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The Cumberland Islander Jun 25, 1926

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Array TBEV CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
il
FORTY-FIFTH YEAR—No. 26.
With wfclcll lg coaiolMated the Cumberland News,
EAGLES TO HOLD ANNUAL
PICNIC THURSDAY, JULY 1
i ~*
Comox Aerie No. 1953, F. 0. E„ will
hold its annual basket picnic at
Royston Beach on Thursday, July 1st.
Members, their wives and children
are requested to meet at the Eagles'
home at 8:15 a.m. The picnic is
open to the public, but transportation
will be provided only (or members
and their families.
RoyGiffeToFight
Ole Anderson On
Dominion Day
COURTENAY, June 24—The matching of Roy Cliffe, the gallant boxer
from Courtenay, with Ole Anderson,
Tacoma, Wash., heavyweight, for a
contest in this city July 1st, meets
with the approval of the lovers of
boxing all over the North-west. In
Tacoma they look upon the match as
an Important one for Clllfe, due no
doubt to the enviable ring record
Anderson has. His contests with
Harry Wills, BUI Brennan, Bartley
Madden and boxers ot that type stamp
hlm aB a most dangerous opponent
for the Courtenay youngster.
Joe Mullins, manager of Anderson.
has Intimated that Ole* is a sure win
ner. "In fact, it would not surprise
me to see Ole knock Cliffe out," says
Manager Mullins.
Cliffe never looked better than he
does at this time. His sojourn In the
south has put on weight and huski-
ness to the local youngster whom
Lon nie Austin, his manager, says will
some day be heavyweight champion uf
the world. Referring to his recent
match at Los Angeles the newspapers
of that city printed the following:
Herald—"Ernie Owens had a very
lucky break when he had his. hand
raised over Cliffe. The worst Roy
should have had was a draw and lt
there was an edge he had it. Owens
started well by taking the first three
rounds, but then he started dodging
the Issue. Cliffe shook him up repeatedly and took live ot the. remaining seven rounds."
Times—"Ernie Owens and Roy
Cliffe'put up a whale of a ten round
argument. Owens was given the decision which was mighty close with
the crowd In sympathy with Clilte
because of his aggressive showing
throughout. Owens was on the verge
of going down In the eighth from a
right to the chin but staggered
through the round by clinching."
"Examiner—"In the first ten round
bout Ernie O'rins was awarded a
thoroughly unmerltted decision over
Roy Cliffe by a new referee named
Levlngston. Cliffe should have had
the nod because he hit more sturdily
and forced the going all the way.
Twice be had Owens out on his feet,
but lacked the opportunity to finish
him."
Record—"Roy, Cliffe is one of the
most courageous boxers this writer
haB ever had the pleasure of watch-
In. He was outclassed by Owens but
he kept coming for ten straight
rounds. At the finish Owens was cut
down to his size. There was never
a better heavyweight battle—there
couldn't be."
The promoters announce that they I
have an excellent card of preliminary
bouts to be used in conjunction with
the Cllffe-Anderson contest. In the
semi-final Ernie Woodley, of Victoria,
meets Eddie Gross, of Seattle. Wood-
ley Is well known in Courtenay having fought Roy Cliffe here two yenrs
ago, also Duke Potter last year. Ed.
Qross ls a fast, clean boxer of the
Woodley type.
Another special event will be the
four-round go between Harold Jones
of Cumberland and kid Sullivan of
tbe I. T. Cantp, Campbell River.
Jones needs no introduction to fans
In this locality. In Sullivan he will
have an opponent worthy of hlm.
Other prellmnarles ate between
Wing Hay, of Port Alberni, and Willie Townsend, of Vancouver nt 122
pounds; Sid Williams of Courtenay,
and Len Woodley of Victoria, at .115
pounds; and Howard McQuinn, 60
pounds, versus Jack McQuinn, 55 lbs.,
both of Camp 3.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Up-Island Eleven
Defeated By The
English Tourists
A Goal-Less First Half.
7ngland's    touring   soccer   eleven
registered their tenth stralht victory
on Saturday last at Nanaimo when a
team  representing  the  Upper-Island
was defeated by a score of three goals
to none In a game, that to ssy the
least, from a point of football  was
very disappointing.   The majority of
the  Up-Island team appeared  to be
under the Impression that the only
thing to do was to boot the ball as
hard  and  as  far  as  possible.    All
attempts  to get the forwards going
went  by  the  board  with the  result
that the whole of the five forwards
were woefully weak.   Dicky Stobbart
did time and time again fall Into the
half back line and endeavor to get
his wing man going, but his efforts
were of no avail.   It is our opinion
that Wilson is not a footballer at all.
A mad dash down the wing and u
hefty kick at the ball does not make
a forward.   How he managed to cop
a place on the team, after Hltchens |
had  been  chosen   for   the   position.!
needs some explaining.
Edmunds, Monaghan, Stobbart and
McFarlane were the pick of the home
eleven. Jack Monaghan was easily
the pick of the middle line, Nell McFarlane being too prone to boot the
ball too hard, making practically no
attempts to get his forwards going.
The hard checking Indulged In by
the Island eleven took the ngllshmen
completely off their game, and only
occasional flashes of the brilliance
for which they are justly famed, wai
evidenced.
The first half of the game was
certainly a hard one, with the tourists carrying the ball time after time
Into the vicinity of Tait and Co. The
defense, however, was playing a bustling kind of game and repeatedly
booted the ball well up the field,
where the Island forwards had to do
a lot of running around In an endeavor to obtain possession. Stobbart, on one occasion, nearly turned
the trick with a beautiful effort that
just skimmed the bar. At half time
the score stood 0-0.
On resumption of play in the last
half the ball was taken right into the
Island goal-mouth, where Edmunds i
cleared. Back came the tourists, Joe
Smith slipping a beautiful pass to
Tunstall who lifted the ball high Into
the goal. Tait came out a yard or so
and completely mis-judged  the bail,
CUMBERLAND HIGH SCHOOL
— Promotion List --
Passing from Grade IX to Grade X,' n order of merit:
Possible 900
1. Jean  MacNaughton
2. Marjorie Browrt  .....
3. Tatsuml  Iwasa  	
4. Archie Dick
. 713
. 700
.676
. 650
5. Norma  Parnham    646
6. Annie Mann   644
7. Alastalr McKinnon  .... 640
8. Nina McKee ,  621
9. Frank Read   620
10. Gordon   Walker  617
; 11. Lou Mann   6M
; 12. Joe  Freloni  579
;13. Jack Horbury    542
14. Lillian Grant  499
; 15. Sam Williams   491
Passed with supplemental
16. Victor  Marinelli,   1   supp.
17. Nobuo   Hayashl,   2   supps.
18. Tsuneto   Asoa,    2    supps,
Passing from Grade X to Grade XI, in order of merit:
1. Jessie Brown ...
2. Evelyn Carey ....
3. Irene Bates   "... 620
4. Sam Davis   597
5. Helen  Parnham    582
6. Isao Nakano   561
Possible 900
. 630   '   7. Minnie  Harrlgan    5Kj
Passed with supplenientals
8. Leland   Harrison,   1   supp.
9. Myrtle Calnan,'  1 supp.
10. Edna Smith   2 supps.
11. Jessie Grant   2 supps.
jNo Senior Matric
I For. High School
Here Next Term
, The end of the school term today
prompted (he Board of School Trustees   to   I10U  n   special   meeting   last
GRAND CHIEF PAID
UNOFFICIAL VISIT
Mrs. Ellen MdF^fl, of Powell River,
Grand Chief of the Pythian Sisters
of British Columbia, paid uu unofficial
visit to Cumberland last Wednesday.
While In this city .she was tlie guest
of Mrs. Marion  Stewart, Allan Ave.,
.     ...,B   ,ui   who  entertained   in   her   honor   the
.Monday evening In order to clear up same evening, nearly all the Sisters
existing accounts and settle all pres.s- of thc local temple being present to
i.,„ u.—,-.- mee( (ne (jru„,|  chief.
Third Teacher For
High School Wot
Yet Appointed
(Continued from Page Two)
Port Alberni Plays
Return Match Here
Sunday Afternoon
After three weeks holidaying at
Harrison Hot Springs, the guest nf
their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Newman
of the Townsite have returned home.
The Port Alberni soccer eleven will
be seen In action on the Recreation
Grounds Sunday afternoon against
the local Intermediate eleven, the
game being in return for the one
played at the west coast city recently.
