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The Cumberland Islander Feb 20, 1925

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*»* .CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With whki la eraaalliatai the Culwrlaad News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No*  8.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20.  1925
TOsSD SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Owls Won First
Game Of Series-
36 To 24 Points
Doctor Gordon Takes
Over Dental Practice
The Owls are one game up in their
race for the championship of the Cumberland Basketball League, by virtue
of defeating the Rangers by the score
of 36 to 24 In the first game of the
play-off last Monday evening. The
second match In the play-oft will be
held this coming Monday, Feb. 23,
and If again won by the Ovls they
will be the winners of the cup donated by the Athletic Association and
the medals donated by the Basketball
Association, but if they are defeated,
a third game will be necessary, same
to be played on Thursday, Feb. 26.
This week's fracas was a fast on-i
from start to finish, and as is usually the case with these two teams,
very little rough play was seen. Both
are experts of the short passing system- using it continually, but tho
Owls were too speedy for the others
and at no time was their superiority
questioned. The only Incident which
marred the game w*as when Aitken
lost his temper and tried to take a
round out of Graham for no apparent
reason, but he was promptly banished
from the floor.
The star of the evening was Graham, who played his best game of
the season at guard for the Owls. He
and his partner, M. Stewart, made thc
best defensive pair seen in action for
some tin:;. "Peanuts" Robertson was
In the lime-light as usual, scoring 17
of his term's 36 points. Watson and
Sommerville were also good as were
Uie spares. Farmer and Stevenson.
For the Rangers, Bannerman and
Robertson were easily the pick while
Aitken was going good until he was
ordered to the side-lines. Hunden
ls a good player but would do much
better it he followed the example of
some of his teamates and did more
playing and less talking to the referee. Some players cannot take a
beating without, ragging the "ret".
but it is always the same ln every
■port, the losing team always accuses
that official of being the cause of their
defeat. We would like to het that if
Hunden handled the whistle in just
one game he'd never "rag" the referee again.
Before the maln event an exhibition game waa staged by the High
School and the Doo Dads, the latter
winning out by 17 points to their opponent's 16. Mat Stewart handled
the whistle In this game while Heck
Stewart was the official who received
all the ragging in the main mix-up.
The preliminary next Monday will be
a ladles' game between the High
School and the Public School and
will start at 7:30 p.m. prompt.
Doctor W. Bruce Gordon, who has
been practicing dentistry in Cumberland with Dr. R. B. Dier for the past
year has taken over the entire ollice
and practice.
Doctor Gordon has had wide experience in the profession, having
during the past years specialized in
the latest and most up to date methods in plate and bridge work, in eastern aud western Canada.
The residents ot Cumberland and
district are assured of the same careful attention that they have received
at this office ln the past.
OF WHAT BENEFIT IS A
P.T.A. TO A COMMUNITY?
A large number of visiting parents
end friends attended the monthly
meeting of the Parent Teachers' Association held in the school last Monday evening. Among the communl-
catiohs received was one from the
I'.-T. Federation extending an Invitation to an educational gathering to
he held In Vancouver on the 21st Inst.
nl which the prtclpal speaker would
he the well famed Mr. Paton, reputed
to he the best speaker of his class
ln England. Since lt had already
been arranged that Mr. Paton speak
here last Thursday, it seemed unnecessary to send a delegate to Vancouver. Speaking of Mr. Paton,
Principal Apps strongly urged everyone present to avail themselves of an
opportunity to hear this remarkable
! speaker.
Practically all the public works be- Qnestlon Box
ing carried out In British Columbia.; since tnere wag ,„ beanother edu.
as well as those in contemplation, are: catloIlilI raeeting within the next few
provided for fully In the main esti-1 days |t wag dedde(1 by Pres|dent Mr3
McNaughton to allow Monday's meeting to take the form of a question
James A. Robb, acting minister of 11-1 bM      s„p, „, paper    were    pa83e(,
Comox District Is
Not Forgotten
mates   which   were    tabled    ln   the
House of Commons recently by Hon.
nance.      Of the   $4,061,629  voted  to
around, every one present being given
this province, it ts gratifying to dud  an opportun|ty of maklng any dealred
that Comox District will receive a fair
share for Its  public    works;    $2100
being granted for repairs and improvements on the Royston wharf.
$2S00 for repairs to Comox wharf.
$33,000 for Courtenay public buildings, $35,500 for dredging of Courtenay River and $5,000 for repairs to
the Campbell River wharf.
The largest single vote ls that of
$1,600,000 for the Esquimalt Drydock,
now under construction, while Van-
enquiry regarding the Association,
school work. etc. One of the questions drawn was "Of What Benefit is
a P.T.A. to a community?" From tho
response to this enquiry, the benefit
derived by the community was readily seen. Mrs. Y'oung speaking for
Royston, said that It was due to the
Association that the truck for the
transportation ot the children from
outlying points had been procured.
Mrs. Banks, chairman of the Board of
couver is to receive $270,000 for con-1 School Trustees, voiced her opinlou
structlon of the Second Narrows ! that tbe pre3ent gathering was a re-
Bridge.    It ls also Interesting to note j comme„dation to any community, for
that   British   Columbia   Indians   will
It gave opportunity to the parents of
receive $303,990 for medical attend, meeting the teachers, establishing
ance, hospitals, assistance in farming
etc.
SCHOOL ESTIMATES
ARE APPROVED
contact between parent, teacher aud
pupil which would otherwise not be
possible. Principal Apps said that
from the teachers' viewpoint the Association was productive of much ben
elit, acting for the crystalizatlon and
materialization of many of their
thoughts and schemes. The School (armidsummer.
Gardens were another example of the
splendid work and co-operation of the
Association.      Mr.   Sutherland   com-
The regular meeting of the City
Council waa held in the Council
Chambers last Monday evening when
Mayor Parnham and a full attendance
of aldermen were present. It was
pleasing to note that Alderman John I plimented the teachers on their regu
J. Potter, chairman of the Board of j lar attendance at the meetings and
Works was back in his accustomed: contended that their co-operation was
place. I a large factor In the success of the
The school estimates for the yoar ■ P.T.A.     Mr. Apps expressed himself
1925, amounting  to   $29,230.00   were i as being very grateful for the meet-
Prtncipal Apps explained In a very
clear manner the system of grading
In the Cumberland Public Schools.
By the aid of blackboard and chalk.
he demonstrated the different grades
and their division, showing the different ages and the corresponding classes. This was most Instructive ami
Interesting. Regarding thc High
School grading Principal Shenstone
gave a brief explanation. For the
benefit ol parents who considered that
their children were not progressing
in accordance with their age. Principal Apps explained that this was not
a matter for discouragement, that
while some children were mentally
old for their years, others were mentally young. He gave some statisticai
figures which proved that In the majority of cases while twenty per cent,
were too advanced for their years,
fifty per cent were not sufficiently advanced. Many other questions regarding the work of the various committees of the Association, etc., were
asked. It was decided to hold a meeting of the executive when a plan of
the work to be performed by the various committees would be outlined
and presented.
Manual Training and Science
In the absence of Mr. Leversedge.
convenor of the Committee, Dr. Hicks
reported on the progress made In con
nectlon with the subjects Manual
Training and Domestic Science in
our schools. Over one hundred favorable signatures are recorded on the
petition. A report has been handed
in to the school trustees. Dr. Hicks
expressed the opinion that If the proposition were put to the people in the
form of a plebiscite, there would be
no doubt of its success. Speaking
ln this connection on behalf of the
school trustees, Mrs. Banks said that
they had received a communication
from Mr. Kyle who had advised that
there was no available teacher for
these subjects at the present time.
b:tt that he expected there would be
Pruning School Dates   Ocean To Ocean
SetForMarch3-5-6    With Canadian
National Rly.
ELINOR GLYN DEFENDS
HER "THREE WEEK.S'
ings of the Association as they afforded both himself and Mr. Murray an
opportunity of meeting the  parents.
Grading Explained
In   response   to   another   enquiry
submitted and approved by the Council.
It was decided to re-appoint Mr. R.
J. Selfe, City Auditor for the ensuing year.
Solicit Assistance
A deputation composed of Messrs.
R. H. Robertson and G. O'Brien representing the building committee of
the Cumberland General Hospital visited the meeting. Their business was
to solicit a share of this year's poll
tax receipts to assist in the building
of the new hospital wing. While no
definite arrangements could he made,
the committee were given every assurance by the Council that the matter would receive careful consideration.
lirst   I'pper    Island   lnter-Scholasllc |
Night I field  Day  Sports Celebration  which
Good   '8 lo be held iu Cumberland on Wednesday, June Srd.     On this day representatives  of the best talent from
every school In the upper part of tho
Island will meet to uphold thc honor
of their various seats of learning, and
as    there    are    approximately    100
j schools In Ihis area, nnd If each can
In honor of the clearing and con-, bQ perBUad8d ,0 8e„d a few represcnt-
aequenl burning of its mortgage, the i uUvi,4 the celebration will prove to be
Mrs. Banks said
that while no provision had been
made In the usual estimates, that
when the plans materialized, special
provision would be made.
The visiting committee, comprised
of .Mesdames Young, Sommerville and
Braes reported very satisfactory conditions at the schools. Mesdames
Strachan and Watson were appointed
a visiting committee for the month of
February.
Dainty refreshments were served
by the Social Committee after which
the meeting adjourned.
Don't    forget    the    Saturday
Dance at the G.W.V.A.  Hall,
time assured.     Gents 50c. Ladles 10c
Dancing 9-12.     Everybody welcome.
ANGLICAN CHURCH
BURN MORTGAGE
AILEEN PRINGLE
In Qoldwyn's  Elinor Glyn   Picture
"THREE WEEKS"
Elinor Olyn makes on Interesting
reply to those critics who have attacked her novel, "Three Weeks," the
film version of which will be pre-
■anted by Goldwyn at the Ilo-Ilo'
Theatre this Friday and Saturday, j
Mme. Glyn states:
"I have often been  condemned as
an Immoral writer.     Now this is not
American justice.     I challenge any-
Olia carefully lo read every word oi
'Three Weeks' with an open mind, not
with  the determined  idea  to  search
for sensualities, and   then  see  it he <
can find a single sentence taken with
Ita context and meaning, whicli can I
degrade—a single   plnce   where   Ihe'
Lady's   words   were  not    to   elevate
Paul's brain, and his soul, and turn
him, as they did into a thinking, res- j
ponsible  being ot use  to his  coun-1
try." I
members of Holy Trinity Church celebrated at a social evening ln the
Anglican Hall last Friday evening.
Whist was enjoyed for a time, the
winners being Mr. Tarbell and Mrs.
Keeler. Games, dancing and the partaking of splendid refreshments constituted the remainder of a most en-
loyable and gratifying evening.
INTER-SCHOLASTIC
FIELD DAY WILL BE
HELD HERE JUNE 3
With Ihe coming of spring the com Hon. Vice-Presidents are Charles Gra-
mittee appointed at the Teacher's ! aam, Inspector Patterson. A. II. Webb
Convention In Courtenay last fall are Auchinvole and G. w, Slul)bs;
already launching their planB for the
President Is Charles Parnham; Vice-
President, A. T. Heyland; Treasurer.
Sidney Hunt; and Secretary. O. E.
Apps. The Celebration Committe Is
composed of Mrs. Clinton. Mrs. MacNaughton, Mrs. Hanks. Miss Galllvan.
and Messrs Curwen, Lang. Cope, Kaplansky and Dr. Gordon. The chairmen of the committees are Rev. J.
Butler, organizing; Dr. G. K. MacNaughton, entertainment; J. W. Trem
lett, grounds; H. B, Murray, publicity
and A. J. Taylor for program anil
sports.
In order to make this day a sue-
Brackman-Ker
Cup Tie Sunday
The Cumberland United Football
team will journey to Nanaimo on
Sunday to meet the Davenport team
In a Brackman-Ker Cup tie. The
hoys are full of determination to cop
tills game and as the Ports have
strengthened their team during the
past few weeks, a keen encounter is
anticipated. The following will do
duty for Cumberland: Blair. Mortimer, Stewart, Monahan, Conti, Brake,
Bannerman, Plump, Graham, Fowler
and Hltchens.
one of the greatest ever held here.
The idea having originated at this end
of the Island, it seemed no more than
fair to select a city here to havo the
first of these meets, hence Cumberland was chosen, and thc date was
set for June 3rd. because It Is a legal
holiday (King's Birthday) and as all
stores, hanks and schools will be
closed, a large attendance will be an
assured fact.
Naturally for a Sports Day of such
magnitude every consideration was
used In the selection of the committees and their chairman, for Its success will depend largely on the time
and energy expended by the executive
Thomas  Graham  is  Hon.  President;
cess for the youngsters It will be
necessary for the older people to give
their time and Influence wherever
they may, for all children need persuasion in what they are to undertake,
and by so doing those who enlist
their services will certainly he gratified by the results. Help the youngsters to select the events in which
they are to enter, assist them In their
training, showing them the right methods, etc., and the outcome can onlv
be one thing—the greatest children's
day that Upper Vancouver Island has
ever seen.
COURTENAY, Feb. 19.—Word has
just heen received hy the secretary
of the Comox Agricultural and Industrial Association, from the Pro-
ftncial Hortlculturalist setting the
dates for thc pruning school lor the
3rd, 5th and tith of March. About
twenty persons have signified tlieir
Intention of attending this short
course In pruning. The lirst demonstration class will he held on Tuesday morning. March 3rd at the hour
of in o'clock at Mr. John Upton's
ranch on the Upper Road at Sandwick
Mr. B, VV. White, District Horticulturist "Ills 'a all probability, be in charge
of this work.    Arrangements for the
other ciasses will he announced at the
ilrst lesson.
Educationalist Of
Great Eminence
Visits Cumberland
TIDE TABLE, FEBRUARY 20—27 INCLUSIVE
Date Time   H't      Time   H't     Time   H't.      Time   H't.
The  time  used
20....
'   4:16   12-8
9:45     9-3
14:28   12-3
21:51     0-9
is  Pacific  Stand
21....
5:01   13-4
10:43     8-7
16:31   12-2
22:39     0-S
ard,  for  the   120
'SO
6:41    13-7
11:33     7-8
16:32   12-0
23:25     1-2
Meridian West. It
23....
6:19   13-7
12:20     6-9
17:31   11-8
Is counted from 0
24....
0:10     1-9
6:55   13-6
13:06     C-l
18:29   11-6
to 24 hours, from
25....
0:54     2-8
7:30   13-6
13:61     5-3
19:28   11-8
midnight to mid
26...
