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The Cumberland Islander Jan 17, 1925

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Array TH^SiJMBERLAND ISLANDER
With wblcb ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-FOURTH YEAR—No. 3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA      FRIDAY, JANUARY  IC,  1925.
p§*5BfiS> SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
C. J. PARNHAM IN FOR THIRD TERM
PAT. MULLEN
HAS MAJORITY
OF 4-ELECTED
Old Timers'
Reunion & Dance
Grand Affair
MORDY AND DALLOS ARE
SNOWED UNDER
Although Election Day, not
much excitement prevailed in
Cumberland yesterday as the
registered voters of the city
quietly wended their way to the
polling station at the City Hall.
For Mayor, Charles J. Parnham
was unopposed, like wise Donald
Robert MacDonald was unopposed as Police Commissioner.
New blood appeared on the
scene for Aldermanic honors,
making a total of eight candidates in the running. Of these
Patrick Mullen headed the poll
with a majority of only four
votes. The complete contest is
as follows:
For Aldermen
Mullen, Patrick, elected    94
Potter, J. John    90
Maxwell, Alex    89
Mumford, T. H    S5
Ledingham, J    82
Jeffrey, Alf. E    68
Mordy, Thos. defeated    47
Dallos, Frank, defeated    35
Total 590
By. a new ruling, the first
three mentioned will serve for a
term of two years, while the latter three will hold office for only
one year.
DATE OF BEER
LICENSES IS NOT
CERTAIN AS YET
VICTORIA,—A good deal of mystery surrounds the issuance of the
new beer licenses and little information can he gained here from the ni-
torney-generale department with regard to the time when the sale of beer
by the glass In licensed premises will
commence. Hon. Mr. Manson states
emphatically that "everything ls being left in the hands of the new liquor
commissioner,  Mr.  Hugh  Davidson."
However, It Ib expected that the new
licenses will be issued ln about a
month. The new regulations will he
considered by the executive council
today and will be gazetted next week.
According to the provincial law, ap-
llcanta must advertise their applications In the newspapers for one month.
After returning from Vancouver,
Attorney-General Manson stated that
the "misunderstanding between the
provincial police and the Vancouver
force had been smoothed over and forgotten."
COURTENAY, Jan. 10.—The Old
Timers' Reunion and Dance which
has came to be an annual affair, and one of the largest events of
Its knld ln the Comox Valley, was
more successful this year than ever
before. The general committe was
composed of Messrs. J. N. McLeod,
Dave Roy, E. A. Embleton and Harry
Radford. Invitations were issued to
all those wbo have lived in the Comox
Valley or district for forty years or
more and the number of these invitations amounted to over two hundred and fifty. Seven hunderd participated in the gathering which was
held in the Gaiety Theatre.
The supper room of the theatre waa
kept very busy for three and a half
hours during which time over six
hundred people were served. The
catering was In the hans of the local
assembly of Native Daughters and
was handled with great credit to them
Old time dances were in order until
midnight, in fact, it was generally
understood that the Old Timers had
the floor until that hour. An excellent orchestra composed of real
old timers Included Messrs John Baird
Dave Roy and Harry Murdock, assisted by Mr. Les Moody wbo performed
in the absence of Mr. Polo Monte. Mr.
Isaac Parkin acted as floor manager
for the evening, which position he fulfilled admirably. Tbe feature of the
evening waa the Grand March. This
was led by the oldest of the Old Timers present who, on this occasion
were Mr. Robert Swan of Denman Island, himself over eighty years of
age and a resident of the district for
well over half a century. He was
partnered by iMrs. Thos. Plerc. another well known pioneer resident.
The hall was splendidly decorated
for the occasion by Messrs A. H. Herd
W. I. Hagarty and W. Shannon who
formed the committee for this purpose. During the evening short
speeches were delivered by Messrs
Robert Swan, William Duncan and J.
B. Holmes. These addresses were
received in the heartiest possible man
ner. A clever step dance by Mr.
Harry Black hall entertained the large
assembly and was much appreciated.
The whole affair was under the
auspices of the local Assembly No. 2
Native Sons of Canada. Mr. Alex
Cleland wbo ls the president of this
organization, acted as chairman for
tbe evening.
Soon after midnight the older folk
commenced to wend their way home
Some, however, stayed for the finish
and were rewarded by participating
in one of the most enjoyable nights of
tbelr lives. Real old-time hours were
observed, dancing continuing trom
eight P-m. to four a.m.
COURTENAY COUNCIL
WILL CHOOSE THEIR
MAYOR FOR 1925
Results Of
Foootball Meet
In Nanaimo
Literary And
Athletic Assn.
Annual Banquet
The annual banquet of the Cumberland Literary Association was held lu
the Cumberland Hotel last Saturday
evening. The honored guests were
the Board of Management and Committee men of the Association, the
banquet being given lu npiiicclatlon
of Ihe Bplemlid work done by these
men ln the past.
Thc table was set to thc shape of
thc letler "L". With a splendid
menu, good service, aud a Jovially efficient toaslmaster In the person of
Mr. RoLert Strachan, the success of
the banquet was' assured from Ihe
Blart. Many toast woro proposed.
encli receiving an enthusiastic re-
spouse.
Musical Program
An excellent program was provided
during the evening ln which the principal artists were Messrs. Gallagher,
Thomas. .Morris, Goodali and Jackson,
each rendering splendid vocnl and instrumental Kelcctlons. Mr. Gallagher delighter the aifdlence by a most
appropriate and effective selection of
songs.
In the early hours ot the morning
the parly disbanded, bringing to a
close one of the most enjoyable events
In the history of tho association.
UNION BAY NOTES
Mr. A. Matheson returned to Union
Bay on Friday, after a Bhort visit to
Ladysmith.
Miss Fraser ond her sister, Mrs.
Baird, returned from Victoria on Saturday.
■ Mr. Anderson, of Vancouver, arrived
here on Saturday to soeud a visit wilh
his son, Mr. E. Anderson.
Miss Sherburn of Cobble Hill arrived here on Friday, and Is staying
with her brother Mr. H. Sherburn.
Mr. W. Bird and his two children
left here for Vancouver on Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. N. Nelson returned on
Thursday laBt from their honeymoon ,
The Upper Island District Football
Association held a meeting on Friday
evening last Those present were:
President, Wm. Brown; Vice-President, J. A. Knight; sec.-treas., Wm.
Holllday; Jas Watson, A. Murdock, C.
McGarrlage and A. Thorneycroft.
Nanaimo Club were censored for
playing Jas. Watson In a game Dec.
14th at Cumberland for tbe Davenport Shield. James Watson was suspended two weeks for taking part l"
the game.
This District fell ln line with tbe
P. Q. F. A. idea of signing on professionals. Players Appleby and Zac-
carelll were suspended for two weeks
and A. Strang for one week; J. Douglas tor one month.
T. Strang, a Bpectator, was cautioned and to govern himself against repeating the offense of going on the
field to speak to the referee.
Davenport were ordered to pay expenses to Cumberland Rangers for declining tbe game on Dec. 7th, aud
give Cumberland Rangers a game at
some date to be arranged by tbe Secretary.
The protest by the Davenport F. C.
was sustained against Ladysmith.
The draw for the B. & K Cup resulted as follows :
1st Round.—Nanaimo City vs. La-
d,smith; Davenport vs. Cumberland
United; 0. W. V. A. and Cumberland
Rangers, byes.
2nd Round.—Ladysmith or Nanaimo
vs. Davenports or Cumberland United; G.W.V.A. vs. Cumberland Rangers.
Dates to bo fixed at next meeting
for B. & K. Cup.
Imperial Theatre
At Chilliwack Under
New Management
COURTENAY, Jan. IC—Municipal
election results, for aldermen, Frederick Field 142 votes, Wm. Fielders
120, Herber Cooke 105, E. L. Mcdonald 89, Theed Pearse 88, Johu McKenzie 76. The first three aldermen
will serve a term of two years, the
other three successful candidates, tor
a term of one year. Unsuccessful
candidates were Albert Kerton 67, W.
J. Haggarty 66, Thos. Gwilt 66, A. E.
Embleton 62, and Dalton Cudmore 52.
.The Transportation Plebiscite was
defeated by 119 negative 239 afflrlmn-
tlve. The Cow By-Law which asked
the ratepoyers, "Are you in favor of
milk cows running nt large within
the city," received the answer No, 112
times to 55 answers to Yes.
Total polls cart was 175. Both
candidates tor mayor, Messrs John
Aitken and Geo. H. Pidcock having
withdrawn their names. Courtenay
will be without a new city executive.
After the new council meets they will
have to elect the mayor for 1926 from
among their members or otherwise as
they see At. If the mayor is chosen from the council, such vacancy will
have to be filled by means of a by-
election.
V. B. HARRISON
IS NEW MAYOR
FOR NANAIMO
DICK BURDE CHOSEN
PORT ALBERNI MAYOR
PORT ALBERNI, Jan. 12—Elections for municipal offices here resulted in Mr. Dick Burde, M.L.A., being unanimously chosen as mayor, an
office which he filled for several
terms before going to tbe Legislature.
Aldermen unanimously elected were
F. H. Steede, C. Durrant, G. A. T.
Jones, A. G. Sanders, A. B. Wood anil
A. Fleming.
Police Commissioner B. I. Hart anl
School Trustee Mrs. Roy Hanna wera
also unanimously chosen for tho.?e
offices.
NANAIMO, Jan. 16.—Twelve hundred and twenty-two voters turned
out yesterday. They elected three
of the four council, a new man for
mayor and voted against concrete
j bridge. Victor B. Harrison will be
I the mayor of Nanaimo for 1925. Yesterday at polls the electors decided by
six votes that he was a be'der man
than Aid. Barsby and they nV "1 him
In the chief executi.-e'n position. It
was a close call In the flrst analysis
Mr. Harrison had a majority of seven
The vote was recounted and he came
out with six majority. Following
are the votes cast for mayor: Harrison 484, Ilarsby 478, Smith 121, Randle
127.     Rejected 12.
The following Aldermen were elected, for South Ward—Cavalsky 161;
Freer 83; Ferguson 176; Newton 95;
Sutton 80; Spoiled 11. Cavalsky and
Ferguson elected. Middle Ward-
Barnard 151; Hickman 178; Jenkins
269; Rowe 123; Welch 83; Jenkins
and Hickman elected. North Ward—
Cain 48; Hart 158; Ironside 182; McKinnell 75; Planta 167; Rufus 39;
Spoiled 6; Ironside and Planta elected.
The fact that the voters desired to
have a man represent them as Police
Commissioner was conclusively shown
when 920 of them voted for Mr. Chas.
Ironside, while 316 cast their votes
for Mrs. Irvine. There were 27 rejected ballots.
The bridge by-law resulted as follows: 779 votes were against a concrete structure while 138 were in favor
of same.
trip.
CHILLIWACK, Jan. 11.—Mr. Haworth, late of Cumberland, has taken
over the interest ln the Imperial
Theatre from W. A. Wilkinson, the
transfer actually taking effect Monday. He has also purchased Mr. Wilkinson's home on Spadlna Avenue.
Extensive Improvements are planned. Mr. Haworth has been a very
successful theatre proprietor In
Cumberland. Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson will leave this week for Victoria
where they Intend to stay for a time.
J. R. MUTTER REMAINS
MAYOR OF DUNCAN-
DUNCAN, Jan. 13.—Mayor J. R.
Mutter retained office as Duncan's
chief executive by acclamation. The
only other office uncontested was that
of police commission, E. Smlller being
the only nominee for that position.
For aldermen, four to be elected—
Tames Duncan, David Ford, F. Marsh,
T. Pitt, J. M. Campbell, William Evans
and R. Whittington.
For the consolidated board, two to
be elected—MrB. Briggs, O. C. Brown,
E. S. Miller and R. A. Thorpe.
WELCOME NEWS
FROM COAST
The Vancouver Sun announces big
reduction in subscription rates, the
price being actually cut to $3.00 per
year. The Publisher states that orders will be accepted for any length
of time. This reduction is not confined to short term orders. People
in this district will welcome this announcement and no doubt will be
quick to take advantage of sucb a remarkable offer.
PRESBYTERIAN
ORGANIST HONORED
GUEST AT SOCIAL
In honor of Mr. Charles J. Parnham
who has served as organist of St.
George's Presbyterian Church for a
number of years, the choir held a social time last Thursday evening. The
hours passed most happily for all
present, and an enjoyable musical
program was rendered, the principal
participants being Mesdames Bernstein, Spooner, McLean and Hood.
An address to Mr. Parnham was
read by Rev. James Hood, who on behalf of. the members of the choir,
presented the honored guest with au
engraved silver handled, Bilk umbrella, a pair of gloves and necktie, tokens of high esteem and appreciation.
P. T. A. MEETING
On Monday evening, January 19th
at 8 o'clock. Members are especially urged to attend. Visitors and ne"
members are cordially invited. Rev.
Butler, Dr. Hicks and Mr. McLellan
will give addresses on Organized
Play,  School Grounds and Building
BASKETBALL MEETING
A meeting of the local Basketball
Association is called for 8:00 p.m.
Sunday ln the Athletic Club. Business of importance to all teams will
be carried on and therefore all ren-
resentatives, or In fact, all the players, are asked to be present.
Interesting Games Played
At The Badminton Court
Invading Cumberland in force on
Monday evening last, the members of
the Comox Badminton Club engaged
the Cumberland Club in a Beries of
very Interesting games at the Court
In the Anglican Hall. Mixed doubles,
Ladles' doubles and Gent's doubles
were played; tbere being such a large
turnout of plnyers it was impossible
to bave any Ladies or Gentlemen's
singles games. Twenty-one games in
all were played. Cumberland winning
14, and Comox 7. The total number
of points scored by tbe Cumberland
team aggregated 205 with Comox obtaining 192. The full list of games
played follows:
Bryan aud Mrs. Spicer beat Cliffe
and Mrs. T. Cliffe 15-8; Shenstone and
MIsb Scott beat Cliffe, E. and Mrs.