The Port players won the last match
by three goals to one, so that this
time the Cumberland squad will be
out for revenge and are confident that
they can take the measure of the
visitors. At any rate, it ought to be
a good game for the visitors have a
snappy team and the local boys are
also Hearing top form. Wednesday
night they defeated the Courtenay
Intermedaltes to the tune of three
gouls to none.
Mr. Tom Carney Is working hard
to assist the Cumberland team as
manager, and will make his selection
of Sunday's team from the following
players: Boffey, Marshall, H. Stewart,
Bickle, Strachan, Banner, Weir, R.
Bennie, Hunden, Gibson, M. Stewart.
Stevenson and Little.
The game Is scheduled to commence at 3:00 o'clock In the afternoon and it Is hoped that a large
number of spectators will be on hand
to boost the respective teams. When
the locals played at Port Alebrnl the
whole town turned out en masse lo
witness the match.
In a communication read before the
Board of School Trustees last .Monday evening, Miss I. MacFadyen requested oue year's leave of absence
from her teaching duties on the staff
of the Public School In order to study
art with a view of bettering her position In the teaching profession. Tbe
request was Immediately granted, and
then arose the queston of which one
of tbe long list of applicants. In which
are included three local girls, should
be appointed to the staff to All the
vacancy caused by Miss MacFadyen's
absence from September 1926 to June
1927.
Some, of the Trustees favored the
engagement of a male teacher and
were supported n this -by Supervising
Principal Apps, while again others
thought a male teacher was not required and that one of the local girls
should receive the appointment. The
arguments In favor of a male teacher
seemed to carry more weight, however, wth the result that out of the
list of male applicants (and others
yet to be received) it was decided to
select the new teacher, provided that
a suitable one can be found.
The meeting also endeavored to
select a third teacher for' the High
School out of the numerous applications sent In response to ah advertisement In the Vancouver Province.
This proved an even greater task
than trying to HU the vacancy In the
Public School staff, and it was nearly
11:00 p.m. before all but four ot the
applicants were eliminated. Theso
are Mary C .L. Astell, New Westmln-.
ster; Cllve A. Kelly, Vancouver; Hen.
ry J. C. Poore and R. H. L. Girling,
both of Victoria. The odds seemed
to facor Miss Astell but the final
choice will be made later.
Entrance Class
Annual Proves
Worthy Effort
Those pupils of the entrance class
of tUe Cumberland Public School who
were recommended, have been busy
all week editing and printing the first
iissue of the "Cumberland Entrance
Class Annual," the first copies of
Which appeared on the street-) a day
or so ugo. Tliey are being sold. to
Increase the school Athletic fund,'
which is now at a low figure. '
This first effort of the entrance
class Is a ten page magazine, size
8% by 14, printed on the school mimeograph, and containing -stories of
important events that have happened
at the school during thc past term, all
very able articles and written entirely by the pupils. A feature of the
contents are the prlzc-wlnnlng essays
on "Fire Prevention." the 1925 essay
'Being'written by-Wfi's Claudia Harrison and the 1926 essay by Miss
Kathleen Emily. Stephen Jackson
also tells in an interesting article of
the organization of grass hockey' iu
January, while another page Is surrounded by an intricate panel, drawn
by Fusac Suglmorl and enclosing
touching tributes to the memory of
Eleanor Mercy Davis, Mltsuye Aida,
aud Holiest Wong, pupils of the entrance class who passed away this <
year and last. There is also a bit
of parting advice from the teacher,
Mr. H. E. Murray, to his class.
M|ss Josephine Freeburn is editor-
in-chief. Amongst those contributing
to the annual are Annie Beveridge.
Mary Clark, Margaret Richardson,
Isabella Herd, Bob Osborne. Norman
Hill, Barbara Grant, Hobble Colling,
Norman Freloni, Gordon Horwood,
and Edna Conrod.
CONNAUGHT CUP SKJILKINAI,
Anuual Caledonian
Sports To Be Held
At Hastings Park
Nanaimo and Canadan Collieries
will meet at Con Jones Park on Saturday, July 3, In the semi-final of the
Connaught Cup B. C. series. The final against Westminster United is
scheduled for July 10.
Hastings Park, Vancouver will bc
the scene this year of the annual
sports of the St. Andrews and Caledonian society instead of Brockton
Point as In former years. The sports
will be held on Saturday, August 1,
and will be run ln conjunction witli
the Vancouver Exhibition. Entry
forms are out for Athletic events,
Piping and Dancing and also for the
Junior Athletic events. These forms
and further information can be obtained from Mr. R. Strachan secretary
of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association.
The many friends of Mr. William
H. Cope will learn with pleasure that
he has recovered sufficiently to lea re
the hospital and Is now enjoying a
two week's holiday at Royston Beach.
Minister Inducted
Cumberland United Church had ils
new minister, Rev. John Hewitt, inducted on Tuesday evening. June 22.
A good congregation wus present, including friends from Courtenay and
Union Bay.
The Rev. J. P. Westman of Centeu-!
nlnl United Church, Victoria, was In j
charge, assisted by Rev. W. A. Alexander of Courtenay. and  Itev.  J.  II.
Bobbins of Union Bay.   The address
to the minister was given by Kev. J. I
P. Westman and (lie address to the
congregation by Rev. Alexander. The;
choir assisted in the service, and Rev.
Hobbins  sang a solo.
The following members of the session, Thomas Bannerman. David Hunden, Alex Henderson and Alex MacKinnon, were also set apart aud inducted. The other members, Alex.
Armstrong and John S. Brown wero
not able to attend.
Ing business, as well as outline tlie
I programme of alterations und repair
work lo be undertaken this summer.
A full Board was In attendance and
It wus Well past 11:00 p.m. when the
meeting was adjourned, having been
In session three hours and a half.
Trustee Henderson presented a^ list
of work tlmt will have to be done
inside Ihe school, Including the laying of two new floors, the calclmlnlng
und graining of the walls in one room
and one hall, and repairs to the'
small stairway on the^ north side of
tlie oltl school. This work received
tlie approval of the meeting and will
be commenced  immediately.
A  hurried   review  of  tlie  expenditures' to date this year showed that
approximately   $18.1100   have   so   far
been expended out of the $33,000 es-
timuted ut the beginning of the year.
Bills and   accounts   for   the   month,
totalling In the neighborhood of $350
were found correct and ordered paid.
Speaking  for  tlie  committee delegated to Investigate the senor matric
question', Trustees MacNaughton and
Brown   were  both   convinced   that  a
class of this nature next term would
not be to the best advantage of the
High School; even with a third teacher on  the staff.   In  tbe   first place,
there Would not be enough pupils to
warrant  the  continuance  of such   a
class ami secondly, without the senior
matric.    the    High    School   will   be
brought to a high state of efficiency,
whicli is most desirable.   In view of
such a report, the meeting as a whole
fell iu line with the suggestions con-
tnlned therein,  with the  result that
it  was  decided   riot  to  teach   senior
tnati'ic in the High School next term.
The school gardens, which are beginning to look very nice at present,
will    not* be"" neglected "dunig the
summer months while tbe pupils are
on   holiday. .. A   r_onipctenU.fard.ener
will be engaged to give tbem bis careful attention at regular Intervals.
10 (olds of cord wood am needed
for the furnaces aud the secretary
was Instructed to call for tenders for
this amount, ns well as for 3,000
shingles! The necessary chemical
supplies tor the High School will also
he ordered.
Trustee Bunks said thut the visiting
committee hud been much distressed
to find the tennis courts iu a neglected condition, one of tbe nets being
torn and n rope broken, as well as
several other mlnur depredutlons.
This is due mainly to the younger
pupils and is probably inevitable because they do not yet realize that the
courts are their own property, and
until lhey do such little damages are
bound to occur. Mrs. Banks added
tliut she thought much of this could
bo prevented If the teachers would
appoint committees from among their
number to supervise the courts during recess and noon hours.
Auto Park To Be
Established At
Comox Lake
The   Cumberland   Hoard   of   Trade
obtained permission during the week
from the Canadian Collieries (D), Ud.
to erect an Auto Park at Comox Lake.
Two acres  of ground,  one  on   each
side of tbe road have been set apart
for  the  Park.   The  site  Is  right on
the crest of tbe bill  where a  lovely
view of tbe Lake can be obtained. It
has been the opinion of the members
of the Board of Trade that an Auto
Park  at  the   Lake   was  an   absolute
necessity    and  during  Ihe  past  two
weeks certain members have rushed
their views and Ideas along until now
tbe Park Is an assured thing.   We are
given  to  understand   that it  will  be
up-to-date in every respect, the Secretary.  Mr.  H.  G.   McKinnon   having
obtained informaton from Ihe operators of other auto parks just what is
needed  to make a  successful attraction -for  tbe   tourists.   A   dance   or
concert or some other form of entertainment will he bold il the near future wth a view to raising money to
clear the site of the Park.   It ii confidently expected that the  Park, will
be    ready    for    the    tourist in  one
month's time.
