BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Sep 8, 1923

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342567.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342567.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342567-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342567-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342567-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342567-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342567-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342567-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342567-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342567.ris

Full Text

Array Al
TME CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
'/3B Wlih  <_kl.,k   I.  .u.a,<Ml.M.-aft,*J th*    riinihArlan.fl   V»> *
/>
A
With which ii eoBtoUiUUd the Cumberland Newi.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR.—No.  36.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPT. 8th, 1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Cumberland Teams
#       *       *        *       *       *        *********
Win Large Number Of Prizes
First Aid And Mine Rescue Competition at Ladysmith Creates
Great Interest: Local Teams Successful, Carry off Majority
of Prizes.
COURTENAY GOLF CLUB
HOLD A MOST
ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING
Purchase of Golf Course To Be
Completed As Early As Possible.
TENNIS TOURNAMENT
AT COURTENAY
ALMOST FINISHED
Finals Will Be Played This
Week-End. Martin of Headquarters Outstanding Player
of Tournament.
The flrst aid and mine rescue teams put Cumberland.on the
map once more, when in open competition at Ladysmith on Monday last they met and defeated teams from different parts of the
province in First Aid Work and Mine Rescue. The local teams,
both Ladies and Men have been putting in a lot of study and hard
work in preparation for this annual event." The result of their
labor of the past few months was demonstrated on Monday-last,
when they practically made a clean sweep, carrying off a number
of valuable prizes..
The competition was open to all teams in B. Cj> Fernie and
other places in the Eastern portion of the province, being represented, in addition to teams from all coal-jmining centres on the
Island, thus making the competition a very open one.
The Hon. Wm. Sloan, Minister of Mines, and Geo. Wilkinson,
Chief Inspector of Mines were present in addition to many prominent men in the mining affairs of the province.	
Six doctors were the judges In the
Ilrst aid; three from Vancouver and
CORRESPONDENCE
three from Victoria, and two Judges
in the Mine Rescue Work, supported
by a committee of four. Mr. A. Me
Kendrlck, of Merritt was bench
judge and Mr. Bernard Caulfleld, Superintendent of the Crow's Nest Pass
Coal Co.. Ferule" was Mine Galley
Judge.
The committee In charge of the arrangements for the day were ill the
capable hands of Mr. T. A. Spruston,
superintendent Canadian Collieries
(DuiiBmuir) Ltd, Ladysmith; Mr.
Geo. O'Brien, safety first engineer.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
Cumberland, Jas. Touhey, manager
Granby Consolidated Coal and Coke
Co., Cassidy, R. Henderson, mine
manager manager Western Fuel Co.,
Nanaimo. ( /
The arrangements niuilc for the
comfort and convenience of competitors and spectators were a source
of great satisfaction and many congratulatory remarks were expressed
by those present.
Thc Cumberland competitors were
naturally jubilant over the success
they attained over their keen rivals,
at Ihe same time extending to their
opponents, hearty congratulations
for the manner In which they carried
on their work, thus forcing tho locals
to give of their best.
The teams making thc Journey to
Ladysmith, together /with prizes won
follows;
Ladles' First Aid team, 1st prize:
Cup and Five Gold Wrist Watches.
Team:—Mrs. W. Hudson, captain,
Mrs. A. Farmer. Mrs. J. J. Potter,
Mrs. J. Dnvls, Mrs. Geo. Shearer.
W. Beverldgc's Team:—winners of
the Coulson Cup and five clocks.
Team:—W. Beveridge, Capt., J. Wil-
Cumberland. B.C., Sept. 6th, 1923
The  Editor,  The   IslandetV-
The business men, the Merchants
of Cumberland are most of them
finding business conditions anything
but good at the present time. There
are reasons why such a state of
things exist. The lesser number of
men employed by The Canadian Collieries than a year ago. and the diminished payroll is no doubt partly
responsible, but Mr. Editor, there Is
another factor, that militates very
much against the business interests
of this community at the present
time and has existed tor the past
three years and lt has driven the
bulk of the outside trade that formerly used to come to this city, to our
neighboring City of Courtenay, aud
the Courtenay Merchants are laughing up their sleeves over It, add hare
done so ever since it waB inaugurated. I refer to the closing of the
stores at 8 p.m. on Saturdays. I hope
that they are beginning to realize the
fact if not it Is about time they were.
Even n number of thc residents of
Cumberland arc finding It convenient
to run down to Courtenay on Saturdays nfter the stores close here, to
make their purchases. There is a
regular procession of cars streaming
into Courtenay on Saturdays (after
the Cumberland Merchants have
closed their doors,) from all directions, Minto, Union Bay, Fanny Bay,
yes and even farther than that to
transact business and spend their
money freely, for the mutual benefit of customer and merchants.
I notice In the local papers that
some of the Courtenay business men
advertise the fact, open until 10.00
o'clock on Saturdays, they know
what   they   are   doing.    Cumberland
Hams, J. Taylor, J. D. Davis, R. Reid.   business men. It Is time you woke up,
J, Williams' team, winners of the | or the grass will soon be as luxurl-
Vuncouver   Island   Mine   Safety   Aa-: ant on your main  thoroughfares as
sociotion Shield, 1st prize: Shield, 0
tea sets and 6 (10.00 gold pieses.
Team:—J. Williams, capt., E. E-
vnns, J. Taylor, A. Watson, W. Devoy, W. Beveridge.
W. Beverldgc's team, winners of
the sccoitd prize in the Mines' Department Cup competition, prizes 5
watches:—Team W. Beveridge, capt.,
J. Tuylor, J. Williams, J. D. Davis, R.
Reid.
The Hon. Wm. Sloan, Minister cf
Mines, presented the prizes to the
successful competitors ut a meeting
hold III the band hall. Great enthusiasm prevailed throughout the ceremony, a huge ussembly being present,
the hull being absolutely packed,, many being forced to stand throughout
the evening.
COMOX GOLF COURSE
To Introduce the Comox Golf
Course, which is Hearing completion,
It has been decided to throw it open
to the public, from Sunday, Septem.
ber 9th until further notice. All
those Interested nre cordially Invited to come (free of charged to inspect and try the lay-out of the
course by playing thc hales which
nre now ready.
The best pictures tell the most. Get
a good camera for good .pictures at
Lang's Drug Store.
Mrs. R. Dando returned to her
home In Alberta "on Monday after
spedlng a few weeks with relatives
ln this city.
partly
on tbe Boulevards that now
adorn your City.
OBSERVER.
FOOTBALL SEASON
OPENS SEPTEMBER 16
At a meeting held in Nannlmo ot
thc Up-Island Football delegates the
first half of the seasons schedule was
drawn up.
There are to be six tcuius in the
league this season, which will undoubtedly make n very •Interesting
league and some real classy soccer
will be played. The following are
the teams which will clash on Sept.
Kith, on the grounds of the first
named club: Nannlmo City vs. Cumberland; Northlield vs. G. W. V. A.
Ladysmith  vs.  Davenports.
The Cumberland team will have to
travel to Nanaimo tor their flrst game
and this will likely be one of the many hard struggles of the year, but
nothing will be left undone to see
that Cumberland team is In Al shape.
Owing to only two team being entered in the second division the entry date was set back to Sept. 15th
when another meeting will he held.
A most enthusiastic meeting ot
members of the Courtenay Golf Club
was held at the City Hall on Thursday night, the attendance being good
with Mr. George Pldcock acting as
chairman. Directors were elected as
follows: *
Mr. A. B. Dundas, Mr. George Pldcock, Mr. Fred. Field, Mr. Chas.
Brown and Mr. John Aitken. The
committee ln charge of arrangements
for the purchase of the property on
which the club has been playing and.
on which it has had a lease, presented an agreement of sale, and was
Instructed to complete the deal at the
earliest possible date. It waB also
decided to retain the timber, which
enhances the value of the property as
a beauty spot and park. There are
seventy members and they are all
so stricken with golfltls that from
the moment of organization of the
cluii there has never been any doubt
as to the success of the venture.
The fairways and greens sre ln
ayod shape and the hazards have
been greatly improved. In the words
of the many tourists and visitors to
the district from all points on the
Pacific Coast this year, the course is
an ideal one and capable of giving
players a most enjoyable game. Next
Wednesday a tournament will be begun .entries to be made on the
grounds. Next Thursday night the
annual meeting will be held ln the
city hall when officers for the ensuing year will be elected. All members o fthe club and those Interested
In the development ot the game in
Comox Valley are particularly Invited to attend.
MINES DEPARTMENT
HOLD DEMONSTRATION
Many Prominent Men Present
At Mine Rescue Station Nanaimo.
Ou Tuesday, Sept. 4th a demonstra
tion of the self rescue machine and
the Burrell gas mask was given iu
the Mine Rescue Station, Nanaimo,
B.C. In a gassy mixture of 2 per cent.-
Carbonumonoxide, one of the most
deadly gases known In coal mining.
This mixture is fatal It breathed.
The demonstration was successfully held without any accident of any
kind. #
Mr. George' O'Brien, safety engineer, Cumberland and Mr. T. A.
Spruston, superintendent of Mines at
Ladysmith, both went into the gassy chamber to try the machines.
Many mining men and officials
from the state ot Washington as well
as all mining districts of British Columbia were present when the demonstration took place.
Mr. Geo. Wilkinson, chief Inspector
of mines and H. Devilln, represented
the Government at the tests. Mr.
Chas. Graham, General Superinten.
dent of the Canadian Collieries (Duns
muir) Ltd., and Geo. O'Brien, Safety
First Engineer, attended in the interest of their cuiiiftany. There will
be another demonstration held In
Cumberland about ten days.
Some very Interesting games have
been played In the Courtenay Tennis
Club  Tournament,  and   Interest   In
the different games has been  quite
keen.
One of the best games of the series was that between Corfleld and
Martin, the latter, a veteran^of fifty
Forestry Experts
***************
Visited The Comox District
Visitors View Operations of Comox Logging Co.—Greatly Im-!
pressed With Lumber Industry of The Island.