E. Cliffe 15-3; Leversedge and Mrs.
Leversedge boat Dowt'ie, M. and Mrs.
Ford 15-10; Mumford nml Mrs.
Shenstone beat Downlc nnd Mrs. Fair-
hnlrn 15-11; Symons nnd Mrs. Mordy
beat Steel and Mrs. Ball 15-3; Mumford
and Mrs. Shenstone beat Steel anil
Mrs Cliffe 11-8; Jones nnd Mrs. Stacey
lost  to  Ford  and   Miss   Leach  8-11;
Stevens and Miss Weldon lost to
Downle and Miss Leach 8-15; Murray
and Mrs. Apps lost to Ford and Mrs.
McLellan 13-15; Symons and Mrs.
Stacey beat E. Cliffe and Mrs. Steel
16-9; Bryan and Mrs. Finch lost to
M. Downie aud Miss Wood l-l -15;
Jones and Mumford beat Ford and T.
Cliffe 18-13; Mrs Apps and Miss Scott
beat  Mrs.  Ford and  Mrs.  Falrbalrn
Potato Dinner
And Concert
Marked Success
COURTENAY, Jan 14.—The Potato
Dinner and Smoking Concert held in
the Agricultural Hall on Tuesday
evening was a marked success. Thc
event was promoted by tbe Comox-
Courtenay Board of Trade lu honor oi
the successful exhibitors at the Provincial Potato Fair held In Vancouver last November. The committee
appointed by the Board of Trade to
make the necessary arrangements was
composed of Messrs. VV. J. O. Hannah.
12. F. Thomas and It. U. Hurford. Dinner was served at 7:30 by tlie Ladles'
Auxiliary of the Comox Agricultural
and Industrial Association, and a
splendid dinner It was. The Comox
potato was very much in evidence us
will be seen by the menu whicli follows:
Stall-fed   Comox    Roast   Beef   with
Baked Potatoes a la Clark
Roast Veal with Creamed Potatoes a
la Allberry
Shepherd Pie with Scalloped Potatoes
a la Blackburn
Boiled  Potatoes a la  Perrey
Roast Potatoes a la Swan
Murphy Salad a la Urquhart
Jellies  with  Whipped Cream
Apple Pie                       Mince Pie
Spud Cake a la Prltchard 	
Tea     Coffee      Pickles     Cheese
This repast was followed by a capital program of songs, toasts and musical selections. Mr. Theed Pearse
president of the Courtenay-Comox
Board of Trade was in tbe chair, and
In proposing the chief toast of the
evening, "The Potato Growers," he
said, "We are very proud of the Potato Growers. Two years ago they
had lifted the highest Provincial honors when they brought back the cup
for the district exhibit. This year
it was true the Comox growers only
secured third place, but there wero
only five points between the Victoria
growers who were first and the local
growers. The Comox exhibitors had
taken sixteen prizes at the recent potato fair, they had headed three of the
four commercial classes; and they
had carried everything before them
in the certified seed classes. This
was very satisfactory and was beneficial to all. The seed potatoes would
go to many distant places, the seed
was very good and would cause enquiries ar, to where the potatoes were
grown thus being the means of n
splendid form of advertisement to our
district."
The chairman expressed the regrets
of Mr. P. P. Harrison, M.L.A., on being unable to be present and read ;i
letter from Capt. O. R. Bates,
president of the Potato Growers, thanked the Board of Trade for
J. LEDINGHAM
IS MEMBER ON
SCHOOL BOARD
ALEX MAXWELL TOPS POLL
BY SEVEN VOTES
For School Trustees, four candidates were in the running,
when only three were required.
The polling in this section was
not as heavy as for the Council, only 329 votes being
cast. Alexander Maxwell headed the polls in this division,
with a majority of seven votes.
Following are the complete returns in the School Trustee campaign :
For School Trustees
Maxwell, Alex  105
Ledingham, J. elected    98
Brown, J. C    80
Mordy, Thos. defeated    45
Total 328
Thomas Mordy, was an unsuccessful candidate in both
cases. He offered his services
again this year as trustee and
alderman. Having served as alderman last year, he sought reelection for this title.
Frank Dallos, running for alderman, received the least number of votes polled.
W. H. Cope was Returning Officer for the day, with Mr. John
Walton acting as Poll Clerk.
In both divisions there were
7 spoiled ballots.
NEW CLUB HELD
FIRST DANCE-
ENJOYABLE TIME
15-1; Murray and Bryan beat Downlc
and M, Downie 15-6; Mrs. Mordy anl
Mrs. Leversedge beat Mrs. Cliffe and
Mrs. Ball 15-8; Stevens and Mrs.
Spicer beat E. Cliffe and Mrs. McLellan 11-5; Murray and Mrs. Finch beat
E. Cliffe and Mrs. Falrbalrn 11-4;
Shenstone and Miss Treen lost to T.
Cliffe and Miss Steel 4-15; Shenstone
and Miss Weldon lost to Cliffe and
Mrs. Steel 10-11;
A special challenge from Mrs. Ford
and Mrs. McLellan to play any two
Cumberland ladles was accepted by
Mrs. Spicer and Mrs. Shenstone, thc
Cumberland ladles winning 15-10. It
was a great night, In fact it was the
best Badminton night ever held In
Cumberland.
At 10 p.m. dainty refcrshmcntB were
served by the Cumberland ladles, and
before the tables were cleared nnd
tlie room got ready for further play,
Hev. W. Leversedge Introduced tbe
Idea of a district Badminton tournament. The idea caught on nt one-,
with the result that a committee was
appointed to make arrangements fnr
an open tournament, for the whole
district, announcement of which will
be published as soon as details arc
received from the secretary.
After this meeting, play was again re
sumed and at 12:30 a halt was called;
cheers were given by the Comox club I
for  the  Cumberland   club,   who  responded with three hearty cheers and I
a big tiger for the visitors.
(Continued  on   Page  Two)
Ladysmith
Appeal From
U.-I. Ruling
When the council of the B.C.F.A,
meets in Nanaimo on Saturday, the
members wilt have nn appeal frnm
the Ladysmith club over action taken
with regard to player suspensions at
a meeting of the Upper Island Association in Nanaimo last Friday night.
At this meeting a Ladysmith player
was set down, without having been
ordered off the field, uud Jim Watson,
who played for Nanaimo City in a
Davenport Shield match without being registered, was set down for two
weeks. Watspn fa a member of tho
Upper Island council.
Tuesday, Secretary Knight of th -
Ladysmith club asked Secretary Ami-
strong of the B.C.F.A. to get the following ruling from the D.F.A.:
"Can a player who has committed an infringement be suspended without lirst being ordered on* the Held of play? Also can
a player who stands suspended
sit on a governing body and vote
for said suspension?"
D. F. A. Secretary Sam Davidson
promptly replied as follows:
"Plnyers guilty of misconduct
can be suspended irrespective of
whether they have been ordered
off the field or not. Suspended
players can not sit on governing
board."
It appears tbat the Watson case WM
first disposed of at (he Nannlmo session and that he voted on thc Lady-
smiih case. Ladysmith ofhciuls, on
hearing of the reply by telephone,
stated they would appeal the case at
the Saturday meeting of the B.C.F.A.
A new club, which has recently been
formed  by several  prominent young
Cumberland ladies, held its flrst dance
on Wednesday evening last when considerably over a hundred    of   their
friends had a most enjoyable time on
the   spacious   floor  of   the  G.W.V.A.
I Hall,     The program for the evening
was in the hands of Plump's Orchestra, the city's premier musicians, and
needless to say it was an excellent
oue.     During a lull in the dancing,
refreshments  of  a  high  order  were
served by the club after which the
lone-step, fox-trot, etc., again reigned
' until 1 a.m.      Numerous young folk
I from   Courtenay,   Comox   and   Union
j Hay  were among the guests of the
evening,   Mrs.   A.   Maxwell,   Mrs.   H.
Farmer and Mrs. J. Cameron acting
as chaperons and Mr. John Cameron
as floor manager.
The club, which has not yet select-
ed a name for itself, invited suggestions during the evening and of the
many forthcoming probably one will
be selected.
TIDE TABLE, JANUARY 16—23 INCLUSIVE
Mate Time
H't.     Time
H't.     Time    H't.     Time    H't.
The  time  used
16....   3:10
4-5 | 10:IB
13-2
16:53     6-6
22:16     9-4
is  Pacific Stand
17...,   3:51
5-7 I 10:49
13-1
17:48     6-6
23:48     9-5
ard,   for  the   120
18...   4:42
6-9 | 11:26
13-1
18:46     4-5
Meridian West. It
19....   1:14
10-0 |   5:4G
8-2
12:07   13-2
19:42     3-3
Is counted from 0
20....   2:34
10-9 |   7:13
9-2
12:64   13-3
20:34     2-0
to 24 hours, from
21....   3:41
12-0 |   8:36
9-8
13:45   13-4
21:22     0-11
midnight to mid
22....   4:36
12-9 I   9:46
9-9
14:38   13-3
22:09     0-3
night.
23...   5:26
13-6 !' 10:47
9-8
16:32   13-1
22:56   -0-1
Comox Valley
Residents Step Out
At Headquarters
COURTENAY, Jan. 10.—Another
very successful dance was held at
Headquarters on Saturday niglit.
when nbout one hundred and fifty residents of the Comox Volley turned up
for a good time. The music was supplied by Moody's orchestra with Mr.
L. Rlss at the piano and the best of
dance music was thoroughly enjoyed.
The catering on this occasion whs
done by Mr. I). M. Isenor nnd the supper provided wns both plentiful and
appetizing .
Dist. Badminton
Tournament Is
Being Planned
Advantage was taken of the visit of
the Comox Badminton Club to Cumberland on Monday last to discuss
plans for a District Badminton Tournament Following a thorough discussion it was resolved to arrange
for a tournament to take place In the
near future.
Entries ln all classes will be accepted up to Saturday, January 24th together with the entry fee of one dollar, which covers all classes by either
It. Steele, Comox, or the Rev. W. Leversedge, Cumberland. It Is proposed
to hnve Ladies' Singles. Men's Singles
Ladies' Doubles and Men's Doubles
and Mixed Doubles.
Entries will be received from any
players wishing to enter the tournament irrespective of whether they are
club members or not. All entries in
the doubles events must bo for palm.
The games will be ployed under '.he
rules nf the English Badminton Association. All preliminary games will
ho played lu the dub buildings either
at Cumberland or Comox. For the
scml-llnnls and final games lt Is hoped
that the Agricultural Hall at Courtenay can he secured.
lt Is hoped that trophies will bo
secured for all classes, the trophies
to be held by the winners until the
next district tournament and to become the property of the players only
when they have been won three years
in succession by the same plnyers.
Any further Information can be secured from the committe which consists of the following: It. Steele, E.
Cliffe, Mrs, McLennan and Miss Wood
(Comox i I<\ H. Shenstone, \V. Lovcr-
SOdge, Mrs. Spicer and Mrs Shenstone
(Cumberland). All preliminary games
must be played prior to February 7,
1925.
An effort Ih being mnde to interest
the Parksvllle club lu the proposals
nnd the committee would welcome tho
support of all lovers of the game. P/SETWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY  16, 1936.
JUMBLE SALE WILL
BE HELD IN THE
AGRICULTURAL HALL
COURTENAY, Jan. 14.—Only six directors turned out tor tbe meeting ui*
the Comox Agriculture Society's directorate on Tuesday evening. It is
necessary for seven directors to be
present in order to form a quorum,
No official business could therefore
be done, but the directors who were
present, Messrs. England, Gunn, Hunter, Isenor, Tribe and Thomas, decided to advertise a jumble sale to bo
held In the Agricultural Hall, probably towards the end of February. Ail
those who have any Interest in tlie
Agricultural Association will be asked to contribute some articles for inclusion ln this Bale, no matter how
large or how small. .No matter
whether the donor is an agriculturalist, a merchant, or any other kind ot
resident of the valley.
The Treasurer ot the Association
(Mr. M. B. Tribe) pointed oul that ul
though funds were at present very
scarce, the associtlon was in a much
Bounder financial state thai) for some
yeara past. During the last twu
years over six hundred dollars of obi
debts had been paid off whicli hail
meant a considerable drain on the finances ot the society. It is hoped
that future efforts will meet with a
generous response.
CREAMERY WILL
INCREASE  CAPACITY
OF ICE MFG. PLANT
I anil many of the potato growers, including Messrs H. Clark, W. R. Perrey, J. Butler, R. M. Halliday ami
outers.
A splendid musical program was
carried out by tbe following: Mr.
Herbert Smith, soups; Mr. F. Vf,
Tull, a very funny song set to the tunc
uL "Barney Google,' with the chorus
in which ever.,body joined as follows:
"Our potatoes, winners at every show,
Prize potatoes we certantly can grow,
.If you really want a treat,
Comox Murphys you must eat,
Our potatoes  will  bring you  lots of
dough."'
Mr. Martinicb, Hiawiiuu selections ami
Chinese ininiiiatioiis; Mr. J. H. Mac-
Intyre, songs; Mr. '1'. Booth, songs
and. considering his seventy odd
years, some remarkable acrobatic
seats. Mr. H. S. Baker gave a very
amusing song ubout Taxes; Frank
Hurford a violin solo. Mr. J. R.
Denholm kindly accompanied the sing
ers. and Messrs J. Carwithen and X.
Smith supplied the best ot* music at
Intervals during tlie evening.
