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The Cumberland Islander May 1, 1925

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Array IV r.t
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
1°
prov'
«SaJ^?SUB
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 18.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA FRIDAY,  MAY 1,  1925
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
SCHOOL INSPECTOR
PATTERSON DELIVERS
EDUCATIONAL ADDRESS
COURTENAY B. OF T.
WAS ADDRESSED BY
A. MELVILLE DOLLAR
Indicative of the increasing interest being taken tn the welfare of the
Bchool children of Cumberland, the
largest meeting ln the history of tho
Parent - Teachers' Association was
held on Monday night In the school
room occupied by Division one. The
capacity of the room was taxed to Its
limit and a suggestion has been made
that If the sessions ot the association
continue to grow a larger room will
have to be acquired. Mrs. 0. K. MacNaughton occupied the chair, and Mr.
Oeorge Apps, prlclpal ot the school,
and secretary to the association, wns
ln his accustomed place.
The flrst business of the meeting
was the favorable consideration of the
recommendation that the association
donate prizes for the best kept gardens, competition to be open to pupils In the Junior and Senior Divisions
respectively, the only stipulation being that there must be at least seven
entries in each division.
A resolution making a grant of ten
dollars towards the June 3rd Fleld
Day was also endorsed. The money
thus granted will be handed over to
the committee for the purchase of
medals for the various events.
The annouucement made at the last
meeting, that Mr. Patterson, District
School Inspector, would be present
and deliver an address, was welcomed
and none of the large number who attended on Monday night were disappointed, for the speaker was at his
best and in forceful manner told of
the endeavors being made to bring
about, through "intelligence tests,"
better conditions In tbe public schools
of the Province. He criticized present methods of teaching and said that
teachers were not responsible for the
methods now in vogue. The system
had been handed down through tho
ages and for this reason the educa
tional departments of the various provinces were to blame. But there has
been an awakening to the fact that the
curriculum must fit the child and not
the ubsurdity ot the child to fit the
curriculum. The survey of education
in British Columbia, urged by teachers, will recommend that drastic
changes be made In the system these
recommendations being based solely
on Information gleaned by experience
and the working out of a scheme of
intelligence tests. British Columbia
will then have one of the most effectual educational systems on the American Continent.
Intelligence tests have been standardized. They have been given to
tens of thousands of children and the
averages tabulated, until lt ls now
possible to tell just what any child
of a given age should be able to do.
They afford a means of measuring tho
child and putting the responsibility for
its development, or otherwise, in the
proper place; whether on the teacher,
the parents, or on the child. These
tests are now being Introduced In
British Columbia and will soon be applied to the Cumberland school.
Nobody can properly tell what electricity "Ib," but electricity can be
"measured." So it is with tbe child.
Nobody can tell what Intelligence
"is," yet Inelllgence can be "measured."
At the close ot his address Mr. Pat
terson was asked several questions
on Entrance promotions and examinations, all of which he answered, tu
the meeting's satisfaction.
Some of the Intelligence tests were
Bhown to the audience, after which
a hearty vote of thanks was tendered
the speaker and dainty refreshments
were served by the ladles of the association.
106 ANNIVERSARY NOTED BY
CUMBERLAND ODDFELLOWS
The K. of P. hall was, last Friday
evening, the scene of a very enjoyable whist drive and social evening,
wben the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd-Fellows, assisted by
the Harmony Rebekah Lodge, celebrated the one hundred and sixth anniversary of the founding of the Order. From 8:00 to 9:30 o'clock the
guests were entertained at twenty-two
tables of cards, prizes for which were
won by tbe following: Ladies firs',
Mrs. J. Oear, consolation, Miss May
Hughes; Gentlemen's flrst, Mr. J.
Walker, consolation, Mrs. V. Marinelli, who was playing a gentleman's
hand. Following the whist the members of the Rebekah Order served excellent refreshments after which a
well-rendred program of music, songs
and dances was given, the whole lasting until 11:45 p.m.
The full program and those taking
part in It, follows: Opening remarks
on Odd-Fellowship by Brother James
Smith of Union Lodge No. 11, I.O.O.F.
2. Scotch Reel by the Misses Beveridge, Walker, Davis and Adamson. II.
Violin and piano duet by Masters Norman Frelone and Alden PracoBcIni.
4. Song by Mr. George Shearer. 5
Piano duet by the Misses P. Cloutier
and M. Shearer. 6. Song by Mr. Robt
Goodali. 7. Cello and piano duet by
Miss May Hughes and Muster Norman Frelone. 8 Banjo selection by Mr.
W. Jackson. 9. Club swinging, with
piano accompaniment by Mr. Robert
Walker and daughter. 10. Piano selection by Miss P. Cloutier. 11 Scotch
dance by Miss Jackson. 12. Spanish
dance by Miss Margaret Adamson.
13 Song by Mr. Goodali. 14. "Auld
Lang Syne."
Busy Bees Enjoyed
Hike To Royston
On Saturday last the members of
the "Busy Bee" Club of the Anglican
Church, under the leadership of Min.
W. Leversedge and Miss C. Richardson who organized the club, spent u
most enjoyable day by hiking to Royston Beach in the morning and return
Ing by the same manner in the evening. The girls spent the day at the
summer home of Mr. and Mrs. ll.
Richardson, serving there the refreshments that they had taken with
them.
Throughout the winter months thc
club has been very busy learning thc
art of basket making and from the
sale of these, together with the five
cents which ls paid weekly by each
member It has been able to materially
assist several families who were In
needy circumstances.
ROOF FIRE CAUSES
SOME EXCITEMENT
A small Are on the roof of the store
occupied by Mumford's Grocery on
Dunsmuir Avejiue, was the cause of
some excitement on Tuesday afternoon as the building is in thc centre
of a block, the whole of which might
have been destroyed had the fire not
been Instantly checked. Both Arc
trucks turned out but were found unnecessary as employees of the store
had already put the fire out hy means
of a small garden hose which Mr.
Victor Bonora had qulckl.. coupled to
a fawcett In the King George Hotel.
Sparks from the chimney were probably the cause.
EFFECTIVE TARLEAUX
DEPICT APPEARANCE
OF RISEN CHRIST
A series of very effective tableaux,
representing   the  appearance   of  the
risen  ChrlBt  were  presented   In  thn
| Anglican Hall on Thursday night hy
i the children of the Holy Trinity Sunday School.     In all, ten scenes were
i presented, and the    thoughtful    anil
' reverent attitude    of    the    children
| brought  forth   very   favorable  comment.
I In his opening remarks the Vicar
| asked the audience tn regard the tab-
| leaux aB an attempt to teach, by
I means ot dramatic grouping, the truth
I of the Christian faith. That the ex-
j perlment was amply Justified thero
I can be no doubt and' it Ib now plan-
j ned to present a second series dealing with the nativity.
I The tableaux were followed by a
I short missionary play In which char-
< actcrs from thc foreign Mission fields
j took part. The whole evening was
! from every point of view a decided
i success.
COURTENAY, April 29— The election of officers for the Courtenay-Comox Board of Trade at the annual
meeting which took place hero last
night resulted as follows: Wm. Eadie,
president; Wm. Douglas, vice-president; R. E. Wallls, secretary. Tho
1925 council of the board ls composed of Messrs Walter Beard, Alec. Cle-
land, /Heber Cooke, Georgo Edwards,
R. U. Hurford, R, G. Ker, G. A. Kirk,
E. Lloyd, E. L. Macdonald, J. N. McLeod, C. W. and Charles Simms.
Distinguished visitors at last night's
meeting were Messrs A. Melville Dollar and W. E. Payne, president and
secretory respectively of the Vancou-.
ver Board of Trade. They arrived ln
Courtenay at 6:30 coming by private
yacht via Comox. Mayor Wm. Duncan
and Mr. Theed Pearse ex-presldent of
the local board of trade met the visitors ou their arrival and took them
for a short tour of iuspectln of the
Comox Vulley hy motor. By eight
o'clock the city hall was .well filled
with members for the annual meeting. On coming to order the members rose ln response of a vote of con.
dolence for the widow of the late Mr.
G. O. Graham, an active member of
the board. A deputation from Campbell River composed ot Mesrs Bans-
ton, Forbes, Glanvllle and Pldcock,
was ln attendance for tho purpose of
soliciting the boards assistance ln securing a bridge at Campbell River
which they said was urgently needed.
Mr. Herbert Pidcock was the spokesman for his party and explained the
situation nt Campbell River. The
matter was referred to a special committee of the board consisting of
Messrs Macdonald, Edwards and CIt-
land.
An interesting report made by the
retiring president showed the many
activities of the organization during
thc year. The secretary-treasurers'
report showed the board to be In a
sound financial condition. Several
new members were proposed and elected to the board, these were, Messrs
C. D. Bridges, G. Pattison, A. Sten-
house, Wallace McPhee. A. Bell-Irving
and G. R. Mutrie.
After the meeting an adjournment
was made to the Riverside Cafe where
the visitors from Vancouver and from
Campbell River wore tho guests of the
board at a very enjoyable supper. At
this function the chief speakers were
Mr. A. Melville Dollar president, and
Mr. W. E. Payne, secretary of thc Von
couver board. Their addresses covered an explanation of the workings
of the Vancouver organzlatlon and
were listened to with much Interest.
ANDREWS SOCIETY
OF COMOX DISTRICT
BEGAN 1925 SYLLABUS
COURTENAY, April 27.—Under tbo
auspices of the Comox and district St.
Andrews Society antl by arrangement
of tlie syllabus committee, Mr. P„ McA.
Carrlck of Vancouver, gave a most
able and interesting lecture 111 Booth's
Hall on Friday night. His subject
waB "Why we should honor the memory of Rohert Hums" and he did full
Justice to it. Mr. Carrlck Is president of the Rums' Fellowship In Vancouver nnd Is probably one of the
best posted men on the continent nf
this particular subject. Under the
following heuils hu dealt in a most
brilliant and instructive way with his
chosen topic: 1. A great Poet. 2.
As one of the greatest of our song
writers. 3. As a true Patriot and
4.   Ab a man.
The lecturer frequently quoted at
great length and without apparent effort from the works of Burns, showing that he was thoroughly en raport
with his subject, In fact, It was clearly evident that be was. as he said,
deeply in love with Burns. In addition to his lecture, Mr. Carrlck gave
one or two humorous selections which
were greatly enjoyed by all present.
The musical part of the program was
contributed to by Mr. Herbert Smith,
Mr. Inglis Junior and piper W. W.
Stewart. Mr. Inglis recited a clever
and original poem and Mr. J. Inglis, a
couple of selections ln the broad
Doric. President Walter Brown made
a most capable chairman and ln addition to this duty acquitted himself
very well as an amateur songster.
Mr. Frank Porter of Vancouver presided very efficiently at the organ.
The pleasant evening was brought to
a close with the singing of "Auld
Lang Syne'' amidst the skirl of the
pipes.
The remainder of the proposed syllabus of the St. Andrews Society of
Comox district for the year 1924-25
is as^'ollows: May 29—Deba.te.' "Re-'
snlvti. CffiraaothUsd should halve e"-
tered the Union." June 26—Lecture
and Concert. Mr. John Mclnnes, Vancouver will lecture On "Burns the Reformer." July 31—Picnic. August
—Open. Sept. 25—Concert and So-
I rial. Oct. 30—Lecture and Concert.
Mr. Jas. Taylor, Vancouver, on Scottish poetry prior to Burns." Nov.
27—St. Andrew's Night. Supper and
Entertainment. Dec. 31.—Concert
nud a discussion on "Famous Scots of
each Shire.'' Jan 25.—Burns' Nicbt.
"The Immortal Memory to be propos-
| ed by Mr. Fraser Reid of Vancouver."
COUNCIL ADOPTS 1925
TAX BY-LAWS--GENERAL
RATE IS NOW 15 MILLS
Methodist Board Convened
For a good time on Saturday night
j attend the Dance In the G. W. V. A.
! Hall. Excellent music, excellent
1 dance floor.     Gents SOc. Ladies 10c.
On Tuesday evening the fourth
meeting of the Quaterly Olllcial Hoard
of the Ornce Methodist Church was
held In the Church with the pastor,
Rev. J. R. Butler, presiding. Reports of the Sunday School and other
young peoples' organizations were
presented, all being found to be ln a
flourishing condition. The church
year ends April 30th end the financial
statement was very gratifying. All
obligations will he met and the entire
Indebtedness will be wiped nut, thanks
to tho enthusiastic and energetic efforts of the Ladies' Aid.
Tho Board placed on record their
appreciation of the work of their
pastor and extended to hlm a unanimous Invitation to return for another
year. Mr. Butler expressed his
thanks to the Hoard for its kind
words of appreciation and the invlta-
tlon to return for another term, indicating thut the request would ho presented to the constituted authorities.
