Board. Secretary McKinnon said that the only other similar case where a teacher had held a
flrst class certiiicate, was that of Miss
Mordy, and that she had been granted
the $100 increase as applied for.
Trustee Brown considered that since
such a precendent had been established, it was only fair that the Board
should live up to It. The discussion resulted in Miss McFadyen securing the additional increase of $50
for which she expressed thanks.
The case of Miss Vivian Aspect was
then brought to the attention of the
Board hy Trustee Maxwell. Miss
Hood had been granted an increase of
$100.00, while Miss Aspecl, a grade
lower, it is true, but teaching practically the same class work, had only
received $50.00 increase. It was decided to increase Miss Aspect's salary another $50.00 also.
Chairman Banks then called the attention of the Board to the fact thut
in granting $50.00 increase to the salaries, that J"ss Beatrice Bickle, certainly not eligible for such an increase, had heen included In the list.
The trustees were somewhat sur
prised to hear of this action, as Miss
Bickle is the latest addition to the
staff, commencing her duties at the
beglning of this year. In preparing
the estimates however, her name had
not been singled out for exception,
and had consequently gone through
with the increases. Trustee Brown
considered that since the mistake was
so obviously that of the Board, that
they should stand good for it, and did
not approve of rescinding the motion.
The Board finally arrived at a similar
decision. The salary list tor I926
now stands aB follows:
F. R. Shenstone $2500; Miss Partridge $1650; G. E. Apps $2100; H. E.
Murray $1750; Miss Galllvan $1450;
Miss I. McFadyen $1200; Miss McKinnon $1000; Miss Hood $1000; Miss
Aspecl $1050; Miss Bickle $960; Miss
G. McFadyen $1000; Miss Carey $1000
Miss Hunden $1000; Miss Robertson
$1350; Miss Richardson $1150; Mrs.
Drader $1350.
Other estimates for the year are as
follows; Janitor's Salary $2100; Repairs to Building $000; Repairs to
Grounds $750; Fuel and Hauling $900
Furniture $400; Water $150; Light
$100; Medical Inspection $200; Transportation $300; Janitor's Supplies
$250; School Supplies $500; Sundries
$400.
Otlier Business
Accounts to hum! were referred lo
the finance committee, to bo paid, If
found to be correct.
Interesting reports from Messrs.
Shenstone and Apps were received
and filed. ln Principal Apps' report
it was interesting to note that during
the month of January, $05.00 had been
saved through the children's saving
fund, and 1n the neighborhood of
$397.00 during the year 1924. The
principal also reported that by reason
of the school concert proceeds lt had
been possible to pay off the debt on
the piano, as well as deposit $40 to
the school credit.
Inspector's Report Satisfactory
The reports of high school inspector
Sullivan were received by the board.
Very favorable comments on the work
lietng done by F. R. Shenstone and
Miss Partridge were noted. These
reports were highly Batlsfactry to the
Board.
Thc question of Manual Training
and Domestic Science wus ngain
brought up for discussion, nnd It was
decided to notify the council of the
petition received from the ratepayers, also to arrange a meeting with
the Courtenuy School Board us soon
as possible.
Surprise Party
A very pleasant party, In the nature of a surprise, was enjoyed at the
home of Mr, and Mrs. Morgan of
Minto on Sunday last. There was
quite a large gathering of the young
folks, and a most happy evening
spent.
Miss K. Richardson returned from
Vancouver on Tuesday lust. !
Mr. William Horwood of Revelstoks
is expected to arrive on Saturday
evening aud will he the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. S. Horwood.
Mrs. Wm. Merrlfled entertained a
number of friends nt tea Thursday
evening.
HERE'S   YOUR
OPPORTUNITY
Messrs. Read and Osborne of Vancouver have purchused from the Canadian Credit Men's Trust Association,
the stock and fixtures of the Mercantile Store Company of this City. Their
negotiations resulted in the purchase
of the entire stock, whicli Is reputed
one of the best quality high classed
stocks ever offered for sale by the Association at sixty cents on the dollar. It is the Intention of Messrs.
Read and Osborne to share the benefit of this discount with the buying
public of this district, which presents
wonderful opportunity to the peo- j
pie of Cumberland and vicinity to |
purchase quality goods at rock bottom j
prices.
Week-End Specials
Quaker Rolled Oat tubes 35c. 3 for $1.00
Family Sodas, large package 35c. 3 for $1.00
Royal City Tomatoes, large size 25c. 4 tins for .... 85c.
Kipper Snacks 10c. 3 tins for  25c.
Potted Meats 10c. 3 tins for 25c.
Del Monte Peaches. 2-lb. tin 35c. 3 for 85c.
FULL STOCK OF FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
Head Lettuce,   Celery,  California  Cabbage,  Onions,
Brussel  Sprouts,  Sweet  Potatoes,  Carrots  and
Turnips, Fresh Tomatoes, Hot House
Rhubarb.
Bananas,   Oranges,   Lemons,   Florida  Grape   Fruit,
Cooking and Eating Apples.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
 "■
,INGER LONGER CLUB
I.
TO HOLD MEETING
\ meeting of members of the Linger
Longer Club, of Cumberland, will be '
held in tlie Waverley Hotel at 7.30
p.m. on Sunday next, February 8th.
All members are requested to attend
as there is important business on
hand.
LOST—IN ILO-ILO DANCE HALL,
evening ot Old Timers' Ball, Feb.
2nd, Gold Brooch, leaf shaped Bet
with moonstones. Owner greatly
values same as keepsake and offers reward. Mrs. J. Humphrey.
Union Bay. fi.
NOTICE
The Mercantile Store will be open ;
on and after Saturday, February 7th, I
to receive accounts due and owing to
the G. H. Wycherly Estate.
Canadian Credit Men's Trust Assn.
G. N. O. Kiblcr.
LOST—WHITE GOLD RING, SAP-
phire setting, enclosed In red case.
Reward offered. Finder please
notify   Islander Office. 6.
FOR RENT — TWO-STOREY, SIX-
roomed house completely furnished,
with garage. 400 Penrith Ave.,
Apply Mrs. Foley, or F. Partridge's
Store. C.
OPEN BADMINTON
TOURNAMENT NOW
IN FULL SWING
(Continued From Page One)
thirty. A cordial Invitation ts extended to all parties Interested In
Badminton to he present. Some good
gahes should result and it is confidently expected that all games except
the finals, will be completed on Saturday evening. The tournament committee arc expecting to make arrangements to have the finals played with
the Comox Club at the Agricultural
Hall, Courtenay, and Wednesday of
next week has been suggested as the
possible date.
®"
m
i
Announcement Extraordinary!
Mercantile Store
Sold by the Creditors at 60c. on the $
STORE CLOSED UNTIL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY   12   FOR  STOCK  TAKING
READ AND OSBORNE OF VANCOUVER, THE PURCHASERS,
WILL CONDUCT A
GIGANTIC SALE
Of this $30,000 stock
COMPRISING
.... BOOTS AND SHOES   $10,000
 DRY GOODS  $8,500
MEN'S FURNISHINGS   $8,750
.. GROCERIES, ETC _  $4,000
$10,000 	
$8,500 	
$8,750 	
$4,000 	
ALL HIGH GRADE AND NEW GOODS—A STOCK CONCEDED BY ALL BIDDERS TO BE THE BEST EVER OFFERED FOR SALE
WATCH FOR OUR DETAILED CIRCULARS
Sale Starts Thursday
February 12th at 9 a.m.
Watch for this Gigantic Selling Event
and save money
&.
m

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