The British Empire Forestry Conference left Vancouver for
Nanaimo by the S. S. Princess Patricia on Monday and arrived at
Qualicum at 6.30 in the evening proceeding on up the Island. The
distinguished party arrived at the Comox Logging Railway operations on Tuesday morning,
Major General Lord Lovat was in the lead of Forestry Ex-
years or more eventually beating his perts gathered from all parts of the British Empire who are on
younger opponent. Martin is a mum a tour visiting the lumbering and logging operations of Canada,
of fifty, but the way he moves around   After vigiti 3 ^ 8urrounding woods and booming camp,
tha    n/limt    nmrs    n     tsnimlnHAn     In    n     lniirtn ^ *
the Forestry Experts returned to Qualicum in the evening.
The party consisted of:
the court was a revelation to a large
number of the younger oens present.
The results since last week, are as
follows:
Open to district—Corfleld beat C.C.
Oraham, 6-2, 6-2.
M. Campbell beat J. Idlens.
T. R. S. Graham beat P. McLougn-
lin
P. D. Graham beat Max Blunt. 6-2,
6-4
Brock beat Kennedy, 6-1, 6-1.
Filberg beat H. Idlens, 6-4, 6-3.
Martin  beat Ash.
Heyland beat Brock.
Martin beat T. R. S. Graham, 7-5,
6-3.
Heyland beat Campbell, 6-4, 6-4.
Heyland beat Cabledue, 8-0, 6-2.
Ladies' singles-
Mrs. Ash beat Mrs. Brock, 6-4, 0-2
Mrs. Cooke beat Mrs. Dalby, 6-1,
6-4.
Leaving Mrs. Ash and Mrs. Cooke
In the finals.
Ladies' Doubles-
Mrs. Brock and Mrs. Kennedy beut
Miss Roberts and Miss Sutton, 0-5,
6-4,
COURTENAY PERSONALS
Mr. Ramsey who has taken the
place of Capt. G. R. Bates as the S.
S. B. in the district has been busy
making himsellf acquainted with the
soldier settlers in the district. He
has taken Mr. Laundy's house. Mr.
and Mrs. Laundy are wintering in
California.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Rutherford and
family came down from Cumberland
to spend the week-end with Mrs. K.
Reese.
Mr. and Mrs. Eric Flinton has re-
, turned trom their wedding tour and
are at present staying at the home ot
I Mr.  R. AulU The young couple expect to move  into their    house    at
! Camp 3 very shortly.
Mr. Chas.  Yockney  reports  stren-J
ous times on the prairies, he is assisting to harvest the crop at Drink-!
Mrs.  Ash  and  Mrs.  Dalby drew a , water, Sask.
bye.
Men's Doubles—
Heyland and Brock beat Mitchell
and Butters, 6-3, 3-4.
Corfleld and Thompson beat Blunt
nn* Hughes, 6-0, 7-5.
Men's Singles—
Biscoe beat Hughes, 6-1, 6-1.
Corfleld beat Thompson, 6-2, 6-2.
Blunt beat Brock, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3.
Mixed Doubles—
Sandwick.—Three local schools
commenced the new term with very
good' attendances. Sandwick headed
the list with 32 pupils enrolled.
Grantham has 24 and Dove Creek 11.
At Sandwick Mr. C. H. Sterling of
United Kingdom — Major General
Lord Lovat, K.T., K.C.M.C, D.S.O.,
etc. chairman foiestry commission;
Mr. R. L. Robinson, O.B.E.. B.A., B.
Sc, commissioner, forestry commission; Dr. A. W. Bortwlck, forestry
commission; Dr. J. W. Munro, forestry commission; Prof. R. S. Troup,
CLE., Oxford University; Sir James
Calder, C.B.E.; Earl of Stratford.
British Empire Forestry "Association—Lieut. Co. O. L. Courthope, M.
P., chairman of the association.
Australia—Mr. Owen Jones, B.A.,
chairman forests .commission of Victoria .
India—Mr. W. A. Robertson, deputy conservator, Burma, India; Mr. C.
G. Thevor, officiating conservation,
United Provinces, India.
Ireland—Mr. A. C. Forbes, O.B.E..
forestry branch, department of agriculture, Dublin.
New Zealand—Capt. L. Mcintosh
Bills, B.S.c, F., director of state forests.
South Africa—Mr. C. E. Legat,
chief conservator of forests.
Crown Colonies—Colonial office.
Major R. D. Furse, D.H.O", assistant
'private secretary, Nigeria, Mr. J. R.
Alnslle, senior conservator of forests. Kenya, Mr. E. Battlscombe,
conservator ot forests. Ceylon, Mr. R.
White, deputy conservator of foreBts.
Straits Settlements, and Federated
, Malay States, Mr. C. E. S.    Cubbitt.
Vancouver   took  charge.    Grantham i conservator of forests.  British   Gin-
Mr, and Mrs. Cooke beat Dr. mid i duties.  Mr.  and  Mrs.
| school Is presided over by Miss Smith ; «nn, Mr. L. S. Hohenkerk, forests s,f-
also of Vancouver while   at    Dove- j fleer,
i creek   Mrs.   Halliday    resumed    her I    Canada—Dominion, Mr. E. H. Fin-
Mrs. Butters. 7-5, 4-6, 6-2.
rented  Mr.    Morgan
Sterling have
Reese's    new
Sir. and Mrs." Dalby beat Miss Sll-1 nou8e al„j expect t0 be In occupation
by end of the present month.
SHOWER FOR
MISS D. GRAHAM
lence and Wallls, 8-6, 6-1.
,   Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy beat    Miss
Hlghet and Dr. Briggs, 6-4, 3-6, 6-5. j
Mr. and Mrs. Cooke beat Mr. and!
Mrs. Brock, 6-3, 6-4. 	
Mr. and Mrs". Dalby secured a bye! On Thursday evening last at the
Into the finals which will be played home of Mrs. John Thomson, a dc-
wlth Mr. and Mrs. Cooke. llghtful   miscellaneous   shower   was
' Corfleld and Thomson beat Biscoe j held in honor of Miss Decie Graham,
and Dalby 6-3; 6-3.
Finals in the local tennis tournament will be played this week-end as
follows: 9 a.m. local ladies singles,
finals Mrs. H. Ash vs.   Mrs. H. Cooke.
layson, B.Sc. F., acting director Of
forestry; Mr. ft Roy Cameron, B.Sc.
F., Dominion forest service .
British Columbia—Mr. P. Z. Caver-
hill, B.S.F., chief forester, provincial
forest service.
CUMBERLAND PERSONALS
Mr. A. C. Lymn has severed liis
connections with the Engineering
Department of the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd. and left for San
Francisco, California.
Mr. T. W. Scott has been appoint-
BEVAN BASEBALL
TEAM TO HOLD
SUPPER AND DANCE
The Bevan Baseball team who made
such a splendid showing in the Intermediate league are holding a chicken supper nnd dance at Bevan on Saturday.
This affair is going to be the event
of the season, for when Bevan entei-
taln they do so In good style, and
this ls going to be no exception to
the rule. The Intermediates have
enlisted the services of the good
ladles of Bevan ,so a rare treat Is In
store for all those who attend.
Local men's semifinal F. R. F .S. Bic-
coe vs. T. Hayland. 10.30 a.m. local
men's double final, F. C. Brock and
T. Hayland vs. F. T. Corfleld and R.
Thompson. 1 p.m. local mixed double
final, Mr. and Mrs. H. Cooke vs. Mr.
and Mrs. Ken Dalby. 3 p.m. open
championship semifinal F. T. Corfleld vb. J. Martin, T. Hayland vs.
Graham. 3.30 p.m. local ladles' double
final Mrs. H. Ash and Mrs. Ken Dalby vs. Mrs. F. C. Brock and Mrs. W.
N. Kennedy. 4 p.m. final open district
championship.
On Tuesday at the Gaiety 'Theatre
the Tennis Tournament winners will
be presented with cup nt n club
dance.
who ls to be married shortly to Mr.
Arthur Grant* of Courtenay. The
room was tastefully decorated, pink
and   white  streamers  hanging  from j ed in his stead.
each corner to the center table. The j	
wagon which contained the various! Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Hall of Victoria,
gifts was also decorated with pink i arrived on Saturday last on a visit
and   white  crepe    paper    and    was j to Mrs. John Bruce In a large Paige
touring car,    seldom seen    in    this
NEW "LEATHER
PUSHERS" COMING
HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
TO GET REFUND
Due tn all oversight, certain High
School Books, purchased at Lnng's
Drug Store, were sold at the old
marked prices, and any High School
pupil having purchased such books
are requested to call at the store and
obtain refund.
The most popular short feature
subjects on the market Is without
doubt "The Leather Pushers" the
first round will be screened at the
llo-llo theatre Friday nnd Saturday.
This Round is a genuine knock out,
most of the scenes were taken In thc
big timber country where the thermometer registered 40 below zero.
FAIR PREPARATIONS
WELL AVDANCED
drawn Into the room by little Doreen
Thomson.
After the presents had been opened i Tuesday.
Miss    Graham,    with a    neat    little
speech thanked everyone.
Refreshments were then served
and the rest of the evening spent in
mu>le and songs.
About twenty-five guests were
present, among those were: Mrs. D.
Marsh, Mrs. J. Thomson, Mrs. 11.
Thomson, Mrs. A. Thomson, Mrs. J.
Robertson, Mrs. W. Wier, Mrs. C. Hltchens. Mrs. J. Monohan. Misses D.
Graham, V, Bono, M. Pickettl, M.
Piercy, H. Abbott, Delina and Dill
Wilson, Edna, Marsh L. Henderson.
II. Mounce, J. Boffey, I. Bateman, J.
Stevenson, Doro Hutchinson anil B.
Mitchell.
district  and   left  for  the  south
Charles Graham .acting General
Superintendent of thc Canadian Collieries returned from a visit lo Victoria on Thursday.
Mr. George O'Drien left for Lau.s-
smith on Saturday and relumed on
Monday,
Mr. W. A. Owen left for Ladysmith
on Friday and returned on Saturday.
Mr. Colvlllc Graham nintorci! In
Victoria on Tuesday nml rolurned nu
Thursday.
Preparations are going on* apace
for the fall fair to be held at Courte.
nay on Tuesday and Wednesday 18th
—19th Inst. An orchestra Is being
arranged for aud a program of
sport will be a big feature and will
probably Include a log rolling contest ln the river. Interest Is Increasing as the date of thc big agricultural event draws near and Is more
than likely that the logging camps
will close early on the 19lli lo allow
tiie men and their families to attend.
As'usual the.big feature windup will
be the dance, to be held after the exhibits have been taken out of the
hall. The secretary will be pleased
to accept assistance of any kind
frnm any and all residents who will
take nn Interest ln this big event..