He explained, Iiowever, that in view
of the United Church of Canada becoming an actuality on June 10th. nnd
tho fact of It affecting tho two negotiating churches locally, which will
automatically enter into the United
Church on that date, some changes
would necessarily have to be made In
the arrangement of the work in tho
Immediate future. This latter, he
assured the Board, would be in the
best interest of all parties concerned,
and the fostering of a vigorous branch
of the United Church of Canada In
Cumberland.
Next week, .Mr. Rutler will attend
the annual District Meeting at Nanaimo, proceeding from there to Victoria, the Heat of the last annual conference to be held in British Columbia
ln the history of the Methodist
Church.
Monday's Council meeting was u
very short one, occupying hardly-
more than the full sixty minutes between the hour of 7:30 and 8:30,
o'clock. The full Board, with the
exception of Alderman J. Ledlngham.
was ln attendance.
Communications
As usual, the minutes of the previous meeting were first read and
adopted, following which W. H. Cope,
clerk of the Municipality, read thc
only two communications which he
had received during the past two
weeks. Both of these were tenders
for Insurance of the new chemical
truck to the amount of J2.000.00. and
as the one submitted by T. H. Carey,
for (38.00, wub the lowest of the twe,
it was accepted.
Bills and Accounts
Bills and accounts to the total
amount of $465.54 were presented to
the finance committee for payment if
found correct.
Reports of Committees
Alderman John J. Potter, chairman
of the Board of Works, asked the
Council if he was not right in maintaining that the city could not be called upon to pay for laying a sewer In
private property. He was Informed
that the costs of any sewer laid down
in private property must be borne
by the owner of such property, not
by the city. Alderman Potter then
went on to report that workmen hud
been busy cleaning up the boulevards
and that a silent policeman had been
installed at the Marocchi corner,
which has long been a dangerous one
for passing automobiles. One decayed sewer had been replaced and
the grievances ot the school trustees
In connection with the dumping of
ashes on the school ground bad also
been satisfactorily cleared up.
The Board of Health, the Light
Committee, and the Fire Warden had
no reports, hut Aldermun Jeffre. *, ot
tlie Water Committee, reported that
the leak in tlie main at Pendrlth and
Fourth was still open, In spite of the
fact that tlie water company had made
an attempt l0 repair It.
IIj-Ijiivs Are Adopted
General Rate By-Law No. 66, setting the tax rate at 15 mills on the
dollar, was brought up for final consideration and was adopted, with no
changes, on motion of Alderman Mum
ford, seconded by Alderman Mullen.
School Rate By-Laws, Nos. 67 and 68,
were adopted on the respective motions of Alderman Potter, seconded
hy Alderman Mullen; and Alderman
Jeffrey, seconded hy Alderman Maxwell. The rate of 9 mills on the
dollar, proposed in the by-laws, waa
not changed.
No Celebration May 24th.
Mayor Parnham informed the Council that, In accordance with Its wishes, he had called a meeting to consider holding a celebration on May
24th, but as no one attended, the
question was dropped.
LARGE CROWD ATTEND
EXHIBITION SOCCER
GAME SUNDAY LAST
Cumberland United entertained Ihe
St. Andrews Soccer team, of Powell
River on the Recreation Grounds on
Sunday afternoon last In an Exhibition game. Nearly one hundred and
fifty fans came over from the paper
town to cheer their favorites and in
the majority of cases, the time, waiting for the game to start was spent
in taking iu the surrounding country, some of thc visitors being taken
(Continued on Page Eight)
FIELD DAY WILL BE ONLY BIG
DAY OF YEAR IN THIS CITY
Program Of Upper
Island School Sports
The following is the list of events
lu the program of thc Uppcr-lBland
School Sports to he held in Cumber-
laud on June 3rd. Classifications:
Junior—under 12 years; Senior—12
years and over in thc public school;
High School—ull pupils attending
High School.
Juniors- -1. 75-yds. race for boys anil
girls. 2. Relay race (team nf 4) 220
yds, for hoys and girls. 3. Sack race
for hoys and girls. 4. Wheel barrow
nice for boys only. S, Three-legged
race, mixed. U. Egg and spoon race,
BB yds and return, for girls only. 7.
Hnsebnll throwing, all girls clusses.
8, Skipping, 50 yds. for glrlH only. li.
Hope climbing, 20 fl. for lioys only.
Seniors - 1.  100-yds. dash  for boys
and girls. 2. 220-yds race for boys and.
girls. 3.      440-yds race for boys und
girls. 4.  1-2 mile race for boys and
girls.     5. Relay race (team of 4), 440
yds. for boys and girls. 6. Three-legged  race,  mixed.  7.  Egg and  spoon
I raco, 25 yds return, for girls only, il;
j Nail driving 6 2  1-2 Inch nails, for
! girls only. 9. Bascbull throwing for all
' girls classes.   10.  skipping  rnce  100
1 yds. for girls only. 11. Rope climbing
I 20 ft. for boys only.      12. Standing.
; hop,  skip  nnd   jump  for  boys  only.
i13. Running broad jump for boys and
j girls.     14. High jump for boys only.
j    High School—1. 100- yds. dash for
>bo;,s and girls.     2. 220 yds race for
hoys nnd girls.     3. 440 yds race for
! hoys and girls.     ■(. 1-2 mile race for
j hoys and girls.     5. Three-legged race
] mixed.      6.  Egg nnd spoon  race, 25
j (Continued on Page Eight)
Hospital Auxiliary
Elects New President
A special meeting of the Ladles'
Auxiliary to the Cumberland General
Hospital was held laBt Friday afternoon for the purpose of electing a
new president to fill the vacancy caus
ed by the resignation of Mrs. CharleJ
Graham, who has left this city to reside In Vancouver. Mrs. H. Bryan
was unanimously elected to Ihe position, tbe meeting also deciding to
leave vacant for the rest of thc term
the office of vice president which was
formerly held hy Mrs. Bryan.
PRIZE CONTEST WILL
RUN IN CONNECTION
WITH "LAST LAUGH"
ATTENTION! You boys nnd girla
of the Cumberland and Courtonn..
schools who ure between the ugc of
12 and 16 years. A 15.00 gold piece
ami other special prizes, will be given
by tin inanagements of the llo-llo
Theatre, Cumberland und the Gaiety
Theatre, Courtenay. in each case, for
the best slnrlos from each city of a
personal experience thnt proves the
truth o.f the old proverb-"he who
loughs last, laughs best." No story
Should contain more than two hundred words, and all correspondence
should be sent In as early as possible to P.O. Drawer 430, Cumberland
B.C.
This contest Is being held In connection with the photoplay, "The Last
Laugh," which Is being shown In
Cumberland on Friday and Saturday,
May 8 and 9. and In Courtenay on
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.
May 11, 12 and 13. Dont' miss this
picture. It has caused a stupendous
sensation the world over.
Competent men will be appointed
to judge thc contest stories. Prize
winners In the Cumberland district
will he announced at the llo-llo Theatre on Saturday evening. May 9, and
thc winners of thc Courtenay district
will he announced at the Gaiety Theatre on Saturday evening. Mny 16th.
Competitors nre asked to have their
stories sent In as Boon before these
dates ub possible.
Cumberland people who began the
organization of a field day for boys
and girls, to embrace pupils of the
Public Schools from Campbell River
south to Xanainio. never dreamed the
Idea would grow us rapidly as it has
grown. It ts beginning to dawn upon
them that tltlx event .which will be
held in Cumberland on June 3rd, is
going to be the greatest children's
day ever held on Vancouver Island.
Sixty-nine schools will be represented, and parents, lodges, and public
bodies are taking a keen interest In
It. Proof of this Is given in the fact
that voluntary assistance Is coming
In from every hand—many prizes
liaviug already been received.
In all fourteen cups and one hundred and eighty medals will be up for
competition. Four cups have already been donated as follows: Lang's
Drug Store. It. Kaplansky, Courtcnuy
Assembly Native Sotis of Canada, and
Cumberland Aerie of the Fraternal
Order nf Eagles. Other organizations have signified their Intention of
making donations, either In cash ur
prizes so that when June 3rd arrives
It Is quite likely lhat there Is not an
order In the district that will not be
represented In tha prize list. This
Is not n local affair only, but the com-
mlttee Is working ul Nannlmo and
other places ami good headway Is being ncbleveil. Many Inquiries aru
being received from other points and
the success of tho day is assured.
Donations have been received us
follows: Campbell River Community
Club $15,011; Comox Community Club
$15.00; Cumberland Parent-Teachers
Association $lii.ini; Elks Lodge,
Courtenay $10.00, Thu football club
has kindly donated the use of their
grounds and energetic committees aro
already hard at  work.
Next week a full list of persons
acting on the various committees will
be published, making it easier for the
public to co-operate and keep In toiis'h
with the malingers of the big fleld day.
This will he Cumberland'! only big
day of the year and as the town will
be full of visitors, every citizen Is expected tb do his or !ierfblt townrd the
end that l°e home town will never be
forgotten hy the people who came
here on June Srd.
For a good time on Saturday night
attend the Dunce In tlle G. W. V. A.
llnll. Excellent music, excellent
dnnce floor.     Gents SOc. Ladles 10c. PAGE TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,  MAY 1,  1925
tt
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ANCHOR-DONALDSON
CANADIAN   SERVICE
FROM MONTREAL
To Plymouth . Cherbourg . London.
Antonia, May 9, June 19, July 18.
Aueonta, May 23, June 27, Aug. 1.
Ascanla, June 6, July 11, Aug. 15.
T» Liverpool.
Lancastrla, May 15; Alaunla. Aug, 7;
Aurania, May 29. June 26. July 24.
To Glasgow.
Letltla, May 8; Athenla. May 22; Sat-
urnia, May 15, June 12. July 10.
FICOH NEW YORK
Tu Queensstown and Liverpool,
Samaria, May it; Caronia. Muy 16; Lt-
conia, May 23; Carmania, May 80.
To Cherbourg und Soiilhunipfon.
Berengarla, May 6, 27. June 17; Mau-
retanln, May 13, June 8, 24; Aqtiltunhi
May 20, June 9. July 1.
To Londonderry and Glasgow.
Assyria,  May  9;  Columbia,  May   16;
Cameronia,   May   23;   Tuscania,   May
30.
To Plymouth . Cherbourg - London.
Albania, June 13, July 18.
To Plymouth - Cherbourg - lluinbiiru.
Andania, May 23, June 27, Aug. 1.
Money  orders   and  drafts  at   lowest
rates.     Full information from Agents
or  Company's   Offices,  622   Hastings
St.   W„   Vancouver,   B.C.
LOCAL ILLUSTRATION
STATIONS SUBJECT OP
LONG DISCUSSION
TENDERS FOR COAL
SEALED TENDERS addressed to thc
Purchasing Agent, Department of
Public Works, Ottawa, will be received by him until 12 o'clock noon (daylight saving), Thursday, ilnj II, 192;,,
for the supply of coal for the Dominion Buildings and Experimental
Farms, and Stations, throughout the
Province of Manitoba, Saskatchewan,
Alberta and British Columbia, and at
Kenora, Ontario.
Forms of tender with specifications
aud conditions attached can be obtained from G. W. Dawson, Purchasing
Agent, Department of Public Works,
Ottawa; J. E. Cyr, Supt. of Dominion
Buildings, Winnipeg. Man., H. E. Matthews, District Resident Architect.
Winnipeg, Man., G. J. Stephenson, District Resident Architect. Roglnu,
Sask., J. M. Stevenson, District Resident Architect. Calgary; J. C. Wright,
Supt., of Dominion Uuildings, Vancouver, B.C., J. 0. Hrown, District
Resident Architect. Victoria. B.C.. and
from the Superintendents of Experimental Farms and Stations, and the
Caretakers of the various Dominion
Buildings In the said Provinces, outside of Winnipeg, Regina. Calgary,
Vancouver and Victoria.
Tenders will not he considered un-
lesa made on these forms.
The right to demand from the successful tenderer a deposit, not exceeding 10 per cent of the value of the contract, to secure the proper fulfilment
of the contract, ls reserved.
By Order
S.  E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, April 20, 1925. 18-19.
COURTENAY. April 27—At the last
meeting of tlie Comox Agricultural
and Industrial Association the subject
of Government Illustration Stations
was brought up. It was not generally known, in fact very few residents
of the district seem to have known
that BU°h stations exist. As a matter of fact, however, there are two of
these stations In the Comox district.
He Is located at Sandwick. on the
farm of Halliday Bros and the other
on the farm of Mr. J. A. Carthew at
Comox.
