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The Cumberland Islander Dec 6, 1924

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Array 1
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
W"C'*' Mir* WIU| whlcl1 ls eoMolM»w tue Cumberland Stmts.
—       ==^- **   'm/a l : L-. ^^^ ■	
t
oi
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 49.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA     SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924      (mgg
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
Screen Players
Of Note In Fine
Kipling Picture
Jacqueline Logan, Percy Marmont,
SIgrld Holmqulst and David Torrenco
are featured players in George Mel-
ford's Paramount production, "Tho
Light That Failed," from Rudyard
Kipling's famous story which is on
view this Friday and Saturday at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
Jacqueline Logan, who heads the
cast, Is one of the best known heroines of the screen. She has appeared In mauy Paramount pictures In
roles which called for unusual ability
and has a large following. Fourteen
pictures ln two years is the medium
through which this popular player has
won her way to public favor. Among
these are, "White and Unmarried,"
"Ebb Tide," "Java Head" and "Mr.
Billings Spends His Dime" and "Sa-
lomy Jane."
Percy Marmont, who plays tho role
of "Dick Heldar," opposite Miss Lo-
■ gan's characterization of "Bessie
Broke" is an English actor whoso
appearance and experience render him
especially fit for this role. Mr. Marmont is well known in England whero
he achieved distinction in motion pictures and on the stage.
In the role of "Maisle Wells." Slgrid
Holmqulst Is given an opportunity to
display her talents.
She already possesses a large following which her recent Paramount
picture, "A Gentleman of Leisure."
In which she appears with Jack Holt
has done much to increase.
David Torrence, who plays "Tor-
perhow," Is a brother of Ernest Torrence of "Covered Wagon" fame and
has many successes to his own credit.
Much of the story action in "The
Light That Failed" is located lu Port
Said and the Soudan country. This ls
one of the most ambitious pictures yet
produced by George Melford. It
shows the terrible hardships of the
Soudan campaign which avenged the
death of General Gordon at Khartum.
Among the big scenes is a surprise
attack by desert tribesmen on tbe
British camp. Several thousand minor players participate.   .
The love Interest between two of
the strangest sweethearts ever seen
on the screen has as a background a
passage In nineteenth century history
which is filled with color and drama
Luke Cosgrave and Mabel Van Buren
are In the supporting cast.
'MINING," ANCIENT
AND MODERN; IS
LECTURE SUBJECT
The Literary Committee of the Cumberland Literary aud Athletic Association has this year again been successful in arranging a series of lectures under the extension course of
the University of British Columbia.
The first of these, "Mining," Ancient
and Modern, as Its subject Implies,
will be of special interest to Cumberland residents, everyone of whom is
more or less Interested in mining as
our city is known the world over for
the quality of coal that its mines produce. The lecturer, Professor J. M.
Tumbull of the Department of Mining, Is a man who has done much for
the development of this Industry, and
is especially noted for the valuable
research work that he has dono in
connection with it.
Everyone is cordially Invited to
bear Prof. Tumbull ln the Lecture
Hall of the Athletic Association at
8:00 p.m. on Thursday evening, Dec.
11 tli. Lantern slides of Interesting
phases of. the subject will also be
shown.
OLD TIME RESIDENT
PASSES TO REST
MERVILLE HOME IS
DESTROYED BY FIRE
COURTENAY, Dec. 4.—Mr. R. M.
Hughes of Mervllle had a close call
when his house was completely destroyed by fire early on Thursday
morning. Mr. Hughes had shortly
before returned from Powell River
where he has' been working for the
past week or so. He came home ot
prepare the house for Mrs. Hughes'
return from the paper town. On Wednesday evening some friends had visited him and hnd not left until a late
hour. Mr. Hughes was awakened
at about five a.m. to find the whole
place on fire. He only had time to
make a hasty exit through the bedroom window, and actually got his
hair singed ln the process. The loss
of their home will probably prevent
Mrs. Hughes from returning to Mervllle for the present. It Ib understood that the loss is partly covered
by Insurance.
The death occurred on Wednesday
evening last of .Marion Webster, wife
of the late James Webster of this
city. Much regret will be felt by the
old time residents of Cumberland at
the death of Mrs. Webster as she was
one of the town's oldest residents,
Born In Glasgow, Scotland in 1860,
Mrs. Webster remained there until
18111 at which time she came out to
the coast and all of the ensuing time,
thirty years in number, she has dwelt
In the city of Cumberland. During
the past four or five years Mrs. Webster has been gradually failing ln
health and has been living with her
daughter Mrs. Foley. She leaves to
mourn her loss two daughters, Mrs.
F. Partridge and Mrs. Foley of Cumberland; and three sons. James aud
Cecil at present ot* Vancouver, and
Charles of this city. The funeral
will lake place on Sunday afternoon
at 1:30  from the residence of Mrs.
Courtenay Firm
Secures Contract
For Post Office
4131,500   Successful   Tender  by  Mo
Donald and Brcthonr
According to a wire received from
Ottawa the tender of $31,500 submitted by "McDonald and Brethour of
Courtenay has been accepted, and
preliminary work will be commenced
In a couple of weeks. The post office will be a two-storey brick building. It is estimated that two hundred yards of concrete will be used
on the construction job, the concrete
reaching to the ground level,
The building will be some forty by
fifty feet. Ou the ground floor will
be the post office, lobby, etc., and on
the second lloor the customs office
and janitor's quarters.
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Cumberland Choral Society will
hold tlieir first concert of the season
iu the llo-llo Theatre on Tuesday,
December 16th, when a varied program will be rendered, including
quartets, part, songs and full choruses
Reserve this date, Dec. 16th.
Successful Sale Of Work Held
By Holy Trinity Anglican Church
On Wednesday afternoon last the
Women's Auxiliary of Holy Trinity
Church held their annual Christmas
Sale of Work In the Anglican Hall.
Despite the fact that stormy weather
prevailed the hall was filled to capacity, in the neighborhood of one hundred visitors partaking of afternoon
tea. The hall was attractively decorated with evergreen and gay ChrlBt-
mas colors.
In place of the usual "fish pond" for
the kiddies a novelty was offered In
the form of a well, the gifts being
, drawn up In the "old oaken bucket".
This was the cause of great excitement, the grown ups being in evidence
as much as the kiddies, until finally
the well was drained dry. The novelty well was under the able direction
of Mesdames Br.an and Apps.
The Home Cooking stall was In
charge of Mesdames Bruce, ICeeler
and Shortt and a very splendid showing of cakes, pies, meats and other
goodies  tempted  the visitors.      The
Fancy Work stall was under the supervision of Mesdames Spicer, Mum-
lord nnd Treen. Many beautiful Xmas
gift suggestions were in evidence, being hung ou a miniature tree.
Tea was served during the afternoon, those assisting being Mesdames
Pickard, Parkinson, Buller and the
Misses Tarbell, Treen and Sowery.
It Ib estimated that the receipts of the
afternoon will approximate $205.00.
BENEFIT TEA
In the Fraternity Hall on Saturday,
December 13th from 3 to 6 p.m., the
Pythian Sisters will hold an afternoon tea and home cooking stall. Tiie
proceeds will bo devoted to the Orphanage and Old Man's Home. Keep
this date In mnnd and come and assist a worthy cause.
GOMOX VALLEY
GETS THIRD PLACE
AT POTATO FAIR
COURTENAY, Dec. 2—Although
the Comox Valley only secured third
place at the potato fair held In Vancouver last week there was a difference of less than five points 'between
the score of the Comox growers and
that of the winners, Victoria. This
of course applies to the district exhibition where the total possible score
Is 800 points. The scores ot the
first three are as follows and when It
is remembered that there were nine
entries in this event it will be better
understood what a fine showing was
made by the local growers.
Victoria, flrst, with a score of 788.7;
Windermere, second, with 786.1; and
Comox, third, with 783.8. The Comox
District carried off some seventeen
prizes and a championship which
speaks volumes in praise of the local
growers. The successful Comox
Valley growers were:
Blackburn  2,  Fred   Swan   3. 1	
Certified   Classes— Burbank— John
Blackburn 1, Fred Swan 2, H. P. All
berry 3. In this class Comox swept
the board.
Green Mountain—H, P. Allberry 1,
H. R. Clark, second.
Early St. George—W. R. Perrey 2.
Bliss' Early Triumph—W. R. Perrey 1, with a score 98.8 which was
the second highest score of any potato exhibited.
Boys' and Girls' Classes—Miss
Bates 2, and Miss Hannah 3. Iu the
class for commercial pack, Mr. R. G.
Bates was fourth.
Commercial Classes — Late Loug
Variety—Butler Bros, Comox, 1. Bur-
bank—Butler Bros, Comox 1, and
championship. Green Mountain—H.
R. Clark 1. Sir Walter Raleigh—R.
M. Halliday 6. Early Red—W. R.
Perrey 1. Early St. George—W. R.
Perrey 2.
Among those from the Comox Valley to attend the Potato Fair were:
Messrs H. P. Allberry, G. R. Bates,
George Biglow, E. W. Butler, R. II.
Hurford, W. R. Perrey, J. McPhee, R.
L. Ramsay and Alec Urquhart.
GOLDEN RULE SUNDAY
At Geneva last July, the representatives of fourteen nations decided lo
have Golden Rule Sunday, December
7th, Internationally observed, to relieve the suffering of Armenian and
Greek refugees in the Near East.
Twenty-three nations will observe lt.
In England jn appeal for funds will
he made both from the public and the
government. Government officials
iu France, Belgium, Italy and Switzerland have also promised their aid
and co-operation. In the U.S.A.,
President Coolidge has given the day
his hearty endorsement.'
Through the churches and through
the Bchools, the people of this province are asked to observe Golden Rule
Sunday in union with the people of
other lands. The plan ls that on
December 7 all persons who are disposed to make a practical application of the Golden Rule in their lives
and homes shall provide for their
Sunday dinner a simple meal such as
is provided by the relief organizations
for the tens of thousands of orphan
children to the Near East, the difference in thc cost of the meals to be
taken as a basis for a substantial contribution to the funds of the relief organization. "Whatever ye would that
others should do unto you (or unlo
your children if left destitute) do ye
even so unto them."
WHIST DRIVE
The Cumberland Tennis Club announce another of their popular whist
drives and dances to be held in the
Anglican Church Hall, Thursday, Dtec.
11th. The committee wish to state
that these drives are public and everyone is welcome. Whist 8 to 10. Dancing 10 to 12.   Refreshments.
DANCE FOR B.P.O.E.
"XMAS CHEER" FUND
On December 13th the Headquarters Social Club will hold a dance at
Headquarters, the proceeds of which
will go ,*} the B.P.O.E. "Chiratmas
Cheer," fund.
ELKS AND FRIENDS
XMAS   DRAWING
Drawing for forty prizes Including
choice geese and turkeys will take
place at the Elks Home, Courtenay,
on Christmas Eve.
Your contributions may be sent
through your church, Society or direct to Canadian-American Near East
Relief, 323 Winch Bldg., Vancouver,
British Columbia.
River Service Is Important
Point With City Council
|    Mr.  and  Mrs.  R. RoberlBon  spent
I the week end In Nanaimo.
COURTENAY, Dec. 2.~River freight
service was the subject that occupied
most of the City Council's time at
their regular meeting on Monday
night. After an absence of over two
months, Mayor F. McPherson was
again ln the chair. Some further
applications for electric light service
were referred to the electric light
committee. After the correspondence, which Included a lengthy letter
from Mr. A. McGlIlis, manager of the
Vancouver-Courtenay Transportation
Co., had been placed before the
Council, thc Mayor called on Messrs
Jos. McPhee nnd R. U. Hurford for
a report of their recent Interview with
Mr. .McGlIlis In Vancouver.
Mr. Hurford, who was the first
spokesman, eald he was glad of an
opportunity to address the Council.
