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The Cumberland Islander Feb 9, 1924

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 ""-/I
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
in
With which Is cunsolhlnted Ihe Cumberland Hots.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 6.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA    SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9. 1924.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
CUMBERLAND SCHOOL
REPORT FOR JANUARY
Number of pupils attending 445;
Percentage attendance 93.5; New
pupils on February list 28.
One division was closed for one
week on account of Scarlet Fever.
The shield for the month goes to
Division tl, Miss Aspesl teacher, with
98 8  attendance.
The Entrance Class Honor Cards arc
won   by:—Jean   MacNaughton,   May
Whlrter, Kitty Prior, Vincen Auch-
terlonle, Thomas Robertson, Willie
Mcintosh, Nellie Walker, Clarence
Lewis, Bessie Nicholas, Annie Brown,
Low Ping, Thomas Mossey, Violet
Zanal, Klmeyo Kaga, Willie Shearer,
Andrew Bates, John Comb, Josie Burghiner, Annie Young, John Kuvfs,
Harry Westfield, Matsuljo Abe, Ruili
Borora,   Oeorge    Strachan,   Jemima
FOUR HUNDRED ATTEND
PIONEERS'   RE-UNION
LAST FRIDAY NIGHT
Hughes, Helen Parnham, Jessie Crant, I Mitchell, Elsie Waterfield, Leslie Farm
Waller Hughes, Jean Smith, Kate Rob->r Roslna Thompson, Douglas Baird,
ertson aud Beryl Hudson.
For Progress:— Margaret Young,
Dorothy Maxwell, .Mary Gozzano, Lillian Banks.
George E. Apps, Principal.
intranet' Class
Class Percentage of attendance.
98.24.
Perfect attendance:—Lilian Banks.
Irene Bates, Mary Colin, Alma Con-
rod. Archie Dick, Norman Gomm.
Jack Hill, Beryl Hudson, Jean McNaughton, Helen Parnham, John Strachan, May Taylor, Gordon Walker,
Robert Yates. Norman Bateman, Sam
Davis, Tatsuml Iwasa, Fred Leversedge, Yuen Lou, Victor Marinelli,
Geo. McLellan, Josie Pirozzlnne, Geo.
Raga.
II. E. Murray, Teacher.
Entrance Clliss
Clnss Percentage of attendance
97.28.
Perfect Attendance:—Mabel Williams. Charles Walker, Charles Tobacco, Edna Smith, Ruth Oyama, Dorothy Maxwell, Alastair McKinnon.
Tom Little. Waller Hughes, May
Hughes, Jack Horbury, Margaret Itar-
niay. Jessie Grant, Mary Cozzaus.
Lena GaleazzI. Joseph Freloni, Chas.
Francioli, Leslie Dando, Ella Con/..
Isao Abe.
Tessle A. Galllvan, Teacher
Division III.
Pupils promoted from Jr. VI1 to Sr.
VII:—Annie Mann. Gordon Horwood,
Low Hon, Norma Parnham, Harold
Conrod, Lily Leversedge (Honor Roil
Pupils for January). Edna Cawdell and Margaret Hughes equal, Eleanor Bergland, Isabel Yarrow, Eleanor Davis, Fusttyo Suglmorl. Emma
Plckette, Tsuncto Asao, Andrew
Brown, Nabuo Hayashl, Margaret
Shearer, Norman Hill, Tadashi Dol,
Kathleen Emily and Jack Severnoy
equal, Shigeo Knwaguchi and John
Auchterlonl equal. Joseph Ducca. Ian
Waddell, Edna Conrod anil Dick Marpole equal.
Passed on Trial:—Agnes Bruce.
Sorah Oyama, Lena Bogo, Victor Bono.
Annie Beveredge, Barbara Grant, Jas.
Home.
Marjorie Mordy, Teacher.
Division IV
Attendance 95.1 per cent.
Promoted from Jr. VI to Sr. VI:—
Normon Frelone. Edna Davis, Fre.1
Cawdell, Allan Glen, Tadao Dol, Bessie Marshall, Klshio Kaga, Lem Jane.
Jack MacLean and Joseph Williams
equnl, Sarah Lawrence, Mary Sweeney, Low Leong and Mary Hunt equal,
Alko Yoshlkuin, Jean Johnston, Alex.
MacDonald, Robert Colling, Annie
Walker, Lena Merletle. Norah Wallace, Ella Johnston, Josephine Welsh,
Peter Mossey, Sakayo Suglmorl, Joseph Stanaway, Tom Comb, Jackie
Watson, Helene Hamilton, Louis Dar-
toldl.
On ffrlal:— Charles MacDonald, Bert
MacLellan, Win. Bergland, William
Thompson, William Smith. Reginald
Davis.
Honor Cards:—Edna Davis, Norman
Frelone, Josephine Welsh. Klshio
Kaga, Allan Glen, Fred Cawdell.
Miss Harrison. Teacher
Division   V
Atendancc 95.5 per cent.
Promoted from Sr. V to Jr. VI, In
order of merit: -Beatrice Cavallero
Reta Devoy, Isabel Brown, James
Brown, George Brown, Chlyeko Ka.iu-
jumn, Dorothy Gordon, Sadako Iwo<j«
Kathleen O'Brien, Floyd .McMillan,
Mary Jackson, Robert Burns, Hltoshl
Suglmorl, Jean Brown, Harriet Hor
bury, Mlnoru Tahara. Barbara West-
field. Rena Bonora, Victor Tomassl,
Margaret McDonald, Violet Williams,
Robert Conn, George Logan, Chnrlotti
Slant, Hugh Braes, Ernest Boffy, Sarah Young, Yoshlo Knwaguchi. Annie
Taylor.
On Trial:—Mildred Lockner, Tasku
Oyama, Ronald Gray, Hazel Gibson
Tommy Tobacco, Lena Tomassl, Edward Stockand, May Smith.
Honor List:- Aswald Reid, Vincen
Auchterlonle, Jean McWhlrter, Alven
Frelone, .Matsuljo Abe. Progress: —
Bessie Nicholas.
Miss Aspesl, Teacher.
Division VII
Promoted to Jr. V, In order of merit
—Nina Shields, Audrey Povah, Cyril
Davis, Catherine Brown, Cazuko Iwasa, Muriel Partridge, Hlsako Nakano,
Mary Small, Jack Coe. Albert Cooper,
Norls Herose, Eunice .MacKinnon,
Irene Davis, Takera Kawagauchl,
Dorino Galleazi, Edna Watson, Viola
Reese, Alden Francescini, Tommy
Robertson Second Merletti, Winona
Baird. Edith Cavallero, Quong Cholii,*,
Hatsue Malsukura, Donald Graham.
May Beveridge, Doris Hannay, Hugh
MacNeil, Margaret Smith, Olga Bonora, Willie Sweeney, John Hoh"einz
Honor List:—Catherine Brown, Audrey  Povah,    Nina Shields,    Cazuko
Iwasa,  Cyril   Davis,   Alden   Francescini and Dorino Galleazi for progress.
Miss Horbury, Teacher.
Division VIII
Attendance 94.4 l>er cent.
Promoted from Jr. IV to Sr. IV:--
Dorls Drew, Jennie Lawrence, Mnry
MacMillan, Mah Duck Lung, Muriel
Harrison, Mamoru Tahara. Archie
Welsh Bennie Nicholas, Alfred Jones,
Hirosbl Okuda."Ellen Morrison, Sidney Hunt, Lily Picketti Tommy Con-
rod, Malia Tomassl, Audrey Gear, Ir-
vin Banks, Choo Foo Lung, Joe Why-
ley, Teruko Doi Loyd Klmoto Christ
Following the lead of the Native
Sons, of Courtenay, a small group of
Cumberland pioneers began working
together with the result that one of
the most outstanding events of the
season was held last Friday night In
the Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall, a Pioneer's
Social Re-Union.
It was the first one of its kind ever
held in this cily and judging by the
B. C. DIVISION
TO HOLD ANNUAL
MEETING FEB. 13
15
FIRE CHIEF PRESENTS
EXCELLENT REPORT
Arrangements iu connection with
the annual general meeting of the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, in the Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, ou February 13-14, have now
been completed, and an excellent program has  beeu  prepared.
LOCALS HOSTS TO
G. W. V. A. SUNDAY
The City Council held their usual
meeting on .Monday evening.
The report of Chief Officer Parnham
addressed to the Aldermen and Fire
Last Sunday the local aggregation I Wardens was received and filed.     It
travelled to Nanaimo where they niei   rea<l as follows:
All  thei tne Davenports In  the first game of      '  b<;B t0 submit the annual report
Subjects to be discussed at the technical sessions are of timely Interest
and involve considerations In  which
enthusiasm of old nnd young it will |the Sener"' public is   equally   con-
not be the last; as an annual event I ce'"*d wlt" those directly engaged in
tt has come to stay.
The following committee, which was
Instrumental in giving the re-unlon,
are all old timers and deserve special
praise for their efforts: Messrs.
John Thompson (Chairman), J. P.
Struthers, J. Bennie, R. Robertson and
Mesdames Bruce, Robertson, Lockner, Maclntyre and Thompson.
Close on to 400 people were present when Mr. John Thompson delivered his opening address of welcome
and delight at seeing so many old
faces gathered together once more.
Mr. George Clinton, who has lived
here ever since 1888 then followed
with a short outline of the history of
Cumberland since it beginning ln '8?.
Mr. Clinton was time keeper for tlie
men who built the railroad here. At
the conclusion of   his    address    tli.3
the mining Industry of the Province.
The material welfare of British
Columbia is largely dependent on the
prosperity of the mining industry. All
will agree that everything possible
should be done to ensure that general
conditions shall be as conducive as
they can be made to an uninterrupted
and progressive expansion of the Industry. Certain existing economic
conditions are exerting a retarding
effect on our mining industry. These
unfavorable conditions 11114..' he removed or at least ameliorated. Ways
and means in other directions of stimulating progress need constantly to
be explored. The promotion of tlie
welfare of the mining industry is thc
principal purpose of the Canadian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy as
set forth In its charter.     In keeping
double-header played In that city : »" 'he administration of the Fire Depi.
on Sunday, the second game being ' tat '"e year 1923.
between Nanaimo City and the Na- i During the period the Brigade turn,
naimo Vets. The first game was the ' ed "ut 10 yi alarms of fire. Of these,
more Interesting from the fan's stand-1 seven were inside the City limits, asid
point for it was replete with, thrills | Ave outside.
and  narrow  escapes   by   both  goat;.. |    A total of 3000 feet of hose was laid
Turner scored Cumberland's lone goal I at 'he various fires,
with a beautiful shot while the 'Porn      Ot* tho 7 fires attended within tho
Grand March, in which over 300 peo-, w|(h ,m pnrp08e   attention    „t   the
pie took part, was led by Mr. Clinton
and Mrs. Maclntyre, one of tbe city's I
oldest residents.     Pioneers from all [
over the  district  took  part    ln    It, I
among Ihem being .Mrs. Bennie, aunt
of Mr. J. Bennie, Mrs. Mullado and
her daughter Mrs. Creech of Victoria,
all of whom came to Cumberland over
thirty-five years ago.       Music    wai
supplied  by the old time orchestra.
forthcoming meeting will be mainly
directed to a survey of Industrial conditions as affecting mining in the
I Province, with a view to their betterment. The subjects to be Immediately considered are included under the
tesepctlve heads of: "Conditions favorable and unfavorable to mining In
British  Columbia";   "The disabilities
got thelr's by a penalty whicli Mc-
Fugan easily converted. Jock Stew
art conceded the penalty    when    he
City, the total loss by fire was only
$100.00. The respective premises
were Insured for a total of $9000.00,—
bandied the ball after a shot which ! the amount nt risk being $20,000.00.
would have been a sure goal anyway, j    of the 5 nres attenctcd outside the
Blair being beat a mile.     This ended   city ,Uie ,otai loss ,,y flre amounted
the scoring, the game ending In a one-110 Jio.000.000.     The respective prem-
all draw. | |scs were i,lsured for a total of $14,-
The second game was a walk away | nnn.oo, the amount at risk being $22.-
for the City team, which scored eight
goals to the Vets' one.
This week end the Vets, visit Cumberland and should provide an interesting game. The locals will line up
ns follows:
Blair; Hitcliens, Stewart; Mortimer,
Conti, Monolian; Deluce. Turner, Graham, Plump and Home.
Don't forget the kick-off is at 2.30
Sunday afternoon.
MATRON LECTURES
TO JUNIOR RED
CROSS SOCIETY
Mr. John  Baird. Mr. Dave Roy and,of the Coal Mining Industry in British
Columbia and    Possible    Remedies";
Mr. Harry Murdock, assisted by Mr.