According to Ihj Dominion department of Agriculture, illustration work
was commenced in Canada in 1915;
but at that time was confined to Saskatchewan and Alberta. The value
of the work was strongly felt from
the start. At present the division i3
operating eight stations in Prince Edward Island, thirteen in Nova Scotia;
seventeen in New Brunswick; thirty-
one in Quebec; eight ln Ontario; eight
in Manitoba; twenty-three In Saskatchewan ; sixteen iu Alberta and fourteen in British Columbia. This
makes a total of one hundred and
forty Illustration stations, which the
department is very careful to point
out are not experimental farms. It
is also pointed out by the department
that the character of these illustration stations was not to be experimental hut demonstrative; a practical application of tlie truth determined by the experimental farm.
"Knowledge has no value unless lt
is put to work" is an adage used by
the department which might be taken
to heart by others as well as farmers. It is explained however, that
for the past thirty-five years the experimental farm system has been carrying on much research work covering mnny phases of agricultural endeavor. Year by year the results
obtained have been added to the grand
3iLL>^ BARBER
SAYS
YOU
IEBRATL
lYOURWOOMNl
E0OINC VITH|
A QUART OF
iVOOD ALCOHOL"
YOU'D BLTTERj
ORDER A
WOODEN
OVLRCOAT
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay, B.C.
Loaf of
White
Bread
GET IT AT
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
Thc White Store The White Bakery
Courtenay
total and averages taken for the entire
period. To secure these results is
the function of the experimental
farm, while the crop Itself is of minor
importar.ee, often causing much annoyance to those at the experimental
farm. It was found that the bulletins, reports, etc, tabulating the results obtained by research were nut
being taken advantage of by the majority of farmers and that some plan
of illustration work on privately owned farms necessary to further impress the importance of the work on
the farmers of the district.
The biggest factor of the work of
an illustration station is the operator.
He must believe In the work and bc
willing to defend 11 against all comers. A well known farmer Ib usually selected for the work. One who
is not a specialist in one particular
crop, but a good field husbandman
He should be Interested in all kinds
of improved methods; willing to take
advice and to give advice to all persons seeking it. When a supply of
choice seed is available, he should
make a special effort to dispose of
It tor seed amongst his neighbors.
The stations are usually situated nn
a well travelled highway near a small
town, village or some other centre,
on farms that have a good wide from-
age facing on the highway, where
each crop in rotation, or any variety
tests can be readily seen by the public from tbe road.
One of the objects of the division
ts to arrange the different crops on
the station to catch the eye of the
passer-by. A field divided into crops
such as corn, sunflowers, slock roots
potatoes, grain, clover or timothy
hay or other crop, growing along the
same highway makes an attractive
appearance, and arouses local interest especially when one of the crops
ls being cut at an unusual time. Thc
operator of the station should be Interested in ascertaining which crop
is paying, and which crop is being
grown at a loss. To do this accurate records must be kept of each days
work, and should be recorded in the
regular work book provided for the
purpose. Work on the stations Is
controlled from the division of illustration stations at Ottawa. The work
is done by the farmer himself on his
own land and the only cost Is said to
be the five dollars per acre paid the
farmer for keeping the records, thus
determining which crops pay and
which fail under the conditions on
his farm.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
COURTENAY GIRL
WILL MARRY SOON
—TENDERED SHOWER
COURTENAY, April 29—Miss Ida
B. Trew was the centre of a very pleas
ant gathering at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. J. W. McKenzie Jr., on Tuesday
evening. Miss Trew, who for the
past five years has been ou the local
stall of the B.C. Telephone Company
and for some time the company's;
agent here, was the recipient of a
miscellaneous shower of gifts, among
whicli was a silver tea service from
her late colleagues at the Courtenay
telephone exchange.
During the evening there were musical selections whicb Included a song
0., Miss Dauncey and a duet by Miss
Winnie Woods and Mr. Wm. Woods.
Refreshments were served to the
guests of which there were over fifty
present, and included among whom
were the Misses Audrey Grieve, Stella
lierkley, Jennie Childs, A and C.
Hogg, Violet Simmonds, Rena Dauncey, It, Grunt. Barbara Duncan, Bella
Teed, Pearl Potter, Flora Beaton,
Minnie Ryan, D. Henderson, T. De-
Slonte, Taylor, Woods, Ivy Piercy,
Highet and Orr and Mesdames W.
Campbell, Sam Trew, E. Lloyd, Bradley, Miss E. Cowle, Mr. and Mrs. L.
D. Piket, Mr. and Mrs. P. Booth, Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. McKenzie Sr., Mrs.
.McKnight and Messrs T. Booth, Russ
Crane, H. Morrow, Val Dalby, A.
lliompsett, L. Bankhouse, H. Manic,
e. Midwinter, Sam. Watson, B. Plerc...
H. Coulton, Charles Rive, J. W. Hougli
and others. Dancing on the verandah to excellent dance music supplied
by Mrs. W, W. Moore, .Mr. Stewart
Smith and Mr. Herbert Roy was great
ly enjoyed. The guests left for home
at a late hour.
Miss Ida B. Trew left Courtenay on
Thursday morning for Victoria. On
arrival at the city sbe will become the
bride of Mr. Frederick Leddlugham
of Jordan River, where Mr, Leddlugham holds a position in the power
plant of the B.C. Electric Hallway Co.,
and where the young couple will make
their future home.
FAIR ATTENDANCE AT
ELK'S WHIST DRIVE
COURTENAY. April 30.—The whist
drive held In the Booth Hall on Wednesday night under the auspices of
thc B.P.O. Elks, (Courtenay Lodge
No. CO) was fairly well attended. The
prizes which were excellent were won
by, ladies' first, Mrs. Geo. Van Ham-
mert; Miss Mary Sutton after cutting
the cards with Mrs. W. J. Andrews
with whom she tied, won second place.
Mrs. Fred Smith was awarded the con
solatlon prize. The gentlemen's first
went to Mr. Fred Kerton, second to
Mr. B. Geldt and Mr. John Sutton
captured the booby prize. A special
prize drawn for during the evening
was won by Mr. Bradley the firBt time
but secured by Mr. W. J. Hagarety
on the second occasion. A dance
followed the whist play to music supplied by Mrs. W. W. Moore and Mr.
Herbert Roy.
COMMERCIAL SCHOOL
PUPILS OBTAINED
FULL CERTIFICATES
COURTENAY, April 30.—Results nt
examinations recently held In thu
Courtenay Commercial School have
now been received. The following
pupils are successful In obtaining full
certificates in shorthand trom the
Isaac Pitman Co., Miss Gladys Roy,
Miss Eva Taylor and Mr. Geo. Edwards Jr. It is only quite recently
that the Commercial School turned
out a gold medalist for typewriting,
one of the premier awards of the Rem-
inton Typewriter Co.
WHIST DRIVE WAS
HELD FOR BENEFIT
OF ST. JOSEPH'S
COURTENAY, April 25.- Tho jrhfct
drive and dance held at the Community Hall at Comox last night in
aid of the St. Joseph's Hospital was
Instrumental In netting a very useful sum of money for the Institution.
The winners were, ladles' first Mrs.
E. Boomer, second, Mrs. M. Hardy,
consolation, MrB. Benjamin. Gentlemen, Mr. John Sutton, Mr. Pollock,
while Mr. W. J. Hagarty secured the
booby prize. After refreshments had
been served, Mr. L. D. Piket acted as
auctioneer In the disposal ot a box
of candles and some home-made cakes
The card playcrB required eighteen
tables to accommodate them. An enjoyable dance followed to dance music
supplied by Miss McLennan.
verdure. Good sport ls being obtained ln lake and river, trout being
plentiful.
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
LISTS ACTIVITIES OF
BOARD OF TRADE
COURTENAY, April 29.-At the annual meeting ot the Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade held in the city hall
on Tuesday night the retiring president, Mr. Theed Pearse, gave an interesting and comprehensive report
of the year's activities. The presidents report follows:
The activities of the board ot trade
have been well maintained during the
past year. We have had a meeting
nearly every month and in between,
the council have met on B'* occasions
We close the year with sixty-one mam
hers l„ good standing.
The board of trade, during the year
has taken an active part in all matters
connected with Courtenay and Comox
district. We assisted ln welcoming
the Premier and other members ot
the government on their vIbU last October. We tendered a banquet to the
delegates to the convention of the associated boards of trade of Vancouver Island on their meeting here last
August. As well we bad the representatives of the Victoria Chamber ot
Commerce hore and had a very Interesting, and I hope profitable meeting
with them at a point dinner. We assisted in entertaining the Jersey Breed
era of British Columbia when they
held their convention here last summer.
Such occasions as these help to advertise our district and tend In the
case of the associated board and Victoria delegation, to bring together the
Interests of Vancouver Island. A
most desirable object.. "Better to
know one another Ib better to help
one another," has been the motto of
all meetings In connection with hoards
of trade on Vancouver Island during
the past year. The associated boards
(Continued on Page Seven)
EARLY TOURISTS
SEEN ON ROADS
COURTENAY, April 28.—The following guests are registered at the
Riverside: From Vancouver, Messrs
W. E. Psrkham, A. W. Besson, G. T.
Smith. J. S. White, E. H. O'Brien, E.
S. Semmens, Frank Johns. From
Victoria: A. J. Gray, A. H. Coulter,
J. E. Dodd (Nanaimo) and Miss Martha Sasson from Saskatchewan. A
few early tourists are to be seen on
the roads. The Comox Valley Is taking on Its beautiful spring mantle of
Long Distance Is
Cheapest At Night
NEW NIGHT RATES ARE NOW IN
FORCE    FOR    LONG - DISTANCE
CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN 8:30
p.m. AND 7:00 a.m.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
ARE you USING COMOX
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR?
TRY THE DIFFERENCE.     Substitute Whole Wheat Bread for White Bread and notice
how much better you feel.    If you want the best, get "COMOX" Whole Wheat Flour.
It's ground fresh each week from dry-belt wheat.     "Ask  those who  have  used it."
At your grocer's in 10-lb., 24-lb., and 49-lb.  sacks
"COMOX   WHOLE   WHEAT   FLOUR"
Comox Creamery Association
May 22nd
II
Reductions
in
Return
'Railway
Rates
ypppi
TORONTO
$113.75
MONTREAL
$132.75
NEW YORK
$147.40
From Nanaimo or Victoria
Rates   to   Other   Eastern
Points on Application
Tickets on sale May 22 to
Sept. 15.   Good returning
until Oct. 31.
OPTIONAL
WATER
TRIPS
via
PRINCE RUPERT
or
GREAT LAKES
Liberal Stop-Overs
EDWARD W. BICKLE
Agent — Cumberland, B.C.
Telephone 35 u
FRIDAY, MAY 1,   1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
■it
from the big sales in recent months
by reason of the fact that manufac-
ISLAND TIMBER MUST BE
MANUFACTURED HERE
DECLARES D.C. COLEMAN I luri"g °r the l"B* wouW be done else-
' where.
Following   announcements   of   the;    T!"!    Canadian    Pacliic    lias    vast
snle of vast timber areas on Vancouv-ltlmber al'l*i1s J-"* untouched along the
er Island the logs from which will be | E*    aml    K" aai  '<  would prove  n
shipped to Fraser Valley and other | 8i0U1;cc of satisfaction to Island real
mills,  reassuring entiorsation   of tiio
Canadian Paelflc Hailwa..'s policy in
regard to Its land Is given by D. C.
Coleman, vice-president of the Cana-
Wilcock Bros. Meat Market
KEEP ONLY THE BEST
BEEF — MUTTON — PORK — VEAL
BACON - HAMS — FRESH ASP SMOKED FISH - FARM
PRODUCE ■- CHEESE - HITTER AND EGGS  .
PICKLES
(Heinz Sweet Mustard)
(Heinz   Sweet   Mixed)
MANN'S BAKERY
FOR QUALITY BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRIES
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Etc.
APPETIZING FRUIT PIES
Our Famed Scotch Oat Cakes Need no Recommending
and our
Meat Pfts and Sausage Rolls Are Sure to Please
-WEDDING, CHRISTENING & BIRTHDAY CAKES
MADE TO ORDER
at
MANN'S — CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 18 Phone IS
iH=
I
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to huve your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service nt—-
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address*— Opposite the Drug Store.
ilian Pacillc Railway who arrived In
Victoria a few days ago.
"It is the policy of the company in
disposing of Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Hallway timber to provide that tlio
lumber shall be manufactured on tbo
Island and practically all recont trans
aelloiiH bave gone through on thnt
basis." Mr. Coleman salt).