He and Mr. McPhee had taken the
matter of the boat stoppage up with
Mr. McGlUIs ou Friday morning in
Vancouver. The speaker only had
one share in the transportation company which waB taken to show his
willingness to help the enterprise
along, and the Interests of the cltr
came first. He was sure the boat
service was a very decided asBet to
the city, but he thought the recent
action of the council was absolutely
correct. Backing bonds to the extent of $36,000 for a boat to cost $30,-
000 would not gain the confidence of
the rate-payers. The city should
look at the proposition in the same
way as a banker would and the
scheme would then receive the approval of the council and rate-payers
he thought. It might ho possible to
guarantee bonds to the extent of fifteen to twenty thousand instead of
thirty-five thousand, with a clause In
the contract to Insure continuous service of the boat to Courtenay. A
penalty of $10,000 had been suggested for a stoppage in the service of
two weeks that amount to be the first
claim on any and all assets of the
company. He hoped to see a spirit
of get-to-gether among the aldermen
and a proposition put to Mr. McGlIlis
that the council would approve of and
recommend. Extending our markets
to Vancouver and further was of the
utmost Importance he thought and
would mean the building up of our
city. No doubt, said the speaker,
It was up to Mr. McGlUIs to make
the best deal possible for his company and for the aldermen to make
tho best deal possible for the city.
He felt sure that a letter to .Mr. McGlIlis from the council showing willingness to discuss the boat service
further would immediately bring back
the service to Courtenay. It was
agreed that the council did their best
and the right thing. Far more difficult things had been done by the city
of Courtenay the Bpeaker thought.
Mr. McPhee explained how the
work of the Vancouver-Courtenay
transportation Co. had so far been
largely experimental and of a pioneer
nature. The freight run apart from
the Courtenay call was very considerable. The Courtenay River part of
the trip was the most expensive.
Share-holders of the company ln Vancouver were wondering why Courtenay was not showing Interest and
enterprise in the matter. Courtenay
had done much pioneer work with regard to light and water and Mr. McPhee waB of tho opinion that Courtenay would find the transportation
business just as profitable as the
(Continued  on  Page  Seven)
P. D. Q's TOO MUCH
FOR YELLOWJACKETS
SCORE WAS 46 TO 9
A meeting of the Cumberland Basketball League is called for tonight
(Saturday) at 7 p.m. in the Lecture
Hall of the Athletic Club. Business,
to decide whether the second round
will be proceeded with immediately
or whether It will be postponed until
after New Year's Day. veryone concerned is urged to he present..
The P.D.Q's (whatever that means)
completely removed the sting from
the Yellowjackets on Monday evening by defeating them by the decisive
score of 46 to 9, and settling, if we
are not mistaken, any d- bts as to
which team will head ll league at
the finish as far as the lad s are concerned. Combination ai superior
shooting ability was wha won the
game and if the other teams want to
take the measure of the P.D.Q's then
these are the two points that must be
developed. As Is usually the case,
the smallest player on the floor was
also the best, and to K. Bono, as tbe
smallest player, this compliment ls
due. Of the 46 points scored by her
team she alone scored 22, but in all
fairness it must be said that the other
two forwards, F. Strachan and B.
Bickle, passed up many opportunities
to add to their own total by passing
the ball along to Katie instead of
trying themselves. Miss Bono specializes in under-the-basket shooting
while the other two are long-range
wizards.
For the Yellow-Jackets, or Nurses.
M. Redford scored 3 points and J.
Balagno, A. Baird and G. Oliver scored two apiece. Careful checking by
the P.D'.Q's guards, V. Aspeci and J.
Bono, was the prime factor in preventing a higher score than 9.
During the same evening, after the
ladies' game, two men's teams took
the floor and gave an exhibition of
fast and interesting-to-watch basketball. The Doo Dads finally defeated
their opponents, the Athletics, by the
score of 37 to 17 after a hard-fought
match.
RENOVATES STORE FRONT
The Dry Goods and Furniture store
of Mr. A. McKinnon has been renovated in front and now has attractive
plate glass windows, providing an excellent display setting for his new
Christmas stock. This makes a great
improvement to the appearance of
that section of Dunsmuir Avenue.
Parent-Teachers
Association Visit
School Board
DAVENPORTS PLAY
HERE AGAIN SUNDAY
The Davenports, of Nanaimo, play
here again this Sunday, but this time
their opponents will be the Rangers.
J. Armstrong of Nanaimo, will have
the game in hand and his starting
whistle mill bc sounded at 2:30 p.m.
Rangers will line up as follows:
Walker; Carney, Weir; Devlin, Farmer, T. Campbell; Davidson, Pilling,
James, J. Campbell and Millburn.
A delegation from the Parent-
Teachers' Association headed by Rev.
Butler and consisting of Dr. G. K.
McNaughton, A. J. Taylor, Dr. Gordon, T. Heylands and H. Murray visited the School Board at Its regular
monthly meeting which was held In
the school on Tuesday evening last.
The committee addressed the Board
concerning the adoption of First Aid
instruction throughout the schools,
and as the Board appeared very much
in favor of this a committee composed
of Dr. McNaughton and A. J. Taylor,
assisted by two school trustees, was
appointed to look iuto all details and
to submit a report at the next meeting.
The P.T.A. also desired permission
to install an open air skating rink on
the school grounds should the weather be cold enough to warrant doing
so. It was thought that this would
be tho means of affording excellent
skating to the children throughout the
winter and would eliminate the necessity of travelling to Maple Lake. The
committee also suggested the organizing of a sports committee with
special Held days.. Providing this
did not Interfere with school routine, the Board appeared very much In
favor.
A vote of thanks was tendered to
Mr. McLellan for the splendid manner
In which he had supervised the work
being done on the school grounds. It
was also pointed out at the meeting
that the school grounds were being
used by vehicles as a road and lt was
ordered that this be prohibited In
future.
The Public School Report was submitted by Mr. Apps and accepted as
read. Mr. Apps announced that a
school concert was being given this
month with the intention of raising
sufficient funds to eliminate the
school piano debt and other expenses.
Mr. Apps also announced thet the
new Nelson Encyclopedia had arrived
at the school and was being found of
great value and assistance to the pupils.
School Insurance
During the evening the question of
placing insurance on the schools waB
brought up for discussion. A committee was appointed to obtain Information on the matter.
The following accounts were received and referred to the Finance
Committee for settlement if found to
be correct.
City of Cumberland  $ 35.00
Lang's Drug Store     84.68
A. A.  Brown   _    86.40
A. Somerville     94.80
P. McNIven  158.40
C. H. Tarbell     28.45
M. Brown     28.50
Cumberland Electric       3.62
Union   Waterworks    12.50
George Summers   115.5S
FUNERAL OF MRS. MUTTER
SCHOOL CHILDREN WILL
RENDER XMAS (  'NCERT
The pupils of the school ire giving
their Christmas concert V edncsday,
Dec. 17th, in the llo-llo. Admission
75c. and 50c. Tickets will be on sale
next week. Get a ticket and be as-1
sured of a seat and help provide j
funds for school sports equipment
and the school band.
The funeral of Mary Ann Mutter
beloved wife of James Mutter, took
place last Sunday afternoon. Services were held at St. George's Presbyterian Church, Rev. James Hood
officiating. Mrs. Mutter has been a
resident of Cumberland for the past
two years nnd has been falling in
health for some time past. Sho
leaves to mourn her loss a husband
and two children.
Referee Jones Is Suspended By
Upper-Island Governing Board
j Referee Jones of Union Bay, was
j asked to attend last Friday's meeting of the Upper Island Soccer Association and declined to do so unless his expenses from Cumberland
were guaranteed. The outcome being that "B.C's" best referee was suspended.
In his communication referee Jones
admitted neglect in omitting certain
Incidents ln thc Nanaimo City-Cumberland Rangers' game of a few weeks
ago. " Nanaimo City Is responsible
for bringing the matter to the notice
ot tho association, having lodged a
complaint with the object of preventing similar occurrences In the future.
The similar occurrences referred to
evidently mean the occasion when
Keenan and Carney arc alleged to
hnvo struck Stobbart. We hold.no
brief for Referee Jones or any other
referee or player, but our opinion Is
that If young Keenan had not been
so hasty stobbart would have -received marching orders for an unfair
and altogether too vigorous a tackle,
whon he brought Weir down, necessitating that player being carried off
the field. Keenan's action In Striking Stobbart off-set, to a certain extent, the hitter's unwarranted attack
on Weir, the referee doing the only
possible thing, "throwing thc ball
up," without sending either Stobbart
or Keenan off thc fleld, but administering a caution.
The other Incident, that of Carney
striking Stobbart, so far as Jones WP'
concerned did not take place, as the
mlx-up with these two players oecured nfter the whistle had gone for full
time, and the referee might easily
have heen on his way to (he dressing
room.
Personally, we do not think it redounds to the credit of the Nanaimo
City executive to have reported this
Incident. One of their own players
started thc fireworks and the matter
should never have been nllowcd to
come before the executive of the Upper
Island. THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924
The
"Judge
Special to
The
Islander
Th^yiiig^cessiaM^eMl^^ffip-^^
WELL, WW 0)0 -V00 "RUN AWAV. [=f
WHy DIOMT ^00 HIT VNI-YOACW, 1=
Among the Radios
WE HAVE IN STOCK ARE
RADIOLA 3A
4-Tulie Set operates Loud Speaker
$2.50
Per Week
I        RADIOLA
I    RENEGEFLEX
m
1     Concealed batteries. Loud Speaker
operates with dry cell batteries.
$3.75
Per Week
SHHSjgii*^^
RADIOLA
1 SUPERHETERODYNE
WESTINGHOUSE
GENERAL ELECTRIC
RADIOLA 3A
complete with batteries
and  Loud  Speaker,  installed in your home
$135.00
$2.50 PER WEEK
aigjgjaai3iaaiaiaMSMBiiiaiii'2EEi
Other Sets by
MARCONI
WESTINGHOUSE
DeFORREST
FRESHMAN
NORTHERN
ELECTRIC
CHINESE INTERESTED
IN GOLD MINING
According to the provincial minister of agriculture, the province of
Quebec this year had ils best crop in
the last twenty years as far as production is concerned. In the eastern section of the province, according
to reports received by the department,
the crop is three times that of last
year, and in other sections It averages
twice of 1922.
j    A   mining  prospector  of  Houston,
l centra British Columbia, who visited
Smtthers recently with some very rich
free milling gold  ore obtained  from
j Sibot's Mountain in tlie Houston district, is backed by a rich British Columbia Chinese merchant who is pre-
j pared to prosecute extensive develop-
' menl operations next spring.     Quite
province wash gold from sand and
gravel liars of the Interior rivers, but
thia Is the lirsl Chinaman that has appeared In Ihe Held of quartz mining.
ONE MONTH'S CATCH
During the month of October this
: year, 2,903,100 pounds of fish were
landed at Prince Rupert by the fishing
: fleet of that port according to infor-
1 mation received by the colonization
a number of Chinese ln the Pacific and  development department of the
(1-Tube set. no wires or outside
aerial necessary. Operates with
dry cells. Batteries all concealed in
TERMS
ARRANGED
.rgHaBiaia^aEEHaiaiai^iaEMsia
Call at Our Store and
Arrange for a
Demonstration
^laaaiaasisHSieHasEiEiaiaiai
Cabinet
$5.00
Per Week
Marshall
MUSK AND RADIO CO.
Cumberland and Courtenay
i       I.ARGE.ST STOCK OF RADIOS IN THE DISTRICT
qaMbsslMSEEMtMaMfflSICiEIc
Private Greeting Cards at The Islander
WHIST  DRIVE  and  DANCE
CUMBERLAND TENNIS CLUB
ANGLICAN CHURCH HALL
 DECEMBER 11, 1921	
Whist 8 to HI   Dancing 10 to 12
Refreshments
EVERYBODY IS WELCOME
GENERAL   ADMISSION  SOc.
