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The Cumberland Islander Sep 6, 1924

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Array THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
/'
1/
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRDE  YEAR—No. 36.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 193-1.
UNlow(MU*s5tr>       SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
School Trustees
And Teachers In
Interesting Session
The regular meeting of the School
Board was held in the Public School
Tuesday evening laat with Trustees
Banks, Brown, McFadyen and Secy.
MacKinnon present together with
about fourteen teachers, tlie latter
being there by invitation of the
Board.
The secretary opened the evening's
business by the reading of the minutes of the last meeting. They were
adopted as read. An application for
an Increase of $300.00 In salary, by
Miss Phyllis Partridge, High School
assistant, was read and laid on the
table to be dealt with later. A communication from Miss Edith Horbury,
asking for two weeks' further leave
caused quite a lot of discussion, lt
appears Miss Horbury wrote her application ou Thursday antl left tor
Seattle the same day, apparently taking it for granted that her two weeks'
leave woultl be given her. Fortunately the Board was able to secure
Miss Beatrice Bickle as a substitute
and not deeming it worth while to
have her teach for only two weeks,
which would hardly he enough time
to get her work straightened out, they
proposed giving sMIss Horbury u
month's leave. The matter waB
brought before the meeting for discussion, seveial of the teachers asking
If the Board was acting within its
rights by giving a month's leave when
only half that was asked. Nothing
on this particular point being found
in the school law it was Anally ds-
plded to turn the whole matter over
to the Superintendent of Education
for a decision,
A communication from S. Frank
Pierce, re the 21st Annual Convention
Of the B.C. School Trustees Association, wns laid on tlie table.
Secretary MacKinnon read a statement of bills and accounts for the last
term, the total amount being $15,-
1811.51). it was ordered received nml
fi|ei|. The school ground also came
in for lis share of discussion when
It was found that no check hud been
kept on the work being done there by
the contractor, J. Damonte. Trustee
Brown moved that the Boartl meet
Mr. Damonte on Wednesday and come
to a definite agreement c«i this mailer. MP. Brown also stated that he
and Mr. MacKinnon had succeeded in
Obtaining a.new High School Principal in the person of Mr. Slienstoiie.
of Oourtonny, at a salary of $2511(1 pet-
year. The meeting extended these
two trustees a hearty vote of thanks.
Chairman Bunks then said that
they had come to an Important point
in the evenings business, namely a
get-to-gether talk witli the teachers
on examination results anil kindred
sohool matters. Frankly, the results
had bwn a disappointment, not billy
to the Board hilt lo the teachers as
well. She realized that the latter
had done their best and were not
wholly responsible for the blame, the
parents at home and the pupils themselves, received a goodly share of
(Continued on Pnge Five)
GAME REGULATIONS
ARE ANNOUNCED
Open seasons for birds and game
in British Columbia were announced
by the Provincial Game Board last
Saturday.
Western districts which includes all
the Province west of the summit of
the Cascade Mountains south of the
Atlin electoral district and includes
Vancouver Island and Islands.
Bear—On Vancouver Island, from
November 1 to May 31; remainder of
the district, from September 1 to
June 15.
Deer, (bucks only), over one year
old—Throughout the district except
on Queen Charlotte Islands and other
portions of Vancouver island known
as North and South Saanich and
Highland District, from September 1:1
to November 31); In that portion of
Vancouver Island known as the Highland District, from September 13 to
September 30.
Mountain goats, (over one year old)
—Throughout the district, from September 13 to November 30.
Both dates arc inclusive. Bag limits: Deer, three bucks only; goaW,
two; grizzly, one, and three hears of
any other species.
Kur-Hearing   Animals
All    fur-bearing    animals    except
beaver—December 1 to March 31.
Beaver—In the electoral districts of
Prince Rupert, Skeona and Mackenzie iu the Western district, from December 1 to March 31.
Game Birds
Grouse, blue only—Throughout the
district except South Saanich aud
Highland districts and Bowen Island,
from September 13 to October 15. In
the Highland District of Vancouver
Island, September 13 to September 3D.
Willow Grouse —Throughout the
whole of Vancouver Island (except
Oak Bay municipality, South Saanich
and Highlands districts) and Island
electoral district, November 1 to November 30. ln the Highland District
of Vancouver island, November 15 to
November 30. Throughout the remainder of the district, except Point
Grey municipality, October 15 to October 31.
Pheasant, cock birds only—Except
In the Oak Buy municipality, and ou
the Mainland (except Point Grey
municipality) and on Gnbrlola and
Texnda Islands, October 15 to November 30. Cock birds only, on Sidney,
Moresby, Pender, Mayno, Gallnno,
Snlt Spring, Denman and Hornby Islands, December 1 to December 81.
European Partridge—In the municipally of Delta, November 15 to
November 30. In North and South
Saanich ami Highland District, October 15 to October 31.
Bag limits—Grouse, 5 blue and 5
willow in one doy; 60 in the aggregate for season. Pheasants, 6 in one'
day; 25 for season. In districts where
the season is open on hen and cock
birds, 6 In one day. of which only two
shall be hens. European partridge,
li in one day; 25 for season.
Gnme may be kept for two weeks
ufter any open season is ended.
Mrs. Hudson's Team
Winners Of Ladies'
First Aid Trophy
OUR SAMPLE BOOKS
OF CHRISTMAS CARDS
HAVE ARRIVED
NINTH ANNUAL FIELD DAY OF THE VANCOUVER ISLAND
MINE RESCUE ASSOCIATION IS BRILLIANT SUCCESS
FIRST AID AND MINE RESCUE WORK PREDOMINATE—KIDDIES' SPORTS GREATLY ENJOYED
NOVICE  TEAM   SUCCESSFUL  IN
MINE RESCUE COMPETITION
We received during tlie week, out-
sample books of Private Greeting
Christmas Cards, and to say the
least, we were very much surprised at
the magnificent samples.
Cards vary lu price nnd we have
them to suit every purse und every
purpose, from $2.25 per dozen up. If
vou ure interested, cull at The Islander Ollice, or 'phone 35.. Our representative wlIJ be pleased to wait on
you. It is a gootl itlea to place your
order early, as last minute rushes are
sure to lie heavy. Support home
trade—These cards are printed in
Cumberland at The Islander Ollice.
Wliat was considered a magnificent
achievement was the winning of the
Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association's Ladies' Cup on the occasion
of tlie ninth annual field day of the
association held on -the Recreation
Grounds on Labor Day by the local
team captained by Mrs. Walter Hudson. • This team, under the tutorship of Mr, A. J. Taylor has made
rapid strides In the First Aid work
and it was freely said on tlie held on
Monday that this team would compare
favorably with any Ladies' team in
Canada. Mr. Taylor, the instructor
and all the members of the team were
the recipients of many congratula-, Williams, J. Davis, J
tions. A big surprise was also sprung
iu the Mine Rescue competition when
a team of practically novices won out
over a team of experts, the team captained hy Mr. Woods obtaining 97';'.
whilst the team captained hy Mr. J.
Williams obtained S)4.8r/r.
Competition In the various events
was very keen, the final results reading:
Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association Shield for rescue work won
hy Cumberland Canadian Collieries
(D) Ltd., No. 2 team: W. Woods,
(Capt.), H. Jackson, H. Bates, J. Pinfold, J. Mutters, T. Eccleston, \)T'/i.
CHAS. GRAHAM IS
ELECTED   AFTER
SPIRITED CONTEST
VICTORIA.—Important   resolutions
featured the business session of tiie
B.C. Hospitals Association last Saturday morning.    Encouraged by the optimistic   message  brought   hy   President A. Lockey antl Alderman A. D.
Buchanan, on behalf of the Union of
B.C. Municipalities, promising a basis
of adjustment of differences between
the municipalities and   the   hospital
boards,   the  association    adopted    a
motion to refer to tlie meeting at Penticton    three   motions, two   seeking
financial adjustment ami the third to
tranter the cost of isolation hospitals
to iho province.    If the union accepts
The V.I.iM.S.A. Ladies' Cup was won j the recommendations thou joint action
by Cumberland Team No. 1 Can. Col. | will  be  taken  with  the government,
(D) Ltd., Mrs. Hudson   (Capt), Mrs.   otherwise the association will reserve
Farmer,    .Mrs. Davis,    Mrs.  Shearer,' the right to act alone.
Mrs. Potter. , Invite Hospital Enquiry
Second place was won by Nanaimo | The convention adopted a motion In
team No. 4, W. F. Corp, ot* Canada, I favor of n commission of enquiry Into
Mrs. A. Sharp (Capt.), .Mrs. J. Scott, j the conduct of hospitals In  B.C..  tc
won by Nanaimo. W. F. Corp. of Canada's No. 1 team—J. Burton (Capt.),
D. Stobbart. C. Nicholls, J. Scott, E.
II. Patterson.
Second place was won by Extension
No ti team, Can. Col. (D) Ltd., Gto
Carson Sr., (Capt.), J. Delaney, G.
Carson Jr., J. Carson, W. Carson.
The W. L. Coulson Cup was won by
Nanaimo No. 2 team, W. F. Covp, of
Canada; C, Wharton (Capt.). N.
Wharton, J. Cottle, W. Logan, A.
Bennett.
Second place was won hy Cumberland No. 1 team, Can. Col. (D) Ltd.,
W. Beveridge (Capt.), J, Taylor, J. S.
Reid.
Mrs. J. Barton, Mra. ii. Smith, .Miss
Thompson.
The V.l.M.S.A. Juvenile Cup was
won by Nanaimo No. 1 team, W. F.
Corp. of Canada: E. Randall (Capt),
L. Wharton, W. Frnser, T. Man's, D.
Kilner.
Second  plnce  was   won  by  Nunai-
Second place was won by Cumber- i mo No 2 team, W. F. Corp. of Canada,
land.  Canadian   Collieries   (D)   Ltd.. i H. Blinkhorn (Capt.), D. Galloway, It.
No. 1 team;  J. S. Williams, (Capt.). rLogon, R. .Fruser, R. Geldheurt.
J. Taylor, A.  Watson, W. Derry,  Vs'. j     Tho  One-Man   event   was   won   by
Beveridge, J. Davis, 94.8'/r. j R. Reid and W. Beveridge, of Cunt-
First Aid, B.C. Dept. of .Mines Cup. | (Continued on  Page Five)
KING FOOTBALL COMES INTO
ITS OWN THIS WEEK END
Recommended List
For Entrance Class
BASEBALL SEASON ENDS-
MINERS WON FINAL GAME
Different sports may come and go,
but soccer football to the natives of
the British Isles, is the one sport that
can and does hold them. Thero arc
muny residents of the Mother Country  now   residing  on   Vancouver   Is-1 	
land and nowhere will football be \ As there has heen some mlsunder-
welcomed in more than right here In ! standing in Cumberland over the En-
Cumberland. , trance results, due to Uie fact that
The season commences here ou ! ™'y tlle onme» o( tll0B<) •,ul,lla w»"
Sundnv, when the fast-stopping Lady-\ *"»*** "ie Government Exams., were
smith team, the Provincial champions j Published, we have been asked to pub-
will engage the locals In an Upper "8h t,le following list. It contains
Island League fixture. Cumlierland | th« '"""eB of those recommended by
had an excellent team last year, with
he composed of representatives of tht
government,  union  and  association.