The manufacture on the mainland
of logs cut on Vancouver Island was
a subject which was keenly discussed
at tlie recent meeting of the Associated Hoards of Trade of Vancouver lslnnd af Nunnlmo. lt was pointed out
ou that occasion that Victoria and
other Island cities would reap but u
portion of the benellls ti be derived
Bobbed heads
may be washed
It's ensy to wash and dry llie
bobbed heads—A free lather of
Baby's Own ?onn in n bnsill of
hot water is a simple nml inexpensive shampoo nml the lingering frngrnnce as oi roses in Ibe
hnir is very appealing,
llaby's Own Soap is sold in
individual cartons 10c.—-Everywhere
' 'Best for ami nnil Baby loo''   „.,,
TENDERS KOIt DREDGING
SEALED Tenders addressed to the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for
dredging Courtenay Kiver. B.C.." will
be received until \'2 o'clock' noon
(diiyl'ght saving), Tuesday, May 5,
1925, for dredging required at Courtenay Itiver. B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the forms supplied hy
thc Department and according to the
condition set forth therein.
Combined specification and form of
tender can be obtained on application
to the undersigned, also at tbe office
of the District Engineer, Post Ollice
Building, Victoria, B.C.
Tenders must include tiie towing of
the plant to and from the work.
The dredges and otlier plant which
nre intended to he used on the work
shall have been duly registered in Can
ada at tbe time of the filing of the I
tender with the Deparlment, or shall |
have been built In Canada after the .
filing of the tender.
Each tender must lie accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank payable to the order of tbe .Minister of Public Works, for 5 per cent
of the contract price, lint no cheque to
be for less than fifteen hundred dollars. Bonds of the Dominion of Canada and bonds of the Canadian Nation
al Railway Company will also be accepted as security, or bonds and n
cheque if required to make up an odd
amount.
By Order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, April 11, 1925. 17-1S
dents if the policy of the company,
as quoted by Mr. Coleman, was the
general custom as regard to Island
stands of timber.
Mr. Coleman, accompanied by Mrs.
Coleman, paid his lirst visit to Victoria since his reoerll operation. Although he protests he is feeling very
well, lie still shows signs ot his illness. He expects to stay in Victoria
until President E. W. Beatty comes
West on his Spring inspection trip,
and until thnt time will, on tho strict
orders of liis doctors frce himself of
the cares* of business.
DISAPPOINTED TO FIND
HE WAS AN EX-l'REMIEIl
Having represented the city of Hall-
fax In tlie Commons for many years,
Sir Robert Borden for a time believed
he was no stranger to the good people
of the eastern gateway to the Dbniin-
lon. He was sadly deceived, however, shortly after he laid down thu
onerous duties of premier, according
to the Toronto Star Weekly.
Included among the large number
who pressed forward to* meet hlm at
an Informal reception In Halifax was
a middle-aged lady well known for
her Interest ln child welfare.
Aft*'i* the manner of so many otlier
one-idea enthusiasts, this lady imagined everybody else must necessarily
be particularly Interested in her particular field, and when she got the
chance to talk to tlie guest of honor
launched forth Into her favorite
topic.
Sir Robert was bored but did his
best to stimulate a polite interest,
though listening with only half an
ear.
Suddenly he became all attention
when lie realized the lady was thanking him profusely for what he had
dono to make the lives of little babies
healthier and happier. He was particularly puzzled when he heard himself referred to as "the greatest benefactor of future generations this
country has ever known."
Sir Wilfrid Laurier would have car- J Is known as "The Voice of the Atlau-
ried oft' such a situation with graceful
ease. Hon. Arthur Meighan would
have looked wise and maintained a dis
creet silence. Premier Mackenzie
King would have tactfully changed
the conversation.
But however great may have been
his ability In other lines, Sir Robert
Borden never was ' a nlmble-wltted
politician.
Try as he would, the ex-premier
could not recall any child legislation
of his that deserved such extravaganl
praise, und said something to this effect to his fulsome admirer.
"Legislation? Legislation?" said the
lady, with a look of extreme surprise
■'What has legislation to do with your
business?"
"As member of parliament aud foi -
mer premier, I am naturally supposed
to have something to do with leglsla-
llon," explained Sir Robert, his brows
compressed In perplexity.
tlo" and over In the I'nited States
C.N.R.W. at Winnipeg has become
known as "The Voice of the Prairies
and Lakes," on account of Its proximity to the lake districts of Ontario
and Manitoba.
The extensions which have be«n
made ln radio operation during the
past year were referred to in a brief
message from Sir Henry W. Thornton, chairman and president of the
Canadian National sytem, broadcast
during the evening. Nine broadcasting stations were now operating
from the Atlantic to the foot of the
Rocky Mountains, said Sir Henry, and
the tenth would be added toward the
cud of May, when it was hoped the
Vancouver station would take Its place
as une of the most powerful ln Canada. More trains had been radio-
equipped during the year and the
comments of pas 'tigers left no doubt
as to their satisfaction with the radio
Tlie lady gasped with dismay, then' service   rendered   them   during   their
Bald: "Ob! Are you a member of par-   Journeys between points on the Can-
I   am  so disappointed!     I Indian  National  system.      Tbe presl-
t bought you were the man who con
douses milk for babies!
C.N.R.W. CELEBRATES
FIRST ANNIVERSARY
WITH BIG PROGRAM
WINNIPEG,—Celebrating the ter.
initiation of one year of successful
radio broadcasting in western Canada, radio station C.N.R.W.. located
in the Fort Garry hotel, Winnipeg,
went on the air last week with one of
the most ambitious programs of entertainment and addresses which has
yet been staged In western Canada.
The Canadian National Railways policy of radio broadcasting was extended to the prairie provinces on March
27 last year and since the commencement 'hen with the use of the Manitoba Government Telephones station
at Winnipeg, has been extended to
cover nrnadcasts from Regina. Saskatoon. Calgary and Edmonton. Work
is now being started on a new station at Vancouver, which will operate
under Ihe call lettets C.N.R.V., and be
known as "The Voice of the Pacific".
The new station at Moncton, C.N.R.A..
SYNOPSIS OF
Ul ACT AMENDMENTS
To Europe
anl Return
For Further Information Apply to
EDWARD W. BICKLE        —        CUMBERLAND, B.C.
T»>n palatial aleainer trip* (June (I, 17, 2",
24 '.'7; .(uiy 1, 8; AligUit 5), inrluiliDtf
the Muiirrtiinii, Bprptvuri*, I.uik a-nna on 1
Ami mill touring ill regular point*-, mine
under our 1925 Tourist 111 Cabin Satllntf-*.
Arranged for irurlicro, student! ai*-i t oui lata.
Good company, Mfrlit dining-room, genrroua
wholeaoina loud, roinforulil*; quartcra, (irom
anado deck* iinioMng-rooni, loungi, etci
I'mwuiRCB m low •» $166.00 return Al-o
Educational Tuuri. Sre or »ritfl iK-an.ul
I'mi-iiil  Ani-nt,
CUNARD
SUCH  A RELIEF
At such a little cost
FOR SATISFACTION
and economy send your laundry to us.   Our long experience  safeguards  your  interests and  guarantees
100 per cent, satisfaction.
GIVE US A TRIAL
and we shall prove it.
Patches   —   Clean Work   —   Free Mending
Cumberland Laundry
PHONE 34 Quick Delivery P.O. Box 394
FKE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
I drown lands may be pre-empted by
I British subjects over 18 years of Of*.
'and by aliens on declaring Intrusion
I to become British subjects, eendl-
I tlonal upon residence, occupation,
: and improvemeat for agricultural
> purpose*.
I Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
givisu iu Bulletin No. 1, Load 8*rtM,
"How to Pre-empt Land," oopln of
which can be obtained tie* of charge
by addressing tht Department ot
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Oov-
erumeut Agent.
llecurds will b* granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which lt not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre wwt of tht Coatt Raugt
and 8,000 feet ptr acrt tait of thai
Rang*,
Applications for prt-tmptlont trt
to ot addressed to tbt Land Commissioner of tht Land Recording Division, ln which tht Und applied for
It situated, and art madt on printed
forms, copies of which can bt obtained from tht Land Commlttlontr.
Prt-etiiptloni mutt bt occupltd for
flvt years and Improvement* madt
to valut ot |10 ptr acrt, Inoludlng
clearing and cultivating at leatt flvt
acres, before a Crown Grant can bt
rectlvtd.
For mort dttailtd latoimatton ttt
tht BuUttia "How to Prt-tapt
Land.''
PUUCHASK
' Application! art rtctlvtd Itr pur-
cftase of vacant and unreeervsil
Crowu lands, not btlng tlmbtrland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
prlct of first-class (trabltj land It It
ptr acrt, and atcond-clati (grating)
land 12.60 par acrt. Furthtr Information regarding purchatt or lttst
of Crown lands It glvtn lu Bullttln
No. 10, Land Series, 'Turchttt and
Lease of Crown Lands"
Mill, factory, or Industrial tltti on
timber land, not txettdlng 40 ocrti,
may be purchastd or Itattd, tht conditions Including paymtnt of
■tumpagt.
HOMK8TXAD LIASM
Unsurvtyed artaa, not txettdlng 1st
seres,  may  bt leased  a*  homttittt,
conditional upon a   dwtlllng    btlng
erected In the flrtt year, tltlt being
obtainable   after   rtsldenct   and   Improvement   conditions   art   falllled
and land hat betn turvtytd.
LEASES
For   grating   and   Industrial   pur-
potet treat not exceeding (40 tent
may bt leattd by ont person  or a
company.
GBAZIKG
Undtr the Ortilng Act ta* Province is divided Into grating districts
and the range administered under t
erasing     Commlssloaer. Annual
grazing permits are issued bated on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially freo,
permits are available for eettlers,
jj, campers and travellers, up to ten
" ^CBI   head.
dent's message carried a word of
thanks to olllcers and employees of
the system ill western Canada for the
splendid service they had given the
company during the past year and assured them us well as the radio public
of western Canada and the United
States that the Canadian National was
out this year to make 1925 a record
year for the company.
Mr. A. A. Tlsdale, assistant to the
general manager, Western Region,
spoke in the absence of Mr. A. E. Warren, general manager, and extended to
Americans a hearty Invitation to visit
western Canada and learn at first
hand of the beauties of her rivers,
woods und lakes, and also of the
magnllicent mountain scenery awaiting the tourist in the Canadian Rockies. "If you have a vacation to
spend," said Mr. Tlsdale in his address, "come nnd spend It with us,
and I am sure you will not return
borne disappointed witli your outing."
The Fort Garry Hotel Trio and
Frank Wright's Country Club orchestra, nlso a Fort Garry organization,
together with Die Transcona Shops
brass band, an organization formed
of the company's employees, together
with Earl Hill's Capitol orchestra,
v I'funiislisMl the instrumental features
of the evening, while vocal selections
were provided by Miss Hazel Mills
aud Messrs Kilgour and Oscar Noel.
Special souvenirs of the "birthday
party" are being distributed to kiddles and grownups who telegraphed
or wrote tbe station during or after
the broadcast and no stone was left
unturned to make tills an outstanding event In the radio annals of western Canada. Special telegraph and
telephone operators at the studio
spent a busy evening handling tlle
flood of local and long-distance me.i-
sages which came from nearly every
province in Canada, as well as from
many States in the I'nited States, during the period of the concert, which
lasted from eight o'clock in the evening until ufter one o'clock the following morning.
CANADIAN NATIONAL
PROMOTES RESOURCES
SINCE Eta organization, the colonization and development department i>r thi- Canadian Na-
tiona] Railways hai given attention to tho development of the
natural resources of the territory
traversed l>y Canadian National
lines*; and,1 In order to give greater
effect to tne Qctlvitioa of this
branch of ttie department, it haa
bi'fn decided to placo a representative in charge In the western re-
glon, whose chief duty will be to
gatfior information and promote
further the development of these
resources, more especially in the
provinces of British Columbia nnd
Alberta. In this way, the facta
obtained can be hrought to the attention of those interested, with
capital.
The office for this district will be
nt Edmonton, in charge of R. C.
W. Lett, now General Agent, Colonization and Development Department, Canadian National Railways,
who is well fitted for the work,
having hnd considerable experience
in connection with mining and
lumbering, and during the past
few years has made a very close
study of the natural resources of
British Columbia und Alberta, r, m
PAGE FOUR
THE   CWMMBsLANB   ISLANDER,   CUMMRLANB, B. C
FRIDAY,  MAT 1,  1945
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
DAD
DON'T AMOUNT TO MUCH
When you hear a man sneering at the low;
newspaper because it is not as s..g as the cily
paper you can safely bet that he does not squander any of his wealth in assisting to make it bigger and that generally the paper has done more
for him than he has [or it. The man who cannot see the benefits arising from a local paper is
about as much value to a town as a delinquent
tax list.