FAIR WARNING
POSTAGE REDUCTIONS
EFFECTIVE JULY 1st.
For the informal ion of thc public
the "islander" has been asked to note
that letter postage will bu reduced
from three cents to two cents, effective July hit. 192«. The June supplement of the Canadian Postal Guide
contains the following:
1 "Postmasters will please note that
on and after Hie 1st July. 1926. the
rate of postage on letters for Canada
the United States. Mexico, and all
other places in the North American
Continent, will be 2 cents for each
ounce or fraction thereof." and goes
on to mention tbe names of various
Republics and Islands of llie Nor Ml
American Continent to which letters
may now be sent for two cents.
N'o reduction occurs in postags to
England or otber countries, this remaining the same as heretofore.
Up.-Island Sports
Committee Met At
Nanaimo Saturday
A meeting to wind up the affaire
of tbe Inspectorate No. .'1 school sports
and Held day at Qualicum ou June
3rd, was held at Nanaimo on Saturday morning last and was attended
hy a large number of teachers. A
great deal of business Was transacted
aud it was found that, when all tbe
tchools and those who bave promised
medals send hi the money, there will
be a small surplus, jusi bu (Helen t to
^^^^^^^ pay the cost of engraving shields and
rjgor of the law, any and all persons cups. All bills were ordered to be
found trespassing. This is fair warn- paid and a hearty vole of thanks was
Ing.     We   nre   given   to   understand'tendered the people of Qualicum and
The hooligan gang of Cumberland
has been busy agnin during tbe past
Tew days and numerous reports have
been received of their depredations.
Kences bave been torn down, gardens
entered ;md contents wantonly destroyed, aud it is the intention of thc
authorities to prosecute to the utmost
(hat it is no idle boast and prose
cations will follow against any person so caught, irrespective of age or
class. It has been said that thc dam-'
ago done recently so far Is the work
of young lioys from eleven to fourteen
years of age. We have our doubts
about  that.    Watch your step, gang!
After fhe service the Ladles' Aid
served refreshments and a social lime
was spent together, giving tlio congregation an opportunity to meet the
new minister and his wife. Words
of welcome were given by Mr. Alex
.MacKinnon and were replied to by
Rev. Mr. Hewitt. Mr., Duncan, of
Courtenay, also spoke briefly,
all  who a.ssisled.
Discussion followed as to bow the
field day could be improved and be
better handled, with tba following
should    he    held    on
result:' sports ^^^^^^^
grouuds enclosed by a fence which
would mean Cumberland and Nanaimo. 'Also that some means must be
found to separate large schools from
small aud tbat no candidate from auy
large school, could represent tbat
school (n more than two events. It
was aiso decided thai tug-of-war
should count as pouts for large
schools and thnt committees should
be located in town where sports are
to he held. In event of this happening, perhaps some lodge or other local
body could take over the management.
The mate to this boot can be seen this week-end at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre, where
Charlie Chaplin appears in his masterpiece " The Gold Rush " PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, & C
FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1926.
The Cumberland islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY, JUNE 25; 1926.
ALIBI IKE A young man having broken an
appointment with Ben Franklin,
came to him the following day and made a very
handsome apology for his absence. He was
still proceeding when Dr. Franklin stopped him
with "My good boy, say no more; you have said
too much already; for the man who is so good
at making excuses, is seldom good at anything
else."
We found the above paragraph in an old almanac published more than a century ago. Ben
Franklin has long since passed away, but his
homely sayngs are still read by seekers after the
truth and the excuse maker is just as prevalent
today as he was in Franklin's time.
You find the excuse maker everywhere. He
thrives on the golf course where every poor play
is excused through some fault of the course or
the use of the wrong club. You find them at
every automoble accident where the blame is
shifted because of some carelessness of the other
fellow. "If you had not trumped my queen we
would not have been set," cries the irate bridge
player who overbid her hand. When through
extravagance you have failed to provide for the
note that is falling due you have many excuses
for asking your banker for a renewal. We have
a friend who is so full of excuses for failing to
meet his engagements and his obligations that
he has been dubbed "Alibi Ike" among his associates.
Another phase of making excuses is "passing
the buck." Always blaming the other fellow
for the things that go wrong. After assigning
all the hard prospects to John in the community
drive, the "buck passer" sits back and waits.
When the quota is not reached, he says, "If John
hadn't fallen down we would have gone over the
top."
You know these excuse makers and buck
passers, these "Alibi Ikes;" for every community
has them. They never succeed and finally are
dropped off of committees because you grow tired I
of listening to their excuses.
Here is a habit the young man should never
acquire for it leads to inevitable disaster, for
"the man who is so good at making excuses is
seldom good at anything else." If you lose,
lose cheerfully. Don't make excuses. If you
fail, fail like a man and admit your error.     In
this way you Will have the respect of others and
be given another chance.
FROM AN. OLD An old monk many years ago
SCRAP BOOK left the following maxims to
those who pass through this
life comfortably: 	
"Never speak ill of any person whatever."
Here is a splendid bit of advice that will save
trouble for you in 1926, as it did in the days of
the old monk.
"Perform every office according to strict justice and the wants of your fellow creatures."
That is Roosevelt's idea of the square deal
and if followed faithfully will surely bring respect and peace.
"Suffer the mad world to go its own way: for
it wills to go its own way."
In the language of the flapper, the old monk
said a mouthful. Don't fret about the youth
of today,, they will come out all right or pay the
penalty and you are powerless to change them.
, "The present mode of life is much too artificial ; has too many fictitious passions—too much
ambition, pride and emulation, which keep men
in a constant state of excitement, producing
quarrels, despotism, immorality and crime."
The dear old monk in his cell was absolutely
right and yet the same sham prevails today.
"Follow reason and common sense. Rest
when you are weary; eat when you are hungry;
drink when you are thirsty. Pursue what is
most congenial to your inclinations and ability,
always subordinate to reason arid the laws and
usages of good society."
There it is; the few rules of the simple life
that will surely lead to health and peace of mind.
"A good cause makes a stout heart and a
strong arm."
That was Davy Crockett's motto: "Be sure
you're right then go ahead."
"A man, like a watch, is only to be valued
for his uniformity and regular goings."
By which the old monk meant be prompt, be
dependable, keep your promises and they will say
of you, "His word is as good as his bond."
Arrogance is a weed, produced from a dunghill."
There is a line that packs an awful wallop.
What right did the accident of birth or any other
circumstance give you to become arrogant?
"Anger is often more hurtful than what
caused it."
Guard your temper. "Whom the gods would
destroy, they first make mad," and many a stroke
of apoplexy has been caused by a violent temper.
And then the old monk closes his brief essay
with these lines, which you should commit to
memory:
"All happiness is in the mind. A good conscience is the best divinity extant."
You might read a whole volume on rules of
conduct and not get as much out of it as we
have given you in these few paragraphs.
UP-ISLAND ELEVEN
DEFEATED BY THE
ENGLISH TOURISTS
(Continued (rom Page One)
which Just tipped his Angers and rolled over the line tor the flrst goal.
Exactly 4 minutes after this reverse j
Joe Smith took a pass trom the center |
forward and scored one of the flnest
goals seen on the Island. After these
two set-backs the Up-Island team
went Into the game for a short time,
heavy checking being the order.
Jack Monaghan was making a great
cflort to get his wing going .and after
working the ball well down took a
shot at goal, the ball striking the post
with (!ale. the tourists' goalie, well
beaten. One more raid on the English
goal almost spelled disaster, Plump
and Strang becoming too anxious
when they only had Gale to beat, the
ball rolling harmlessly over the line
tor a goal kick. Shortly after Joe
Smith scored the visitors' third goal
with a lovely effort and Just before
the Anal whistle had a great penalty
shot stopped by Tait. Final score:
Tourists 3, Up-Island 0.
POINTED PARAGRAPHS
Why was Wilson chosen to play
against the English tourists after
programmes had been printed naming
Hltchens for thc outside left position?
• •   •
We wonder, after seeing last Saturday's game, how this eleven would
have stacked up against the visitors
from thc tight little Isle.