IL resolved also to nsk the govern
ment to nppoiut a hospital Inspector-
to advise thc smaller boards in mat
ters of administration.
Chas. Graham, the retiring president, was re-elected after a spirited
contest wilh Dr. G. Brown, of Nntrii-
mo, ond J. J. Bnulield, of Vancouver,
Nanaimo was chosen ns the next plnce
of meeting.
A resolution was ndopted by a
standing vote expressing to Mrs. .Mui-
Iin the condolences at the sudden
death of Dr. R. H. Mullln, a delegate
^t tiie convention, who died suddenly
hist Friday morning at St. Joseph's
Hospital.
Invitation to hold the next convention at Nanaimo, Prince Rupert
and Vernon resulted iu Nanaimo being chosen hy a large majority.
Cumberland Baseball Club hung up
their last win of the season when they
defeated Courtenay at that City last
Sunday. The score was 11-7. With
the exception of tlie batteries, Cumberland had a weaker team than their
rivals . There was not the iistinl pep
|n the game as has been typical t|f
the baseball buttle witli our friendly
rivals of the valley earlier in the
season. Courtenay wns without their
star battery and the local boys without four of their regular lineup.
Hence the llstlessness of the game.
Nevertheless, some good baseball wos
witnessed and thoroughly enjoyed by
the fans. Incidentally the locals
hnve participated in seventeen games
this season, having only lost throe
put of this number. Better luck next
year ,boys!
Dure Hunden on Mound
Dave Hunden wns on the mound for
the first time since he threw his right
arm awny against Courtenay after
that memorable 6-5 game the locals
won. The spice of the game wns
taken away when big Bill Boyd was
away from the mound.    Johnny Rob-
equally good reserve men and whilst
all last year's plnyers nre not yet
available, the players already here
can give a good account of themselves in uny company. Sunday's
! game Is scheduled to sturt nt three
o'clock sharp with Mr. J. Adams, of
ond frame. Cumberland counted | Nannlmo ln charge. Tlie local team
three more  tallies  In  the  third  in- ■ will be:
ning. Courtenay wns the lirst to Blnlr, Goal; Acltroyd, right full
score after that with tho score 5-3 back; Stewart, left full back; Mono
against them, adding another in tho hail, right half buck; Conti  (Cnpt.li
fifth Inning. When the seventh inning arrived, the teams changed the
score to 8-5 In favor of Cumberland.
The latter adtled another run In thc
eighth stanza. In the final frame
each  team  shoved a  couple of runs
Centre half; Broke, left half back;
Bannerman, outside right; Plump, inside right; Fowler, centre forward,
McDonald. Inside left; Hltchens, outside. All other players reserves.
The committee of the Cumberlaml
across the platter leaving the score Unlted nlei on Thursday night for tho
board read, until next year at any flrst mflot|ng 0f ti,e „ew committee,
rate, Cumberland  11, Courtenuy 7.    j w|(n ,,ru<,tu-all>- all members present.
the Principal, in order of the yenr's
average, as well as those who weie
successful nt tlie final Govt, examinations. It will be found from tho
following that the average of the
Cumberland School was 61%, 67s over
the average for the Province.
Ittitiiniiiciiilcd List
In order of year's average:-Helen
Purnham.    Jessie  Grant,    Jean   McNaughton,  Beryl  Hudson,   Isao Aha,
Walter   Hughes,   .Mny   Hughes,   Almn
Conrod,    Lilian  Bonks,   Jean Smith,
Evelyn   Corey,   Mny   Taylor,     Leslie t Const League
Dando, Norman (lomin, Thelma Crny,
Kate Robertson, Robert Votes, Archie,
Hick, Low Yuen, Snm Davis, Andrew
Walker, Edna Smith.
Pass List
Irene  Botes, Jock  Hill,  Low  Man,
Dorothy Maxwell, Margaret Voting.
Hammond-Cedars
Are B.C. Champs
(Special to The Islander)
Iliimmond-Cedors won the Provincial Championship (Baseball) by defeating Victoria yesterday at Vancouver in the final gunie. No score
is yet avniluble.
City Council Did
Much Business
Monday Night
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held in the Council
Chambers Tuesday evening, owing to
Monday, being Labor Day und a holiday, ilia Worship, Mayor Charles J.
Parnham was in the chair with Aldermen A. .Maxwell. T. H. Mumford, J.
Ledlngham, Potter and Jeffrey present.
The City Clerk. W. H. Cope, read
the report uf the recent meeting of
the Police Commissioners recommending five silent police for the centre of
the intersections of the streets on
Dunsmuir avenue. The Mayor explained ihe purchasing of five of a
mushroom shape, ten Inches high and
eighteen inches across, painted whim
With black letters, "Keep to the
Eight". On motion of the board of
works was instructed to secure the
silent policemen and place them in
position.
The communication from the inspector of .Municipalities with reference to the investing of City funds
was ordered filed.
The letter from the Oak Bay Council containing a resolution to centralize all Public Bodies und abolish the
Board of School Trustees, Police aud
Licence Commissioners was also ordered filed.
The fire insurance    covering    the
houses of the returned soldiers was '
ordered to be  renewed.
The Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd.,
granted tbe City Council and Fire
Wardens a donation of $300 as financial assistance In the purchase of one
thousand feet of fire hose; this was a
reply to the deputation of the Fire
Wardens that waited upon Mr, Thomas Graham, the General Superintendent, some few days ago.
Alderman Potter, chairman of tho
Public Works Department gave his
reply in detail on the work of the new
sewer, He suid city employees had
commenced the laying of the twenty-
inch pipe aud were rushing the job to
completion.
Alderman Ledingham, chairman of
the Fire Wardens, explained the handsome donation of $300 from the Canadian Collieries towards the purchase
of one thousand feet of hose and moved a vote of thanks be tendered the
company for their kind consideration.
The Mayor explained the purchase
of the Peerless automobile from the
Canadian Collieries which will be converted into chemical truck containing
two 2ii gallon steel tanks.
Alderman Maxwell moved that Edward W. Bickle be recommended for
the appointment of Police Magistrate
with Small Debts Jurisdiction. This
wus seconded by Alderman John J.
Potter and carried.
The Council will extend au invitation to Mr, P. P. Harrison, M.P.P., to
be present at the next regular meeting of the Council to take up several
matters effecting the welfare of the
city and school district.
PORT ALBERNI WINS OUT
IN SERIES OF MATCHES
Baseball Results
(Special to Thc Islander)
James and Hiiinierniuii tlle Best
From among the locals. Danny Han-
nerman and Tucker Jumes shore even
honors. They fielded brilliantly.
Tucker secured two doubles, a single,
and drove In Just four runs. Dan.
on the other hand, crashed two
doubles, secured two free passes In
four trips to the plnte. He also ran |
the bases brilliantly. Dave Richards pilfered three sacks with real
nifty base running. Muggins cut oil'
three would-be base-stealers. Of thc
rookies, that ls the youngsters who
filled  In  the breach of thc  seniors
ertson commenced operations on that j lineup. "Peanuts" Itobertson was pro-
particular part of the diamond and
was relieved by smiling Lefty Dark-
house In the fifth frame. Cumberland assumed the lead In the flrst
stuiua and the farmers came back
with three more counters In the sec-
babiy the best by virtue of his won
tlerful fielding display. The other
hoys did their best but could not be
expected to play hall without any
previous practice. These youngsters
(Continued on Page Five)
A lot of business was transacted; Finance Committee, Grounds Comtuim.
Selection Committee, Publicity ami
Stands Committees were appointed.
The report of the Secretary Mr. It
Strachan, In connection with his visit
to Nauulmo op Wednesday night to
attend the meeting of the governing
body of the I'pper Island Football Association was also received. Mr, .1.
Quinn nnd Mr. Robt, Hrown also intended this meeting. Mr. Drown represented the Cumberland Rangers
Club.
NOTICE
A meeting of the Cumberland Rugby
Football Club will be held In the
Athletic Club nt 7 o'clock Bharp this
evening (Saturday).
Ambulance Dance
Successful Affair
A large crowd attended tlie dunce
of the Cumberland Centre of thc St.
John's Ambulance Association in the
Ilo-Ilo Hull on Monday evening last,
nfter the concert and presentation of
prizes to the successful competitors
In the First Aid nnd Mine Rescue
competitions held during the day.
Plump's Five-piece Orchestra supplied the music, this well known aggregation of local musicians being
heard to good advantage, all the lat-
est dance hits being played, Dancing commenced at nlne-tlilry and continued until two In the morning. Mr.
.1. I). Davis made tin oflicient Master
of Ceremonies.
Scuttle 4; Ouklund 7.
LOS Angeles tl; Salt Lake 2.
Sjtn Francisco ti; Sacramento 4.
Portland 11; Vernon It.
American I.engue—
Philadelphia 8; New Vork 3.
Boston 5; Washington 12.
Chicago, rnin.
National   Lengtle   -
St. Louis !i;  Pittsburg i.
Brooklyn 5-9; Bfiston l-l.
Chicago o; Cincinnati 3.
New Vork ti; Philadelphia 10.
HERO OP ZANE GREY'S
STORY IS VISITOR HERE
Dr. Wllborn, of   Cstallna    Island,
j the    lone    angler    of    Zane    Grey's
J Htorlcs has  been  enjoying  the Tyee
j llshing nt  Campbell  River uiul  has
taken a fin, 45, two -ln-lhs. und smaller fish on the Catallna light tackle.
The Doctor Is n great booster for
Uritish Columbia and Incidentally
called at The Islander Ollice and
paid his respects to the staff.
Monday evening saw the Port Alberni Tennis Team returning to their
homes afler a day of tennis matt-lies
with the Cumberland Club In whlcn
the latter were defeated by two
mulches, the linnl score being 7-.*i.
Thoso making the trip from the 'Port'
were, Mr. mul Mrs. Vaughan, Mr. nnd
Mrs. p. Swayne, Mrs. Blaokmore, Mrs.
Hanna, Miss Hlni. Mr, Warner, nnd
Mr. Hanson, The visitors were entertained at luncheon ami dinner by
the local club ill the Union Hotel.
Following lire the results of tho
various mutches: Ladles' Singles—
(best out of 16 games), Mrs. Iilnck-
more beat Miss Bickle 8-4; Miss Oliver bent Mrs. Hanna 8-7; Men's Singles, m. Graham bent vnugiian ti-;;,
li-4; T. Graham bent Warner 6-4, ti-l;
Lndies' Doubles, Mrs. ltlnekmnre ami
Mrs. Hanna heat Miss Dickie and Miss
Oliver, 2-ti, 0-2, 6-ii; Mrs. Vaughan and
Miss Bird bent Mrs. Finch nnd Mrs,
Clinton ti-2. 6-2; Mens Doubles, T.
Oraham and M. Graham beat Vnuglnin
nml Warner 6-6, ii-ti. 6-6; C. C. Orn-
hnnt antl P. I). Graham beal Swayne
and Hanson 8-8, 6-2; Mixed Doubles,
Mrs. Blackmore and Hanson bent Miss
Bickle nnd li. Stewart 6-0, 6-6; Mrs.