SHE'S AT IT AGAIN
It's here again! The season of feminini
madness and masculine misery, fhe wild assault
on the home, the drive of the dust pan, the carpet
beater and the dripping mop.
If any mere man thinks that spring house-
cleaning is a thing of the past he has only to go
down the numerous streets any warm day at the
end of April or the beginning of May and see how
many women still conduct this annual war on dirt
He will see brave ladies mounting step-ladders,
taking the high mattress jump, doing the human
fly act as they wash the windows and otherwise
participating in those events which cause men to
leave home.
We have been told that in these days of small
rugs and vacuum cleaners, garbage incinerators
and frigid air machines, better houses and weather strips, we don't need a spring house-cleaning
and that it's all useless effort. Perhaps some
wives are old-fashioned, but we know one that
still clings to the need of an at least once a year
thorough "redding up,' which means pulling
out and laying away and moving every thing
around. And we believe that most women who
are real homemakers just thrive in and revel in
a good house-cleaning. Other women may play
goB, or spend dollars taking some fashionable
"baths," but the woman who cleans house "gets
something out of her system," and after it is all
over is ready to be calm and satisfied—at least
until canning time.
Balloon tires aren't always what they're
blown up to be.
It's called Spring Cleaning because mere man
has to spring from room to room.
They were grouped about the front door,
waiting for the pall bearers to carry out the cas-
cet. There were young men, middle-aged men
ind old men in that group. There were thin
nen and fat men, short men and tall men; but in
.ne thing they were all alike. Each wore a white
.pron under his coat, a spring of green in his but-
onhole, and each had his hands encased in white
doves. You have already guessed that it was a
odge funeral. One of the members had laid
town the working tools of life and the others had
issembled to carry the body to the brow of a
ill, where someone had been and dug a grave.
Every time we attend the funeral of a man
who lias been a husband and a father, we think
of what that home has lost. We associate the
success of a well-managed home so much with
Mother that we are prone to lose sight of Dad.
But whon we stand around the yard waiting for
them to bring Dad through the doorway, we begin
to think of him as the man who furnished the
shingles over that home—as the man who held
the butcher and the grocer off with his weekly
pay envelope—the man who mowed the grass and
hauled out the ashes each morning.
Dad is the man who buys the chicken, who
carves the chicken—and for all his expense and
trouble he draws the neck and wing. Dad is
the chap who wears his last summer's straw hat
that mother and the girls may have new bonnets.
True, it is mother who darns the socks, but who
pays for the darn socks?
It was Dad who went to lodge and came home
smelling like a smoke-house and rolled and tossed
because he had eaten four ham sandwiches and
drank two cups of coffee after eleven o'clock.
Poor old Dad—he was an awful fool about the
work at the lodge, but with all his faults there
was something about him and his Brother Members that makes us sigh as they drop their sprigs
of acacia into the new-made grave.
Dad was as steady as a steam roller, as constant as the drip from a loose faucet. When he
sat silently rubbing his chin and gazing into the
fire he was probably thinking of the price of coal.
Sometimes mother had to chide him for wearing
a shirt too long or neglecting to hang his hat in
its proper place. Sometimes daughter wished
he wouldn't come into the living room without
a collar. Sometimes the boys thought he was
too hard on them and tight with them. But now
that he is gone they will miss him sorely and understand why he went without a new overcoat to
pay that last premium on his life insurance. And
when you come back from the place where you
laid him, and all the brothers of the lodge have
gone back to their own homes, and the undertaker has gathered up the folding chairs and removed the crepe from the door, you are going to
miss that sober presence that stood between you
and so many outside annoyances.
Never go back on Dad.
It's Just Like a Page From Life
-^^^^ .    «*. .n  .«.»» miirA sCisvlvtei nu t DT rPUDOWQ CMIT.tfQ   T.AITfwHS. ^^L\^^\\\\V
A TEAR OR TWO — SOME HEART THROBS — SMILES — LAUGHS,
AND A BIG HAPPY ENDING
First Showing in British Columbia
The Last Laugh
  —■  m     im     ■'■      — nil "■      »
THE PICTURE YOU'VE WAITED FOR
YOU HAVE OFTEN HEARD
THAT CLOTHES MAKE THE
MAN. THIS PICTURE PROVES
IT. SEE SORROW, HAPPINESS,
COMEDY, DRAMA AND ROMANCE CAUSED BY A BIG COAT
WITH SHINY BRASS BUTTONS
AND BRIGHT GOLD BRAID. A
A NEW KIND OF STORY 1 IT
WILL GRIP YOU FROM THE
START BUT FILL YOUR HEART
WITH HAPPINESS. IT'S
COMPELLING!
SUPERB!!
A CLEAN PICTURE
WITH A REAL HUMAN
STORY
SEE EMIL JANNINGS
AS THE "DOORMAN"
FOR A BIG HOTEL,
ENJOY THE STORY
OF HIS LIFE
THE GREAT CHARACTER- ACTOR EMIL JANNINGS, WAS
NEVER BETTER THAN IN
THIS GREAT CHARACTERIZATION 0 FLIFE. IT'S AN EPIC
CF HUMAN EMOTIONS TAKEN
TO THE SCREEN IN AN EN-
TIRELY NEW TECHNIQUE. A
GREAT SURPRISE AWAITS
YOU! YOU CAN'T AFFORD
TO MISS THIS GREAT SMASHING HIT — IT'S
DIFFERENT!!!
——■—■———■—— i —e^.,^——     i - i i .	
Read What the Great Critics Think of This
New Kind of Picture^^^^^^
Dddge Brothers
TOURING CAR
When summer invites you into the country, you will appreciate more than ever
the advantages of Dodge Brothers Touring Car. Open to fresh air and sunlight
the Touring Car is healthful and delightful to drive .
Moreover, it is common knowledge everywhere that Dodge Brothers product is dependable. One-eighth of the total weight
of the car consists of chrome vanadium
steel—the toughest and most enduring
steel that can be used in motor car construction. This is exceptional. It goes
far to explain why Dodge Brothers Touring Car stands up so many years under
the hardest usage.
The Price is $1500 delivered
PIDCOCK AND
McKENZIE
agents for
Dodge Bros. Motor Car
COURTENAY, B.C.
UNCOMMONLY GOOD
"Reflection convinces us that this
Is an uncommonly good picture,
worthy to ran kwlth the best."—N.
Y. Evening Telegram and Mail.
REALISTIC DRAMA
"The Last Laugh starring Eruil
Jannlngs is a dramatic and realistic drama."—Reviewer Dorothy
Herzog,   ot   the   New   York   Daily
Mirror.
A MASTERPIECE
"The story grips one from beginning to end—a Jubilant finish—a
masterpiece. Mr. Jannlngs tells
the story with amazing strength by
his actions and his expressions."—
Mordaunt Hall, of the New York
Times.
SPLENDID
"One of the finest productions
from a human as well as an artistic
viewpoint ever shown. A happy
ending which strikes a high note in
farce. On Us merits as a great
picture 'The Last Laugh' should win
audiences anywhere. There isn't
a subtitle in the picture, yet the
story comes smoothly and with
great force. In a most unusual
way, a dellclously happy ending,
farcical, rich in humor and humanity, a splendid piece of work that
exalted the audience. It's one of
the best balanced casts I have ever
seen. A splendid feature."—Joseph
R. Fliesler, in the N.Y. Morning
Post.
.PERFECT
"The film must prove a sign
post to our directors. Brilliant direction—virtually perieet performance."—W.U., In New  York World.
COMPELLING
"The bill presented this week nt
the Rtvoli is one of the greatest
ever offered at. the younger Riesen-
feld house. The picture held me in
a vise-like grip. When Emil Jannlngs is right, there isn't a greater
screen artist in the world. And he
Is right here. I could devote a
whole column to this picture if 1
had the space but suffice it to say
I have never seen a more compelling photoplay!"—George Oered, in
new York Evening World.
REMARKABLE
"lt ls n remarkable picture-
Matchless acting by Jannlngs. You
can't go wrong with the last laugh."
—Mildred Spain, N. Y. Daily News.
SIMPLY SUPER!!
"We warn you that you'd better
see it. Probably no film shown
this season will stir up such a lot
of discussion and if you want to be
'film wise' you'd better take a peek
at lt. No doubt about it—this is
an exceedingly interesting piece of
work from many angles. Simply
superb—splendidly done—excellence
Itself—new and refreshing. You'd
better see it; you're sure to enjoy
It."—Ultra-Conservative New York
Evening Post.
COMEDY
"The Last Laugh is a gem
throughout Jannlngs plays with
a delicious sense of Comedy."—The
N. Y. Sun.
EXTRAORDINARY
"The production ts unusual. Jan-
nlngs Is superb. The production
Is extraordinary."—Saya Rose Pels-
wlck, Famous Critic of The New
York Journal.
ALWAYS INTERESTING
"The flrst part is artistic. The
second part Is pleasant. The direction is strange, Intense and at times
bnfl'ling, but always interesting.
Jannlngs Is a remarkably fine actor.
—Interesting Opinion of Harrlette
Underbill, In New York Tribune.
TREMENDOUS
"A tremendous work. By all
means throw open the screen of the
country to pictures of this type.
This Is a film that will go down ln
history as one of the big pictures of
this decade. Murau, who handled
the direction, has achieved some
really remarkable touches. Word*
cannot do Justice to what he has
achieved on the screen, and the'
picture must be seen to be appreciated. Thc picture, on the strength
of its humanness, Ita tremendous
comedy kick at the finish Is a production that will be made by word
of mouth advertising such as no
other picture has received In mtny
years.'
A Movie Without Headlines—The Literary Digest
"Clothes makes the man" is a theme of a newly
imported movie made in Germany. "Take a
man's uniform a-
way-what is left?
The Kaiser
might give an
answer.
BEFORE THE
STORM BREAKS
At home with his
daughter there Is felicity In his gold-braid
ed coat for thc hotel
porter, Impersonated
by Emll Jannlngs in
"The Last  Laugh."
WHEN THE
PORTER DIS.
(OVERS HIS
SUCCESSOR
Returning to the hotel one morning he
sees his place as porter taken by a younger man, and he goes
to tho manager to
learn why.
THE
LAST
LAUGH
"In his uniform he may be King—General—
Judge—Policeman with all the power of his
position. But
take away his uniform!    What remains?"  The film
answers:
DEGRADED TO
THE WASH-BOOM
Without the gold-
braided coat he is nothing, family and
neighbors -icorn hlm,
and he spends his
days and nights In
mean surroundings.
LAST STAGE OF
THIS STRANGE,
EVENTFUL MOYIE
HISTORY
The watchman who
covered the poor
wash - room menial
with his coat, now Is
plied with food and
wine and those who
scorned.awalt hia nod
THE
LAST
LAUGH
REMEMBER THE DAYS AND DATES
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
f   Admission
50£—ADULTS—50?
251 CHILDREN 25r
\T>   • 1 Cm.       J TWO SHOWS
Friday -Saturday     EVERY NIGHT
g MAY 9 II COMMENCING AT 7:00
Gaiety Theatre
COURTENAY, B.C.
Mon.Tues.Wed.
MAY 11—12—IS FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1925
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE      /
gjF"
1
u
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, MAY 1st and 2nd
Virginia
VALLI
in
And a brilliant cast—Forrest Stanley, Holmes Herbert, Margaret
Livingston, George Fawcett and Pricilla Morgan.
WHY DO MEN FORGET THEIR WIVES WHEN THEY GO UP
THE LADDER
He Climbed so Rapidly He Forgot His Wife in The Rush!
Every woman faces this tragedy—to be left at the bottom of the
ladder. This wife found after she had sent her husband to thc
top of the ladder that ha was only climbing to another woman!
Seo her gallant fight for his love—you will hope for her, cry for
, her, love her!
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2.30 P.M.
ARE YOU STIFLING LOVE?
DO YOU KNOW WHAT IT MEANS?
COME AND SEE WHAT THIS WIFE DID!
ALSO
COMEDY NEWS REEL
ADULTS 500
CHILDREN 250
Adults, 35c, Children, 15c
Monday - Tuesday
MAY 4—5
Tliey gambled for
a woman's love
with fate turning^
the wheel.   I '■}
On
Adapted ftom
flidiard Harding'
Davtf'novef
,"The Kings Jackal'
DIMCZCD 1Y
VmSONCUFt
Comedy:
".Say It With Flour"
ADULTS 350
553555
MATINEE
Every Saturday
at 2:30 p. m.
3=
CHILDREN 151
Wed. and Thurs.
MAY 6—7
I
"Flirting
With
Love"
WITH
COLLEEN MOORE
AND
. CONWAY TEARLE
THE TALE OF A GIRL WHO MOCKED CUPID
Girls, come and see how a lootlight star lamped 'em
and vamped 'em, but kept her heart free till Cupid
shot his dart and she tripped and she fell heels overhead in love (as you shall see) with her worst enemy.