MACHINE SHOP
IN COURTENAY
Mrs.  Robert Yules lefi   for Nairn I
mo on Tuesday.
Mrs.   Walter  Robinson    nnd     Mrs.
Blunt & Ewart Ltd. have added an , C|,aniller returned from Vancouver OH
i Important  addition  to  their  already' gntuarday
extensive premises In,Courtenay, by1 	
Installing  a   large     up-to-date    machine shop. i    '"BB  °*  "'indo ami   Master  Leslie
This shop has all the latest   Im-1 mnAo ""■J'*"1''1  r'"'"  Vancouver on
proved     machinery,    Including    .me   Solurday.
large ami  one small    lathe,    larger I ■=■ —=—
simper, drill press, power hack saw, | previously been shipped away,
rehnrlng machine, etc. This shop Blunt & Ewart arc fortunate In
will supply n long felt want in the ; having the services ot nil exception-
district, for It will be able to handle! nlly good machinist In Mr. F. C, Wit-
large jobs for logging ramps and' Hams, who has been In charge ot
mills, besides all small work for au-1 machine shops for the past twelve
tomobllcs, et a great saving in time j years, snd hns had u great deal nf
[ and cost, as all this sort of work hus' experience In all kinds of work. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
THE PICNIC
SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
RE CITY CLERKS SALARY
The Cumberland Islander thanks
the Mayor and aldermen of the city
of Courtonay for the courteous reception -tendered the leader that appeared in the editorial columns ot
this paper on August eighteenth last.
lt mny not be any ot the Islander's
business how the Mayor and Aldermen of Courtenay look after the Interests of their townsmen, but as a
semi-public utility lt ls the duty of
this newspaper to let Cumberland
owners of property In Courtenay
know the attitude their servants take
on the question of economy. The Islander did not seek to dictate to the
city council, but if sound advice on
economical questions affecting
people whom this paper serves is
looked upon as dictation then our reply to the alderman who made that
remark is, that so long as we serve
any appreciable number of ratepayers, whether they reside in Cumberland or Courtenay, the council of
the latter may expect more of the
same sort of "dictation."
The article so harshly criticized did
not state that the cost ot administering the city of Courtenay is greater
than, the salaries paid to the city
clerk and employees of the water and
electric light company at Cumberland, but the Islander hazards the
opinion that such is the case. What
we said was that the City Clerk at
Courtenay received a greater salary than the Government Agent who
administers more public business and
handles much more money and receives a smaller salary than the city
clerk. Readers of The Lslander have
perhaps noted how diplomatically
Mayor Simms refrained from criticizing this statement. We reiterate
here what we wrote in our edition ot
August 18th ill this respect.
The Islander is still ot the opinion
that any unnecessary expense added
to the administration of civic business at the city of Courtenay is unjustifiable.
Te picnic ls a place where people
go,to relax from labor and study the
bug family.
There is no place ou earth where
tbe habits and personal eccentricities ot the wandering and dissatisfied bug can be studied to greater advantage than at a picnic, when the
tablecloth has been laid directly over
a smoldering ant hill.
Picnics are held ln the summer
time, when the grass is long aud
green and insect lite is more animated.
Great care is taken to read the
weather forecast and pick out a day
that winds up in a moist rainstorm.
This teaches us that the weather bureau, which Is supported by the patient, perspiring taxpayer, ls a lugubrious and aganizlng joke.
Picnics are composed of people
wbo provide. Why is lt that so many
ny people are able to go to picnic after picnic and never have to furnish
anything but a bubbling laugh? The
Injustice of this arrangement has
rankled ln many a feminine breast
and has caused close neighbors to
refuse to speak to each otber, except at prayer meeting. There is also the man who Is first to get to the
table, but never can see anything to
do except prophesy rain and kick
about the files. These two classes
are always on hand and even get
some of the white meat
Men are invited to picnics,oh account of their lovable attributes and
their ability to produce a fire out ot
water-soaked brush. A picnic with
out a few men to build the fire and
eat all of the surplus potato salad
would be a greater failure than an
attempt to sell envelope chemises on
the African coast. Unmarried men
are much sought after at picnics, as
they know how to hang a hammock
and also how to disport themselves
therein. One otthe most pathetic
Bights In life iB a picnic party composed entirely of old maids who have
no more use for a hammock than a
bald-headed man has for a set of ml
litary brushes.
Picnics would be more popular If
they were held on high, dry ground,
where the death chant of the course,
aggressive mosquito could not be
heard.
From one end of the world to the
other came the most fragrant, distinctively odored toilet creations so
common in the toilet goods department of Lang's Drug Store.
NEW GOODS
Homespuns in an assortment of shades and colorings, 56 inches (g-| (fA d»0 Off
wide, per yard tpJLet)U and tpu.uu
SERGES—
Special in Brown and Blue, very   suitable   for
children's wear H^\P
40 inches wide, per yard   I wt
Blue Serges, 54 inches wide at—
$1.35, $2.25, $2.50, $2.75
Boys pants for School wear. Heavy blu? Serge,
lines at dJO Hf?
per pair      tyM. I O
Boys Tweed pants a good heavy (PO EA
pant for school wear    *pmtt.O\t
A special in school shoes for girls. Good "serviceable shoes.
Misses Calf Bluchers d»Q AA
11 to 12     tPO.UV
Girls d»0 RA
8 to 10'/2   *J>£t.O\J
Child's $9 AA
5 to 7Va      V*«W
Leckie's Red Stitch Shoes for Boys, per pair—
$3.50, $4.25 ^ $5.00
Our Furniture Department is well stocked in all
lines.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
»   '
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
That's Where They (let Hurt
When airplanes go through the air,
They don't just scatter everywhere.
They fly around an awful lot
In what they call the "soar spot."
ss       *       *
Har-Har
Dr. W. H. Crook of Lancaster, 0-
hio advertises that he can cure
crosseyedness.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND!
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
I
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   • •    Proprietor
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Cal, Wool and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to AU Parts of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE    M    TELEPHONE
•r Leave Orders at Yendome Hotel
second-hand
furniture
Comox Exchange
C.urtenay, B.C.
Showing This Week
the Newest Creations
in
FALL MILLINERY
THE NEWEST AMERICAN MODELS IN LADIES', MISSES AND
CHILDREN'S
FALL COATS
AT POPULAR PRICES
TRICOTINE, gOREET TWILL   AND   CANTON   CREPE   DRESSES
NEW SILKS-
KING TUT AND EGYPTIAN CANTON CREPES. ILLUMINATED
RADIUM SILK AND BROCADED METAL CLOTHS.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Before Buying Your
Building Material
Phone, or write us for quot"tions
OUR SERVICE TO YOU
We will gladly assist you in planning any building you have in mind, also tell you the amount of Material you will require for the job.
Express Delivery Anywhere
Prompt Attention to All Orders
EDWARDS & ORR
Phone 17
COURTENAY, B. C.
P. O. Box 62
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No- * Cumberland
Phone 159 : Night—134-X  Courtenay
Fall   Announcement
TIP TOP CLOTHING FOR MEN, SUITS AND
-   OVERCOATS
Made to measure   $27.00
Fit guaranteed, made from all Wool British manufactured Tweeds and Serges.
Our Toronto representative will be here this
week with the new samples for Fall and Winter. We
invite you to call and inspect the large range of goods
that he will have to show.
The values are so well known that wc do not need
to call your attention to the fact, that by comparison
they are without an equal in Canada.
We are also showing Fall lines of Ready Made
Suits and Overcoats, for Men, Young men and Boys,
in the latest Snappy styles.
Men's Suits and Overcoats priced at $22.50, $27.50
and in Navy Serge at   $35.00
Boys' Suits at -  $7.50, $10.50 and $13.50
Men's Odd Pants in All Wool. Priced at $3.50
$5.50, $6.50.
aSJSJSISraiBISiaiMIEEL^^
Yours for Good Value.
FRANK PARTRIDGE
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
Cumberland, B. C.
Opposite Post Office SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
Ia*
The Impoi tance of
Being Pretty
Many a girl's fortune is determined by her face.
A skin which is fresh, smooth mul alluring with the
radiance of health, predicts a htippy future, because
this is the greatest of all womanly charms.
Every girl can have a beautiful, attractive skin if
she will only learn to give it pruper care.
. The constant application of cold creams, lotions,
powder, and rouge tend to make ihe skin sluggish
and inactive. Dirt accumulates and blackheads and
other blemishes appear.
Thorough cleansing once a day prevents such
a condition and keeps the complexion fresh and
smooth. Cold Cream is beneficial when applied to
a clean skin and rouge and powder are harmless
beautilicrs—but—start fresh every day on a clean
foundation. Keep your skin active and it will be
clear, fresh, youthful and attractive.
Soap to be thorough, need not be harsh. The
mildest toitet soap made is the most thorough of
all cleansers, as you will know after yon have once
tried Palmolive.
You can buy Palmolive Soap at all first-class
dealers.
Pelt* md Olive Otis
—tithing else—the
.uteri's tret, celtr
tt Ptlmtlive Step
Made in Canada
Volume and Efficiency
Product IS-ctnt
Qtellt)
510c
f
Ho=Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday, and Saturday, September 7th and 8th
A
100* SHOW
TKomis Meitfhin m the
Paramo ant Picture
•Homeward Bound,'
and Round One of the new "Leather Pushers" is a
genuine knockout.
Thomas Meighan
"Homeward Bound"
You'll want to be on deck when Tommy comes
.sailing home. Its a bracing yarn of the world of
ships—swift as a gale; mighty as the sea.
Meighan as the stalwart skipper, Lila Lee as best
Mate, and a crew of favourites.
LOOK EXTRA -LOOK
Round One of the new Third series of the "Leather Pushers" most of the action in
this round takes place in the big timber country where the Thermometer registers forty below .this is a positive scream.
AL ST. JOHN
"The Author"
Matinee Saturday at 2.30 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday
Madge Bellamy and "OSCAR" the Elephant
—in—
"THE SOUL    OF THE BEAST"
A drama of the circus, and the North Woods
Wednesday and Thursday
A Thomas H. Ince Production
"WHAT A WIFE LEARNED"
"THE FLIRT"
is coming next Friday and Saturday.