Moody from Courtenay and Mr. Jock i
"The Possibilities for an    Iron    and
Stewart, while T. Hudson from Union | Steel Industry In British Columbia"
Bay  performed  the  duties   of  floor
and "Research In    connection    with
On January 29th, the regular monthly meeting of the girls of the junior
000.00.
There were 10 ordinary drills, and
one surprise turn nut held during Ihe
period .and the attendance therat were
very satisfactory.
j The small amount of loss by fire
I during tbe period speaks well for th*
j efficiency and smartness of the Brl-
! gade.
I During "Fire Prevention Week" the
j children at tbe Public School were
j lectured on Fire Prevention, aud elder
j boys Instructed in the use of fire flgbl-
| Ing appliances.
The efficiency of the Fire Depart-
I ment has been greatly Increased  by
thc  much  needed  additions  aud  improvements to tbe Fire Hall—as tlle
manager In a manner satisfactory to  local Metallurgical  Problems."
everyone. j    The second mentioned subject comes
At twelve o'clock delightful re-Jjn the "Coal Session" under the chair-
lna Small, Bern Ice Stant, Masalu Sora, fragments were served by the ladles I SansltTp of Mr. Nichol Thompson and
Edmond Carrigan, Arnold Derbyshire, j 0, the committee, nfter which dancing J W'11 he Introduced by Mr. Chns. Gra-1 m'^er8
Clinton Harrison. Marjorie Bird,! was kept up till 2 a.m. at which time ham, Mr. C. M. Campbell, Mr. J. P.
(Robert Cossar. Daniel Stant and John i mllny were still anxious to keep on., Biggs and Professor Joseph Daniels.
Burgheimer on trial) Alice Taylor, I old-time dances were the order nlL The meetings, it may be added, are
Robert Marshall, Chow Chee, Marion | through the night with an occasional open to the public.
Combs. ! fox-trot for the youger folks. 	
Honor    Cnrds:-Mary    MacMillan,; 1 ANOTHER POPULAR
Red Cross Society was held in the engineer now resides on the premises,
Cumberland Public School. Miss ana- tlle heating Installation renders
Brown, matron of the local hospital, j t|le nre truck ready to turn out at a
gave a very Interesting antl instruc- j moment's notice regardless of climatic
tive talk to the members, her suii-1 »onditlons. In this connection the
ject being "Home Nursing." ! thanks of the Department aro due to
At the close of her address a hearty | the City Council, to the Canadian Col-
vote of thanks was extended to Mis*
Brown," after   which   dainty   refresh
ments  were served  by some of the | er0us donations and assistance.
The- Fire   fighting   equipment
llerles (D) Ltd., and the Cumberland
Electric Lighting Coy., for their gen-
Doris Drew, Mamoiu Tahara, Bennie
Nicholas, Jennie Lawrence, Mah Duck
Lung.
Miss MneFadyen, Teacher.
Division IX
Attendance 91 per cent.
Promoted from Jr. Ill to Sr. Ill:
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE TO
OPEN BRANCH OFFICE
WHIST DRIVE MONDAY
I The Anglican Hall will again be the
Dr. R. P. Christie, of Cumberland.'. scene of another whist drive and
announces that he has extended his dance on Monday night. This one is
practice by an up-to-date dental sur-; being held by the Women's Auxiliary
gery in the Booth Bldg., Courtenay. [ of thc local hospital for the purpose
ChrisBie Robertson, Annie Cheung, i The latest approved modern equip- j of raising funds for their work in that
Mary Hussell, Thorn Keeler, William I ment, such as electrical engine, direction, nml everyone attending will
MacNaughton, Bryson Praiiham, Au- fountain cuspidor with running water j be assured of a good time. Whin
dr«y Horailton, John Bannerman. and Bitter dental chair, is being in- starts at 8 p.m. and ends at 10. when
Agnes    MacKinnon,    Jackie    \-*>ng. ] stalled. j dancing continues until 1 a.m.     Dnr-
Murlel Thompson, Chow Ting, Shi-1 Dr. Christie's Cumberland office will ing the evening refreshments will In
geurn Yagauki, Kiyoko Abe, May Mah, j be placed In charge of a competent | served by the ladles. Messrs. Mordy
Fung Him, Wllbert Graham George ! and duly registered dental practitlon-' and Mumford will act as door man-
Mah Jessie Robb Johnnie Robertson,' er-to be announced later, At pres- j ngers for the whist and dancing re-
Cheyoko Suglmori, Lem Hing, George | ent Dr. Christie will give his person-1 spectlvely. For a good time don't
Salto, David Marshall, Harvey Hurd, j al attention to the Cumberland office | miss this, and the admission is only
Jackie .Marpole, Clyde Lewis, William j twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fri-1 fifty cents.
Slaughter, John Zenanl, Euls Bonora, | days, or by notice on his office door, j	
Barbara Martin, William Eccleston.    1    Dr. Christie nlso has a dental sur-( JUNIORS COP ONE
Honor Roll:—Annie Cheung, Mary j gery ot his  residence    at    Royston., GOAL—DISALLOWED
Hassell,   Chrlssle Robertson,   Agnes I Phone 70L, Courtenay, where he re- 	
MacKinnon.    Wlllian    MacNaughton. I celves   patients   by   special  appoint-1    on tho Recreation Grounds, Sunday
BEVAN SCOTS LOYAL
TO THEIR BARD
Bevan Scots celebrated Itobei-i
Rums' Anniversary on January 20tii
In the Hotel Bevan when about 20(1
people attended a banquet, conceri
and dance. Mr. J. G. Quinn opened
the banquet by a speech suitable to
the occasion after which came the
following program:
Toast. "The Immortal Memory." by
R. Strachan. "City of Cumberland," by
ex-Mayor MacDonald; song by Elizabeth Henderson; toast to "The Lassies" by Dr. MacNaughton; song by
.Mrs. Thompson, toast by Charles Urn-
ham to "Our Industries," songs by
Mrs. R. K. Walker and Mr. MacQuir-
trie; Highland Fling by Margaret
Adamson, Sword Dance by Jennie
Hlrd and a Scotch recitation by Mrs.
S. Cummingham of Qualicum  Heutii
For    Progress—Clyde    Lewis,    John 1 ment.
Bannerman.
Charlotte Carey, Teacher.
Division X
Attendance 94.7 per cent.
Promoted to Jr. Ill Reader:—Harold Hughes, David Hunden, Don Long,
Alhert Drew, Sylvia Mutters, Lome
Murdock Willie Home, Arthur Povah.
Willie Logan, Preston Bruce, Alex
Sommerville, Don Sing, Masake Kaga.
Takeshi Okahi, Akera Herosl Jackie
Morrison, Akea Matsunaga, Heromltsu
Salto, Margaret Westfield, Insugnn
Matsukura, Susumo Kawagauchl.
Echlro Shi, Edith Taylor, Jackie Has-
sel, John Chapman, Willie Cloutier,
♦Willie Johnson, 'Charlie Gomme.
"Willie Tobacco.
Honor List:—Lome Murdock, Arthur Povah, David Hunden, Don Long,
Albert Drew, Alex Sommerville.
Miss Richardson, Teacher.
Division XI
Attendance 92.3 per cent
Protomted   to   Sr.    II   Reader:—
Rhoda   Walton,  Madge  Bryan   Josie
last, the Cumberland Juniors met the
Rangers In a scheduled league game
.„.,,,,,. , iXTETiiTO which resulted in a  scoreless draw.
Sm IS GIVEN FOR     "0"' l°mw wcrc vcry even'y m'"""-
SHOW hit 1» UlVBsW run      c(| nml nt no tlme dl(1 ellher s|,|e ll]1¥,,
MRS. J. D. WILMETH J „„,; marked advantage.     Dave Wil-
  I son, former manager of the Cumbei -
A delightful miscellaneous shower | Innd United, handled  the whistle  10
JUNIOR FOOTBALL
CLUBS TO HOLD A
CARNIVAL DANCE
Next Thursday, February 11, the
combined Junior Football Clubs of the
district will hold a grand Whist Drive
and Carnival Dance lu the llo-llo
Theatre. This Is going to be the
event of the season so don't miss it.
See advertisement on page 7 Of ijls
Issue.
wns held at thc home of Miss Beatrice
Mitchell in honor of Mrs. James I).
Wllmoth   (nee  Miss    Jessie    Baker)
the    satisfaction    of    everyone    concerned.
The Juniors entered the game with
youngest daughter ot Mr.  and  Mrs. I out two of their regular line-up. Bof-
Thomas Baker of this city. I fey and Robertson, both being unable I
A very pleasant evening wns Bpcni   to  play  but  their  places  were ably j    Wednesday evening,  January 30ih.
In games and song; Mrs. Wllmoth be-1 taken by Billy Marshall and Miller. | thc ,ilre(,tor8 „{ the St. George's Pres-
ANNUAL MEETING OF
CHURCH DIRECTORS
i HELD JANUARY .30,
ing the recipient of mnny  beautiful
and useful gifts.
Mrs. Wllmeth left on Thursday
morning to Join her husband ut
Qulney Illinois, where they will re.
side.
ENJOYABLE SOCIAL
EVENING AT HOME OF
MRS. A. WALKER
On Wednesday evening, January 30,
the Pythian Sisters spent an enjoyable
evening at the home of Mrs. A Walker In the New Townsite.    Games and
Wong, Mllsuo Obara,  Robert Logan,
Honor List for January:—Reta Do-1 jseter Bono, Lelnnd Bannerman, Gertie
voy, Mary Jackson, Kathleen O'Brien | Davis, Sheglma Marlya, Muriel Shortt.
and Beatrice Cavallero equal. Dorothy , George Nunns, Jean Dunslre. Johnny | gtofy-teiling were In evidence 'ill
Gordon, Isabel Brown, Bnrbnra West-' f1jaili Marguelte Laugnn, Bessie Brown | through a delightful evening, nfter
field for progress. Margaret Drummoud, Milsuo Hayas-  ^^ dainty refreshments were serv
ed by Mrs. Walker.     Mrs. F. Carter
Annie B. Gntz, Teacher, I kl.Shorl Klyonaga, Willie Combs, Ar-
Dlvlslon VI thur Wong,    Willie Walker,    Robert
Attendance 98.8 per cent. Walker, Audrey Phillips, Wong Ylng.
Promotion List for V to Sr. V:—Os- On Trial for One Month Only:--
wald Reid, Alven Frelone, Jean Mc-, ((ontlnned on Pitf* 8)
from Royston, was the lucky winner
of a lovely salad bowl donated by Mrs.
Bruce and raffled for the benefit of the
lodge.
the latter taking Honey's place In
goal. They were, however, the more
agresslvc team and had hard luck in
not being able to score all hough they
did get one which the referee disallowed. Watson, left inside, for llie
Rangers .missed a beautiful chance
to open the scoring when he headed
wild over thc bar.      The defense on
byterlan Church held tbelr annual
meeting. Itev. James Hood opened
the business by calling for election ■>!
officers for 1924, which resulted na
follows:
Mr. J. C. Hrown. chairman, Mr. D
McLean secretary; and Dr. Mar.
Naughton, Dr. R. MacDonald. I). .McLean, J. C.  Brown. C.  Nash  and A
eludes: 1400 ft. of •>)/■. In. hose, 100 ft.
of V% In. hose; 3-2VJ In. nozzles; 1—
1% iu. nozzle; 1 extension ladder; 2
axes; I doz. nozzle spanners (2>£ln.)
6 nozzle spanners (1<AI|>); 2 Smoke
helmets; 1 firsl aid equipment; 0
chemical extinguishers.
Respectfully   submitted.
Chas. J. Parnham. Chief Officer.
Estimates for the year 1924 were accepted as presented by the School
Board, making a total of $28440.00,
under the various headings ns follows:
Salaries, Teachers, $21,400; Janitor,
salary. $2,100; Insurance. $400; Repairs to buildings, $000; Fuel $900;
Furniture. $000; Improvements to
grounds $400; Water $150; Light
$50; Medical Inspection $200; Transportation, Royston Ril. Children, $240;
Secretary's Salary. $150; Wiring re.
maiiiing portion old building, $300;
Janitors Supplies $250; School supplies $500; Sundries $20(1. Total ordinary estimates $28,440.00.
• Yours truly
A. McKinnon, Secretary School Bd.
The Board of School Trustees made
application for an additional grant of
$151111.011 for the Installation of a new
toilet In the basement of the school.