AND COMEDY
COMING SOON A NEW SERIAL
THE FAST EXPRESS
ADULTS 350 CHILDREN 15<?
Friday - Saturday
MAYS—9
First Showing in BritishColumbia
THE PICTURE THAT AMAZED NEW YORK
THE
LAST
LAUGH
WITH
EMIL   JANNINGS
"A PAGE FROM LIFE"
Read the criticisms in the "Literary Digest,"
Read the advertisements in "The Saturday Evenimr
Post."
BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT
TWO DAYS ONLY
—REMEMBER THE DATE-
ADULTS 500
CHILDREN 25c
Ilo=IIo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
2 Shows Nightly
7 and 8:45 p. m.
GOOD MUSIC PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,  MAY 1,  1936.
NEW DRUG STORE
WILL OPEN SATURDAY
On Saturday next the new drug
store, which hns just been completed
for Mr. Robt. C. Lang, a, the corner
of Argyle street und Kings.my. wiil
he opened under the name of Lang's
Drug Store.
Mr. Lang, wlm is the proprietor of
Langs Unit Store in Cumberland, '
was struek by the lutine prorpocts nf
the Alberni Valley, und decided li
establish a branch store In this city.
The commodious and up-to-date store
which he bus erected is an evident! i
of bis faith in this diatrict, Pail
Alberni News.
TO SEARCH FOR TREASURE IN FAR NORTH
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort   and   Homelike   service
28   roomi,   electrical!*   heated
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations I'hone Lis
R. YATE8, Manager
T. Malpass 1
GENERAL  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY ANO
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS OIR MOTTO
OR PHONE 15 UNION MOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
Five men from Hull, England, nil unmarried and ot* ages ranging from 22 to 6!), sailed Irm U»
„ i VZphMv bv Canadian Pacific S.S. Montclare on the quest of a rich vein ot silver, said to be hidden in
S°M0 Man's Land''of th G eat Northwest. Thc mine is claimed to be in the vicinity of the Mackenzie
River District of Alaska, and is located in a cliff hundreds of miles from civilization. The last port
hefore itelkinK the nail will be Wrangell, Alaska. The party is led by John Riley, engineer, aged 59,
»v fcJ nSi flxnerlence in the Klondike gold region. The rest of the party are Thomas Thompson, sailor,
1.™! 2ft Jo«enh Mi lard eweller aged 22; Robert Flemming, engineer, aged 36, and Ernest Starte, con-
flniner aeeI 32i When they fnd the mine, they will state it and return to England to form .com-
Banv for' ufdeveiop.ne.it. As they passed through Saint John, N.B., the party was full of conf.denc.
and'hope to ret/irn to the Old Country by next October.
HOW
TO TREAT
TRAVELLERS
CUMBERLAND  HOTEL
WM-MEHKIFIEI,!),    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
New Car Service
CAB FOB HIRE DAV OK NIGHT
atmenl of ibe tourist which shall
tlsfactory to the visitor and prot-
in the community, can  result
rom carefully thought-out plans
Trea
be salt
liable
only fr
formulated and generally understood | sires and prepare to meet them
well in advance of the touring season,
according to a bulletin of the Automobile Club of Washington just out
to every commercial body in the state
The Bulletin asks that community organization as well as Individuals give
some thought to tourist needs and de-
»4—-TELEPHONE MO
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Barber Shop
Opposite   Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical   Barber,  and   Hairdresser.  Shampooing,   Singeing.
lUtiaflnf,    Scalp    Treatment.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS.
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHOUT
NOTICK WITH  REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
|    "What about, the policemen in your
'home town?" the bulletin asks. "Did
' it ever occur to you that the police-
I man is a walking, talking advertlso-
| ment of your community?   Did It ever
! occur to you that your town Is judged
I by the people with whom the stranger  comes  in  contact—such as  your
police—that just such Is your town
so far as the stranger is concerned?
If tlie policeman Is courteous, pleasing and polite you have a good town.
Hut if he Is dumb, hard-boiled, discourteous, you have a heck of a town.
That's how il works with the stranger
every time.     The motal Is self-evident."
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 1MX Courtenay
Office: 15!) Cumberland
Portland Canal Mining District ■
(.ur statistical department has
compil si.   and   we   will   mull
FREE ON REQUEST
A LARCE COLORED MAP
antl   other   valuable   Information
regarding   recent   important   discoveries   and   activities   in   this.
Itritisii   Columbia's   richest,   gold
and silver producing district.
GRANT MAHOOD & CO. LTD.
Members Vancouver stock
Exchange
522-525 Roger* Buitdln|
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Active In All  Mining Stocks
We r.uy and Sell All  Shares
H
As to tourists purchases: "If the
parking laws in a city are such that
the stranger cannot find a place lo
leave his car while he gets out to
make purchases, he will drive out to
the town that does provide conveniences which make the spending of
money possible. If business men of
the small towns only knew it, they
could take 75 per cent of this tourist
trade away from any large town, for
the small town can, it lt will, arrange
parking and other shopping conveniences better lhan the larger town.
"Trade from the motor tourist is
knocking at the door of every town,
out the business men in many ot then,
have hot yet heard the knock, or recognized it if they have heard it. Tlie
restaurant man who fails to supply
and advertise box lunches for motoi
ourists ls losing a lot of exercise on
his cash register. Whon the weathei
is warm, the restaurants are wanner
and who wouldn't rather stop the ca,
under a fine large tree somewhere on
the rural highway and eat a good
lunch than to eat It from a restaurant table? When folks tour, they
want to be out of doors. That U
one of the reasons they are touring
and the restaurant owner should give
them helpful encouragement to this
end.
"In thc distant past the business
men of about every town of size fell
thc Importance of renting a vacant
lot near the business centre whare
.'armers could hitch their horses and
.pond the day trading in the stores
antl visiting with tlieir friends. In
hese days it is just as important that
lusiness men obtain the use ot a plot
jf ground of generous size with sign
,oards directing the way to It that
■notor tourists may easily hnd theii
,vay lo it and know that they are welcome to free space while buying theli
.supplies. Such hospitable treatmen.
as this will give these visitors a lasting and favorable impression of a com
munity to carry away with them.
"The commercial club in thc towns
and few are without-a business organization of some kind, can make its Influence felt in the caBh registers of
its members by ever being on the alert
to give motoring tourists cordial
treatment and convenient facilities
for parking. Cordiality from a town
spreads the fame ot the community
as far and as rapidly—and much more
favorably—than does the best speed
trap ever devised.
"To the motor tourist nothing bespeaks the character of a town or
city as plainly and emphatically as
the condition ot the streets. A belit-
tered roadway, with the surfaces studded with cliuckholes, Indicates to the
tourist a carelessly governed community, one that is lacking in pride and
desregard of the opinlon ot passing
sdsitors. There are many cities In the
United States (you won't find any ln
Canada?) which boast chuckholes so
ihlck along main travelled streets that
motoring tourists who know of these
conditions will detour around the city
rather than experience the discomforts ot riding through it.     This is
community advertising of a kind that
spreads widely and rapidly among the
touring population.
"The community that gives constant
attention to the wants and pleasures
of the motoring visitors ls Just as
constantly reaping liberal dividends
on time, effort and money expended."
\MENDMENTS TO THE
MOTOR VEHICLES ACT
Further amendments to the Motor
"ehlclcs Act ara published in The
iazetto on April 9th.
Two In particular are brought to
he attention of motorists, the first
etng that no stickers of any kind
ire lo be pastod on the upper half
if the windshield, or on any part ot
the rear window. This effectually
ibollsbes the "bathing girl" stickers
rstially to be seen gracing the wlnd-
hields and rear windows.
The second is that »ll motor cycles
mist, in future, carry either a rear
ight or a reflector.
.{OD AND GUN IN CANADA
Featured in the May issue of Rod
ind Gun In Canada, the Spec'\l Que-
iec Tourist Number, are the delights
md possibilities of this province for
:he tourist and sportsman.     An editorial message from the Hon. J. E.
?errault,   Minister   of   Colonization,
Mines and   Fisheries,  introduces  the
province to the tourist and points out
the many charms  it holds  for htm.
In "Remember the Time?" Harwood
Steele recalls in the account of one
ashing trip the good times enjoyed in
aiany such and which may be enjoyed
by any fisherman who so wishes this
summer.  "Idylls  of the Spring,' by
Mason  B.  Woollard,  reveals the delights of canoeing and "Dajight and
Ducks" by A. . Douglas Is an enter-
j taining story of a duck hunt In the
; early hours of the morning.     W1I-
' Ham MacMillan, in his usual interest-
I ing and masterly manner    recounts
I the story of a pair of eagles on "The
j storm   swept  crags  of  the  Jacques
Cartier," In "The Eagles of the Pine."
!"The  Wicked   Fleeth"  by  Harry  M.
| Moore    and    "The    Greenhead"    by
; Frank   Young   complete   the   Hat  ot
j Interesting storleB with a Quebec set-
; ting.     The regular contributors are
j also represented in this number. The
; stories  from   Honuycastle   Dale  and
| Martin Hunter and the various departments,    Fishing Notes,    Outdoor
, Talk, Guns and Ammunition, Kennet
j and The Trap, all come up to their
i usual mark of excellence.     Publish-
! ed monthly by W. J. Taylor, Limited,
Woodstock, Ont.
MINERAL ACT
(FORM F.)
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND  PRESSING
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Ladies' & Gent's Tailoring
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
DsMtsmuir Avenue
P. P. HARRISON
BARRISTER   and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND B.C.
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
When you are In need ot a
Plnabiat * Resting Eafflaeer, Bee
R. RUSHTON
Phone 114
Courtenay
Phone lt7
Cumberland
Vour  needs  will reoeive  Immsdlati
attention.
Teal Fractional, Robin, Red Bird, Canary, Black Bird, Blue Jay, Lark, Wren
Snow Bird, Birch No. 2, Hemlock No.
2, Cedar No. 2, Spruce No. 2, Tamarack No. 2, Swan No. 2, Raven No. I.
Pine No. 2, Fir No. 2, Maple No. t.
Oak Fractional, Locust, Long Fractional, Loon, Hawk Fractional, Mink.
Martin, Eagle No. 11. Eagle No. It and
Eagle No. 13 Mineral Claims, situate
in the Quatslno Mining Division ot
Rupert District
Where located:—Near Old Sport
Mine, Elk Lake.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Frank C.
Green, acting as agent for Coast Copper Company, Limited, Free Miner's
Certificate No. 75.895C, Intend, sixty
days from the date hereof, to apply to
the Mining Recorder for Certificates
of Improvements, for the purpose of
obtaining Crown Grants of the above
claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificates ot Improvements.
Dated this 28th day of October, A.D.,
1924.
F. C. OREEN,
221 Pemberton Bldg..
llS-24 Victoria, B.C.
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
THE JUDGE:
It's A Fire Alarm.   '•- & KB FRIDAY, MAY 1, 192a
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN l
Gaiety
Theatre
Courtenay
CONTINOUS PERFORMANCE 7:00 —10:30
MON., TUES.,
WEDS.
MAY 4—5—6
ADULTS 35.f> CHILDREN 15t?
HOOT
GIBSON
IN THE
Sawdust
Trail
He was a college man (?) just from the east where he
joined up with the toughest wild west show on the road
The outfit had a cow-girl who saw to it that Clarence
(our college man) didn't remain a tender foot long.
Here's a picture packed full with typical Hoot Gibson
thrills, action, romance, fast riding and sharp-shooting
Thurs., Fri.
Sat.
MAY 7—8—9
Virginia
Valli
IN
"UP THE
LADDER"
HOW CAN A MAN'S LOST LOVE
BE REGAINED?
What would you do if your husband gave a diamond
vanity case to another woman?    Would you stand idly
by and wring your heart in anguish?    Or would you
do the startling, audacious thing this wife did?
COME AND SEE FOR YOURSELF!
ADULTS 501 CHILDREN 25<?
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.
ADULTS 35< CHILDREN 15^
CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE 7:00 TO 10:30
De Luxe Shows Saturday Night 7 • 9
Commencing May 18,19, 20
A NEW SERIAL
THE FAST EXPRESS
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
LISTS ACTIVITIES OF
BOARD OF TRADE
(Continued From Page Two)
have held meetings at Duncans and
Nanaimo with the object ot getting
the government to improve the Island
highway as being in the interest ot
Vancouver Island aB a whole. A
delegation waited on the Minister or
public works (or the same purpose.
The minister, as a true politician, received us with smooth words and
promised his assistance. So far we
are still waiting in hope.