SBSISHVSJKHBJSe
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
-AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue
NURSING HOME
Criminal Fools and Canadian Forests
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 TEARS' EXPERIENCE
A  Isrssutilm stisnd in Us.  Mpiuon  district,  near which ■ Canadian Pacific Bungalow Camp hu been erected,
the tessult If thle camp fire should be neglected.
Below—Canadian Pacific tank car unit on the road ■
Lett—Showing the pumps and how the? throw a elrearn high over a BO foot tower.
1 OOK tt the boards at your feet, the walls which
*"* surround you, the root' over your head, the chair
In whicb you sit, and your furniture. All are products
of the Canadian forests, and practically everything
you come into contact with in the day depends on the
forest for one or more of its component parts. Then
take the foods you eat, the paper you read by the
wood fire at night; the food is produced by Canadian farmers who depend on the forest for a regular
supply of moisture, the paper is composed largely of
wood pulp. It is almost beyond comprehension—the
amount of lumber used by Canadian industries each
day, and the amount used in construction and In the
development of the country each year. Canada's
prosperity, her whole future, is one with that of her
forests.
Ontario alone gives employment to 17,000 men
ln the bush; pulp and paper mills in the same province
employ 8,000 men, and the amount of capital invested
in the two industries amounts to over $160,000,000.
Yet, for every tree that is felled, for every log that
helps to keep the wheels of industry moving, for every
board that is used in construction, twelve are destroyed
In the forest by fire. This means that forest fires consume twelve times the amount of the lumber which
is the life of Canadian industries, and that each year
fire is depleting the forests which should hold
back the rain fall so as to ensure throughout the year
the moisture which is the life of the farm Five hundred thousand acres of forest are burned over In
Ontario each year, and the government of this province Is burdened with a forest fire protection organization which costs $11,000 a day.
Why is the country put to such a loss ?
Because there are no means of segregating the
criminal fools and careless! Take the fire which in
October last took forty-four lives, rendered thousands
homeless, ami destroyed property valued at eight
million dollars in the vicinity of llaileybury, the ter
rible fires in 1916 around Matheson, and in 1911
around Cochrane. These, like the majority of other
fires, were the result of criminal carelessness. Settlers allow their slash fires to grow beyond control,
the sportsman builds his camp fire in a mossy
place and forgets to extinguish It, a lighted cigarette
or match is thrown away carelessly and originates a
small blaze which may soon develop into a holocaust
beyond control of man.
Years ago the railways were' perhaps, responsible
for many conflagrations, but not so today. Although
one half of the Canadian Pacific Railway right-of-
way lies in forest areas In the east and is flanked by
forests for hundreds of' miles in both Ontario and
British Columbia, this railway has long since ceased
to be a factor in the destruction of the forests. In
order to eliminate the possibility of fires being started
by passing trains, all Canadian Pacific locomotives
are examined at the end of each trip and great care
is taken to see that ash pans and front ends are in
perfect condition. Engineers and firemen are given
explicit Instructions not to dump live coals or to throw
waste upon the right of way, and should an engine
crew notice a blaze, by a series of whistles the section men and fire patrol are notified, and the nearest
despatcher takes steps to secure whatever additional
men are required.
The Canadian Pacific maintains a regular and
efficient force which patrols the right of way in
forest areas after the passing of trains and which
cooperates with the Dominion, Provincial and other
fire prevention organizations to the fullest extent.
Also at various points along the line are kept a
number of fire tank units, each unit consisting of
two tank cars, each of 7,000-gallon capacity, equipped
with powerful pumps, and approximately one mile of
hose. This equipment has proved valuable not only
in fighting forest fires but In fighting fires which
have occurred in forest and rail side towns.
SAVE THE FORESTS. ■■' ,
THE DECLINE OF i turmoil of modern town and city life,
NEIGHBORLINESSi the gentle art of being neighborly.
  |    Tho mothers of    yesterday    were
Too many o fthe women of today   less hurried  than those    of    today,
have   forgotten,  In   the  hurry    and J and, consequently, were less selfish.
The Beer Withoui a Peer
and
U.B.C BEER
100 Per Cent. Canadian   •
Alberta barley, Fraser Valley hops,
Canadian - made bottles, crowns,
labels, wrappers and boxes go to
the making of theae all-Canadian
products.
ORDER TODAY AND GET FREE
-DELIVERY TO YOUR HOME.
Vancouver Breweries
This advertisement is not published or
displayed liy the Liquor Control Hoard
or   by   the  Government   of   British
Columbia.
They had time for the simpler pleasures wieh gave Ihem as much enjoyment as the complex, strenuous,
businesslike affairs of today. Tliey
could be interested In the people
whose lives touched their own and
without any sacrifice of their.,own
more immediate home duties. They
could lend and borrow; they could
render loving assistance iu times of
joy and sorrow.
These acts made them more kindly
and more tolerant as well. They hud
a chance to get behind (he BCenes of
lite, to see tlieir fellows when they
were not playing parts and when tlie
paint and powder were washed on*.
They got at the mysteries of existence; llie love of u good wife for a
good husband; the fifrglveness of
fond parents for frailties of suns anil
daughters. They went out of thom-
selves to get their knowledge and
when it was theirs It broadened
them.
Little of the sort rewards the
aloofness of the present day. To
meet at a party or at a formal dinner; to know people by tlieir gowns
and to make their parties social clearing-houses doesn't put any
man or woman Into thc warm, Instructive, self-developing relations
which followed upon the old big-
hearted nei'ghborliness.
This Is a pity. A greater pity
lurks behind In the knowledge that
nothing can Improve affairs. The
world Is too busy to go backward.
and so lt grows colder every day.
We know a home in Courtenay in
which the sixteen year old daughter
has seven beaus and the twenty six
j year old daughter never even has one
caller. What's the answer? FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
COMOX
Featuring
FINEST JERSEY STOCK, SHEEP, SWINE, POULTRY     '""
UNEXCELLED FARM PRODUCE       /       INDUSTRIAL DISPLAYS
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
September 18 and  19
Officially opened by A. W. Neill, Esq., M.P., Wednesday at One O'clock.
Entries positively close on Sept. 15th
SPECIAL SPORTS PROGRAMME
REFRESHMENTS SERVED BY LADIES' AUXILIARY
DANCE WEDNESDAY NIGHT. GOOD ORCHESTRA IN ATTENDANCE
Full information from E. Felix Thomas, Secretary
'Phones: Office 151 — House 24 L.
COURTENAY
ROAD HOGS
It is said that   the   ground    hug
shows  up early- in  the year  but    a
road  hog is liable  to  show  up any
time, more especially during tlle holiday   season.    Sometimes   he   is   tin
amateur motoriBt to whom the wht-
est road looks narrow when another
car Is approaching.    If he    hears a
11 horn honk honk behind him, he tries
his darndest to give the overtaking
IsyiH all the road, but when he    approaches the edge of a six foot ditch
he becomes alarmed and shoots his
car to the opposite side of the road.
I j This action stops the rear car suddenly.    After   a   little   coaxing    the
green one gets his Lizzie straightened out ill the road and, just as the
j \ big Maclaughlln passes  hlm he  exclaims:   "You  dam   fool,   why  don't
. ] you give a fellow a onanoejo get out
■, ot* your way." He iu au innocent of-
j  fender  and  never \ will    break    any
'■  speed  records, although   he  may  lie
j'. the cause of a whole  lot of broken
\ cars and necks.
In the stock market reports the
I value of hogs runs all the way from
: eight cents a pound to fifteen cents
! i a pound but the only value a road
I j hog recognizes is that of the damage
I j done to his own car when he col-
| lides with another. The other party's
i always to blame and there can be no
value placed on his damages.
Some road hogs are subject to
"nerves" and are carelessly careful.
especially when another ear Uoves
in sight W more than half a mile
away. This is the species that pampers and pets Lizzie nnd must have
the middle of the road. If he or she
does not get at least two-thirds of
the highway the car met either goes
into the ditch or takes tlie port
wheel off one of the machines. The
driver with "nerves" is as fussy
about his car as a good housekeeper
is about her bric-abrac; Lizzie travels better when her skin is nice nnd
shiny and the engine is singing liko
one in a nightmare. The road hog of
this type does not mean to he a
"boar" but It's a cinch that when lie
can't bounce an on-coming ear off the
road he will grunt like a real grouchy
Duroc-Jersey.
Hogs Is hogs and whether they are
milk ied or dirt fed on the roads they
want 'just a liyic more than is their
share.
mmm
Enjoy th*
combined pleasure*
OF A
Rail and Water
Trip
tbatcl ea «u»
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
From Vancouver 9:50 p.m.
KuaiHls.au  NATieA-flOII  ITBAMsMU tfm FOB* slBXUUM
SUMM1B TOURIST FARM
laatai* tkla sSMatteg
E. VV. Bickle. Agent   C. F. Enrle, D.P.A.
Cumberland Victoria
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
i v.:
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
"Tii" —rt
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Off ee;   Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and f?
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Bicycle Snaps
26" Oents Bicycle     *Iih00
20" Boys Bicycle, good shape .... 20.00
22" Boys Bicycle, 1st class shape 22.00
22" Boys bicycle, new tires and
tubes   87.00
22" Boys motor bicycle model, Al
ehape   ,18.00
24" Boys bicycle 1st class condition       85.00
22" Boys bicycle Al shape .... i.UHI
GUN   REPAIRING
I reborc, restock, repair Huns and
Rifles
Any kind --Any malic
E. T. Ellison
GUNMAKER
rOITHTENAY, B. ('.
THE GOOD HOUSEWIFE
A quaint philosopher recently said:
"It is said by one who is iu every
way qualified to speak on the subject, that the reason thousands ot
girls never get. married is, at some
time or other they've expressed themselves as being bitterly opposed to
housework."
Of course, lt is only the foolish,
sappily sentimental girl or the one
who makes grotesque effort to be ul
tra-mannlsh, who says such things
Unfortunately, there are too many of
both varieties.
The wise mother teaches her girls
to cook, to buy for the house and to
run it smoothly and economically,
not so much for a career In life as
a protection. They many not have to
do these things, but they should
know when they are well done.