Bears, Baboons, Bees, Bicycles and Bullion
T
Also... lisss chicken, arc a ri'Ktslur hue, ami. (null!) hears nru (Uso s-arstl lssr at tsmsT*. Loll, tliiss parrsst was In the
hand, of the Dominion Kmiisss Company over a 2,1)00 mile journey. On the truest liehind it in a shipment isf bees. In sit
ia ■ caae of putting Ihe cart under tho iier.se for shipment.    Below, baby chicks aro handiest hy thousands daily.
ence. Snake, insects, worms, apes, mountain lions,
canaries and macaws—a regular Noah's Ark it has
transported.   A regular line consists of baby chicks
Sometimes special bursts of speed are called
for. On one occasion the bottom of the Toronto
fish market "dropped out," and a Toronto dealer
found himself "stuck" with 80 tons of cod from
Prince Rupert, B.C. A market was found for it
in London, England, if it could be sent by the next
boat,  sailing in   forty   hours' time from  St. John,
The foreign department of the express company
is not the least interesting. Among other things it
looks after the carrying of silver bullion from tho
Northern Ontario mines to its destinations throughout the world. During 1918, the biggest year in silver mining history, the Dominion Express carried
$13,000,000 of silver bullion in 168 shipments, from
four different mines. It is interesting to note that
nine millions of this went to London, two millions to
the United States and two millions to Japan. "The
ultimate destination of almost all silver, though,"
says Mr. Sutherland, "is Japan. Over there they
bury silver in their backyards, figuratively speaking
at least. Although the "movies" and the photograph
industry are taking a lot of silver now, over HO per
cent of it goes eventually to Japan."
During the war the Dominion Express, nt that
time the official carriers to the British Government,
performed one of the most remarkable feats in the
history of express work. This was the transportation
of $1,500,000,000 in gold from Ihe Pacific to Ottawa
and Atlantic ports. The gold w»s brought from Asia
by Japanese warships, which were boarded by express
company officials off the Pacific coast. From that
time the movement of the gold was shrouded in
secrecy. It was earned through the country in
special trainshaving absolute right of way, carrying
nothing but express ?ars, and with scores of armed
guards. Thc trains went through cities without any
lights showing. Food and water was put on them
at Vancouver, and the doors wen never opened until
the cars reached their respective destinations. Not
a single dollar's worth of metal was lost during the
time the gold was in the hand of the express company,
hut officials claim that they acquired grey hairs during those trying days.
here arrived in Toronto recently, after travelling
thousands of miles by rail, a stud pony. Jim, or
whatever his name was, had a compartment to himself, a crate of the latest description. He arrived
in the best of condition, after being fed and watered
en route by the messengers of the Dominion Express
Company.
Unusual shipments like this, however, are "all
in the dny's wort?" for tho express companies. They
wiil take a treasured jewel or a pet elephant with
equal pleasure. If you want to ship home the money
to pay off the mortgage on the old farm, or send
father a couple of cows to keep up his milk shipments, the express companies will look after it for
you. Strange consignments pass through the Express Company's doors, and sometimes strange sounds
issue from inanimate-looking packing cases.
Take the case of the bear cub used at the recent
Rotarian Convention in Toronto. The Dominion Express Company wns called on to handle this beat for
transportation to Auckland. New Zealand. Two or
three times daily between Toronto and Vancouver
this husky specimen of the "boo hoo" tribe wns fed
'biscuits and milk. At Vancouver he was fed and
taken care of until such time as the boat for Australia departed, and arrangements were made to see
that the same attention was given until the bear
reached its destination. They say that the poor little
bear cried when the time came for it to leave the
hands of tho express company, so well had it been
treated.
In case of live animals travelling in the company's cars no excuses are accepted for failure to
give them attention. Officials tell a story, in fact,
of a messenger some years ago who, in his anxiety
to escape a call to thc carpet for failure to make
;orrect reports, carefully noted "Fed and watered
D.K," on a way-bill covering one crnted bicycle
Animals somewhat more lifelike than the siroject
.'f the expressman's mistake do often travel, however. For instance, 20,001 pet dogs went travelling
in care of the Dominion Express Company last year.
There are not many kind.- of boast wild or domes-
ticated, that haven't conic i;. tl:; coutininy's experl-
/
Canadian National Railways. Included in the catch were 2,210,700
pounds of halibut, 569,460 pounds of
salmon 70(1 pounds of crabs and 300
pounds of shrimps.
GENERAL BOOTH'S OPINION
A cable despatch from London, England, states that on his return to England aftor a tour of Canada over Canadian National lines, General Bram-
well Booth, head of the Salvation
Army, alllrms that Canada stands out
among the dominions as the most attractive to the people ot tho British
Isles.
MANITOBA OCCUPIES
PREMIER   POSITION
RE LIVESTOCK
II   is  claimed  thai  Manitoba,  with
respect to raising live stock, occupies
premier position among the Western.
. provinces.      Last year there was in
i this province an animal population of
j 1,444,175, an increase of 4011,1100 in ten
years, notwithstanding heavy marketing (lining Ihe years of the war. The
value placed  on  ibis live stock, including  horses,    cattle,    sheep    and
! swine by Ihe provincial government,
was   *$54.1."s4..rs:'r>.      Manitoba   farmers
\ last year produced for home use and
market 160,000 cattle.  18,000 horses,
220,1100 pigs, nud 411,00(1 sheep—a total
of  ins,ono anlmala, which yielded au
ugrregate income of $9,160,006. Cattle
j winter well and profitably in  Manl-
: toba, so Instead of offering them upon
: a glutted market in the fall, the farmer Is able to sell, at a higher price,
: cattle  which  have gained  in   weight
I y winter feeding.
:CANADA PRODUCES
MUCH   MACARONI
—RIVALS ITALY
Canada has become Italy's rival as
' n macaroni manufacturing nation,
i Three   years   ago   the   Dominion   im-
ported 7,0110,000 pounds of macaroni,
principally from Italy. Last .year it
i imported only a few hundred pound?.
Canada's factories turned out 12,000,-
1 000 pounds, according lo a report ia-
i sued by the Dominion bureau of sta-
1 tistics. Canada, the report show?,
j is building up a world market for its
I macaroni, Exports increased from
j 210,000 pounds in 1922 to' 2,229,000
i pounds in 1923. The product went
j principally to the United States, Great
| Britain and Belgium. The manufac-
j ture of macaroni began in Winnipeg
j twenty-five years ago, and there are
| now two factories operating in the
j Greater Winnipeg district, both turn-
I ing  out   goods   of  excellent   quality
from Western flour. One firm in
I Greater Winnipeg makes special sorts
I from semolina, a granulated flour, in
order to eompeto with goods of the
I same class imported from Italy.
GETS PERSONAL
MESSAGE ON TRAIN
BY RADIO
To he "picked up' 'by radio whilo
on the Conl inental Limited bound for
Vancouver and informed in a message
specially broadcasted to him from his
own city of happenings of importance
to him, waa the experience of Mr. B,
C, Nicholas of Victoria, B.C. according to information received by the
Canadian National Hallways here. Mr.
Nicholas, in company with Alderman
U. M. B, Ker, of Victoria, was travelling towards Victoria from the east,
when, at Kamloops, the radio operator
ou the train picked up a Victoria
broadcasting station announcing a
special message for Mr. Nicholas. The
message was picked up and amplified
just as clearly as though the speaker
were seated In the car} according to
Mr. Nicholas' report. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6. 1921
iflE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
IP
1/
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5th and 6th
NOW   PLAYING
"THE LIGHT THAT FAILED"
Fine   is   Picturization   of   Rudyard A Superb George Melford Production
Kipling's Story A PICTURE WITH A SOUL for Paramount
THE GREATEST STORY BY THE GREATEST LIVING AUTHOR.    WHAT MARVELOUS MATERIAL FOR A SCREEN!  !     THE EXQUISITE
STORY OF LOVE AND SACRIFICE—THE PULSE-QUICKENING ACTION—THE CONTRASTED BACK GROUNDS, TUCKED AWAY IN ODD
CORNERS OF THE EARTH— ALL VIVIDLY REAL AND SURE TO GET YOU.
ADULTS 50<* CHILDREN 25£
Monday and Tuesday
DECEMBER Sth and 9th
CAN A MAN COLLECT ANOTHER MAN'S LIFE
AS HIS DEBT?
The law says he can.    If you doubt that this can be done, see
"IT IS THE LAW"
A Big Special William Fox Screen Melodrama Just Filled With
Mystery and One of the Most Startling
Climaxes You Ever Saw
An Adaptation from the Novel by Hayden Talbot and the Stage|
Success by Elmer L. Rice
1
E
e
E
E
Does Love Rejected Always Turn to Hate and Even Murder?
See "It Is The Law" at this theatre next week
1
CHILDREN 15<>    |
3IE. SHii''J3HEi^^
Matinee every
Saturday
Afternoon at
2.30
■EiTHEMaEHiaaEElSM
Wednesday and Thursday
DECEMBER 10th and 11th
Hal Roach
IKe Jy n% of
lorses
Story by Hal Roach
Directed by Fred Jackman
Don't Forget
our
Country
Store
HEvery Thursday
Night
Between Shows
Patoicture?^'?'
UNTAMED!      UNCONQUERED!     UNRIVALED!
The Film Sensation of the Year
Daring that Thrills—Deeds that Inspire—Action that's Tense—
Love that Throbs
ADULTS 35<> CHILDREN 15C
Who was "K"
■
What was the sinister secret
of his past ?
Fate forced him to a daring
decision;   Don't fail to see
the result at the Ilo-Ilo
COUNTRY STORE EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT.
8:30 P.M.—DRAWING—8:30 P.M.
Next Friday and Saturday
DECEMBER 12th and 13th
The
Unknown
CARL LAEMMLE
presents
VIRGINIA VALLl supported by PERCY MARMON
in
A HARRY A. PHLLAND PRODUCTION
froi:   (he novel by
MARY ROBERTS RINEHART
TWO SHOWS NIGHT LY 6:45 P.M. AND 8:46 P.M.
ADULTS 50<* CHILDREN 25c
ILO-ILO   THEATRE
CUMBERLAND;
^^^mm^^^^M^i^^^^i^^^ ^A.^s^iA^s^iims^^mM^M^^^^AmEMi THE CUMttKLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1924
WATCH
"for our'
"saturday'
EVENING
SPECIALS "
IN ALL
DEPARTM'TS
STORE
CLOSES
EVERY
SATURDAY
AT   Sll30   P.M.
asuru
vs-s-e^^-^^r^s^-^
: Apprrriatiw 3ter All:
STORE
CLOSES
EVERY
SATURDAY
AT  8:30   P.M.
WATCH
FOR OUR
SATURDAY
EVENING
SPECIALS
IN ALL
DEPARTM'TS
Dry  Goods  Department
Novelty Dress Goods in Dress Lengths in Shot
J   Crepes, Silks, Silk Crepes and Cut Velvets
READY-TO-WEAR GOODS-Silk, Canton Crepe, Tricotine and Brodella Flannel Dresses. Silk,
Georgette Crepe, Crepe De Chene Overskirt Blouses and Waists. Silk and Crepe Nightgowns, Step-ins,
Bloomers, Under Slips and Bloomers, Camisoles and Boudoir Caps and Kimonas. Silk and Chamisottee
Gloves.   Silk Hosiery.
NEWEST CHRISTMAS NOVELTIES
IN SILK AND SILK AND WOOL SCARFS AND SHAWLS; UNDER ARM
PURSES AND HAND BAGS, IN LADIES, MISSES AND CHILDREN'S;
COLLARS, JABOTS AND COLLAR SETS; ALL LINES IN FRENCH
IVORY, PEARL AND BEAD NECKWEAR; FANCY TOWELS; TABLE
CLOTHS; CENTER PIECES AND BUREAU SCARFS; FANCY COMBS,
BARETTES, ETC.