Recently we have seen concentrated
action taken by the north end ot Vancouver Island In a scheme for advertising tor tourists by means ot the issue ot a joint booklet to be distributed
to tourists before they reach Nanaimo
In this way we hope to turn a fair
portion of the tourists north instead
of less than twenty per cent, as has
hitherto been the case. Incidentally
we hope to keep some of the money
the tourist class has to distribute.
I hope this is the beginning of t
get-to-gether movement of the north
em part of the Island. Our inter
ests are so much the same but we are
too small units to be able to do much
as individual centres. The boards of
trade are entitled to the credit of
fathering the scheme. A committee of our board has been working in
conjunction with our city council,
preparing the advertising material for
this booklet and the board is contri
billing a substantial amount to the
cost.
Coming nearer home, we have this
year seen carried out one thing the
board has strenuously fought for,
new post office at Courtenay. We are
also anticipating seeing the real com
mencement of another piece of work
that we have equally urged, the improving of the river channel. As
you know, a sum of $3,500 was set
aside in the estimates for this purpose and, I understand tenders for
the work are being called for. We
have, during the year, considered various resolutions forwarded to us by
other boards and have given our support to resolutions In favor of an em-
barge on the export of pulp and pulp
wood also for the better protection of
the egg industry of B.C. We also
registered our protest against the re-
establishment of the Crows Nest Pass
agreement and what was as important
as any, to bring into effect, a resolution passed by the National Economy
Conference urging on the Government
the practice of economy. On the social side, we have held two dances,
our annual picnic at Kye Bay was attended by more people than ever, a
potato supper to celebrate the victory
of the Comox spuds etc., and this even
ing we are having the honor of entertaining the President and Secretary of the Vancouver Board of Trade.
During the year we have seen the
first auto park established in Courtenay. The board of trade contributed half the cost of putting the grounds
in order, a matter ot 185.00. We
spent $15 on a sign at the junction of
the Courtenay-Cumberland roads. We
sent Beveral hundred folders to the
Wembley Exhibition advertising our
district.
All these things cost money and our
sources ot Income this year have been
limited to membership fees as our
various entertainments though without exceptional successes, were financial losses. The more money we have
the more we can spend in the interests of thc district. We have no
heelers to look after and our district is our sole charge.
Our membership is not as large as
it should be; $5 per annum is not
much to contribute towards the furtherance of the general interests of
our district. Moreover, could we increase our membership we could proportionately decrease our annual subscription. During the past year wc
have enrolled over a dozen new members, thanks mainly to the energy ot
our worthy vice-president Dill Douglas, but against this wc have lost
about as many from various causes.
The board of trade does not get
the support it should, cither In membership or its members taking active
parts In the proceedings. The outside public seem to look on the board
of trade as being a body that must
always be ready to take lead to remedy any grievance or Initiating any
improvement. It may be a sort of
compliment but the puhlic should remember that most of these things entail spending money and, always,
work on the part of the secretary and
other members. We are here for the
$ood of the community but liko recognition and assistance financially
and otherwise.
In conclusion I wish to thank Mr.
Eadle, our excellent secretary for his
great assistance during my term of
office. With a voluntary body like a
board of trade there is much of the
priclple "Let Oeorge Do It" and
Oeorge is usually the secretary. Mr.
Eadle haa never turned us down and
Is much to be congratulated on the
good financial showing we have notwithstanding failure of some of our
source of income. I wish also to
thank all the members for the assistance they have rendered me during
the year and especially that faithful
band who regularly turn up at our
meetings (to mentlon names would be
invidious) and to who one always
turns when there Is work to be done.
THREE NOMINATED
FOR QUEEN OF MAY
AT COURTENAY
COUKTENAY, April 27—Friday last
was nomination day for this years'
May Queen at the Courtenay Schol.
A great deal of Interest Is being
shown and there were numerous aspir
ants for the queenly office . The
nominees are Muriel Leighton, Eileen
Moore and Agnes Sutherland. Other
names were put up but did not receive the necessary majority of returns from the various rooms in the
school.     The election of Courtenay's
B
ere an
JTK
ere
The mineral, fish and land resources of British Columbia will
again be extensively advertised al
Wembley this year at a cost of $18,-
000 or $19,000, according to a statement by Premier Oliver.
The Universal Film Company it
perfecting its plans for filming the
Calgary Stampede this summer a:
part of a forthcoming production
in which Hoot Gibson will star.
This will involve an expenditure oi
about $100,000.
Canadian exports to France in
1924 were valued at 482,826,000
francs as against imports from that
country of 333,264,000 francs. There
has been a marked increase in trade
of late years which is attributed
partly to the Treaty of Commerce
and the propaganda work of the
Canadian Pacific Exhibition train
S. Frank Mussard of the South
.•Yfrican Irrigation Association, Johannesburg, who has just completed
an independent investigation of the
agricultural conditions throughout
Canada has stated that he is "perfectly satisfied with the possibilities Canada has to offer the right
type of settler."
"Mountie" the lead dog of the
famous Chateau Frontenac husky
team realized $1,200 during the
Humane Society tag-day at Toronto
recently. He collected on behalf of
this organization throughout the
city and the tag that was sold was
decorated with his portait.
Broadcasting of copyright songs
in the United States is declared subject to copyright fees or royalties
just as much as publication by other
methods of performance. This decision, which has considerable bearing on the Canadian Copyright Bill
now under discussion in Ottawa was
reached as a result of a recent test
case in the United States.
Approximately five millions dollars will be spent in maintaining and
constructing new highways within
the Province of Quebec during the
present year. At present there are
2,586 miles of highway in the province stretching into all parts of
Quebec and linking up with main
roads in the U.S. and the sister
provinces to the East and West.
According to a report prepared
by the Merchants Exchange of Vancouver, forty-two regular steamship
lines are now operating out of that
harbor, the gross tonnage for last
year being 14,473,618 which is over
a million tons in excess of the 1923
figures. The Canadian Pacific Railway is now erecting a new pier there
which will be one of thc finest and
largest on the continent.
The Campbell River Company of
White Rock has purchased the entire holdings of the James Logging
Company of Vancouver which include 35,000 acres of timber lands,
containing over two billion feet of
logs, a saw mill with a capacity of
more than 50,000 feet of lumber
a day, three large tugs and a complete logging outfit. A sum of more
than five millions dollars is said
to be involved.
Arrangements have been completed to ship 200 books by Canadian authors to be exhibited at
Wembley this year. A special grant
has been made by the Provincial
Government of Quebec to provide
artistic bindings for these books
many of which will bc by French-
Canadian authors. That this is to
be done is largely due to the initiative of the Arts, Science and Letter)
Society of Quebec City in co-operation with the provincial government
1926 May Queen will be held on Friday next. There is a healthy spirit
of keen competition throughout the
school for this year's queen and lt Is
difficult to say which of the three
girls nominated—all of whom have a
strong following—will be queen for
the day. On election day there is to
be an exhibition of school work and
activities during which tea will bc
served. Each room ls preparing a
special project for this occasion.
In connection with "Save the Forest Week," and arising out of a lecture by Mr. Webster, the forest ranger, which took place last Thursday,
division two is preparing a panoramic
scene of the woods which will show a
lumber camp In full swing, with
models, before being wiped out by a
devasting forest "fe and the samo
mill site after the forest fire has
swept over It, showing ln a very realistic manner the dreadful destruction and loss which uncontrolled fire
causes ln the woods. A small charge
will be made to help defray the May
Day expenses.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Flsh
SEASON'S FUR PRODUCTION
The total value of the raw fur production of Canada for tbe season 1923-
24, was $15,643,817. This amount
represents the market value of tho
pelts of fur-bearing animals taken I"
Canada during the season, comprising pelts of animals taken by trappers and pelts of ranch-bred animals,
the value of the latter constituting
approximately 6% per cent, of the
total value.
I     HOTELS AND CAMPS
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
/ Will Call
at your house In time to take you te
the train or boat.
Car  For Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
At Reasonable Prices
Special Rates for Long Trips
PHOJiE 25 OR 22-ASK FOR
Geo.  Mason
New Improved
Model Eureka
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelings and other
surface litter.
$65.00 $65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30-inch extension tubing, 7-inch aluminum nozzle with detachable
upholstery brush, and radiator tool.
$10.00 $10.00
FOR SALE BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Red Top Relief Valves. $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a !/2-iiJ'Valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
"The Most of the B»jt for the Uut"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND  GENERAL DELIVERY.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHOJiE 160
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices. PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY,  MAY X,  1»26
\
If You Are Of
Average Figure
Very few of us are ideal average.
There is always a bit of coaxing to
be done—a little moulding, a subtly
straightened line, a comforting support. With remarkably few bones
and no undue contraint, Gossard Corsets designed for the average figure
bring it gently but surely to its ideal
perfection and eternally guard you
from the injustice of looking older
than you are.
Understanding your type Is one
of tbe nuut important aid* to
heauty you will over find. He-
member that whatever your Ug-
ure may be there are Gossard
Corsets with just the support
you need al your age nnd weight
to give you the proper propor
tions of the type to which you
belong. Oossards are moderately priced, launder beautifully,
Will outwear two or oven three
ordinary corsets and will give
you a comfort such as you nevor
know before.
Gossard trade marked Corsets as low in price as $2.50
Sutherland's, Cumberland
^^JMr^ii>i'''''u.'
"PROVINCIAL ELECTION ACT"
Comox Electoral IHstrlct
Notice is hereby given that 1 shall,
on Monday, the 18th day May, 1925,
at the hour of 10 o'clock In the forenoon, at the Court-house Cumberland,
B.C., hold a sitting of the Court ol
Revision for tho purpose of revising
the list of voters for said electoral
district, and hearing and determining
any and all objections to the retention
of any name on thc said list, or to the
registration as a voteor of any applicant for registration, and for the
other purposes set forth in the "Provincial Elections Act,"
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 17lh
day of April, 1025.
CHAS. H. GRANT.
Deputy Registrar of Voters,
16-19. Comox Electoral District
FOR SALE—House suitable for two
families or for boarding house. For
particulars apply 207 Derwent Ave.,
Cumberland, or write Box 502. Cumberland. IT.
Job
Printing
-of the
Better Kind
Obtainable at the office
of thc
Cumberland
Islander
Phene 35
Job Printing that won't stick is
not worth any more than that
kind of a friend.
MANY ATTEND FUNERAL
COURTENAY,—The funeral of the
.ate Mr. Charles W. Harris took place
.it tlie Anglican cemetery at Sandwlcit
on Saturday. A large number of
people wended their wo >■ from Courtenay in slowly moving cars to pay
.heir last respects to the deceased
A'ho was a highly respected citizen.
The service was conducted by the
Rev. J. W. Fllnton nnd the body was
borne to its last resting place by
Messrs John Aitken, Wm. Fielder,
Geo. E. Grover, Dan Kllpatrick, Robt.
McQuillan and Charles Simms. Chief
among the mourners were the widow.
.Mr. nnil Mrs. Alfred Horn of Union
Bay and Mrs. Harris' two sisters from
Nanaimo. The floral tributes wero
beautiful. Mr. John Sutton had
charge of the undertaking arrangements.
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite llo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
There's nothing puzzling
about the quality of the
foodstuffs here — or the
prices. They help solve
the problem of high living
cost.
FRELONE'S
Grocery Store
Cor. 5th and  IMinsmnlr.
Revive That Old
STRAW HAT
USE
Elkay's Straw Hat Dye
16 Colon to choose from
85c.
i
PER BOTTLE
PER BOTTLE
Social and Personal
Entertained ut Ten.
Mrs.   Charles   Hltchens,   Maryport
Avenue, entertained at tho tea hour on
Wednesday afternoon.
Inspector Paid Visit.
Mr.  Pringle, Inspector of Post-Of-
lices  with headquarters  in Vancouver, paid an inspection visit to Cumberland on Thursday.
From Vancouver,
Visitors to City. I Visited City.
Mrs. Smith and daughter Joyce, ef      Mr. Patterson, District Inspector .if
Vuncouver, and Mr. Smith Sr., of Scar  Public Schools, was a visitor to Cum-
i borough, Eng., were visiting friends In   berland on Monday.     In the evening
j Royston during the week. The party ' he addressed the monthly meeting of
! also visited Cumberland on Tuesday,  the Parent Teachers' Association.
being the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Walton while ln the city.
To. Tiicomu.
Mr. and Mrs.
William Treloar left
Miss Katy Richardson returned to CumijeI.land on Tuesday for Tacoma
Cumberland  on  Thursday  after  an   where lhey w„, resl(le ln future
extended stay ln Vancouver.
Hostess at Bridge Tea.
For a good time on Saturday night
attend the Dance in the O. W. V, A.
Hall. Excellent music, excellent
dance floor.     Gents SOc. Ladies 10c.