This is fin age of quick shifts;
riches come over night; and so the
girl who starts her domestic life with
no maid at all, or a mild apology for
one iu the shape of n little inexperienced girl, may end with a housekeeper, a French chef and a retinue
of other servants. Then is the time
for her mother's teachings to show
their value. x
I I
Wives   qif   the   foreign    diplomats
who come here canno^ understand
the devotion of the wealthy and dis
tinguJshed women to their own
homes. They are astonished that
tlle wives of men high in the administration of affairs of state and other
prominent ' women, should keep
trained eyes on tlle housekeepers
they employ, giving and taking eoun
ell witli them. They wonder the
mote when Ihey llnd these dome
stlc women in high station abreast of
them in general culture and lu specific accomplishments, and in their
understanding of politics, both theoretical and direct.
After reading about all the beautiful brides," muses Diggon, "we can't
help hut wonder where all the homely
married "women came from."
* ss       ss
Correct this sentence: "Don't distress yourself about it at all." said the
hanker, "we'll be glad to renew it.'.'
• -•-'_*
It's a great life if you don't waken.
We Give the Best-
Electrical Installations
sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssisisssssssssssssssssssssssSssssmssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssisssisssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss.
There Is no doubt about It.   We aro here to prove it.
On the 19th of May 1821 we received from the Provincial
Inspector of Electrical Energy a set of Rules and Regulations
governing the Installation of Electrical Wiring were immediately adopted and have been lived up tp In every smallest detail.
We carry the largest and most complete stock of any
Company or Arm of Its size in B. C. and so can take immediate
care of your job without subjecting you to any annoying delay
waiting for special material, etc.
We gladly invite inspection b ythe highest Electrical
Authorities of any installation we have made since the Provincial Regulations were Inaugurated and our most convincing
argument aa to why we should do your wiring is the fact that
of the jobs we have had Inspected ALL have been pronounced
perfect. And then we have tlie knowledge ot Electricity acquired through many years of experience an dthls should
surely count for something witli you when you are selecting an
Electrical Contractor.
A man may know how to drive a nail precisely, but he Is
a dangerous mau unless he knows the effect of the driving
upon the material Into which the nail enters and so it is in the
Electrical Contracting business, it is not only necessary to
understand the practical Installation of wires, switches, fittings, etc., but it is doubly necessary to be able to make the
calculations that will ensure maximum safety, economy ot
operation, and the proper functioning of the Electrical Energy
for which thc wires, switches, etc., are meryly paths.
If .you want High Chios Electrical Installations, go In the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Op
tician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tues
day
Cumberland Hotel Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5.80—7 to 9p.m. It
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We (aft Sell Vou the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade Wilh us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
I'hone 56—We Deliver.
L—r says he seems to have a
feeling in his bones that he'll never
travel to Europe in an Aeroplane.
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class -land
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class
to $2.50 all acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary Improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-eniptors .must occupy claims
for live years and make improvements
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivation of at least 5
acres before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor ill occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause,
be grunted Intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without tlermanent * residence may be issued, provided applicant makes improvements to extent
of $360 per annum and records same *
each year. Failure to make Improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than 6 years, aud Improvements of $10.00 per acre, Including
a acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land in conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made and residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may he leased as homesites,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased hy one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage. i
Natural hay meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cost of road, not exceeding halt of
purchase price, Is made*.
I'rc-Knipliirs'  Free  (Iruiils  Act.
The scope of this Act Is enlarged to
include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended from for one year from the deatli
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of tlle great
war. This privilege is also made fc-
trocatlve.
No feeB relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes are remitted for live
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 11114. on account of payments,
fees or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1920.
.Siiii-I'iireliiiscrs of Crown Lands"
Provision made for issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers ot
Crown Lands, acquiring rights (rom
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase, interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
must be made by May 1, 1920.
V ('razing
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development; of livestock Industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits Issued based on numbers ranged; priority for established owners. Stock-
owners may form Associations foi
range management. Free, or partially free, permits for settlers, campers
or travellers, np to ten head.
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for— ^
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, II. ('.
Tl^e Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Oents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent 111 Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   und   Service
Will   I'lenso  Vim   ::   tt
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, R. C.       :      Phone ,1502 SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
FIVE
V
i*»t
•Lavers '
Fall Opening.
Of Coats, Millinery and General
Dry Goods in the New Store
NOTE  OUR ADDRESS:
BOOTH BLOCK
„COURTENAY
Ladies' Rest Room •
PHONE   163
WINTER
Is Coming
Why not be prepared by repairing those leaky roofs
and sides of your house and barn with
Gwilt's Famous Shingles
$2.00 per Thousand
Second Grade
While they last Terms strictly cash
Gwilt Lumber Co., Ltd.
PHONE 79L
COURTENAY, B.C.
"'TIs Ihe heart's volco alone can
reach    the"- heart."—De   .^lussett.
The invention of the telephone resulted, not from
an effort to find a means of communication, but from
the deep pity in the heart of the inventor for those
without the ability to hear the human voice.
The range of the unaided voice is only a few feet;
but the same voice speaking into the telephone may be
heard a mile or three thousand miles away. The inflections, the accents, the individuality are all transmitted faithfully.
The telephone stands ready day or night to transmit your voice to relative, friends, or anyone with
whom you have need or speech. The telephone is the
universal instrument.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
COURTENAY NEWS
CORRESPONDENCE
The  Editor-
Cumberland  Islander,
Dear Sir:—
Herewith list of particulars of donations for the purchase of the Agricultural grounds, together with
collectors' names.
Life membership tickets have been
issued to donors ot $25.00 or over.
1923 general membership tickets
to donors of '$5.00 to $25.00.
1923 Hall membership tickets to
donors of $2.50 and less than $6.00.
Will those who have promised donations as per list supplied to secretary by canvassers, kindly send
them In as soon as posible.
E.  FELIX  THOMAS.
Collected by Mrs. Brown and Mrs.
Sills:—
Mr. A. Urquhart $50.00
W.  Uurquhart 60.00
. Lewis - 60.00
J. McPhee 30.00
Hurford 26.00
Corfleld Motors' 20.00
Mr. P., L. Anderton 10.00
Mr. L. Piket 10.00
T. Booth ft Sons
Courtenay Hotel
Dr. Butters
Dr. Briggs
Mr. Dixon
Mr. Marshall
Mr.   C.   Brown
Mr. McLeod
Matpass  ft   Wilson
Comox Co.Op.
Lavers Store
Mr.  H. Cooke
Mr. C. Pigott
Blnut ft Ewart
Kent ft Co.
Mr. J. Asten
Canadian B. of C.
Mr. W. Willard
Modern Shoe Store
Royal Bank
Mr. Biscoe
Mr. T. Menzies
Mr. H. Stewart
Mr.  iMcPherson
Mr. Pldcock
Graham ft Moncriell*
Jap  Tailor
Mr. Hlghett
Mr. Cleland
Mr.  Dalby
MrB. McBride
Farmers' Produce     •
Mr. McDonald
Mr. J. M. Mitchell
Mr. Wm. Douglas
Mr. Dunn.
Mr.  Perrott
Mr.  T.   Robertson
Mr. Mutrle
Mr. J. Rickson
Mr. Sutcllff
Mr. F. Dick
Mr. Stubbs
Mr. Q.  Powers
Mrs. Perez
Mr. J. Stevenson
Mr. F. Thomas
Mr. Richard
Mr. W. Hames
Mr.   Self
Collected by Mrs. Wain:
Mayor Simms
Mr.  R.  Robertson
Air. F. Feely '
Capt. Carey
Williamson ft Sons
Mrs. Rtngrose
Mr. J. Idlens
Mr. D. Roy
Mrs. T. Pearse
Mr.  H.   Miller
Mr. W. Hatton
Mr. G. Muschamp
Mrs.  M.  Smith *'
Collected by Mr. J. Crockett:
Mr. J. Crockett
Capt. G. R. Bates
Mr.  F.   Swan *
Mr. F. Janes
Mr. J.  Blackburn
Mr. Robert Mosten
Mr. J. Casannva
Mr. J. Follet
Mr. V. Follet
Mr. J. W. Smith
Mr. J. B. Smith
Chas. Mclver
Mr. R. M. Hughes
Mr. Evans
Mr. J. R. Gurney
Mr. J. Hance
Mr. F. J. Dolby
Mr .11.  Melnnda
Mr. A. Matterson
Mr.  C.  McAbel \
Mr. L. Jarvis
Mr. J. Tukdas '
Collected by Messrs.* Gunrt and
land:—
Mr.  Thomas   Graham
Mr. Edward W. Bickle
Mr. G. W. Clinton
Messrs Tarbell Ltd.
Mr. D. R. McDonald
Mr. C.  Graham
Messrs  Campbell  Bros.
Mr.   W.   Wain
Mesrs Mumford ft Walton
Mr.  Sutherland
Messrs  Burns ft  Brown
Mr. J. H. Blalock
Mr. T. R. Smith
Mr. O.  W.  Smith
Mr. A.  McKinnon
Mr.   W.   Henderson
Friend
Mr. E. King
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1,
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
10.00
6.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
25.00
25.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Eng-
30.00
25.00
25.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.C0
3.00
2.50
2.00
2.00
ICE CREAM
IP IT'S COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM—IT'S GOOD
■jjBEiasMKHBraM&WE^
MADE FROM PURE JERSEY CREAM—sCane sugar and the   highest
grade flavorings possible to procure.   You want the Best when ordering
i
refreshment for your Best Girl.
.SEJBiaiSfflBIEIBJEiaiBMEISHaiS^
COMOX CREAMERY  BUTTER
— THE   STANDARD   OF   QUALITY —
Our Strawberry, Raspberry and Loganberry Jam ran be obtained at the
. Best Stores
COMOX   POTATOES   IN   A   CLEAN   BRANDED   SACK
Graded to Quality—"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Collected by Ben
Hughes
:—
Mrs.  J.  V. Qeidt
25.00
R. T. Cooper
15.00
Wm.  Duncan
10.00
Mr. Holmes
10.00
H.  Gurney
5.00
Miss Grlffitb
5.00
Merle Halliday
5.00
Mrs. Carwithen
4.00
Mr. L .R. Clitfe
5.00
E. C.  Eddlngton
2.50
Collected  by  Mr.
and Mrs. J.  Mc
Kenzle  (Comox).—
Capt.  Guthrie
25.00
W. A. B. Paul
10.00
John McKenzie, Comox
5.00
J. Carther
5.00
John Knight
5.00
E. H. Davis
5.00
Idlens   Bros.
5.011
D. Carthew
6.00
H. Foskett
5.00
Prltchard Bros.