; Vaughan and Vaughan bent Miss 01-
| Ivor and Mr. Graham 6-1, 4-6. 6-4;
.Mrs. Ilannit antl Swayne bent Mrs.
Clinton nnd D. Sutherland 6-3, 0-3;
Miss Bird and Swayne beat Mrs,
Finch and J. Vaughan 0-4. 6-1. PAGE TWO
lUE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMDER 6, 1924.
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
Courtenay Post
Office To Cost
Thirty Thousand
tlie federal publie works department i
plans to erect shortly at Courtenay,
Vancouver Island, is estimated to cost
$30,000, according to an official announcement from Hon. Dr. J, H.
King, federal minister of public works
who lias asked the Journal to state
definitely the architects^ estimate of
The new pos to ince building whirh the cost of the structure in view of
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store The White Bakery
How to live a hundred yoars—Bury the Pepper dish
and the Vinegar bottle and eat McBrvde's 100 per cent
Wholo Wheat Bread
Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from, which
you know.
Not How Cheap—But How Good
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
The Holding-on-to Quality Store
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
m
HUNTERS!
Before buying your Guns and Ammunition for the
coming season which opens September 13th, call and
inspect our complete line of Shot Guns, Rifles, Hunters' Clothing, Compasses, Knives, Cleaning Kits, Rust
Removers, Oils, Etc., Etc.
All kinds of Metallics and Shells, comprising the
famous Black Shell in 'A grades: Ajax, Climax and
Homax, Superex and Dominions.
THE.
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Courtenay
Canadian Notional Railways
From Viotorlt $53.29, Including ntnl, and berth
on •tumor botwoon Vancouver and Prince Rupert
» 'mmrni
TRIP
several erroneous estimates! which
have been given to western contractors.
When the announcement was first
wired from Ottawa that a sum hml
heen included in the year's estimates
of Ihe federal government for a new
postofflce at Courtenay. the total
amount, allowing for lutings anil
equipment, was $36,600. Unfortunately, In transmission from Ottawa,
another cypher was erroneously added to this sum .making the projected
postofflce rank as one of the best in
the Dominion, if the sum had been
correct.
Ur. King now gives the estimated
cost as $30,000, and Intimates that
as soon as the plans now being prepared In the federal public works department are completed, tenders will
be called for tho structure.-—Journal
of Commerce, Sept. 3.
Normal Students
Are Honored At
Informal Dance
The Oniety Theatre was the scene
LANG'S DRUG STORE
APPOINTED AGENT FOR
FAMOUS REMEDY IN
CUMBERLAND
Progressive Cumberland druggist quick to recognize outstanding merits of Dreco as a system cleanser
and health builder, and now offers it as a safe and reliable remedy for digestive disorders of every kind,
rheumatism, biliousness, that tired, run-down feeling
that comes from an impoverished blood stream.
DRECO IS  Miff  AVAILABLE  FOR  EVERY  SUFFERER
A Iirm of this type does not,
take on a new remedy on here-
say alone or on the, recommend- j
ation of its manufacturer. Tliey!
want more convincing proof
than this. They want the signed statement of people who
really know suffering and who
can vouch for the ability of the
"remedy offered, to overcome
this suffering. Testimonials,
they are called and Dreco Is
supported hy thousands.
lt offers the signed statements
of substantial people, people o£
standing In their communities,
men and women in every walk
in life—business men, mechanics, professional men, merchants, laborers, housewives, and
working   girls—all    of    whom
have  taken   Dreco  and  proved
its ability to help them.
If you suffer from indigestion,
gastritis, acid risings, poor appetite, biliousness, dizzy spells,
pains in the back, rheumatism
of tlie joints or muscles, constipation or any one of the nianv
other distressing symptoms *ltat
are traceable to the Improper
functioning ot stomach, liver,
bowels or kidneys, you need
Dreco. Let its pure herbal
juices cleanse your system of
poisonous, clogging waste matter, correct the action of the
organs and tone and regulate
them back to healthy working
order. Then indeed, you will
know the joy of living again
and will praise the day you
started taking Dreco.
Dreco is being specially introduced in Cumberland by
Lang's Drug Store, and is sold by a good druggist
everywhere.
of a delightful informal dance last
Friday night ni honor of the Court-
enuy girls who left the following Monday morning to take up their studies ut the Normal School in Victoria
and the University in Vancouver.
Many of the girls' friends from nil
over the district were present, a most
enjoyable time being had.
During the evening the musicians,
Moody's Orchestra, struck up a
Brownie Two-Step and when the
dancers formed a circle the six departing girls were found standing in
the centre of the ring. They were
the .Misses Marion McPherson, Isabel
Moncrleff, Mildred McQuillan, Peggy
Lucas, Madeline Swan and Jean Beasley, and while standing there the Orchestra struck up the old tune, "For
They Are Jolly Gootl Fellows," the
dancers heartily Joining In. During
tlie evening delicious refreshments
were served.
Many people gathered at tlie E. «
N. Hallway station on Monday morning to see them off. Besides the
above girls there were Miss Edna
Finch and Miss Honor Fitzgerald, tins
laBt of whom is going to attend
High School In Victoria.
Cumberland's
Police Chief
Gives Report
To His Worship The Mayor and
Police Commissioners, Cumberland,
B.C.,:
Since your last meeting hold on
June 26th, 1024, 1 have to report that
no cases of crime have been reported.
Motor Accidents—During the period
1 motor accident has been reported.
One of cars in tbls accident was overturned antl the occupants slightly cut
antl bruised.
Sanitary Conditions—One case of
measels lias been released from quarantine. Alley-ways etc. have been
Inspected and found to be all correct,
As collector 1 have to report having
collected the following amounts:
Pound  Fees   „... $   6.00
Trades  Licences     732.50
Night Watchman      136.50
Fire Calls—Three culls bnve been
received. One in the night time, nnd
from outside the City und the tire bell
two in the daytime. All calls were
was rung on all occasions.
Motor Traffic Regulations—Under
this heading 1 would respectfully call
your attention to the prevailing
conditions in this City. Tall light
and licence plate   regulations   have
been disregarded for many months, a
large number of cars In the City hav-
nelther tall light or licence plates.
Cars are also operating without mufflers and with cut-outs, which distutb
citizens in the early hours of the
morning and late at nights. I would
also request that Ei silent policemen
be purchased for use at Intersections.
At the present time all drivers are
cutting corners, and it is only a mutter of a very short time until a serious accident will take place if the
present state of affairs are allowed to
continue.
General—During the past week a
number of Provincial Policemen arrived in town, armed with rilles, who
were distributed around the City in
buildings and woodsheds. I have
no official knowledge of what their
business was in town as no report of
any description was furnished to this
office. I would ask that steps lie
taken to have this sort of thing discontinued. At a recent Police Chief's
Convention the Provincial Police were
strong for co-operation. The least
tbat can be said ill this case is that
co-operation was very conpicuous by
its absence.
1 am. Gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
W. H. Cope, Chief of Police.
CHINESE JUNK
AMOY TO BECOME
PLEASURE YACHT
STRATFORD, Conn.—Leroy Lewis,
head of the H. J. Lewis Oyster Company, has arranged to purchase for a
pleasure yacht, the Chinese Junk
Amiiy. the first vessel of this type
ever to visit the Atlantic Seaboard.
The Amoy is now moored at Bridgeport, where Capt. George Ward, a
native of Holland, but now a British
Subject, is preparing for his trip
back to Voncouver Island, where he
plans lo spend Ihe rest of his days
on a ranch. The Amoy made the
trip from Shanghai to Victoria In
eighty-seven  days.
It Isn't so much the lot of talking
a woman does sometimes, as the
trouble Friend Husband has ln trying
to flntl out what she's saying.
/#• KeefrsEYK
Clear, Bright ami Beautiful I
WttnMuilistCo„sChlcMQ.fecBT»CwtBoolt I
DR.  R.. B.   DIER  AND   DR
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
i Pressing    •    Cleaning    •    Repair*
j    Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. V.
EDWARD W. BICKLE    AGENT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
mmtwtmtmm+mMmtttmmwmmAmmmmmmwm
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
■MEATS
FISH
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
  POULTRY 	
  AND VEGETABLES 	
Telephone 143 P. O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered to All Parts ol District
Coal. Wood and Uoodi of Anr Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARQES
>WH«f>J!"
^Mm«S
4
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
w
Dodge Brothers
COMMERCIAL CAR
Commercial car transportation must be dependable. The operating
losses due to a tie up of vehicles t'or repairs increases materially the cost
of delivering goods. Dodge Brothers cars are universally known for their
dependable service. In considering haulage problems in general and deciding on the best car for your particular needs it would be well to consult
Dodge Brothers dealer and get the benefit of his experience, and information on the elements of satisfactory transportation.
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
PHONE 61 PHONE 61
(TMBERIiAND, B.C.
I SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
53
jji'illliilllll ilil'lirr'li'lli'liiliilllliiilll H Ml [ lliilllllTOIIIIIill'lllllllM
The Mercantile Store
'PHONE 133
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
(G. H. WYCHERLEY)
"The General Store With A General Purpose"
P.O. Drawer 100
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
lErajllEIfflSISEEISEMaiaEraiSElffls^^
The "Mercantile"
Red Letter Day
Saturday, Sept. 6
Saturday, September Sixth
Will be a Red Letter Day at The
"Mercantile." Last Saturday was the
best day since our opening last July
The "Mercantile"
Red Letter Day
Saturday, Sept. 6
- " *■ «J  J IZ ———■■ II
Our store was thronged all day.   Do your shopping early in the day-you will receive better attention.
ISMjSfitUE^^
Boots and Shoes
A few pail's only Men's Mine Shoes
Per pair	
Men's Work Shoes, no toe cap
Per pair 	
Men's Box Calf Blucher Shoes
Per pair	
Ladies' Glace Kid 1 Strap Slipper
Per pair 	
Youth's "Sterling" Shoes, sizes 11 to 1
Per pair 	
Boys' "Sterling" Shoes, sizes 2 to 5
Per pair 	
$2.95
t-pO.Z**)
$3.75
$1.40
$3.00
$3.25
Here are a few Snappy
Bargains for last
day of sale
Men's Brushed Cotton   Combinations,   worth   $2.50
Per Suit d»-|   fTP
On Sale at   tpl. I D
Ladies' Wear
Ladies' Crepe Night Dresses
To clear at 	
Ladies' Black Patent Belts
Each	
The same in Shirts and Drawers
A splendid garment for Fall wear
Per Suit	
Ladies' Under Vests for fall
Each 	
$1.35
Girls' Strong Box Calf Shoes, sizes 8 - lOi/odJrt QK
Per pair    (P^y.OO
Boys' Tred-Right Shoes in Waterproof Chrome, welled, sizes 11 to 1'/.. (j* A r(\
Per pair     tP^r.OU
Sizes 2 to 51/2
Per pair 	
Men's Grey Flannelette Shirts. You cannot by these
for $2.00 d»-|   QC
Today   «pX.t)9
A Man's Leather Vest. A splendid garjnent for outside wear d»-| A tft
Special Price  «D.LU.t)U
Men's Work Socks
4 pairs for 	
Girls' Brown Calf "Tred-Right" Shoes,
sizes 11 to 2    Per pair	
Ladies' Patent Slippers, 1 strap
Per pair 	
$4.95
$4.95
$3.00
Black or Brown Leather Belts
Each 	
$1.00
35c
$2.95
10 only Ladies' Voile and Ratine Dresses d»Q ns
Saturday only  «JJO. % u
25c
65c
$1.75
40c
$4.75
$9.50
Ladies' Hole Proof Hose, assorted colors
Per pair 	
Ladies' Silk Fibre Hose
Per pair	
Ladies' Brushed Wool Sweaters,
Sale Price 	
2 only Ladies' Coats, suitable for fall wear
Sale Price 	
Men's   Fine  Dress   Shirts,   with   collars d»1   QP
attached  «pl.«/U
Gent's Single Grip Garters
Each 	
A special line of Ladies' "Thrill" Slippers, worth $6.00.