Visited Victoria.
Mr.   and  Mrs.   T.   Mordy  and  son
Harry  paid  a  visit  to  Victoria  last
Saturday, returning the following evening.
Motor Party to Victoria,
Messrs T. H. Carey, C. J. Parnham,
J. L. Brown and J. Walton motored
to Victoria on Saturday and returned I Itcturns From AlbernL
Mrs. A. E. Jeffrey was, on Tuesday
afternoon, hostess at a Bridge Tea at
her home on Maryport Avenue. First
and second prizeB were won by Mrs.
LARGE CROWD ATTEND
EXHIHITION SOCCER
GAME SUNDAY LAST
(Contlued From Page One)
H.  Bryan  and  Mrs.  T.  Mordy, with i out  to  Comox  Lake,  Courtenay  anil
ms-^s.     s.s     rst..s .J    .«—I..,.,   .s...    £.—_..    ' Pnsssnv Tlw,    siulliiitr   tsssssss    sstisss   ,ssi.
Mrs. E. Pickard receiving the consolation.
ou Sunday.
From Ladysmith.
Mr. Ambrose Moore of Ladysmith,
was a visitor to Cumberland on Thurs
day, going on to Comox to spend tlie
night at the home of his parents, Mv.
and Mrs. C. J. Moore, Comox.
Auditor Paid Visit
Mr.  R.  P.  Wllmot,  auditor-of the
Liquor Control Board, paid Cumberland o„ official visit on Wednesday.
Visitor to City.
Mr. Thomas Spruston, of the staff
of the Canadian Collieries, Ladysmith,
Mr. Malcolm Stewart, of Lang's
Drug Store, returned on Wedneaday
afternoon from Port Alberni where
he
days.
IN MEMORIAM
Comox. The visiting team was entertained at dinner at the Union Houl
by the local club at twelve o'clock.
The game Btarted shortly after two
with A. S. Jones, of Union Bay In
charge. Less than one minute from
the kick off, Fowler had scored number one for Cumberland.   Ten minutes
.... ,  ,    . after Powell River obtained the equal-
has  been spending the  past ten | ,zer through Contl   the Cumberlallll
Captain,   who  evidently   thought  he
would show the visitors how to score
a goal, banging a beauty past Walker.
The home forwards afler this settled
down to real combination with the ruin  loving memory of our  beloved : suit tha, Powell River were very rare-
a  ,    ..       .,,.„.        , t.    ,. ,  'ly  dangerous.      With  practically  -ill
son and brother, Vsllliani John Col-, tho suitors playing a defensive game
ling, who died April  29,  1922, aged i and Ihe goalie being a 'wizard" it was
20 years. imposlble for the home team to pene
Entertained at Tea Hour.
Mrs. Merlon Stewart, Allan "Avenue,
entertained a few friends at the tea
hour this afternoon In honor of Miss
Margaret Mitchell of Seattle.
T.OGEAM FOR UPPER
ISLAND .SCHOOL SPORTS
(Contlued From Page One)
yards return for girls only. T. Nail
driving. 6 2 1-2 inch nails, for girls
only. 8. Baseball throwing for all
girls classes. 9. Skipping race 100
yds. for girls only. 10. Rope climbing, 20 ft. for boys only. 11, Standing, bop, skip and Jump for boys and
girls. 12. Running broad Jump for
boys and girls. 13. High Jump for
boys only.
Extra Events—1. Tug of war, open
to scIiooIh of seven rooms, or more,
and High Schools. 2.Thread the
needle, a team, one boy and one girl,
In Junior, Senior and High. Girl holds
Iho needle, boy runs with thread.
passess thread through eye and botb
run with threaded needle to start.
Climbing Greasy Pole, open event.
4. First Aid, St. John's Ambulance,
open to teams from any school. ts.
Rest Clown on Held. 6. Strathcona
Trust Drill, open to a mixed group of
ten pupils from any school. Teacher
of school to give exercises. T. Best
all-round athlete, boy or girl.
Itors' defence would again be penetrated. So well did the Powell River
goalie defend his citadel that twenty
minutes of the second half had gone
by before Fowler scored number two
for Cumberland from a perfect centre by Hltchens. Five minutes later
Toots" Plump scored number three
was a visitor In Cumberland on Thurs i Whcn a hand from out the darkness
day and left for the south again on ; Touched him and he slept.
Friday morning. |    In8el.led by hls three brother9 &ni
Was Business Visitor. j tvv0 si9ters and by his parents, Mr.
Mr. L. J. Marks, of the Canadian ■ ana- Mr9  William C. Colling.
Explosives Company, paid Cumberland
a business visit on Thursday. ——        — . .. ~——
From Nanaimo.
Mr. Conrad Reifle, ot Nanaimo, was
a business visitor to Cumberland oo
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Entertained at Bridge.
Mrs.  A.  E.  Jeffrey   entertained  at
three   tables   of   bridge   on   Monday
evening last.
At Home Wednesday.
Mrs. John Shortt, Pendrith 'Avenue
was at home on Wednesday afternoon
to a few friends.
for   his   team,   u   corner,  admirably
trate.   Monohan,  however,  hanered  n I piaCed by Bahncrinan being easily con
"Not dead but sleeping.' j (,„, one  through  a host of  players,   verted. Two minutes later Toots slam-
"Niglit came releasing hlm from labor! which was too hot for the goalie to   mea-  |n another hot one but offside
hold. Referee Jones, for some reason  spoiled the effort.     Toots »as not to
or other decided It was not a leglii- |be denied and one minute from time
mate goal giving offside against ono
of the Cumberland players.
The  second  half opened   with  tho
locals   pressing  heavily  and   it   was
only a matter of time before the vis-1 four goals to one.
he bent tbe visiting defence scoring a
beauty. Immediately after the whistle
sounded for full time with Cumberland  United  winners  by  a  icore  'if
I Mercantile Store Co.
Telephone 133    READ & OSRORNE        Cumberland
COURTENAY GOLFERS
PROVE SUPERIORITY
OVER QUALLICUMITES
COURTENAY, April 2T.—Courtenay
golfers have returned from Quallicum
after enjoying a very pleasant day's
piny there yesterday. Nearly all the
returning players have a smile that
answers the question before it is asked. "Oh Yes! We Won," is written all
over their faces. And win lhey certainly did, both in the two-ball
matches before lunch and the foursomes played in the afternoon. Major
A. B. Dundas, who went down by rati
on Saturday Is staying at Quallicum
until today. Mr. Joe Idlens took Mrs.
Idiens over the road on Saturday and
made a week-end of lt. Joe's reputation as a local cup lifter had preceded him however. The otlier members of the Courtenay team who played at Quallicum on Sunday and who
gave such a good account of themselves while there made the trip by
motor. They arc John All ken, C. A.
Brown, Percy Booth, J. Dick, Tom.
Graham, J. N. McLeod, M. Moncrleff
and T. W. Stewart. The returning
golfers say there ls nothing lacking I
In thc liospltallty of the (>uall!cum
club.
SATURDAY WILL BE AN-
OTHER DAY OF BARGAIN
VALUES AT THE MERCANTILE. EVERY DEPARTMENT BRISTLES WITH IN-
TERES! ING OFFERINGS AT
MORE THAN. INTERESTING
PRICES. OURS IS A SHORT
STORY OF LONG VALUES.
Men's Overalls. Reg  $2.25  and
$2.60 for  18.10
Men's Suspenders.    Reg.  price
76c. for  ;  50c.
BOOTS AND SHOES
Kodak Time Is Here » we
can supply all your requirements
Lang's Drug Store
-THE REXALL KODAK .STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S'
Plant Now'
Magoon Strawberry Plants
$2.00 per 100
Early Cabbage Plants
$1.00 per 100
$8.00 per 1000
Cauliflower Plants
$2.00 per 100
All plants well hardened off.
George Edwards, jr.
P. O. Box 62, Courtenay, B.C.
Phone 98X
Men's "Astoria" Oxfords In
Brown. This well known shoe
Reg. |8.60 for   $6.50
Men's Leckie Shoes, In 3 or 4
different styles, Black or Brown
Reg. $9.50 at the bargain price
per pair   $0.95
LADIES' HOSIERY
Ladies' Silk Hose, In wanted
colorings, a $1.25 value.     Our
Cash Price »5r
Holeproof Silk Hose, In Brown.
Greys   Rose. Beige, and White.
Reg. 12.00 for   $UI5
Art Silk Hose, In most wanted
shades, a 06c. value. Our Cash
Price    Uf.
Silk Lisle Hose. In Black and
Brown. Special at   45t's
Staple Dept.
Bargain Briefs
30" Heavy   White   Flannelette,
per yd ~  45c
34" Strong Weave Flannelette,
per yd  89(1
32" Unbleached Cotton   18c
30" Mull, various  colors, at 3
yds. for   $1.00
32" Ginghams   20c
40" Figured Linings   50o
20" Ginghams  lite
30" Crepe de Chine. Reg. price
$2.75      IMS
30" Silk and Wool Crepe. Reg.
$2.00 for  _... $1.41)
36" Curtain Net. Reg. $1 .... «9c
30" Curtain Scrim   29c
34" Cretonne   206
Men's Work Shirts In Kahkl.
Blue, Greys, etc. $1.25, $1.50 and
$1.78
Men's Shirts & Drawers spring
needle  make  in  natural color.
Reg. $2.25 garment for $1.76
Men's Work Sox. 4 prs. .. $1.00
Astoria Boots, Reg. $9.50.   Our
price  »'«»
Men's Work Boot. McLaughlin
tailor made. Itfg. $7 for *.'..7.'>
Miner Boots, Reg. $7.50 .. $5.95
Miners Rubber Hi-Press and
other makes $0.50 for   $.1.25
DRY GOODS
RritiMi siits
About 15 only Ladles' Spring
Suits. They come ln Gabardine,
Trlcotlno, Blues, Fawns nud
somo Tweeds. Reg. $40.00 ami
$35.00  for     $24.50 and  $22.50
MILK DRESSES
About 10 only in various smart
styles. Some beaded anil others
neatly trimmed. Tbey come In
Crepe de Chine, Charmeuse
Satin and Canton Crepe. $30.00
values for  $19.50
GROCERY   SPECIALS   FOIt
SATURDAY - MONDAY
a I our
"CASH & SAVE" PRICES
Swees, Corn, 2 tins   R5e
Malkins best Jelly Pwd 2/li>f
Fels Naptha Soap cart. 80c
Fresh Ground    Coffee,    per
lb   IHc
Purity  Salt,  3   1-2   lb.  sack
2 for   25c
White Swan Soap, pkg 20r.
Market Day Seedless Raisins
4 lbs. pkg -  50e
Crown Brand Sardines lOo
King Oscar Sardines .... 1,1c
Graham   Ico  Wafer  Biscuits
per lb  S5c.
Cambridge   Sandwiches    per
Ib   95c
Nabob Tea, per Ib  75c
Dates (now), 3 lbs  25c
Toilet Paper, 6 rolls       25c.
Fresh In
Lettuce. Green Onions. Radishes. Cabbage  and  Cucumbers, Bananas
Men's Dress Shoes, In Black or
Brown, very special  $6.50. por
pair for  -  $4.05
Ladles' Spanish Style Slippers
In Black, Grey Suede and Two
Tones. $6.50 values for .... $4.45
Lodlcs' Oxfords In Brown. "A
Murray Maid" $6.00 for .... $4.45
HOUSEDRESSES -- About 30
only Housedresscs In Gingham
and Prints. Value to $3.25. Clear
out at   $1.95
SPHIXG MILLINERY
AT    HALF    PRICE
Girls' Straw Hats, with neat
ribbon hand aud streamers. Our
Cash Price  $M6
TOWEL SPECIAL
Hand  Towel  Special—Size  3Sx
16. Per pair  4»c
Men's Wear
Men's Blue Fine Serge Suits;
also some Browns—These are'
of stylish cut and  well  made.
Reg. $35.00 for $24.50
Men's Tweed Suits of hard-wear
ing material... $27.50 for $I9.i>0
MEN'S HATS
$7.50 Stetson Felt   $5.50
$7.60 Velour Hats $5J0
$6.50 Felt Hats  $1.50
SPECIAL
10 only Men's Felt Hats,
Hrown & Grey. Heir. $1.50
for $2.50
Men's  Sweater  Coats   In   Coat
Si)le. Pullovers, nil  wool, One
or heavier meshes at
1-4 & 1-3 OFF REG. PRICES
Men's 1007c All Wool Sox. Our
Wonder  Value   still   selling   at
3 pairs for   $1.00
Men's Dress Shirts In Broadcloths, Piques nnd Cambrics.
$2.50 and $3.50 values for $1.95
$2,25 and $2.75

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