1:37     4-0
8:04   13-3
14:36     4-7
20:29   11-0
night.
27....
2:19     5-2
8:37   12-9
16:22     4-3
21:34   10-7
Creditable to arrangements made by
the Comox District Teachers' Association, Mr. Paton, that eminent educationalist, ex headmaster of Manchester Grammar School, and for seven
years a master in Rugby School, Kngland. addressed a Cumberland School
and public audience last Thursday,
Cumberland is greatly honored B( a
visit from this prominent man who
ranks with such men as Sir Henry
Xewbolt, and Hon. Mr. Fisher, British
Minister of Education, Mr. Paton is
a great lover of the cause of education
and its promotion and under the
auspices of the National Council oi
Education is spending a year touring
throughout the Dominion of Canada.
Addresses Pupils
On Thursday afternoon Mr. Paton
delivered an inspiring address to the
pupils of the High School and seniors
of the Public School. The speaker
was introduced to the students by Mr.
F, R. Shenstone, Principal of our
High School here. Mr. Paton wbo al
once gained the earnest attention oi
the pupils, forcibly brought home to
ihem the supreme necessity of honesty and self reliance In their work
and the execeedingly great importance of a proper use of the education
they received. Education, Mr. Paton said, could be applied either fui
tasting good or evil, aud it was up 10
each student to guide his course in
the right direction. Afler a brtef
address by Mr. Charleaworth, secretary of the B.C. Federation of Teachers, Rev. Mr. Hood called for three
cheers and a tiger In appreciation of
Mr. Paton and these were heartily
aud enthusiastically given.
Teachers Entortulii
At 6 p.m. the local branch of the
Teachers' Federation entertained al
dinner In the L'nion Hotel, thus if-
fordiug many of our leading citizens
an opportunity of meeting and conversing with Mr. Paton. Alter full
justice had been done to the splendid
dinner, Mr. J, \V. Young, principal ol
of the Courtenay High School called
upon Mr. Paton for a few remarks,
In the course of these Mr. Paton outlined to his interesetd nudieuce the
manner tn which teachers were taring In England, und referred to the
benefits accruing to exchange of teach
ers between Canada and England. A
concluding speech was made by Mr.
Voting who outlined lu a delightfully
humorous vein his researches in history regarding famous teachers. This
was very enjoyable and appreciated
by all present.
Addresses Public
At 8 p.m. Mr. Paton addressed a
large aud appreciative audience who
gathered at St. George's Presbyterian
Church. He was introduced by Mr.
Charlesworth. secretary of the B.C.
Federation of Teachers, who iu a few
well chosen remarks outlined thi
work of the National Council of Education nnd the splendid work it was
achieving in bringing sum eminent
speakers as Mr. Paton to these parts,
Mr. Paton, tbe speaker said, has voluntarily given a year of his time to
Canada for the furthering of educational theories and practice, and it
was a splendid thing tbat Cumberland
had been numbered aa one of bis stopping places.
Mr.   Paton   chose   as   bis   subject
Leisure" and its resulting evil or
good. From the start the speaker
held the interest of his audience, his
magnetic  personality  aud expression
impelling their intense and vital interest Interperslng his theories
with humorous anecdotes and < om-
mon places experienced In bis dealings with various classes of people,
not a dull moment intervened. Tin
speaker expressed the fact, thai i
man's character could best bo determined by the manner in which be employed bis leisure moments, and he
drew striking comparisons of how two
mcn doing exactly the same class of
work during tbe dny, would employ
their leisure hours iu different ways,
one for a good cause, tbe otber for
an indolent pleasure loving craving,
and ihe difference results noted in the
two men in later years. If a man
were properly interested, he would
always tlnd joy in his work, Mr. Paton said, and if such was not the case,
there was something wrong with his
line of work and application.
It Is to be hoped that other speakers of Mr. Paton's calibre will visit
Cumberland in the near future, for
the splendid address last Thursday
evening brought home to many of us
the fact that addresses of this kind
are one of our greatest needs.
1     Laat   Sunday   evening   the    llo-llo
I Tbeatre waa more than filled to capacity wben an audience of over seven
hundred gathered for the showing ot
j the slides "Across Canada ' by way of
[the Canadian National Hallways. This
is tlie greatest s'»Sie railway system
i in the world, comprising 22.267 miles
J or railway.      It traverses each of the
'nine  provinces and  readies  each  of
I the  pricipal  cities  of  the   Dominion.
The theatre moving picture machine
' was    somewhat     too    powerful    for
tlie  showing of the slides,  and  this
impelled  tbe operating some, but did
uot  prevent  tbose  present   from  ap-
' predating     the    grandeur    of     the
■ scenes.
The  journey,  starting  at   Victoria,
showed    views    of    the    Parliament
Buildings, Beacon Hill Park, etc., and
the beautiful Stanley Park. Capllano
j Canyon, etc., at   Vancouver.      Splen-
i did scenic views of the  entire  province were shown.     The journey then
continued throughout tlie province of
Alberta   emphasizing  such  points  of
interest as the famous Jasper Park.
! Mount Edith Cavell, etc.     Continuing
the journey depicted views through-
1 out each of the provinces of Saskatchewan.   Manitoba,   Ontario,   Quebec,
New    Brunswick,    Nova    Scotia    aud
Prince Edward  Island.     The beauty
and magnificence of these views was
I most  appealing, and  the large audience was given a splendid opportunity
! of   realizing   the   magnitude,   natural
beauty and resources of this wonderful country in which we live.
We are indebted to the C.N.R. for
the use of these beautiful slides. Mr.
Itober, Strachan nded in the capacity
of chairman for the evening, explaining in a splendid manner the different
scenes and their location. The Ilo-
iio Orchestra was In attendance, and
the evening proved not only extremely entertaining, loi,  also educational.
POPULAR COUPLE
ARE MARRIED
IN VANCOUVER
HOME COOKING SALE
Don't forget the Home Cooking sal-
in the Presbyterian Church Basement
on Saturday. February 21. 3-0 p.m.
A quiet but effective wedding ceremony of much local Interest took
place last Monday evening, February
16, at St. John's Church, Central
Park, New Westminster, when Gladys
Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Caleb Dando of this city became
the bride of Mr. Frank Telford of
Vancouver, Hev. W. II. George officiating.
To the strains of a wedding march
rendered by Miss Morrison of Vancouver, tbe bride entered the church
on the orm of her brother, Mr. John
Dando. Her gowu was of pale orchid georgette effectively trimmed
with cream lace and ostrich feathers,
while ber hat was fashioned of a
beautiful silver material wtth slippers to match. She carried a bouquet of pink roses nnd carnations.
Miss Irene Telford, sister of the groom
acted as hridemald, nnd was prettily
1 gowned in pale pink georgette with
I while picture bat. Mr. George Telford supported tbe groom.
Following the ceremony a reception was held at the home of the
grooms parents, when only immedl-
I ate friends and relatives were pres*
i ent Mr. and Mrs. Telford will make
their future home In Vancouver. The
brble has lived In Cumberland for
many years, being for some time past
on the ollice stuff of the Canadian
Collieries. Tlie good wishes of a wide
drdc of friends and associates nre
extended to tlie young couple.
DEPOSITS OF ZINC AND
GOLD-ZINC DISCOVERED
IN COMOX  DISTRICT
The discovery of important zinc
and gold-zinc deposits on Vancouver
Island, near Comox, Zebullos River
and Nootka Sound, west coast; a flvc-
foot vein in the latter area carrying
30 to 40 per cent zinc; lenses of pure
realgar up tn two feet in width had
been discovered in a wide zone near
Comox, was au auiinoiicrtneut made
by H. C. Nichols before the convention of the B.C. Division. Canadian
Institute, which opened in Vancouver
on Thursday. In a comprehensive
summary of tbe mining prospects of
British Columbia tbe speaker reviewed the mining situation in British Col
umhla from the Atlln district to tho
boundary  in optimistic terms.
Mr.   Roland  Graham  left  for Vancouver Thursday morning. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20,  1925
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C,
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY   20.   1925
QUIT YOUR KNOCKING
It is claimed that a new anti-knock gas has
been produced in ethyl. Used in the ricketiest
old car, it is said to quiet the engine and remove
all knocks.
Among motorists and garage mechanics
knocking indicates carbon in the engine cylinders
Knocking in thc human i lechanism may be taken
to indicate a clogged liver, a fagged brain, tobacco heart or over-loaded stomach.
Vou never hear a knock in a smooth-running
engine. it functions noiselessly and with little
or no vibration. lt has a cheery and efficient
hum and it works satisfactorily and restful.
If you are prone to knocking, look over that
human engine of yours and tune it up if necessary. Back up your pessimistic brain, your cold
heart, your disordered stomach, your overworked
kidneys or your billious liver. Perhaps a dose of
castor oil will have the same effect upon your
knocking vitals that ethyl gas may have on your
automobile engine.
Give the wonderful mechanism within you a
chance. Man was not born to be a knocker. The
Almighty intended every one of us to be healthy,
happy, constructive boosters, free from knocks
and engine trouble, and running smoothly with
our fellows on life's well-paved highways.
Keep Smiling!     When down in the mouth
think oi Jonah, he came out alright.
IS THAT SO?
A city dweller made this smart remark at a
banquet: '"'The country to rest and to rust in. The
city to sow and to reap in."
What tommy-rot! Does this tailor-made
gentleman believe for one moment that the peo-1prenticeship as a fireman
War";    "Huge Whisky Frauds Exposed";   In- IS ENGLISH LOVE AS
creasing Trouble in Ireland"; "Coal Shortage";
"Railroads Poorly Equipped".
How true it is that history repeats itself—
that the growth of a nation, necessitating changes
of program, is only repeating the old act.
There is nothing that strengthens the faith
of a thinking reader, in the future of his country,
so much as to review the pages of the past.
With eternity as the curtain and the sun for
the spotlight, this great human drama goes on.
A great captain of industry said, a few days ago,
"The world must be getting better or God would
destroy it."
And the beauty of it all is that we are growing bigger and getting better, day by day.
Don't condescend to be pleasant. Be that
way in the interest of yourself.
GREAT AS LATIN?
Are English natures capable of as
great love as Latin? The interesting
question was brought up by Elinor
Glyn, when she was at the Goldwyn
studios where she aided Director Alan
Crosland in filming her novel "Threo
Weeks," which will be the attraction
at the Ilo-Ilo this Friday and Saturday.
Mrs. Glyn points out that in Lath-
countries there have been countless
cases of supreme passionate lovers,
whicli have made history—but in English speaking countries this is very
rare. She states she often used to
wonder if it was because Englishmen were naturally cold, or because
English women were not capable of
inspiring the great passions.
Therefore when she wrote "Three
Weeks" she made the man. Paul, an
Englishman. But she made the Lady
i Slav—because that race possesses
the passion and the intensity and thu
capacity of psychological deduction,
more than any other.
.Mrs. Glyn's novel seems to prove
that Englishmen are • capable of being fired by as great and complete
love as men of Latin countries.
The first Bilk stockings were knitted on needles.
ny——3
Most of the shadows of this life are caused
jy standing in our own sunshine.
Keep smiling!      The
laughs must sure do well.
man  that loves and
EVERYBODY'S DOING IT
The killing and maiming of people by reckless autmobile drivers continues and each year we
kill more people because there are more automobiles. These accidents are very rarely caused
by the motor vehicle; they are almost always the
fault of the driver.
A great deal of time and money is spent in
various campaigns to conserve human life. Research laboratories are maintained at great expense to fight disease germs; We inspect the
milk that if fe.l to babies and the meat that is
given to grown-ups. We swat the fly because
he carries disease. We taboo the oyster because
a typhoid epidemic in an eastern city is attributed
to polluted oyster beds. We look after the bread
and vegetables of a community. We isolate patients suffering from contagious diseases in the
hospitals. We put a crimp in personal liberty
by quarantine laws. Everywhere the health officer is supreme.
The man who operates an elevator has to j
pass an examination; the operator of a power
plant must be a licensed engineer, and no man is
permitted to drive a locomotive engine on a railroad unless he has served a certain term of ap-
He must know his
pie of the rural communities do not sow and reap? lenigne and how to control it, though its right-of-
Are all the achievements for the big city man and J way is limited to steel rails.
do those of the small town and farming commun- j       But any crazy youth of inexperience, any old
ities produce nothing? Let him look through
the pages of "Who's Who," let him study the directory of the names of big business men. and
honestly tell us how many of those who have achieved success came from and still live in the small
communities. Let him search the crowded tenement houses, the slums, the missions and cheap
lodging houses, and tell us, honestly just what
percentage of the population of any big city havo
sown and reaped to advantage.
Don't worry!     Business is good.
THE GREAT HUMAN DRAMA
Recently we came across a copy of a newspaper printed forty years ago. On the front
page we found these headings: "Trying to Avert
man of dim eyesight, and woman of nervous
tendencies, who has money enough to buy any
kind of an automobile is turne dloose on the public highway.
We put up signs warning auto drivers against
exceeding the speed limit, we caution him to drive
carefully within a school zone and these limits
are ignored by even careful drivers. We make
laws only to break them and wonder what has become of the old-fashioned respect for law.
In most European countries there is no fixed
speed limit, but drivers are arrested and heavily
fined for any act that imperils the life of another.
A little less attention to the passing of laws that
are not enforced and a little more difficulty'in the
matter of securing the right to operate an automobile would to be the better way,
SUBSCRIBER RENEWS FOR FIFTEENTH YEAR
Following is a copy of letter received at The
Islander Office last week from one of the old subscribers who, no doubt, appreciates his little "Country
Weekly."
522 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C.
February 5th, 1925.
E. W. Bickle, Esq.,
Cumberland, B.C.,
Please find enclosed S2.00 subscription for 1925.
From your old reader for the last fourteen years.
Yours truly,
Subscriber.
BSE
Cars may Come
and Cars may go, but the
Goes  on for  Ever
EVERY  OTHER CAR  IS A
FORD CAR
L
Corfield Motors, Limited
FORI) DEALER E
B.C.
hone 16
5j
Courtenay, B.C.
£3
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Boor
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN' that,
on the 14th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board for a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as the Bevan Hotel,
situate at Bevan, Comox District,
County of Nanaimo and Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Part of Sec. 4. Township 9,
Victoria Land Registry District, In the
Province of British Columbia, for thc
sale of Beer by the glass or by the
open bottle for consumption on the
premises.
Dated this 20th day of Februarv,
1925.