To clear at (JQ AP
Per pair    «p0.t/U
A Dressy Hose for special occasions
Per Pair	
95c
35c
$1.95
Men's Dress Belts
Each 	
60c
75c
95c
See our line of Worsted Suitings at
Per yard 	
Cretones, a few assorted designs left, at
Per yard 	
Spun Silks in colors, 36 inches wide
Per yard, only •	
Anderson's Ginghams, last call
4 yards for
A special in Men's Suits.     2 only Men's Irish Serge
Suits.     Last call (111 "I   Aft
Special Price  «pll.UU
Men's Worsteds, in 3 cloths
Special Per Suit 	
 I. $1.00 1
Canadian Prints, going at d»-|   A A     a
5 yards lor   «Pl.l/U     |
$21.00
A few odd Suits at fl»-| Q  £TA
Per Suit  «plO«9U
Men's Odd Pants
$1.95    $3.25    $4.75
Mercantile Best Coffee, per lb.
3 lbs. for	
mmmmmmmmmmmmmbwm®mmimwmmiM&imi
Mercantile Best Tea, per lb  60c.
3 lbs. for $1.65
Rosedale Tea, per lb. ...a ,  65c.
3 lbs. for   $1.80
  40c.
 $1.35
Van Camp Tomato Soup, per tin  10c.
Van Camp Pork and Beans, 2 for , 25c.
Per dozen   $1.45
Napoleon Tomatoes, 2VS?'s, 2 for 35c.
Lion Brand pure malt Vinegar, 26 oz. bottles .... 25c.
Heinz pure malt Vinegar, 32 oz. bottles 50c.
Heinz pure malt Vinegar 16 oz. bottles  30c.
Malt Pickling Vinegar, double strength, per gal. $1.00"
Malkin's Best Orange Marmalade, 4-lb tin 75c.
Meadow Brook Strawberry Jam, 4-Jb tin  75c.
Lion Brand Jelly Powders.     One package makes 1
pint.     Per pkt t 5c.
Per dozen   55c.
Zip Hand Cleaner, reg. 25c. for 15c.
MairoaaaasisiaiaifiEME^^ EMEraieiaraMaiMiEiBJSEi^^
The "Mercantile"
Red Letter Day
Saturday, Sept. 6
Come in and see us—We have the
Best Selected Stock in the City
REMEMBER SATURDAY AND MONDAY
Last Days Of Sale
The "Mercantile"
Red Letter Day
Saturday, Sept. 6
 — ————————————————— —WMa^HHWHi BI IHiaiaiaiHUaiaBlaiHJ^fflaiH/tSiH/fili
The  Mercantile  Store  Company
BMSMii'
STORE HOURS
MONDAYS,   TUESDAYS,
THURSDAYS,    FRIDAYS,
K iijii to 5:110 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS 8 a.m. to 12:30 noon
SATURDAYS 8 iuii. to  10:00 p.m.
Remember, the Mercantile is the leading Home of Fashions
DUNSMUIR AVENUE, CUMBERLAND
STORE HOURS
MONDAYS,   TUESDAYS,
THURSDAYS,    FRIDAYS,
H un III 5:30 |i.m.
WEDNESDAYS 8 um. to 12:30 noon
SATURDAYS 8 tun. to  10:00 p.m.
niimiiiiiimiii PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1921.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
!    On   the  other  hand   complete co-
. operation and understanding between
Published every Saturday morning at   the public and  the  lumber Industry
- - - , can only result in the confident In-
; vestment of further   millions,   more
Cumberland, B. C,
KDWARD W. BICKLE.
j intensive development of our resources antl the consequent prosper-
; Ity accruing to the prolnce.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER ti, 1924.   !
PUBLISHING  REMARKABLE
FACTS
The ultimate prosperity of British
Columbia is to a very great degree
dependent on the goodwill of its citizens towards the industrial forces
that are developing its natural resources.
It is a common fault of all countries richly endowed with natural
wealth to minimize the hardships and
overrate the rewards of the operators engaged in tlie conversion of tlie
raw material into the finished product,
The sympathy of the puhlic with
the industrial groups that are building up national wealth is only effective when it is the outcome of an intelligent knowledge of the scope of
those industries and a study of their
economic issues.
In the case of the British Columbia
lumber industry it is difficult to account for any lack of interest hi its
problems by the citizens of tlie province for tlie reason that iu no country in the world, perhaps, has a basic
industry so entwined itself with the
destiny of the community.
We suspect that tlie lumber industry of British Coumbia is so omnipresent that It is very much taken
for granted, even hy those who are
dependent on it for a livelihood.
It is a commonplace to us that we
are the owners of one of the very finest stands of softwood timbers in existence. We dimly recognize that our
forest industries have been the main
factor in transforming our settlements into cities and our waterfronts
into wharves. We have an idea that
but for shipments of wood products
by land and sea our railroads would
not pay and our harbors would attract but little shipping. Those of us
who have been abroad recall now and
then the facts that British Columbia
lumber is its pricipal publicity
medium in far-off countries.
In a word, we would not deny the
statement that lumber put British
Columbia on the map and lumber is
keeping it there.
The Timber Industries Council nf
British Columbia, in a series of articles now running in our pages, are
publishing some remarkable facts
and figures concerning the great importance of the forest industries to
the province, lt is stated that our
lumbermen contribute a third of the
revenue of British Columbia; that
they directly employ one-fourth of
the workers in British Columbia and
thnt they are resposihle for a third
of the industrial payroll of the province. Further .that the combined
forest industries represent an annual
purchasing power of not less than
$100,000,000, or something like $200
per capita of the whole population.
With facts such as these staring
us in tho face some loyal interest iu
the problems of this vast industrial
force becomes a duty of our citizens.
The goodwill and support of the people of British Columbia is afler all
the main security upon which our
lumbermen have freely invested a
sum exceeding two hundred million
dollars. If that security depreciates
into Indifference the vast investment
becomes imperilled and disaster faces
both parties to the contract.
CAN'T HOLD IT
It is a long, long way from grass
to hay, and it is the everlasting grind
that puts pork and beans on your
table. Once in a while you hear that
Johnnie Smart has made a killing in
tlie stock market and closed out at a
big profit. Maybe he did. More
likely he didn't. But if he did the
money won't do him any good. Money
not honestly earned—cash not earnestly worked for, is counterfeit. li
has wings of an eagle. You cau no
more hold it than you can hold a
wildcat with your bare hands. That's
bunk, you say? All right, now sit
down and go over the family fortunes
you bave known. Think of tbe people you actually know wbo have had
speculative success and see if their
winnings didn't suddenly leave them.
HEADED FOR HIGHER UP
On the grim battlefield the soldier
that sings is better fitted to fight. The
grouch get sulky, lacks courage, and
his influence is a menace.
So it is on the battlefield of business. The sour, pessimistic cuss
who never smiles or sings is a commercial coward every time. As an
employee he is the most expensive
luxury in the shop. He hates his
job. His oue ambition is to get out
of the office, store or plant, and ja^z.
He can only see a smile after five
o'clock. He rushes from the job,
changes his clothes and starts out
for fun. Life holds nothing for him
but the hours after work.
Play is an important part in the
program of life, but work must be
done before we can afford to play.
Play is not all jazz. The most interesting and inspiring sport that a
real mau can find is the companionship of successful men who occasionally meet and talk over their achievements In hunting and fishing, selling
and serving.
The story of success holds no ro
mance more entertaining and enthusing than that of th* companionship
and the conversation of men that
have made good—men who are big
enough to sit down by the home five-
side and tell of the thrills tbat have
come through work and play.
A mau that spends most of his evenings at the pool rooms must have
little, very little, interest in anything
other than his meal ticket.
Select a dozen young men in town,
watch where they go at night, and
you can lell where they will go when
business   is   slack.
Hear a man singing, or see him
smiling at his work—see this man at
night trying to improve himself hy
study, and you can make up your,
miud that this man is headed for high
er up.
Sidelights on a Great Industry
Then Comes
the
Royalty Rate
UK AW    EXPENSES   OF    ACQUIRING AMI HOLDING STANDING
TIM BE It
Trees   Purchased  to  the  "Eighties
Only Just Being; l'u< (or the
Market
Cigar Clerk: "For three hundred
hands of that brand they give you a
gramophone."
Customer (milling hard): "If 1
smoked three hundred of these I
wouldn't want a gramophone, I'd
want a harp."
Boys are said to Inherit their
mother's eyes and their father's forehead, but not so many of them ara
wearing their father's cast off britches as formerly.
Work Glove Specials
Leather Gloves, Reg. 50c.    Special per pair 42c.
Leather Gloves, Reg. 65c.     Special per pair 57c.
Leather Gloves, Reg. $1.00.   Special per pair 87c.
A new line of medium weight underwear for men at
per garment  _  $1.15
A heavier weight at per garment  $1.50
Boys' Black Cotton Hose, suitable for school wear
in all sizes.
Boys' Golf Hose, in shades of Black, Brown and
Heather Mixtures, with fancy tops.
Leckies' School Shoes for Boys and Girls.    These
are of the best quality and will give good wear.
A new line of Hats and Caps for Men just received.     Call and inspect these lines.
Many lines of new goods coming to hand and being
placed in stock.
Another shipment of wall papers jurat received.
A. McKinnon
It mas interest those who imagine
that timber Is bought today aud cut
tomorrow, to know that some ot iho
areas that are being logged today
have been in the possession ot the
holders since the "eighties."
For 40 years these stands have beeu
paying increased taxation exposed to
the risk of destruction by tire, storm
and decay.
Before the axe touches the timber
of British Columbia, thousands of
dollars are spent iu sizing up its
"logging chalices." Initial recoa-
naissaances have to be made to ascertain the (jauntily and quality of
the timber. Then the services of experienced engineers are called in aud
the ground gone over in detail to find
put the possibilities of getting tho
timber out hy railroad. Grade problems presenting seemingly overwhelming difficulties and entailing
heavy expenditure have to be overcome or the investment must be
abandoned. Finally a suitable booming ground must be located where the
logs are to be dumped for rafting to
the market.
When all this preliminary investigation is concluded the timber il
purchased and the long period anticipatory to logging commences. During this wait the owner has to hold
his own against the elements and the
ever busy tax collector.
Finally, perhaps, after a period ot
long years the timber is cut aud the
public asserts its further demands in
addition to the carrying charges by
claiming thousands of dollars cash
or royalty fees.