Tait, Anderson, Edmunds, Monaghan, McFarlane, Brake, Fowler,
Stobbart, Kenny, Plump, Hltchens.
Wc would at least have seen some
football.
ss     ss     •
Who said a baseball player makes
a good manager for a football team?
♦     *     ss
Rumor had tt on the streets of
Nanaimo last Saturday that Nell McFarlane refused to play unless Nelson Wilson was included ln the team.
• ♦   •
Jack Monaghan proved himself the
best right half In B. C. during last
Saturday's display.
• *   •
Edmunds played a whale of a game
also. If Fat would only place his
ball   to   better   advantage   he   sure
would be a dandy.
• .   .
Nanaimo, the best team In B.C. (?),
might not travel East tor the Connaught Cup. Other teams are going
strong at present.
Westminster 5, Sapperton 1.   Some
win!
Cumberland United Football Club
iB holding a monster Prize Drawing.
Have you got your ticket yet?
CAR for HIRE
At The Royal Candy Store
Or Phone 25
Residence Phone 22
See Geo. Mason
SPECIAL
NEW IMPROVED MODEL EUREKA
embodying the most recent improvements and refinements and equipped with the detachable sweep-action
brush for picking up threads, lint, ravelingg and other
surface litter.
$65.00
STANDARD SET OF ATTACHMENTS
consisting of 8-foot web covered hose, 30 inch extension tubing, 7 inch aluminum nozzlte with detachable upholstery brush, and radiator tool—
FREE
For Sale By
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a Vs-in.valve for uae on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Muni-
cipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
Cumberland
Special
Sale this
Week
40 inch French Crepes in shades
of Peach, Canary, Mustard and
White: value at $1.25 per yard.
Special Sale price d»-| QA
3 yards for  «pJL»»/U
Ladies Silk Lisle Hose in shades
of Beige, Bamboo, Dove, Black.
Special Sale price /I K/»
per pair  ~tOv
42 inch (good quality) Pillow
Slips; sale price, (j»-| AA
3 slips for  tplsAJU
Dress Ginghams & Chambrays,
Special values at QP-
3 yards for OtlC
Ladies' Undervests in Comfy
Cut and Opera Styles, in white,
pink, peach and mauve. Special
rt.81 $i.oo
Ladies' Bloomers in white, pink,
peach and mauve. Special for
this week at Eaft_f»
per pair  «JvfC
UNION   HOTEL
CDMBIBLAH*. W. C.
■XsMlUat ouUlne—
For reservation Fkoao 11.
Comfort ant  HoaolUu  ttrtUn.
II room, electrical.* kortot.
B. TATIA, Manager
DR. W. BRUCE GORDON
Dental Surgeon
Office Cor, ot Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
DINING ROOM
I Our Dining Room offers good food,
good service, reasonable charges.
[King George Hotel
TEACIIF.lt WANTED
WANTED—Applications wanted to All
a temporary vacancy on the staff of
the Cumberland Public School, for
one year. Preference will be given
to male applicants. Address applications to A. MacKinnon, Secretary
School Board, Cumberland, B. C.
26-27
AGENTS WANTED—AGENTS $600.00
.MONTHLY easy Belling MAGIC
OAS. $1.00 box equals 33 gallons
gasoline. Proven merits. Your
name on cans. 300% prollt. Write
quick. P. A. LEFEBVRE & CO..
Alexandria, Ont. lt.
BARRELS    FOR    SALE—Apply    at
McBryde's Bakery, Courtenay, B.C.
tfn
WANTED—Wc want cars. If you
have a car and need cash, write or
call B, C. Motor Exchange Ltd.,
1012 Fort St, Victoria, B.C.    t.f.n.
GAS
OILS
Henderson's Garage
FOR SERVICE
We handle Firestone Tires and have secured the sole
agency for Gutta Percha Tires.
Cylinder Honing and Repairs of all Description.
THIRD STREET, CUMBERLAND.
GAS OILS
m
E. L. SAUNDERS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear
■longer after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
MANN'S BAKERY
The home of high class cakes and pastries.
Large and varied selection.
Freshly baked daily.
APPLE, RAISIN, and PINEAPPLE PIES.
BUNS, BISCUITS, COOKIES, SCONES, etc.
Try some "Golden Brown Doughnuts" for Saturday's
dinner.   The kiddies like them.
Cream Rolls, Cream Cakes, etc., dainty looking and
delicious tasting.
Mann's Bakery
Phone 18
■J	
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
i
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C. FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE THREE
i
CHARLI
FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
June 25 and 26
m
A Dramatic Comedy written and directed by
Charles Chaplin
Also Weekly News
and Two Reel
Comedy
A Super Show
ADULTS, 50c.
CHILDREN, 25c.
De Luxe Shows at 7 and 9 nightly
at. the
LO-IL
THEATRE
Cumberland
IN
I TIIE        *
GOLD RUSH
"The Radio Detective"
CHAPTER XVIII
DANGER!
WHILE we were riding and calculating with the radio direction Under, some most exciting
events were preparing at Rockledge
in our absence.
Hank had vainly scoured the neighborhood over the telephone to locate
Ken.
Hank would have dispaired, but he
had a keen, crafty mind. He would
get at Ken through Ruth.
He tried the Blue Rooster. Not
there. Then he thought ot the Binnacle Inn. Sure enough, there Vira
Gerard, Glenn Buckley, Rae and Jack
Curtis were end with them was Ruth,
listening in. She had taken Laddie
along with her.
"Ruth," he lied excitedly, "don't tell
anybody. But And Ken. Tell him
that Dick has got a way of using the
radio on that Scooter and that If Ken
will listen In on the radio he will be
able to get word from Dick—perhaps
rescue him!"
Ruth was overjoyed. She left thc
telephone, made some hasty excuse to
the others, climbed lu her car with
Laddie and was off In a cloud of dust.
But lt was not an easy job to And
Ken. Ruth started out first to And
Craig and me. But wherever she
went she could And no trace of us.
After she had found Eagles' Nest In
a deserted condition she drove tn the
Radio Shack. . As she approached, it
looked deserted and she was full of
misgiving. But it was only for a
moment. Ken was right on the job
as guardian and came, on tbe run
from around the side of the shack.
Kello, Ruth," he called. "Anything new?"
'I should say there is Ken. I just
hail a message from Hank Hawkins.
He told me that he was sorry for
what he had done to everyone
and that he had heard that Dick
was on the Scooter and trying to get
in touch by wireless with some of us.
Don't you suppose you could get in
the shack, listen in? Maybe we might
pick up something."
"Why, yes. I have the key. We'll
try." Ken was so excited that he did
not even stop to doubt the sincerity
of any conversion on the part of
Hank. He selected one of Easterns
radio sets with which he was most
familiar. He began to twirl the dials.
It might have been perhaps half an
hour of patient waiting and adjusting
when Ken suddenly, twisting a knob,
heard his own name called from the
louH speaker.
"Ken!"
The boy started. Quickly he sharpened it up.
"I am Dick Gerard on the Scooter!
We are pulling into Bayles' shipyard.
Bring help. Please get Ken AdamB
at Rockledge, anybody who Is listening in, if Keu does not hear this himself. This is Dick Gerard. Tell him.
The Bayles coal docks—at once!"
Ken and Ruth were both almost beside themselves with excitement. To
them there was no question but that
this was Dick himself. To the best
of his ability, Ken sought to transmit. His message was, "I'll be there.
Dick!"
"We can't leave this place totally
unguarded." decided Ken. " Yet we
must go. I have It. We'll lock Laddie in. Here, Laddie, good boy. You
watch till we come back!"
A few moments later Ken and Ruth
were whizzing along to the old shipyard.
Little did they realize what it was
they were so blithely running into.
Hank, back home, was gloating over
his radio and his apparent success
In  fooling  his enemies.   Far to the
'East, Kennedy, Easton and myself
were painstakingly following the minute little direction finder.
In Bayles shipyard an evil-looking
old sailor had been detailed to stay
as the Scooter put to sea. His Instructions were to get Ken and hold
him for the gray racer. He hung
about, making friends with the very
toughest customers in case of need.
As for Dick, a long-distance eye
might have seen him on the deck of
the Scooter miles away—still a prisoner—and he was not. broadcasting
anything.
When the noon whistle blew the
men took their lunch boxes and then
sought out a shady spot on the docks.
Full of the urgency of their mission
Ken and Ruth pulled up at the shore
entrance to the coal dock. Under the
huge sign was another in red which
warned:
So Admittance!      ,
DANGER!