ALEXANDER J. MCMILLAN,
8-11. Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Ilcer
License
I
ESSEX-6-COACH
$1595.00
F.O.B. COURTENAY
For REAL Car Value
INVESTIGATE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
HUDSON
COACH ...
$2395.00   $1595.00
DURANT — With   Full   Balloon   Tires
Disc  Wheels,  Completely  Equipped.
STAR   COUPE — Completely   Equipped
Full Balloon Tires on Disc Wheels.
$1550.00 $1325.00
$925.00  -  STAR TOURING   «p"Z5.UU
Bell-Irving Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay, B. C.
PHILCO DIAMOND GRID BATTERY SERVICE STATION
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board (or a license in
respect of premises being part of the
building known as King Ueorge Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Avenue, City ot
Cumberland, Nelson District, County
of Nanaimo, and Province of British
Columbia, upon the lands described
aB Lot No. 9, Block No. 7, Map No. 622.
Victoria Land Registration District,
In the Province of British Columbia,
(or the Bale of Beer by the glass or
by the open bottle for consumption
on the premises.
Dated this 13th day ot February.
1925.
VICTOR BONORA,
7-10 Applicant.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March next the undersigned intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Hoard for a license in
respect of premises being part of Ihe
building known ns Campbelltown
Hotel, situate at Townsite of Camp-
belltown, near Campbell River, on 'lie
Island Highway, in Sayward District,
County Of Nanaimo and Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot No. 211, of Lot liii Block
No. C, Map No. 1058, Victoria Land
Registry District, In thp Province of
British Columbia, Tor thc sale nf Iteer
by tlie glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated tills 20th (lay of Februarv.
1925.
JAMES ENGLISH,
8-11. Applicant.
Look at this I
Order your Spring Suit from the Tip-
Top   Tailors,   thc   largest   one-price
tnilors  in  the  world,  made to your
measure of all wool materials.
Suit I $27.00
with extra pants   *X,.IH\
British   made  suits   In  all  wool serviceable Tweeds, made fnr hard wear
and in neat patterns.   All sizes.
Suit, with 2 pairs pants   S22..10
F. PARTRIDGE
SELLING AGENT
Cumberland     &     Courtenay
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply lo the
Liquor Control Board for a license In
respect of premises being part of tbe
building known as Baynes Sound Hotel, situate on the West Bide of Island
Highway, Nelson District, Vancouver
Island, County of Nanaimo, Province
o( Uritish Columbia, upon the lands
described as Part of Four Acres of
Lot 12, Victoria Land Registration
District, In the Province of British
Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glasH or by thc open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated this 13th day of February,
1925.
JOHN R. JOHNSTON,
7-10 Applicant. |
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for Beer
License
Notice of Application for I
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tbat. j NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the un- 0n the loth day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply lo thc j dersigucd Intends to apply to th.
Liquor Control Hoard (or u license In \ Liquor Control Board (or a license in
respect o( premises being part of the ; respect of premises being part ot the
building known as Nelson Hotel, building known as Willows Hotel,
situate at Island Highway, L'nion Bay,   aimatc   at  The   Island   Highway,   in
In Nelson District, County of Nanaimo,
and Province of British Columbia,
upon the lauds descrlbetl as Lots No.
11, 12 13 and 14, Block No. 7, Map No.
438, Victoria Land Registration District, In the Province of British Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by tlie open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated  this   13th  dav  of  February.
1925.
JOHN ALEXANDER FRASER,
ALFRED RAPER HORNE,
7-10 Applicants,
Campbell River, In Sayward DIstrIc*.,
County of Nanaimo, Province ot
British Columbia, upon the lands descrlbetl as Lot till, Victoria Land Registration District, in the Province of
British Columbia, for the sale of Beer
hy the glass or by the open bottle for
consumption on the premises.
Dated  this  15th  day of February,
1925.
CHARLES THULIN,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application for llivr
License
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
"Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the un-
idcrslgneil   Intends   to   apply   to   tbe
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, i
on the 7th day of March next, thc undersigned   intends   to   apply   to   the >L,    -  c , ,       , ff;    ,, ,
Liquor Control Board   or a license in \     '        o(        „,„,,„ ,   ,           , of ,„,
respect of premises being part of the   ,,       ^              Vendome   Hotel,
building known as  The Cumberland ] „  „,   ,„„
building
Hotel, situate at Dunsmuir Avenue,
In Nelson District, County of Nanaimo.
and Province of British Columbia,
upon the lands described as Lots No.
1 and 2, Block No. tl. Map No. 522,
Victoria Land Registration District.
ln the Province of British Columbia,
for the sale of Beer by tbe glass or
by thc open bottle for consumption on
the premises.
Dated   this   13th   day  nf  February.
1925.
WILLIAM  MERRIFIELD.
7-10 Applicant.
promts
,n
situate nt Dunsmuir Avenue, in the
City of Cumberland, in Nelson District. County of Nanaimo, Province of
British Columbia, upon the lands described as Lot No. 3, Block No. 5,
Map No. 522. Victoria Land Reglstra-
i tion District. In the Province of
Uritish Columbia, (or the snle of Beer
by tlle glass or by the open bottle 'or
consumption nn tho premises.
Dated  this  13th  day of February,
1925.
VIRGINIO MABENBLLI,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notioe of Application for Beer
License
Notice of Application for Beer
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to tho
Liquor Control Board tor a license ln
respect ot premises being part o( tho
building known as Eagle Hotel,
ituate at Dunsmuir Avenue, City o(
Cumberland, Nelson District, County
of Nanaimo, and Province of British
Columbia, upon the lands described
as Lot No. 3, Block No. 3, Map No.
522, Victoria Land Registration District, in the Province of British Columbia, (or the sale of Beer by thc
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated   this   13th   day  of  February,
1925.
JOSEPH ASPESI,
7-10 Applicant.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 7th day o( March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to the
Liquor Control Board (or a license In
respect o( premises being part of the
building known as Union Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Ave., extended
Westerly. In Nelson District, Count/
ol Nanaimo, and Province ol Uritish
Columbia, upon tlie lands described
as Part of Lol No. 24. Nelson District,
adjoining City o( Cumberland, Victoria Land Registration District. Ill
the Province of British Columbia, for
the sale of Deer hy Ihe glass or by tbe
open bottle for consumption on the
premises.
Dated this 13th dav of February,
1925.
ROBERT  YATES,
7-10 Applicant.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice nf Application fer 1
License
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on thc 7th day of March next, the undersigned Intends to apply to tbe
Liquor Control Board (or a license In
respect of premises being part of the
building known as Waverly Hotel,
situate at Dunsmuir Avenue, In the
City of Cumberland. Nelson District,
County of Nanaimo. Province of British Coliimbln, upon the lands described as Lot No. 2. Block No. 3, Map No.
522. Victoria Land Registrator District. In the Province of BrltlBh Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
trlass or by the open bottle for consumption ou tbe premises.
Dated this 13th dav of February,
1925.
FRANK DALLOS,
7-10 Applicant. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREI5
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   and   SOLIC
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - -
ml
1TOR  I
B.C. |
NEAT SUM REALIZED
FROM SILVER TEA
COURTENAY,   Feb.   19—A   Silver
Tea was served at the home o( Mrs.
C. W. Harris on the Lake Trail road
—J: on Tuesday afternoon, when a  neat
SHOES FOR
BOYS
A shipment of Amherst Shoes just received and are
being placed in stock.    Come in and see them.
Leckies Red Stitch Shoes for Boys in all Sizes
Ladies' Oxfords and Strap Slippers—A good assortment of styles and prices.
We are opening up many lines of new goods this week
which we will be pleased to have you inspect.
A. MacKinnon
sum was realized by the Women's Aux
illary of the Anglican Churches lu tbe
district. Mrs. G. T. Corfleld was ln
charge o( the candy stall and after-
noon teas were served by Mesdames
G. J. Brethour, C. Carwithen aud T.
Booth. There was a good attendance
during the afternoon.
SOCIAL EVENING IN
CHURCH BASEMENT
SPLENDID CROWD AT
GRANTHAM SOCIAL
COURTENAY, Feb. 19.—There was
a splendid crowd at the Grantham
whist drive and dance on Wednesday
evening. The card players occupied
seventeen tables and the prizes were
won as follows: Ladies' first, Mrs.
John Blackburn, second, Miss Kathleen Clifford., consolation, Mrs. F.
Swan. Gents, ilrst Mr. Lloyd Swan,
second, Mr. Carl Corbett, and Mr. D.
M. Isenor was awarded the "booby"
prize. The Grantham social committee served an abundance ot delightful refreshments. The floor
was then cleared, and a capital dance
followed to the best of dance music
supplied by a two-piece orchestra,
composed of Miss McQuillan and Mr.
Pete McLaughlin. Dancing continued until a late hour.
Candidly, Wouldn't
You Rather Talk?
Probably you are like most people; you prefer a
personal conversation to letter-writing. That is why
we suggest: "Once in awhile between friends—Long
Distance."    Special low rates after 8:30 p.m.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Mann's bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
Taste Teasing Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
8HIN0LES,
KILN DRIED rLOORINOI,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHEM IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHAROIS.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PHONES |Nlgh,C'"":1"XC8"rU"ir
IHONES|Office: 189 Cumberland
DR.   R. ..B,   DIER  AND   DR
VV  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dummuir Art.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Tbeatr*.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrically  kMsML
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 11.
R. TATIS, Kantffr.
COURTENAY, Feb. 19-An audience
that taxed the limited seating capacity of the Presbyterian Church base
ment,  was  delighted  with  humorous
Scottish recitations and impersonations o( Mr. P. McA Carrlck on Tuesday evening. The Rev. W. T. Beat-
tie was in the chair, and in the course
o( the evening he called for a song
from Mr. Herbert Smith, a cornet
solo from .Mr. F. Wood, Highland
Fling by Miss Margaret Inglis. recitation by Mr. J. lnglls and humorous
Scottish stories from Mayor Duncan
aud Mr. Inglis Sr., all of which were
heartily encored.
The treat of the evening was, however, the meeting and reciting of Mr.
Carrlck of Vancouver. Mr Carrlck
is a most pleasing personality and
combines a splendid memory with
much humor. Ile hns a fund of entertaining recitations which seems
inexhaustible. Among his contributions     were:      'The     Deputation,"
Burns' Nlcht," "A German u;i Temperance,"  "The  Goalkeepers'  Ghost."
A new version of Tain O'Shanter"
and he threw In for good measure a
couple of Irish recitations which convulsed his audience. At tbe conclusion of the musical program the chair
man called for three cheers for the
gifted Vancouver entertainer, which
were most heartily given. The Ladies'
Aid of the church served refreshments
at the close and the gathering concluded with the singing of Auld Lang
Sync. Everyone present voted it a
most enjoyable and delightful evening.
EVERY PREPARATION
BEING MADE FOR THE
BIG JUMBLE SALE
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEltKIFlELI),   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
COURTENAY, Feb. lS.-The Jumble
Auction billed for next Wednesday al
tlle Agricultural Hall looks like being
a big success. The directors and
others who are soliciting donations
of articles to be sold by auction on
this occasion are meeting'with a ready
response and the Agricultural Association, for whose benefit the sale Is
being arranged, should derive much
help from the undertaking. It is impossible to canvas everyone ln the
district personally, but it Is hoped
that all well-wishers of the association will do their bit to make this
Jumble Auction a success. Those
that cannot see their way to give some
thing to bc sold, can perhaps attend
Ihe sale and avail themselves of the
opportunity of bidding on some of the
many useful ankles that have already been given. Those giving thjlr
services on this occasion are doing so
gratis.
After partaking of some dainty refreshments, the tables were put aside
and n Jolly dance, which lasted until
l:!lo kept the orchestra, composed of
Miss Williamson and Mr. N. Smith,
assisted by Mr. Jack Carwithen, very
busy until the last number of the
evening. The next social at Dove
Creek will be on Friday the 27th inst.
DOVE CREEK HOLD
SOCIAL EVENING
COURTENAY,    Feb.    14.—Ariothar
very enjoyable social evening was
spent at tbe whist drive and dance
held In the Dove Creek school house
las, night. Nine tables accommodated the card players. Miss Jenny
Williamson won the first prize for
ladles and Miss Bull secured the consolation prize. Mr. A. E. White was
awarded first prize for gentlemen and
the booby prize went to Mr. Jimmy
Norman.
New Car Service
CAU FOR HIRE DAI OK NIGHT
Frelone's   Grocery Store
CORNER 5th ST. AND DUNSMUIR AVE.
CUMBERLAND
When in Need of High-class Groceries,
Give us a Trial
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
BETTER MEAT
AT WILCOCK BROS* MEAT MARKET
For the better cuts of Delicious Meats, you can always
get satisfaction at Wilcock Bros' Meat Market.     We
make a specialty of quality cuts at prices that mean
wholesome saving to you.
Wilcock   Bros.
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland, B.C.
24 TELEPHONE 1(10
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bav.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
"Revelations," Is being held over
for Saturday's Matinee hy the management of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre and
this will be your last chance to seo
this picture and from all accounts of
tlie showing on Wednesday last, it is
j one of tlie best plays that Viola Dana
has appeared in to date.
A Galaxy of Talent
Talents otlier than acting are frequently found among tlie players.--
For instance, In Metro's all-tsar cast
of "Revelation," Saturday Matinee,
there Is Marjorie Daw, who gave up
a grand opera career to play In pictures; there's Lew Cody, who writes
songs that bring in tidy little sums
ot money; there's Viola Dana, who
could make a living as dancer, If she
couldn't act. and there's Monte Blue,
who was a sailor, lumberjack and
cowpuncber, before he became an actor.—And tbe director of the picture,
George 1). Baker, is the author of two
successful plays, "The arcdevll" and
"The Count and tbe Convict."
t
&
The.
New
Chevrolet
NEW RADIATOR—Large honeycomb radiator with
highly polished nickle plated shell, adding greatly to
the appearance of the car.
NEW CLUTCH—Single plate disc type—easier,
smoother, more positive, requires no lubrication.
Clutch and flywheel fully enclosed,
NEW REAR END—Rear axle re-designed, strengthened and enlarged, gear contact greatly increased.
One piece Banjo type housing.
NEW SPRINGS—Semi elliptic chrome vanadium steel
springs. Rear springs underslung, Alemite lubrication.
and   larger.      Five   sturdy
NEW FRAME—Longer
cross members.
NEW BODIES—Open bodies lunger, ami larger. Modern full stream lines, beautiful durable upholstery, on
deep cushion springs. Closed bodies have new and
more beautiful bodies by Fisher.