On motion of Aid. Maxwell, thlB was
laid over pending the report of the
Finance  comniiiiee  for   1924,
Aid, Mordy, chairman of the Hoard
of Health, said he had heard several
complaints about the (ily Dump and
suggested its removal to a point
where It would nol be a menace to
Ihe haellh of the City. It waa decided to Instruct the Hoard of Health lo
Investigate the mailer of building an
Incinerator,
Further correspondence will be published next week.
holh teams played well and it was j ii0,,i,|lnrt as the hoard of management
due to their efforts that the game 1 Ml. grown was also appointed treas-
went scoreless. I m.e,. and Sunday School Supt.. for Hie
The following ls the line-up of both   ycar
teams: votes of thanks were tendered the
Juniors—Miller; Campbell, H. Stew- var|oua committees and organizations
art; Wilcock, Farmer. Mitchell; M. inHtrumeiital in carrying on the work
Stewart, Marshall, Stevenson, J. Rob- Qf (ne dmrch and nlso to Mr. and
ertson nnd A. Robertson. 1 j|,,8   fj00t|   |n  appreciation  of  their
Rangers—Walker;   Marshall,   Rob-1 serv'|C08,
ertson;  Weir, R. Strachan, I). Lock-!  __:	
hart; Campbell, Watson, Burns, Audi-;-— '
Invole nnd H. Strachan. Allan series which will probably he
NO INCREASED SALARY
FOR MI.SS GALLLIVAN
At the last meeting of the Board of
School Trustees and on the reconsideration of teachers' salaries, sN'ettie
Robertson was Increased to $1300 par
annum.
Miss Oalllvan's salary of $1400..)0
was reconsidered by the Hoard whicli
refused to grant her an additional Increase.
Mr. Murray stands at $1700.00 and
Miss Galllvan at $1400.00 tor duiies
of a similar nature.
Thc Cumberland Liberal Conservative Association will reorganize during the coming week and send tblr-
Next Sunday the same two teams   at Bevan If the seniors use thc home   teen delegates to the convention to ho
meet ln thc flrst gome of the O. II.   grounds. | hold nt Courtenay on February 20. PAGE TWO
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberlaud, B. C.
EDWARD W  BICKLE
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
AIN'T IT AWFUL?
Oy, yohee! Sufferln' cats and great
gobs of gloom. We got into the aw-
fulest mess of pessimism the other
day you ever saw. We went into one
of our local stores and the proprietor
was on the verge of tears. Thc great.
big baby actually bowled like a dog
with a tin can tied to bis tail, a thorn
lu his foot and in the last stages of
the mange. That business man was
enough to give a fellow the blind
staggers. You should have heard
him. Everything was wrung. He
had taken In eighteen cents all day.
People wouldn't trade with the home
merchant, they would rather spend
their money with the city robbers.
Property values In our town were falling like leaves In tho autumn frost i.
The only things thai flourish in this
town are poker games. The town
was bankrupt. Talk about a budget for charity work, wc couldn't pay
our honest debts now. The automobile was ruining everything. People
put mortgages on their homes to pay
for them. It was a good deal better
when wc had saloons and you could
get a big free lunch with a flvo cenl
glass of beer. He didn't Bee how we
were going to get along much longer
There were too many retail stores In
Cumberland. Competition was ruining all our merchants. And on, and
on, and on, until we began to be afraid
for the old home town ourselves. Then
we found out what was the cause of
all the gloom. The poor fellow hail
sent a check for some taxes and the
check wonld make him overdrawn nt
the bank if It should get back before
he could make a deposit. Oy. yohee!
Ain't It awful, Mabel?
POOR BUTTERLFY
There has ever been a spirit of contempt iu the manner in which tbe
"home man" is regarded by some of
his acquaintances, and there seems to
be an underlying vein of sarcasm in
the comments of some as they refer
lu withering scorn to those ot their
fellow men, who are perhaps In every
way their moral and intellectual superiors. The "home man" is the good
man, the honest man and thc manly
man, and the more time he spends at
home with his family, after his day's
work is done, the more it is to bis
credit and eternal happiness. Tlie
guy fellow wbo spends bis time away
from home as much as possible with a
coterie of equally gay associates,
lives the life of the butterfly, which is
devoid of benefit, to himself or anybody else, and which, when It has been
lived, has mnde no one any better.
Tbe "home man" who spends his leisure time at home with his wife and
little ones, or, if he Is unmarried, with
Ills mother and sisters Is the sensible
man, the man for whom life holds
something brooder and better thim
Ihe shams and so-called pleasures of
,i buttorfly existence.
PASTE THIS IN
YOUR 'PHONE BOOK
ai
Earn upwards of $25 weekly,
growing snushrooms [or ua.
.Start now, using portions of
irostproof t-ellar. Materill (or
beds easily obtainable, even
in severe weather. Pleasant,
profitable work. Write, en-
closing stamp foi illustrated
bookie ami particulars AdilressDept
Canada Mushroom Co., rtoflarden Av.. Toronto
Address Dept. 84.
HAVE MERCY
Of all the fellows who stand in need
of sympathy, the poor widower probably Is entitled to more consideration
than any other man who is "horn to
trouble." We used to bear it said
that In India when a man died liis
widow was placed on a funeral pyre
and burned. Whether this wns ever
really done we very much doubt, yet
It would be a merciful way of disposing, not of the widows, but of tho
widowers, In this country. Yes, we
honestly believe it would in a way be
more merciful than the treatment
which they nre accorded.
As soon as a man's wife dies be becomes almost an outcast. Who but
a few close relatives ever come to see
him? In the case of the widow, neighbor ladies rally about her and in many
caaeB even take their husbands along
to call. But how odd and almost improper it would he considered for
neighbor Jones or Smith to fetch bis
wife along and come to call on the
poor alone widower.
If he tries to hire help he is talked
about for having a housekeeper. If
he tries to "batch" he Is too stingy to
hire help. If he stays at home alone
he ia queer, an old hermit, and has
turned against hiB friends. If he goes
abroad he is looking for a woman, and
so on, and so on.
If he starts courting someone the
men arc all jealous and envious ba-
eouse he Is getting a new deal of the
cards and they are nol; while the
women all think he ought to lie skinned alive for so soon forgetting bis
dead wife. In reality, they arc Imagining themselves gathered to the
bosom of Abraham and their John
courting someone else, whicb Is why
they are so indignant.
So he patient and tolerant of the
poor lone widower who stacks his
supper dishes and goes to a picture
show because tbe home is so empty
thnt he enn't Btay in It.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WH1TTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 21120 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Ten new 'phones have recently been
added to the local exchange so to save
time and trouble why not put this iu
your 'phone book?
Apps. G. E 148L
Blair, Tom  155
Brown, R. P LSI I
Brown,   W.  T 100
Henderson, w 1ST
Hing, Lem  IS'):
Keenan,   W.  J 172 *
Lockner.  J   Mill
Potter, John  8"IL
Sommerville,  J.   D 1851,
—	
While cranking his car last Friday
evening iu starling out for the Pin-!
neers' dance at Cumberland. Mr.  J. i
N.  McLeod  hud  the    misfortune    '."
sprain bis arm.
R 2 SITTINGS OF EGGS
Your choice of B breeds. Thia One premium
will be given free to all who carol M
Students of the
Cold Wt Poultry Cou**
while chicks or eggs are still available.
In a few months they will more than pay
for the cost of this persona] training In
commercial poultry-keeping. George W.
Miller, famous poultry expert, will teach
you how to make a success out of poultry-
keeping—how to become Independent In the
greatest of outdoor ocupatlons. This Course
is approved by 8 Government* and 11
Agricultural Colleges, It Is the only Course
written expressly for northern conditions.
InvMtiffate this opportunity
at once. Be your own boss.
Study, In your spare time,
how to make a comfortable
living from poultry-keeping.
Full particulars on request.
Ask for Free Folder No. II,
Shiw School Limited y   &t£H
40 llMrli W^Torowtoyy^Jfcl^
i
BABY
CHICKS
1IIH HEARING RESTORED
The Invisible ear drum invented by
A. 0. Leonard, which Is a manlntuie
megaphone, fitting liiBlde the ear entirely out of  sight,  is   restoring  tlie
hearing of hundreds of people In New-
York  City.      Mr.   Leonard   Invented
this drum to relievo himself of deaf-
iicbb and hend noises, and It does this
bo successfully that no one could tell
ho was a deaf man.     It Ib effective
wheu deafneBs is caused by cntarrah
or by perforated or wholly destroyed
natural  drumB.      A  request  for  Information to
A. 0. LEONARD,
Suite 436, 70 Fifth Ave.,
NEW YORK CITY,
wtll be given prompt  reply.
NEW SPRING GOODS
Satin Stripe Ratine, in choice ot colors, per yd  85c.
Check Homespuns, very suitable for Skirting, yd 95c.
Sport Flannel in all the wanted shades, per yd. $1.25
and    $2.25
We have just opened out our first consignment
of this season's Ginghams.     Call and see them.
Fancy Art Silk Hose, in Black, White, Nickle and
Brown, at per pair $1.00 and   $1.25
The balance of our Ladies' Dresses, in Homespun and
Flannel, are offered at very low prices. It will pay
you to examine these.
A. McKinnon
Cumberland, B.C.
St Margaret's Lines of
TRAVELLER'S   SAMPLES
On Sale this Week
AT CAMPBELL'S
A COMPLETE RANGE OF TRAVELLER'S SAMPLES IN WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S HOSIERY AND JERSEYS—THE FAMOUS   "ST.   MARGARETS"   BRAND—
AT BARGAIN PRICES
New Goods
MILLINERY, DRESS GINGHAMS, RATINES AND VOLIES, MISSES' AND CHILD-
REN'S SCHOOL DRESSES, ATHLETIC BLOOMERS AND MIDDIES, BOTANY
SERGE PLEATED SKIRTS, SIZES 6 TO 14 YEARS.
Men's Department
MEN'S PIT BOOTS—In Heavy Chrome Leather, with solid leather counter and
toe cap, all sizes, Regular $8.50.    Special  $5.50
MEN'S WORK SHIRTS—Men's Khaki Drillwork Shirts, Regular $2.25.     Special $1.50
BOYS' SWEATER COATS—Boys' All Wooi Sweater Coats, sizes from 24 to 32,
Regular $2.75.     Special   $1.50
BOYS' BLOOMER PANTS—Boys' School Tweed Pants, in Grey and Brown
Mixture, Regular $2.50.     Special   $1.65
EOYS' UNDERWEAR—Broken lines in Boys' Underwear, prices to $2.25.
Special, each   65c.
aaHSJii&'siMEifflaaaEEis?is^ areshaisiarBiHiaEraiaJS,
Grocery Department
Evaporated Prunes, 2 lbs 25
Evaporated Apricots, per lb  .25
Black & White Cooking Figs, 2 lbs 35
Libly's Asparagas Tips, tins  50
Blue berries, 3 tins for 1.00
Libby's   Peaches,   halves   or   sliced
2yVs tins  45
Potato Flour, Pkts  20
Semolina, pkts 25
Eagle Lobster, Vi's tins, 3 for 1.00
Clark's Corn Beef, I's tins, 3 for 1.00
Empress Raspberry and Strawberry
Jams, I's glass   .40
HEAD  LETTUCE,  RHUBARB, CAULIFLOWER,
ORAPE FRUIT, FINNAN HADDIES, KIPPERS
Empress Bramble Jelly, I's glass	
Naval Oranges, 5 doz. for	
Sunlight Soap, cartons, 2 for	
Toilet and Bath Soap, cakes, 5 for .
2-in-l Shoe Polish, black, 2 for	
White Clover Honey, jars,	
K. B. Strawberry Jam, 4's tins	
Empress Crab Apple Jelly, 4's tins.
Egyptian Lentils, per lb	
Symington's Pea Flour, tins	
Symington's Gravy Salts, tins 	
Hirondelle Macaroni, l/2's pkts, 2 for
CABBAGE.   BANANAS,   GRAPES,   FLORIDA
AND KIPPERED COD.
.40
1.00
.55
.50
.25
.35
.95
1.15
.15
.15
.15
.25
jA. A. Brown
General Hauling
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
MANN'S
BAKERY
THE HOME OF HIGH CLASS CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection See Our Window
Hot Pies Every Saturday
Once you try them, you always prefer them.'
Phone 18 CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
I'lcnse  leave four orders at  office,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
I'hone 50.
SERVICE IS OCR MOTTO
Or Phone IS l'nion Hotel
(TMBEIII.tNO TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
COURTENAY NEWS
ANNUAL MEETING OF
COW TESTERS' A^'N
Annual meeting ot the Comox Caw
Testers Association was held laat
night In the Agricultural Hall, aud
tho officers elected woro aB follows:
Geo. Hornby, President; Howard
Cox, Vice-President; John Prltchard,
Secretary-Treasuror; J. Iablster, Ed.
Williams, G. C. Bigelow, L. Reese, 13.
W. Butler, H. Hurford, C. Carwithen
and W. Laban.
Quick Action and Accuracy
arc what one depends upon when placing a Long Distance call.     These are factors which our Long.Distance staff exert themselves to provide you with.
Are you making your Telephone deliver 100 per cent,
useful service in your business or home life? At your
disposal are Long Distance lines to all principal towns
and villages within hundreds of miles of your own
Telephone, including many United States points.