See Special Handkercheif Display Table
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
MENS, YOUTHS AND BOYS' CLOTHING AND OVERCOATS; SWEATERS AND SWEATER COATS; FANCY WOOL VESTS; WOOL AND
SILK SCARFS; SMOKING JACKETS AND DRESSING GOWNS;
PYJAMAS AND NIGHTGOWNS; PURE WOOL UNDERWEAR; SILK
AND SILK AND WOOL HOSE; NEWEST NOVELTIES IN MEN'S SILK
AND KNITTED NECKWEAR, GARTERS, ARMBANDS, SUSPENDERS
AND BELTS; ALSO IN FANCY BOX SETS.
TIE RACKS; SHAVING SETS; SAFETY RAZORS; MILITARY BRUSH-
ES; CUFF LINKS; TIE PINS; PLAIN AND INITIAL LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS; FLASH LIGHTS; WALKING .STICKS, ETC.
Corn on Cob, large tins, 2 for 65<?
Canned Plums in heavy syrup, 2 for 55<)
Fancy White Cooking Figs, 2 lbs. 25-£
Fancy Black Cooking Figs, per lb. .. 20<>
Campbell's Pork & Beans, tins, 2 for 35p
Tomatoes, 2'/o's, tins, 5 for 95<i
Peters Marmalade, 3'/->'s tins,  75<?
WATCH FOR OUR SATURDAY EVENING SPECIALS IN ALL
DEPARTMENTS
STORE CLOSES SATURDAYS 8:30 P.M.
Grocery Department ==-======—=
R. D. Pineapple, 2's, tins, 2 for 55<J King Oscar Sardines, tins, 2 for 35<?
Canned Shrimps, tins, 3 for  $1.00
Chicken Haddie, tins, 2 for 55£
Fels Naptha Soap, carton 85<>
Witch Hazel Toilet Soap, 3 for 25C
Castile Soap, small cakes, 5 for 25<?
Princess Soap Flakes, pkts.  25<i?
New Naval Oranges, 3 doz 80-p
CUMBERLAND
Jap Oranges, Bananas, Grapes, Florida Grape Fruit, Cauliflower,
Brussel Sprouts, Spanish Onions, Kippered Cod, Kippered Salmon,
Finnan Haddie, Haddie Fillet.
i^mt^e&^v^smv^
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Published tvery Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924
SHOULD WOMEN BE
FLOGGED?
During the debate In the House on
the resolution requesting the Federal
Government to amend the law so that
convicted drug traffickers be (logged,
Mrs. Mary Ellen Smith, M.L.A., intimated that she favored the lash for
such offenders, regardless of sex,
which brought Mr. P.P. Harrison.
Member for Comox to his feet asking
ill shocked tones if tlle Lady Member
really was In favor of Hogging women,
a question whicli was plainly embarrassing and caused her to evade tho
Issue by volunteering lhat she had always stood and still stood in favor
of equal rights and equal responsibilities for both sexes. This only brought
further query as lo whether she was
serious In advocating that women bo
(logged nnd on receiving the evasive
reply "why not?" Iho Comox Member
offered to withdraw his question it It
embarrassed. Stung hy this Ironical
offer the Lady Member replied with
considerable heat that it would lake
more than he to embarrass her. This
little passage at arms closed the matter.
THE EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR
We have a friend who breezes into
our office at stated Intervals, and If
perchance he finds us at our desk he
sings "The editor sat In his easy
chair." Now, this mon ls one ot our
very beBt friends but we resent his
continual assumption that the edilor
does nothing but sit In his easy
chair. Another man came in to collect a bill this mornnig and he found
us setting a head at tho case. "Why. I
thought you never worked." said the
humorist.
It seems to be a prevalent idea
throughout the community that an
editor Just loafs about the office and
draws his salary. Ye gods and little fishes! Do people believe that
the newspaper prints itself? Do they
imagine the types just march Into line
and nil tlie columns? If some of the
men who think an editor sits In an
easy chair could spend a whole day
with the said editor, they would very
quickly change that point of view.
Then, there is another wise guy
who calls ut the office at intervals
and brings in a column or two of
matter "just to help fill up the paper."
If the average reader of any newspaper could see the editorial waste
basket he would be amazed at the
amount of propagauada, free press
agent stuff and vain efforts to get advertising published as news that goes
into that waste basket evey day. Just
why, otherwise intelligent men, will
spend money in an effort to get something for nothing in the local newspaper is one of the big problems of
today. Ever since the World War.
when newspaper editors generously
primed columns of free matter for the
war loans, the army and navy activities, and other appeals for foreign
relief, a hundred corporations have
heen trying to get into print on thc
same basis. Tbey have wasted enough money In this effort to pay for
the space they seek at the regular
advertising .rates. Politicians, reformers, charity workers, a hundred
welfare organizations that pay everybody else a salary, pile the editor's
desk high with free publicity. For
a lime the editor smiled and hung the
copy on Ihe compositor's hook, but as
everybody got to doing it, the hook
wouldn't hold the free copy and the
waste basket got thc overflow. Today
the waste basket won't hold it and
mosl of 11 goes direct from the editorial desk to tlie furnace. In self-defense the editor who seeks to meet
his bills and pay his employees has
adopted the very simple little slogan:
"You charge, we charge." Which
means that advertising for all events
where an admission fee is charged
must lie paid for.
N'o, the editor does not sit in an
easy chair, He has as many problems as other business men. He puts
in as many hours and goes home just
as tired us otber business men and he
never needs any copy "just to help
fill up the paper."
CHRISTMAS CHIMES
The chime of the cash register
hells ringing In the stores ls an Indication that the customers' have recovered from their scare and are buying again—not buying what they do
not want, but buying what they actually need.
The early touches ot winter are
driving shivering humanity to seek
their heavies, woolen socks, overcoats and the things they put off buying while the delightful Indian summer lasted.
In addition to this necessary shopping the Christmas trade Ib also at
hand and there are no Christmas
chimes bo merry to the ear ot the
merchant as the chime of the cash
register bell.
It ls needlesB to add that these
bells chime most frequently In thc
store of the man who advertises.
LAND ACT
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPI,Y
TO LEASE LAND
IN NELSON LAND DISTRICT, Re-
uate near Village of Royston Waters
ot Comox Harbor, Nelson District.
Subdivision of Lot 86 and Section 4
and Section 6-A: Map No. — Tako
notice that the Royston Lumber Company Limited, of Royston, B.C., occupation Sawmill and Timber dealers
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described lands: —
(Foreshore) on the North boundary of
Marine Drive distant 60 ft. from the
West side of Royston Whart: Thence
in a westerly direction following the
North boundary of Marine Drive and
high tide mark a distance of 1000 feet
to a post set On said North boundary
of Marine Drive: Thence at right-
angles North to approximately low
tide mark .thence in an Easterly direction, following low tide mark a
distance of 1000 feet more or less.
Thence ln a straight line to place of
commencement, and containing 10
acres more or less.
THE ROYSTON LUMBER CO. Ltd.,
per Oeorge K, Uchlyama.
Name ot Applicant.
Th* Mart af tht Batt fer tha Leatt"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
 and Grocers
11  LOAVES FOR $1.00
ASK FOB
Fletcher's   No.  1   Bacon
CUT FROM TENDER YOUNG PORKERS
A.B.C.—PRODUCT—
AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
CUMBERLAND DISTRICT
City Meat Market   Wilcock Bros.   Frelone's Grocery
Matt Brown's Grocery and Marrochi Bros.
C.  W.  Sillence        G. M. Swan        Fraser & Home
Royston Fanny Bay Union Bay
bliansisiffiimBifflBiaffl
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It payi to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
What are you going to drink at
CHRISTMAS
English Ale and
Stout, Lager Beer
ASK YOUR LOCAL VENDOR AND DEMAND
Silver Spring
BEER THAT NEVER HAS BEEN EQUALLED
Silver Spring Brewery, Limited
Victoria
This advertisement is not published or displayed by tho
i j Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C. 6
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924
lUt CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
FIVE
Pat O'Hooley
sees
A  Glimmer of Light
By I. H. Holden
Pat  O'Hooley  nnd    Donovan,    the
section boss, had finished their noon
lunch and were reclining near the
hand-car, smoking their pipes,
"What's en your mind, Pat?" asked
Donovan, "You seem as thoughtful as
a Ouija board."
"Maybe I am," said Pat. "I'm con-
siderin' fwhat th' Pote said. Ut runs
somethin'  lolke  this:   'Great  moiiuls
BETTER MEAT
AT WILCOCK BROS* MEAT MARKET
For the better cuts of Delicious Meats, you can always
get satisfaction at Wilcock Bros' Meat Market.     We
make a specialty of quality cuts at prices that mean
wholesome saving to you.
Wilcock Bros.
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland, B.C.
Illlllillilll	
I!illl!!!!!lll!l!ll!l!!i!i
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
llilllllllllllllllllll!
PHONE ISO     m
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
OVERHAULING,
ACCESSORIES
GASOLINE   AND   OIL
REPAIRING,
GOODYEAR  TIRES,
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
t' Insanity aro close allied; an' but a
thlu partition dotli th' brain slparate,'
sez he; an' I'm thinkin' there's somethin' in ut."
"Oft* the main line again, eh?*'
quaried Donovan, with a grin. "Who
left the switch open?"
"Well, I was down t' th' Insane
Aslyum last wake, vlsltin' me cousin,
Moike, who is wan of th' kapers,"
said Pat, digging thoughtfully in the
earth with a stick. "He showed me
all over th' Institution; an' tf ut
wasn't fer th' poor people an' th'
deplorable condition most of 'em are
in, ut would lie a foino place t' spend
an hour or so, fer iverythln' is as
purty an' restful as ye plaze. Whin
we'd gone all over th' grounds, Moike
lades me up t' an old glutleman slttin'
under Ih' trees an' sez:
" 'Mr. Dell, this is me cousin, Pat
O'Hooley,' sez he. 'I can't trust him
alone out of me soight. Would ye
molnd lookln' after him fer a short
while? He's perfectly harmless!' An'
Moike gives me a knowln' wink as he
goes off on another job.
" 'Will ye have a chair, Mr.
O'Hooley?" sez Mr. Dell, politely.
'Ye don't reside here, I take ut?'
"'Not yet,' says I, maneinly; 'but
there's no tellln'.'
" 'How long have ye lived out in
tli' world?' sez he.
" 'Purty much all me loife,' sez I.
" 'Poor man!' sez he, wld a sigh.
'Ye have me sympathy. Ut must be
awful t' spind yer days wid all thim
maniacs! Are ye a kaper or a nutt?"
sez he.
" 'I'm jist wan of th' bugs,' Bez I
gittin' wize t' his drift.
"'Ah! a deglnerate, I suppose,' sez
he, cyein' me closely. 'Yours ls a
remarkable case, fer most looneys
belave they're sane. But ye have all
th' appearance of a nutt, an' I spotted
ye at wance. Are ye iver violent?'
sez he.
" 'Only whin somewan stales me
whiskey,' sez I.
'"I see; I see," sez Mr. Dell,
thoughtfully. 'Well, me poor man,
ut's too bad! But don't give up hope.
I have evovled a plan that will rer
store th' sanity of th' people an' Bave
th' world  from roone,' sez he.
" 'How can ye do ut?' sez I.
" 'By the application an' assimilation of me Noine Points—I have jist
a few less than Prisident Wilson had.
Would ye lolke f hear 'em?' sez he.
" 'Indade I would,' sez I pertindin'
t' humor him.
"'Listen!' sez he, takin' a peek
around. 'Don't be surprised; th'
world is totterin' t' a fall an' ut will
take drastic measures. .Me flrst point
Is:
" 'Dissolve all political parties al
wance; arrest th' spoilsmln an'
grafters an' put 'em breakin' stone
—if we kape on makin' flivvers we'll
nade wider roads.
"'Point two: Hire three business
min t' run th' government; if they
don't make good, kick 'em out.
"'Point three: As money is tli'
root of all avil, do away wld ut—an
honest man will pay widout money.
"'Point four: Reform th' court
procedure; cut out th' rotten spots,
throw tli' rist away an' begin agin.
"'Point live: Sliootall th' yellow
nooaepaper min; ut will be a big job,
but th' army nades rifle practice.