They parked the car and seeing no
one at the gate or about the dock
stealthily entered. Under the shelter
of the dock lay a small speed boat.
It was from this that the evil-faced
sailor and a couple of compulsions as
tough as himself were watching.
"There they come!"
The three stole stealthily down the
dock behind piles of lumber. The
dock was still deserted.
"Do you see anything of Dick?"
"No." replied Ruth. "But wc have
not been all over the place yet. Let's
go "
She never finished thc sentence.
Looming up before them suddenly
were thc three thugs. Ken and Ruth
did not hesitate. They turned and
Aed.
"Hey!    He's over here!"
Tbe call did not stop them.
# Over piles of lumber, about heaps
of coal, everywhere the Alght led.
"Here,  Ruth!    Quick!"
He pulled Ruth up with him and
they dropped quickly into a coal car.
crouching below the protecting sides.
The thugs dashed past, turned, and
started scouting about to pick up the
trail. Just then the one o'clock siren
blew.   The men   were on  the job.
The engine idling at the head of
tbe coal train puffed and snorted as
It moved the full cat ahead of Ken
and Ruth just enough to bring the
empty car in whicli they were hiding
undei* the range of the steam shovel.
The foreman raised his hand. The
huge steam shove! dipped into a big
pile of coal on the dock. The iron
jaws of tlie shovel hit into it. closed,
and the load was raising, dripping,
as tlle shovel swiveled over until lt
stopped directly over the heads of the
two luckless young folks crouched In
the coal car.
The saw the shadow, turned in horror to see the bucket directly overhead.
The engineer pulled his lever. Tons
of coal began dripping over their
heads.
"Help!    Stop!'
Ruth's scream was muffled by the
roar of the machinery and the rumble
of the deadly tons of coal that were
Just about to crush them lifeless.
(Continued  Next  Week)
Some authorities say tlmt bobbed
hair Is going nut. Parents Interviewed on the subject contend that
It's not ouly going out, but refusing
to come home at a reasonable hour.
*     *     ss
Hubby: "I miss the old cuspidor
since It's gone."       ,
Wifey: "You missed It before—that
is why it's gone."
ffrestotte
MOST MILES PER DOLLAR
A buying organization wjth ten separate
offices in tlie rubber growing centers of
the British and Dutch Colonies enable
Firestone to obtain the highest grade of
rubber and insures an adequate supply by
purchasing at the source of production.
See Sole Cumberland Agents:
HARLING &
LEDINGHAM
Cumberland.
^Summer V&cation
—ytith A thrill at Every Glanced
*ps
LOW EXCURSION
FARES EAST
On Sale Dally to September 15—Return
Limit, October 31
Alaska Jfca $90
Choice of Routes  and  Liberal Stop-Overs
£»
Canadian National Railways
III I'll    Ml   i,l    |     n| ll   '  i'l    ' 'I'lil—ll'llHII'IIJill'    ,'.N PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1926.
|   THE PUZZLE CORNER
Puzzle No. 140
Bllllughaus, the greengrocer, who
has a wonderful aptitude for mental
arithmetic, makes a point of selling
small or large quantities at the same
CUNARD
ANCHOR
ftNCHOH-OONALO'sON
CANADIAN HKItriCi:
FROM MONTREAL
To Plvmouth-Cherbourg-Loiulon
Ausonia July 3.        Alaunla July 10
To Liverpool
Aurunia July 2, 30, Aug. 27.
To Belfast Md Glaogow
Athenia July 9, Aug. G.
FROM NEW YORK
Tn Queeiistown and Liverpool
Frunconia July 3.     Samaria July 10
To Cherbourg and Southampton
Aqultania July 7, Aug. 4, 24, Sept. 15.
Berengarla July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 1.
•Mauretania July 21, Aug. 18, Sept. 8
To Londonderry and Glasgow
Caledonia July 3, Cameronla July 17
To I'ljmouth-lIavre-London
Carmania July 7.     Tuscania July 17
To I'lymonth-ClierhouiTr.Hnmhnrg.
Andania July 31, Sept. 2, Oct. 7.
FROM BOSTON
To Queeiistown and Liverpool
Samaria July 11.       Laoonia July 25
•Calls at Plymouth, Eastbound.
Money orders, drafts and Travellers'
Cheques at lowest rates. Full information from local agents or Company's
Offices, 622 Hastings St. W., Vancouver. B. C.
price, which leads occasionally to
some interesting, although simple,
problems. Can you tell the price of
sugar and flour when he Bells one
customer eight pounds of sugar and
three of flour for 61 cents, while to
little Maggie he gave live pounds ot
each for 50 cents?
Puzzle No. 141
Remove the flrst letter from a grain
and leave a word which signifies high
temperature. Behead once more and
leave a word meaning to consume.
. Remove the flrst letter from a word
meaning "in that place" and leave a
i word meaning  "in  this  place."   Be-
I head  once  more and  leave  a  word
i meaning previously.
I Remove the flrst letter from a word
meaning Shoal and leave a word that
means consecrate; behead again and
' leave to concede.
I Behead an animal and leave a cereal; behead again and leave a word
signifying occupancy of exact position.
Behead a word meaning fragile and
leave a wooden bar; behead again
and leave a complaint.
|    Behead a wild animal and leave one
The "GEM"
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber k Hairdresser
Ladles' hair cut, any atyla BOc
Children's hair cut any style 35<
llllllllllllllllllllllll
llllllllllllllllllllllll
FIFTY TELEPHONE
EXCHANGES
The B. C. Telephone Company now operates
more than fifty telephone exchanges, serving ninety
thousand telephones.
B. C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
■IK
domesticated; behead again and leave
a number.
Behead'a word meaning to reside
and leave a hole ln the earth; behead
again and leave a measure of length.
.   .   .
Puzzle No. 142
The blanks in each of the following
sentences are to be filled by placing
in the flrst space a word, which decapitated and placed ln the next
space, will make the sentence entire:
If the children  ghost stories,
the nurse should cease to them.
The  heavy     came  over  the
hill with the last   of the sinking sun.
In a pleasant   the little stationer exchanged a   of paper
for a pot of gold.
It was   to see the stout burgomaster   down the hill.
The  physician  accidentally  epilled
his       upon  the      after
which his patient speedily recovered.
Ot the flowers I most admire
the beautiful 	
ss     *     •
Puzzle No. 143
To show how little the patrons of
the turf know about the theory of
odds as practiced at the race track
let readers seek a solution to the following elementary problem: If the
odds are 7 to 3 against Apple Pie and
6 to 6 against Bumble Bee, what
should be the odds against the
famous running horse Cucumber, the
other contender?
•   *   *
Puzzle No. 144
Take a Civil War general, subtract
an Insect, add a mild stimulant, add
a nibbler, subtract Yale's football
players, and the resulting letters will
spell GROUSE.
Additional puzzles, as well as the
answers to the foregoing, will appear
in this column next week.
*   •   *
Answers to Last Week's Puzzles
No. 136—The mountains were Hccla
Abro, St. Helen, Ellas, Snowdon,
Washington Hooker, Hermon, Hood,
Everest.
No. 136—Chief, Said, .Maid, Ruin.
Pain, Paint, Patient.
No. 137 — Profitable, Alternative,
Handled, About.
I    No. 138—In the race between the
hare and the tortoise the length of
the track makes  no difference.   The
'.tortoise had one-eighth start and has
{run 4.25 times as fast as the hare up
! to the time they meet, and as the hare
[has  five-sixths yet to  run  5  x  4.25
I equals 21.25 as fast as he went before,  but as  the question  said  how
1 much   faster,   we  will  say   thut   the
answer should be 20.25 plus faster to
win.   It being clear that 20.25 would
.only tie the race, he must go a little
'over to win.
I No. 139—TEA plus MANTEL minus
TEAM plUB OPERA plus TAPE minus
RAT minus APE equals ANTELOPE.
CANADIAN BRIEFS
BEST GROCERIES
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES
The select quality of our
Groceries is sure to keep that
smile of satisfaction glowing
on hubby'a face.
OUR LOW PRICES WILL
MAKE YOU SMILE, TOO!
FRELONE'S
GROCERYSTORE
Cor. 6th and Dunsmuir.
Phone 122 Cumberland
MY GARDEN
If twenty kings should ask of me
The favor of my property,
All things should go except this one—
My garden drinking in the sun.
Four walls and comfort I'd resign
If hollyhocks might still be mine.
Spiraea would be wealth indeed.
Though   food   and   clothing   I   might
need.