NEW MOTOR REFINEMENTS—Improved construction for carburetor and manifold. Larger crankshaft
and bearings, Rocker arms and valves enclosed, for
better lubrication, anil protection from dust and dirt.
cHpw On Display
Blunt & Ewart   Limited
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone 61
23 PAGE FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY 20,  1925
NEW HIGH LEVEL
REACHED BV SIN LD7E
New standards have been set lu
Canadian life assurance records bj
the lifts-fourth annual statement nnv.
presented by the Directors of the Sun
Life Assurance Company ot* t an-
ada. Acceleration of the rate of pro
gross is noticeable, eve,, as against
the surprisingly rapid growth in previous venrs of this great institution.
Resources have been considerably
augmented while the expansion of operations has been equally pronounced
policyholders in this popular inter,
national Company and, In fact, all
who are interested in tbe growth ol
Canadian Institutions, will regard
with satisfaction the advances made
In all branches through the agressivi
policy of ibe Hun Life under a careful and conservative management.
Strength in resources Is exemplified
by the assets of $274,130,407, an
amount which Increased by 564,873,-
094 .luring the year 1024. This gar
alone is equal to the total assets held
by  the  Company only  eleven   yean
Income for the year totalled $62—
245,681 and represents an advance i I
(16,280,042, No sums received as
consideration for reassurances arc included In these figures.
Very gratifying results were experienced in tlie earnings from the Coin
punVs Investments. Increased market values of securities held yielded a
gain of $6,331,377, while sales made
in order to capitalize the Improved
value Of others showed a net profit ".
$2,891,260. This is largely due to the
policy, established long since, of investing in long-term bonds and like
choice securities and which has resulted in distributing Ihe beneliis to
bc derived from ihe high interest rates
of the war period over later years.
Payments to policyholders and beneficiaries have been made on a generous scale ami amounted to $31,-
8.S1.039 for tlio year. This represented settlements of deatli claims, matur-
ed endowments, profits, etc. The
Btabilizlni powe of this great <Ii-*-
tribution ... lif. :■ i:ance funds will
be readily appreciated. The total
amount bo paid out since organization of lb" (*n:.,pany has now reached $183,798,128.
There were 384,113 policies in force
representing assurances of $871,636,-
457 an advance over the previous
year of $167,871,214, In addition to
the number of ordinary'policies mentioned above, the families of 30,160
employees of Industrial and commercial corporations and linns are protected under Sun Life Group policies.
Applications were received for new
assurances to the amount oi $165,-
.",..."..:'..7. -New policies Issued and paid
f.,r numbered 43,671 for a total sum
of $137,466,384, ..f which $3,491,311 lev
been reassured. Owing to the worldwide scope of tbe Sun Life business it
has been possible for ilie Company to
complete reassurance contracts by
which the British business and some
of the foreign businei - of a large American company, operating in il"; East
has been acquired. The policies of
a small Canadian company were also
assumed.
For the fifth year in succession, an
Increase in tbe scale of profits to
policyholders is announced.
ll will l.e seen that the Company
bas materially strengthened its position in making provision for tb. future. The entire life policy reserves
have been valued al three per cent,
the extra amount due to this adjustment thus set aside being $1,111,032.
An adjustment of annuity premiums
has also been made because of the
progressive   increase   in   the   lifetime
PORTLAND CANAL
MINING   DISTRICT
Our  statistical  department  has
ion,piled,   and    wo   will    mall
FREE ON REQUEST,
a
LARGE COLORED MAI'
and other valuable Information
regarding recent important dis-
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ALBERT ETANS
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of annuitants as shown by recent in-
•esiigations. In addition, a special
innuity reserve of $760,000 has been
.et up beyond the amount required by
the Government standard. The amount
if $760,000 has been written off the
igure at which tlie Company's Head
mice, branch buildings and otber real
istate is held. The sum of $4,000,000
nas been added to contingency re-
lerves, S3.ui1ii.ihji) of this amount being transferred to the fund to provide
.'or possible fluctuations in tbe market value of securities, while $1,000,000
las been added to the general contingencies account. With a total
nun of $7,600,000 to the credit of these
iccounta tbe Company is in a ve.*y
itrong position to nice, any unforeseen conditions whicli the future may
hold.
Notwithstanding these allocations
an increase In Ihe undivided surplus
of $4,234,490 was established, making
tbe total surplus $22,107,368,
Interest earned during the year, has
been shown as G.3S per cent, exclusive of profits from sales, a substantial Increase due to reinvestments In
securities yielding belter returns.
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February 27th.
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One hundred selected British farm
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This is tbe advance guard of three
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two years through joint arrangements
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nancially by them, state officials of
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The British Government will furnish each settler with funds for the
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a reasonable cost and to have them
ready for occupation immediately the
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Repayment of the advances and the
price of the land is expected to be
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instalment not becoming due until the
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The harvest of salmon In the Fras
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Crown lauds may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intention
to become British subjects, tend!-
tional upon residence, occupation,
ami improvement for agricultural
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Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
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How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Qof-
ernuient Agent.
Records will be granted covering
ouly laud suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, ie, carrying over 5,000 board
feel per acre west of the Coast Raugt
and s,i..uu feet per acre eaat ot that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions art
to ne addressed to tht Land Commissioner of the land Recording Division, in which the land applied for
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must ba occupied for
five years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Orant can bt
received.
For more detailed lnfoimatlon see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Laud."
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Applications are received tor pur-
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for agricultural purposes; minimum
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per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
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Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may lie purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stum page.
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, Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
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poses areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
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Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided Into grating districts
and the range administered under t
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers  and  travellers,   up   to   ten
. head.
T. Malpass
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FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY  20,  1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
The History Of The Moving Picture Art
WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE ACCOMPLISHMENTS^ CARL LAEMMLE
BV PAIL (ilLICK
COPYRIGHT O. A. PETERS PUBLISHING COMPANY, MOW YORK.
J'
age of opportunity, l>ut n iirm graap
of all of the progressive elements
which have gone to make the grout
moving picture industry whicli we
know today. What more fitting than
lo tell the history of the moving picture business through the business
life and accomplishments of Carl
Laemmle.
The Idea of moving pictures is not
new. lt is as old
as the Nile. 01
course, the word
"moving pictures '
is a misnomer lie-
cause pictures do
not move. — they
only seem to do so.
Any child can imitate fnr himself a
device which the
brown-skinned ragamuffins sitting
on tlie steps of the
temple at Luxor
made from papyrus and worked as
HERE ls no such thing
as current history. History can only he written
from tlie perspective oi*
time. The moving picture art and industry,
like radio, hasn't as yet
had time to acquire this
necessary perspective. Time alone
can weigh the actions of tlie individuals whose faith, foresight and amazing good fortune have created out of
a defect in the human eye which even
the Egyptians knew all ubout. a business which ranks as the fourth in
world importance and from some
angles ls destined to he one of thc
dominating factors in human progress
The only possible way to write the
story of the moving picture at present is to write the story of the men
who made the moving picture. Most
of tbem havo either passed to then-
reward, retired, or gone down to defeat ln the obstinate pursuit of a
wrong promise or have been swallowed up by their own vaulting amotion. Leas than a dozen men whose i you would flip a
contribution to tlie sum total of mov- pack of cards over
Ing pictures has been of such a na- i your thumb. This
ture as to draw upon Itself the light ] motion, If made at
of publicity would cut any figure to- j a speed of about
day In the industry they helped to j sixteen per second
build. Edison, whose genius con-! completely deceiv-
cerned itself only with the method | es the human eye
but who had not the foresight to sec j Into imagining
the possibilities of his invention, was j that it sees motion.
given a dinner a few months ago by ! Physiologists call
moving picture men. at which he had ' this defect a law
to be introduced to almost every man
present. Klelne, Thannhouser. Marlon Aitken, Kessell, Bauman. Dinten-
fass. Horsley, Freuler and Kennedy,
names all-powerful In their day, have
nothing to say today in the councils
of the moving pictures; and Swanson.
Lubin, Long and Rock are dead. You
can count the names ot ihe men of
prominence today whose experience
goes back to lllliO, on the fingers of
ont hand. One of these men Is Carl
Laemmle, president of Universal Pictures Corporation. e
Mr. Laemmle Is celebrating his
nineteenth year in the moving plc-
tire business by moving tlle homes
offices of Universal from their location at 1000 Broadway, where the com
pany has been for llie lust twelve
years, to the beautiful new Heckschor
Building at Fifth Avenue and 67th
Strtet. This move, taken by itself,
It an indication of the pioneering spirit In which Mr. Laemmle has ever led
his company In the bustling, forward-
marching progress of the moving picture, Universal was the Ilrst company to break away from the old lofts
and makeshift ollices around 14rh
Stree; Its move lo 1600 Broadway was
an epoch-making one and brought thc
industry hurrying in its wake and established it around 48th Street and
Broadway. Universale new move to
Fifth Avenue and 57th Street seems
I Hr. Goodwin of a celluloid film to take
, t'.ie place of the universally used glass
plate.
Car! Laemmle^aaw this Invention of
■ Edison's nt the World Fair, as did
many other million men and women,
viihout a thought as to the practical
.significance of the highly Interesting
little peep-show device. Laemmle
■* ui at thai time n clerk ln the wholesale Icwelry firm of Otto Young/& Co., j
I; Chicago and his mind was mor,- j
I.i oi up wiih figures and with his
del 'r* Ination '. * gel n start In bus!-1
■ cess lor himself than with anything '■,
j so   pioblematlc'il   v.:   a   kinetosoope.
Tlie thrill os" show business had never j
entered his head nnd it was twelve '
years before he returned to the same
cily and in  fifteen seconds changed
ihe whole course ot liis purpose ia
life.
Bul in Ihe meantime, Laemmle dis- i
covered in himself ia Oshkosh a ke^n I
mai ttgerlal ability, a faculty of saving i
money and an unusual resourcefulnessj
:i- a ralesman.     The refusal of his
employers to admit him Into the firm j
earned Laemmle  to  resign aad  take]
Ills ravings  to Chicago with the In- i
tei'tion   of  opening a   chain   of  five-
il d-te:i cent stores.     He had already !
Interested in his plans a number o.']
: men l,i Chicago who had known him
in the Oshkosh establishment.     One
of these men was H. H. Cochrane, now
i ice-president of Universal, then vice-
president of the Witt K. Cochrane Ad- I
vertlslng Agency In Chicago.     Cochrane had written the clothing adver- i
tisements for Laemmle for a number
of years.
With promises of financial assist- j supposed
ance, Laemmle started out one fine j companies working under the Vita-
day to locate the site of his flrst store j graph, Biograph. Kalem. Lubin. Selig.
As he nnd the representative of a i Essanny and Edison brands had quick
real estate firm were walking down : ly followed the proving of this theory
.Milwaukee  Avenue,  the.,*  came  upon i and such  companies as  I'athe. Gali
um! dlcsouragements. The films which
were received itl Chicago came, intermittently and were used until worn
out. Soon the supply was Insufficient to meet tlle demand and tho few
respect and attention in New York,
the headquarters of the old General
Film Company with which Laemmle
sp nl ten 5*ears of his life in mortal
combat     With  the Cochrane adver-
velopment was confined to travelling
troupes who used the moving picture
merely as an added attraction an*t
presented it to satisfy curiosity. The
two stores  in  Chicago however, had
been established upon the discovery I companies producing being unable to tising brains and Laemmle's financial
by several men in the industry that supply a suflicient quantity une ••■■■- ablIlty a,ul intrepid spirit, the Lae-
the continuance of thia curiosity of  tremely arrogant about the prlc,  th       " '''"'  ('"ien>rises  naturally  as-
seeing persons ami objects in motion charged.     These films were supplied
was not as  ephemeral  as       ..   hnd I by distributors who bought territorial
sun ed a leadership which was not to
be di uled.     Such trade papers aa ex-
■ ■   al   thai   time   were   filled   with
Ii genlous attacks and appeals signed
mul. and liis business and pres
ige grew with each advertisement
nn! each year.
Finally  In   1803  Laemmle declared
var on  the  Patents Company which
barged every exchange and, through
he   exchange,  every   moving  picture
iise, a tax tor doing business. With
v   I    ents film supply cut off, Lae-
tnmlo soon saw thai  he would have
to   iw   inlo   the   business  of  making
Ime himself, and the same year the
Imp Company, created from the slo-
ii.n**   Independent  Moving  Pictures."
ras   incorporated  and  started  bust-
i      In a Hale studio in New York.
■  lurnlly,     the     Patents     Company
a hi   . aeicmle at  ever,   move and
nexl few years were the busiest
id 01031 ,:., iilng of tlie entire history
n the moving picture business.   The
[tie tor tho use of the moving plc-
ur<   camera   waged   in   and  out  of
•en-1.  became a  hectic struggle  for
i. nil"  in which the Imp Company
bore the brunl  of legal conflict and
ictunl physical combat.     At one lime
Laemmle was forced to take his companies to Cuba in order to retain tho
cameras, which were the all-Important  equlpmenl  of every moving pic-
The establishment of thc j rights for various brands of film and   une company.     Through four years
turned over their money very rapid-   of litigation Laemmle fought the cel-
ly in what amounted to a sure thing,   ebrated Latham Loop case in which
Naturally, ihey started to squeeze the   mot'}' moving picture man outside the
theatre  men   who   had   been   making   Trust was equally concerned as much
very  good   money.       Tlieir   avarli     as Laemmle, which litigation cost In
drove Laemmle in    eourl fees alone upwards of $200,000.
to    fhe    exchange      In 1912, in order to break the pow-
business as a com-   ';* '*>' '">' Trust, Cnrl Laemmle, Chas.
petltor.      From   a   Battmann, W. II. Swanson and P. A.
retailer    Laemml      'owers and Beveral oilier Independ-
no'.v  became   i   l1'1   united their forces Into the Unl-
wholesaler on  '      renal Film Manufacturing Company,
own   account   ami   *"i:h offices a!  1  Union Square.     In
hie   stake   in   Ih     l"'1"1 '''* "r liul sn"ie year, a grievous
business   advanci      Internal Btrife shook the newly formula te r hilly   with   "' Universal and out of it there came
the  new  angles   'wo   camps,   llie   Universal   and   tho
w h I e ll   t ll e   e X-
The original Imp Company. Top row. left to right, standing George
Lonne Tucker. David .Miles. Mis. Pickford, William Robert Daly. Tony
Gaudio. cameraman. Second row- William Shay, Mrs. David Mile's. J.