Last year the Government collected oue and a half millions of loddars
In royalties alone before the material
that paid that amount was placed ou
the market.
This series of articles coinmuui-   j
cated by the Timber Industries   j
Council  of  British  Columbia.
I'm surprised that Joe didn't get
on; he always seemed to have plenty
of backbone."
Oh, he had backbone, all right;
the trouble was the knob at the upper
end of "It was of the same material."
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
Mt B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg,
PHONE 2»18      VICTORIA, B.C.
A. A. Brown
General Hauling
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave yoar orders at office,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
Phone 66.
SERVICE IS OUR MOTTO
Or Phone la Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
Telephone
19
Telephone
19
Just Received Another Shipment of
Ladies' Misses' and Children's
FALL COATS
Newest
Styles
Popular
Prices
,i'ffl**'3a'"sji^
Newest Models in C.C a La Grace
CORSETS  AND
LONG BRASSIERES
ffi&EE't'EMHMfii^^
NEW LINES in SILK and MUSLIN FRENCH LINGERIE
Watch for our Saturday Evening
Specials from 6.30 to 8.30 only
SPECIAL VALUES IN LARGE SIZE ENGLISH
MAKE ALL WHITE FLANELETTE SHEETS
;EiairaMaMSEM^MEMEiaEMaiaiai^
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
NEWEST STYLES in MEN'S FALL HATS and CAPS
VELOURS AND FELTS IN ALL THE LEADING
SHADES
SPECIAL VALUES IN MEN'S TWEED HATS AND
CAPS
Campbells   -   Cumberland
Jam Special
RI IP-
B
Comox Strawberry
Jam
High grade Comox Valley berries plus pure sugar and made under
perfect sanitary conditions.    For sale at all local grocers at
85c per 41b. Tin
To those who have used this delicious jam this advertisement may
have no appeal, except so far as the price is concerned, but if you
are one of the unfortunates who have not as yet partaken of this
delectable local food product, you would be wise to try a sample
tin.
Every tin carries our own guarantee as to quality.
Get the habit of using local produce on every opportunity. You
not only get the best products on the market but you help keep
your money in local circulation.
REMEMBER.--
It's Guaranteed
Christmas Cards in great variety will soon be arriving at
The Islander Office. See our samples before placing your
order    Our Slogan "Cards a little better than the rest" SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
The   Famous   McClary
Electric Range
Protected Elements    —    Indicating Lamps
—Reciprocating Switches—
Seamless, easily cleaned ovens
To cook electrically with one of these ranges
IS CHEAPER
than using coal.
No soot, no ashes, no hot kitchens.
25 per cent, saved on your meat bill owing to
non-shrinkage.
Everything in favor of the busy housewife.
Let us show you.
Fans        —       Washing Machines        —       Irons
Vacuum Cleaners        —       Toasters
Grills        —        Etc.
Everyapplianco sold by us of the best make only and
we   are   HERE   TO   MAKE   IT   RIGHT   should
you be in any way, shape or form disappointed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMRERLAND, R.C.
SPRINKLING NOTICE
Hours for Sprinkling and Irrigating purposes are
Morning 7 to 8 a.m.
Night 7 to 9 p.m.
Watering Sidewalks, Streets Etc, must be discontinued
Effective July 6th, 1924.
CUMRERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
For Sale by Cumberland Electric Lighting Co.
Auction Sales
MONDAY NEXT, SEPT. 8—For Mr. J. G.Qulmi, who in leaving
for New Zealand, at his Residence. Bevan. The whole of his
Household Furniture and Effects, including Radiophone, being
the contents of his six-room house. For the convenience of
those wishing to attend the salo, a special train will leave Cumberland for Bevan at 1 o'clock. Sale to commence at 2 o'clock
prompt.     Particulars In posters.
WEDNESDAY NEXT, SEPT. 10 For Mr .Charles Pearse, who is
leaving the district, at ills Residence, Happy Valley. All that
well built and newly erected Bungalow with half acre of land,
situate at Happy Valley. Also the whole of his new Household Furniture and Effects, Including Full Bedroom Suite In
Ivory finish, Handsome Oak Buffet, Solid Oak Arm Chairs, etc.
Team of Horses, Harness, Tools, etc. Particulars in posters.
Sale at 2 o'clock p.m. Further particulars of these and other
sales may be had from
G. J. HARDY
Phone 10 Auctioneer Courtenay
MRS. HUDSON'S TEAM
WINNERS OF LADIES'
FIRST AID TROPHY
(Continued From Page One)
berland, with D. Stobbart and J. Barton of Nanaimo, second.
The Two-Man event was won by
Taylor's team, of Cumberland, composed of Jonathan Taylor (Capt.),
J. Williams and J. D. Davis, with J.
Delaney's team, of Ladysmith gaining
the second prize.
The trophies were distributed by
the Hon. William Sloan, minister of
mines, immediately after the competitions were over, while the prizes
that were won with them were distributed by Mr. P. P. Harrison, the
newly elected member of the Provincial Legislature for the Comox
Riding.
At the concert held In the evening
at which the prizes were distributed,
the following artists gave their ser-|
vices, the different items on the lonij
program being well received: Mrs.
Roger and Messrs Jackson, Thomas,
Goodali, Edwards, Gallagher and
Roger.
The judges for the various events
were Inspector of Mines Jas. Dickson,
Victoria; and Jno. Macdonald, Fernie
for Mine Rescue Work; Mr. MacDonald judging the bench work, while Mr.
Dickson judged the work in the mine,
which was erected hy the Canadian
Collieries (D) Ltd., for the occasion,
and which caused a lot of favorable
comment on the admirable way it was
laid out.
The First Aid judges were Dr. Daniel McLellan, Vancouver, (Chief);
Mrs. R. Wilson, Vancouver; Dr. McNaughton. Cumberland; Dr. A. A.
Sutherland. Cumberland; Dr. H.
Briggs, Courtenay; Dr. Butters,
CoHsjrtena'y; Dr. Jessop, Ladysmith;
Dr. Bissett, Cassidy.
There were two Mine Rescue teams
each present from Ladysmith and
Cumberland, and 16 teams for First
Aid, full team events, of which eight
were from Nanaimo; three from Cumberland, one from Lantzville, one from
Cassidy (Granby Cons M.C.&P.CoO.
and three from Ladysmith, besides
one and two-men events.
The success of this year's celebration of the association, must go to the
untiring efforts of the executive officers, James Quinn, President, George
Yarrow, Vice-President. Win. H.
Moore, Secretary. George O'Brien.
Safety First Engineer of tlie Canadian Collieries (D) Ltd., was an efli-
cient director of ceremonies, working
around the Held on Monday last from
early morning and not calling it a go
until the finish of the dance In tha
llo-llo. .Members of the Boy Scouts
from Cumberland, Courtenay ami
Union Bay, under Scoutmaster W.
Leversedge, came in for a lot of favorable comment, stagiug a demonstration nt* Bridge Building on tlie
grounds and other phases of scout-
craft.
The kiddies were also well provided for, a series of sports being held
for them under the management of
Messrs Charles O'Brien, Tom Blai",
Harry Devlin, Harry Jackson and
others, whilst Dave Wilson and Bobby
Brown looked after the Quoit ing competition.
Next year's celebration will he held
in Nanaimo.
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
AND TEACHERS IN
INTERESTING SESSION
(Continued From Page One)
that. However, she looked for better results next year and was sure
that everyone would do their level
best to get them. Miss* Galllvan
endeavored, by quoting Vancouver
School results, to show that the Cumberland showing had not been so bad
They had had a large entrance class
for a school of this size and besides
only two-thirds of that class were lit
for the work they had been taking.
The average pass for the province
was 557e while Cumberland passed
617«, 6% over the average, which wav
nothing to be very disappointed
about.
Secretary MacKinnon brought up
the point about care of the school
property and the punctuality of the
teachers. The Board knew several
occasions where tardiness had been
checked up but was never marked in
the attendance book. Also too much
time was spent on "frills" and not
enough on the old "standhys," reading, writing and arithmetic. The latter especially was a weak point in
this school. The matter of punctuality was dropped, however, when II
was found that all the teachers had
made a resolve to be always on time.
Principal Apps took exception to
the statement that school property
was not being properly looked after.
He felt that the mutter was being exaggerated and skid so. He promised.
anyway, to take particular care iu
Ihis respect and to see that the other
teachers did likewise.
Alter the Public School Teachers
had left the meeting, MiHs Partridge
showed the Trustees, by help of the
blackboard, just why she thought she
was entitled to a raise She demonstrated, witli actual figures, that her
pass for the final exams was 02's
while the Principal's was 4S7r, and
in plain language she showed thai
she could and did do the work, which
was just as much as the Principal's;
and therefore she did not think- there
should lie the I10IM difference between tlie two salaries. The Board
apparently, was favorably impressed
but instead of granting Ihe $300 increase asked for, Trustee McFadyen
moved, and Secy. MacKinnon seconded, that an increase of $1110 be given
with probably another addition at
Christmas,     Carried.
The meeting then adjourned.
RASERALL SEASON ENDS
(Continued From Page One)
might have hooked a couple of valuable outfield hits had they been in
practice. Jim McKay pulled down
the niftiest catch for the locals when
he robbed Rab. Robertson. Dave
Hunden fielded in grand fashion with
six perfectly handled chances.
.Millard Slugs ('real
Courtenay had out their usual lineup In the field but It was rumored
ihey were celebrating the same day
and the day previous to the buttle.
On paper they appeared the better
team. George Millard finished tho
season strong, pelting out 3 triples
and a double in five trips to the plate.
Halle..*, pleased old "Dick" when lie
kissed the apple for four bags. Young
Ed. O'llroy connected for a triple and
two safeties in five attempts. Their
fielding was below the standard although Lefty Barkhouse got a hand
from the crowd when he nipped Jim
McKay's clout to the left garden. Geo.
Millard got underneath one after n
line run. too.     Such were the bright
im
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Cumberland, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 5th and 6th
IcEiSBfc'L^'iLE'i^^^
The Mad Rapture
of Desert Love!
%REXmGRAtf
PRODUCTION OF
THE ARAB
Featuring
Ramon Novarro
and Alice Terry
Bated  on   the  Famoui  Stage
I'tiiy hit
EDGAR SELWYN
Photographed by
JOHN F. SEITZ
Directed by
REX INGRAM
"The Arab"—
Screened in Algiers and Tunis, with thousands of Bedouins and other desert tribesmen in the teeming mob
scenes.
A Sheik's son and an American girl in a sensational
romance.
S/SJiaMi'd'SJ^^
JACK DEMPSEY
in
"WEST OF THE WATER DUCKET"
And a Sunshine Comedy
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Here's a picture of pep for you
Reginald Denny
in
"The Reckless Age"
A real cure for the blues.
I30gMSiaraH*'*!'fflEI^^
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
Charles (Buck) Jones
in
"The Vagabond Trail"
NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, SEP   T. 12-13—"THE SIDE SHOW OF LIFE"
Coming September 15, 16 and 17
THE COVERED WAGON
PAGE FIVE   '
spots. Pat Fletcher umpired a most
satisfactory game to both fans and
players.