In beds of asters 1 might lie,
Considering tha Junetime sky.
Beneath a grapevine I would  creep
As winds of Yule began to sweep.
The earnings of the year  I'd  spare
To hold secure my roses fair,
And face with cheer a pilgrim's plight
To keep my pansies dewy-bright.
But   what    I'm    saying—beg    your
pardon—
Is simply this, I love my garden!
Thomas Curtis Clark.
P.P. Harrison, M.L.A.
Barrister, Solicitor,
Notary Public
Main Office
Courtenay           Phone  258
Local Office
Cumberland Hotel ln Evenings.
Telephone  115R or  24
TREES ON THE PRAIRIES
The staff of the Dominion Forestry
farm at Sutherland. Sask., bas been
busy shipping baby trees destined to
become pleasant groves of shelter in
nearly 3,000 places in the prairie
provinces. The demand for this free
service afforded hy the Department
of Agriculture fluctuates with the
years, according to farming condi-
[ lions and settlers' movements. Up to
the fall of 1923 the Sutherland station iiad shipped, since its inception,
oyer 17,000,000 trees. For 1924 the
toal wns 2,000,500, while In 1925 it
was about the sume number. This
year 3,355.000 were shipped.
*     ss     ss
MORE I.AMI-lllVKltS FROM I.S.
Twenty-tsvo prospective land-buyers and home seekers from Omaha,
Nebraska, arrived in Winnipeg just
recently enroute to Easton, Sask.
These men are all successful farmers
and slock raisers and the total combined capital which they are prepared
to invest in Western Canada, if conditions are to their liking, represents
a very considerable sum. The party
is one of a number which have been
and will he brought to Canada by the
Canadian National Railways Colonization and Land Settlement Department during tlie year and they represent the type of agriculturalist who
has bad long experience under conditions similar to those obtaining in
the section where tbey contemplate
settling and who, in addition, has
suflicient capital to commence farming of an intensive character.
At the present time the National
system la tlie only organization seeking to attract this desirable type of
settler from the United States by
means of personally conducted tours
which permit tlie prospective buyer
to sec for himself what the country
has to offer.   The success of tho plan
Is evident from the fact that of the
last, party of 34 farmers taken to
Eston last month, seventy-five per
cent have already purchased land In
that territory and have either moved
there with their families and equipment or are preparing to do so.
For the present efforts are being
concentrated largely upon central
Saskatche .van, where conditions resemble more closely those with which
these United States farmers have
heen acquainted aud It is believed
that before tlie end of the year a
large number of experienced mixed
farmers with their families v.;IU have
entered this district from the United
States.
RECIPES FOR MILK DRINKS
'    It Is universally known thnt milk,
| besides being a refreshing drink ls a
j very    valuahle    food,   supplying the
j necessary  elements  for  growth  and
I health tn an easily digestible form.
j Unfortunately, many adults and some
i children have a distaste for milk In
| its natural state.   The Dominion De-
i partment of Agriculture has just Is-
j sued a Bmall circular distributed free
j by  its  Publication   Branch,   Ottawa,
which gives a number of recipes for
milk drinks to suit any taste.   They
are easy to prepare, delicious and refreshing.   In making them, ordinary
household  flavoring  extracts,  spices,
juices from fresh or canned fruits, or
fruit syrups may be used; soda water
may or tnay not be  added.     These
recipes will he especially valuahle In
the case of children who have a fancied dislike for milk and for invalids
whose food consists mainly of liquids,
and who would relish a change in the
flavor  and  appearance  of  the  milk
they drink.
21 TELEPHONE 100
TAXI
ASK FOR CHARLIE DALTON
Car   leaves   Cumberland   Hotel
at 9:00 a.m. every Sunday and
meets   boat at  Union  Bay.
Twenty-five yenrs ago it was beneath the dignity of scientists to work
with poultry. To-day they are working on diseases, nutrition, genetics,
etc., and many world famous scientists and Investigators will be at
Ottawa July 27th to August 4th, 1927,
attending the World's Poultry Congress.
JOHN INGLIS
The Practical White Tailor
! 131R —PHONE— 1S1R
i COURTENAY, B. C.
AH Roads Lead To
Courtenay
DOMINION
July 1st.
1926
DAY
July 1st.
1926
COURTENAY'S
Annual Celebration
Under auspices of Native Sons of Canada, Assembly No. 3
Monster Parade leaves the School Grounds at 10:00 a.m. sharp.
Crowning of the Dominion Queen, Miss Muriel Leighton, at the Baseball
Park, at 11:00 o'clock.
Good Prizes given for the Best Decorated Float, Best Decorated Car and
Best Comic Group in Parade; also for best display from Courtenay
and Cumberland Schools and t'or best display from rural schools.
A Full Afternoon's Programme of
Field Sports, Base Ball, Horse Racing
Refreshment and Lunch Counter on the Grounds
TWO BANDS IN ATTENDANCE
Admission to Grounds:—Adults BOc; School Children Free
Big Novelty Dance
9:00 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., at Royston Imperial Pavilion
Two Orchestras.        Continuous Dancing.      Gents $1.25; Ladies 50c.
BOXING, July 1st t
A£S1 STADIUM, c-55r
Main Event-8 Rounds
ROY CLIFFE versus OLE ANDERSON
175 Ibt 1961b*
Semi-Final, 6 rds., 165 lbs.
ERNIE WOODLEY
(Victoria)  vs.
EDDIE GROSS
(Seattle)
Special 4 rounds, 142 lb*.
HAROLD JONES    •
(Cumberland) vs.
KID SULLIVAN
(I. T. Camp, Campbell River).
WING HAY
(Port Alberni)   vs.
WILLIE TOWNSEND
(Vancouver)
SIDNEY WILLIAMS
(Courtenay)  vs.
LEN WOODLEY
(Victoria)
HOWARD McQUINN
(Camp 3)  vs.
JACK McQUINN
(Camp 3)
—Admission—■
$3.30,   $2.20,   $1.65
Show starts 6:30 sharp
Band in
attendance FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1921.
THE CU-sWE-ELANP ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.
C.
PAGE FIVE
News of Courtenay and District
Mayor McKenzie
Making Progress
Towards Recovery
COURTENAY, June 23.—The five
aldermen present at Monday night's
regular Council meeting were Messrs.
Theed Pearse, F. Fleld, Wm. Fielder.,
and Wm. Douglas, with Alderman E.
L. MacDonald, acting Mayor, presld-
• Ing. Mayor McKenzie, who has been
undergoing operations in the Vancouver General Hospital, ls reported
to he . making satisfactory progress.
The other absentee wtr Aid. E. Lloyd
who is tn Vancouver on business.
Among the communications was a
letter from the Public Works Engineer, which quoted extracts from the
order-tn-councll relative to vehicular
traffic coming to a stop, when approaching the Island Highway, and
pointing out that such regulations
are applicable to the highway approaches ln Courtenay.
Aid. Douglas, ln his report as chairman of the Works committee, showed
that the programme for the year's
board sidewalk construction had now
been carried to completion. In this
connection lt ls interesting to note
that very decided improvements have
been made, which will be even more
conspicuous when the wet weather
again sets ln. A report was sub
mltted by Dr. T. L. Butters, city medical health officer, included in which
was a matter of certain oSendlng
city drains and the parties effected
had been notified to clean up. which
had been duly done.
The best news to the residents of
the city, perhaps, is the council's decision to take advantage of the presence of tbe Provincial Government's
tar and asphalt machinery, which has
A now reached the Island Highway at
this point, to hard surface other
streets within the city. The many
residents of the Lake Trail section
will be delighted to know that this
road ls to be treated as far as the
E. A N. crossing; but will ne doubt
regret that this work is not to be
done as far as the city limit on this
much used road. Other short stretches of city streets in the hard surfacing programme are Judson Street
from Union to the Creamlery. and
Isobel Street as far as the Post Office.
Alderman Pearse gave notice of his
Intention to bring in a by-law that
would prohibit the parking of cars
within certain areas In the city.
The weekly report from the Provincial Police showing favorable conditions prevailing, was approved by
the council. During the week the
speed regulations in the vicinity of
the Public school had been specially
enforced and several car drivers apprehended. There Ib no doubt that
theae regulations should be observed
at all times, but the beginning, rather
than the end of the school term perhaps would be a more appropriate
time for special attention thereto.
The matter of advertising the district in conjunction with the Courtenay-Comox Board ot Trade was discussed and it was decided that the
city contribute the sum of fifty dollars toward getting out a pamphlet
for this purpose. The council adjourned at eleven-thirty p.m.