Call our "Rate Clerk" for charges.     You will find
them reasonable.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
CAPT. G. R. BATES TO
ATTEND POTATO
GROWERS' MEETING
Comox Potato Growers' Association
annual election of officers held on
Thursday night In the Agricultural
Hall resulted in the following:
G. R. Bates, President; Hugh Clark,
Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer; R. Hurford, E. W. Butler, W.
Hunter, K. Willis ond Wm. Wm. Duncan directors.
Capt. Q. R. Bates wna delogated to
attend Potato Growers of B. C. meeting at Victoria, next week.
Mrs. Geo. Green is 111 at the Comox
Hospital.
THE
Phone
164
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
m
FISHING TACKLE
We have a full and complete line of Rods, Reels,
Lines, Spoons, Casts and Hooks. In fact, all tackle
necessary for the "Cdmplcte Angler."
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
We are headquarters for Electrical Supplies and
Radio Sets and Parts in this District. We are electrical contractors and no job is too big or too small.
LET US QUOTE ON YOUR ELECTRICAL WORK
Piket Electric
Mr. Frank   Stephenson   spent   tlie   oration.
week at Victoria on business.
Mr. Wm.    Douglns    returned    la.-.t ■
Mr.  L. Tlppctt, of the Condensory
Thursday  from  Vancouver  Hospital,   Road has been Buffering from an al-
where he recently underwent an op-' tack of Measels. 1/
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 9. 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
9m
INTRODUCTORY SALE
THE   MERCANTILE   STORE   COMPANY
(GEO. H. WYCHERLEY)
"The General Store With a General Purpose"
We wish to thank the people of Cumberland and District for their patronage and support during the
first days of our "Introductory Sale" This sale will continue until Tuesday, February 12, when prices on
our large poster will be in order.
DEPARTMENT NO. 1   -
GROCERIES
Assorted Sweet Mixed Biscuits, Reg. ,50c. per lb.
2 lbs  65c.
McCormick's Jersey Cream
Sodas, large packets
25c
Genuine   French   Peas,   5
tins for
95c
Fresh Rhubarb,
Per lb.
20c
DEPARTMENT NO. 3
GENT'S
FURNISHINGS
All goods on our counter at
the same price.   Don't miss
these.
Men's Black Work Pants,
per pair, only
$1.75
Men's Flannel Work Shirts
worth $3.00, only
$2.25
Men's   Work   Socks,   new
stock, 3 pairs
$1.00
DEPARTMENT NO. 5
DRYGOODS
New Curtain
Scrim, Per Yd.
25c
New Towels,
each
35c
DEPARTMENT NO. \
LADIES' WEAR
BARGAINS
One   only   Ladies'   Jersey
Dress,  Fawn and  Copper,
Reg. $11.50, for
$8.50
A few Girls' Crepe Dresses
left, only
$2.75
Ladies' Blue Serge Dress,
one   only
$12.50
And many other bargains.
Come in and see for
yourself.
DEPARTMENT NO. 2
BOOTS&SHOES
We have sold hundreds of
pairs of Boots and Shoes.
There   are  a  few  Choice
Lines, at per pair
$1.95
Men's Nailed Work Shoes
$4.95
Can't be repeated after
Tuesday
Gent's  Dress Shoes,
Black or Brown
$5.00
G. H. WYCHERLEY, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Increased Business For Can.
National In Year Just Closed
PA.SSENGER, FREIGHT AND ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
REPORT MUCH MORE WORK HANDLED THAN DURING
PRECEEDING YEAR—INCREASED GROWTH ON NATIONAL SERVICE IN .WEST
WINNIPEG,  Man.—With  Increased t commodities over the Western Region,
freight and passenger business reported over the entire system and a record  movement of  grain  and othor
thc Canadian National Railways have
found 1923 a year of vastly increased
business .according to officials ot the
system here. Operating figures from
the Ilrst ol' the year to the end of Sep.
teniber .the latest available nt the
time of writing, show that in the nine
months thc Canadian National system
earned a net operating revenue of
$6,857,815, compared with $527,311
for the corresponding period of 1922.
And with this must be considered the
fact that very little of the western
grain crop had moved this year before
the end of September, the movement
of grain from the prairies to the lakes
being almost three weeks later than
ENJOY RADIO ON CONTINENTAL LIMITED
NO longer need the business
man or broker be out of touch
with market fluctuations
while ha is travelling from his own
city to another on the Continental
Limited, thc all-steel train of the
Canadian National Railways. The
Canadian ..National system is the
flrst railway in Canada to provide
radio receiving sets aboard its regular trains for the convenience and
entertainment of passengers. Effi-1
cient receiving lets, in qharge of,
competent operators, are 'being
installed in observation cars on the
Continental Limited, with the result that the business man or
broker may, if he wishes, follow
the marketa regularly while travelling or may enjoy music or other
entertainment featurei •broadcast
from the various stations in Can
ada and thc United States. Market quotations are sent from the
large American and Canadian
broadcasting stations at regular intervals during the business day
and in addition to these, passengers aboard the Continental Limited are enabled to enjoy good music
and other features as thoy travel
icrosi the continent.
j last year, with a consequent effect up-
' on earnings .
j Tourist Traffic Increased
j Tourist and general passenger trnf-
, tic over the Western Region showed a
j considerable increase during 1923 as
| compared with 1922. In the year just
closed tourist traffic on the western
lines was tlie heaviest since the operation of the system, and from the
period of .May 15, when summer tourist fares became operative, until September 30, when these tickets were
withdrawn from sale, mountain resorts and the Pacific coast, as well as
the holiday centres further east, each
drew their quota of tourists. During
this period the peak of the travel sea -
son wus reached July 1 to 31; the Increase being especially noticeable immediately the schools closed, wheu a
great many families leave on vacation and teachers ure released from
their duties. Many special trains
were operated and special parties were
carried over western lines during the
past year.
Summer Hotels and Ledge*
The summer hotels and lodges operated by thc Canadian National Railways at Jasper Park Lodge, Jasper
National Park; Grand Dench and VI
torla Reach; Mlnaki Inn. Minakl. Ont.,
and other points, were patronized to u
much larger extent than In uny previous year. Tbe new Lodge at Ju.-e
per Park was practically filled to capacity during the entire season, and hua
been thc means of attracting tourists,
nut alone frnm Canada and the United
States, but from nearly all other
countries which provide tourist travel, many coining from the orient, Australia, all parts of Europe, West Indies and South America, as well ns
from the larger centres in the United
States and Canada. Thc snme might
be said, on a smaller scale, of the
resorts at Mlnaki and Grand Dench,
which were increasingly popular last
yoar ns indicated by the largely Increased patronage; Grand Beach
alone attracting over 100,000 people.
Improvements Curried Out
Improvements of existing lines and
further steps toward co-ordination of
service was n feature of the construction work carried out during thu
vear hy the Canadian National on the
Western Region. No grading wns
undertaken during the year on lines
undor construction, the work being
confined to Improvement on operated
commenced in 1922, such as line revisions, reduction of existing grades,
and thc construction of second track.
These were carried out at the following points:
Second Track—Port Arthur to Ku-
kabeka 21.1 miles: This section oi
double track was commenced in 1922
and continued during 1923. The work
is now completed with the exception
of two small sections where thc litis!
crosses the C.P.R.. at Westfort, ami
crossing at Industrial Spur at N'ecii-
ing Evenue, Fort William. These
sections yet to be laid amount to ahum
2,000 feet of second track. Ballasting and fencing Is also completed as
far as track work will allow.
Rowan. Ontario: Grading of the
line revision ou thc Canadian Northern Railway near Rowan commenced
In 1922 and completed In 1923. Track
was also laid during thc year bul no
ballasting doue. Thc connection
from the revised line to the C.G.I'..,
also commenced in 1922, wns completed In 1923 and put into operation.
Grading wus commenced on a continuation of the Rowan line revision from
mile 35.05 to mile 32.11, Kashnhowie
Subdivision. This work Is now approximately  05  per cent,  completed.
Second Track — Kakubekn to Moka
mon: 11 is proposed at it future dale
to double, truck the line between Kn-
kahckn aitd Mokomon, As a commencement of this work the sidings
nt Hume and Mokomon were extended
during the year, and a new siding huili
hall' way between them nt mile 88.4.
These sidings will eventually he part
of the second track.
Needing Yard. Ontario: The new
terminal yard at Nccblng, 3.2 miles
west of West Fort Wllllnm, which wot
commenced In 1922, was completed
'luring 1923 and put iuto operation fot
the grain movement of the full. In
addition to thc original layout, two additional tracks were laid in the receiving yard making u total of approximately 37 miles of tracks In tho
yard. The buildings were all completed and include 21 stall roundhouse, power bouse, stores, machine
shop, hunkhouso, ynrd office, car repair shop, 35n ton coaling plant, 160,-
000 gallon tank and pipe line, stand
I pipes, track scales, ash pit, turntable
sower and water lines.
Portage   la   Prairie.   Man.:     Pro- I 70 per cent, completed,
posed co-ordination  of the Canadian      Grahom,  Ontario:   A   proponed
Northern and Grand Pacific Railways (Continued  on   page  7)
to eliminate interlocking plant nt
each end of town, hy a rearrangement
of tracks through the town, construction of is connection al the east end,
and building of a double track through
the town. The work was commenced
during the year by the construction
of two new passing tracks for cast
and west hound traffic, which ore now
completed and ballasted. The foundations for a 6t)m. gallon tank are completed and the structure under way,
also the erection of a 300 ton coaling
plant is about 50 per cent, completed.
Lampman, Sask.: Thc track on
thi sconnection between the G. T. P.
this connection between the G.T.P.
graded In 1922, was laid in December of the same year, the ballasting
and fencing work being completed in
1923. Application has now been
made to the Hoard of Railway Commissioners to operate trains over this
connection.
Iteglna, Sask.: The steel on Ihis
connection between the G.T.P. Railway aud the C.N'.lt.. which was graded
during 1922 was laid In November und
December of the same year, the ballasting :ind fencing being completed
during 1923. This connection was
put Into operation in June 1923.
Battlo-Duhnmol, Alborta: Track
was laid on tills connection between
Ihe G.T.I'. Railway and the t'.N.R. In
December, 1922, the ballasting nnd
fencing being completed In 1923. This
connection was put into operation In
June 1923.
Ansell-niokerdlko Revision: Grading on this line revision on thc G.T '■'.
railway between Ansoil and Blolter-
dike was completed in 1922. Track
was not Inld. Iiowever, until February and March of 1923. Tlie line hns
since been bnllasteil and is now in np.
e ration,
Olroux, Man.: Work on a proposes!
grade reduction on the C.N.R. near
Giroux wns commenced and about tb)
per cent completed during the year.
This work necessitated the plneing of
approximately 27,000 cubic yards of
material.
St. Amies, Man.: <\ proposed grade
roduction on the f'.N.lt, near st.
Antics was commenced during the
year, requiring when completed the
placing of about 20,000 cubic ynrdH of
material,     This work Is now about
J PAGE FOUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
CORRESPONDENCE
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting .'1th Boat at Union Bay
every Sundi.y Morning. Leave Cumberland Hotel. 8 o'clock.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, 0. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Delivered to All Farts of District
Coal, Wood aud Goods of Any Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
Cumberland, B. C.
February 6. 1924.
Sporting Editor, Islander,
Dear Sir;—It is not within my province to suggest to the Junior Soccer
magnates of the district how tbey
should handle their teams. Furthermore, it is not my Intention to do so
and I hope thc few remarks I am
about to make will be taken in thc
spirit In which they are written.
Last Sunday, those of us who witnessed lhat soccer game, between
Cumberland Juniors and Bevan bbw
ln action thc two teams who will
compete with one another for the
right to represent this district iu the
OB. Allan Cup, which is emblematic
of the Junior Soccer Championship of
thc Province,
lt is certain, after Sunday's display
that neither of these two teams as individual teams are strong enough to
retain the O.B. Allan Cup In thia district. Yet It will follow In course of
a week or so that theso two teams will
be striving lo oust one another for
the right to play for tho O.B. Allan
Cup.
Cannot the leaders and players of
these two teams be reconciled together so that a representative team
of the whole district can be selected.
Certain it Is that neither of the two
teams, whichever finally wIhb out, will
bring the cup back again into this district.
There is ample time for a compromise between the two teams, for transfers and for solid unity towards lauding the O.B. Allan Cup once more in
this district.
Two provincial soccer championships for this district would go down
in the annals of British Columbia football history. Make the slogan for
1924, "Let's Go Get 'Em."
I remain, sir.
Yours for sport,
"A PHAN."
Cumberland, B. C.
January 30, 1921.
The Editor,
Cumberland Islander ,,
Cumberland, D.C.
Dear Sir;—
On January 1st, 1924, a tax of thr?o
cents per gallon wna placed on gasoline by the Government of thc Pro.
vlnce of British Columbia for tbe purpose of replacing the revenue loss
caused by the twenty-flvo per cent.