Last Sunday's game will probably
be the last this year, the boys will
lay aside their togs until next year
when, let's hope, they have a more
favored place in the graces of the
ever present Dame Fortune, Here is
what will probably be the last box
score until next season:
Box Score
I linilicrhinil AB R H PO A E
Richards,  e      5    II    1    8   4   ll
Bannerman, ss     .*!   :i   2   2   l   u
James. 2h     5   13   3   2   1
•McKay, If     5   2   3   1   0   ij
Hunden.  p       5   0    10   6   0
Robertson, lb     4   0   0 13   0   1
Weir, cf 3b     4   2   10   1;
.Miller. 3b     3   0   0   0   1   o
Aitken, rf     4   t)   1   0   0   1
"(5.  Hunden,  cf  ....   1    o   ll   0   0   t)
Totals     30 11 12 27 IB   4
*G. Hunden balled for Miller in !>th
Inning.
Courtenu)' ab R H po a B
Cuinmings, ss   4   n   2   (i   1   2
11. Robertson, 2b .... 4   0   0   2   3   0
•Millard, cf   5   3   3   10   1
Dixon,  lb    4   2   2 11   0   1
Harris,  3b ss    4    1113    1
A. Robertson, rf .... 5   0   10   10
O'llroy,  3b    5   0   3   4    12
Ilarkhouse,  if    5   12   0   0   0
J. Robertson, p if.. 3   o   l   2   3   o
Totals     311   7 15 27 12    7
Score  by   Innings
12 3 4 5 6 7 8!)
Cumberland .... 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 1 2—tl
Courtenay   0 3 0 0 10 10 2—7
Summary
Earned runs: Cumberland,.!, Courtenay 5; Two-base hits: Bannerman
(21, James (2) .Millard; Three-base
hits: Millard (21, O'llroy; Home runs
Dixon; Sacrifice hits: Miller; Stolen
bases: Richards (3) Bannerman (2),
James. .McKay, A. Robertson; Left ou
bases: Cumberland 3, Courtenay 10;
Struck out: by Hunden 7, by Robertson 8, by Ilarkhouse 3; Bases on balls
oil' Hunden 3, off Robertson 2; Hit by
pitcher; Harris and J. Robertson by
Hunden. R. Robertson by Barkhouse;
Wild pitches: Robertson 3. Barkhouse
1; 8 runs,' 7 hits off Robertson In 7
innings; 3 runs, 3 hits off Barkhouse
In 2 Innings. Credit defeat Robertson.
Umpire Pat Fletcher.
"Mother," said the little boy, "these
new trousers are too tight; they're
tighter'n my own skin!"
"Now, my boy, you know that isn't
so."
"It Is too. I can sit down In my
akin, but I can't sit down in these
pants!"
$"
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT EYAN8
Practical  Barber,  and  Hairdresser,  Shampooing,  Singeing,
Massaging,    Soalp    Treatment.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. C.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician.   Reg:, by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9 p.m. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1921.
PROBABLY
She: "What makes the leaves turn
red in the fall?"
He: "They are blushing to think
j how green they have been all sum-
I mer.
"Will you mary me?" he asked.
There was a pause.
"Tell me one thing first," she said.
"Do you drink anything?"
His face lit up.
"Anything." he said.—News of tbe
World.
Help Us To Give
You Better Service
Giving the name instead of the number of the
party being called slows up the operator. She is now
instructed to request the number if it is not given, this
procedure being in the interests of good telephone ser-
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
a
i
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllll
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUGHNUTS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices — Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
"The Moat oi the Boat for the Leatt"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers	
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
PHONE 11 CUMBERLAND
SJcMlBJSHrMSMSfflffii^E/aEIBlEsBlSEi™^
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
PIANOS AND BEDDING AS BAGGAGE
lop tell mid ventre islam, ssinpre.se ul Canada peeaersgera sssissa th. Irani svhlcis io •, them .cruse itsaiss Uu. sear, lop
meet, Tibetan Spinner, Market Square, Darjeellns. Other views are of Ihe Canadian Pacific S.S. blnsureae of France, .elected
te carry tha Canadian flar around-the-srorld In I9JS5. and of the Jama Maajid. l.urknosv. Lower riolil ia a Miihammeslan at
prarer, Agra Fort.
"The Indian railway guage is the broadest in the
*     world  and  a   modern  first-class  compartment
ia the last word in comfort,
Fans, shaded  lights, cooling arrangements,  blue
glass windows to let down in case the glare is too
strong, Venetian blinds to supply an airy twilight,
a luxurious bath-room next door, arm-chairs, tables,
beds.   .   .      Yes, 'beds.   In India, the traveller takes
his bedding with  him  by  train.    After dinner  his
servant enters the carriage, makes the bed and lays
out the Sahib's pyjamas and slippers.
Unless otherwise ordered, he will await the
Sahib's   return   and   help  pull   off   his   boots   and
clothes.    Perhaps this is a relic of the old "John
Company" days, when the Sahib came back of an
evening  carrying   more   than  a  necessary   dose  of
brandy pawnee; at any rate the old-fashioned servant still expects to unlace his master's boots
It is, however, unnecessary to do what one's servant expects. But to be without a servant in India
would be impossible. For a ten-day trip each married couple and every two or three bachelors will
find it desirable to have an attendant.
A word as to their treatment: Many of these ser-
srants are excellent and trustworthy men; but the
idea of "liberty, equality, fraternity" is abhorent to
them. The tourist who is condescending enough to
show them any sort of brotherly love will be merely
snubbed l'or his pains, for the relations of master and
man have been established since immemorial time
throughout  the  East.
The average compartment on the Indian railways
it nearly twice the size of the American drawing
room car. Two couches run along its length on either
side, under the windows. At the foot of each there
is door-space and an armchair. Above the couches
are two more berths, to be let down at night as
sct*asion requires.
A very large quantity oi baggage is carried in
every compartment, for many passengers take, in
addition to wardrobe trunk, bedding, suitcase, helmet-
case, typewriter and all sorts of odds and ends such
as hogspears, golf-sticks, fishing rods and tiffin
baskets. But there is room for everything and anything (a perambulator is a common sight and a cottage piano has been taken as personal luggage) on
the wide floor of an Indian railway compartment
!n the early moming, when the tired sun of India
is fighting its way over the mists lying over the
plains, your servant comes with "chota-haziri," the
"little breakast" of the East, coisisting of tea and
Wutt«ed, toast
Later, he returns to lay out your clothes. So do
the servants of the other passengers; if there happen to be four travellers in a compartment, each
with a servant and with the articles of baggage
enumerated above, the routine of shaving and dressing is apt to resemble a film comedy.
One compartment on the train, or sometimes more,
is reserved for ladies traveling alone. A whole compartment can always be reserved by paying for four
first class seats. Considering the accommodation
provided, travel is not expensive in India. A first
class fare from Bombay to Delhi costs about $35.
The day passes quickly on the train, for the
plains of India, having been cultivated for untold
ages, hold more of interest than similar places in
other parts of the world, which have not been lived
in so long. The diversity of types to be seen at the
wayside stations is truly amazing.
Twilight. Dinner-time The teeming plains of
India still unroll before you.
You return to your carraige, where your bed has
been laid out on one of the sofas. With a novel and
a bedside light, you while away a few more hours,
reading, smoking, watching the dim villages, shorn
of their dirt and decrepitude, and invested with a
certain magic in the moonlight. Between these villages, thick with a life lived in a key so minor that
the North American could hardly live a day on tho
month's food of an Indian peasant, slow bullock carts
creep along, bound on errands we know nothing of.
The mystery of India steals over your drowsy
senses, you switch off the lights, the fan overhead
moans, the coach wheels chatter of their travel and
you pass into your own particular Western brand
of nirvana, until, at last, day returns and a dusky
figure says: '^Salaam. Sahib, chotahr.*)iri ready!"
The photographs reproduced above were taken
by members of the Across India party of the "Empress of Canada" I924 "Round the World" cruise
passengers. Next season the second "Round the
World" cruise will be conducted under Canadian Pacific auspices, the famous trans-Atlantic liner "Empress of France" being scheduled to sail from New
York on January 14th, returning, via the Panama,
May 23rd. Shore excursions will be made from every
port of call, and, among other things, all members
of the cruise will be taken by train to Delhi, one of
the ancient cities of the world and capital of India,
and to Agra, the beautiful city of the Moguls where
facilities will also be available for members of the
cruise who desire to take an extension trljj from
Agra to Benares, and also to Calcutta. Jarjeeling,
Madras and Madura, rejoining the ship at Colombo.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORB,
SHINGLES,
KILsN DRIED FLOORINGS,
ANI)     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE  WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
CUMRERLAND, H. C.
PHONES
fNight calls: 134X Courtenay
I Office: 15!) Cumberland
SWIOPoiSflr
UlACTKDMENTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
liriiibli subjects over 18 years o( age,
aud by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in liulletln No. 1, Land Series,
'How to Pre-empt Land," copies ol
which can be obtained free of charge
by addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only laud suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not timber-
land, i.e, carrying over 5.UUU bourd
leet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per ucre east of that
Range.
Applications for pre-emptions are
to ue addressed to the Land Commissioner ot* the Laud Recording Division, lu which the land applied lor
is situated, aud are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from tho Laud Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
live years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least five
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, nut being timberlaud,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land Is (5
per acre, aud second-class (grazing)
land J2.50 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands is given in Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase aad
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites nn
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment of
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding 20
acres, may be leased as homesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected in the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and improvement conditions are fulfilled
and laud has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and Industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province is divided into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grazing      Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based ou
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
j campers aud travellers, up to ten
head.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
TIRED FEET SKIN-IRRITATION. BRUISES
JABS Ut,« Wc-TUBES JOb-At all Drat Item
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMRER CO., LTD.
Office 262(1 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
'hone 2-1 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
CUMBERLAND   HOTEt
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor.     .
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
J. SUTHERLAND
--Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, fi. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning aud Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will Please Ion :;     ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.      —      Phone 81102
T.WHERRY
iWUDflWBWTANNB
t3t  Pars*,™  Avt.,
Victoria, Vo.1 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1924,
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
j Our Sample Books
 .,	
Private Greeting
Christmas Cards
HAVE      NOW      ARRIVED
.MAY WE HAVE THE PLEASURE OF
CALLING ON YOU WITH SAMPLE.'!
*>
The Cumberland Islander
PHONE 115 I'HONE 85
Have Good Beer
In the Home
—It's the best drink for you, for your
wife, for your guests.     Good beer
is endorsed by foremost medical authorities throughout the world.
Drink
'BeerwithoutaPeer
U.B.C. Beer
They're real good beers—produced at
B.C.'s model brewery—on sale at all Gov't.
Liquor Stores.     Have a case in the houso.
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, R.C.
SCOTTISH  PLOUGHMEN  FOR CANADA
Two hundred ploughmen from all parts of Scotland, including twenty-two splendid families, recently sailed from Scotland, tinder the
direction of Mr. T. E. Roberts, of the Department of Colonization and Development, Canadian Pacific Railway. These emigrants have capital
ranging from a few hundred to a thousand pounds. Ninety of the party, hailing from the counties of Inverness, Ross, Sutherland and Caithness,
were selected by Miss Anne MacDonald, Canadian Government agent at Inverness. Most of the party entrained for the West upon arrival at
Quebec. . , , , , s .