CAMPBELL RIVER
PERSONAL NOTES
i
SEALED tenders, addressed to the
undersigned and endorsed "Tender
for dredging, Courtenay River, B.C.,"
will be received until IS o'clock noon
(dajrllKht  saving), Wednesday, Jane
Tenders will not be considered unless made on the forms supplied by
the Department and ln accordance
with the conditions set forth therein.
Combined specification and form of
tender can be obtained on application
to the undersigned, also at the office
of the District Engineer, Post Office
Building, Victoria, B.C.
Tenders must include the towing of
the plant to and from the work.
The dredges and other plant which
are Intended to be used on the work
shall have been duly registered in
Canada at the time of the filing ot
the tender with the Department, or
shall have been built In Canada after
the filing of the tender.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, for 6 per
cent of the contract price, but no
cheque to be tor les% than fifteen
hundred dollars. Bonds of the Dominion of Canada and bondB of the
Canadian National Railway Company
will ho accepteed as security, or bonds
and a cheque if required to make up
an odd amount.
By order,
S. E. O'BRIEN.
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, June 11, J926. !'■
CAMPBELL RIVER, June 23.—Mr.
and Mrs. S. Dawson are receiving
congratulations on the birth of a baby
boy on Friday, June 18th.
Mrs. M. Morrison, ot Campbelton,
is at present visiting with friends at
Vancouver.
I Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Painter are receiving congratulations on the birth
of a baby girl, Friday, June 18th.
The many friends of Rupbert Fitzgerald, Campbelton, will be sorry to
learn of his recent illness. He ls at
present In St. Joseph's Hospital, at
Comox. Mr. Fitzgerald underwent a
serious operation on Saturday and Is
unfortunately still in a very critical
condition. •
Mr. and Mrs. Fortune Salvall received a baby girl on June 11th, at
St. Paul's Hospital at Vancouver.
Mr. Norman Stewart, of Vancouver,
was a guest at the Willows Hotel for
a few days during the week.
Mr. Frank Cross of the C. R. Trading Store paid a short visit to Vancouver recently. Mrs. Cross has
taken up her new residence at Campbell River.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Callon, of Valdez
Island received a baby girl on June
7 th at the Lourdes Hospital, Campbell River.
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bickle, of Cumberland, paid a short visit to Campbell River on Sunday last.
Miss Elin Thulin left Thursday
morning for a month's vacation.
Mr. Cecil Fitzgerald, ot Alert Bay,
Is at present visiting with his parents
at Campbelton.
The following are a few names that
were registered at Forbes Landing
during the week: Dr. and Mrs. and
Miss Barbara Booth, St. Helena, Cal.;
Mr. and Mrs. W. Sink, Cloverdale,
Cal.; Mrs. Lydia Sprugue, Yakima,
Wash,; Mrs. Sameral Multln, Seattle;
Mr. and Mrs. Donald, Chlmaencis; Mr.
and Mrs. W. Bruce Hibberson. Victoria. '
Mr. J. Whitehead paid a few days
visit to Campbell River . while en
route North.
Cards of merit were presented to
the pupils of Oyster Bay School as
follows: regularity and punctuality,
Jennie McGlmpsey; deportment, Martha Storle; proficiency, Elizabeth McGlmpsey. Three other pupils were
successful in obtaining McLean writing certificates, being Elizabeth McGlmpsey, Margaret McGlmpsey and
Martha Storle.
Mrs. Duncan and daughter Betty,
of Grantham, are visiting Mrs. Wm.
Storie.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Hugh Mann have
left Oyster Bay and are moving, to
Bevan.
Miss Madeline Swan, teacher of the
OyBter Bay School, has returned to
her home at Sandwick.
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Cobb, of the
International Timber Co., are receiving congratulations on the birth
of a baby daughter.
A number of Indians of the surrounding district left Friday morning
for River Inlet where they will spend
the season fishing for the northern
canneries.
MISCELLANEOUS    SHOWER
FOR BRIDE-TO-BE
On Wednesday, June 16th, Mrs. W.
Woods gave a whist drive and miscellaneous shower in honor of Miss
Iris Treen, who ls shortly to he married. Mrs. Treen kindly loaned her
home for the occasion1 and the rooms
were tastefully decorated with scarlet roses and ferns. During the first
part of the evening whist was indulged in, Mrs, King and Mrs. Gibson
winning the prizes. The guests then
assembled in one room and Miss
Sheppard carried ln a large basket
beatuifully decorated and laden with
handsome and useful presents, which
showed the high esteem tn which the
bride-elect is held. A very excellent
and dainty tea was served and the
dest of the evening was spent wltb
music, ending with "For She's a Jolly
Good Fellow.''
for a plant t'or treathg the ores from
small British Columbia mines along
the coast is Uie objective behind H. 1.1.
Thomson's recent purchase of tlie
Ladysmith smelter, stated the new-
owner on his arrival in Vancouver today on business. The plant will not
be operated as a .smelter he said, exhaustive studies being now in progress wth a view to utilizing the very
latest principles in chemical treatment
of ores as being adopted by the chief
plants throughout the continent. This
will necessitate many clinnges In the
equipment ot* (he Ladysmith plant and
It would be several months before ore
cau be accepted.
If
LADYSMITH PLANT
NEEDS MANY CHANGES
VANCOUVER,  June   22:—Provision
 t, ;—
r mothers
Send for the
free booklets on
ttie care and #
feeding of babies.
73cn/e4ii
EAGLE BRAND
Condensed Milk
The Borden Co., Limited
VANCOUVER 21.26
Used Cars
easy terms
FULLY GUARANTEED
OVERLAND "4"
Full baloon tires all new, late model
$525
$525
$250
$250
$100
See them at
Pidcock & McKenzie
CHEVROLET TOURING
New tires, late model 	
CHEVROLET TOURING
Good tires, perfect condition
FORD TOURING, mechanically Al
One of the best models, new tires .
FORD TOURING,
At a give away price of	
Phone 25
I'hone 25
Courtenay
Agents for
DODGE BROS.,  STUDEBAKER,  STAR CARS
QUALITY
WE HAVE A REPUTATION FOR QUALITY
Try our Layer Cakes, they are lovely
PURCHASE YOUR BREAD AND CAKES FROM
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
AND TEA ROOMS
The White Store
First-class Certificates for Bread, Cake, Confectionery
Courtenay, B. C.
=•&
PREVENT
FOREST
FIRES
YOU   CAN
HELP
B.C. FOREST SERVICE
Lumber
In every sorts »f building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOOM,
BHIN81.BS,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    rURNUHINa*
\VB DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE  WITH REASONABLE CHARGES
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
(Nlskt Mile: 1I4X Courtenay
|OfflH: 111 Cumberland PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1926.
The Days for bathing are here,
and to enjoy the pleasure to the
full you want a smart new all-
wool bathing suit, one that will
fit snugly and look smart. See
our new line of all-wool bathing
suits, special at   $3.95
HATCHWAY COMBINATIONS
For real comfort these hot days
every man should invest in a
couple of Hatchway Garments.
They sure are cumfy and cool,
no buttons to annoy, a pleasure
to wear and the price is, per
garment, only   $1.50
LIGHT TWEED SUITS
We have some good wearing
suits, made in the cloths that
appeal and will look good, as
well as cool. A suit that will
give you extra good satisfaction
for your investment.   Price
$22.50
Sutherland'
CUMBERLAND
HOME COOKING SALE
TO AID CITY BAND
Personal Mention
Mr. H. E. Murray left this afternoon
for Victoria where he will spend a
few days prior to taking up tbe sunt'
mer course at the University of B. C.
*   .   .
Mr. Douglas Sutherland, student at
the Dental College, Portland, Ore.,
arrived in Cumberland last Monday
and will spend the holidays with his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Sutherland, at Royston Beach.
ss     ss     ss
Dr. and Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton
and family left Tuesday for Victoria
where the Doctor will attend the
Dominion Medical convention.
ss     ss     ss
Miss K. Richardson Ifet for Victoria today and will cross over to
Vancouver where she will take treatment In the Vancouver General Hospital for a minor ailment.
Mr.   and   Mrs.  A,   MacKinnon   and
family are now living at their summer camp, Royston Beach, the change
being made last Monday.