Farrel MacDonald. next two not listed, Jack Harvey. Third row. silting—Thomas Ince. Owen Moore. Mary Pickford, King Baggot, Joe
Smiley.     Front row—Isabel Uae. Jack Pickford, Louie Pickford.
e h a n g e busines
opened lit) lo him
and lo liis energetic and wlde-awako
advertising partner, it. ii. Cochrane.     The keen
nnd they call the
law visual persistence. It wns not
until 1890 that experiments looking
toward utilizing
tills law had attracted     anything
except the curiosity. •   With the ex-  one of the two moving picture shows , mont  and   Melies  and  other foreign I
perlments    of    Muybridge.    Edison, I in Chicago.     In the ten years since I concerns were already competing  In
Greene and Evans, showmen ,lad no j the Chicago Fair the entire progress'the  American   market   with  half-reel'
Interest.     Invention was the only re-1 which bad been made In the moving pictures and news events,
ward that these experlmentors could   picture business hnd evolved nothing:    It wns one nf these shows that Lae-
hope to obtain.     Hul with the show-1 Ihan u sixty-foot reel of film and that   mmlc saw operating so busll) on 'Iii'
' most moment.mis day of his llfo,     .\
Universal City looking from the administration building. Universal City is located In the Sau Fernando Valley
and Its four hundred acres contain an amazing variety of natural scenery dotted everywhere with gigantic open-
air singes, greal electric light stages, sets which look like buildings and villages from ihe front and like scaffolding from Hie rear, sets which can chnnge their complexion, nationality and aspect overnight through the
efforts of four hundred carpenters who are always on  the job In this capital ol* the film world.
Mutual. Universal moved its offices
to : 100 Broadway and announced that
it wouhl Increase Its own output to
tweuty-oight reels of film a week.
Pictures ai this time wero of one
aid two reel lengths. Universal!
were made nt the old Imp studio at
111 iventh Avenue and 43rd Street, at
ness with whh ii Coytelesvllle and at Hayonne. On Its
these two attacked roster appeared such names as Mary
the prevailing a Pickford, Owen Moore. Tom Ince,
buses thai hail King Baggot, Ben Turpln, George
grown up, tlie Lonne Tucker, Jack Pickford, Joe
trust stranglehold Smiley, Wallace Raid, "Pearl White,
which was threat- Loulsi Fazenda, Ford Sterling, Flor-
ening a monopoly ence I awrence, Mary Fuller, Ben Wtl-
in a highly prollt-,son, A! Christie, J. Warren Kerrigan,
able business, tli I Allan Dsvun. Frank Lloyd, Rex Ing-
Bpread of loader- rani. Lon Cliancey, Annette Keller-
ship which gavo man, Leah Baird, Herbert Urenon,
hope to all ib" Gene Gauntier. Jane and Kiithryn Lee.
Independent ex- Dorothy Phillips. Allen Holubar, Lar-
change im,, of the   ry Semon, .May Murray, Bob Leonard.
west,   soon    in.ni" [ .	
tor     Laemmle    n (Continued  on   Page Sixi
picture
c Carlo set which was
Universal'! tlrst million dollar
dtstlned   o sinr   another (ill., center Lju,! a moving picture set. b„, modern moving picture sets must be built
Already two  other  large companies      ,„„ way     Th|, ^^ ( „,„,„„,,„„ „, ,,„, Ca„      „" (,,f(>
are considering ollice space ln the big I    ,,„ ,,„r|s „„„ |he „otcl dc, p^ .„ ^ c
building in which  Univeral will oc-1    ,he p|ece fle rcs|s|nm,e 0(..,,. s|| w,yM
cupy two floors.
For a young Immigrant to this!
country, one who landed with less ing at Ihe Chicago World's Fair in
than fifty dollnrs In his pocket, to I ISM of the Kinetosoope. a few show-
have reached the position which Carl mou saw possibilities of novelty in
Laemmle occupies today argues not j Ibis Edison Invention and Ibis was
only keen knowledge of human na- Anally mnde practical only through
ture and the ability to take advam-1 the Inventions of George Easlmnn ninl
queue of people standing In tho ho
sun   for   twenty   ininuies   while   '
hundred   people  within   bad  satisfied
their curiosity and come out another
door, only to have another qtieui   of
people  take  Ul'  their  positions  Willi I
tlieir dimes In their hands, was woll
calculated   to   Intrigue   the   Interest
of the budding capitalist    who   was)
seeking a method of capturing thoss !
very  dimes  through   the  fivc-nnd-tou
cent store method.      lie Investigated
it further and In nn hour had chang d
his mind about the fivc-niid-ten cent j
store business.      Ile wus going lino ■
the   moving   picture   store   business.
For the greatest  moving pictures of
those da..s were nothing bin  Btores
and so remained for five years more
From the dny lie bought h'; firsl
theatre   Laemmle   became  an   active,
energetic and Important factor in Ihe
moving picture business.     The cap-'
ittal that was Invested with hlm ":<
rapidly turned Into profits through a |
growing chain of Btores  In  Chicago
and to Laemmle there came visions of
having lo do not with a story such ns I wealth such us he hnd never dreamed
we know n story today hut such anl-j of In his fondest momenta,     Put no-
mated experiences as the arrival of a j thing that I.cainnilc had ovi r ncqulr- ,
train lq a station, a procession march   ed had conic easily and  ibe success
ing along n  street  nnd  action  of a  which he has scored has been in face
"  ™ """*' ' '   ■ i-.iins^ > tat, ikiisssV*    ;     )
k' :^V<i -\(-<y <*r'■>■"■*--- *-~*y->: !**>>*X\ <m- 4 rr^w'™**^   >■>.-     B   I    fe*
Wl^m
hollar character.     Most of thli de-' of the direct opposition, competition
'I'll" mosl remarkable moving picturi -> i evor constructed.     Replica of
the marvelous Notre Dam,' Cathedral bulll al Universal City for Universale super-Jewel, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame." PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20, 1926
THE HISTORY OF THE
MOVING PICTURE ART
(Continued From Page Five)
pie Ihe advantages of California and j ing  of  Universal   pictures—pictures
Ella Hall, Violet Mersereau and Rudolph Valentino.
In September 1912 Mr. Laemmle
purchased the site of Universal City
In the San Fernando Valley, a purchase which was to result in the
greatest moving picture studio in tho
world, a model upon which almost
every later studio was constructed.
The city was opened with great formality two years later, with a national
advertising campaign such as had
never been attempted before In moving pictures. This advertising campaign did as much to popularize the
growing industry as any other one
factor. It brought pictures to the
attention of thousands of people to
whom the moving picture furnished
an amusement which they could afford
and which took them out of the humdrum of work Into the realm which
their Imagination peopled with all of
the pleasant and longed-for-experiences of their souls.
The establishment of Universal City
near Los Angeles definitely located
the entire producing end of the business in California in a climate designed by nature for moving picture
work. It took four years, however,
to impress upon moving picture peo-
even the Universal built at Fort Lee
one of the biggest sudlo ever erected
outside of California. In this studio
were made some of the most impress
like "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea." When Universal decided to confine its producing activities
to California, this studio was rented
Carl Laemmle discussing with Gas ton  Leroux,  the  forthcoming Universal picture, "The Phantom of the Opera," in front of the beautiful
Paris House which ls now being bu Ut at Universal City for this production which will feature   Lon   Chaney.
out to companies whose actors' work
on the stage necessitated their making pictures in New York.
Universal had its full share in thc
making of what Ib now called the feature, that Is, the picture of five reels
or more In length. Its first attempt
along this line was "Traffic In Souls'
made by the late George Loane Tucker as an experiment, which was played in thirty houses in New York simultaneously. These bouses were
"legitimate" not moving picture houses and they played to prices much in
advance of the current moving picture prices. ThlB production opened
the eyes of the moving picture Industry in general and of Mr. Laemmle as
well to the possibilities tbat lay in
feature pictures. There resulted such
features as "Samson," starring J.
Warren Kerrigan; D. W. Griffith's
"Judith of Bethulla," the forerunner
of a long list of remarkable Griffith
pictures; "Damon and Pytkias";
"The Dumb Girl of Portlcl," starring
Anna Pavlowa; and "Neptune's Daegh
ter,' wilh Annette Kellerman.
Carl Laemmle was tbe leader ln
bringing to the screen the best known
legitimate players of that period, such
as Henrietta Crossman, Effle Shannon,
Herbert Kelcey, Marie Tempest, Helen
Ware, Julia Dean, Wilton Lacka.. e.
Lawrence D'Onay, Lula Glaser,
Gladys Hanson and Cyril Scott, and
Y
Ini't Buy This Course--
et You Can Secure It
TKE Maple Leaf Club Course of 20 lessons on Cookery Arts
and Kitchen Management is presented by Anna Lee
Scott a noted authority—in the most interesting and entertaining manner. There is no theory, just new and useful facts
such as are given in the best Domestic Science Colleges.
Think of it! This course costs you nothing—not even postage.
Four lessons come to you prepaid each month. Thirty minutes
each week is time enough to study the lessons. No blanks to
fill in. No examinations. No correspondence—unless you
wish to write Anna Lee Scott for personal advice on special
recipes or regarding methods of preparing and serving special
dishes for special occasions. This astonishing free offer is
made to introduce
FOR  BREAD. CAKE & PASTRY
Your first batch of bread or your first cake or pie baked with
Maple Leaf Flour will reveal its high qualities. A definite
guarnntee of uniform quality accompanies every sack of Maple
Leaf Flour. It is made from Canadian hard wheat, carefully
chosen and expertly milled.
HOW TO ENROLL AS A MEMBER OF THE MAPLE LEAF CLUB
AND OBTAIN THIS FREE COURSE:
Coupons will be foend enclosed in every
bag of Maple Leaf PlouTs (24 lb. bag—
1 coupon; 4y lb, bag—2 coupons; 98 ib.
bag—4 coupons).
Send only four coupons addressed to the
Maple Leaf Club, Maple Leaf Milling
Co., Lim:* -1, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and
you will be enrolled without one cent
of expense as a member of the Maple
Leaf Club and receive the first four
lessons in the course. Other lessons
will be sent in four monthly instalments
—4 lessons each month
Ask your dealer about Anita Lee
Scott anil the Maple Leaf Club
Course. He will give you full
particulars.
MAPLE  LEAF   MILLING
LIMITED
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
CO.
AF FLOUR
strange as it may seem now the object was to inject novelty into tlie
releases of the company.
The exchange system which Laemmle started in Chicago soon spread
over the United States, partly as a
combination of independent interests
and private holdings, but later merged into a closer knit distributing body
through the buying out of individual
concerns and the amalgamation of the
whole into one of the smoothest and
most effective distributing organizations in the industry. With the machinery of distribution so well organized tn America, Laemmle turned his
eyes toward the foreign markets and
soon had prosperous exchanges', established throughout Europe, South
America, Australia and Asia. Of
course, the War added a tremendous
impetus to American made pictures.
for America had the capital at Its disposal and the nations at war needed
the relaxation of the amusement
which moving pictures alone wero In
a position to furnish. Today tlie Uni-
I versal Pictures Corporation has ex-
| changes in every capital of the known
world and frequently London, Paris
! and Berlin are privileged to eee u
* Universal-made moving picture' even
before the premiere ln New York or
Chicago is given.
! In addition to the pictures it has
made at home, Universal has also con
: trlbuted a useful and interesting
chapter of pictures made abroad. Its
first foreign made picture was "Ivan-
hoe," which King Baggot and Herbert
Brenon made ln England in four reels
Tbe same company made a picture
called "Absinthe" ln France. The
next "foreign' undertaking was a submarine picture, "Twenty Thousand
Leagues Under the Sea," the under
water parts of which were made in
the Bahamas through the Williamson
submarine invention. In 1919 Universal sent an expedition under the
leadership of William Alder to Borneo
which brought back with It a remarkable film. "Shipwrecked Among the
Cannibals." Edward Laemmle, Carl
Laemmle's nephew, was the cameraman of this expedition.
Though Universal didn't originate
the idea of the moving picture serial,
it was one of the first to establish a
regular release of moving picture serials to moving picture exhibitors. Its
"Lucille Love," made back ln 1912,
brought out more than any other moving picture the possibilities ot this
adaptation of the continued serial
story to the moving picture. Universal has been the leading producer
from that time to this.
In newt reels Universal also has
been among the leaders. Ita Animated Weekly was for years one of the
standard methods ot transferring
news happenings to the screen, and
when that and Carrent Events were
retired, Universal undertook the distribution of tke International News,
which has maintained the priority of
this department wklch Universal established.
The early features mentioned above
were followed by many ot the most
extensive and well-known super-features which bave ever been made.
"Foolish Wives," established a new
principle ln the moving picture business. That was tbat a production
which cost over a   million    dollars
could be made to pay for itself. Unii*
versal followed this with "The Hunchback of Notre Damme" and ls now
making a feature which bids fair to
outclass either of them, in Gaston
Leroux's internationally known novel
"The Phantom of the Opera." For
the first picture, Universal constructed In its wonderful Universal City the
oulstandlng buildings of Monte Carlo
such as the Casino, the Cafe de Paris
nnd the Hotel de Paris. The elevation facing the square waB built in the
city proper, but 'be opposite side had
to be built over one hundred miles
away on the Pacific coast at Del
Monte in order to obtain the required
sea scope.
For "The Hunchback of Notre
Damo" the gigantic. Cathedral of Notre
Dame was recontsructed in the form
in which lt was described ln Victor
Hugo's Immortal story, and with tho
Cathedral was built a whole section
of thc Paris of that day. Costume*
properties and the entire atmosphere
of 1482 were recreated by gigantic effort, infinite research and prodigious
cost,—an effort probably without a
parallel ln the history of moving pictures, but one worthy of the courage
of Carl Laemmle and the resources
of the Universal company which he
bad built up. For "The Phantom of
the Opera," Universal is reconstructing from plans and photographs the
beautiful Paris Opera and will people
it wilh operagoers of the period. The
necessary cost of this production
would stagger any producer unequipped with the facilities which Carl Laemmle possesses or one without the
previous experience in big pictures
which bas been his privilege.
When one compares such pictures
as "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
and "The Phantom of the Opera" with
the first struggling efforts of the days
of the first Imp release, "Hiawatha,"
made in 1909, tt is difficult to realize
that only fifteen years separate this
marvel of the moving picture art from
its flickering, sketchy, Inadequate ancestor and prototype. But progress
has been the watch-word of the photoplay and fifteen years has been an
eternity ln the pulsating history ot
the moving picture art, an art In
which Carl Laemmle will always be
remembered as one of the prime
movers and most brilliant accomplishes.