START EXCAVATING
FOR NEW POST OFFICE
AT COURTENAV
COURTENAY, Jan. 9.—Not many
people in the Comox Valley were
thinking about ice cream during the
recent zero Bnap, but owing to work
at the Comox Creamery Association's
plant which was then under way-
there wiil be more ice cream available ln Courtenay and district during
the coming summer than ever before.
The directors of the Creamery Association decided to materially increase
the capacity of the Ice manufacturing
plant, which is operated in conjunction with the Association's Creamery
.in the city. The Improvements include an increase In the ammonia pigling system and an Improved device
for the conservation of the low temperature of the ammonia as it returns
for compression.
The facilities for the storage of
manufactured Ice are also being considerably Improved and Increased.
which will give the Creamery Association a storage capacity of one hundred tons of that commodity wihch is
■o much in demand when the mercury
ls aronnd ninety in the shade. The
Ice and ice cream department has always been a very profitable one to the
Association, but the want nf capacity
for the manufacture of ire was felt
during the peak of last year's business.
Besides, there Is a steady increase
In the demand tor both the ice and
the famous Jersey ice cream; and it
Is difficult to say how long it will be
before another increase in the plant
becomes necessary. The work which
has been undertaken during a time
when the popular summer dish Is lu
the least demand, is being done in a
very economical manner and at no
great outlay to the Association. Comox Jersey Ice cream is in demand
at many points on Vancouver lslnnd
during the summer months, besides
which the famous cows of the Comox
Valley supply at least a portion of
the cream tbat goes to feed the people of Victoria on Strawberry sundaes or banana splits.
P. N. SPROUT RECEIVES
INTERNAL INJURIES
COURTENAY, Jan. 15— While employed at Headquarters early this
week Mr. P. N. Sprout had thc misfortune to receive severe internal injuries. He was carrying some heavy
steel when he fell with the weight of
the metal on his both*. On being conveyed to St. Joseph's Hospital at Comox lt was decided that his condition
wu so critical that a specialist from
Vancouver was obtained. Enquirers
at the hospital today learn tba* Mr.
Sprout, although in a very serious con
ditlon, is doing as well as can lie expected. Mr. Sprout's farm is in the
Merville area.
POTATO DINNER
AND SMOKING CONCERT
MARKED SUCCESS
(Continued From  Pnge Oncl
COURTENAY, Jan. IT,.—The work
of excavating for the building of the
new Post Ollice is now well under
way. Mr. Bert Grieves lias the contract for this work and lias already
doue the biggest part of it. The material which Is being excavated is being used for tlie purpose of improving
the road opposite the present post
office on Union Street. The commencement of this new building so
early in tlie year augers well for a
banner year in the building trade for
Courtenay for 1925.
made passable. Some extensions in
the electric light system had been
made which included the Liuo line
and other extensions within the city.
River transportation hud ueeu given
a good deal of thought and consideration during the year, the matter ot
dredging of the Courtenay R-iver bad
been taken up with tbe Dominion Government authorities and the visit °f
Premier Mackenzie King, he regarded as favorable. Referring to tlie financial situation Mayor McPherson
said the civic expenditure had been
kept within tlle estimates. The city
had about $5000 less debt than at
this time last year. Tlie old system
of gravelling the streets had been
found too expensive and tbe Corporation hud therefore purchased its own
truck, which under the present system was very much cheaper and more
efficient. A fire proof vault had been
added to tlie City Hall at a cost of
$600 und tlie city records could now
be safely taken care of. Some improvements had also been effected to
the fire ball. All these things had
been done in spite of an otherwise
very dull year and the old council
took credit for these tilings. The coming year showed promise of being a
really good oue for Courtenay and dis
triot he thought. The matters of
hard surfacing the main street of
the city and High School extensions
wero subjects that the new council
would have to face.
Mr. W. Prltchard, representing the
Vancouver-Courtenay Transportation
Co. Ltd., was then invited to address
the meeting. Mr. Prltchard explained briefly the draft of tlie agreement
submitted to the council n few weeks
ago. The speaker made his explanations very clear and subsequently
answered a number of questions put
to him by various members of the
audience. Nearly all the speakers
had something to say about the two
plebiscites which come before the
ratepayers on Thursday.
CUMBERLAND HUNTERS
STAND TO YOUR GUNS
EDMONTON, Jan. 12.—There is a
plague of jack rabbits in Southern
Alberta and the prospects are that unless checked at once, they will become
as much a menace as the grasshoppers and caterpillers.
A report to the department of agriculture from Okotoks says that the
farmers thereabout are being about
eaten out of bouse and home. The
rabbits are thicker than gophers aud
us hungry as bears. They eat fast,
often and much, and if they keep on
unchecked that P^rt of Alberta is
iikely to be worse tban dried out.
According to a long distance telephone call, a big corral on one ranch,
built especially for the purpose out
if wire, caught about 5000 of the rabbits over the week end, end they are
still coming. "Pigs Is pigs,' ns Ellis
I'uikcr Butler puts It, but down Okotoks way Jack rabbits are a nuisance.
COMOX VALLEY COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following ls a list of cows in the above association that gave 50 lbs. or
more of butter-fat for December 1924
Days Milk   Fat
Fresh          Name of Cow                 Hi-eed lb,       lb.
Pre,
Gdr.
Gdr.
Gdr.
Gill*.
Gdr.
Gill*.
30 Bell  	
40 Lilly  	
33 Josephine 	
60 Spots 	
45 Polly	
40 Pet 	
30 Jessie   Gdr.
47 Heather   Gdr.
60 Cherry   Gdr.
60 Brampton   Valley  Maid   ....  P B.
44 Lucy  Gill*.
40 Eventide of Hearsney   P.B.
129 Fern of Sandwick   P.B.
120 Dark     Odr.
51 Rhoda     Gdi*.
40 Mynonettc of Haven  „ P.ll.
39 Rosie    Gdr.
62 Aggie  ,  . Qdr.
30 Rosle   Gil".
33 Pansy   Gdr.
105 Leonette of Hearsney    P.ll.
158 Maud    Gdr.
30 Dina   Gdr.
1280.. Clancy   Gdr.
ed
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
Jersey
1518 85.0
1344 83.3
1560 78.0
1248 69.8
1206 68.7
1095
1470
65.7
64.6
1035 64.1
1221 623
1035 58.9
1320 58.0
1128 56.4
1215 55.8
1014 55.7
1071 55.6
1029 55.5
1080
855
1122
1098
1182
55.0
54.7
53 8
52 7
50 8
821 50.8
906 50.7
792   50.6
Owner
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
W. A. Urquhart
Prltchard Bros.
J. McKenzie
A.  Randall
Prltchard Bros.
Miss M. J. Hardy
A. Randall
T. D. Smith
G. Hornby
W. A. Urquhart
A. Randall
R. U. Urquhart
Miss M. J. Hardy
H. Scales
W. A. Urquhart
Butler BroB.
T. Menzies
W. A. Urquhart
D. Kllpatrick
W. A. Urquhart
Eye shades have been invented
small enought to insert Into eye sock-
its over the lids, being held In place
by a clasp on the nose of the wearer.
PUBLIC MEETING
IN GAIETY THEATRE
WELL ATTENDED
COURTENAY, Jan. 15.—There was
a public meeting in the Gaiety Theatre on Wednesday evening, when
nine of the candidates for aldermanic
honors addressed a fairiy representative gathering of the ratepayers. Both
nominees for tlie office of mayor,
Messrs John Aitken and Geo. H. Pidcock, having withdrawn their names,
there will be no contest for this office
On, polling day, but the 1925 council
wiil have to acquire their own chief
executive from among their midst or
otherwise as they see fit. The nine
candidates to address last night's
meeting were .Messrs Heber Cooke, A.
E. Embleton, Wm. Fielder, W. J.
Hugurly. Theed Pearse, D. Cudmore,
Frederick Field. Albert Kerton and
E. L. Macdonald.
The addresses ranged all the way
from speeches of about half an hour
duration by aldermen Cooke and
Pearse—the latter supporting his antl-
■ow remarks w|th a clanging cow bell
much to the amusement of the audience—to the mere verbal request for
support of Messrs A. E. Embleton and
Albert Kerton. Mayor McPherson
was in the chair and after explaining
why the meeting had been called gave
an interesting resume of the work of
the council during the last year. No
very large expenditures had been
mnde. lie said, but steady progress
hnd been maintained, The streets
had been improved. Courtenay Avenue
hnd been opened up and Mill Street
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy> Hardware Start
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Eye-Strain Is
Painful And
Distressing
IT is amazing why so many
persons submit to all the distress and discomfort of eyestrain, when certain and immediate relief can be so easily obtained.
IMPERFECT vision, headache,
nervousness and all the other
results of defective retractive conditions not only cause
you actual suffering but Impair
your efficiency as well. You
are not as good or as useful a
member of society lt a nervous-
leak caused by eye-strain ts sapping your energies away.
IF you have defective eyes
you know this to be true.
Can you think of any good
reason why you allow this to
continue? Is there anything
to prevent you from putting an
end to this difficulty of yours,
instantly and permanently?
DROP In and see me, I have
something    to    tell    you
about    your    eyes,    you
ought to know.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-5:00   OFFICE   7:80-1:50
P.M.       HOUB8       P.M.
Medical Fund Building, Cumberland
WM. ROSE, Supervisor.
PLACE YOUR ORDERS WITH
Edwards Lumber Co., Ltd.
Largest Assortment of Building Materials ln the
District
Office & Store
Union Bay Rd.
COURTENAY
Lumber Yard
Mill Street
For any Kind of Lumber, Hardware, Paint, Roofings,
Etc.
P.O. Box 62 Phone 17
A. GAMBA
COURTENAY
Milk, Cream, Eggs, Farm Products
A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED
....Leave Orders at Marocchi's or Scavarda's Grocery...
Store.
the Invitation and regretted, owing lo j
recent sickness, his Inability lo lie I
present. Cnpt. Hates hoped then'
WOOld be still closer trade relations
between merchants of Courtenay expressed through the ilouril of Trail".
and the agriculturalists of the district. The chairman suid lie would
welcome Capt. Bates and any new
members to thc Board of Trade meetings at any time. Immediately prior
to drinking this toast, the handsome
cup won by Messrs Butler Bros., wus
Oiled and passed right round the hull
amidst much good natured banter,
Mr. H. P. Allberry replied to the tnust j
and gave a vory Interesting resume
of the work necessary In preparing
tbe potatoes for exhibition purposes.
He advocated the planting of more
potatoes In the district. It was only
lack of quantity to select from Hint
prevented the cup being wnn by this
district last November.
Other speakers of the evening
were Messrs F. C. Brook, who pointed
out the very advantageous prices obtained for farm produce In Comox
district, as compared with other parts
of Canada; Wm. Duncan, frank Mc-
Pheraon.   Ben Hnfbes,   Thos. Booth [k
Ask Your Grocer For
Comox Jam
Comox Creamery Butter
^   Comox Creamery Eggs
Comox Creamery Potatoes
EGGS   ARE   CANDLED  AND   GRADED   CAREFULLY   AND   ARE
GUARANTEED TO RE STRICTLY FRESH.
JAM WAS MADE IN OUR OWN PLANT FROM FRESH GATHERED
BERRIES DAILY.
WHEN BUYING POTATOES "LOOK FOR THE TAG ON THE BAG."
IK CO.MOX CREAMERY THE "GROWERS" NAME IS THERE AND
THEY ARE GRADED HY US.
Comox Creamery
Association
•
LOOK!
We have just unpacked the swellest line of Table <
Lamps, Shades, Candle Lamps, Etc., which have just
arrived from the east. The very latest in electrical
fixtures. Come and select yours early before the
Xmas rush begins.
Our Sporting Goods Dept. is still busy with all the
best Guns—Ammunition—Hunter's Clothing, Etc.
-RADIO-
•RADIO	
We sell reliable Radio Sets and Parts and service the
sets we sell.    Get your radio from a reliable firm who
know their business.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Ctrorteov
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
The White Store
The White Bakery
Eat McBryde's innc',- whole Wheat Bread, the lost that drives
the poison from the system.    He that is hailed as the greatest
writer on health says, "Patent foods should be shunned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM FRID4Y,  JANUARY 16, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND.B.C.
PAGE THREE
4
The
"Judge"
Special to
The
Islander
every
week
THE JUDGE- But the Judge's Uncle Vill Be Dead the Lowest —Wlffi
Canada's Smaller Wool Crop
Affords Food For Thought
round of schedule could be printed.
Following Is the schedule complete;
Thursday, January 8.—
P.DQs vs. Pub. Sch. Girls.
Athletics vs. Rangers.
Monday, January 12.—
Yellow Jackets vs. C.G.I.T.
Athletics vs. Owls.
Thursday, January 15.—
Pub. Sch. Girls vs. High Sch. Girls.
Doo Dads vs. Athletics.
Monday, January 19.—
High Sch. Girls vs. Yellow Jackets.
High Sch. Boys vs. Owls.
Thursday, January 22.—
P.D Q's vs. C.G.I.T.
Rangers vs. High Sch. Boys.
Monday, January 26.—
High Sch. Girls V3. C.G.I.T.
High Sch. Boys vs. Doo Dads   ,
Thursday, January 29.—
Yellow Jackets vs. Pub. Sch. Girls.
|    Doo Dads vs. Owls.
I Monday, February 2.—
P.D Q's vs. High Sch. Girls.
Athletics vs. High Sch. Boys.
Thursday, February 5.—
C.GI.T. vs. Pub. Sch. Girls
Owls vs. Rangers.
Monday, February 9.—
Yellow Jackets vs. P.D.Q's.
Doo Dads vs. Rangers.