"'Point six: Make ut a misdemeanor t' write in a noosepaper a
story of a riot, crime, divorce, scandal, or family rukus of any kotnd, on
pinalty of instant death. Th' people
have had their moinds pizened wid
this stuff too long, now.
" 'Point sivin: Make another hunt
fer yellow-backs an' comb all down
th' lolne.
" 'Point eight: Any man drawin'
rough-house cartoons t' pizen th'
children's nioinds is t' be drawn an'
quartered on th' public square.   *
"'Point noine: Cut out the rotten
movies; hang iverywan who carries
a gun; an' force th' noosepapers t'
print nothln' but th' doln's of dacint
people. Whin this is done, there will
be a change in th' mentality of th'
masse*. They'll see that there's a
whole lot of foine folks all about
'em1—aven on their own strate; an'
there will be no necessity t' emulate
th' toughs t' become famous; byes
will grow up normal an' strong an'
spind their leisure playln' in th' sand
poiles instead of runnin' about wld
automatics    an'   highpowered    cars,
]
Special Trains
To Ships' Side for
Christmas Sailings
8s. "Regina" to  Liverpool    Deo.   7
8a. "Andsnia"   to  London   Dae.   8
8a. "Saturnia"   to  Glasgow    Deo.   8
8s. "Pittsburg"   to Southampton  Deo, 11
8a. "Orduna"   to Southampton  Doo. 11
Si. "Carmania"   to  Liverpool   Coo. 14
St. "Canada" >• '■*•  Liverpool   Deo. 14
Wa will be pleased  to give you  full  details and  assist you  in
planning* your trip, making all reservations.
E. W. BICKLE—AGENT, CUMBERLAND
Ran apian National Railways
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.     Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Ladies' Waists
A beautiful range of Waists, in newest styles and color
combinations.
Silk Crep de Chene Waists, ranging in prices up to
each .■„.!  $10.00
Silk Knitted Waists in very new styles and moderately
priced.
Ladies' Dresses
Ladies' Dresses, a new lot.     These will interest you.
Prices ranging from, each $6.50 to $15.00
Handkerchiefs
Fancy Handkerchiefs in boxes, a very choice assortment, and well worth your inspection.
Our Chirstmas goods are now on display.     Call and
look around.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
Better Rubber Footwear
at the Regular Price
If RHINO Rubber Footwear wern't better—if it
didn't wear longer—we
would not support the
iron-clad guarantee that
goes with every pair.
These facts hold good with
all RHINO Rubbers.
Note the Protector flap on
rubber shoe illustrated.
It is an exclusive, patented
RHINO feature. It effec
tually prevents dirt,
manure, snow or moisture
from getting inside.
This footwear is made
from RHINO RUBBER-
the toughest and most
wear-resisting that Science
has yet discovered—which
will wear up to twice as
long as ordinary rubber.
Insist on RHINO Footwear.
"Compare The Wear"
CAVIN'S SHOE STORE, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
stlckin' people up. IC me lau ls followed t' th' letter, in foi\> years tli'
masses will be sane agin . .1' there'll
be no nade fer me t' stu.' here in
this House of Refuge. Fwhat do ye
think of me plan, Mr. O'Hooley?' sez
he, beamin' all over wid pride.
" 'Well, sorr,' sez 1, 'if I wasn't
crazy—an I'm mptghty sorry I am—
I'd sure loikos. t' stay here an' talk
this over wid ye, as yer conversation ls most retreshin',' sez I
"Whin Moike takes nie t' th' gate,
I jerks me thumb backwards an' sez;
Fwhat's th' nature of Mr. Dell's hol-
ucinations?' sez I.
"Him?' sez Moike. 'Oh, he he-
laves he's Solomon!'
'Well,' sez 1;  'he may not be as
wize as Solomon, hut he's got wan or
two purty good notions at that!' "
(Copyrighted 1924 by 1. H. Holden.)
the balance of the House. So far
even the Provincials have seen fit to
approve of government policy and
there appears little likelihood of any
issue arising before the end of the
session which will emharass the administration.
DEPUTY SPEAKER
PRAISES B.C. GOVT.
HOUSE MAKES MOVE
ALONG RIGHT LINES
VICTORIA, Dec. 5.—A move along
the right lines has been made by the
House committee on private bills, with
regard to the contracts between cooperative  organizations  and   individuals.     The committee has approved
of the bill of the Associated Growers
and recommended it to the Legislature.      When   the   bill   ls   passed   it j
will provide that in future ail con-1
tracts   must   be  strictly  adhered   to. j
This will prevent the "lootlegging" of
fruit.
VICTORIA, Dec. 5.—A strong defence of the government was made in
the Legislature by Mr. H. G. Perry,
Liberal, Fort George, who is also deputy speaker of the House. He went
fully in ull phases of administration,
quoting exhaustive figures to prove
his contention that the administration
of public business In British Columbia
was vastly ahead of that of other
provinces. Things for which the
government wus justly praised included the gradual reduction of taxes
good roads, grants for schools, travelling libraries, correspondence school
courses and reductions on stumping
powder.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PRODUCTS FOR ROME
PROVINCIALS ARE
WITH GOVERNMENT
VICTORIA, Dec. 5—The three divl-
slons In the Legislature which had
occurred up to last week-end were all
won by the government with good
majorities. That of last Friday found
fifteen Conservatives lining up against
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBEBLAN&, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike   service
26  rooms,  tlMtrieaisV  hwt*4.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phono li.
K. TiTM, -Manager.
Samples of northern British Columbia minerals, lumber, plants, flowers aud Indian relics will shortly be
sent to Rome by Bishop Bunoz, of
Prince Rupert, for inclusion In the
industrial exhibition which takes place
In the Vatican during 1025, Catholic
Holy Year. The exhibition, which
takes place every quarter of a century during Holy Vear, is to be opened on Christmas Day and exhibits
from tlie entire world will be on display. Bishop Bunoz is being assisted in gathering his exhibit hy M. P.
McCaffery, W, H. Tobey, division engineer of the Canadian National Railways at Prince Rupert; George Clothier, resident mining engineer; and the
Hay Lumber Company.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - .   B. C.
You want L ETTER BEER
try th ise—
wBeerwithmtuPeer
and
U.B.C. Beer
Produced by Vancouver Breweries,
Limited, under ideal conditions of
cleanliness and scientific brewing.
Sold at all
Govt. Vendors
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed  by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
Christmas
Suggestions for the Family
FOR MOTHER
Dainty   Handkerchiefs,   Hand   Embroidered   Pillow
Cases, Scarfs, Buffet Sets, Guest Towels, Aprons, Etc.
FOR DAD
Hose, Ties, Eversharp Pencils, Sleeve Holders.
FOR GRANDMA
Warm Hose, Underwear and Bags.
^OR CHILDREN
Toys, Dishes, .  ackboards, Writing Paper, Etc.
Mrs. L.  Francescini
SPECIALIZING in HEMSTITCHING PACE SIX
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 192*
IMMIGRATION INCREASED
SIX PER CENT IN YEAR
During the past 12 months 131,
189 Immigrants entered Canada, an in
crease of six per cent over the previous twelve-month period when 126,-
744 arrived. During the seven months
ended October 31, 1924, 30,966 Canadians returned to this country from
cManns Hakery
The Home of High Class  Cakes, Pastries and Quality Bread
Order Your Xmas  Cakes Now
Dark Fruit. Sultanna, Cherry, Scotch Buns, etc.
Scotch  Shortbread,  made  from  the  finest  ingredients.
Xmas. .Mincemeat Pies
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Cream Rolls, Cream Sponges. Cream Cakes, Cream Buns.
Doughnuts
Meat Pies and Sausage Rolls. Hot Every Saturday.
Telephone 18 Cumberland
Special Offer
filSIEHBEMaji*^
With any
Eureka  Vacuum
Cleaner
ordered on or before November 30, we will give
—F R E B—
a complete set of attachments that usually sell for
$10.00
Order early if you wish to take advantage of this
Special Offer.
 ♦-
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
the United States, according to reports issued at Ottawa by the American department.
QUEBEC GOLD FIELDS
PROVE VERY VALUABLE
In one two-hundred-acre area in
the northern quarter of Quebec's gold
belt has been found a better record
than the Porcupine region of Ontario,
according to the statement of Consulting Engineer Charles Spearman.
He declared there was every reason
to expect that the gold fields of Quebec would prove as paying as those
of Ontario.
SECOND PARTY
FOR VERMILLION
Full of enthusiasm for the future,
tho second party of young men from
England, being brought out for settle
ment ln Alberta through the activities of the Alberta minister of agriculture, passed through Winnipeg by
Canadian National Railways a few
days ago en route to Vermillion, Alta.
The boys, the average age of whom is
21 years, are entering the School of
Agriculture for a year's training before taking up land. The number
taking advantage of the opportunity
offered by this scheme is 196, 54 of
whom are now in Alber.ta.
AND I HAVEN'T
FORGOTTEN A SOUL
CATTLE EXPORTS UP
«%Gft
Red Top Relief Valves, $7 each
TO KEEP "CLOSED" PLUMBING "OPEN"
This is a '/3-in.valve for use on domestic hot water
supply systems for relief of damaging pressures caused
by ranges and tank heaters.
APPROVED
Both Red Top Relief Valves are approved by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., and by State and Municipal Bureaus of Water and Boiler Inspection.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS OO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Dirwter.
frpcnOi^ANi)iE
j" ViriilnfrPaper'
7Appaper thats ttood ■'
iJS(^    to writp upon " _^£
The Gem
Barber Shop
Oltoilto Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CVmiBLAHD, 1.C
1UIIT ITARS
PraeHeol Barber,  aad   Hair-
streeaor, Shampooing,  Singeing,
Uassaflag.    Soalp    Treatment.
:a
SYNOPSIS OF
LANDACTAMENDMENTS
J. SUTHERLAND
—Attest for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Urieet aad Moat Up-to-date Dr/
•lewloi aal Dyelag BsUkllakment
oa TtaeovTor Islaad. W. Clean or
Bro oil Mote of Utiles' aad Oeate'
Wearlat Apparel, Heuiekold Furateh-
lap, e«e. Drop In and ate Ur. Buttatr-
lu.t, oar Anal In Cumberland, woe
win Uflee too on anr work r.u wlak
te kan iene.
•ar  Wort  aal  torrloo
WU Pleaoo Toa I :     11
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
TICTBBU, IX.      -      rkoao UN
New Car Service
GAB FOB BIBB DAT OR If IGHT
CITY M.EAT
MARKET
For Baat Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Froah and Cured Plah
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND BERTICE"
W. P. Symona   •
H TELEPHONE 100
Cumberland Hotel
Car leaves Cumberland Hotel at
8 o'clock every Sunday morning
and meets boat at Union Bay.
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Merchant
TAILOR
CLEANING  AND  PRESSING
Open for business November 20
Under New Management
E Aida
CUMBERLAND TAILOR
Dunsmuir Avtnue
PBE-KMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects orer 18 years ot age,
ud by alien, on declaring Intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon reeldence, occupation,
and improvement tor agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulation! regarding Pre-emptions la
given ln Bulletin No. 1, Und Series,
How to Pre-empt Und," copies ot
which can be obtained treo ot charge
by addressing the Department ot
Undo, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted ooverlng
only land suitable tor agricultural
pnrpoaee, and which le not timber-
land, l.e, carrying over 6,000 board
(eot per acre west ot the Coaat Range
and 8,000 teet per acre eaat ot that
Range.
Applications tor pre-emptions ara
to be addreesed to the Und Commissioner ot the Und Recording Division, ln which tbe land applied tor
Is situated, and ara made on printed
forma, copies of which can be obtained from tho Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
live years and Improvements made
to value of $10 por acre, Including
clearing and cultivating at leaat Ave
acres, before a Crown Qrant can ba
received.