Theed Pearse
RARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road, Courtenay
W. T. GOARD
1'IANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Car  For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or Residence
25 22
('UiVBEKUND
When you are In need ot a
Plumbing & Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 167
Cumberland
Your  needs   will  receive  Immediate
atttentlon.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
T. P. HIGHWAY TO
BE COMPLETED
VICTORIA, Sept. 5.—One of thu
most Important government projects
ever undertaken by tlie Oliver administration is the completing 'ot* the
Transprovincial Highway between
Hope and the Interior. Hon W. H.
Sutherland, minister of public works,
announces that tenders will be called
for this work within four weeks, while
the bidders will have October to look
over plans and prepare their estimates. When the Legislature meets
late in October the tenders will hove
been deckled upon and the House will
be asked to vote the necessary money.
The link will cost about $1,000,000,
with an additional 1(250,000 required
for the big steel bridge across the
Fraser River at Spuzzum. The government plans to carry on some of tlle
work this winter, if unemployment
conditions can he relieved in that
manner.
Every section of British Columbia
will profit through the completion
of the Transprovincial Highway The
road will provide a main artery across
the province, linking up practically
all districts with tlie main Trans-Canada highway. Returns through Increased tourist travel should pay for
the work many times over within ten
years.
AMATEUR BOXING AT NANAIMO
OLIVER'S RETURN
IS WELL FOR B.C.
Premier Oliver's return to tbe Legislature, through his success at Nelson, and the reconstruction of his
cabinet, have brought the beginning
of an era of better times in British
Columbia. Elections are, fortunately or unfortunately, necessary but
the depression resulting from upset
conditions in this province has passed and with the Oliver administration
firmly entrenched for another four
or live years, thore appears uo reason
why tbe industrial and commercial
life of tbe province should not be
stimulated  materially.
H
"SATISFIED"
When policyholders unsolicited, write and congratulate the Company on results, "there must be a
reason."
F. H. Buker of Brockville, Ont., writes:
"Dear Sirs: Enclosed herewith you will And
cheque for $62.94, being one year's premium on
Policy No. 24,179. I may say that I am surprised at the large reduction in my premium.
This is much better than I had hoped for in this
respect, and I wish to congratulate the Company."
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
WATER NOTICE
Mr, T. Moore of Xanainio, in an endeavor to stimulate interest on Vancouver Island in the noble and manly
art of self-defence, is holding a monster amateur boxing exhibition In tiis>
Hub City on September 20th, In the
St. John's Ambulance Hall. It is
expected that a few of the local box-
era will enter this competition and
anyone desirous of doing so should
communicate with Mr. Thomas .Moore.
Nanaimo, Entries to date include.
Tom Sandland and Jim Knight, 137
Fat Edmunds and Voting Cock-
IIj.h .;
mouth, 1G0 lbs.; Scotty Clark. Har-
rey Pollett, Jim Wilson, Bill Huby,
130 lbs.; W. Townsend and Anderson
110 lbs.; David Baird, 90 lbs and J.
Townsend 85 lbs. All the above are
Nanaimo entrants. Harold Jones,
150 lbs., Cumberland is also entered.
C.N.R. HAS EYES
ON RG.E. RAILWAY
VICTORIA, Sept. 5.—Despite the
fact that the inherited I'.G.E. Railway haa caused the Oliver government untold grief, there at last appears a ray of sunlight upon the horizon, aud a satisfactory solution of thu
problem may be found iu the near
future. Hon Dr. MacLean, who has
Just given up tbe portfolio of railways, to become the minister of finance, has planned carefully during
tho past two years and administered
the affairs of the government, line
economically. Now the Canadian
National sees in the P.G.E. Railway a
means by which the great Peace River
country may be entered. The province cannot hope to get entirely clear
of the burden of past expenditures,
largely incurred by tbe former Conservative government, but it is expected that a working arrangement
will be completed whereby the province will dispose of most of the railway and witness the development of
that portion of tbe country whicli it
serves.
PREMIER OLIVER TO
GO TO OTTAWA
VICTORIA. Sept. 5.—Premier Oliver will leave for Ottawa within a few
days to attend the sitting of the Board
of Railway Commissioners on September 17. when that body will deal
with complaints against the restoration of the Crow's Nest Pass Agreement frieght rates. The government
leader lias waged a valiant tight for
the removal of all discrimination
against this province and is determined not to cease his efforts until British Columbia secures justice. He will
conduct, the fight unassisted by
counsel.
RACES LEGALLY
STEAL THOUSANDS,
DECLARES DAVIES
VICTORIA.—Preaching to a congregation of 2000 that packed the
Royal Victoria Theatre Sunday last,
Rev. Dr. Clem Davies made a bitter
attack on race tracks in British Columbia, saying tiiat it took more than
one saint of tbe modern grab to "disturb the smug sclf-satislied crooks
and plug-uglies that ruu the race
tracks at Colwood. the Willows and
in Vancouver, legally stealing thousands of dollars from the pockets of
British   Columbia   citizens.
THK READY A NSW EH
A city business man was very keen
on having proficient clerks in his employ. Before a clerk could enter his
office he was required to pass a written examination on his knowledge of
business.
At one examination one of the questions was: "Who formed the first
company?"
A certain bright youth was a little
puzzled at litis, but was not to be
floored.      He wrote:
"Noah  successfully  floated a company while the rest of the world was
in liquidation,"
He passed.—-London Answers.
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   •  -    Proprietor
(inversion and Ise)
TAKE  .NOTICE  that Jacobus Cal-
jouw,  whose  address  ls  n.It. No.  1,
Parksvllle, B.C., will apply for a II-
cenco to take and use 1500 gallons per
day of water out of Nash Creek, whicli
(lows easterly and drains into Qualicum Bay,    Strait of Qoorgla,    about
section 21 nnd  22.      The water will
! be diverted from the stream at a point
i about on Lot 4, section 21, near where
j it crosses tlie joint boundary of said
Lot 4 and Lot 5, and will be used for
] irrigation purposes upon tlie land de-
j scribed as Lot 4 of section 21, Map
j 45, Newcastle  District.     This notice
j was posted on tbe ground on the 4th
I day of September, 1924.     A copy of
I this  notice  and  an   application   pur-
* suant thereto and to the "Water Act,
j 1924," will be filed In the office of the
I Water Recorder al. Nanaimo, B.C. Ob-
sit Pays To Advertise In The Islander
MANN'S
BAKERY
jj== The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
£*£ Large and Varied Selection—See our Window
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBEKMIHI, II. C
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
26   rooms,   electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservation! Phone 15.
R. TATES, Manager.
lections to the application may be III-1 *3
ed with the said Water Recorder or §1
with the Comptroller of Water Hlghts. =
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., Ig
within thirty days alter thn Ilrst an-15=
pearance of this noiice in a local SBS
newspaper. The date of the Ilrst g
publication of this notice is September
6th, 1924.
Jacobus Caljouw.
39. Applicant.
OUR LEADERS
Apple and Raisin Pies—Just a Treat—Fresh every day |g
Scotch Oat Cakes & Homo-made  Biscuits  unequalled Is
Doughnuts—that  taste just  right. g|
Hot  Pies every Saturday—Once you try  them you js
always prefer them. |I
Our Superior Loaf—Give it a trial—Wholesome and
.Satisfying.
•=    Telephone IR
Cumberland      S
111 PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 6.  1921.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS.
Local Briefs
Mrs. .1. Horbury and daughter Edith
left tor Seattle on Wednesday morning.
...
Edward W. Bickle left on a holiday
trip to Vancouver on Wednesday
morning.
*        *       *
Mr. and Mrs. A. Walker left on a
holiday visit to Seattle on Wednesday last.
...
Mr. A. II. Peacey and son Jack
were visitors to Cumberland during
the week.
...
Mr. T. Spruston, Supt. of the Ladysmith mines was a visitor to Cumberland on Labor Day.
R. H. Hindmarch, publisher of the
Nannlmo Daily Herald, was a visitor
to Cumberland last week-end.
*     .     ss
Andy Home, formerly of the Cumberland Football team, has been transferred to the Calgary Caledonians.
S. Richardson, of Nanaimo, was a
visitor in town this week, the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Richardson.
APPRECIATION
Mr, James Wilcock, of Vancouver, j
was a vlstor to Cumberland last
week-end.
|    .Miss   Beatrice    Mitchell    returned
Mr.   Allan   li.   Nunns,   rff   Penrith j Saturday   last   rrom   a  two   months'
Avenue, bas purchased a Radio out-   holiday Bpent at Cowichan Lake.
lit. which he Is having Installed UUb . .   .   .
week end. '
New Fall Goods
Admiral Win. Merrifield Is able to
be around again, after having been
knocked out In the Ilrst round by n
Wee McGregor.
...
Hon.  William Sloan,    minister    of
mines, was a Cumberland visitor last j
Monday,   coming   here   especially   to j
attend tbe Labor Day sports.
...
Freddy Deluce, the speedy outside
right of  the    Cumberland    Football
Jsfcssrs Stanley Monunce, Donald
Watson. Reggie O'Brien and George
Henderson were a motor party to Victoria last Saturday, returning early
Tuesday morning.
ss     *     ss
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Apps returned on Sunday from a two-months'
holiday spent in camp at Pender Island and at Mission City.
*     *     ss
H. E. Murray, who spent a portion
team, has strained a muscle of his leg . of the holidays at the Summer School
Our first delivery of Ladies'
New Fall Coats have arrived and
comprise some real smart sytles
as well as extra good values.
See our leading Special in
Coats made of a heavy tweed in
new checks, full length and sizes
up to 42 and our price is only
$15.00. A real good coat at
the price.
New figured velour with fur
collar.     Price $21.00.
New Millinery arriving for
Fall and many new styles are on
view.
See our New Navy Serge Suit
for men at $16.50.     A real suit I
and it will surprise you to see
the value that is in it.
New Silk Waists have arrived
in many new colors and the
styles are up to date. Our values are what we consider extra
special.
Men's Sox. We have just:
received a fall shipment of'
Men's Hosiery and we have some
new lines at prices under the
regular and qaulities better than
ever.
Ladies' Flannelette Night
Gowns made from our own imported Flannelette and in all
sizes to suit the lady who wants
a full size.     See our range.
Boys' Combination Suits, the
season will soon be here when
you will require something
heavier for the boy for under- >
wear and we are ready to supply
your wants in Boys' Combinations, all sizes.
and will be unable to play for some
time.
...
Mr. A. Taylor, of the staff of the
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Cumberland branch, expects to leave today (Saturday), for a two weeks' vacation.
Miss  Itosabelle Lockhart .who has
been visiting her aunt and uncle, Mr.
and Mrs. A. Lockhart of this city, returned  to her home In  Nanaimo on   companled by the latter.
Tuesday morning.