NEW POCKET TPYE
OF FIRB ESCAPE
CHILLIWACK.—Dr. George Jordon
of this city has invented a new type
ot fire escape which, he claims, ta
light and small enough to carry in the
pocket. With it a person of any
weight may descend from a four or
40-storey building with equal ease and
safety, quickly or slowly aa desired.
It is represented as being waterproof
and lire proof. It will probably be
manufactured in Vancouver, Dr. Jordon Btated.
An open season tor beaver, during
the months of March and April of next
year, has been declared by the Alberta
provincial game guardian for the districts north of township 69, which Includes the Grand Prairie, Peace River,
Grouard and Fort McMurray districts.
*dS
Sufferers from bronchitis
need a quick-acting remedy
like Shiloh. It brings away
the phlegm, eases the chest
pains and heals the sore
tissues. Shiloh is made from
the formula of a physician
who specialized on throat
and bronchial troubles. It
is a concentrated remedy,
Sleasant to take.    A few
rops is an effective dose.
Does not upset the stomach.
At yoar drmtgi.t, 30c, SOc and $1.20
Shiloh!
Famous since 1875 .1^1
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY '20,  1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   18LANPER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
Friday and Saturday -- Evenings Only
avi..™^,™™™ _        _        50(,  TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY —6:45 & 8:45	
At last in pictures!
ONE ADMISSION PRICE        —        —        _        50c*.
CHILDREN UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE, NOT ADMITTED
Elinor Glyn's
jgfa
famous love story
. rIL$
A^-A>^
fmsF
ri
A/f~>^       ■••  _^	
"ti^fe
n .    .- !,".'***■
BE*
wffiw
£tfen better than the booty
with CONRAD NAGEL and AILEEN PRINGLE
SATURDAY MATINEE
Adults 35c. - Children 15c
Monday and Tuesday
February 23   --   February 24
Wednesday and Thusday
February 25   -   February 26
ADULTS 35c. CHILDREN 15c.
The NARROW STREET
:%
*:w
,A;*.
Adults 35 cents
Children 15 cents
Bebe's first picture as a full-fledged Paramount star.
Come and see her make good in the role of a poor
girl made reckless by sudden riches.
0 HUNTED,SHE  FOUND   AN
UNLOCKED OOOR_-
MYSTEIVY ANO HUMOIV
\UH    "'the narjvow street" M
Iv nN     I      ■ • fill
mil '%r\        m
Li .*
'EPFP
t LOVE
iAUTIFUl
*^#
...   ■; :     L t     ll
'^''■:.:',MM
SHf  CAME HIC.HT
S'*'.
in-w niNribJ
and Chapter Seven of "The Ghost City"
Friday and Saturday
February 27   ■-   February 28
"MARRIED FLIRTS"
starring Pauline Frederick, Mae Bush, Conrad Nagel
and Huntly Gordon
Ilo-Ilo Theatre, Cumberland, B.C. PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   6UMMRLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20,  1925
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
DENMAN ISLAM) NEWS
The Judge:- A Glutton for Punishmen
KB.
__—1
(WELL I THI MK IF VOU VlcRE    ,
\51TTI(iq VMHERG'^WA, you'd \
—-x DECIDE THAT "YOU
lJ\ ALREADY HAD
DAMAGES ENOUGH
Mrs. T. Cessford has returned home
after visiting relatives in Cumberland,
Mr. anil Mrs. F. Piercy mul Mrs.
Piercy are away visiting the coant
cities.
Mr. Sinkison Swan of Coalmont is
visiting friends on the Island.
Annual Fair Meeting
The annual fair meeting was held
in the old hall on February 13th. It
was well attended anil the following
committees were appointed, President, Mr. J. Isbister; vice-president,
Mr. II. Piercy, secretary, Mrs. J. Moso
ley. A committee consisting of live
ladies and five men was appointed .is
follows: Mesdames Ii. Piercy, F. Graham, F. Piercy, McNaught, A. Swan
and Messrs A. Randall, M. Bell-Ir-
ving, Green, T. Chalmers and I). Hastings.
The business ot the evening being
disposed of, the lloor was cleared anil
dancing commenced. Mr. ami Mrs.
Cliuily anil son Walter played on accordions and violin and during the
evening Austrian songs were snug hy
some visiting clam-diggers. Although not understood by their auili-
ience, their songs were given hearty
applause. Mr. J. Moseley sang "The
Placo Where the Old Horse Died.*
Dancing was kept up until 1:30, Proceeds will go towards the fair.
PROMOTERS PUSH
PULP PROJECT
VICTORIA, Fell. 9.—Thc proposed
pulp plant on the Alberni Canal is
still nn active project, according to
Newton J. Kerr, Land Commissioner
ot the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, who states lhat the promoters
are still negotiating, and that the
hydro-electric plant will he located
at Stamp River Falls, the power being transmitted to the site of the
paper mill on the Alberni canal. Surveys are still in progress, and an application to the Government for approval is expected later.
Mr. Kerr says that the announcement of tlie plans of the Great Central Lake Sawmills Limited to develop tlieir new holdings at the Lako
Immediately the railway) is completed to Great Central Lake has stimulated numerous inquiries tor timber
in that area. Some of the existing
limit holders in tiiat section have
been making inquiries as the railway will enable them to develop their
holdings.
COMOX  VALLEY  COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following Is a list of cows in the above association that gave 50 lbs. or
more of butter-fat for January 1925.
Days Lb. Lb.
Fresh      Name of Cow                      Breed Milk Fat          Owner
63 Josephine   Gdr. Jersey 15G6 81.4 W. A. Urquhart
70 Lilly   Gdr. Jersey 1350 81.0 W. A. Urquhart
70 Bell   Gdr. Jersey 1305 70.4 W. A. Urquhart
76 Northern Star  P.B. Jersey 1476 69.3 R. U. Hurford
50 Buddy    Gdr. Jersey 1380 09.0 W. A. Urquhart
75 Helma of Sunset   P.U. Jersey 1221 68.3 A. Williamson
57 Barney 3rd   Gdr. Jersey 1098 61.4 *VV. A. Urquhart
54 Happy Hollow Sultana 3rd.. P.B. Jersey 1011 60.6 J. McKenzie
30 Maggie     Gdr. Jersey 1212 60.6 Prltchard Bros.
00 Jessie   Gdr. Jersey 1284 59.0 J. McKenzie
30 Nugget   Gdr. Jersey 1050 58.8 Butler Bros.
77 Heather   Gdr. Jersey 936 58.0 A.  Randall
75 Polly    Gdr. Jersey 1074 57.9 W. A. Urquhart
60 Rosie   Gdr. Jersey 1254 57.6 W. A. Urquhart
39 Patsy of Pansy   P.B. Jersey 1146 57.3 G. Bigelow
135 Leonette of Hearnsey   P.B. Jersey 1101 57.2 T. Menzies
90 Spots   Gdr. Jersey 1176 56.4 W. A. Urquhart
70 Pet   Gdr. Jersey 1080 56.1 Prltchard Bros.
74 Lucy   Gdr. Jersey 1272 55.9 A. Randall
70 Cherry   Gdr. Jersey 1071 55.6 Prltchard Bors.
74 Yellow   Gdr. Jersey 1011 55.5 G. Bigelow
67 Bluebell of Menzies   P.B. Jersey 1062 55.2 G. Bigelow
81 Rhoda   Gttr. Jersey 1062 55.2 A. Randall
48 Biddy   Gdr. Jersey 1050 54.6 R. U. Hurford
150 Darky     Gdr. Jersey 936 53.9 W. A. Urquhart
143 Cherry   Gdr. Jersey 852 52.8 W. A. Urquhart
63 Pansy   Gdr. Jersey 1056 52.8 Butler Bros.
84 Spottv   Gdr. Jersey 113 52.3   G.  Bigelow.
70 Mynonctte of Haven   P.B. Jersey 1029 51.4 R. U. Hurford
30 May     Gdr. Jersey 933 51.3 Bayly Bros.
62 Edna   Gdr. Jersey 1062 50.9 Butler Bros.
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY
OF CANADA
HEAD OFFICE   •   •   MONTREAL
A Statement of Remarkable Progress
Extracts from Directors' Report
Your Directors present their fidy-fourth Annual Report with
unusual MtbtacUon. The rapiii M|isnM("i of oi»enitiiin*, ond the
sternly upbuilding of resources, which have so markedly < liarac-
teri/.ed the Company*! tran"attinns in previous years, have continued during Uie past twelve months, and at a (-.really increawd
rate of progress. •. .
.... These fipires [herewith quoted) show the growth whicli
has taken place in the volume of the Company's oi>erulions. and
in its resources. Thc figures as to profit-earning power and financial strength are even more impressive.
As to profits actually paid, the sum of je.081,fl5'l.« has heen
disbursed during thc year to policyholders under this heading.
As to provision for the future, the Company's .position bu been
materially strengthened in all directions.
There has Ix-en a further upbuilding of the life poliey reserves.
Heretofore .policies issued prior to 1003 have btctl valued en the
basis of assuming three and a ha'f per cent. Interest, m the discounting rote for the Company's obligations. 1ml this year the
entire life assurance contrails have been Vttued It three per cent.,
the extta amount thus set aside Wing 91,11 1,03*.
There has also been a strengthening of the Annuity Reserves.
Recent investigations have shown a progressive ii.'-Tcase in the
average lifetime V annuitants. A special annuiiy rewrve of
I75II.OOO has this-year been set up beyond the amount required
by the Government standard.
The Company's Head Office and branch buildings and other
real estate, have been written down by 1750,000.
The Contingency Reserves hnve been llrengthened by the addition of $4,000,000 taken trom Hie earnings ol Ihe year, 19,000,000
of this amount going to the fund to pro nie fur i«.-^ilile fluctuation* in the market value of our lectirillei. ratling llutt fund to
ti.ooo.ooo, ami 41,000,000 going to General Contlngenetu ac
count, raising that to 98400,000, These contingency account* thus
amount now to $7,500,000.
After making these heavy allocation*, the undivided surplus
bal vet l>een increased by 14,834,400, .ringing it to a total of
IW.107,338.
The Company is, of course, in a position to Increaie Ita already
generous scale of profits to policyholders, and your Directors has c
pleasure in announcing, for the fifth year in lUccmknJ, that such
an Increase will 1* made.
While many factors have contributed t" this remarkable showing, the mosl noteworthy ha* been the targe earning from investments. As ha* been mentioned in previous repott*. It has for many
years been thc polny of the Company to Invesl in long-li nn bonds
ami similar choice lecurltle*, in order thi t Ity Dili mram lli«*hi;:h
rates of interest then prevailing si r. r - ill ol the abnormal conditions produced by the war. might be pr ijected Into future years.
This policy i* now bearing fruit Current rate*.if Interest, though
still very "satisfaclory, are materially lower than UkjM of former
years, ond m a consequence Iberc hns baen a marl ed riw In the
quotations for most of Ihe scnriiies owned by the Company.
During the past year some of these Increased values h.iSe Iteen
capitalised by saies, and a mt profit of ${,801,450.48 ha* been
realized from this HUtCC In addition there has Ixtn an ItlCfftW
of |6,331,877ifi9 In the market value ol tlie securities itill held.
Although most of this Increased value li undoubtedly permanent,
and due merely to the readjustment of Interest Mitel tO a more
normal basis, it will Ite noted that lie Company hn* carried
$-1,000,000 ot the jim..'.mt to contingency accounts! a* already
explained.
The rate of interest earn*-' ' 'ng the year on the mean Invested
assets ha* been 0.3H per cenl ■ tcliulve of proiils from sales. This
is a substantial Increase over the retool the previous year, and has
resulted from our having realist d on some of our Holdings ol gov-
eminent and other l»ndi which had risen to high figures, Ihe proceeds being theu reinvested in securities yielding better returns.
1924
New Assurances Paid For
Increase .... $30,075,000
Total Income • • • ♦
Increase .... $15,280,000
Payments to Policyholders
and Beneficiaries	
(Total paid (ince organization,
$103,798,000)
Assets at December 31st. .,
Increase .... $64,873,000
Reserves for Unforeseen
Contingencies	
Surplus Over All Liabilities
and Contingency Reserves
Increase . . . .   $4,234,000
$137,466,000
$62,245,000
$31,881,000
$274,130,000
$7,500,000
$22,107,000
Assurances in Force (Net). .   $871,636,000
Increase . . . $167,871,000
Policies in force (excluding Group Policies). . . . 384,113
Employees of firms protected by Group Policies .  30,160
Dividends to policyholders again increased
The Sun Life ranks amongst the Foremost
Life Assurance Institutions
of the World
Incorporated 1865
Began buslntss 1871
Imagination, Humor, Kindness, Athletics
Attributes to Success
But Real Success Rarely Obtained Except Through
Individual Effort, Says E. W. Beatty.
"'There nre many exceptions to every
rule in which accident
or good fortune seem
to have played a great
part in a boy's or a
man's life, but in the
main, real success is
probably rarely obtained except
through individual effort." In addressing the students of Lower Canada College recently, E. W. Beatty.
chairman and president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, enumerated
as qualities and attributes to material success, work, self-reliance
coupled with modesty, loyalty, imagination, humor, studied thought
and human kindness.
"If I were to pick out for you the
most admirable quality possessed by
the students of this college, I would
say that it is that of loyalty; loyalty to your family, to your school, to
your university, to your country and
tr, yourself. The second in the long
list of qualities which are admirable
is imagination; dreams mean idealism and idealism is often followed
by constructive vision. Imagination
enables a man to take out of life
sometimes mnre than there is in it.
Retain as long as you can your fnith
in other men.
"The third quality that I would
mention is self-reliance, and I think
that it is probably one of the outstanding characteristics of the Canadian young men." The field of
athletics, Mr. Beatty considers as
tbe most helpful contributor to the
spirits of self-reliance and having
cultivated the out-doors spirit he
would then "cultivate a sense of
humor—not    the    harmful    humor
that only takes delight
in the confusion or humiliation of others, but
that humor which enables a man to laugh
at himself and hold
himself in proper proportion, a man who
sees the bright side
and communicates the
brightness to others."
"Now, most of you,"
he said, "will proceed
from here to a university and into a profession, or maybe without the university
course into business,
and you will want to
succeed, and perhaps
you would not mind my
saying some of the
I have observed that
contributed to a man's success.
"At the outset come the qualities
1 have mentioned to you because
they are so admirable in themselves.
There are many and 1 can only mention a few. I have mentioned self-
reliance. Couple it with modesty—
that fast disappearing virtue—and
you have a combination of inestimable value to any boy starting in life.