C*l.   wUttL  McBwan'i rhssisspltsn erne lot   af  Cssnssdisssi   sressthssr  unsbi.  "Southdowisss," al  Chicago  lislfrnatlnsal  ansssss.
perms in the British isles support 24.0UU.UU0 shorn
sheep, while the whole Dominion ol Canada .supports but 2.00U.0U0, one twelfth as many. Yet during
the fiscal year ended March. 1924, woollen and knitting mills imported into Canada aome 19,375,926
pounds of raw wool.
In Canada, in 1922, according to the Census of
Industry figures we bad 277 woollen and knitting
mills, which employed sume 22.UUU workers. Yet In
1922. countries abruad sent into Canada f3H,UUU,UUU
worth of woollen and knitted goods, and in 1923,
f41.UUU.UUU worth, representing employment for some
17.0UU to 2U.UUU workers. Although during the past
year the wool and knitting industries have expanded
to some extent and. particularly in the Eastern
Townships of Quebec, have new mills opened up, it
te seen that only about half of the woollen goods sold
In this country could have been produced here. Kaw
wool, grown in Canada, comprises bul a small fraction of that which is used by the mills that are operating in the Dominion.
There ia not enough wool grown to supply the
demand of the world. Japan and China, the staple
clothing and bedding materials for which countries
were formerly silk and cotton, are rapidly becoming
great wool consuming countries, imports to Japan
alone having jumped 7UD per cent in ten years.
Thus it is seen that the Canadian wool grower
haa not only a growing domestic market, but an ever
Increasing foreign market for his clips, yet sheep
are rarely given due consideration by Canadian
farmers even though they bave been dubbed "mortgage lifters" in the West.
Col Robt. McEwen of London, Ont.. president of
tne Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers' Association, who won the championship for a car-load lol of
Canadian weather lambs. "Southdowns." at the
Chicago International Show, haa said, "taking Canada as a whole it haa been proved thai climatic con-
stations are favorable to sheep raising.   No devastat
ing disease has visited our flocks. Yet today wa
find ourselves up against the serious economic condition of consuming more wool than we produce, and
for a comparatively new and fertile country like
Canada to have reached the stage of deficient supply for such an essential as clothing should surely
demand the serious consideration of us all."
But although wool growing as an industry in
Canada does not come up to what might be expected
uf It, those who are engaged in it are highly and effectively organized as rtgards marketing, in 1914
those in charge of the Dominion Live Stock Branch,
Ottawa, began to urge that sheepmen be more careful in putting up their fleeces and that they stop
selling at any old price which might be offered
locally. Following their efforts various sheep breeders and wool growers' associations throughout Canada
began to collect wuol from their members, this wool
being graded in turn by expert graders supplied by
the Dominion Guvernment and being sold on the
graded basis. As more and more local associations
were formed, it was felt that all should be affiliated
under une central selling agency with the result that
in ISII8 the Canadian Co-operatrve Wool Growers
Limited was formed with headquarters in Toronto.
This is a commodity marketing organization handling wool only, having about 2,500 shareholders and
approximately 12.UUU shippers of wool throughout the
Dominion. Individual clips are collected at various
points for shipment in car-load lots to *.he central
warehouse at Weston. Ont., for grading and sale.
At the present time this organization which
operates from coast to coast, is handling from a quarter to one third of the Canadian clip reaching tha
open market. Its Influence is being extended mora
and more each season as will be noted from the fact
that in Ontario alone the number of shippers has increased from 3.20U in 1922, to 4.0U0 in 1924. The
various grades of wool are sold to equal advantage in
Canadian. American and English markets, and it Is
perhaps noteworthy that during the past two years
approximately three-quarters of a million pounds of
Canadian graded wools have found a market with
English mills.
LANDACTAMENDHEMS
E C. MEN INCORPORATE
$1,500,000 COMPANY
TO OPERATE COLLIERY
VICTORIA.—A syndicate of B.C.
men headed hy Lieut-Governor Nichol,
were granted papers at the Parliament Buildings for the East Wellington Coal Co. Limited, with a capital
of (1,600,000.
This company has taken over and
ls operating some worked seams ot
the old Dunsmuir property at East
Wellington, which was the richest co il
on the Coast until the chief part of
the fleld was worked out and the
camp abandoned early this century.
Production ls now going ahead at
East Wellington on a basis not exceeding a maximum ot a couple of
hundred tonB a day. The products
of the mine are being marketed
through the Canadian Collieries organisation here.
WESTERN COAL MEN
ELECT OFFICERS
CALGARY.—John   Shanks, general
manager of tbe Brazeau Collieries at
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND. B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
16  rooms,   electrical)/  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
ror reservations Phone 11.
R. YATES, Manager.
Nordegg, was re-elected president of
the Western Canada Coal operators'
Association at the annual meeting of
that organization here last week. Geo.
iveilocK, general manager of the McGillivray Creek Coal and Coke Company, Coleman, was elected first vice
president and William McVeigh, general manager of the Elgin Coal Company, Druuiheller, second vice president.
The members of the executive elected were: G. Watkin Evans, Corbin,
B.C.; George Kellock, Coleman; G. A.
Vissae, Blalrmore; Lewis Stockett,
Calgary; John Shanks, Nordegg; M.
B. Morrow, Canmore; R. G. Drlnnan,
Edmonton and W. J. Dick, Edmonton.
NOTICE
Wood for sale $5.50 per load
(Also any other hauling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
VV. C. White
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
DR.   R.. B.   DIER   AND   DR
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
CUMBERLAND BASKET
BALL LEAGUE; SECOND
ROUND OF LEAGUE
In our last Issue, owing to lack of
space, only a portion of the Cumberland   Basket   Ball   League;   second
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will Please You t >     11
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
j Crown lands ma/ be pre-empted by
British suujecta over 18 years of age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions Is
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Laud Series,
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies oi
which can be obtained free o( charge
by addressing the Department ot
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e, carrying over 5,uuu bourd
feet per acre west of the Coast Range
and o.uou feet per acre east of that
Range.
Applications tor pre-emptions are
to ue addressed to the Land Commissioner ot tbe Land Recording Division, In which the land applied lor
is situated, aud are made on printed
forms, copies ot which can be obtained from the Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied lor
five years and .Improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed Infoimatlon aee
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
Ior agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable! land Is ti
per acre, and second-class (grazing)
land $2.60 per acre. Further information regarding purchase or leaie
ot Crown lands Is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment nt
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding M
acres, may be leased as bomesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the flrst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land bas been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 040 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act tbe Province ls divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based ou
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
Manns 'Bakery
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pastries
Special for Saturday
Delicious Cream Cakes, Cream Rolls, Cream Buns, Etc.
Taste Teasing Palate Pleasing
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls
Scotch Scones, Doughnuts, Oatcakes, Biscuits
Make our Quality Bread the Basis of Every Meal
Give us a Trial
Telephone 18 Cumberland
£3
JmU Xml^itimSmk
BETTER MEAT
AT WILCOCK BROS' MEAT MARKET
For the better cuts of Delicious Meats, you can always
get satisfaction at Wilcock Bros' Meat Market.     We
make a spscialty of quality cuts at prices that mean
wholesome saving to you.
*                                             t   .             '
Wilcock   Bros.
Dunsmuir Avenue            —            Cumberland, B.C.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
(Night calls: 134X Courlenay
I Office: 169 Cumberland
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander PAGE POUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY  16, 19«.
The Cumberland Islander
PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY AT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
FRIDAY,  JANUARY  16,   1925.
PRESCIENCE
Over the winter glaciers
I see the summer glow,
And through the wild-piled snow drift
The warm rosebuds below.
—Emerson.
THE WAY OF THE WORLD
The editor goes on week after week boosting
the town and community and advocating the doctrine of trading at home. The local business man
pats the editor on the back and says that's the
right idea; tell it to 'em. He then refuses to help
support the paper with his advertising and calmly
sends an order to an out-of-town print shop for a
supply of printed matter.    Funny world, isn't it'.'
YOUR COUNTRY WEEKLY
With the beginning of this year The Cumberland Islander took its forty-fourth step on the
ladder of journalism and with this step a continuance will be made to bring before the public
the news of the day, literature of enlightment and
advertising that pays. Many are the knocks
hurled at the small press of today, but as a year
slips by another enthusiast steps in and so the
work is carried on. The editor takes his stand
once more and waits for what may.
Your newspaper is your Country Weekly. It
is the friend of the family, the bringer of news of
other friends. It is the recorder of great and
small, the varied acts of the days and weeks that
go to make up life, and oft times reserves the
odd joke that might hurt some fellowman and instead publishes a little news item which brings
cheer to someone. By way of giving to your
paper, local happenings of the day, you can help
us to make a better Country Weekly for you.
It brings together buyer and seller, to the
benefit of both. It is the word of the week, the
history of the year, the recorder of community
and town—your town. Cumberland is just what
you make it. If you don't like the town you will
probably find that the town doesn't like you.
Different with your Country Weekly; it s,tands at
all times ready to help you and maintains to help
the community.
We are thankful for your help in the past and
hope for your co-operation in the future in help,
ing us to help you. Make the 1925 volume of
The Cumberland Islander your Country Weekly
and boost for your town and community.
FIVE YEARS AGO
(Taken From The Cumberland Islander Files of 1920)
Below are those who have been entrusted by the citizens to look after the affairs of the city for the year 1920.
Mayor—Mr. D. R. McDonald (re-elected by acclamation).
Aldermen—Mr. Charles J. Parnham (re-elected); Mr.
Thomas C. Bannerman (re-elected); Mr. Frederick Pickard (re-elected); Mr. John Thomson (re-elected); Mr.
John J. Wier (elected); Mr. John C. Brown (elected).
Board of School Trustees—Mr. Wesley W. Willard
(uncompleted term); Mr. Neil McFadyen (re-elected);
Mrs. Thomas E. Banks (re-elected).
License Commissioners—His Worship Mayor D. R. McDonald (re-elected); Aid. Charles J. Parnham (uncompleted term); Mr. Alexander Maxwell (elected by acclamation).
CANADA'S OUTLOOK
While the year 1924 waa in general one of
poor business for Canada, it cannot be regarded
as an entirely unsatisfactory period in our business history, since the foundation for a real and
substantial improvement in Canadian trade was
laid during the twelve months in question. The
development referred to took place in the wheat
market. This is the commodity which has been
responsible for business depression in Canada for
years past. Most of our other leading natural
industries have not been in at all a bad position.
While the demand for lumber fell off during 1924,
it could not be said that the lumber trade was in
a state of acute depression. The paper industry
has been active, the mining industries in Ontario
and British Columbia are doing well, the fishing
industry in British Columbia experienced an improvement and, in the Maritime Provinces, had a
good year. Briefly, reports on many of our great
natural industries were either favorable or reasonably good during the twelve months under review, but the benefits arising from activity in
these lines were almost entirely offset by continued unsatisfactory conditions in the Prairie Provinces, where close to twenty-five per cent of our
population is located. Poor business in these
provinces was the main cause of industrial depression in Eastern Canada and for the short time operations of manufacturers of textiles, iron and
steel lines, boots and shoes, clothing, furniture
and agricultural implements.
The low price of wheat was a result of world
production being somewhat in excess of the world
requirements. This situation is now changed.
There is a shortage of wheat rather than an excess supply. The effect on prices has been striking. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics index
number for grains rose from 114.2 in October,
1928 to 178.9 in October, 1924.     Unfortunately,
the rise in price found Canada with a short crop.
The Prairie Provinces harvested only two hundred and forty-five million bushels, the yield per
acre having been lower than at any time since
1919. The rise in price has been so substantial
that even with this low yield, the farmers in tht
West will in general improve their position, bul
the improvement will not be sufficiently marked
to result in a general revival of business throughout the Dominion, although it may well cause a
moderate increase in the volume of sales in many
lines. That a general revival will materialize
during 1925 is not only by any means certain, but
we can claim that the chances are somewhat ii.
our favor. Last year, the United States had ar.
exceptionally good wheat harvest, while Canada
had an exceptionally poor one. What we must
hope for in 1925 is that world production of wheat
outside of North America will not increase substantially, and that in North America there will
be a more equitable distribution of good results.
While the above view makes our prospects
for good times look somewhat problematical, it
must be remembered that reference is made only
to the current year; so far as the more distant
future is concerned, there is little to fear, if we
conduct our affairs properly, because Canada can
produce Wheat efficiently and cheaply, and we
may expect that the price of this commodity will
not for any long period stay below a figure at
which our Western farmers can operate satisfactorily. Current prices are not by any means the
minimum necessary for prosperity. If the yield
per acre were good, the price of wheat could be
substantially below the present quotation, and
still leave a profit in the business. Considerable
space has been devoted to this subject, because it
is a very important one for Canada at the pres-
ant time.—The Royal Bank of Canada Monthly
News Letter.
GETTING TOGETHER:
A BASIS FOR SUCCESS
How often when you have met a competitor
on the street corner or have dropped into his office to borrow a match and find out if co-insurance
is compulsory on dwellings, how often have you
gotten into a business discussion with him and
have exchanged ideas which have been helpful tc
both of you or cleared away some of the difficulties which you thought you had ?
Wouldn't it be a good thing if we all got together regularly, got our feet under a table ana
discussed the matters in connection with our business that were bothering us. We are pretty clean
competitors and all of us are willing to give the
other fellow the benefit of our experience when it
may be useful to him in getting business for himself. We all know that these little informal meet
ings do us a lot of good and how much better it
would be if we had regular meetings at a certain
time—every week or two weeks. We might not
always have things to talk about when we started
but it wouldn't take long for us to discover subjects of general interest and the general discussion would do us all good. If you cannot find
matters for discussion, call on the Club.—Insurance.
DROSS
FROM THE MELTING POT
BY SCOOP
The woman Is   seldom the silent partner.
• i   «
It's a blind alley that has no crooks In lt.
• ss     ss
People and automobiles that knock need attention.