(257r) reduction In Motor License
Fees which came into effect on January 1st. I am quite ln accord with
this tax provided the money is spent
on the upkeep of roads, especially tiie
main highways where motor traffic
is considerable Thc persons using
the roads most will of course pay the
highest taxation which is only Just.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry I
Gleaning and Dyeing Establishment \
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or I
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents' I
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Suther-,
laud, our Agent in Cumberland, who1
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
I
Our   Work   and   Service
Hill Please Vou : :     : :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.      -      Phone 8802
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
$4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 : Night—184-X Courtenay
COMOX JAM
Ask your grocer for COMOX JAM it is made from pure fresh fruit and
B.C. Cane Sugar, nothing added by way of filler or preservative.
STRAWBERRY — LOGANBERRY — RASPBERRY and a limited am
ount of ITALIAN PRUNE — GREENGAGE and PLUM.
COMOX POTATOES
"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Your are entitled to a graded potato. If it's a Comox Creamery Sack with
the tag it is graded and better value. Demand no other.
With gasoline retailing at 30 cen's
per gallon, as it was iu Cumberland
at the end of December 1923. the extra three cent tax would be an increase of 10 per cent per gallon. As
sumlng that the average motorist
uses about 500 gallons of gas per
year, which is a very conservative
estimate, the Government would receive approximately (15.00 per car tn
gasoliuc tax. There is about 40,000
motor vehicles ln the Province at th
present time and taking the above
average of $15.00 per car, the neat
sum of $600,000.00 would be netted by
the Government tn gasoline tax from
B.C. Motorists, exclusive of foreign
motorists.
I am just quoting the above figures
for comparison with whnt the oil com
pany's are doing for the country, and
I would like to have some Information
as to why the motorist has to pay an
additional two cents per gallon as wo
have to do here In Cumberland.
As previously  slated  gasoline  was
i sold In the local garages here In Do
cember 1923, for 30 cents per gal
lon.     Along conies the gasoline tax
1 of three cents making it a total of
33 cents per gallon but it did uot stop
there. Thc new price is 35 cenlB per
gallon and a good many local motorists are asking tbe question, Why?
! Taking the same averages as wus
taken for the Government tax, motorists of tbe Province are compelled to
pay an additional $400,000.00 for their
gasoline on a 2 cent per gallon in
crease.
And where docs this money go to?
The answer Is to foreign oil compau
les. I do not think that the local
garages are making large profits out
of tho additional price, as I under
•stand their retail prices are set I"
the oil companies and that the local
gorages have no control whatever over
tbe retail price. If tills he so. then
It Is time that the motorists of Cumberland and district organize them
selves together in a local orgaulza
tion for protective purposes and be
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phones:   From   9 a.m. to It p.m.   23
From 11 p.m. to   9 a.m.
Ask for Geo. Mason.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orden at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
W» B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONE MU     VICTORIA, B.L
come affiliated with some of the lar {.t
organizations, so that pressure could
be brought to bear on the parties responsible for this holdup.
There is no legitimate reason why
gasoline should cost nearly twice hs
much here in Cumberland us it does,
say in Seattle for Instance. We arc
all aware of the fact that there is
duty to be paid, also that the American gallon is a little less than tlia
Imperial gallon, and that transpo'l-
atlon costs are a little higher, bu-.
with all these additions, gasoline
should uot cost 35 cents per gallon
here in Cumberland.
I would like to see some other opinions expressed by parties interested
in this matter through the columns
of your valuable newspaper, Ml',
Editor, as it Is a vital matter to ill
motorists in tills district nnd possibly throughout the Province of
British Columbia.
Thanking  you  for  thc  space  and
publicity given to this question.
Yours truly,
"MOTORIST*
sDUCKLETS
Hronchitis
U MIXTURE
SAVED My LifiB
Read this Ira* stalemat
"1. Mrs. Clayton, have suffered
Irom Bronchitis fer yean and
found roll*! only in Buckley's
Bronchitit Mixture. I consider
thia to bo a wonderful ramody
and wouldn't ba without it in tba
house, and I am firmly convinced that it saved my life."
Mrs. W. Clayton, 90 Uibrids.
Ave., Taronto.
Buckley's la (aaraataad to
relieve with Ik* very firet deie,
coughs, colsla aad braachitU.
Cat a battle at year drun»t'»
today.
W. K. BUCKLEY. LIMIT! D
Ul MUTUAL »T., TOaoNTO   ilo
SOLI) AT LANG'S DHl'G STORE
HISTORICAL ASSOC.
WILL HOLD REUNION
OF PIONEERS
The British Columbia Historical As.
Boclatlon is contemplating having a
reunion of Pioneers of British Columbia, and would be glad If those persons
who arrived ou the Island or Mainland prior to 1871 would furnish their
name and address to the Secretary, J.
Forsyth, Provincial Library, Victoria,
who will issue invitations when arrangements  are  completed.
In order to have the list of Plo.
neers as complete aa possible .all persons who may know old-time residents
will confer a favor by furnishing
names.
Local organizations who are Interested In the early history of the Province are also to co-operate with tlie
Historical Association. This body is
affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, nnd is also an auxiliary to the Provincial Archives Dept.,
wherein are preserved Ihe records,
journals, diaries and photographs relating to the Colonial days of Vancouver Island and British Columbia.
Prepared forms for the personal
records of pioneer residents may be
obtained upon npllcatlon to the Provincial Library and Archives Dept.,
Victoria, B.C.
STEAMSHIP
TICKET AGENCY
TICKETS TO ALL PARTS
OF THE WORLD
AGENT FOR ALL STEAMSHIP
COMPANIES
Drop ln and let us talk It over.
E, W. BICKLE
Agent, Cumberland, B.C.
Canadian National Railways
King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
Dunsmuir Avenue—Cumberland, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Beet Quality
REEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Freah and Cured Fish
I    HOTELS AND CAMPS    I
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
•     Notary Publie
CUMBERLAND • . B. C.
"The Superior Grocers
Where  Most People Trade
ORANGES
6 dozen for $1.00
.»•
VEGETABLES
CAULIFLOWER,   SAVOY   CABBAGE,   TURNIPS,
CARROTS,   PARSNIPS,   SWEET   POTATOES,
CELERY AND BRUSSEL SPROUTS
HEAD LETTUCE AND FRESH TOMATOES
Mumford's Grocery
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
DUNSMUIR AVENUE        CUMBERLAND i?
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
a
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
FRIDAY  and SATURDAY,  FEB. 8-9
BIG DOUBLE FEATURE SHOW —-TWO SPECIAL PICTURES	
MARY  BROUQH  IN  THE
FAMOUS   ENGLISH    COMEDY    SCREAM
A Sister To
Assist'er
You will roar with laughter at Jim,
Gladys, and Alf., comedy characters
of fame throughout England.
Is Mrs. May hin? She says she is
well brought hup, but the only pliec
she wna ever brought hup was before
the Judge. Eight times in the last
month, think of it.
 ALSO ON THE SAME SHOW	
Priscilla Dean in "The White Tiger"
A thrilling drama of a band of International Criminals.    Miss Dean is a fiery emotional
heroine.
MATINEE SATURDAY AT 2:30 PJM.
DANCE SATURDAY AT 9:30 P.M.
—MONDAY AND TUESDAY—
Betty Compson
IN
I The Woman With 4 Faces
A notorious crook—so clever she made fools of the
Police—so beautiful that when caught, the jury would
not convict her—That's Betty Compson in this high-
powered melo drama.
EXTRA 4 REELS OF COMEDY WITH THIS BIG
FEATURE.
j-gBBBBH«g«B'sW«B«MMa
 WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY	
FIRST CHAPTER OF THC MILK . A • MIM'TK SERIAL
"THE RADIO KING"
AND
Irene Castle in "No Trespassing"
iiWiiWimimmmmitwmmAiWiwmiiWiitiAWSsiimsB
 NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY	
HAROLD LLOYD    IN    "WHY WORRY"
SHIRLEY MASON      IS    "LOVEBOUND
"IF WINTER COMES" AND HERITAGE OF THE DESERT" COMING SOON
Moil's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments o( these high-,
grade confections trrlre erery
two weeks, ensuring fresh foods
all the time.
Henderson's
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite Ilo.no Theatre
CUMBERLAND,  B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber,  and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
Farmers Needing Help
Can Secure Immigrants
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ANNOUNCE PLAN OF
BRINGING NEW SETTLERS IN TOUCH WITH FARMERS
WHO REQUIRE THEIR SERVICES.
WINNIPEG,—Prospective settlers
from many countries, directed by the
overseas organization of the Canadian
National Railways, will begin tn
each Winnipeg about March 15 nnil
many of theHe newcomers will be anxious to secure work on farms in order that they may learn by actual experience the Canadian methods of
carrying farm work. In order to as-
Hist these settlers and also the farmers who require their services during
the spring, summer and fall, the Canadian National Railways have placed
application forms in the hands of nil
agents on C.N.R. western lines which
farmers can complete and send In
without financial obligation of any
kind. Ollicials of the Colonization
and Development Department of ths
Railway in Winnipeg will then place
the prospective worker in touch with
the prospective employer and thus
get the settler away to a good Htart.
It should not be overlooked that the
immigrant who is moat likely to be
of use to the western farmer is the
man who comes enrly In the spring,
prepared for a year's work, rather
than the man who comes for a short
time, tempted by high wages which
are paid during rush period and it is
strongly recommended that as far as
possible, help should be engaged by
the year.
No charge Is made for this service
and the company assumes no obligation except to bring the worker and
his prospective employer together for
their mutual benefit.     Farmers who
anticipate needing help   during   the
coming year ore urged to make application early and thus take practical
! steps to assist thc vigorous Immigra-
' tion campaign  being enrried out by
| the Canadian National Railways.
!    The aggressive immigration nnd colonization plan benlg followed by the
j Canadian National  Railways will result In thc bringing to   Canada   of
many thousands of good citizens dui-
Ing the next few months.     To ensure
I these  newcomers   work   is  the   mosi
< practical wny of ensuring their success.      By  the  method  outlined   tha
employer of farm  labor can  supply
; tills co-operation and at the same time
1 secure help for himself for the coming year.
IN   MKHOItlAM
In loving memory of J. William
Whltehouse, who died on Febraury
the 8th, 1923.
Only a memory of bygone days,
And a sigh for the face unseen.
But a constant feeling that God alone
Knows best what might have been
We never knew what pain he had.
We never saw him die;
We only know he passed away.
And never said good bye.
Inserted by his loving wife and hoii.
February S. 1924.
PRELIMINARY NOTICE
Auction Sale
OF HOUSEHOLD FURNITUREAND OTHER EFFECTS FOR
MRS. J. A. FRASER, AT THE RESIDENCE MARYPORT AVE.,
CUMBERLAND, ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, AT 1.30 P.M.
FULL PARTICULARS LATER
G. J. HARDY
AUCTIONEER PHONE 10 COURTENAY
From B.C's Model Brewery
and
U.B.C. Beer
All the resources of the greatest
brewing institution in the West
combine to make these popular
beverages the last syllable in
purity, palatable flavor and appetizing perfection.
Delivered to your home free
—Order today—
VANCOUVER   BREWERIES
LIMITED
IN  MEMOKIA.W
III loving memory of William Milch-
ell, who died February 8, 1923.
No oue knows the silent heartache,
Only those who have lost can tell
Of grief that Is born in silence
For our dearest we loved so well.
Surronded by friends we are lonesome
Amidst our pleasures we're blue,
A smile on our face, still a heartache
Aching and longing for you.
Inserted by his loving mother, sisters and brother.
In loving memory of our beloved
son and brother Johnny Frelone. who
was  called  suddenly   home  on   February S, 1923.
No loved one stood around hlm
To bid a last farewell.
No words of comfort could he leave.
To those he loved so well,
We little thought his lime so short.
In this world to remain,
Or thought, when from his home he
went,
Ile would never return again.
Ever remembered by his sorrowing
parents,  sister  and  brothers.
In loving memory of my dearly beloved  hushnnd  Alexander  Robertson,
who was killed In an explosion ln No.
4 Mine, on February 8, 1923.
One year has passed away, a loving husband, hence Is gone.     His
loss Is great to everyone.     Loving thought will ever linger 'round
the grave where he Is laid, until
the   daybreak   and   the   shadows
flee away.
Inserted by his loving Wife and
little Children, nlso Grandpa, Bevan,
B.C.
Thy Will lie Done
In loving memory of Vincent Cavallero, beloved husband of Margherita
Cavallero and father of Beatrice,
Edith, Norma and Lind Cavallero, who
departed this life February 8, 1923.
.My sweet darling, light of the home,
Looking   for   someone,   beckoning
come;
Bright as a sunbeam, pure aa the dew,
Watching   for   denr   ones   waiting
below.
inserted   by   his   loving   wife   and
family.