"Now there is a word, an ugly
word, which has a great deal to do
with a boy's or a man's success-
Work!. . . . This school and higher
colleges can give you much. They
ean teach you to think, study and
analyze, but your education in Itself will not make you anything.
This is a result which must come
from your own effort. Do your
own thinking. Advise and consult
with others, especially older and
more experienced people. Mental
exercise is just as good as athletics
if you are later to take your place
in a contest where judgment and
brains are your chief equipment
and not physical powers.
"The last quality I am going to
mention which helps a boy to succeed is human kindness," Mr. Beatty said. "Your own success will
never be retarded by a kindly and
neighborly spirit. Remember that
you will go much farther through
the good will of others than you can
possibly go by climbing over someone's back."
Above ali—pure
Silver Spring
Best by Test
PURITY—STRENGTH
—WHOLESOMENESS—
GUARANTEED BY
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
ASK YOUR LOCAL VENDOR AND DEMAND
English Ale, and Stout
Lager Beer
j
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thu
Liquor Control Board or by tlv Government of B.C. i>
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20,  1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE NINE
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
BNI*BARBER
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
HELD AT HEADQUARTERS
IAN E.XPERT
ISPORTWlTERl
ISM MAN
JVHOKNOWSl
■THE NATIONAL-!
IITYOFALLTHEl
AMERICAN
■PRIZE FlGHTERSj
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
COURTENAY, Feb. 14.—The whist
driva followed by the usual dance nt
Headquarters on Wednesday was welt
.mended. The successful card players were, ladles' first, Miss Violet Currie, second, Mrs. J. Pettigrew; gentlemen's first, Mr. M. Klziski and Mr. R.
J. Downey secured the consolation.
There was an abundance of very enjoyable refreshments and the music
for the dance was supplied by the
Headquarters' Orchestra.
COMOX CREAMERY
WILL CONSIDER
MAKING CHEESE
neeting of the Comox Creamery As-
oclatiou has been set for tbe 26th ot
.Ills month (next Thursday) and will
no doubt, be interesting. This year
.lie director's report and the financial
itatement, which has Just been lamed, is In the hands of the shareholders in good time,
A new branch of this organization,
it Is interesting to see, may be the
manufacture of cheese. At the time
of writing,   Messrs   R.   U.   Hurford,
mens' Association for the second year
in succession, Mr. W. A. Urquhart, u
well known local farmer, now becomes the owner of this haudsome
prize. Of much more importance to
the Comox Valley Is the splendid typo
of dairy animal that made this success possible. The competition was
„, ,.     ,, ,. .     ,  ,„   .   ,,     . , I lor the four best daughters of ono bull
Walter Prltchard, W. A. Urquhart and |Here are tlle particulars:
W. A. URQUHART
WINS DAIRYMEN'S
ASSN. SILVER TRAY
The trophy, which Is a handsome
silver tray was presented to Mr. Urqu-
lnu*i. at the recent Dalrymena' Convention in Vancouver.
COURTE.N'AY, Feb. 17.—In winning' ._.  i?.nsuc»c   nni
the trophy offered by the B.C. Dairy-   l"1-1 *   *TAl*nJ!iKB  UXiALi
COURTENAY, Feb. 13.—The annual
FINEST PRODUCTS OF THE BEST LUMBER
MILLS ARE  ASSEMBLED IN OUR YARDS.
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
P.O. Box 62 COURTENAY 'Phone 17
If—ss
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
The White Bakery
1,
The White Store
Eat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives
the poison from Ihe system.     He that is hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
,V*. J. Carroll are In Vancouver gatn
sring data concerning cheese making. For a No. 1 grade cheese made
in tlie Comox Valley there should nt
least be a good local consumption and
it is difficult lo see why Comox- Valley
,'heese of the right quality, should
iOf find ready sales in any market
jf the world.
"Polly" who produced 9869 lbs. mill;
containing 552.4 lb.s butterfat In thf
year.
"Strawberry H" S2011 lbs. milk and
54.8 lbs. butterfat.
"Pinky" SS70 lbs. milk and 646.8 lbs.
butterfat.
"Tripoli" 10,087 lbs. mill; and 145.S
lbs. butterfat.
WITH  MANY  VERY
IMPORTANT ITEMS
Jumble
Auction Sale
WEDNESDAY NEXT, FEB 23
AT
THE AGRICULTURAL HALL
COURTENAY, COMMENCING
 2 P.M.	
Five Hundred Day-Old Chicks
Sittings- of pure-bred eggs
Certified    Seed    Potatoes
Loads   of   Firewood   and
Many  other  useful  articles,
have been donated to the Comox
Agricultural and Industrial Association to be sold by auction
next Wednesday.
Come and meet the crowd!
Your opportunity to hei]) yoi'r
Valley. Bring your donation
to the Hall anytime between 8
a.m. and 1.30 p.m. on Wednesday next the 25th. For list of
donors see later issue of the
Cumberland Islander.
LADIES' AUXILIARY WILL
SERVE   AFTERNOON   TEA
for the Comox Agricultural ami
Industrial Association.
A. R. ENGLAND, President.
E. FELIX THOMAS, Secty.
Comox Creamery Association
Courtenay, B.C.
IF IT'S BUTTER
ASK FOR
Comox
Creamery
Butter
Made
Cream.
From    Pure    Jersey
IF IT'S JAM
INSIST ON
Comox Brand
Jam
Made from fresh fruit in tbe
Valley. Pure cane sugar only
used in Its manufacture.
IF IT'S FLOUR-SEE THAT YOU GET
COMOX    WHOLE    WHEAT    FLOUR
IF IT'S POTATOES
DEMAND
Comox
Creamery
Potatoes
Grown in the District and
graded according to Govt,
regulation, "Look for the
tag on the bag."
IF IT'S EGGS
OURS ARE
Strictly
Fresh Eggs
Candled and graded in accordance with the New Egg
Act.
THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING WILL BE  HELD IN THE AGRICULTURAL
HALL, COURTENAY, ON THURSDAY,   FEBRUARY  26th,   1925  AT   10:00  A.M.
COURTENAY, Feb. 17.- The city
council met here last night in regular session with Mayor Duncan In tho
chair and all aldermen present The
communications revealed an application irom tlie Courtenay library for a
.similar grant to that given last year.
On that occasion the modest sum oi
twenty-five dollars was granted, bul
the present council turned a deaf ear
to this years application ami no
grant is to be made. It was pointed
out that there nre fifty-four members
of the Library Association and that
the books are hugely used by school
children.
Airs. Jessie McQuillan wrote complaining of the open ditch in front of
tier property on the L'nion Bay road.
it was almost impossible to get loads
it wood or coal into her premises she
laid. Tlie matter was referred to the
Joard of Works.
A letter from Mr. L.
formed the council that
i ing to accept the sum of $125 for tbe
| laud necessary in widening Puntledge
j Avenue.    The city would be required
J lo  move  tbe   fence,  but   Mr.  Cokely
would make tho necessary survey and
plans without any additional charge.
this matter was also referred to the
Board of Works.
A letter from the Courtenay Transfer Ltd., demanding payment for five
yards of gravel supplied for sidewalk in front of the Masonic Block
•vas left iii tite bauds of Alderman
fielder, Cooke and McKenzie. The
sjhalrraan of the Public Hoard of
A'orks committee. Alderman Fielder.
eported on the work done on the
^ake Trail road and tiie proposed
.vork to be done on the Cumberland
•oad and  Isabelle street.
Alderman Pearse wanted to know
.f any further Information had been
received from the government concerning tbe reductions from Court-
anay's share of the liquor profits. No
further word having been received.
Wt. P, P, Harrison will be written to
igaiu.
A discussion which lasted over an
hour was started by bringing up tho
matter of shutting off electric light
service to Mr. W. ll. Grieves' premises on the I'pper road ut Sandwick.
Alderman McKenzie bad been ask I
by Mr. Grieves to bring the matter
Up. There is apparently an outstanding bill of $38 for light supplied
which Is'part of a minimum charge
per year. Mr. Grieves does not appear to have signed the contract with
the city in this connection. Alderman Cooke thought that all contracts
should be sfgncd and that a star!
should be made on a right bOslB. hi
the ease where the minimum annual
charge was ?:iti ft was thought best
to collect twelve monthly payments
of ?.'{ and to give no discount except
ou amounts ,tbat exceed thf minimum. Tbe matter was eventually
referred to the Electric Ugh' committee and Alderman McKenzie, to report to the next meeting.
The "Cow By-Law" passed its
third and final reading, hut Alderman
McDonald thought they should H
careful about passing a by-law tbat
was going to give a bit of trouble.
Ile thought tbo city bad to build
fences to keep tbe cows out. Aide.-
man Pearse suggested that Alderman
Macdonald referred to the Fence Act
which had nothing to do with the
case.
At   a   lato   hour   Alderman   Pears (
said be was going to take up tbo matter of the opening up "t 'lie city law ;
at  a   future  occasion.      Mayor   Duncan asked of when  tlie council  was
going to get to work on the estimates
City   Clerk   Wood   reported   that
school  estimates  were out  and
they showed an Increase of $3,000 ov
last year's.     Tbo city only had until
the middle of the month to disapprove
.if them. As u precautionary mea-
; sure Alderman Pearse immediately
mo veil disapproval. This was seconded by Alderman Cooke and carried. It will give tbe council time
■ .o go into tlm estimates thoroughly,
it was explained.
Chief of Police    Hornal    reported
-onio   complaints   re     city     licenses.
Some of the  trade    license    holders
thought   that   the   garages   were   not
paying enough.     Alderman Field said
thai tlie city received a good revenue
froiti tliL- garage proprietors for light,
lower   and   water,   tbey   employed  u
i number of people in the city with a
pa)   roll  of  about  $6,000   a  month.
He agreed that the present licensing
; system was unfair but lie thought tbo
I garages had better be left alone. Ald-
■ru.au Pearse and .Macdonald support
\ Ed this view.
ROAD MAKING IS CHIEF
TOPIC OF MEETING
HELD ON MONDAY
Y/ltjixtQGn
ifine stationeryJiai/1
*  a Special charm' L
t>MacLi.rM
I hun tc. Limited
« Child Bcctpi Rs*eh. MsjMrul.
COrUTKXAV, Feb. 17.—At last
Monday's meeting of the city council
a very important report was made by
Alderman Cooke concerning the bard
surfacing of tbe city streets. The
special committee conisting of Alder-
S Cokelv In- I men t(,()'U1' chairman, Fielder and Mc-
he was will- ^enz'e' had gone thoroughly into the
'matter, It was proposed to hard
surface the L'nion Hay road from the
city limits to the Canadian Bank of
Commerce and as far as the tracks
Of the Comox Logging and Railway
Co. Also two blocks ou L'nion street
starting from the silent policeman at
the corner of tbe Cumberland road
down to where Union street meets the
Island Highway. The total estimated cost would be $42,000 of whicb
the city's share would be $20,000 and
the provincial government's share
$22,000. The estimated eost would
be $16 per foot over the whole distance. Two qualities of road had been
discussed, oue of which was known as
Tarvia Concrete and tbe other As-
phaltlc Concrete.
Calculations had been made from
the profile prepared by Mr. Johnson
U* the Vancouver General Construction Co, Tbe asphaltic concrete Is
Llie type of road allowed for in the
estimates of the construction company and it was thought that this was
the longest wearing material. Two
different qualities or thicknesses of
ihis road would probably be recommended. Tbo ono would be asphaltic" concrete with a five inch black
base. This would be on tbe main
sections of the road, and the other sec
ions would have a three inch black
base. It was proposed to finance
this undertaking by a bond issue, the
principle aud Interest of which would
be guaranteed by tbe profits of the
electric light system. Tbe by-law
covering this bond issue would aot
bo u local improvement by-law said
Alderman Coolie ln answer to a question. The speaker thought the
electric light consumers should be
the ones to benefit most from tho
scheme. Alderman Pearse wanted
to know if the committe had considered tbe application of asphaltic oil.
Ho was informed lhat this bad been
givon consideration, but that for tbe
climatic conditions here a concrete
base was necessary. Asphaltic oil
treatment was only temporary treatment which didn't prevent the roads
in this climate from heaving with the
frost, necessitating treatment every
yea r.
Mayor Duncan thought Alderman
Cooke bad given a very interesting
report; but wanted to know whai assurance there was .that the government would do its share towards tho
hard surfacing of tho roads even if
Courtenay did their share. Alderman
Macdonald reported as to an interview -.vith Mr. P. P. Harrison M.L.A.,
relative to road improvements. Tbe
council went on record as being in
favor of Asphaltic concrete roads.
The result Of the commit toe's work
Is to be put into definite form ami another interview will be arranged with
111111 i Mr. Harrison when the mattor will he
further dl cut sed
Councillor Macdonald brought up
the subject of the necessity of iucroas
ing the electrical energy supply from
tbe Ci Nan Collieries. At the present  tim.- Courtenay was getting LSO
I kws  he  said and  this  should  be  fn-
!■■! • il  to 300  kws,      The  line  was
over-loaded   now   and   tbe   speaker
thought that tho ' ity was nol getting
'what  It was paying for.      City Clerk
Wood said the electrical current cost
i  oul $7,1  lor last year. He thought
the cheapesi way out of the difficulty
would be to bring about 13,000 volts
to the centre of distribution in Court-
■ enay.     Thi    n ould  necessitate  the
1 building of a new line from tbe Power
House, but it would Insure bettor ser-
nd \    lid keep Ihe lin,- dear of
the t ni..n Baj line     Alderman Macdonald and Field ar.' to report furth-
> ■ r on the matter.
SSf
COURTENAY, Feb. 10. Tbo road
Into camp No 8 of the Comox Logging and Railway Company which
leaves the Island Highway at Black
Crei k, and which has for some weeks
been in an impassable condition. Is
now very much improved. During
the last week considerable work has
been doi e on this road which is some
: ■ mile iu length. In fact, Mr.
John Crockett, wbo has been working on this section says "Ynu can now
i ome oul of Camp :, on high."
fcmee/y rVlg
BRONCHITIS I
AT ALL
DRUC6ISTS
c
ig l-—aa^jsg: "like a flash*
SSJftMM—WWs1ssws»*s'T .1—i|J-».JOsig~-»w U'.isssss«vssj
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND HV LANG'S DRUG STORE
Use Baby's Own
Soap. It's "Best
for Baby —Best
for You". PAGE TEN
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLAN1ER,   CUMBERLAND. B. C
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY  20, 1925
FUGI   SILKS
We have just had delivered for Spring Showing a
full range of Fugi Silks which are so much in demand
at present, and which are so suitable for so many purposes. For Ladies' and Girls' Dresses they are de-
lightfuKaud soft and make up in pretty styles, will
wash welt, and givo every satisfaction. For Lingerie
there is nothing that will give greater service, or value
for your money. We have shades of Pink, Paddy
Green, Peach, Navy, Fawn, Blue and White and the
price $1.10 width 29.30 inches wide.