• •   •
We have known a lot of dull people who act smart
• *   *
First decide what you want to do before you try to do
it
One touch ot scandal makes the whole of Cumberland
chin.
ss     *     «
A bargain that takes money out of Cumberland Is a
backfire.
... <
There ls getting to be a close relationship between car
and corner.
...
It ls a good rule to be sure you are right—and then
keep still.
...
When we refuse to meet an opportunity It Is apt to
overtake us.
...
The hand that drives the binder ls the hand that feeds
the world.
...
Fish never seem to realize what a time you had getting bait
• .   .
Don't use the steam tn your whistle tbat should be
used in your cylinder.
• .   .
Some girls expect barbers by bobbing their hair to
make them look beautiful when nature long ago gave It up
as a bad Job.
.   .   .
The way to a man's heart may be through his stomach; but the operation requires some tool more efficient
than a can opener.
...
There's a price tag on Opportunity. Sometimes you
pay for lt with brains, sometimes with brawn and sometimes with cash.
...
Our motor car bandits are law-abiding in one respect
at least. You never hear that one of their earB has been
towed in for being improperly parked In front of the bank.
...
The hobo had asked the hard-faced woman for something to eat "Yes" she replied. "I'll fix you some supper if you'll saw and split some wood, sweep off the walk,
fix that hole In the fence, tidy up the barnyard and burn
that rubbish piled up at the cellar door." "Lady," said
the hobo as he started away, "I'm only a hobo; I ain't your I
husband."
Women's Coats
Sweaters, Slippers
Brodella Flannel
Children's Dresses
Showing this week
Women's Sweaters Slippers and Oxfords
Wool and Silk and All Wool Pullovers, in A new line of slippers and Oxfords, with
Plain and Fancy, Tuxedo styles in Brush- one strap. Fancy Fronts and Elastic in-
ed Wool Checks and Fancy Stripes. steps, all this coming season styles.
Children's Dresses: ChS*n n£r
Dresses in plain and checks, embroidered trimmings
SPECIALLY   PRICED
Men's Wear
FOR THE COLD DAYS
All   Wool   Flannel   Shirts,   big   roomy    Work Socks—Serviceable All Wool Work
cut, in Grey and Brown, hard (j»i  AE    Socks in Light and Dark Grey      Kfl/»
wearing material. Special ....
Stanfield's Pure Wool Ribbed Underwear,    Odd Pants—Our   stock   of   Men's   Odd
in White and Dark Grey. Pants at 20 Per Cent. Reduction.
Great
Bargain Offer
The
Daily Province
4 months for $1.00
Subscribe Now
THE SAME RELIABLE FAMILY NEWSPAPER
NOTHING CHEAPENED BUT THE PRICE.
Subscribers who paid in advance at the SOc rate will
be given advantage of this offer.
T. Malpass
CENERAL  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE 18 OUR MOTTO
OR PHONE » UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to havt your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new,
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
-*i
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND PHONE IM
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING AND PRESSING
Open for business November 20
Under New Management
E. Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avenue
When you ara In seed of a
Plumbing a Heatinf Enftaeer, Se*
R. RUSHTON
i
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 117
Cumberlaad
Your  needs  will  recolre  Immediate
attention. FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE FIVE
1°
New Car .Service
CAR FOR HIRE DAT OR NIGHT
84 TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
EDUCATIONAL SURVEY
REPORT WILL BE
SUBMITTED AT EASTE't
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—The report ot
the   educational   survey   commissi™
conducted by Dr. J. H, Putman and I
Dr. W. Weir, ls now being prepare!
and will be submitted to tbo govern- [
ment at Easter.    Following many sif.
tings at various points in the province
the commissioners are    claimed    (o
have covered Ihe entire situation In
detail.     However, It la known  lint
fow important chni'ges nre to bo suggested, the feeling  being that in  a
province like British Columbia, with
its vast extent, there is not much room I
for improvement.
My son, you will never, if you live
to be a hundred, see a woman .politician of wbom even tbe ugliest man
will want to take au eyeful.
"I Wonder Who
That Was"
She waited only a moment to finish a conversation with a neighbor before answering the telephone,
but in the meantime the party calling had decided that
no one was home and had hung up.
Who had telephoned? Was it an important call?
The possibilities are endless. Prompt answering
would have saved worry.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Year Round Joys
Electrical Appliances
Here are gifts that are certain to make her
NEW YEAR
one of joy. Picture her delight on New Year morning when she steps into the parlor and finds there, on
the table, an Electric Iron, an Electric Percolator, an
Electric Heater, an Electric Toaster, an Electric Warming Pad, a Vacuum Cleaner, and many articles from our
store that will aid her in the home.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
"LOVE AND GLORY" IS
UNIVERSALE LATEST
SUPER PRODUCTION
'Love and Glory,1
lian-lniveisal-Jewel
Marion Davies and Lyn Harding
in the Cosmopolitan Production
"YOLANDA"
Dhtriotiui Jy Mttro-Gollviyn
AT THE ILO- ILO THEATRE
Monday and Tuesday, January 26 and 27
the Rupert Ju-
.     Vu..y.tsss.-SSSSSTS>S      PrOdUCtiOll     COIN-
ing this Saturday only to tlie llo-llo
Theatre, presents a distinct novelty in
the way ut screen entertainment in
that iu characters live through a lilts
year lapse of time.
|     ihe uueu featured characters, por-
i tiayed by Charles De Roche, Wallace
I MacDonald and Mange Bellamy, an
, Introduced  In  tlie  story    as    young
peasant solk in a French village.     Io
I the closing scents of the  Hlm  plaj
they appear in tbe make-up of persons seventy years of age.     So real
is the transfiguration that It Is sah,
1 to be diilicult to believe that the char-
! acters are protrayed by tlie same play
iers.     lt is a triumph fur the actors!
I as well as for the director.
Psctoriully the production Is one o:
! tlie most beautiful of the year. 011-
bert Warreiiion, credited on the screen
Willi tlie photography, can take many
a bow for his skillful camera work.
Fundamentally It is a war time romance woven around incidents of the
France-Prussian war, but there ia little ot actual war revealed on the
screen, One sequence of the picture.
Iiowever, reflects a desert engagement between Zouaves and Arabs and
it ls colorful and dramatic, carrying
one of tlie biggest thrills of the story.
The screen play is an adaptation ol
llie novel, "We Are French," written
by Perley Poore Sheehan aud Robert Davis. Other featured players
are Gibson Gowland, Ford Sterling,
Charles De Ravenne and Priscilla
Dean Moran.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
HIGHWAY PROBLEMS
HAVE BEEN DISCUSSED
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P.- Symons   - -    Proprietor
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Highway problems of every description have been
discussed by district engineers, assistant engineers and road foremen, at
tho annual conference just held hero.
Hon. W. H. Sutherland, minister of
public works. Is continuing the practice of calling the department engineers into conference every winter! believing that the best of results for the
province as a whole are secured
through the exchange of ideas and
presentation of recommendations.
OFFICIAL ARE
DETERMINED TO
ENFORCE ALL LAWS
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Following u
conference between Attorney-General
Manson and magistrates from different parts of the province, a report has
been given out by the magistrates.
They support the new amendments to
the .Motor Vehicles Act and are determined to enforce the new liquor laws
fully. The magistrates agree thnt
fuller punishment should be meted
out to those who commit crimes with
violence and also that tlie lash should
be administered in many instances
as a deterrent to crime.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a 1/2-m.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
"The Moat of the Beit for the Leatt"
Marocchi  Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
    and Grocers	
 BREAD IS YOUR BEST FOOD	
 EAT MORE OF IT	
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
NEW PHOTOPLAY IS
VIOLA DANA'S BEST
T
HESE beers, the products of Vancouver
Breweries, Limited, are extremely popular
on the Island—because of their absolute
purity, their wholcsomeness and their fine
"hops and malt" flavor.
and
U.B.C. Beer
On sale at all Govt. Vendors
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thc
Liquor Control Board or by thc Government of B.C.
"Her Fatal Millions," Viola Dana's
newest Metro starring vehicle, and
one of the most charming and amusing photoplays of tbe year is coming
to the llo-llo Theatre on Monday and
Tuesday of next week. Miss Dana
calls It the best picture she has ever
made aud that statement has aroused
the highest delights of anticipation
among the followers of this tiny, vivacious comedienne.
And tbls photoplay can well be
awaited with keen interest because,
according to advance reports, It is the
highest type of wholesome, rollicking
comedy, spiced with dramatic thrills
and surprises. Little Miss Dana
romps through the closely knitted
story In her most vigorous and fascinating manner. The role is ber
greatest triumph in delicious, high-
power, rapid-lire comedy drama. Her
role ln "Hed Fatal Millions" gives
Miss Dana opportunity to display her
versatile tallents.
The story ls concerned with a girl
who "borrowed" Jewels, furs and a
limousine (without the knowledge of
the "lenders") in order to meet au old
sweetheart on bis own level. Mary
even told Fred that she was the wife
of the richest man in town. So when
her "borrowed" limousine Is wrecked,
Fred naturally takes her to her "husband's" home. That's only the beginning of a series of amusing and
surprising complications. And tlie
methods Mary uses to untangle herself are screamingly funny.
Director William Beaudine has done
excellent work In every phase of the
production. The story, which was
written by William Dudley Pelley, was
adapted for the screen by Arthur
Statter. The action was photographed by John Arnold.
Miss Dana's supporting cast ls
particularly noteworthy. It includes
Huntly Gordon, Allan Forrest, Peggy
Brown, Edward Connelly, Kate Price,
Joy Wlnthrop and others.
Useful Recipes
Having been asked by several
housewives of the district for recipes,
The Islander begins this week to accept all enquiries for different recipes
and will endeavor to get same answered and publish the following Issue.
Any housewife desiring a certain
recipe, will, by writing or phoning
The Islander office, be given every
consideration. This week a lady
wishes to know how to -make an Inexpensive cake icing. We are fortunate In not having to wait for an
answer as one of the staff (a first-
class cook) has been kind enough to
olfer the following:
An Inexpensive Cake Icing
1 tablespoon butter, 3 dessertspoons
Cocoa, 1 table spoon cornstarch, 1
cup white sugar, 1 cup hot water.
Mix the cocoa, cornstarch and sugar, and add to the melted butter, together with the hot water. Boll
slowly until thick. Cool before using.
This recipe, with on additional half
cup of sugar and one more cup of hot
water, makes a delicious pudding
sauce.—C. J.
Another Lady Writes
"Would you please print a recipe
for Cottage • Pudding?"—L.M. Any
reader knowing of a Cottage Pudding
Itcclpe, will oblige by sending same
to The Islander, before next issue, I
STARS OF SPORT
WORLD SHOWN IN
NEW FILM PLAY
The Gem
Barber
Shop
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practteal Barber, and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
Car  For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or Reeldence
25 22
CUMBERLAND
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
The field of sports will have Its Innings iu motion pictures when "The
Great White Way," a new photoplay
that mirrors life on Broadway, will
be shown Friday and Saturday nights,
January 23 and 24 at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre. Leading celebrities ot the
prize ring, the race track, prominent
sports writers and other familiar figures of sportdom make tbelr film debut ln the new picture.
The turf and the riug, along with
the leaders in these two branches of
sport, are graphically brought to the
screen In tbls picture of life ln the
great metropolis. One of tbe big
features Is a realistic prize fight In
which Pete Hartley, well known lightweight contender, battles Oscar Shaw,
leading man of the film.
Thia scene includes such sporting
celebrities as Tex Rickard, wbo appears as promoter; Joe Humphreys,
ss announcer, and Johnny Gallagher
as referee. Others who appear
around the ring or in the training
quarters of Madison Square Garden
are Irvln S. Cobb, Damon Runyon,
"Bugs" Baer, Billy De Beck, "Kid"
Broad, Tammany Young and H.. C.
Wltwer, author of the Btory.
Another thrilling feature of '"the
Great White Way" is a big race track
scene, filmed at Belmount Park ion
Futurity Day. It discloses a realistic steeplechase, specially staged
for the picture, and many otber phases of turf life. Earle Sande, world's
premier Jockey, is another ot the many
sporting celebrities who appears.
"The regular cast, ln addition to Oscar Shaw, Includes Anita Stewart, T.
Itoy Barnes, Tom Lewis, Olin How-
land, Harry Watson, Dore Davidson,
Hal Forde, Stanley Forde and Frank
Wonderley.
YOLANDA COMING TO
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Marlon Davies' crowning achievement In motion pictures, her latest
Cosmopolitan production, "Yolanda,"
from Charles Major's novel of qld
France of that title will be the attraction at the Ilo Ilo Theatre Man-
day and Tuesday, January 26 and 27.
Miss Davies is said to reach new
heights in subtlety of characterization
in her portrayal of Princess Mary of
Burgundy( who mnsquerades as Yol-
ada, a burgher maid, and loses her
heart to Prince Maximilian of Styrla.
Princess .Mary becomes a pawn in the
political battle of wits between her
father, Charles the Bold, Prince ot
Burgundy, aud King Louis XI of
Franco. Never has Miss Davies been
seen to better advantage, displayed
more personal charm nnd flncsBe in
acting than Hhc docs ln this production.
The cast supporting her Is on an
all-star quality, embracing Lyn Harding as Charles the Hold, llolbrook
llllnn as King Louis XI, Ralph Grates
as Prince Mnslmnllan, Maclyn Arbuckle as Bishop La Maine. Johnny
DOOley as  Ihe   Dauphin,  Leon  F.rrol
as the Innkeepers Theresa* Maxwell
Conovcr as Queen Margaret, Ian Mac-
larcn, Mary Kenned... Gustav von
Beyffertltz, Thomas Flndlay, Roy Ap-
plegate and Arthur Donaldson.