In loving memory of my denr hushnnd. Thomas Edward Williams, who
was kills? din No. 4 Mine Explosion,
February 8. 1923.
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of you, are ever dear;
We who loved you sadly miss you,
As it dawns another year,
.lust a thought of sweet remembrance.
From his loved ones, fond and true;
Just a token of affection.
And a longing still for you.
Sadly missed by his sorrowing wii'e
and children.
Courtenay Road.
Swire or
LMTffillNTS
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years of age,
ind by aliens ou declaring intention
to become Bri Hull subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and Improvement for agricultural
purposes,
Pull lrifui iu.iih.tri concerning regu-
iiiluns regarding pre-emptions ts
given in bulletin No. 1, Lund Series,
■ 'How to Pre-empt Lund," copies of
which can be obtained I'ree of charge
hi addressing the Department of
Lands, Victoria. B.<\, or to any Oov-
nment .Agent.
Uecurds will be grunted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which ia not timber
land, i.e., carrying over 5,000 board
feet per acre west of tlie Coast Range
tiud s.i""i fe<t per acre east of that
l.arige.
Applii uiiuus for pre-emptions are
lu he addressed tu the Lund Com-
nlssioner of th'-- l-md Kc.urding DI
.Islnn, In which the hind applied for
h situated, und are made uu printed
futins, copies uf which cun be ob-
i.iint-d Trom ihe Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions mum lie occupied foi
five years ami Improvements made
to value oi 'fin tier acre, including
clearing ami cultivating at least flva
acres, before w crown Gtrant can be
Pi
mure 'h-uii-j infurmutiuu aee
Bulletin     "How     io     Pre-empt
Appl
PURCHASE
ft lions are received for pur-
of \ neurit and unreserved
'row ti lands, nut being tlmberland,
or agricultural purposes; minimum
rice .if flrst'Olasa (arable) land la $»
er acre, and second class (gracing)
tnd $2.60 per acre, Further iiufor-
mt ion regarding purchase or lease
f Pruwii hinds is given In Bulletin
Jo, 10, Lund Series, "Purchase and
.•us<   o|   Crown   Lands."
.Mill. Factory, or Industrial sites on
linher Innd. nut exceeding 40 aores,
iu) he purchased or leased, the con-
llloiis      Including       payment      of
inipage.
HOMESITE   LEASES
I'neurveyed areas, nut exceeding 10
• ■res, may be leased as homesltes,
undltlniiftl upon a dwelling being
reeled In ihe first year, title being
htHiiiiib'e after residence aud im
rovement conditions are fulfilled
nd land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and   Industrial    purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may  be leased  by one  person or a
company;
GRAZING
Under (be (.hazing Act the Province Ih divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under -i
Grazing Commissioner. Annual
grafting penults are Issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head. PAGE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
Wfy Ford Predominate
Low Fisrst Cost
The low price of Ford cars and
trucks has been one of the great
dynamic forces in the development of motor transportation.
Since January 1920 the average
price of Ford products has
dropped 38% and Ford prices
are now the lowest in the history
of the industry.
And because Ford prices are so
low, the worker and his family
enjoy the innumerable benefits
and delights of owning an
automobile; the merchant and
manufacturer extend their
business into new and profitable
fields by means of motor delivery;
the farmer carries his fresh
produce to the 1 : markets with
none of the old-time hardship
and delay—and all for a very
sr:all initial investment.
Fifty out of every hundred
cars and trucks in Canada are
Fords —due to the public
appreciation of Ford value.
See Any Authorized Ford Dealer
CARS   .   TRUCKS   -   TRACTORS
FROM   FLORIDA TO  THE  ORIENT   ALONE
^jaiiMMSHSraJS't"^^ sssISISISMBiSJOl^ISs^lSISISlSlGllSIcUSISj
You Can't Stay in Business
Without Keeping Books.
1„'t>l( people tu travel nine thousand null's in these
days of rapid and easy transportation is a Ire-
quenl occurrence, but for three children tinder tiftcw
yenrs of age to do so unaccompanied by an adult ,is
unusual if nothing else. More remarkable still is the
fact that one trio of youngsters who covered more
than this distance alone, Jack Turner, aged fifteen,
Mary, liis ten-year-old sister, and Richard, aged four,
travelled from Jacksonville, Florida, • to Shanghai,
China, with but one change of cars,.,and one change
lor the steamer, making the quickest trip on record
between these two pomis, according to the traffie
experts of- the Canadian Pacific Railway, officers at
which company looked after the welfare of he children throughout their journey. From Jacksonville they
travelled to Chicago on thc Dixie Flyer. From ther«
they travelled via Canadian Pacific to Vancouvet
where they transferred to the Canadian Pacific S.S.
"Empress of Russia." They left Jacksonville on Df
member 21st, arriving at Shanghai on January 12th,
covering the distance of 9,133 miles in a llttlt over
.wenty-one days.
ORNAMENTAL   SHRUBS      Dominion  Experimental  Farms  and
  Stations   during   the   past  thirty-six
In giving a descriptive list in his years, with notes as to their hardl-
unnual report of some fifty varieties ness and attractiveness, the Dominion
ot ornamental shrubs  tested at  the! Horticulturist, Mr. W. T.! Macoun, re-
f
IF YOU MAKE ANY KIND OF WRITTEN RECORDS, OK
WHICH YOU KEEP ONE OR MORE COPIES, YOU WILL HE
INTERESTED IN OUR LINE OF COUNTER CHECK BOOKS.
ORDERS MAYBE PLACED WITH OUR REPRESENTATIVE,
WHO WILL HE PLEASED TO CALL AND QUOTE YOU PRICliiS
*. The Cumberland Islander
PHONE 35
P.O. BOX 430
I
IBISIBIBIBEiaiSEISiaiSIBfEi !EEI3iaiiSIHaMBIBIBiaiBiaiSHi^^ I
11
Mothers and Dads!
This is a message of real importance to you!  That
is if you want to save money!  We can cut your
Shoe Bill in half!   Just Think! In Half!
Yes! and then some.
YOU KNOW WHAT A PROBLEM IT IS TO KEEP SHOES ON YOUR BOYS' FEET-
WELL, WE HAVE .SOLVED THAT PROBLEM FOR YOU, BY HAVING P. PARIS, OF
VANCOUVER, MAKE US A LINE OF BOYS' AND YOUTH'S SHOES. THESE ARE
TRULY WONDERFUL SHOES. WE COU LD TELL YOU A LOT ABOUT THEM, BUT
.SPACE WILL NOT PERMIT. COME IN AND SEE THE SHOES AND JUDGE FOR
YOURSELF. THEY WILL, WITHOUT DOUBT, OUTWEAR THREE PAIRS OF ANY
FACTORY MADE SHOES. JUST THINK WHAT ONE PAIR OF THESE SHOES
WILL SAVE YOU.    THE PRICES OF THESE SHO ES ARE:
boys' sizes l TO ii a*n nr
PER PAIR   **PD. I 0
YOUTH'S SIZES 10 TO 13 (!»/» r A
PER PAIR    «PO.OU
IT WILL PAY YOU TO BUY THESE SHOES! YOU ARE THROWING YOUR
MONEY AWAY WHEN YOU BUY CHEAP OR FACTORY MADE SHOES FOR THE
ROUGH SCHOOL BOY.
CAVIN'S  SHOE  STORE
Footwear Only
3E
LAMPS
ELECTR0=AUT0MATES
■ (AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC LAMPS)*
NO BATTERIES! ■ NO ACIDS!
^•W'WILL   LAST   A   LlFE.TIME«PW»v"
Practical, Durable, Always Ready on Land, Under
Water, Any Climate, Anywhere
The Electro Automate Is an Electric Lamp made in France without a battery or refills, and of a new conception. It Is a perfect
machine; the result ot years of test In the 'plants of the manufacturers in Switzerland and France :: This marvellous little
pocket lamp, embodying simplicity, reliability and compactness,
weighs only 12 ounces.     It is patented in all countries.
The dynamo, with permanent magnet, based on new methods,
gives dense magnetic fields of perfect concentration, which surrounds the induction without loss of magnetic dispersion, and
permits the maximum exploitation of the energy.
Construction of these lamps Is very carefully carried out by
skilled SwIsb clock and scientific instrument makers :: Electro
Automate Lamps are tight and dust-proof. They can be used
In all climates, Including equatorial regions. They will everywhere render the utmost service, giving a clear white light, without fear ot the bulb burning out "or the generator bcomlng
warm.
All Electro Automate Lamps are guaranteed for six months, conditionally that they are not tampered with. With reasonable
care they will last for years. Any part can be renewed at slight
cost.    Lamps are provided with a pocket for extra bulbs.
This lamp Is especially useful to travellers, tourists, marine and
mining engineers, automobllists, dairymen, in fact everybody.
They are Indispensable on lite-boats and rafts, where a light is
needed that will not be extinguished by wind or wave:: Every
mine should be provided wltb one or more of these lamps at Its
portal or entrance, for the convenience of the employee or official
whose work takes him In and out of the mine at Irregular intervals. It ls the cheapest and best light on the market for this
purpose :: Marine engineers welcome Electro Automate In their
engine room. It saves them from the annoyance and loss of
time occasioned by the unreliability of battery lamps when tbey
wish to locate trouble or And something ln a hurry :: Pilots are
favorable to these little lamps because tliey are always standing
by ready and able to do their part lu any and all kinds of
weather. They are hardy little fellows and will stand any
amount of knocking about, even to the bulbs, which are superior
to any others on the market:: Mushers over the northern trails
take these lamps In preference to others, because they give a
never ending light and add less than a pound of weight to their
outfits. The winds can't blow them out and the snow or wet cau
not short circuit them.
DIRECTIONS
The working of tbls self-generating lamp Is very simple. Pull tho
lever completely and sharply with the Angers and let go, allowing
It to open fully In order to take another full stroke. Strokes
ulumlil be even and sharp for best results. This lamp Is the
only one nf Its weight that will give a perfect light. The bearings nf this lamp should be oiled about once a month.
SOLD LOCALLY BY
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This ia a W valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
Cumberland and Union Water
Works Co. Ltd.
cords that there has been a great Increase in Canada in recent years of
Interest in the beautifying of home
grounds. The report contains a list
of twelve satisfactory ornamental
shrubs for general use In order of
blooming, and covering the season.
These are: Spiraea arguta, blooms the
third week of May has white flowers
and grows to a height ot 3 to 4 fejtj
Caragana frutex, var, gcanditlora.
blooms third week of May, height 4
to 6 feet, large bright yellow flower.*;
Lonicera tatarlca and varieties,
blooms third week of May, height 5
to 10 feet, bright pink (towers; Lilacs
In variety; Spiraea Van Houttei,
blooms first week of June, grows to
3 to 5 feet, and has white flowers;
Viburnum Opulus, blooms second
week of June, height 6 to 8 feet, large
clusters ot white flowers; Phtladep.1-.-
us or Mock Orange, blooms second
week of June, height 6 to 10 rest,
white flowers with strong sweet odor;
Roses; Robinla hlspida, blooms from
June more or less throughout tlm
summer, rosy pink flowers; Hydrangea arborescens grandiltora, large
panicles of white flowers which come
In succession from July to September,
height 4 to 6 feet; Hydrangea panl-
culata grandlflora, blooms from August to October, white flowers gradually becoming pink, height 6 to 10
feet, and Tamarlx pentandra, blooms
from July until late summer, flowers
small and pinkish ln color, height 4
to 6 feet. A list Is also given in the
respect if eight varieties of single
lilac and seventeen of double. Two
fine hardy varieties of lilac that should
be in any collection, Mr. Macoun says,
are Syringa rothomagensis and S.
pubeacens.
MINISTER OF FINANCE
OBTAINS HIGH PRICE
FOR B. C. BONDS
Another Instance of what the financial world thinks of British Columbia ls to be found In the price which
Hon. John Hart, minister of finance,
obtained for the $2,000,000 worth of
bonds just sold. Twenty-live year
five per cent, bonds went for 96.877
and the return figures out at 5.22. ln
other words, this price is the best Re-
cured since the province last floated
a five per cent, loan, a little better
than the last loan and a good deal
above the recent western provincial
loans.
Half of the new loan goes to take
up treasury bills sold to the bank to
raise money for capital outlays on
University buildings and trunk roads.
Tbe other half will refund the $1,000,-
000 loan which matured last October.
This loan was made Just before the
1920 election and hore Interest at six
per cent., and the price at which It
was sold In New York, together wilh
the premium which was received when
the purchase price was paid here,
made the cost to the province 4.70
per cent. Considering premiums paid
on remittances of Interest and prlcl-
pal, the actual cost ot the loan was
5.473 per cent. Hon. Mr. Hart ilg.
ured on clearing off this loan on a
5.30 per cent, basis, but succeeded In
do|ng so on a 6.22 basis.