For more detailed lnfoimatlon see
the Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received lor purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being tlmberland,
tor agricultural purposes; minimum
price of first-class (arable) land le 16
per acre, and second-class (graelng)
land 82.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lease
of Crown lands Is given ln Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial altee on
timber land, not eioeedlng 40 aores,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions Including payment of
stumpage,
HOMESTEAD LIASES
Unsurveyed areaa, not exoeodlng 90
acrea, may be leased aa bomesltes,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected ln the Arst year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land bas been surveyed.
LEASES
For grating and Industrial pur-
poaoo areas not exceeding 840 acres
may bo leaaed by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grating Act the Province Is divided Into grazing districts
and the range administered under a
Grating     Commissioner. Annual
grating permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
head. I
With the close of navigation in the
St. Lawrence ports still a tew week.,
away, shipments of cattle to the United Kingdom have all but reached Ihe
total for the full twelve months ot
1923. For the week ended November 14 the total shipments were 1,605
head, which brings the total for the
year up to 70,653, as compared with
50,753 for the same period last year.
It Is expected that the total movement
of cattle to the United Kingdom this
year may exceed 100,000 head, as there
will be a considerable movement from
St. John and Portland after the St.
Lawrence ports are closed.
NOTICE
All watches, jewellery and jobs of
all description left in my charge for
repairs tf not claimed by January 1st,
1925, will be sold to defray expense.!.
T. D. McLean, Dunsmuir Avenue.
Cumberland.
\ <:i'
A
tjkin
use
Ihenwoiaium
Jars30gs60* - Tubes Jo*
f TOUFEEL IT HEAL
thole
When you are in need of a
Plumbing A Heating Engineer, Soo
R. RUSHTON
Phone 167
Cumberland
Phone 124
Courtenay o
Your   needs   will   receive   immcdlett
attention.
I have learned my lesson. It is
this. The people who always do the
right thing at the right time—these
people we come to love for their
constant acts of kindness—who are
always known for their thoughtful-
nesfl—these people aren't inspired
They don't act on the impulse of tho
moment. They simply use forethought. They are always thinking
ahead about ways of showing their
good will to others.
It was last Chirstmas morning that
this came over me, when the postman handed me dozens of Chirstma.-
cards from friends to whom I had entirely forgotten to send cards. I w&9
so mortified that then and there 1
made a vow.
And today, long before Christmas
I huve made up my list of friends to
send cards to this year. First, ever,*
one who sent to me last year, for I
had pasted every card I got into a
book, with the address of the sender.
Then I got out my old school class
book for the friends of long ago.
From the leal telephone book, year
books and other lists I got the addresses of neighbors and acquaintances.
I'm sure i haven't forgotten a soul.
And what a relief it is to know that
it's all done way ahead of time, that
all the addresses are right and that
I can go out now and select my very
own private cards quietly and comfortably.
And this year there won't be in my
mail any cards from people I forgot
to remember.
Good form is largely a matter of doing the right thing at the right time.
That is why the sending of greeting
cards has come to be a matter not
merely of good will but of good form.
Ages ago the lords and ladies of the
land began the use of hand illuminated cards to carry the season's greetings.
And if all the good-will which has
been created by greeting cards
throughout these years could be accumulated there would be a quantity of it sufficient to offset the ills of
the world for a long, long time.
The most uncomfortable creature in
tlie world is the noe, who on Christmas morning receives a numebr of
cards from people whom he—or she-
forgot to remember.
This Christmas, more    than    ever
before, greeting cards are going to be
in vogue. Send greeting cards and
send them generously.
And it is so easy to forget some one
whom you really want to remember
.hat the best plan is to start at once
to keep a notebook, including in it
every one to whom you wish to send
a greeting card, together with the ad-
drosses. The telephone book is very
handy to make sure of an address
about which you are in doubt.
With greeting cards, as everything
else, the early shopper gets the
cream of the stocks to choose from,
and though the selection of cards offered this year is larger and more
/aried than ever before, the demand
is going to be exceedingly hard to
supply.
Remember to mount tho cards you
receive this year in a permanent book,
with the address of the sender, for
futur convenience and enjoyment.
In order to get exactly the personal cards you want, and as many
of them as you will need, be sure to
make your selection early. Now is
not too soon!
Scatter sunshine with The Islander,
made in Vancouver, Chirstmas Cards.
New select designs, in charming variety, unrivalled quality and remarkable values.
THAT ii' you neyk'fL thu minor siiniH
ol' HtoiiuiL'li distress such ;is tru*
nalns. -sour-burning stomach, bloating, belobliiff, mm] after-eating mis-
cry, you are condemning youi- body
lo years ot chronic stomach troublo.
Jo-To "old by druggists everywhere
will quickly relievo all stomach
misery.
A. GAMBA
COURTENAY
Milk, Cream, Eggs, Farm Products
A TRIAL ORDER SOLICITED
....Leave Orders at Marocchi's or Scavarda's Grocery....
Store.
One of our recently mnrried young
ladles was telling some of. the older
matrons that Bill was a model husband. One of the more experienced
matrons repeated this to her "hubby"
who grinned at flrst and then had a
hearty laugh. His wife rather testily asked him the reason of his merriment, so he pulled down the dictionary and pointed to the word "model;"
and this is what she read: "Model"—
a small imitation of the real thing.
PICKFORD'S RETURN
UNITES FAMILY
IN HOLLYWOOD
Jack Pickford arrived in Hollywood
from New York last week for the
double purpose of okaying the flnal
cutting of his latest film, "The End
of the World" and to spend Thanksgiving with his mother and sisters,
Mary and Lottie.
Following completion of production
work on "The End of the World" early
in the autumn, Jack went to New
York with his wife, Marilyn Miller,
who is starring in Charles Dillingham's stage production of "Peter Pan"
which will be shown at the Ilo-Ilo
Theatre, Cumberland, January 8, 9
and 10. After seeing his wife well
launched in this vehicle, Jack then
devoted his attention to distribution
plans for "The End of the World",
whicli is now scheduled for release
about January flrst by Allied Producers and Distributors, a subsidiary of
United Artists.
After Thanksgiving, Jack will return to New York to spend Christmas
with ills wife, and to close a deal
which is now pending for his next
story.
B.   P.   O.   E.
New Year's Eve
DANCE
GAIETY THEATRE
Reserve This Date
COURTENAY, B.C.
Particulars Later.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Car  For Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy Or Reeldence
25 22
CUMBERLAND
Wouldn't You Like To
Hear That Voice Again?
Perhaps at some distant point a friend or relative resides. Ordinarily you
write letters to each other, and they are very welcome, yet at times they seem hardly
sufficient. You long for something more oersonal, but a visit is out of the question.
Then you remember the long-distance telephone, at your servbe. You place a call with
courteous, capable "Long Distance," and soon—but what need for us to say more?
Wouldn't you like to hear that voice again?
British Columbia Telephone Company SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6. 1924
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
RIVER SERVICE IS
IMPORTANT ISSUE
WITH COUNCIL
(Continued From Page One)
other commodities.     The boat service
waB an excellent thing and we should
do all in our power to retain it. The
dredging of the Courtenay liiver was
of the utmost importance he thought
but it would be very difficult to induce
the government to assist in this work
If there was no boat ou the run. Mr.
McPhee thought that the present
time waa very opportune considering
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
BHINOLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND     FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
I Night calls: 1S4X Courtenay
1 Office: ISI Cumberland
I the influence of our present member
ln the House, and he would ask the
council to do all In its power to further the transportation facilities.
The farming interests were increasing In the district while logging and
other interests were decreasing and
cheap transportation was vital to the
farmer.
Councillor Fielder didn't see why
the city wanted to bother about a boat
service. What Courtenay wanted
was industries he said. Alderman
Simms immediately explained that
Courtenay would never attract industries until they could show something
attractive. Cheap    transportation
was first among attractions to manufacturers. Courtenay, he said, would
never he better than the average town
unless proper use was made of the
river. Alderman Pearse said there
was.no doubt that the Vancouver-
Courtenay Transportation Co. hail
done n very fine thing for the city and
district. Everyone recognized the
fact. Transportation was not necessarily Mr. Gillls; there were other
concerns he said.
Mayor McPherson thought the company had shown a very arbitrary attitude In suddenly discontinuing the
service. Councillor Cooke complained that the city had nothing definite to go on and suggested that the
council should not stand too much on
its dignity, but should ask for certain information covering the company's operations to Courtenay and
other points. The Mayor thought It
would be poor business to offend the
C.P.R. in any way, whereupon Alderman Simms said surely the council
has as much back bone now as it had
In former days when private Interests
were trying to monopolise other untll-
Itles that rightfully belonged to tlie
people. Are we going to give our
water way up because \v,e are frightened of the C.P.R. he said.
>
LOOK!
We have just unpacked the swellest line of Table
Lamps, Shades, Candle Lamps, Etc., which have just
arrived from the east. The very latest in electrical
fixtures. Come and select yours early before tho
Xmas rush begins.
Our Sporting Goods Dept. is still busy with all the
best Guns-^sAnrmunition—Hunter's Clothing, Etc.
-RADIO	
-RADIO	
We sell reliable Radio Sets and Parts and service the
sets we sell.    Get your radio from a reliable firm who
know their business.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone 164
Courten"y
Do You Know?
THAT nine-tenths of the grouchy
sour-faced people in the world are
stomach sufferers? If these people
would go to their Drug Store and
get a package of Jo-To the world
would be a brighter, happier place.
Jo-To stops all stomach misery in
two minutes.   All Drug Stores,
sWEmffiBE'R
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllIIHIIIi
BILL SUTLIFF
Courtenay.
Illl
Comox Creamery Butter
A Vancouver Island Product
m
Comox Jam
ASK YOUR GROCER FOR COMOX JAM.    IT IS MADE FROM PURE,
FRESH FRUIT AND B.C. CANE SUGAR, NOTHING ADDED BY WAY
OF FILLER OR PRESERVATIVE.    SPECIALIZING IN STRAWBERRY
AND RASPBERRY.
Comox Potatoes
"LOOK FOR THE TAG ON THE BAG"
YOUR ARE ENTITLED TO A GRADED POTATO.     IF IT'S A COMOX
CREAMERY SACK WITH THE TAG IT IS GRADED AND BETTER
VALUE.      DEMAND  NO  OTHER.
ag|giEE^]SISBISISia,^IBIBiaSEElSE^
Comox Creamery
Association
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
After a great deal of discussion
and the proposal of many communications to be sent to Mr. McGlUIs, it
was Anally resolved, on motion of
Alderman Cooke, to write Mr. McGillls saying that following a report
given to the council by Messrs Hurford and McPhee, the city of Courtenay was willing to continue negotiations for the furtherance of a
scheme to be submitted in the form
of a plebiscite to the ratepayers concerning the guaranteeing of bonds on
the proposed new boat. The letter
will also ask for detailed information
of the company's operations as suggested by Alderman Cooke.
The proposed by-law Introduced hy
Alderman Pearse, relative to the controlling of traffic loads on city roads
was turned down; but the by-law prohibiting the discharge of Are arms
within the city, passed Its third ami
last reading with Bome modifications.
James and Donald Carthew, William
Duncan, Paul Downey, Hugh Clark
and Fred Burns. The Rev. Mr. W.
T. Beattie of Courtenay conducted the
impressive funeral service and the
undertaking arrangements were In
the hands of Mr. John Sutton.
COMOX PIONEER IS
LAID TO REST
COURTENAY, Nov. 28.—The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Mathewson whose death occurred last Tuesday, took place today from the family
residence on the Dyke between Courtenay and Comox, to the Presbyterian
Church at Sandwick.
The late Mrs. Mathewson was the
wife of Mr. William Mathewson. She
was in her seventy-eighth year. She
was a native of Pictou County, Nova
Scotia and waa born ln the year 1847.
Mrs. Mathewson was one of the very
first pioneers to settle ln the Comox
district, and the Mathewson farm on
the Dyke Is one of the oldest homesteads ln the valley. Besides the
husband, there are four daughters,
Mrs. Whiter Renlson and Mrs. Hugh
Russell both of the Comox district,
Mrs. Geo. Ardley of Powell River and
Mrs. E. Anthon of Vancouver. Broth
ers and sisters of the deceased are
Messrs Kenneth and Robert Grant of
RoyBton and Mrs. Lindsay Ray of Victoria.