Vancouver, and the remainder at his
home In Armstrong, returned to Cumberland on Monday.
ss     ss     ss
Messrs. Parker and Kaplansky, of
"Forcimer's" Nanaimo, were weekend visitors to Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Horwood. of
Victoria ,who have been visiting with
Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Horwood left
for tlieir home on Friday morning, ac-
Withthe
Creomlcftin?^'
f
Keep a supply
inyour pantry
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Write  to  the  Borden  Co.,
Vancouver.  B.C.
Limited
SUTHERLAND'S
Cumberland
CARD OK THANKS
Mr. Robert Halcrow and family
1 take this opportunity of extending to
. all those friends, who by their sym-
pathy and ready help did so much to
aleviate the pain caused by the death
of a loving wire and mother, heartfelt
thanks. 3i;_
Mr. T. W. L. Mutch, who has been
relieving Mr. A. T. Heyland at tlie
local branch of the Bank of Comnierca
left on Thursday morning for Parksvllle, where he will relieve the manager, for the next two weeks
.   .   .
I Mr. A. T. Heyland, manager of the
local branch or thc Canadian Bank
j of Commerce .after spending the past
j two weeks on a vacation In Lady-
! smith. Victoria, Vancouver and other
mainland cities, returned to Cumber-
| land on Wednesday.
*     ss     ss
j Mr. and Mrs. James Dick and fam-
| Ily returned to Cumberland on Tuesday evening last, after spending tho
past two weeks on a motor tour of
Oregon and the State of Washington.
Mr. Dick speaks in glowing terms of
i the roads in the neighboring states to
I the south of us, and whilst stopping
| at the different places made enquiries
I as to the amount of monies expended
lor roads anil upkeep of samp. Mr.
Dick states that whilst trade is fairly
brisk in thnt portion of the states his
party visited, prices ror the different
commodities run about the same as
B.C., with tbe execeptlon or fruit,
which is much cheaper. Tlie parly
had an excellent time whilst away
with the weather all that could he
desired.
Yes, we won tbe Mine Rescue
championship on Monday last, but to
whom Is the credit due? Jock Thompson. For it wns he who took hold
of us a little over a year ago, when
we were raw recruits, we didn't even
know tbe name of the machine. We
hadn't the slightest idea how to put
the machinne nu, in fact some of us
hadn't seen tbe appartus before.
Jock has been our Instructor and
teacher all through and he is today,
and we can safely say he Is one of
the best .
We cannot take this honor of being champions without saying Jock
Thompson Is champion also. Hats,
oft*, boys, to our instructor.
Cumberland No. 2 Mine Rescue
Team.
FORGIE SENIOR
TO RULE ROOST
FOR CITY CLUB
Robert Forgle Sr., Is the new pres!-
dent of the Vancouver City Football |
Club, formerly Vancouver Elks.    Ro..-
Goodali,  hitherto one of the moguls ;
in   charge   of  the  Hanbury   baseball
outfit,   will  act    as    secretary.      R. j
Forgle   J..   A.   Hazelden.   H.   Drink- i
water  and   the  president  and   secre-!
tary will serve on tho executive. The !
energetic Harry Drinkwater will serv.» I
as team mannger.
Most of tbe old members have sign- j
ed up and the club looks forward to a i
successful season.     The plnyers will
practice at Con. Jones Park tonight I
at. 6:15 o'clock. Harold Roberts, Do
laney. Forgle, McDowell, Smith, Wil
liams. Howden, Cameron and  Butch
nrt bave all signed again.
Sp
ecials for
Saturday
19c.
Peanut Brittle, iL, lb	
Chocolates, assorted, Reg. 75c. Special Saturday 58c.
Chocolate Ginger, per lb  89c.
Whole Brazil Nuts, Chocolate coated, per lb.   89c.
TRY A  POUND OF SWEETEST MAID CHOCOLATES
THEY ARE THK BEST AND PUREST MADE,     PRICK
PER I
bSI.OOp
ER LB.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK .STORE
"It   PAYS   to   DEAL   at   LANG'S"
THE HERO OF EVERY DAY
...
The heroism or Ihe world is not
displayed only ln cases or danger.
Tlie world's battlefields are orten In
the human heart aud walking the
path of plain duty often develops real
heroism,
Who can  Imagine the mental  anguish  endured   by    thousands    upon
thousands of unknown  heroes? Who
cun conceive or the numberless aching bleeding hearts that beat with a
dull, maddening    persistency    within
the   weary  hearts  or  many  a   noble
i heroine?     Many men and women live
I long lives without ever encountering
the necessity of having the occasion
to show their mettle lu limes of dan-
j ger, nnd yet who daily enact heroism,
Heroism Is In fortitude as well as
In courage; It Is moral as often as It
Is physical.     There are men who remain steadfast ut their posts through
many trials, who, Impelled by strict
regard fnr duty, sacrifice health and
all the sweetness of life in honorable
fcnlty to others.     There arc husbands
| and   lathers   whose   prolonged   years
: are hut one record of self-suppression
There nre wives and mothers whose
; lives nre mnde up of self-sacrlllcc and
devotion.       Obligations    and    duties
are the wool and web of ordinary ax-
I perlence, and  there ure but  few  of
us who nre below or can claim to be
above the burdens they impose.    The
■ udmiratlon   whicli   heroism    Inspires
| could not exist If Ihe world were filled with  untold  meanness and gross-
| ness.      We arc all  prone, whenever
heroism   Is   enacted   under  pictures-
1 que or drastic conditions, to exalt it
; too much above the dally seir-sacri-
; flee of other men;  but. the heart of
I human   nature   In   lis   sympathy   for
these acts of self-abnegation proves
j that It Is not so had as the synlcs
paint It.
R. FORREST HAS
CHANCE FOR LIFE
Richard Forrest, 3-14 Garden-Drs'e.
who, police state, drank a quantity
of lysol at ills residence on Wednesday morning, has n chance for recovery although his condition Is decidedly serious, according to tiie authorities at tlie Vancouver General
Hospital.
Police state thnt Forrest had apparently received had news In n letter from his former home in Scotland, and went down inlo the basement only to return a few minutes
later very ill. Mrs. Forrest summoned medical aid. The doctor,
upon arrival found Forrest to have
taken poison und hnd him removed
Immediately to the Vancouver General Hospital.
It was stated at the Forrest homo
Wednesday evening that despondency over unemployment could nol
have brought on the alleged attempt
at suicide as he had a good position
at the B.C. Sugar Refinery.
"Dicky" Forrest, ns he is known
to the football fraternity of Vancouver, appeared quite ln normal
spirits on Labor Day, according to
one of his friends. He hnd asked 11
any members or the team on which
he played last year were "kicking
the ball around" yet. When told
that tbey were Forrest Is said to
have remarked that he would probably tisy'ii out when the season opened.
Coming to Vancouver from Scotland in 1908, Forrest immediately
signed on with one of the teams playing in the cily and for the past 21
years has taken au active part, in tlle
game every season. He is considered to be one of tlie most outstanding
plnyers in the city.
ORANGES
5 Dozen for   $1.00
3 Dozen for   $1.00
Oranges at, per dozen   .50c. 75c and $1.00
Sliced Pineapple, per tin 25c, 4 for , 85c.
Van Camp's Pork and Beans, 2 tins 25c.
Quaker Tomato Soup, 2 tins  25c.
King Beach pure Prune Jarne, 4-lb tin , 75c.
King Beach pure Red Plum Jam, 4-lb. tin 75c.
Comox Creamery pure Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tin 85c.
Jelly Powders, assorted flavors, 3 pkts  25c.
Libby's Picklesi—Sour and Sweet Mixed, Sour Chow
and Sweet Chow, Gerkins and Sweet Relish.     Reg.
50c. size for 35c.     3 for  $1.00
Potted Meats, Vi's, 3 for   25c.
Potted Meats, lA's, 2 for , 25c.
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2'/■> lbs. for , 50e.
Lemon Snaps, 2 lbs for 55c.
Oatmeal Soap, 6 cakes for  25c.
Swift's White Laundry Soap, 15 cakes for  $1.00
Swift's Cleanser, per tin 10c.
Swift's Pride Washing Powder, per pkt 35c. 3 for $1.00
KINK STOCK OK KIIKS1I FRUITS AMI VEGETABLES
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS FOR
PRESERVING PEACHES, PEARS  AMI  ITALIAN  PRINKS
Pickling season is now here. Fresh Green Tomatoes
and Ripe Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Cauliflower, Green
Pepper, Pickling Onions, Etc.
We carry Crosse and Blackwells Malt and White Wine
Vinegars, full strength, Pickling Spices and Herbs, etc.
Matt Brown's Grocery
• FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
The tailor's goose  never  bas  goslings.
A clothes horse uever hns a coif.
Catalogues never have kittens.
Monkey wrenches don't climb.
A cowBlIp never hns calves.
A dandelion has no roar.
OONTi
DO
THI
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. G. Richardson and
family. C. Brown, J. Tllley and S.
Richardson, accompanied by ,Mr. and
Mrs. II. 11. Bernstein, were a motor
launch parly to the head of Comox
Lake over the week end.
FOR SALE-HANSON'S NEW HOTEL
Building nt Cninpbeltou, 12 bed j
rooms, bath room, toilet, living:
room. 2 stores, club room, plate
glass front, on lot 50x11)11. Everything for 14,000.00 cash. Address
T. W. Hanson, Campbell River,
B.C. ,1<i.
LOST—A SUIT CASE, WITH 2 SUITS
in. iu the vicinity of Deep Bny.
Please notify owners immediately,
name and address in suit case.    35.
LOST ON SUNDAY NIGHT NEAR
Union Baiy, a small brown hand
grip, containing wearing apparel,
belonging to Alberni Tennis Club.
Will finder please return to Islander
Office. 35.
LOST — SUNBURST BROACH, O.N
Monday, Labor Day, between llie
New Townsite and the Recreation
Grounds. will finder please return to Tlie Islander Office. 3.*i
PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH
IIKOPKMNG
The Presbyterian Church wi|l bc
reopened for Divine Service nn Sunday. September 7- The church lias
been painted outside nnd redecorated
inside, having a very handsome and
cheering appearance. Additional
lights have been installed to make it
oven moro attractive. Tlie choir
have prepared two anthems whicli
will be sung al the evening service;
"Hall Holy Lord," nnd "Thc Way Of
The Cross." Hours of service, 11
a.m. nnd 7 p.m. The Sunday School
will also reopen at 2.30 p.m.
In connection with tlie reopening
service, the Ladles' Aid will hold a
supper lu the basement on Tuesday
evening, commencing ut 5.30 o'clock.
Everybody knows wliat a good supper
the ladies provide, so come and enjoy the good things und hnve a social
chat and meet your friends, Price
of supper, SOc,
GRACE  .METHODIST  (JIH'IM 11
The services will be conducted nt
Grace Methodist Church on Sunday,
September 7th by the pastor who has
just returned from n visit to Eastern
Canada. Preaching Services at 11
n.m. and 7 p.m. Sabbath School at
11.45 a.m.
Everybody  welcome
J. U. Butler, Pastor.
ffl
NOW IS THE TIME
TO START TO GET HIOADV FOR CHRISTMAS
Come in and see;
STAMPED PILLOW CASKS,   .NIGHT DRESSES,
III EKKT SETS AND TEA CLOTHES
etc, at
Mrs.   L.  Francescini
Cumberland
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
Hemstitching A Specialty

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