Meanwhile, the pessimistic howling
of opposition members in the Legtu-
ture appears to have had no effect
upon the financial houses, who readily
purchase British Columbia securities
at a better figure than any other province In Canada Is able to secure.
Just heard of a fellow In Courtenay
who met with a painful accident.
Broke his wrist, patUng himself ou
tbe back. SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
7*
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
COMOX BADMINTON
CLUB   GUESTS  OF
COURTENAY CLUB
On Tuesday evening last, twenty-
tour badminton players, members of
the Comox and Courtenay Club, held
a social at the Agricultural Hall. The
members of the Comox Club were present on invitation of the locals.
During the evening delightful refreshments were served and Mr: H. D.
Forde on behalf of the visitors, thanked their hosts for their kind Invitation.
FIRE DEPT. CALLED
Ou Monday the Are department had
a call to the residence of Mr. Oeo.
BOXING
GAIETY THEATRE
Thursday, February 14 th.
COURTENAY
AT 8:30 P.M.
PROGRAM
Subject to slight alteration.
SIX .'I-UOINB BOUTS
Courtenay
Cumlierland
H. Dixon
vs.
H. Jones
A. Monks
vs.
W. Trelour
B. Piercy
vs.
B. Marsh
A. Robinson
vs.
Boffey
H. Stevens
vs.
E. Thompson
W. Thompson
vs. -
and others.
Marshall
MAIN EVENT:
EIGHT S-MIM'TE ROrSBS
R. CLIFFE vs. T. TAPELLA
Courtenay Cumberland
FOH   LIGHT   IIK.m.WKlGHT   CHAMPIONSHIP
OK THE ISLAND.
THREE PRICES
Ring side seats  $2.00
Other seats      $1.00
and   75c.
F. Green Laketrall, where a shingle
on the roof had become Ignited. A
bucket of water was suflicient to ex
tlngulsh  the flame.
KICKED BY HORSE
A Japanese farm hand working fur
Mr. Wm. Pidcock, Oyster River, wus
severely Injured on Thursday afternoon when he wan kicked by a hois,'.
His Jaw was broken in two places and
he was brought to Comox Hospital for
medical aid.
The   late  Mr.  Hellan   leaves  a  wile
' and three children, Mrs. Frank Lee,
' and Enoch, of Courtenay and Paul, of
I Comox.        The    pallbearers    were:
Messrs.  David Ryan,    Paul  Downey.
Kenneth Grant, William Erickson, Ell-
ward Manwarnlng and R. II. Slemon.
CHAS. E. BEASLEY
ELECTED PRESIDENT
OF G. W. V. A.
COURTENAY. — Thc Courtenny
branch of the Great War Veterans' Association held a meeting on Thursday
evening, January 31st and elected the
following officers for the year:
President, Comrade Chas. E. Beasley; Vice-President, Comrade H. S.
Baker; Secretary-Treasurer, Comrade
G. B. Capes; Executive Committee,
Comrades A. GiiBt, William Farley,
W. B. Harris. H. R. Treherne. Val.
Taylor.
The meeting was held in the Agricultural Hall, Courtenay and despite
the pressure thst was brought to bear
upon Comrade G. R. Bates who has
held the presidency for the past four
years, he would not allow his name to
come before the meeting for re-olec
tion.
DOVE CREEK CLUB
HOLD WHIST DRIVE
Last Friday at the farm of Mrs.
Geldt, the Dove Creek Community
Club held one of their enjoyable whist
drives, the funds from which nre be.
ing devoted to school service. There
were nine tables in the piny and the
winners of prizes were: Ladles' flrst,
Miss Williamson; second, Miss Sybil
Treherne; Gentlemen's first, Mr. R
H. Treherne; second. Mr. D. Rutherford.
MR. OLE HELLAN
BURIED ON TUESDAY
USED CARS
1923 FORD, New April, driven by one man,
in A-l shape, recently overhauled.
This is a Real Bargain $450.00
1919 CHEVROLET TOURING—Good rub-
ber, New battery and in good mechanical condition $3.50.00
1923 "STAR"—This car was unloaded from
train by us December 22nd and has
only run 280 miles as a Demonstrator.
Good as new. To make room for new
models.    Special Price $750.00
Terms arranged on above cars,
OUR MOTTO "Civility & Service
COURTENAY.—On Tuesday afternoon the funeral of the late Mr. Ole
Hellan wns held from the family residence, Comox, to the Sandwick Presbyterian Cemetery, where service was
conducted by the Rev. W. T. Beattie.
Meredith Bros, and Bell-Irving
STAR DEALERS
Phone 182 Courtenay Box 121
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND  OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
R. B. ROBERTSON ON
GOV'T ENGINEER STAFF
Mr. Harry Simms, who has been on
the staff of the Proviniclnl Government Engineer In this city for the past
two and a half years has accepted a
position witli the Comox Logging uml
Railway Company and leaves the government employ this week. Mr. H.
B. Robertson, of Sandwick hns received the appointment to All the vacancy caused by Mr. Simms' rcslgni-
tlon. |
peared before the council to request
the extension of the electric light lino
to his and otlier farms In Comox.
The estimates for the year were laid
over to he taken up at the next meeting of the council. The council has
decided to purchase a truck and to
keep It In operation on city work such
as street gravelling and to keep a man
employed at that work all the time.
Tenders are now being considered ior
tho purchase of the truck.
W. A. OF ST. JOHN'S
MET ON SATURDAY
COURTENAY.—The Women's Auxiliary of St. John's Anglican church
met on Snturdny afternoon last at the
home of Mrs. George Pidcock. Cuiii-
berlnnil ltd , the chief topic of discussion being ways and means of raising
funds for the completion of tlie work
on the interior of the church. The
meeting was presided over by Mrs.
Ringrose and the president, Mrs. G.
Brethour was also present besides the
following ladles: Mesdames Thomas
Booth. II. V. Collins, G. T. Corfleld, J.
M. Forrest, Chas. Harris, J. Hornby, C
G. Lucas. V. J. Maycock, E. F. Thomas. M. Tylor and Miss Vine. The
meeting was an enthusiastic one ami
It was definitely decided to hold a
home cooked sale on February 22nd
In Booth's Hall which has been place!
at tlie disposal of the nuxiliary by ths!
owners.
FIRST GASOLINE
DONKEY TO BE
OPERATED HERE
COURTENAY—Messrs. W. It. Senile
and A. Ohlsen. ol* Colwood, were visitors to Courtenay Inst Saturday anil
through I*. Leo Anderton purchased
the timber on the Hornal much nl
Little River. There is approximately
four million feet on one hundred aoros
anil it is the Intention of Messri.
Scalfe & Ohlsen to come to the district in March and commence logging operations. Their equipment
consists of a gasoline donkey which
they have been working successfully
for the past two years In the iMel-
chosin district about fifteen mil ;s
from Victoria, and a truck. This will
be the first gasoline donkey to be operated In the Comox Valley nnd it will
no doubt be watched with a great deal
of interest.
ROYSTON SCHOOL
JANUARY REPORT
REGULAR SESSION
OF CITY COUNCIL
MONDAY NIGHT
The city council met in regular session Inst Monday niglit when all were
present with the exception of Alderman Pearse. A discussion took place
re thc application to the Dominion
Government for a portion of the Puntledge Indian Reserve for park purposes. It was decided to try and
arrange for n twenty-three acre tract.
Mr. Norman Prltchard, representing
Ihe people of the .Nob Hill district ap-
Csi'nde   VIII—Clarence Trail.    Duncan Thomson.
Grade VII—Ritsuko Uchlynnia, ller'
Carey.
Grnde VI—Edgar Kclley. Tom Fee-
lay.
Grade  V—Megan   Nnvey.   Margaret
Dunn.
Grade IV—Annie Watts. Irene Kel
ley.
Grade    III—Jean    Ogilyle,    Lloy-l
Navey.
Grade    II—George    Watts,    Gladys
Feely.
Grade 1—Jimmy Henderson.
Jean  OKilvie  hns    been    promoted
from Grade III to Grnde IV.
INCREASED BUSINESS
FOR CAN. NATIONAL
(Continued From Page !l)
We have a large assortment of
PANTS
that we are offering
At Reduced Prices
also a number of lines in flannel shirts.
Loggers Boots 12-14 ins. Tops
agjaiaiaisEEi3iag*'fiiaiaiaiiffifi[ra
See us before buying elsewhere.
McLEOD'S STORE
COURTENAY, B.C.
ductlon of grade at Mile 1)8, Ornhimi
Subdivision, was completed during the
, year, requiring the placing of approximately 8.500 cubic yards of material,
nlso the removal and relaying of 3,700
lineal feet of track.
In addition to the above itmes, work
wns commenced on extensions to sisl-
Ings. passing tracks .elevator tracks.
industrial tracks nnil yard tracks at
ninety-eight points, of which about 90
are completed. The mileage of these
additional tracks when completed will
be about 30 miles.
The policy of improving existing
water supplies and the construction
of new supplies where needed has
been continued during 1923. wilh a
view to reducing operating costs nnd
improving traffic movements.
During   1!)23.    approximately    253
miles of heavy steel was laid on lines
In  operation,  replacing  lighter steel.
In addition to thc new terminal far-
' illtlcs  completed during the year at
I points such ns N'eebing, Itcildlit. Sioux
I Lookout. Winnipeg. Mirror, llutnholt
! .Melville nnd Edmonton, n largo num-
! ber of new stations and other building swere erected.      Also a miniber
of Improvements were made to existing buildings ,twenty-four stations nt
various points being stuccoed.
At Melville, ii residence for the superintendent of that district was built.
The car shops at Edmonton were completed, also the restaurant there. The
roundhouse and machine shop at Mirror were completed during the year
and a two-stall engine house commenced at The Pas. At Transcona
a scrap-reclaming plant was erected.
At Wainwright, 1.000 ton Ice house
was built. In order to accommodate
tourist tralllc, "The Lodge," was built
at Jasper and in addition fifteen employees' cottages are nenrlv completed
at the sauie point. At Grnnd Bench
a summer resort near Winnipeg, a
number of Improvements were Installed, Including thc construction of n
Caroussel nnd two stuccoed lavatories
Improvements were also made to the
grounds at this point and to the flro
protection and water service.
Preparation fnr I'rnln Movement
In preparation for the heavy grain
and otlier movements which were anticipated during the fall months, the
Canadian National ollicials had
brought into tlie western region much
additional engine power and new
grain cars to handle the 1923 crop.
Over 1,000 new cars were ordered,
nnd. in addition to this, all available
cars were hauled into the repair yards
early In the season and given a thorough overhauling and, repairing. As
a result, when the grain season opened in September, 1923. more cars wero
available thnn ever before and lonil-
Ings were maintained at a dally average far in excess of any previous
year. Forty-seven new engines, nf
the powerful Mikado type, were also
sent to the prnlrie provinces In readiness for the grain hauling, and before
the season opened engines and cars
had been distributed throughout the
west to points where they would he
available when loading commenced.
NEW LAMP
BURNS94'/* AIR
Heals Electric or (ins
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Try our 100 P.C. Whole Wheat Bread, made by special
process which enables the body to assimilate the full
nutrition of the Wheat Berry. Our local doctor eats
no other and highly recommends it.
$>
X     Fint Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for
§>     Bread   Making   guarantees   th*   quality.
The Courtenay Tea Room
A new oil lamp that (Ives an amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas nr electricity, has
been tested by the U. S. Government
and 35 leading universities and found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps.
It burns without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up, Is simple, clean,
safe. Burns 94% air and ti't common kerosene (cool oil.)
The Inventor, J. B. Johnson, G79 Mc.
Dermot Ave., Winnipeg, Is offering io
send a lamp on 10 days' FREE trial,
or even to give one FREE tn the first
user tn each locality who will help
him Introduce it. Write him to-day
for particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can get the agency, and
without experience or money make
|»n to $500 per month. —39-47.-1923
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and   Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
FOR SALE
DAUBED ROCK COCKERELS-AG-
assiz and Agasslz-Goldlng strain,
$4.00 each. It Waddell. It It. No. 1,
Cumberland. F.18
Are You Working? No! AreYou?
YES!   BUT  THAT'S  NOT  GOING   TO  PREVENT   MB   FROM
GOING TO THE  BIG
Carnival Whist
Drive and Dance
UNDDR THE AUSPICES OF TIIE
DISTRICT JUNIOR FOOTBALL LEAGUE
TO   BE   IIEI.ll   IN
ILO-ILO THEATRE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11
St. Valentine's Day
WHIST 8—10
DANCING 10 P.M
Gentlemen $1.00
Ladies ,50c.
VALUABLE PRIZES NOVELTY DANCES
DROWN   YOUR   SORROWS   IN  CONFETTI
EVERYBODY   WELCOME PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924.
tt
NEW   SPRING
DRAPERIES
Our first delivery of new Spring Window Draperies has
arrived and comprise some of the best values we have
had for a considerable time.