"Yolanda" Is said to bo one of tho
tensest nud most dramatic of Cosmopolitan productions and the color,
rnmanco and realism of ancient
Franco ore most vividly pictured.
m
UMLr
EVESl
WholesomecLiiiiiHRefreshlftt PAGE SIX
THB   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDBlt,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 1»36.
FOR SATURDAY ONLY, JAN. 17th
"LOVE md GLORY"
Two ofHhe greatest things in the world!
With a brilliant cast, including:
Charles De Roche, Madge Bellamy,
Wallace MacDonald,, Ford Sterling,
A. Gibson Gowland,   Priscilla Dean
Moran.
Hem Whr&bs For All!
Men - Women - Young - Old!
ADULTS 50?
CHILDREN 25?
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M..
A   MIGHTY   PHOTODRAMA   OF
BRAVE    HEARTS    AND    TRUE
SOULS—A MAN'S COURAGE AND
A  WOMAN'S  CONSTANCY
-CHILDREN 15? ADULTS 35?
Monday & Tuesday
January 19th and 20th
,*»#■*
VIOLA
DANA
Wed. and Thurs.
January 21st and 22nd
"DAUGHTERS OF
THE NIGHT"
A PICTURE OF DARING ROMANCE—OF THRILLS
-OF EVERY DAY LIFE—
IN
HER FATAL
MILLIONS
All she had was nerve—the furs, the limousine and
the limousine manner were—to stretch the word	
borrowed.
DON'T MISS THIS STORY OF LOVE AND LAUGHTER AND LUCRE
ADULTS 35? CHILDREN 15?
De Luxe Shows 6:45 — 8:45
CHAPTER n OF
"THE GHOST CITY"
/.   "The Bulldogger"   .\
FEATURING
PETE MORRISON MARGARET MORRIS
AND AL WILSON
The flrst Chapter was a big hit.    Everybody is talking about this serial—Don't Miss It 1 !   A1m a good
——comedy	
A Stampede Of Thrills!
ADULTS 35? CHILDREN 15?
De Luxe Shows 6:45 — 8:45
Come to the Saturday Night Dance!
Gents 60c. 9:30 to 12:00 Ladies 15c.
IIo=Ho Theatre
TWO DE LUXE SHOWS
NIGHTLY
CUMBERLAND
—MATINEE—
EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30
Friday & Saturday
January 23rd and 24th
An actual mirror of the great
metropolis and a thrilling, tense
story of celebrated figures of
sport, art, theatre and the newspaper world.
The most realistic and interesting reproduction of musical comedy, the prize ring, race track
and of night life on Broadway
ever filmed.
No one ever dreamed of such a
cast:
Anita Stewart.
Dore Davidson
Tex Rickard
George McManus
Winsor McCay
Earle Sande
Joe Humphreys
T. Roy Barnes
Hal Forde
Irvin S. Cobb
H. C. Witwer
Billy De Beck
Harry Hershfleld
"Kid" Broad
Johnny Hennessey
Oscar Shaw
Harry Watson
Ned Wayburn
Damon Runyon
Nell Brinkley
J. W. McGurk
Pete Hartley
Johnny Gallagher
Olin Howard
Stanley Forde
"Bugs" Baer
Tom Lewis
Fay King
Hal ColTman
Billy Gould
Tammany Young
and the entire "Ziegfeld Follies"
chorus.
THE
WONDER PICTURE OF
NEW YORK'S
"MAIN STREET" FRIDAY, JANUARY  16, 1986.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B. C.
PAGE SEVEN
(J
AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE
Wednesday and Thursday, January 21 and 22
Jtakthatflit
telephone told
DAUGHTERS!
ANIGHT
Storu \n\ Idillard (Robertson
Mttma Clifton production.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MBRIUFIEU).    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunamuir Avenue. Cumberland
Bob's wife aaid to him, "You don't
bring me candy like you used to before we were married."
Bob replied, "That so—well, you
never heard ot a fisherman feeding
bait to a fish after he had caught it,
did you?"
"My mind is prone to criticize
The many faults I see—
I wish that I could realize
My only Job ls—me!"
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING.     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Start 1925 Right!
ASK TOUR LOCAL VENDOR AND DEMAND
Silver Spring
BIER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
English Ale and
Stout, Lager Beer
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
BfflJBflW/B
j
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by tha Government of B.C.
A8K FOB
Fletcher's   No.  1  Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNO PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros.   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C.  W.  Sillence        G. M. Swan        Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
Scenic Trip Through
I        Cumberland District I
i (Specially Written for The Cumberland Islander) I
^^jL^'SMaiaiEfis!*"!*^^
A BEAUTY TRIO, AND ZIEGFELD CORALLED THEM ALL
In order to further the glorification of the American Girl, Flo
Ziegfeld has coralled these three beauties of beauties. Photo
shows, left to right, Lois Wild, "Follies" beauty who won the
1923 Beauty Contest held at Atlantic City; Dorothy Knapp.
Follies beauty who won the 1922 Atlantic City contest, and
Beryl Williams, who is to appear in the forthcoming Revue,
"The Comic Supplement," and who won the 1924 Contest held
at Atlantic City. They are shown with the silver trophies
that they won.
Commenting on the following story,
.ve would like to say that perhaps 1.
10 place can more pleasures from i
scenic and sportsman's point °t view
ie had than on our own Vancouve;
Island. We would welcome more o
.hese stories along with "Ploneovint,
.lie Wild West." and will at all time:
live manuscripts our best oi* atten
tion—Ed.
Snorting and puffing on three
•.teaming, till we thought it woult".
mtt, Lizzy had mp.de the grade. I
teemed only a short time since tve
■oiled onto the wharf at Nanaimo, si
pleasing had the scenery been on thc
.rail noni thai city ;o where our For'
leemed ready to give up the ghost.
Cumberland, one mile—Can wc
make it? The little mining town wc
'.iad heard so much about, slowly, bul
surely, became a reality. As we roll
ed along on Broadway, (which wc
afterwards learned was Dunsmul,
Ave.), a number of curious residenli
gave us the once over, and no wondci
—Poor Lizzy had died and we were
stalled on the main avenue of tlu
city, with darkness creeping upon us
A hotel proprietor and garage man
seemed to be the only solution to oui
troubles. Incidentally Lizzy had
stopped in front of a Cumberland
hotel, so it was with very little effort
hat our first trouble was settled. A
comfortable room, followed up with a
grand shower bath and lurfch put new
life In the party and we decided tu
spend the night in Cumberland.
"Where's our Lizzy?" Next morning the garage man was not needed so
much as a policeman. In a tew min
utes, telephone conversation with the
city constable Informed us that cat
No.  was ln pound, and that a
warrant awaited the owner, charging
him with parking against the laws
of the city. Here we shake handf,
with ourselves as our car was stored
n a city garage and after paying tne
ine, a walk to the Cumberland Motor
Vorks, a few words with the mechanic, our car was ready for the
oad again. Lizzy must have only
leen tired the night before, for a filing of gas and oil gave new 'life
.0 her.
Having learned a few things about
he city's regulations, we decided to
inquire about the pleasures that the
llstrlct afforded the tourist. The
proprietor of the hotel seemed very
veil Informed on this subject, and offered to furnish a guide to accompany us, which offer we accepted, and
here begin some of the exploits that
his guide, named ".Mickey," led us
through.
Having made all the necessary arrangements for the morrow, Mickey
tapped on our door at 5:00 a.m., and
after adjusting our packs, we set out
'.o climb the mountains. Beini; new
o the game, our guide did not work
is too hard, but explained the differ-
mt sights as we looked over toward
he mainland. Here could be seen
he mountain stream rushing on its
/ay   to  supply   water   for   tlie   city
hlch we had Just left, the Courtenay
liver, with its great scenic views, the
mtrance to and Comox Harlioi' and
ast, but not  least  beautiful  Comox
ake. These, said the guide, will
e prominent places in our trips to
ollow.
The First Fishing Trip
The tramp who asked the Chir.aman
or a feed one Tuesday afternoon,
jn being asked if he liked flnh, and
in answering in the affirmative, was
.old to come around "Fllday," was no
lore dissapolnted than the writer
.vhen trying to land his flrst salmon,
ifter pulllisg in the line to rid it of
.vhat vas thought a snag, one look-
i saltron—and then no salmon and no
jpoou or line. Such are the trials ot
.he "green ' angler. A few pointers
.rom Mickey soon put the party riglit
in regards to landing their catch.
Have you ever caught a salmon?
Hundreds of anglers have dreamed o£
.he supreme moment when they would
■ee this king leap high above tlie
svater, and feel the thrill of thrills
A'hich comes to the lucky one, who
knows that it is his. Suddenly your
line is taunt—a jerk—and then away.
your boat travels as fast as any motor
,ian drive it. Experience has taught
lo let tho flsh have Its run and so in a
ihort time, Mr. Salmon gives up and
Vours Truly lands his first.
It was one glorious Ashing trip, enjoyed to the limit by all. We were
glad to exchange the lures of the city
.'or the rocky hills the dense forest,
the cloud-tipped skies, the Christmas
trees, the river banks, the camp fires,
.he landed flsh, the fried fish, the
black coffee and are anxious to go
again.
RAILWAY CONFERENCE
AT OTTAWA HAS ENDED
P. P. HARRISON
1UKISISTKR  and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - • • B.C.
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Premier Oliver has telegraphed from Ottawa, before leaving the federal Capital, that
the railway conference has ended.
with the understanding that matters
dealt with will be taken up with officials of the Canadian National and
Canadian Pacific Railways and another conference may be held at n
later date. It Is generally understood, though, that a tentative agreement has been reached which will
lead-toa solution of the P.G.E. Railway problem and the question of a
railway for the Peace River district.
A casualty Insurance company that
had required some additional evidence
to support a claim recently received
a letter from the widow of the Insured, which ended:
"I have so much trouble getting my
money that I sometimes almost think
I wish my husband was dead."
IY APPOINTMeNT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KING GEORGE V.
u
@jadun (Bis)'
WHISKY
Thoroughly Matured in Oai\Casi\s
There is no necessity for anyone in Canada to buy immature
whisky.
The Canadian Government
Permits the bottling of whisky in
ond under its supervision and
Guarantees the Age of whisky so
bottled.
Look for the Government Stamp on the capsule.
Observe carefully the dale stated thereon.
IT TELLS THE ACE
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Montrsul, Que.
Distillers ofTint
Whiskies since I8S8
London, Eng.
New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thc Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. W-5
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
Photos from Underwood and Underwood
GOVERNMENT
DYKES STAND UP
UNDER STRAIN
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Despite the
severest criticism of opposition members of-the Legislature and the fiercest attacks of the elements, the new
Sumas Reclamation project has come
through its flrst big test In perfect
manner. While many parts of the
Lower Fraser Valley were badly injured by the heavy floods, the new gov
ernment dykes stood up under tho
3train and engineers report no damage whatever.
START HAS BEEN MADE
TO COMPLETE HIGHWAY
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Hon. W. H.
Sutherland, minister of public workit,
states that a start has been made on
the remaining link of the Transprovln
cial Highway and work will he rushed
as rapidly as possible. Camps have
been established at different points
and such work as can be done at this
season of the year will be proceeded
with. Early in the spring the main
work will be tackled. Meanwhile,
the early start on the work is expected to do much towards relieving unemployment.
DEATH CLAIMS
MAISIE EDWARDS
The death occurred at 6:30 p.m.,
Monday. January 12th of Maisie Olga,
aged 11 years 6 months, daughter ot Jir. and Mrs. A. C. Edwards ot
this city.
The little girl has been tailing In
health for a number of yeara, her
condition becoming very much more
serious during the past few months.
She had bcen confined to the Cumberland General Hospital tor aome
months, but was removed home a
short time ago. The father of the
deceased child is well known throughout the district as an organist of exceptional ability, and the sympathy of
a wide circle of friends Is extended
to Mr. and Mrs. Edwards In their aad
bereavement.
The funeral took place at 3:00 p.m.,
on Thursday from Grace Methodist
Church. Rev. J. R. Butler officiating,
assistance being rendered by Rev.
James Hood and Rev. Beattie ot
Courtenay.
With 2637 manufacturing establishments, employing 41,000 workers,
British Columbia has now become the
third industrial province in Canada.
I wonder whut would happen
If we all went on strike
And everyone refused to touch .
A job he didn't like.
Suppose the cows and chickens quit
And wheat refused to grow,
And corn and clover threw a fit,
And wind Just wouldn't blow.
Mankind has such an easy life;
He thinks he owns the earth,
If these things  happened he would
learn
How little he was worth.
T.WHERRY
JUDBMBIftUNNER
ttmtm prim Ml .1
w»esfcH«»l»«T»e
Sympathetic Man (to yawning
guest, at a large reception): "Are you
I very much bored, sir?"
Yawning Guest: "Yes, dreadfully.
; And you?"
!    S. M.:  "Oh, 1 am bored to death.
] too."
Y. G.: "How would lt do to clear out
together?!!"
!     S. M.: "I am sorry I can't.     I am
t the host."
GET THIS!
BE SURE AND BE THERE.    THE OPPORTUNITY
OF A LIFE TIME
Quick   Action
Sale
 AT A. MACKINNON!
Mark This Down on Your Calendar
THE OPENING DATE—SATURDAY. JAN.  10TH.
THE OPENING TIME   —   —   —   —   9:30 A.M.
NOTE—Regrets never put money in any one's pocket and it won't in yours, so be there. The
best bargains go flrst.
"LOCKHEART"
A. MacKinnon PAGE SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1925.
FOR SATURDAY ONLY, JAN.  17th
((■   Alir    a am    sfl ■   AHU))
LOVE and GLO
Two of Ihe greatest things in the world!