6.00
Miss  Worthlngton
5.00
P. Whalen
5.00
R. J. Smith
6.00
Mrs. Stevenson
5.00
C. R. Worthlngton
5.00
Dr.   Worthlngton
/ 6.00
Mr.   McCullock
5.00
A. Grist
i
5.00
Mrs. M. M. Lebon
2.50
John Jones
2.50
James  Holmes
2.50
H.  Idlens
2.50
Mr. Scales
2.50
J. Giddlngs
2.00
T. Knight
2.00
A. Knight
.   2.00
Mr. Parry
2.00
W.  Hannah
2.00
C.  Westrup
2.00
Gus.   Wastrup
2.00
P.   Ryan
'
1.00
I.i Beckensell
1,00
Mr. Helm
1.00
Susie E. Ryan
*
1.00
Mr. Emerson
1.00
D. R. "Ryan
0.60
Mrs.   Bond
0.50
NATIVE SONS
s     REGULAR MEETING
The regular meeting ot Courtenay
Assembly No. 3, Native Sons
of Can-
ada was held ou Thursday
evening,
having been postponed trom Monday
on account of the
Labor Day, holl-
day   . There  was   n
falr   attendance
and a great deal of keen Interest was
taken in the doings
of the
\ssembly.
After initiation of
'iindidiites a soci-
al evening was spent a    programme
having been arranged as follows:
Piano  solo:   Bro
J.    Carwithen;
song,   bro.   Robt.   Ogllvle,;
solo    sin
Chinese fiddle and
song by bro. A.
Martinish.'Song (by
special
request)
Master  Bradley, of
Union
Bay;  ac-
companied  by Mrs.
Walters
also of
Union Bay; song, bro. J. W.
Molten.
zie, sr. Club singing,
bro. A.
H. Herd;
step dancing,    bro.
Spence
Teed;
others,   including  bros.   David   Roy;
O.  W.  Smith  .provided  instrumental
music and lead- In choruses.
Refresh-
ments were served
and the
meeting
adjourned until the
17th.
Mr. and Mrs. Chns. Thulln, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. William Maynard of Campbell River, passed
through Courtenay on Tuesday en
route to Victoria by motor.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for wharf at Porpoise Buy. B.C.",
will be received at this ollice until
IS o'clock noon (daylight suvlng),
Tuesday, September %% IMS, for tlie
construction of a pile bent and Umber
decking wharf nnd float at Porpoise
Bay, Distrcit of Comox-Alberni, B.C.
Plans and forms of contract can lie
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained nt tbls Department
at the offices o fthe District Engineers, Post Ollice Building, New Westminster, B. C; Post Ollice Building,
Victoria, B. C, nnd at the Post Offices, Vancouver, B.C, and Scchell,
B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and in accordance with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered bank payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, equal to
10 p. c. of tlie amount of thc tender.
War Loan Bonds of the Dominion will
also be accepted as security, or War
Bonds nnd cheques if required to
make up an odd amount.
NOTE.—Blue prints can be obtained at this Department by depositing
an  accepted    bank    cheque  for  the
sum of $10.00, payable to tho order
of the    Minister of   Public    Works,
which will be returned if the Intending bidder submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. 0, DESROCHERS.
i _ Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 25, 1923, SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
CHARLIE CHUMP
BB g'S  VMONDEWUL ,"P nt, THE ]p
, WW THEY,, PUT   RAW  BSHSSSS^gl
JIA*^*-,
H-EaN-yfejlr^,
EAGER TO COME TO CANADA
This photograph was taken at the European head office of the Canadian Pacific Railway in London, England, and shows a number of men who were induced by the special harvesters rate to make fur-
ther enquiries with regard to the scheme and conditions to be expected here after the harvest. Nearly
five thousand men, the finest to come within the Canadian immigrant class in years, were recruited by
the Canadian Pacific, and lack of steamship accommodation necessitated the closing of the doors against
almost as many more.
BIG SEA PICTURE IS
"HOMEWARD BOUND"
Thomas Meighan Has Fine Stellar Role in Thrilling New
Photoplay.
A story ot the sea, packed with
drama and every scene having a
distinct thrill of its own, Thomas
.Meighan's latest Paramount picture,
"Homeward Bound," based on the
story "The Light to Leeward," by Pe-
ter B. Kyne, and superbly directed
by Ralph Ince, will be tbe feature
ut the Ilo-Ilo theatre Friday and Saturday next. Llla Lee, beautiful and
popular, plays opposite the star.
In this captivating photoplay, Mr.
.Meighan is seen as Jim Bedford, a
sailor who savesa ship from foundering after Captain Svenson, the cowardly skipper, quits the bridge and
gives up the struggle. When tfhe
ship reaches port, Svenson ls given
an ovation and Rufus Brent, the
owner, unaware of the facts, makes
bim skipper of his yacht which Brent
aims to present to his daughter, Mary.
Bedford,  who  loves  Mary,  refuses
to permit  Svenson  to command the
yacht an  dthus  imperil  Mary's  life.
When the yach is about to sail, Bed-1
lord  forces  Svenson off the    vessel
and  himself   takes   command.   Brent
threatens   to   have  Bedford  arrested!
lor  piracy  and after a severe  time
aboard Bedford takes the yacht back'
tn port.    He then takes -command of J
an unseaworthy schooner and before i
sailing, quietly marries Mary. Events
follow  Iii  quick  succession,    all    of j
which combine  to make the picture I
tremendously interesting and appealing.
The supporting company Is excep-
tlonally strong. In the cast are
Charles Abbe, William T. Carleton, |
sjfugli Cameron, Gus Weinberg,
Maude Turner Gordon and other
noted players.
PEANUTS, WILD WOMAN,
THRILLS, IN INCE'S
"SOUL OF THE BEAST"
Madge Bellamy and "Oscar,"
the Elephant, Forsake the
Circus for Wilderness Freedom—Every Freak on the
Job.
They're all there; the living skeleton who eats enough for three ordinary people; the fat lady to whom
iinperticnt by-standers suggest dieting; the "wild woman, stolen trom a
cannibal mother ln Africa" and the
latooed man.
The first reel from Thomas H.
Inee's "Soul of the Beast," Monday
and Tuesday at llo-llo theatre, is
better than a day at thc circus for
the sights are all there without attendant discomforts of heat and
dust.   The surging crowds; the loud
mouthed peanut, popcorn and lemonade vendors; the "hick" with staring eyes, taking in all the side shows,
are real as life tor a real circus was
used to make this part of the film.
Audiences today insist upon realism,
so when Mr. Ince Alms a story with
a few scenes trom a circus, he sends
his players to travel with the show
for two weeks to get the shots needed.
The picture gives a satisfying suggestion of the glamor ot the sawdust
ring and then shifts the scene to the
atwdry life behind, where a close-
fisted, grasping old villain begrudges
even the food they eat to the people
who work for him. Little wonder
that when the top of the tent blows
off in a terrific storm that "Oscar,"
the big elephant, who is the troupe's
star performer, pulls away from
captivity, taking his small mistress
with him.
The adventures that befall a small
girl and a large elephant In the Canadian backwoods after their spectacular run-away hold equal charm
for any spectator, young or old. Romance comes nito the life ot "Ruth"
when she meets a boy musician at
a quaint trapper's town. "Oscar,"
pouting In elephant fashion—whatever thot is—when his mistress forgets him, turns his back and wanders
off into the woods where he haB a
big time renewing old woodland acquaintances . He can't forget the desire for human affection, however,
and Anally wanders back to the
settlement ln time to save the girl
from dire peril.
Madge Bellamy, a screen light evtr
since her big success In luce's "Hall
the Woman," and Cullen Landis,
head the cast with "Oscar" sharing
honors. "Oscar" Is only ten years
old—a mere child for an elephant—
but with eight years' training in captivity to his credit he shows an Intelligence that would put some school
children to blush.. The children and
the grown-ups, too, will get many
thrills and laughs trom this delightful picture written by C. Gardner
Sullivan and directed by John Griffith Wray. The elephant's performance Is absolutely unique and In addition the story is Intensely human
and full of dramatic action which
works up to one of the biggest climaxes ever shown on the screen
when "Oscar" nearly kills a big bully who has tormented his mistress
and tortured the man she loves.
"Soul of the Beast" furnishes the
best evening's entertainment of any
picture that has been shown for some
time. It ls absolutely novel and carries an appeal for every screen fan,
young or old.
SLATS' DIARY
By Ross Fiirqnhnr
By the way, what has become of
the folks who were always attributing everything that may happen, or
may not happen, to the spots ln the
sun?
Friday—Pa made a brake tonite
witch wood ot coated him dear If ma
ha dot ben present to
hear it. Witch is a foolish remark to make because If ma wood of
ben there pa woodcut
of uttered such a saying ln her presents._We
met Jakes pa and pa
ast him where was he
a going to and he replied and sed he wns
going down town to
get sumthing for his
wife and then pa up
and says Well do you
think you will be able
to get much for her.
And they both laffed hartily.
Saturday—Pa and ma was a tawklng about sum very smart man who
.was travelling all over the wlrld and
he carried his typewriter where ever
he went to. Well all 1 got to say is
this. That if he had ot ben as smart
as fokes let on he wood ot let her
walk part of the time.
Sunday—This afternoon a cupplc
of us was over to Janes house to call
on she and ber cuzzen witch is visiting her. and I heard her ma tell
her pa to fone for sum Ice Cream and
cake, and then Jane ast me what
shud she put on the fonograff and
I sed 0 put on ennythlng apprope-
rate so she put on Home sweet
home. And we all grinned ft looks
at each another then we dissided to
go home ft Just then we seen the Ice
cream man deliver the cream. And
we went on home.
Monday—Mrs. Glllem wus tawklng
about sum poor kids in New York
witch dlddent get much ta cat. Why
she sed these poor yumnn children
gets lessen a animal to eat, but
Jake sed she was rong there. He sed
how wood she like to be a puor little
moth and get nothing to eat only
holes.
Tuesday—Blisters has got a new
dog and I ast him whnt was his
name and he sed he was going to
call him Delay. I sed Hows cum you
call him that and he sed because he
red ln hlstry tbat Delay Is dangerous
and so is that dog.
Wensdey—I mny be dum but Pug
Stevens takes the meddle when he
thot a Idiom was a young Idiot.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Something
Good to Eat
Something   made    of   good j |
flour, of good milk,   of   good,
nourishing compressed yeast, of
good shortening!