The remains were borne to their
last resting place by some of the best
known residents of the district, Messrs
LUMBER ARRIVES
FOR EDWARD'S WHARF
COURTENAY, Dec. 2.—A large
scow load of lumber which came ln
Monday was unloaded on Tuesday.
The shipment was made from Campbell River by the Wilfret Lumber Co.
The consignees in Courtenay are the
Edwards Lumber Co. Ltd. Thc scow
load was consisted mostly of heavy
planking and will he used in the construction of the new Edwards wharf
on the Courtenay River.
CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR
THE FAMILY
The cheapest, best and most appreciated Christmas gift would be a
year's subscription to the Family Herald and Weekly Star of Montreal. It
costs only Two Dollars and the whole
family would enjoy it. The beautiful art calendar for 1925 with a large
picture ln colors which goes with the
Family Herald this year would help
to brighten the'home. We also hear
that each subscriber is to receive a
free entry to a popular contest in
which ten thousand dollars in cash
will be awarded. That Is surely
extraodinary value for the money.
SOCIAL EVENING
IN ROYSTON   CHOOL
COURTENAY, Dec. I.—A    a social i
evening held in the Roysi n school
on Friday evening last, tlu   winners I
in  the  progressive  whist  play  were |
lady's first Miss Dallos; second, Mrs.
Edwards.     Gentlemen's flrst Mrs. E.
Navey, playing as a gentleman; second Mr. Sillence.     During the evening  refreshments  were served  after
which dancing was enjoyed to music
supplied by the Misses Florcen Dalby
and GladyB Roy and Mr. Tom McLennan.
HUNTER WAS LOST
AT CAMPBELL RIVER
COURTENAY, Dec. 2.—Some uneasiness was felt for the safety of
Harry Creech on Monday when it was
learned that he had not rejoined his
hunting companions after a day's
hunt at Campbell River. A party of
three had gone up on Saturday night
and bad go away to an early Btart on
Sunday. Harry did not go out until
.Monday morning when be followed
the Campbell down to its mouth. Sunday night was quite mild and with
the aid of a good Are Harry managed
to keep fairly comfortable.
COMOX VALLEY COW-TESTING ASSOCIATION
Following ls a list of cows In the above association that gave SO lbs. or
more of butter-fat for November 1921
Days
Fresh Name of Cow Breed
90   Darky    Gdr. Jersey
30   Cherry     Gdr. Jersey
30   Spots    Gdr. Jersey
70   Fern  of Sandwick  P.B. Jersey
32   Aggie   Gdr. Jersey
66   Dcbennette  .'. Gdr. Jersey
336   Strawberry 2nd  Gdr. Jersey
128   Maud    Gdr. Jersey
66   Nancy  Gdr. Jersey
75   Lonette of Kearsney   P.B. Jersey
Milk Fat
lb, lb.         Owner
1143 69.7 W. A. Urquhart
1059 59.3 Prltchard Bros.
967 56.0 W. A. Urquhart
1191 54.1 G. Hornby
885 53.1 H. Scales
981 51.0 Mrs.   Bell-Irving
678 50.8 W. A. Urquhart
858 50.6 W. A. Urquhart
1126 50.6 H. Scales
1191 60.0 T. Menzies
WM. ROSE, Supervisor.
Eye-Strain Is
Painful And
Distressing
1 1T Is amazing why so many
I persons submit to all the dls-
* treBS and discomfort of eyestrain, when certain and immediate relief can be so easily obtained.
IMPERFECT vision, headache,
nervousness and all the other
results of defective refractive conditions not only cause
you actual suffering but Impair
your efficiency as well. You
are not as good or as useful a
member of" society if a nervous-
leak caused by eye-strain is sapping your energies away.
IF you have defective eyes
you know this to be true.
Can you think of any good
reason why you allow this to
continue? Is there anything
to prevent you from putting an
end to this difficulty of yours,
Instantly and permanently?
DROP In and see me, I have
something    to    tell    you
about    your    eyes,    you
ought to know.
R. Kaplansky, 0. D.
REGISTERED   OPTOMETRIST
2:30-5:00   OFFICE   7:30-9:30
P.M.       HOURS       P.M.
*3k-* I
BRONCHITK
MIX1
■'l.WllllUllUiJIM
rent        1M
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE
Sold by Lung's Drug Store,
Cumberland, list'.
TWO "J.P'S" DISMISSED
VICTORIA, Dec. 5.—Attorney-General Manson Informed members of the
Legislature that he had dismissed two
justices of the peace recently in Saanich because they had committed great
wrong In dismissing an accused wbo
had debauched girls without placing
the man ln the witness stand.
"I shall follow the same course ln
future, regardless of anyone's poll-
tics," he warned.
HOUSE EXPRESSES
ITS APPROVAL OF
MANSON'S POLICY
NOTICr
Wood for sale $5.50 i ;r load
(Also any other ha: ling)
Telephone 92R Happy Valley
W. C. White
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
Thc White Store
Tht White Bakery
Eat McBryde's 100% Whole Wheat Bread, the loaf that drives
the poison from the system.    He that is hailed as the greatest
writer on health sayB, "Patent foodB should be shunned like the
devil and to eat the Natural Whole Wheat Bread."
First Claw Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
VICTORIA, Dec. 6.—"The most convincing argument ever put across the
floor of the House," was the way
Major R. J. Burde, Independent, Alberni, summed up the speech of Attorney-General Manson on the Janet
Smith murder mystery. The first
law officer of the Crown went fully
inlo details of the actions taken by
ills department to ruu the criminal or
criminals to earth. Keen criticism
of the government had come from opposition members, ending by their
placing on tlie order paper a resolution favoring the calling In of the
Canadian Mounted Police. Following
Mr. Manson's speech the entire Houso
expressed approval and the resolution
wns withdrawn. Hon. Mr. Manson
tokk occasion to praise the Provincial Police, a body, he declnred second to none.
^LWHERRY
tr'£Pi:1T
DR.  R. ..B.   DIER  AND  DR.
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeon*
Office:  cor. of Dunamulr Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultiy Suppliei
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orden tt
Tommy's Hardware Store
CrKBlRLAKD, ba
iA
/ TRB CUMBB.1LAND ISLANSIK
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6. 1924
.
'PHONE
133
'PHONE
133
The
Mercantile Store
Company
The General Store With a General Purpose
We are in line again for Big Business. Your needs
can be supplied at the "Mercantile" at less cost to
you, with the best of merchadise, than any other
store in the district- Read this adv.; call and find
out the truth for yourself.
Saturday, Dec, 6th is Big Business Day
Men's Department
6 only English Tweed Suits, wear like
iron. Big Business Price $19.50
Winter Overcoats for Men, three button, double breasted, half leather lined
finish.     Prices from  $25.00
Men's "Peck" made Suits, in Brown,
Grey, Blue and Checks, from $27.50
Men's 100 p.c. Wool Socks worth 85c.
for   50c
Men's Heavy Winter Pants, in Brown
and Grey Tweeds, from $3.25
Men's Black Overall Pants. Today only
Per pair $2.00
Ladies' Department
We have many useful and novelty gifts
for Christmas. These are a few things
our lady friends like. If you want a
gift for Sweetheart, Wife or Mother,
then give us a call.
Ladies' Winter Hats, some of the prettiest seen.     We will allow you 20 per
cent on any hat you may choose
Ladies'
Ladies' Winter Coats
CORRESPONDENCE
Victoria,  B.C.,
November 22, 1924.
Edward W. Bickle, Esq.,
Secretary of the
Cumberland Board of Trade,
Cumberland, B.C.,
Dear Sir;—
I have your letter of recent date,
drawing my attention to the condition
of the public highways in and around
Comox District. I have asked the
Engineering Department, to inquire
into the matter and furnish me with a
report.
I am,
Yours truly,
W. H. Sutherland,
Minister.
ANNOUNCEMENT
R. KaplanBky, O.D., the optometrist,
will hold office hours during the
month of December one day each trip
instead of two, from 10 a.m. to noon;
from 2:30 to 6 p.m.; 7:30 to 9 p.m., on
Monday, Dec. 15th, at the Surgery.
49-00.
that horseback riders  are born and
not made.
FILM ACTRESS LEARNS TO
RIDE HORSE IN TWO DAYS
Tom Mix, hard riding, straight
shooting cowboy star of William Fox
motion pictures has always contended I
Mimi Palmeri jt»"It is the Law'
WILLIAM FOX   SPECIAL   PRODUCTION
Mimi Palmeri, sloe-eyed young
Latin beauty, who is tlie leading woman player in tlie Fox special "It ls
Tbe Law," wblcb conies to the llo-
llo Theatre, Mondny and Tuesday,
December S and 9, disputed Mr. Mix
and his theory and claims that sho
learned to ride a horse in 48 hours.
She offers us proof one of her recent scenes in "It Is The Law." The
action called for Miss Palmeri to gallop along the bridle path In Central
Park. This was the first time that
Miss Palmeri hnd ever been called up
on to ride a horse.     In fact she had
never in her life been on one. When
Director J. Gordon Edwards learned
this he wrinkled his brow and suggested a "double" for her. Pretty
little Mimi would hear of no such
arrangement.
During the next two days she spent
most of ber walking hourB on horseback with an instructor. And forty-
eight hours from the time her lessons began, Miss Palmeri jumped
aboard a horse and raced through her
scene as if she had been doing it all
her life.
DANGEROUS HORSE
NEW SCREEN HERO
There have been many trained
animals In pictures, but Hal Roach
Is responsible for another screen innovation through putting an untamed
unconqttered, magnificent black stallion in tbe leading role of "The King
of Wild Horses," the Pathepicturo
showing Wednesday and Thursday,
Dec. 10 and 11 at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
Rex, he has been appropriately
named, is a beautiful Morgan and
wns anything buti a trained horse
when Roach found him. He was an
outlaw, a "killer." He was so
,hngerous his ownerB kept him
chained in a stall. He needed shoes
nnd other attention, but none could
approach him.
Roach bad sent Fred Jackman, his
director, and "Chick" Morrison, veteran horse trainer, scouting for an
equine leading man. They heard of
Rex and, after some telegraphic correspondence, they bought him. It
ook two weeks of patience and kindness for Morrison to win Rex's confidence. Then they started the picture.
Patrons of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre will
see on the screen the result' of their
humane treatment and their knowledge of animal psychology. Rex
"acts" like a seasoned trouper—lt is
difficult to realize that he has not
been retained for yearn before the
camera.
Of course no spirited stallion ever
becomes  a  gentle  house  pet.     Rex
11 never be n safe horse for domestic purposes, but the Hal Roach
studios have made him a useful citizen and brought him into a happier
life. Edna Murphy and Leon Bary
play the leading parts In the drama
of romance and Intrigue that is woven
throughout tbe horse's story.
RADI-OH!
Tom Carey was telling of "picking
up" some distant place with his radio
set and Johnny Cameron, with an air
of impatience listened to what wos
said and then suddenly burst In with,
"Say. fellows, last night the wife gave
me the mischief. I was listening ln
and got Greenland. For two hours 1
listened In and when finally I switched off, the flowers in the room were
all wilted; tbere was an inch of Ice
In the water pitcher and a couple of
inches of hoar frost on the horn."
The only way for farmers to get
even with Irresponsible picnic parties Is to start picnics in town themselves.
These  days  tliey  promise to  love,
honor nnd obey their impulses.
We have 10 left and will allow you a rebate of 20%
Shoes
We have a $15,000 Boot and Shoe Stock-
to choose from. Ask for our Tred
Right Shoe for Boys and Girls' School
wear.
We are the Loggers Outfitting Experts
Waterproof Tin Pants, double Seat and
Knee, strong and dry. Waterproof Coats
to match, with the waterproof Hat.
Loggers'   Shoes,  the   Christie   Brand,
14 in. high „ $14.00
Gloves for every branch of logging.