Plain Glos-Silk Skirting—Two colorings in Mauve
ings in this new material, which is one of the newest
designs for Novelty Skirts, in shades of Fawn, Green
and Navy, the width is 3G inches wide, and the Price
is $1.95.
Plain Clos-Silk Skirting—Two colorings in Mauve
and Grey, two pretty shades in a beautiful material for
Dresses or Skirts.     Very new.     Price $1.95 per yd.
Wembley Stripe—A new material in a silk stripe
36 inches wide, in the new shade and coloring, so much
desired at present. Price $1.50 per yard.
For New Dress Goods in Silks, Flannels, Etc., Visit
J. SUTHERLAND
Cumberland
Social and Personal
ss     •     ss
Mr. Thomas Graham, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (D) Limited left for Vancouver on
Tuesday morning.
Mr. T. H. Mumford left for Victoria
on Monday morning.
Rev. W. Leversedge went to Victoria Monday morning.
Mr. N. O. Klhler, who for the past
two months has been looking after interests of the Credit Men's Trust Association, accompanied by his wife,
left Saturday morning for Vancouver.
Mrs. Robert Mitchell left for Vancouver on Tuesday last On a short
visit to her son, Mr. T. Mitchell.
Mr. A. McNIven, of the survey gang
of B.S. & W., was in the city on Wednesday.
Mr. Charles Graham went to Vancouver on Tuesday where he will attend the Mining Institute Convention.
Mrs. Harrison and Miss H. Harrison left for Nanaimo this morning.
Mrs. G. Curwen was at home to a
number of friends on Tuesday afternoon.
Mrs. A. Dick of Alberni, Is in town
on a visit to her son, Mr. James Dick
and Mrs. Dick.
Mrs. Keeler was at home to a number of friends on Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. J. Walton entertained a number of friends at afternoon tea on
Wednesday last.
FORESTERS DANCE
Court Bevan Lodge, Ancient Order
of Foresters have set Friday, February 27th for a dance to be given iu
the Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall. Particulars
later.
G. W. V. A. ELECT
OFFICERS FOR 1925
COURTENAY, Feb. 19.—Only a
small attendance of about fourteen
turned out to the G.W.V.A. meeting
held in the Agricultural Hall on Wednesday evening. The officers elected
for the ensuing year are: C. E. Beas-
; ley, president; A. W. Grist, vice-president; G. B. Capes, secretary-treasurer. Executive committe, Messrs.
Baker, Hughes, Parker, Pratt, Ren-
; uie and Tull. No definite resolutions
] were made, but several matters were
; discussed. Among these were the
I questions of re-organizatlon through-
; out the province. The annual fee was
j made one dollar with the hope that
i membership would be Increased. The
; feeling of the meeting was that the
' organization should not be allowed to
lie dropped.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR ACT
Notice of Application (or Beer
License
Mr. Fisher, representing Smith,
Davidson and Wright of Vancouver,
visited town on Wednesday.
Bargains
$13.50 Boys' Suits  *»."'
$11.50 Boys' Suits   $8.75
$10.50 Boys' Suits  $7.80
$7.50 Boys' Suits  -  $1.95
$8.90 Hoys' Navy Serge Reefers ^.l.j.'i
$2.50 Boys' Sweaters, now $1.60
$2.75 Boys' Sweaters, now  $1.95
SIIOK DEPT.
$7.50 Men's Nailed Shoes   MM
$7.50 Men's Working Shoes   %i.K<
$5.50 Men's Nailed Shoes   $4.45
$4.50 Boys' School Shoe, now .... $2,0,1
WE CAN SAVE YOU REAL MONEY
F. PARTRIDGE
Cumberland    &    Courtenay
Mrs. T. Mordy entertained at bridge
on Tuesday evening.
WANTED—A MAN TO HANDLE THE
Rales and Distribution of The J. R.
Watkins Company's Products In
Cumberland and the surrounding
district. Apply The J. R. Watklnn
Company, 1150 Hamilton St., Vancouver, B.C. 8-9.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
on the 14th day of March next, the undersigned intends to apply to the
j Liquor Control Board for a license ln
respect of premises being part of the
| building known as Willis Hotel,
situate at Union Bay, adjoining Island
; Highway, Nelson District, County nf
j Nanaimo, Province of British Colum-
j bla, upon the lands described as See-
I lion 32, Victoria Land Registration
1 District, ln the Province of British
Columbia, for the sale of Beer by the
glass or by the open bottle for consumption on the premises.
Dated  this  20th  day  of February,
i 1925. I. C. WILLIS,
18-11. Applicant.
Week-End Specials
Fels NaptKa Soap, per carton   85c.
White Wonder Soap, 7 cakes for 55c.
Canned Tomatoes, 2Va's, 4 tins 85c.
Marmalade, 1-lb. glass 25c. 2 for 45c.
K. B. Red Plum Jam, 4-lb tin   75c.
K. B. Strawberry Jam, 4-lb tin -... 85c.
Special Blend Ceylon Tea per pound 75c.
Fresh Ground Coffee, par lb 60c. & 70c.
Red Arrow Sodsis, per package 25c.
6-lb Wooden Boxes Soda?,, each  $1.00
8-lb, Boxes Fairy Sodas, each $1.35
Fancy Mixed Biscuits per lb. 35c. 3 lbs. for $1.00
Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for 55c.
Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs for 45c.
Sliced Pineapples, 2-lb tins, 4 for 85c.
Del Monte Peaches, 3 tins for   85c.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
WANTED—REPRESENTATIVE FOR
Cumberland District, by old established Life Assurance Company.
Splendid .opening for good man.
Previous experience not necessary.
Apply Box 430 The Islander.
FOR SALE—CHEVROLET 5-PASS-
eiiRcr Touring Car, 1921 model.
Low price for cash, or easy terms
arranged. Owner at present out
of town but particulars may be hail
from W, Beveridge, Jr., Cumberland
B.C. 8.
FOR SALE-4 ACRES IMPROVED
land, good fencing, new house, outbuildings, new modern chicken coop
125 laying Leghorn Pullets, large
brooder. Furniture can be had at
valuation, near Cumberland. For
particulars, apply Box 300, Islander
ollice. 8-!).
LOST—Small Nugget Stick Pin, between Derwent Avenue and the hospital, via the post office. Finder
rewarded. Please notify Islander
Ollice. s-
l,OKT — LADY'S GOLD WRIST
Watch without strap, small round
shape. Apply P.O. Box 403. Finder |
will be rewarded. "
Cream of lillics
The Sure Relief For Chapped Hands, Face and Lips.
Also For Rough Skin.
TRY    A    BOTTLE   TODAY
50c
-PRICE
^_50c
NOTE
STARTING .MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23
this store will close ;.. H:30 p.m. daily except Saturday,
wh n we will close at 10:30.
SUNDAY HOURS
Morning—10180 - 12::'.0 Evening 6:30 - 8:30
Closed Wednesday Afternoons.
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Mercantile Store
Phone 133
CUMBERLAND
Phone 133
BOUGHT OUT BY READ & OSBORNE, WHO CONTINUE THE GIGANTIC $30,000
BANKRUPT SALE
The response to this great money saving sale has been quite up to our expectations and it has been a real pleasure for
us to meet the people of this city and district and share wit h them the big discount we received on this great bankrupt stoc.        EVERYTHING REDUCED AT THIS BIG SALE
TWEEDS
40 inch wide. They come in plaids
and neat checks. Reg. sold at $1. aud
»1.25  yard AS
Bankrupt Sale Price  ■xUfc
ANDERSON'S  GINGHAMS
and Chambrays, in plain colors and
some nice checks, Reg. 15c (PI AA
yard. 3 yards for   WX.UU
31 INCH PONGEE SILK
ln flue even weave Pongee 34 inch
wide, free from dressing *7Q/»
Reg.   $1.25 _   I VKa
HUNTS
32 Inch fine prints, light, some dark
patterns, 2 qualities. Reg. 30c and 40c
Sale Price
19C an ,26C
SILK CANTON CBEPE
3C inch wide, in colors of sand, grey,
brown, navy and pink Reg. (P*| JQ
$2.00. Bankrupt Sale Price VfL.'xeJ
SILK & WOOL KHINKLED CREPE
best grade sold at $3.50, Three dress
lengths (3% yards each) only left
Regular price $12.25 leiigthfl'Q PA
Sale Price, Length
TOWELS
Colored  Turkish  Towels, size 42x20.
Reg. $1.00 per pair fiQ/»
Sale Price, per pair
DRY GOODS
DRY GOODS
COTTON CBEPE
Three or four pieces to clear OO/i
Reg.  30c.  ililL
MERCERIZED MULL
for Ladies Langerie, etc. 36 Inch wide
Pink, Mauve, Sky and MaizeflJI AA
Reg. 65c. 3 yards for    tDl.VU
STKIPED SATINETTE
36 inch wide, suitable for Ladies' Neg-
legie, linings, etc., various shades.
Reg. 75c. per yard AQp
Bankrupt Sale Price   tUX/
COTTONS, MIDDY TWILLS, SHEETINGS, SHEET AND DOMESTIC COT-
TONS AT ENORMOUS REDUCTIONS
LADIES' SUITS
About 25 In all—Some in the new 3/4
lengths and come In line Navy Tricotine with self Silk Embroidery and
others in Homespun, With Military
Braid trimming to match. All real
bargains from (CI ft <K1 r\
off regular price     <Plv   to 0)1.0
HOYS' HOSE
Boys' Black All Wool 4/1 Ribbed Hose
Values to $1.00. A€kf   r7Qi*
Sale Price   1t/<L» I VKa
According to  size
LADIES' COATS
About 30 Ladies' Coats, comprising
Velours with tur trimming, nlso nice
spring styles ut enormously reduced
$6.95  tr  $19.50
LADIES WEAK
Ladles' Bloomers, 95c. fiQ/»
Pink or Cream  \3U\a
House   Dresses,   $1.50 QQ«
Sale Price   J/OC
Ladies'   Vests,  $1.00 AQ/»
Sale Price  U57C
WOOL SPECIALS
Ilalwins Purple Heather 4-ply Fingering In Black, Navy and Heathers, Reg
$2.75 lb. a»o nn
Sale Price per lb  tMsi.VV
Heather   Bloom  and    Elasco     (l-oz.
balls)   Reg.  20c QP„
7 balls for   UOW,
Tiger  4-ply   Finegilng    Wool,    2-oz.
packages.      Reg.  40c. 9Qp
Shetland Floss. 15c.
4 for 	
35c
Artsyl Sweater Silk in    16   different
colors.   Reg.   85c.  hank P\*^i»
Sale Price.
MEN'S
FURNISHINGS
$4.50
MEN'S HATS
Stetson, and other high grade makes
in  Greys.  Camel  Velours  and  Felts.
$7.50 hats (£P  PA
Sale Price  _    OO.OV
$6.50 hats
Sale Price	
MEN'S CAPS
A large assortment of fine colorings
Values to $3.00 <j»1   AP
Sale Price   <DJ..«/t>
MEN'S OVERALL ft PANTS
Master    Mechanic.     Headlight     and
Pride of the West Overals at
1/4 ft -l/ll Off Hcirulnr Prices
Men's  Merino Shirts    and    Drawers
Regluar $1.00 7Q/i
Sale Prico  t VKa
^■BBMHi^MBBMKMsMMa
MEN'S ALL WOOL SOX
A wonderful buy,     These nre going
rapidly.      Reg. 60. fl»1   AA
3 pairs for
MEN'S SUITS
Some great savings here—Blue Fine
Serge  Suit,  Reg.  §35.00  0>)4  PA
Sale Price     «> irttOV
Also  in  Greys    and    Browns,    Blue
Rough Serge Suits, Reg. fl»1 Q 7K
$19.60 for     tDlO.lll
Tweed Suits $28.50
Sale Price
$17.50
MENTION
BUT
A FEW
OF OUR
Cash Grocery Prices
"SEE WHAT YOU SAVE"
Broom Specials, each   O50
Ready Cut Macaroni, per lb   10©
1-lb. pkt Macaroni    150
Horse Shoe Salmon Vfe's, 2 for .... 85?
Braid's Best Coffee, 1-lb tin   (),"it*
Braids Best Coffee, fresh ground,
per lb  500
Tudor Coffee, 1-lb. tln  GOO
Quaker Toinntoe Soup. 2 for .... 25c
Van Camp Tomato Soup, 2 for .... 2,50
Libby's Pork aud Beans, large .... 115c
Seeded Raisins, 15-oz. pkts, 2 for 250
Seedless Raisins, 15-oz pkts 2 for 2,50
Ftlllabras Currants, 2 lbs. for .. 250
Malkins Best Malde, 4's tin  .... 7O0
Dutch Cocoa, 2 lbs. for   250
Nabob Tomato  Ketchup    ,'{Oc
Oranges,  Lemons,  Bananas,  Cooking
and  Eating Apples  and   Lettuce  for
the week end.
We Deliver
BOOTS  AND
SHOES
LADIES' SHOES
Ladles' Black High Shoes, medium heel, about 1 pairs at values to $5.00 (*1 AP
To cienr     tOLtVO
HOOTS tt SHOES
Men's Dress Shoes In Blnck and Tan
Bal. some with rubber heelsd* 4   4E
A wonderful value    tDcx.lrO
Miner's    ubber   Boots,   White   Sole,
Cascade  make QA  iC
Sale Price per pair     tD'l.'lO
CHILDREN'S SHOES
Girls'  and  Little Gent's  Boots.
John Cote mnkes, vales to $4.50
$1.95 a,,d $2.50
 According to size	
LADIES STIIAP SHOES
Ladies' Black Strap Shoes, medium
heel, Reg. $4.00 (PO ^P
Sale Price     OitAO
Better grade Suede and Patent Shoes
$6.50 and $7.50 O* OP (?* QP
Sale Price tD'i.UO* tDt.VO
HOYS' SCHOOL SHOES
Bovs' School Boots,   values   to
$4.50 <|»0 AP
Sftle Price     *0ii.UO
LOGGERS' HOOTS
Logger's  Boots,   Christie   hand
made, $16.00 (P-f O PA
Sale Price     «D±.£.UU
J

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