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a fine, natural
flavor, with a satisfying slice,
with a crisp crust.
What could it be but Bread—
the perfect food.
Bread is your Best   Food—j|
Eat more of it.
MANN'S   BREAD
is Bread at its Best—insnst on
it.
NEW HOME BAKERY
JOHN MANN, Proprietor
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Car  For  Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    ■    Repairs
Telephone 1.     -     V. 0. Box 17
<'IIMBl.KI.-AND,  B. 0.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service.
2G   rooms,  electrically   heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
R. YATES, Manager.
"SAFETY FIRST"
STAGE LINE
Cumberland-Courtenay
and Nanaimo
Ask for "Bill Hyde"
Phone 9 Courtenay or 13 Nanaimo
Leaves Cumberland every morning for points
South at 8.20 a.m. returning, arrives 5.40 p.m.
TIME TABLE
Leave Arrive
8.00  Courtenay  6.00
8.20 Cumberland 5.40
8.35 Royston 5.25
9.00  Union Bay 5.00
9.10  C. Johnson's  4.50
9.30 Grant's Camp 4.30
9.40 Robert Dollar 4.20
9.45 S. A. Lumber 4.15
10*.00 - Bowser 4.00
10.25 Dashwood 3.35
10.35  Log Cabin  3.25
10.45    Parksville    .....3.15
11.25 ~  Straits L. C .2.35
11.45  Wellington  2.15
12.00  Nanaimo  2,00
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
carries passenger insurance. Co nnects with all stage
lines and C. P. R. Boats.
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
CUMBERLAND—COURTENAY AND NANAIMO
ELECTRIFY
WE WANT YOUR ELECTRIC WORK
Headquarters For
ELECTRIC WASHERS, RANGES, IRONS,
TOASTERS, GRILLS, ETC.
RADIO SETS and SUPPLIES
Specialists in Wiring and Construction
THE
Piket Electric
WIFE SAVING STATION
Phone COURTENAY P.O. Box
164 B.C. 71
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
a
r*
Starts you
toward the
ownership
of a
Car, Truck or Tractor
The FORD Weekly Purchase
Plan is now ready
The car helps pay for itself.
Ask us for further particulars
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay
FORD   MOTOR    COMPANY    OF    CANADA,    LIMITED,    FORD,    ONTARIO
m
ft
GORDON'S
Phone 133
GROCERIES—
Fancy Hot House Tomatoes No. 1 per lb  10c
Ripe Bananas per doz  60c
Fresh Golden Bantam Cob Corn per lb 50c
Pure Dutch Cocoa per lb  12'/jC
Burn's Pure Lard 5 lbs. for  95c
Wedding Breakfast Coffee per lb 65c
DRY GOODS—
Mens fine Balbriggan shirts and Drawers, specially priced to clear, each   75c
Boys combinations (good quality) garment $1.25
Boys' Wool Jerseys, extra fine quality $1.75
Boys' strong ribbed worsted hose   with   double
heels and toes at, per'pair .■  75c
SHOES—
Mens rubber pit shoes (Canadian make) good fitting last to clear, per pair  $3.95
Mens "Stetson Shoes" about 40 pairs of this line
to clear out at per pair  —  $5.00
English K Shoes the best shoe made for men in
Eaton and Balmoral lasts. Priced at pair $10.00
BOYS AND GIRLS
$50.00 Worth of Prizes FREE
GORDON'S
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard Md Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
809 B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg
I'HONE 2.118      VICTORIA, B.(.
News Of Courtenay and Surrounding District
COURTENAY SCHOOL
NOT LARGE ENOUGH
Courtenay's new eight room school
that was constructed three years ago
to take care of the ever growing number ot scholars, and which, at the
time of building, was thought to be
commodious enough to DU the requirements of this progressive town
for many years, is this term filled to
capacity. Thirty-four new pupils
were admitted to the junior or
"first-timers'" class on Tuesday
when school opened for the autumn
term . It has been necessary to make
an addition to the teaching stall*.
Miss Inez Smith takes the place of
Miss Dougam, as teacher of Division
Four and Miss Isidore Sutton has
been added to the staff to take care
of the children ln Division Five. Mr.
Shenstone, a graduate of Dublin University has been appointed to All the
position at the high school vacated
by Mr. Fournier, who has forsaken
the teaching profession, having secured his certificate as a civil engineer and taken a position with one
of the substantial Maniland construction companies. Mr. Shenstone comes
to Courtenay from South Vancouver
where he has been teaching. Th^re
Is every reason to believe that the
peculation of Courtenay will continue to Increase, with the consequent addition of families of school
age, which will soon place Courte-
nay In the second class as a school
town, advancing from her position
In the third class. a*
At the opening on Tuesday Miss
Gladys Roy, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. David Roy, was presented with
a special prize for grammar for pupils of the entrance class, lt has
been hinted that next summer a
prize wlill be given by a resident of
Courtenay for Canadian History, one
of the tests being an essay on Confederation and the progress of Cnn-
iiilii since that time. This will be
open to boys and glrs of the Courtenay school regardless ot the class
to which they belong.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
l'nion Bay Road
NAVAL SCOUTS
ENJOY HOSPITALITY
OF CHIEF SCOUT
Ou Labor Day the boys of the Naval Scouts, most of them in uniform,
Captain E. Lloyd .their chief scout,
and a large number of Invited guests
from among the boys and girls of
Courtenay left the Government
wharf at teu o'clock for a cruise
down the river aud across the bay
to the Goose Spit where they enjoyed the last opportunity for an
outing before school convened for
the autumn term. Full of gladnass
which showed outwardly In smiles
und hsppy grins on the faces of the
boys and girls of the party, the good
ship "Roona" towing a scow rigged
with seats for Just such occasions,
went down stream to the sound of
the children's merry volceB, carrying the good wishes of those who
were unable to go. Mrs. W. McPhee
and Mrs. Lloyd went along and helped
the youngsters to enjoy a great day.
The older boys looked after their
smaller friends and acted throughout like real seamen, always ou the
alert for commands from the chief
scout. They spent the day in bathing, boating, and other sports, arriving home before darkness came on.
The sound nf their merry voices coming across the water was evidence
that every one of the boys and
girls who had accepted the hospitality of the chief scout and the bovs
under his command had enjoyed a
perfect day.
1 game the little brownies were sadly
| outclassed.   On Sunday ihey took ,ul-
t vantage  of  the  Courtenay   vautlevil-
i lans and handed it to them. Brown
behind  the  bat   played  consistently
1 and made two ot the live runs. Andy Robinson In centre was, as usual,
full of pep, doing   a    nice   fielding
-stunt ln the second Inning when he
threw a runner out from centre field
to first base. Jimmy    Robinson    nn
flrst and  brother  Rab  on  third  .lid
their bit, although Rab let oue easy
ball  go through.    E Brown did  the
throwing for seven Innings and Cummins  finished the game In  the  box
after   Brown   evidently   had   said   to
himself  "what's  the  use.'    Mr.  Edward Cliffe acted  as    umpire    and
called 'em right.
COURTENAY BALL
TEAM DEFEATED
Nine little brown men from the
land of the Mikado administered a
good beating to the Courtenay Base-
hall team last Sunday In what proved
to be a game that, on the part of several of the stars of the Valley savored of mediocrity. The visitors
were in the game all tlle time and deserved the win by a score of thirteen
to five. It was not a comedy of errors becsuse though there were plenty of these, the comedy was noticeable by Its absence. A disillusioned
ball team left the Held at the end of
the nine innings, tor it was plainly
evident that a repetition ot the game
played against the Japanese a tew
weeks ago was looked for.   ln that
Knjoyiililc Motor Tour.
During the summer vacation period Mr. William G. stuhhs, principal
of the Courtenay Public School,
spent a considerable portion of his
time motoring. One of the trips he
made was around the Georgian clr.
cult which embraces many t\s the
towns of Washington, the mainland
of British Columbia and Vancouver
Island. On that trip he was accompanied by Mr. Robert Sutherland, of
this city.
Mr. T. Mlnnes, a one time resident
of .Courtenay, has been a visitor at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mlnnes. Since eaving Courtenay he has
travelled extensively in Eastern
Canada and the United States.
Mr. Dan Bell, sawyer at the Gwilt
Lumber Company, had the misfortune
to tall and break two ribs on Wednesday morning.
Mr. Fred Fielden and Mr. John
Verdier of Shawnlgnn Lake are motoring in the district.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. MacDonald spent
part of the week at Victoria visiting
relatives and incidentally taking in
the fall fair at the Capital City.
McLeod V Store
Be WESTERN!
STETSON HATS
New Styles in
Blue — Black — Iron-Grey — Brown
These Hats are selling very fast.   Come in early and
get a good choice
J. McLEOD
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Courtenay, B.C.
Returns From Vacation.
Mr. J. W. Young has returned lo
Courtenay after spending his vacation at Toronto and other Eastern
cities. He says that the Immensity of
the crops on the prairies and the
evident prosperity of that section are
a revelation to the casual observer.
Mr. Young is remaining as principal
of the Courtenay High School.
One of the finest   Tye'e   Salmon
that has been seen In Cumberland for
some tfme was    on   display   ln   J.
Brown's  confectionery  and   tobacco
store on Monday evening.
The llsh which weighed 40*j4
pounds was the catch^o fMr. T. Walker, who was accompanied by Mr. J.
Brown and  M.  D. Wilson. Tlm nas
had many offers to take his friends
to his fishing waters since this catch
has beeu made, and likely the best
offer will be accepted. •
The old Wooden side walk between
the  Electric  Light  Office  and  the
Company office, which has been an I
eye-sore for a considerable time, has
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
at last been torn up. The forms
have been laid and will be filled in
with ashes. We understand tint
later a concrece welk will be laid.
IMPORTANT
Auction Sale
of High Class Household Furniture and Effects for
A. C. Lymn, Esq., who is leaving for California, at his
residence, corner of Windermere and Fifst Street,
Cumberland, on
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER,'8th*
at 1.30 o'clock p.m. Prompt.
The whole of the contents of the Drawing-room,
Dining-room, Kitchen, 4 bedrooms and the outside effects. Full particulars in posters or from the auctioneer. Terms Cash. No reserve. Special attention is
called to this sale as all the goods are in the best of
order and condition having only been in use for a short
time.