*   •   •    '
Jock Clarke, inside right of the
Nanaimo team, who was picked to
play ln that position against the
English tourists, was taken to the
General Hospital at Nanaimo on Wednesday night, apparently suffering
from appendicitis.
s.     *     ss
Mr. and Mrs. Basil Llttley and Ml*.
and Mrs. Walter Sykes, who have
been visiting their sister, Mrs. Jam"s
Quinn, have returned to their home
at Corbln, B. C.
8
Under the auspices of the Cumberland City Band, a sale of home cooking will be held Saturday afternoon,
June 26th from 3 to 6 p.m. In the
Vendome Block, Dunsmuir Avenue.
Ice cream will' also be sold. It is
hoped that the sale will be well
attended as the Band ls an asset to
the city aud as such should be supported as much as possible. Any
donations will be gratefully accepted
.^a
AS an example of the
• values of Monarch-Knit
Hosiery presents at every
price from 73c to £2.00, take
Monarch Green Stripe at fl.
Made of pure silk, for the
shttn and smoothness women love—reinforced with
fibre silk, for long tenice.
Every newest color. And
"runs" that start never show
—the Green Stripe, or the
second "stop run" a few
inches below, stops them.
Double safety.
MONARCHCREENSnupE
^
HOSIERY
HMdOfflct
KNarr
Dunnville, Ont-
m
SYNOPSIS OF
UND ACT AMENDMENT
NOTICE
A mass meeting of the employees
of the Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.,
will be held in the Athletic Hall,
Cumberland, on Sunday, June 27th, at
10:30 a.m.
Business—The Picnic, (and to receive the committee's report), and
make arrangements for same.
Signed:    Agreement Committee.
Gtinjberlaqd
J Co mm ere i i
SHcidquirur*
Rate*
Heiionible jj
t, Hotel
ACCOMMODATION THE BEST
Rooms Steam Heated
W. MERRIFIELD, Prop,
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fiah
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY   AND  SERVICE"
W. P. Symona
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring Intention
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies ot
which can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing the Department ot
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which Is not timber-
land, I.e., carrying over 6,000 board
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied tor
ls situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
live years and improvements made
to value ot $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
Por more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being ttmberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land is J5
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands in given ln Bullet'n
No. 10, Land Series. "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may he purchased or leased, the con-
di.lons Including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acreB, may be leased as homeBltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the flrst year, title being
obtained after residence and Improvement conditions ure fulfilled and
land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or •
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available tor settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
Proprietor head.
DUNSMUIR AVE. HOME
TO BE SCENE OF TENNIS
TEA NEXT WEDNESDAY
The weekly afternoon tea under the
auspices of the Cumberland Tennis
Club will he held from 3 tp 6 o'clock
next Wednesday afternoon „ oil the
beautiful and spacious lawn at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Edward W.
Bickle, Dunsmuir Avenue, and. given
fine weather will prove one .of the
outstanding social events of the season. These teas are proving more
popular as the weeks go by and are
the means of keeping the players tn
touch as well as augmenting the finances of the Club, the executive of
which is endeavoring to redeem a
number of outstanding bonds: They
wish It to be understood that the teas
are not for members alone; anyone
interested may attend nnd is  urged
Paper |Town Talkj
POWELL RIVER, June 22.—This
has been a week fraught with anxiety; a week in which so much of
importance has happened that your
correspondent would err if he were
to overlook the fact that installation
of the machinery ln the new wing of
the big paper mill is complete. Not
since the Inception of the construction ot the original plant has there
been so much dependent on the judgment of the directors of the Powell
River Company and the engineers
they have employed as the operation
of the new wing of the big paper mill,
construction of which has been under
way for the past six months. This
week "she" was turned over and wttn
a few minor adjustments that nny industrial machinery of the magnitude
of the Powell River Company might
need, she is ready to go.
Construction of buildings and the
assembling of machinery may be
judged from the fact that at the beginning of the year there were one
thousand men employed by the contractors whereas to-day there are
only one hundred and twenty-live.
About the first of July paper will be
made In the new addition to the mill
and this means something for there
will be needed some three or four
hundred paper mill operatives and It
ls understood that many of these, with
experienc, are to be Imported Into the
Province from Eastern Canada; these
men are coming to British Columbia
with a knowledge of paper making
gained trom years of experience ln
the industry and our Pacific Province
will reap the benefit of the coming
of these skilled artisans. In the development of the plant of the Powell
River Company there is something
of which Comoxlans may justly feel
proud. This plant Is, forgetting political division of the District, In Comox.
The time will come when a daily
steamship service will make Powell
River and Comox Valley are real
neighbors.
Iu this connection It is only necessary to mention that last Sunday
afternoon as passengers on the Charmer were Bob Lang and his protege,
Norman Hill. Well, Bob was keeping
his promise to llie boy, as he keeps
his promise in every other respect.
They arrived at Powell River on Sunday last at four-thirty and after a
survey ot the hlg water dam were
shown through the plant by Mr. Thoi.
McQulgan, of the firm of McQuigan
Bros., general merchants, of Michigan,
the thriving suburb ot Powell River.
Bob and the youngster were amazed
at the magnitude ot the plant. This
ls a real town where everybody ls on
his toes and where prosperity is
noticeable the moment one steps off
the boat.
Motorists!!
OUR AMBER HORN RIMMED GOGGLES ARE
JUST THE THING FOR YOU TO USE ON SUNNY
DAYS. THEY ALSO PROTECT THE EYES FROM
THE GLARE OF HEADLIGHTS AT NIGHT.
75c
TO
$1.00
CREAM OF LILIES
LANG'S CREAM OF LILIES CURES SUNBURN
AND WHITENS THE SKIN
Per bottle     CA.^     Per bottle
50c
Lang's Drug Store
The Rexall-Kodak Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
See Charlie Chaplin in "The Gold Rush"
SATURDAY  SPECIALS
MEAT PIES ASSORTED PASTRY
BUTTER HORNS
Apple, Lemon and Pineapple Pies
Marocchi Bros.
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Try our Cracked Wheat Loaf
to do so. In addition to the afternoon tea, Ice cream will be sold next
Wednesday. j
Last week's tea, given by Mr. and
Mrs. A. R. Stacey on the lawn and
verandah at the home of Dr. and Mrs.
MacNaughton, wns an outstanding
success, an extremely large attendance being recorded. The weather
was all that could be desired. I
One of the Principals in the
July 1st Cliffe-Anderson Fight
Cumberland Supply Store
Rickson's Old Stand
Dunsmur Avenue
Blue Ribbon cTa, per pound   7»c
Braid's "Best" Tea, per pound Mc
A splendid Bulk Tea, per pound   «."■<•
Wedding  Breakfast   Coffee,   per  pound     JOr
Fresh Ground Cofl'ee, per pound      59c
IT WILL PAX YOI' TO PAY U8-KOR YOl'R (.HOC EHIES
Quaker Tomatoes, 2's, per tin  *  lie
Quaker Tomatoes, 2  1-2's, por tin    Mc
St. Charles Milk,  tails, per  can    12c
St. Chav^es Milk, "baby" size, 3 for   l»c
Quaker Corn, per can  Hi'.   Quaker peas, per can   17c
Horse Shoe Salmon,  1-2's, 2 for   Isle
Date Butter, Ideal for plcnls, per glasB  SSc
IK YOU HAD A HOLE IN YOl'R POCKET AND LOST
MONEY. WHAT WOULD YOI' 1101
Canadian  Cheese  per  pound     80c
Brookfleld CheeBe In 1-2 pound packets, 2 for  4fte
Kraft Cheese  In   1-2 pound  pacets   :.... 45c
Vancouver Creamery  Butter, 2 pounds for   88e
Brookfleld Butter, per  pound    40c
Local Ranch Butter per pound 40c
YOI! WOl'LK STOP THE LEAK-DO THE SAME WITH
VOIR (IROCEKY RILL
5 Roses Flour, 49 pound sack  $2.75
Royal Standard Flour, 49 pound sack    8.7f>
Best  Cane  Sugar,   20   pounds     1.4ft
Comox Whole Wheal  Flour,  10  pound sack     Af}
Pastry Flour, 10 pound sack     .8ft
Thursday, July 1st, Is a Dominion Holiday.   For the convenience of our City nnd Country customers we  shall  be open
Wednesday afternoon, closing at 5:30.
(iOOII QUALITY PAIR PRICES PROMPT SERVICE
JACK DEMPSEY AND ROY CLIFFE
A "WHISKY OF QUALITY"
MATURED IN CHARRED
OAK CASKS
THE ONLY METHOD BY WHICH "QUALITY"
CAN BE IMPARTED
Whisky
EgaBeas
jiBB^Bg

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