Colored Marquisite, .30 incites wides, very suitable for
side hangings.     Price, per yd  25c.
Cream and White Marquisite, with 2 inch border, suitable for bedrooms, per yard ,  25c.
Fine Marquisite Drapery Net, made of a fine even quality, with a nice border.     Price per yard   50e.
Cream Madras Muslin, 3.1 inches wide, with deep border both sides, makes a soft drape and has good appearance.     Price per yd.     <  50c.
White and Cream Check Net, 36 inches wide, made of a
large check.     This is a very good quality net.     Price
per yard   SOc.
Bungalow Net, with lace border,.a very choice design.
52 inches wide, makes a very dainty curtain.     Prico
per yard   75c.
White and Cream Lace Net, with good design, a fine
lace border, made of a very good quality net.     Prico
per yard   95c
Real Fine Curtain Net, made with a beautiful scroll
design. This is one of the finest nets we have seen
for a while and is real good value, per yard 75c.
Madras Colored Muslin, good colorings, makes a very
choice drapery material and gives a good appearance
to a window.     Price per yard   75c.
SEE OUR CHOICE OF CURTAIN NETS
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
m
JANUARY SCHOOL REPORT
(Conllnueil From Page 1)
Yaeko Obara, Margaret Williams, Willie Prior. Richard .Marshall.
Honor Roll:—Rhoda Walton, Madge
Br..an, Josie Wong, Metsuc Obara.
Robert Logan, Peter Bono anil Leland Bannerman equal.
J. E. Robertson, Teacher.
Division XII.
Attendance 95.2 per cent.
Promoted from Sr. 1 to Jr. Hijack Anderson, Alice Brown. Hilda
Chapman, Leslie Cue. Audrey De-
Couer, Alice Jackson, Dudley Kceler.
Tenlko Klyonagn, Jauinicy Mah, Rosie
Mah, Elizabeth Malpass, Margarel
Marpole, Shlzeo Matsunaga, Ella McWhlrter, William Merrifield. Harry
Mordy. Alex Mossey, Robert Mossey.
Kujoshl Okuda, Jean Quinn, Gordon
Robertson, Kisn Sora, Masahlko T.i-
telshi, Tommy Wong, Cheung Wlmg.
Yasushl Yaniasahl, Doreen Bickerton,
Wardcna Thompson.
Honor List:—Margaret .Marpole.
Cheung Wong, Harry Mordy, Rossic
Mah, Ella McWhlrter, Jean Quinn.
Pearl Hunilen .Teacher.
Division XIII.
Attendance 92.3 per cent.
Promoted to Sr. I Reader:—Sammy
Armstrong, Mary Baird, Arnold Bonora, Cheung Ming, Harry Choe, Jimmy Choe, David Davis, Gee Doon Low
Fow,  Irene  Gomm,    Jackie  Oraham,
Dorothy  Haworth,    Mitsuro    Hirose.
Lem   Ho.    .Mirhisin    Isonnga,    Isugio
Iwasa,   Hlroshl    Knwaguchi,    Moysbi
Kimoto, Kelseji Klyonagn, Stanley
Lawrence .Jackie Mali, Tsuztniatsu
Matsunaga, Tommy McMillan, Harm)
Niihano, Ina Robertson, Uri Salto,
Mabel Sommerville, David Waddell
luon Jack, Thelma Bennie, Gladys
Cooper, Dhryl Thomson, Mary Mc.Mil
lon.
Honor Roll—Tommy McMillan.
Stanley Lawrence, Gee Doon, David
Waddell, Haruo Nakano, Sammy Armstrong.
.   Eva G. Drader, Teacher.
Your Grocer
\sAJ3otrdeft,
Milkman
Free Recipe Book—Write thc Bo:'
den Co. Ltd.. Vancouver.
"IT PAYS TO DEAL AT LANG'S"
St
Valentine's Day
FEBRUARY THE  14th
Our stock of Valentines is complete
Prices Range up from
2 for 5c.
Candy  Specials
SATURDAY   ONLY
Moir's Mixed Candy, per lb  38c.
Neilson's Chocolates, 1 lb box   75c.
Mixed Chocolates, per lb.   68c.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
Local Briefs
Professor John Redlngton, of the
University of B.C., left Monday morning for Vancouver. Professor Redlngton delivered a very interesting
lecture In the Athletic Club Saturday
night, his 'subject being "New Poetry."
s,      SS      *
James Haworth of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre, left for Vancouver on Sunday
and relumed on Tuesday.
* ss     ss
Mr. A. McNivcr rteurned to Cumlierland on Sunday from Drumhelliv
where he has spent the last four
months.
* ss       *
Mrs. M. Watson left for a two
weeks' holiday 111 Vancouver last Saturday morning.
ss     ss     .
Mrs. James I). Wllmcth left (or
Qulney, Illinois, Thursday mornini!.
after n week's visit with her parent.'.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Thomas Baker.
* *       *
Tlle many friends of Charles 'OllicK'
Reid, who was accidentally shot last
December while hunting, will In'
pleased to lenm lhat he is well
enough to leave the hospital.
+      ss      *
Thomas Graham General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd.. left for Vancouver
on Tuesday and returned on Thursday.
ss      ss      *
R. C. Lang left ou a business trip
to Vancouver on Saturday and returned on Tuesday.
ss      *      *
J. A. McLennan of Parksvllle. arrived In Cumberland on Monday, lo
tnke a position as grocery clerk tit
the Mercantile.
* *   *
W. Hagger, Dominion Egg Inspector
was in town on Tuesday and Wednesday giving demonstrations iu tne
candling and grading of eggs to thc
merchants of the city. In future they
will be expected to comply with the
government regulations concerning
egg grading.
Mr. R. Strachan left by Friday I
morning's train on a business trip to
Nanaimo.
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Cunningham
and Mrs. Hatchwortb were the guests
of Mrs. J. Miller of Bevan, having
come up from Qualicum Beach to V-
tend the Burns' Banquet.
•      ss     *
Miss Gladys Dando left Thursday
morning for Vancouver.
ss     *     *
The St. John's Ambulance Association will hold their regular monthly
meeting in the First Aid Hall on Monday evening, February 11, at 6 o'clock
sharp.     A good attendance is desired.
ss     ss     ss
William Horwood left for Revelstoke on Saturday. During ills
stay here he was the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Horwood.
ss      *      •
Frank Porter of Vancouver, who
Is nuditllng the City hooks arrived on Wednesday. It Is sold thnt
he will leave his report ready by 'be
18th of the month.
With The
Churches
i
ii
VALE—To Mr. nnd Mrs. Willinm Vale,
of Bevnn, on February 4th. a (laugh
ter.
ss     *     *
Mrs. Sidney Horwood left for Victoria on Saturday and returned on
Monday, accompanied by Mrs. Ernest
Horwood.
ss     ss     ss
Mrs. M. M. Lang left Saturday on a
holiday trip to Seattle.
Royston Boys met the Navy League
Boys in Courtenay on Saturday and
maintained their good reputation lu a
victory of 3 to 2.
VALENTINE TEA
The Ladles Aid of Grace Methodist
Church arc holding a Valentine Tea
In the class room of the church on
Wednesday next, Februrny 13th, from
3 to 6 p.m.
The ladles are also making preparations for their annual sale of
work, which will be held on April 9th.
Further announcements will be made
later.
FOR SALE—BEAUTIFUL PIANO.
Cost $550, iu first class condition.
Apply 306 Maryport Ave.
FOR SALE—FIVE-ROOM HOUSE,
on Penrith Street, hot and cold
water, out-bulldings iu good order.
$750 caRh. For terms apply Mrs.
James Potter.
HOLY  TRINITY ANGLICAN
Sunday, February 10, 1924
Holy Communion 11 a.m.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Evenson 7 p.m.
—Rev. W. Leversedge.
ss     ss     *
(.'RACK    IIKTHOIUST   IHIRCH
Sunday, February 10, 1924
Morning Service 11 a.m.
Sabbath School 11.45 a.m.
Evening  Service 7  p.m.   Subject—
"Modern  Spiritual  Healing.      is    il
Scientific?    Is it Christian?
Everybody welcome.
—Rv. J. R. Butler, Pastor.
Liquid Veneer
WONDERFUL FOR CLEANING, BRIGHTENING AND RENEWING   ALL   FURNITURE   AND   WOODWORKS.
SOLD IN THREE SIZES
Per Bottle 30c—60c—$1.25 Per Bottle
ALSO  LIQUID  VENEER  iMOP   POLISH
Per Bottle 30c 60c Per Bottle
Liquid Veneer Victory Mops, each  :. $1.50
Liquid Veneer Large Champion Mops, each $2.50
JUST ARRIVED
A full stock of Scrub Brushes, all sizes, Brooms Whisk
Brushes, Banister Brushes, Clothes, Shoe and Stovo
Brushes, Pot Scrubs and Mops and Mop Cloths, Etc.
•*8S!BlfflE|BII*!M*^^
SUNKIST OKANGES
6 Dozen for   $1.00
5 Dozen for   $1.00
4 Dozen for ....  $1.00
3 Dozen for   $1.00
California Sunkist Grape Fruit, large size, 3 for 25c.
Florida Grape Fruit, 2 for 25c.
Sunkist Lemons, per dozen 25c and 35c
HEAD   LETTUCE,   CAULIFLOWER,   HOT   HOUSE RHUBARB
CABBAGE.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
ijaaa'ss'sifHa'Ba ibis
FOR SALE CHILD'S SAFETY CRIB.
Apply Islander Office.
It's here — in Cumberland!
What?    The new STAR Car.
WHY THE POPULARITY?
Because the "STAR" is the—
MOST   COMFORTABLE   LOW-PRICED
car, fully equipped with Speedometer, Dark
Light, Ammeter, Oil Guage and Cord Tires—
MOST ACCESSABLE LOW PRICED car,
being a single unit car; pistons can be taken
out from top or bottom, and—
Last but not least, it is the BE.ST LOOKING LOW-PRICED CAR.
For immediate delivery—
Regular Touring  $ S9SJMI
Regular   Roadster  ♦ HUM
Special Touring  ,  1(1050.00
Special Roadster   IM0.10.II0
Regular Sedan or Coupe  *I345.00
Special Sedan or Coupe  tlSlNMril
Easy Terms Arranged. Come in and drive
one and be convinced.
Meredith Bros, and Bell-Irving
Phone 182 Box 121 "STAR" DEALERS, COURTENAY |
l3aE'arajB,B'SJ3,SEEJ^^
NEW CROOK PICTURE 1
HAS MANY THRILLS
WANTED—TO HEAR FROM OWNER
of good Farm for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush.
Minneapolis, Minn.
One ot the most thrilling dramas
ever shown ou the screen Is "The
Woman With Four Faces," featuring |
Betty Compson and Richard Dig,
which will be the attraction at Uie
Ilo-Ilo Theatre next Monday and Tuesday. It ls a Herbert Brenon Para- j
mount production.
Ynu can't Ignore public opinion, und ynu nin't keep a gimil
thing dawn.
FLAX-O-LENE
For Coughs, sore throats, ole,
has never liwn misrepresented,
and the public appreciation ol
that fact Is shown hy the Increased demand.
WHY OPERATE?
tor APPENDICITIS, GALLSTONES, stomach and liver
troubles, when HEPATOLA does
the work without pain and no
risk ot your life nor loss of time.
Contains no poison. Not sold
by druggists.
Mrs. Geo. S. Almas,
Sole Manufacturer.
230 4th Ave. S., Saskatoon, Sask.
Price $6.60.        Pbonc 4855.
Prncel post 25c. extra.
ENGLISH COMEDY HIT
"A SISTER TO ASSIT "ER"
BOOKED FOR ILO-ILO
"A Sister to Asslt 'er," which comes
to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre Friday and
Saturday, Is one of the funniest cinemas that ever came (rom the Old
Country. From the opening scene of
thst uproarious character Mrs. May,
through adventures on well-known
English streets, in pubs and out, with
those other famous cockney characters, Jim 'Arris, Daisy and Alt, the
audience will be transported with joy.
"WHITE TIGER," LATEST
DEAN, IS COMING HERE
"White Tiger" is the fancy-captlvu-
tlng title ot the Universal-Jewel photoplay which will be seen at the Ilo-Ilo
Theatre Friday and Saturday in which
Priscilla Dean is said to excel her
porsonal triumph in a similar underworld story of two or three years ago,
"Outside the Law," and Tod Browning his handiwork as an author and
director.
"Chevrolet Superior"
THE   MOST   RELIABLE,   ECOiNOMICAL,   FULLY   EQUIPPED
LIGHT CAR ON THE MARKET.
PRICE $895.00 F. O. B. COURTENAY
Blunt & Ewart
Limited
COURTENAY GARAGE
Phone 61
Phone 61

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