G.J.HARDY
Auctioneer, Real Estate and Insurance Agent
Phone 10. Courtenay, B. C.
High Wages For Plasterers.
Mr. H. Edwards, who owns a part
of the old Calhoun ranch has been
at home from Astoria, Oregon, for
the past two weeks. He says thnt
prosperity Is rampant on the othor
side of the line and that there is no
difficulty In finding work. Plasterers
and Bricklayers are receiving twelve
dollars a day for an eight hour
work period; carpenters earn eight
dollars and a half in .eight hours.
Board can be secured for forty dollars per month. Everywhere there
Is plenty of work. In fact Jobs are
looking for men instead of men looking tor jobs.
Leaves For Kuywurd District.
Mr. Dan G. Sutherland, who has
been superintendent of construction
on the Courtenuy river bridge for
the Department of Public Works left
last Saturday for the Sayward District. Mr. John Baker who was ono
of the valued employees under Mr.
Sutherland, left for the same place
on Monday.
Mrs. W. W. Moore and family have
returned from the Cnpllol City, whine
they spent Ihe past mouth on :i vacation.
leaves For Crow's Nests.
Mrs. Donald Puttnell. sister of Mr.
F. It. Heric, who bus spent n fortnight holidaying at the home of hor
brother and Mrs. Heric. left for her
home at Yahk. In the Crow's Nest
country on Saturday morning.
Mr. James E. Aston spent the
week-end holidaying on Denmnn I <-
lannd.
Mr. Tom Bailey hus returned lo
Courtenay from thc Upper Country
and has again jointed the staff of
Messrs. T. Booth & Sons.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
WtM EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPT 8th, 1923
NEW
ARRIVALS
Homespun Skirtings in Stripe effects, Brown, Navy,
and Saxe grounds witht orange fl»9 OK
stripe, 54 inches wide, per yard      tp0.m\st*J
New Flannels for suits and Dresses in shades, Navy,
Fawn, Paddy, Rose Crimson and 01  OC
Blue. Single width per yard    tp±,m\.ej
Double width (IJO 9^
per yard        $£i.£iO
The latest in Dress Velvets, Brown and   (PO CA
Black, 36 inches wide, per yard      tpO.OXt
Black French Velvet in Black only (gff EA
36 inches wide. Price per yard     <PO.*J\l
New Collar Laces arrived by Express to day in elaborate designs. —See them.
NEW MILLINERY
Our stock of Fall Millinery is increasing and we have
now on view a very choice assortment of Ladies' Hats
in the new styles.
DRYGOODS
GENTS .FURNISHINGS
CHEVROLET
Superior Sedan, F.o.b Courtenay
$1365.00
The body of the New SUPERIOR SEDAN, as with all
Chevrolet closed car bodies is Fisher-Built, and carries
the builder's insignia. Fisher bodies are well known to
be the highest type of construction, finish and appoint
ment and standard on the best closed cars, even those
selling at the highest prices. The high hood, radiator
and cowl with straight body lines complete a stream
line design that is distinctive and most attractive and
puts Chevrolet at once in the quality class. Growned
pannelled fenders, drum type, headlamps, plate glass
windows with Ternstedt window regulators and extra
fine finish, make even more secure Chevrolet's position
as the lowest priced quality closed car in the world.
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
Phone 61
Phone 61
THE COURTENAY GARAGE
Local Briefs
Rev. J. R. Butler returned on Fri- [
day last, after an extended visit to
Eastern Canada. He was accompa-
nieil from Victoria by Mrs. Butler
and family, who have been visiting in
that city, while Mr. Butler was In I
the East.
The name of Miss P. Hunden was
omitted from the list of new teachers
nt the Cumberland Public School
published ln lost week's Islander.
Miss Bella Baird returned on Sa- j
turday after spending a months holi-!
day in*Vancouver, with her sister,
Mrs, Thomas Carney.
Mr. and Mrs. James Dick closed
their summer residence at Little River on Thursday and returned lo
town.
Mrs. Geo. Shearer and family returned from a holiday spent in Seattle, on Saturday last.
The many friends of Miss Mary Davis will be pleased to learn that she
returned home from tlie local hospital on Thursday.
Born—August 31st to the wife of J.
Stant, ln the Cumberland Qeperal
Hospital, a son.
R. Brown, manager of No. 5 mine
returned from a vacation on Wednesday.
Mr. W. Milligan returned to Cumberland on Saturday last and we understand that he has signed to play
(or the local team during the coming football season.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Beveridge motored
to Nanaimo on Thursday.
Miss M. Bannerman, who has accented a position at Cranbrook left
last week to take up her duties.
BORN
To Mr. and Mrs. J. Vaughan,
Swansea Wales, ou Wednesday, Sept.
5th—a son.
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN TIIE HEAD,
AND NASAL CATARRH.
The new Continental remedy called
"LARMALENE" (Regd.)
Is a simple harmless home-treatment
which absolutely cures deafness, noises In the head, etc No Expensive Appliances Needed tor this new Ointment instantly operates npon the affected parts with complete and permanent success. Scores of Wonderful
Cures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, of Slad Road,
Stroud, writes i—"Please could 1
trouble you to send me another box of
the Ointment. It Is not for myself, but
for a friend of mine who is us bad as
I was, and cannot get nny rest for the
noises In the head. I feel a new woman, and can go to bed now and get ii
good night's rest, which I had not
been able to do for many months. It
Is a wonderful remedy and am most
delighted to recommende It"
Mrs. E. Crowes of n'bltehorse Road,
Croydon, writes:—"1 am pleased to
toll you that the small tin of ointment
yon sent to me at Ventnur, has proved
a complete success, my hearing Is
now quite normal, and the horrible
head noises have ceased. The action
of this new remedy must be very remarkable, for 1 have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ton
years, and have had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instruments all
to no purpose. I need hardly say how
very grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an entire change."
Try one* box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for 11.0(1, There Is
Nothing Bettor at any Price.
Address orders to:—
THE "LAR.MALENE" CO,
10, South  View,  Watllng St,   Hurt-
ford, Kent, England.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM. MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars In for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at Jhe Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
Thomas Graham, acting General
.Manager of the Canadian Collieries
spent the week-end In this city and
left for Victoria on Monday.
Miss Viqlet Graham returned in
Victoria on Tuesday to attend
school at St. Aim's Academy.
Mathew M. Brown, the genial bare
taker of the Cumberland Post Office
returned on Wednesday from a throe
weeks tour of Vancouver Island, visiting all the beauty spots of the
scenic district of Comox, accompanied by Mrs. Brown and family and
he has returned with renewed energy and is about to add to the appearance of the surrounding of ttie
Post Office by placing soil anil
green turf hi the vacant lots between
the concrete, and with that object
in view he wantB to renovate the German field gun that stands at tlie
steps of post office by giving it a
coat of paint, and constructing concrete cradles for lt to rest on.
Should the-City Council donate the
gravel, cement and paint, which will
cost about live dollars, the caretaker
says he will be pleased to do the
work.
IN MEMORIAM
In loving memory of my little son
Clarence Coe, who was accidently
drowned in Comox Lake, Sept. 10t.li
1922.   '
Dear little hands. I miss them so!
All through the dny wherever I go-
All through tlie night liow lonely it
seems
For no little hands wake me out nf
my dreams.
I  miss them all through   tlie  weary
hours
I miss them as others do   sunshine
and flowers,
Day-time or night-time wherever I go
Dear little hands I miss tlieni so.
Inserted by his loving mother and
brothers.
.   Mr. Alexander Clelnnd  paid a business trip to Vancouver this  week.
The Gem
«
Barber Shop
Opposite  llo-llo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND,   B.C.
ALBERT  EVANS
Practical Barber, and Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing.
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office  and   Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
FOR SALE
MASSEY SILVER RIBBON Bicycle as good as new. Apply Inlander.
1922 DURANT 4-CYLINDEIt CAR IN
perfect running order, tires hardly
worn: gone 5,000.- miles. Cost new
$1,530, 14 months ago. Offers invited. Also garage for rent. Apply P.O. Box 105, City.
S.22
Just Arrived
New Seasons Stock of Pickling Vinegars and Spices,
.  Etc.
Preserving Peaches and Italian Prunes.
Buy now as they are. at their cheapest
  _J      '_	
WEEK-END SPECIALS
Singapore Pineapple, talis, 2 tins for  45c
B.,& B. Ceylon Tea, per lb,   60c
B. & B. Fresh Ground Coffee per lb 60 and 70c
Sodas, plain or salted, 2 packages for  45c
Chrisp Ginger Snaps, 2 lbs. for   35c
Graham Wafers, 2 lbs. for  '  45c
7 lb. Boxes Sodas, each for  $1.00
Sugar Chrisp Corn Flakes, 5 pack, for   55c
Juicy Oranges, 3 dozen for  $1.00
Juicy Oranges, 4 dozen for  $1.00
Grape Fruit, large size, 4 for   35c
See our Window for Grocery Specials
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
You Cannot Deny the
Quality of Our
CANDY
The firm name speaks for itself, and even then if you
were at all skeptical a test by taste would prove to you
undeniably that the quality we claim really existed,
and then some. Candy couldn't possibly be nicer, and
it never will be nicer than these fine confections by,
the famous houses of Nielsons Liggetts, Moirs, etc.
AH size boxes, some plain, some fancy for gift purposes.
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
SEND US YOUR MAU, ORDERS
PHONE 211
(J
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
Grace Methodist Church
NEW HOUSE FOR SALE. RECI3NT,-
ly built. 4 rooms and pantry. {5011
cash. Apply Box 574, Cumberland,
POUND ON AUGUST 18th GOOD
Year tire size 30x3% on Cumberland Road.—Apply Miss M. Colling
106  Maryport Ave.  Cumberland.
Rev. J. R. Butler, pastor
11 a.m. subject: "In the wrong
plnce." Children's story: "Old Mother  Wang."
2:30 p.m. Sabbath School reopening.
7 p.m. subject: "The Generation
and Transmission of spiritual power"
Everybody  welcome,
ST. GEORGE'S
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Service, morning  11  o'alock.
Service, evening 7 o'clock.
Solo In the evening by Mrs.
Wood:   "Abide  with  us!"
Adult  Bible  claus  1.30  p.m.;
day school 2.30 p.m.;  Choir practice
Thursday evening 7.30.
Win.
Sun-

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342567/manifest

Comment

Related Items