With a brilliant cast, including:
Charles De Roche, Madge Bellamy,
Wallace MacDonald,, Ford Sterling,
A. Gibson Gowland,   Priscilla Dean
Moran.
Heart  Throbs For All!
Men - Women - Young- Old!
A   MIGHTY   PHOTODRAMA   OF
BRAVE    HEARTS    AND    TRUE
SOULS—A MAN'S COURAGE AND
A  WOMAN'S   CONSTANCY
ADULTS 50?
CHILDREN 250
SATURDAY MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M. CHILDREN 150    ADULTS 35?
Monday & Tuesday
January 19th and 20th
Vtom f
VIOLA
DANA
Wed. and Thurs.
January 21st and 22nd
Friday & Saturday
January 23rd and 24th
 ♦ * ♦-
"DAUGHTERS OF
THE NIGHT"
A PICTURE OF DARING ROMANCE—OF THRILLS
—OF EVERY DAY LIFE—
IN
HER FATAL
MIL LIONS
All she had was nerve—the furs, the limousine and
the limousine manner were—to stretch the word—
borrowed.
DON'T MISS THIS STORY OF LOVE AND LAUGHTER AND LUCRE
ADULTS 350 CHILDREN 15?
De Luxe Shows 6:45 — 8:45
CHAPTER n OF
THE GHOST CITY"
.".   "The Bulldogger"   .'.
FEATURING
PETE MORRISON MARGARET MORRIS
AND AL WILSON
The first Chapter was a big hit.    Everybody is talking about this serial—Don't Miss It ! !   Also a good
——comedy	
A Stampede Of Thrills!
ADULTS 35<) CHILDREN 150
De Luxe Shows 6:45 — 8:45
Come to the Saturday Night Dance!
Gents 60c. 9:30 to 12:00 Ladies 15c.
IIo=Ilo Theatre
TWO DE LUXE SHOWS
NIGHTLY
CUMBERLAND
—MATINEE—
EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:30
An actual mirror of the great
metropolis and a thrilling, tense
story of celebrated figures of
sport, art, theatre and the newspaper world.
The most realistic and interesting reproduction of musical comedy, the prize ring, race track
and of night life on Broadway
ever filmed.
No one ever dreamed of such a
cast:
Anita Stewart.
Dore Davidson
Tex Rickard
George McManus
Winsor McCay
Earle Sande
Joe Humphreys
T. Roy Barnes
Hal Forde
Irvin S. Cobb
H. C. Witwer
Billy De Beck
Harry Hershfield
"Kid" Broad
Johnny Hennessey
Oscar Shaw
Harry Watson
Ned Wayburn
Damon Runyon
Nell Brinkley
J. W. McGurk
Pete Hartley
Johnny Gallagher
Olin Howard
Stanley Forde
"Bugs" Baer
Tom Lewis
Fay King
Hal Coffman
Billy Gould
Tammany Young
and the entire "Ziegfeld Follies"
chorus.
THE
WONDER PICTURE OF
NEW YORK'S
"MAIN STREET"
di FRIDAY, JANUARY  16,  1925.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND.B.C.
PAGE SEVEN
H
AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE
Wednesday and Thursday, January 21 and 22
J tak that the
telephone told
William fox presents
DAUGHTERS!
ANIGHT
Story bu 'Willard (Robertson
AnttmerClifton products
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MBHIUFIKUi.    Prnpriotor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
lloh'H wife aaid to him, "You don't
bring me candy like you used to before we were married."
Bob replied, "That ao—well, you
never heard of a fisherman feeding
bait to a fish after he had caught it,
did you?"
"My mind is prone to criticize
The many faults I see—
1 wish that I could realize
My only job is—me!"
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
Start 1925 Right!
ASK   TOUR   LOCAL  VENDOR   AND   DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER  THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
English Ale  and
Stout, Lager Beer
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
This advertisement is not published or displayed by thc
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
■si.
ASK FOR
Fletcher's   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNO PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros.   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C.  W.  Sillence        G, M. Swan Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
|  Scenic Trip Through       I
1 i
j        Cumberland District I
i (Specially Written for The Cumberland Islander) 1
j g
jseibjehhitsIs^^ sisiar
A BEAUTY TRIO, AND ZIEGFELD CORALLED THEM ALL
In order to further the glorification of the American Girl, Flo
Ziegfeld has coralled these three beauties of beauties. Photo
shows, left to right, Lois Wild, "Follies" beauty who won the
1923 Beauty Contest held at Atlantic City; Dorothy Knapp.
Follies beauty who won the 1922 Atlantic City contest, and
Beryl Williams, who is to appear in the forthcoming Revue,
"The Comic Supplement," and who won the 1924 Contest held
at Atlantic City. They are shown with the silver trophies
that they won.
Commenting on the following story
.ve would like to say that perhaps i.
io place can more pleasures from f
loenio and sportsman's point of view
>e had than on our own Vancouvei
Island. We would welcome more o
.hese stories along with "Pioneerini
lie Wild West." and will at all time:
■jive manuscripts our best o[ atten
tion.—Md.
Snorting and puffing on three
teaming, till we thought it woult"
>Ui-t, Li:>.::y had m.-de the grade. I
icemed only a short time since ivi
•oiled onto the wharf at .Nanaimo, si
pleasing had the scene: y heen on thc
trail ftom lhat city ;o where our Fori
teemed ready to give up the ghost.
Cumberland, one mile—Can sve
make It? The little mining town wc
Iiad lienrd so much about, slowly, bul
lurely, became a reality. As wc roll
:kI along on Broadway, (which wc
afterwards learned wns Dunsmui
Ave.), a mini .er of curious resident!
gave us the once over, and no wondei
—Poor Lizzy had died ami wc war-
stalled on the main avenue of the
city, with darkness; creeping upon us
A hotel proprietor and garage man
seemed to be the only solution to on*,
troubles. Incidentally Lizzy had
stopped In front of a Cumberland
hotel, so It was with very little effovl
.bat our first trouble was settled. ,\
comfortable room, followed up with a
grand shower bath and lunch put new
life in the party and we decided to
spend tile night in Cumberland.
"Where's our Lizzy?" .Next morning the garage man was not needed su
much as a policeman. In a few minutes, telephone conversation with tht
city constable Informed  us that cai
No. — was ln pound, and that a
warrant awaited the owner, charging
him with parking against the laws
of the city. Here we shake hand;
with ourselves as our car was stored
n a city garage and after paying tne
ine, a walk to the Cumberland Motor
.Vorks, a few words with the mechanic, our car was ready for the
oad again. Lizzy must hnve only
jeen tired the night before, for a (Ding of gas and oil gave new life
.0 her.
Having learned a few things about
ho city's regulations, we decided to
inquire about the pleasures that the
listrict afforded the tourist. The
proprietor of the hotel seemed very
veil informed on this subject, and of-
.ered to furnish a guide to accompany us, which offer we accepted, nnd
here begin some of the exploits that
.his guide, named "Mickey," led us
Ji rough.
Having made all the necessary arrangements for the morrow, Mickey
tapped on our door at 5:00 a.m., and
after adjusting our packs, we set out
o climb the mountains. Beim; new
o the game, our guide did not work
is too hard, but explained tlie dlffer-
mt sights as we looked over toward
lie mainland. Here could be seen
he mountain stream rushing on its
.ay to supply water for the city
hlch we had just left, tho Courtenay
liver, with its great scenic views, the
:ntrance to and Comox Harbor and
ast, but not least beautiful Comox
ake. These, snid tho guide, will
o prominent places In our trips to
ollow.
The first Fishing Trip
The tramp who asked Ihe Chinaman
or a feed one Tuesday aft 'i noon,
in being nsked If he liked ftr-H, and
jn answering in thc affirmative, was
.old In come around ■r'iiday," was no
.norc diSBapolll ed than the writer
vhen trying to land his lirst salmon.
ifter pulling In the line lo rid It of
.vhat 'Vn« thought a snag, one look--
i salmon—and then no salmon und no
jpobn or line. Such are tlie trials of
Jie "green' nngler. A few pointers
rom Mickey soon put tlie party right
In regards to landing their catch.
Have you ever caught a salmon?
Hundreds of anglers have dreamed of
.he supreme moment when they would
jee this king leap high above tlie
water, and feel tlie thrill of thrills
.vliich comes to the lucky one, who
knows that it is his. Suddenly your
line is taunt—a jerk—and then away,
your boat travels ns fast as any motor
jan drive it. Experience has taught
to let tiie fish have its run and so in a
(hort time, Mr. Salmon gives up and
Yours Truly lands liis first.
It was one glorious fishing trip, enjoyed to the limit by all. We were
glad tn exchange the lures of Ihe city
."or the rocky hills the dense forest,
the cloud-tipped skies, the Christinas
trees, the river banks, the camp fires.
ho landed flsh, the fried fish, the
black coffee and are anxious to go
again.
RAILWAY CONFERENCE
AT OTTAWA HAS ENDED
P. P. HARRISON
BARKISTER  and   SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
CUMBERLAND - - - B.C.
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Premier Oliver has telegraphed from Ottawa, he-
Core leaving the federal Capital, that
the railway conference has ended,
with the understanding that matters
dealt with will he taken up with officials of the Canadian National aud
Canadian Pacific Railways and another conference may he held at a
later date. It Ih generally understood, though, that a tentative agreement has heen reached which will
lead to-a solution of the P.G.E. Railway problem and the question of a
railway for the Peace River district.
A casualty insurance company that
had required some additional evidence
to support a claim recently received
a letter from the widow of the insured, which ended:
"I have so much trouble getting my
money that I sometimes almost think
I wish my husband was dead."
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
u
»»
g^ADIAN (to
WHISKY
Thoroughly Matured in Oai\Casi\s
There is no necessity for anyone in Canada to buy immature
whisky. •
The Canadian Government
permits the bottling of whisky in
Bond under its supervision and
Guarantees the Age of whisky so
bottled.
Looi\ for the Government Stamp on the capsule.
Observe carefully the date staled thereon.
IT TELLS THE AGE
DISTILieD AND BOTTLED (JY
Hiram Walker & sons, limited
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Distillers of Flnt
Whiskies since I85S
Montreal, Que. London, Enj. New York, U.S.A.
Thia advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or liy the Government of British Columbia. W-s
3£^^.
Photos from Underwood and Underwood
GOVERNMENT
DYKES STAND UP
UNDER STRAIN
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Despite the
severest criticism of opposition members of the Legislature and the fiercest attacks of the elements, the new
Sumas Reclamation project lias conic
through its first big test in perfect
manner. While many parts of tbe
Lower Fraser Valley were badly Injured by the heavy Hoods, tbe new gov
ernment dykes stood up under the
strain and engineers report uo damage whatever.
START HAS BEEN MADE
TO COMPLETE HIGHWAY
VICTORIA, Jan. 22.—Hon. \V. If.
Sutherland, minister of public work.;,
states that a start has beeu made on
the remaining link of tbe Transprovin
cial Highway and work will he rushed
as rapidly as possible. Camps bnve
been established at different points
and such work as can be done at this
season of the year will be proceeded
with. Early in tbe spring the main
work will be tackled. .Meanwhile,
the early start on the work is expected to do much towards relieving unemployment.
DEATH CLAIMS
MAISIE EDWARDS
The death occurred at 6:30 p.m.,
Monday. January 12th of Maisie Olga,
aged 11 years ti mouths, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Edwards of
this city.
The little girl has been failing In
health for a number of years, her
condition becoming very much more
serious during the past few months.
She bad been confined to the Cumberland Ceneral Hospital for some
months, but was removed home a
short time ago. Tbe father of the
deceased child is well known throughout •>!(-' district as an organist of exceptional ability, and the sympathy of
a wide circle of friends is extended
to Mr. and Mrs. Edwards In their sad
bereavement.
The funeral took place at 3:00 p.m.,
on Thursday from Grace Methodist
Churcb. Rev. J. R. Butler officiating,
assistance being rendered by Rev.
James Hood and Rev. Beattie of
Courtenay.
With 2637 manufacturing establishments! employing 41,000 workers.
British Columbia has now become the
third industrial province in Canada.
I wonder what would happen
If we all went on strike
And everyone refused to touch
A job he didn't like.
Suppose the rows nnd chickens quit
And wheat refused to grow,
And corn and clover threw a fit.
And wind just wouldn't blow.
Mankind has such an easy life;
He thinks he owns tbe earth,
If  these   things  happened  he  would
learn
How little he was worth.
T.WHERRY
^.TANNER
fmt) hr mrtm KM «i
Ws>rb^a*latla i
at PMiston Ave.,
Sympathetic Man (to yawning
guest, nt a large reception): "Are you
very much bored, sir?"
Yawning Quest: "Ves, dreadfully.
And you?"
K. M.I "Oh, I an bored to death.
loo."
Y. (!.: "llnw would it do to clear out
together ?H"
S. M.J "I am sorry I can't. I am
the host."
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
GET THIS!
BE SURE AND BE THERE.    THE OPPORTUNITY
OK A LIFE TIME
Quick   Action
Sale
 AT A. MACKINNONS—
Mark This Down on Your Calendar
THE OPENING  DATE—SATURDAY. JAN.  10TH.
THE OPENING TIME   —   —   —   —   9:.lfl A.M.
NOTE—Regrets never put money in any one's pock"
et and it won't in yours, so be there. The
best bargains go first.
"LOCKHEART"
A. MacKinnon PAGE EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER,   CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FRIDAY,  JANUARY 16, 1925.
Madame
X
REDUCING GIRDLE
The New Girdle That Reduces
Waist and Hips
This wonderful new scientific girdle
reduces your waist and hips instantly!
Makes you look thin while getting
thin! Thc moment you put it on, the
bulky fat on waist and hips seems to
vanish, the waistline lengthens, your
figure is erect and graceful—for the
girdle Ib strong enough to really hold
you in. But it does not merely draw
in your waist. It actually takes off
thc fat, gently but BUrely.
The Madame X Reducing Girdle is
built on scientific massage principles
that have caused reductions of 6, 10,
20 pounds. It is made of the highest
grade pure Para rubber, especially
designed for reducing purposes, and
is worn over the undergarment In
place of an uncomfortable corset.
Touches and massages every portion
of the surface! With every breath,
with every little motion it gently massages away the disfiguring, useless
fat. Women usually lose one to three
Inches the very first week! Makes
you look and feel years younger.
It ls entirely new—nothing like it
has ever been known before. The
most comfortable, practical girdle you
ever had on!
Social and Personal
J. Sutherland
Cumberland
Mr. T. R, Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, was iu town during the week.
* *   •
Mrs. H, Newton, of Nanaimo, Is visiting in town, the guest of Mrs. Thos.
Graham.
* ss     ss
Mr. 0. E. Ford auditor of the Dominion Express Co. visited Cumberland during the week.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. R. C. Lang returned On Monday
night from Vancouver, where he has
ocen spending a few days on business.
ss     ss     ss
Pierce Graham returned to Victoria
on Monday and will resume his studies at the University School of that
city.
* ss     ss
Mr. Louis Murks, representing the
Canadian Explosives Ltd. of Victoria
paid an olllcial visit to Cumberland
iliis week.
* *   e
.Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., left for Nanaimo and
Ladysmith on Tuesday and returned
on Thursday.
* *     ss
At Home
Mrs. S. Horwood and Mrs. E. W.
Dickie will bo at home ou Wednesday,
January 21st from 4 to 6 p.m. at the
residence of Mrs. E. W. Bickle, Dunsmuir Avenue.
Recovering
The many friends of Mrs. John
Bruce will be pleased to learn that
she ls doing as well as can be expected. She is confined to the Cumberland  General  Hospital.
DEATH TAKES
"SCOTTY" CLARK
Mr. and Mrs. James T. Brown left
ou Tuesday morning tor Newcastle,
Wash., where they were called by telegram which notified them of the
death of i\Irs. Brown's brother, Mr.
Walter Clark, better known to his
Cumberland friends as "Scotty." The
deceased was a resident of this city
for a number of years, being especially prominent in the field of sport.
No details are as yet available, but a
full account will be published next
week.
FOUR GAMES ARE
PLAYED IN WEEK'S
HOOP SCHEDULE
Sam, while walking in thc woods
late one afternoon ,was surprised by
a wildcat which proceeded to chase
him to the top limbs of a large treo
on the edge of a deep canyon. The
wildcat was climbing as fast as Sam.
and soon had forced him perilously
near the decaying end of a long limb
extending beyond the edge of the
precipice, Sam decided it was time
to remonstrate.
"Wilecat" he said, impressively,
"wilecat, does yo' make me go one
inch furdah, yo' is gwlne to Jump a
long ways fo' yo' suppah!"—American Legion Weekly.
CORPORATION   OF  THE  CITY  OK
CUMBEMAKI)
NOTICE
Dog taxeB for the current year are
new due and must be paid to the undersigned not later than January 31,
1925.
W. H. COPE.
j. Chief of Police
Four games were played in the second round of the Basketball schedule
this week and although all were won
by fairly large scores, yet they were
not without plenty of excitement for
the spectators antl keen competition
on the part of the players.
ln Monday's fixture Yellowjackets
had a hard time beating the C.G.I.T.
by 8 to 4, Miss Redford scoring all
points for the winner. In the men's
game, the same evening, "Peanuts'
Robertson provided a sensation by
scoring 1? baskets. It was his first
game of the season and doubtless it
will not be his last. The Owls, tor
whom "Peanuts" was playing, consequently swamped the Athletics by
60 to 6, which is, by the way, the
highest score yet made.
Thursday evening saw the High
School Girls In action against those
from thc Public School and, as before
it was anybody's game until the final
whistle. The first-named team won
by 12 points to 10, The spectators
derived much enjoyment In this mix
from tlie manner ln which E. Con-
rod and P. Cloutier were checking
each other, both seeming to want to
play while rolling on the floor.
Doo Dads won by a fair margin
over tlie Athletics but the second half
was anybodys for the former seemed
to slow up and the latter to gain more
pep. Denholme and James starred
for tho winners each scoring about
eight baskets, while Prior and Mortimer, on the same team, also showed
up well.     The final score was 36-14.
John Cameron refereed both men's
games with M. Stewart and H. Stewart handling tlie ladies respectively.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. W. A. Owen visited Vancouver
this week.
»   •   •
Geo. Barton, of Victoria, is spending a few days ln town on business.
* *   •
Jack Simpson, who has been confined to the hospital for a couple of
weeks. Is able to be around again.
• • '•
Mrs. George Odgers. Mr. and Mrs.
John Edwards, and Mrs. Kynock of
Nanaimo, arrived on Wednesday for
the purpose of attending the funeral
of the late Maisie Edwards. They returned on Friday.
Hotel Guests
H. E. Wallls, Courtenay; C. Davis;
J. Irvine, Victoria; E. O. Doctor; T.
Wallls, Vancouver; Geo. Barton, Victoria; Louis Mark, Victoria; Tom
Stevenson, Vancouver; Arthur Paull,
Nanaimo; S. P. Falrbalrn*, Victoria;
Harry Gray, Vancouver; Adam Philip, Vancouver; J. Bryon, Courcliau
Station; T. H. Hill, Vancouver; C. L.
Foss, Cobble Hill; F. W. McFanle,
Vancouver.
NOTICE
The annual meeting of the Women's
Auxiliary of the Cumberland General
Hospital will be held In the Anglican
Hall on Friday, January 23rd, 1925, at
3 p.m. All members are earnestly
requested to attend.
E. N. JEFFREY, Secretary
The leading citizen of a small country town lost ''Is daughter's pet cat.
He handed the local newspaper an ad
offering $100.00 reward for the cat. A
day or so later he called at the newspaper office for news of the cat, only
to find a small boy present. "Where is
the editor?" he asked the boy. "Out,'
was the reply. "The assistant editor?"
he continued. "Out," was again the reply. "Wheres the reporter, the printer, Where's the whole staff gone to?"
All out looking for your cat," was
the reply. Which only goes to show
that $100 is a lot of money.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
OF FLORAL TRIBUTES
AND CARD OF THANKS
It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S
Emulsion
Cod Liver Oil
A Cod Liver Oil that has been rendered practically
tasteless by the addition of a few aromatics and gums,
it is uniformly mixed and will not separate.     For
your system, try
LANG'S EMULSION COD LIVER OIL
A pure white emulsion that is pleasant to take and is
very palatable.     It will increase your appetite and
build up wasted tissue and give you strength.
Lang's Drug Store
—THE REXALL KODAK STORE—
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Edwards wish
to thank friends and neighbors for
their kind expressions of sympathy
and assistance rendered during their
recent sad bereavement. The following floral tributes are gratefully acknowledged.
Pillow—The Family.
Wreaths—Uncle John and Aunt
Mary Edwards, Nanaimo; Uncle Matt
and Aunt Mary Brodrick, Nanaimo;
Uncle George and Aunt Amelia Odgers, Nanaimo; Uncle Frank and Aunt
Ettie Kynock, Nanaimo; Aunt Alice
Odgers and Cousins, Nanaimo; Teacher and Class; Grace Methodist Sunday
School; Mr. and Mrs. George Ramsell and Family.
Sprays—Mrs. W. Graham; Bessie
Nicholas; Mr. and Mrs. Charles O'Brien.
CARDS OF THANKS
Mr. A. E. Jeffrey wishes to thank
all who supported him In the recent
election, and will continue to work for
the best interests of the city and community.
To the Electors of the City ol* Cumberland :
I herewith wish to extend to you
my sincere thanks and appreciation
of the honor done me, by again returning me as an alderman of our
city. 1 shall endeavor in the future
as I have in the past to warrant your
confidence.
T. H. Mumford.
To the Electors;
I wish to thank alt those ratepayers
who tendered me their support at the
recent municipal election.
Your obedient servant.
Thomas .Mordy.
To all those who rendered support
at the recent election, Mr. Patrick
Mullen wishes to extend hia sincere
thanks, and gives every assurance thnt j
he will do his utmost towards the continued welfare of the city.
WHY SO MANY PHONE
GIRLS ARE PRETTY
The mighty army of American telephone girls has a high average for
good looks, according to trained observers. After looking over the first
1,000, any normal man will agree to
this proposition. Or perlinps it
wouldn't he necessary to give even
1,000 the once-over.
In "Daughters of the Niglit," the
big, human telephone photoplay produced by William Fox and which is
hooked at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday, 21-22. ll.iere
are bevies of attractive telephone
girls. And they're all real, snapped from life with no making up.
right out of the daily and nightly
routine of  the telephone service.
Application for a job as telephone
operator is no beauty contest, but
nevertheless the process of natural
selection results in the high average
of attractive girlhood.     Why?
A long-haired savant explaned tlie
reason.
One of the absolute qualifications
for the Job is a pleasant voice. And
voices that are easy to listen to generally go with faces and forms lhat
are easy to look at.
That's why the average "hello"
girl Is generally agreeable both to the
eye and ear.
Vancouver
Evening Sun
The Peoples' Paper
First newspaper in Canada to reduce
-subscription prices—will now accept
yearly subscriptions at the reduced
less than pre-war price of $3.00 per
year.
Trial
Subscription
2 Months--50c.
Including    big    week-end    Saturday
Evening feature  paper with  colored
comics.
Order now through your local Postmaster, Drug Store, or send direct to
the Vancouver Sun, 125 Pender Street
West,   Vancouver,   B.C.
NOTE—Morning, dally only, also $3.01)
per year. State whether Morning or
Evening edition is required when
ordering.
Week-End Specials
SUNKIST ORANGES SWEET AND JUICY
4 Doz. for S5i? 3 Doz. for 95tp
60<>      90<>      $1.00 PER DOZEN
EATING OR COOKING APPLES
4 Lbs. for 25c* $2.35 Per Box
EXTRA SPECIAL No. 1
25<* Per Bottle or 2 For 45^
Sweet  Relish,   Libby's  Prepared  Mustard,   Holsum
Pickles small size as follows, Sweet and Sour Mixed,
Sweet and Sour Chow, Sweet Gerkins.
Orange or Grape Fruit Marmalade.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for 45tp
Chrisp Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs. for  55<*
Special Mixed Biscuits, 3 lbs. for $1.00
EXTRA SPECIAL No. 2
35<? Per Bottle 3 For 95<*
Lion Rrand Peanri  Butter,   1-lb.  Glass, Libby's  or
Clark's Catsup,     Libby's Pickles—Sweet or Sour Mixed, Sweet and Sour Chow, Sweet Gerkins and Sweet
Relish.
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
A. BIRD
27 CAMP 27 CAMP
UPHOLSTERING,  FURNITURE  REPAIRS
STAINING AND VARNISHING, ETC.
Estimates
Given
Prompt Attention
to all orders
PHONE 123
HAYNES "BUBBLE" HAYNES
& HAYNES Colored Show & HAYNES
COLORED SHOW!!
Colored Singers and Dancers
Gaiety Theatre, Courtenay, Tuesday, January 20
32 prizes given away at Country Store.
5"C—ADMISSION FOB SHOW OM.Y-CHILIHtE!,— *5C
111(1 BUL AFTER SHOW 25c
75c 75c
DANCE — SHOW — REFRESHMENTS
B. C. GIRL WINS
$150 PRIZE FOR
PEACE ESSAY
OTTAWA, Jan. 12.—Walter Sht>;r,
aged 13, a pupil ot tlie continuation
school at Sutherland, Out., is the winner of the $300 prize for tlie best es-
Bay, not exceeding 000 words, written
in English or French, by a high
school pupil under 15 years of age, in
tlie William Cleaves  Doyle prize es
say competition provided by the widow of the late representative for the
League of Nations Society In Canada.
The subject was "How Peace Between
Nations Can Be Best Provided."
In (he class open to pupils between
the ages of 15 and 18 years. English
or French, Miss Hilda A, Marshall,
aged 15, of tlie high school, Lady-
smith. B.O,, was successful and won
the $150 prize.
Tlie   Vatican   has   11,000   chambers
and apartments.
I wish to thank and express appre
elation to all those who supported mc !
in my election as Alderman and
School Trustee for the City of Cumberland. I will do my utmost tr
merit the confidence you have placed
In mo.
John  Ledlngham.
To all those wbo supported me ln
my candidacy for alderman of the
City of Cumberland, I wish to extend
my sincere thanks nnd appreciation.
and Bhnll continue In exert my utmost
endeavors towards thc best interests
ot the City.
John J. Potter
Mr. John C. Brown extends thanks
and appreciation for tlie support given j
him at the recent election to School
Trustco for the City of Cumlierland.
Mr. Alex. Maxwell wishes to express his appreciation of the co-operation and support rendered him at the
municipal election, and will exert hi-
utmost endeavors to further the best
Interests of the City.
Mrs. T. Williams, Courtenay Hoad,
wishes to thank Dr. McNaughton and
nursing Btaff of the Cumberland Gen- |
eral Hospital for kind attention shown
to her daughter Mary while a patient i
there.
FOR  SALE—3  H.P.   7.  ENGINE,  IN
flrBt class condition.     Apply Blunt I
and Ewart, Courtenay. 3.
Photos from Underwood & Underwood.
THE NEWEST SPORT OF TRANS-ATLANTIC   TRAVELERS
Fencing in bathing suits is the newest amusement for fair passengers traveling across the
Atlantic.    Here are Billy Ball (left) and Mi3S Elsie Gay engaging in a friendly "duel" on
the deck of the S.S. Aquitania.

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