LARGE STOCK OF SLICKERS, RUBBER COATS AND RUBBER SHOES
The Mercantile Store Co.
The General Store With a General Purpose
DUNSMUIR AVENUE CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Dont just askfomgmmWQik for q   i_£\ LP
1
1
For Sale by Cumlierland Electric Lighting Co. /
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924
t«E CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
ON THE SUMMIT OF SUCCESS
'•A  ..
ALBERTA HORSE GOES
TO SOUTH AFRICA
The government of South Africa
has purchased from Alberta an Alberta-bred Percheron stallion which
was raised on the Bar-U ranch and
sired by the samo sire as the prize
Fercherons on the Prince of Wales
ranch.
NEW SUGAR BEET
FACTORY FOR ALBERTA
The Utah-Idaho Sugar company, of
Salt Lake City, will erect a new beet
sugar factory in southern Alberta in
the near future, and the one In the
Yakima valley, eastern Washington,
will be discontinued, according to an
announcement made recently hy company officials at Salt Lake City. The
prospects for beet raising in Alberta
are considered very good by this concern.
$850,000 WORTH OF
FOXES EXPRESSED
Two shipments of silver black foxes, which for size and value create a
new high record, passed through Montreal last week. The shipments!,
which came from Prince Edward Is-
B  -
WHAT WOULD BE NICER THAN A RADIO SET FOR THE FOLKS
AT CHRISTMAS?
We have sets to fit your pocketbook, including
RADIOLAS - DeFOREST - NORTHER ELECTRIC - ETC.
PHONE US OR COME IN FOR A DEMONSTRATION
Get Yoar Radio Equipment Where You Can Get Electrical Service
Sparks Co. (Courtenay), Ltd
Phone 99
AUTO   ELECTRICIANS   AMI  RADIO   SPECIALISTS
COUKTENAY
Phone 99
land and were handled by the Canadian National Express, consisted of
381 foxes with a total estimated value
of $850,000. The first and most valuable lot comprised 200 prize foxes
valued at $750,000, being sent to the
Ko. al Winter Agricultural show at
Toronto and representing the finest
animals Prince Edward Island lias
been able to produce. Tbe secoml
shipment consisted of 181 silver black
foxes valued at $100,000, which were
being sent to various points west to
be used for breedlug purposes. Officials of the Canadian National Express slate that not only do these
consignments represent a new higii
record for' Montreal in tlie number
and value of the foxes handled, but
Ihey also create a new world record
or this class of express business.
BUYING POWER OF
WEST IS GREATER BY
175 MILLIONS
The Canadian prairies are at last
getting their business to a point
where the balance is on the right
side of the ledger, according to various bankers and flnanclal men who
have been on the Pacific coast recently, says an eastern financial paper.
After three years of depression aud
heavy loads to carry, the Canadian
farmer is beginning to see sia.. light.
Last year there was a good crop,
but it had been planted and harvested
with high-priced labor, n terial and
machinery; but this yea. while the
fields have produced only bout two-
thirds of the volume of whi it, as that
of 1923, the planting and .larvesting
were done iu many instances for 20
cents a bushel less than last year.
In many districts the farmers' profits last year were estimated at 10
cents a bushel. This year there has
been an advance of more tban 50
cents a bushel in the price of wheat,
so that tbe farmer is not only making
this 50 cents, but he ls getting last
years prollt of 20 cents and the 20
cents a bushel saved on production
cost, making a total profit of more
tban 90 cents a bushel on his crop
this year.
A profit of 20 cents a bushel ou
430,000,000 bushels of grain produced
last year meant to the farming community of the prairies about $86,000,-
000 of a buying power; but this year,
with only 290,000,000 bushels at a pro-
{pIBIiiHEIffli!!^^
Biggest Sale
OF
Used Cars Ever Known
IF YOU HAVE THOUGHTS OF BUYING A USED CAR NOW IS YOUR
CHANCE TO PICK ONE FROM—
100CA
OF ALL MAKES
Many Late Model Geared
Cars.       Ford   Cars   and
Trucks of all Years and
Models
DO NOT MISS THIS WONDERFUL CHOICE
-AT NANAIMO-
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12 & 13 IN THE
New Garage of
NANAIMO   MOTORS
LIMITED
NOTICE
Every Car Sold Will be Numbered.
Numbers Will be Drawn at 10 p.m. Sat. Dec. 13
1st Number entitles purchaser to 100 gallons of gas
2nd Number entitles purchaser to  50 gallons of gas
0
3rd Number entitles purchaser to  25 gallons of gas
TO   BE   DRAWN   AS   REQUIRED   FBOM   NEAREST   "CORFIELD   GARAGE"
Duncan — Ladysmith — Nanaimo — Alberni — Courtenay
!BK,EMaM2.,3I'aE*'E*'HEIEIs,M
Gifts that last
Sale continues
Xmas Sale
Buy Now
and  get
to Dec. 31 OF JEWELRY First Choice
20 TO 50 PER CENT. DISCOUNT OFF
Jewelry,  Watches,  Clocks,  Silver Plate,  Cut Glass,
Leather Goods and Novelties
LADIES' WRIST WATCHES
15 jewel movement, In
"Cashier" Gold-filled Cases,
assorted shapes. Reg. up to
$16.50.      Now      $11.2.1
17 JEWEL  MOVEMENT
Rectangular Shape, in White
Gold and Yellow Gold. Reg.   gj
price $25.00.     Sale .... %2l2So
OTHER  WRIST   WATCHES
greatly reduced.     On some,
prices cut to half. m
£
S
]
fi
1
I
|
E
I
1
-$r-
RINGS
10K. Onyx and Pearl. Reg.
$5.00.      Now   i,  $8.75
10K.    Signet   Rings. Reg.
$6.00.      Now   ..._  $3.75
10K. Baby Rings. Reg. $1.25
to $1.50.     Now   75c.
20% off Sliver Plate
20% to 30%off
All Leather Goods
20% to 25% off
All French Ivory
20% to 30% off
All China and Cut Glass
IS JEWEL, 14 K. SOLID
Gold Case and Bracelet. Reg.
$05.00.     Now   $50.00
PEARLS
24-In Indestructible Pearls.
Reg. $3.00 to $3.50 Now $1.95
30-in Indestructible Pea* 's.
Reg. $6.00.     Now   f'  10
SOLID GOLD
Broaches, Necklets,
Cuff Links, Scarf Pins,
All reduced 20% to 60%
SMOKERS
Pipes, Tobacco, Pouches.
Cigarette Cases, Cigarette
Holders. All reduced from
20%  to  50%
G. R. MUTRIE
Jeweler
Courtenay
Is Your Car An
Oil Pumper?
•
If so, let us instal oil rings, giving you a reduction in
oil consumption as high as 600 per cent. If your cylinders are roughed, let us grind them, with a Halts
Cylinder Hone, to a perfect fit. The job soon pays for
itself in reduction of oil and gas. We repair any make
of car.     Welding and brazing done while you wait.
Geo. H. Pidcock
Gases, Oils and General Accessories
Courtenay, B.C.
fit of 90 cents a bushel, will give the
farmers In the aggregate approximately $261,000,000, or $175,000,000 more
than last year.
GETTING OUT A PAPER
Getting out a paper Is no joke.
If we print a lot of jokes, people
say we are silly.
If we don't, they say we are too
serious.
If we publish original matter, they
say we lack variety.
If we publish things from other
papers, we are too laz/ to write.
If we are rustling news all the time
we are not attending to the business
of our department.
Like as not some fellow will say
we swiped this trom an exchange.
So we did.
INCREASED VALUE OF
SETTLERS' SUPPLIES
An Indication of tlie Increase In the
value of effects being brought Into
Canada by settlers from tbe United
States is shown In the latest report
of the department of trade and commerce. From April 1 to Sept 30,
1924, settlers effects to tlle value of
$3,129,339 were brought from tho
United States Into Canada, compared
with $2,666,467 ln the same period
last year. In September alone this
year, the value of settlers effects
brought into the Dominion by former
residents of the United States wos
$541,123, compared with $461,519 lu*
August, 1924, and $503,437 in September, 1923.
LOOKING AFTER
INTERESTS OF B.C.
The government's determination to
fight the freight rates case to a finish
has resulted In sending Mr. G. G. McGeer, K.C, to Ottawa to hold a watching brief when the prairie provinces
fight for the restoration of the Crow'B
Nest Pass Agreement rates. Should
they succeed In winning their point
Mr. McGeer will protect British Columbia's Interests by insisting that
these rates apply eastward as well as
westward.
The annual meeting ot the Calgary
Exhibition company a few days ago
revealed the gratifying fact that the
surplus from the 1924 exhibition and
stampede was $15,582 and the total
attendance 167,279.   •
FOR RENT—STORE IN THE HAW-
thorne Bldg., Courtenay, B.C. Apply Mr. Clarkson, c-o The Farmers
Produce Store, Courtenay, B.C. 48.
WANTED—DIAMOND   DRILL,   OUT-
flt complete.     State price to operate or rent. Address X X, Islander.
41.
WANTED—TO HEAR FROM OWNER
of good farm for sale. State cash
price, full particulars. D. F. Bush,
Minneapolis, Minn. 48.
LOST—A STERLING SILVER CIO-
arette case. Initials T.H.W. Please
return to Islander Office. 49.
FOR SALE—PURE BRED COLLIE
Puppies, five months old. Female
$20.00 up; male $25.00 up. Apply H.
R. Hassell, P.O. Box 592, Cumberland.     Residence, Company Farm,
T. Malpass
GENERAL  HAULING
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please leave your orders at office
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
SERVICE IS Ol'B MOTTO
OR PHONE 15 UNION HOTEL
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
T. Malpass
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland TEN
1*HE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1924
Christmas
Neckwear
YES, here are Christmas
Ties that are every-day
Ties—made to be worn
with satisfaction. No matter what selection you
make yen are assured
pleasing pattern.1-*, quality
and low prices.
Men's Ties lead the way as
one of the most acceptable
remembrances that could
be desired, we have a very
large stock of smart up-to-
date neckties, delivered
from Toronto and New
York. We especially desire to draw your attention
to the"New Cheney"which
have arrived. Prices  from
75c to $2.95
Men's Dressy
SHIRTS
Your choice of one of
our New Snappy Forsyth Shirts, everyone
carrying the guarantee
of the makers, will prove
a gift that will be appreciated. See these
in the new stripes; also
in the new plain broadcloths which are so much
used at present. The
price of these (roods are
in keeping with the
quality.
Men's Pure Linen Handkerchiefs are worthy of appreciation and will prove a very useful present for the
festive season.
Men's Gloves, lined and unlined, are being shown a3 a
remembrance of goodwill. Select yours now.
Men's Silk Sox in the most desirable shades are showing in nice qualities. Give a box of three pitirs for
your gift, they sure will please.
Men's Sweater Coats, made by Vancouver firms. Every
garment made of 100 p.c. all wool. Most useful and
comfortable gifts.
We invite your inspection of the many Xmas Gifts
which will be on display on our counters. Gifts suitable for the whole family.
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
sT '* iaaU Os-.sy ETrHaXStiiSi .5 s -ax** ' *»* sv
 KEEP THIS DATE OPEN	
December 23rd, 1924
Big Christmas Dance
GAIETY THEATRE
Courtenay, B.C.
Local Briefs
m^^^^m^^w^^^^^km^^^^v^M
Xmas Gifts
I
GENUINE
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Parfltt wlio
have been visiting with Mr. and Mrs.
S. Horwood for the past ten days returned to their home in Victoria on
Thursday morning.
"   »   *
Mrs. R,  Abrams and daughter returned from Vancouver   on    Sunday
last.      Mr. Abrams  motored  to  Nanaimo to meet them.
"   "   *
Mr. E. H. Ruttan, Dominion Meter
Inspector, of Victoria, is in town.
*   *   *
Lieutenant Colonel Charles Villiers
General Manager of ihe Canadian Collieries (iJ) Ltd., accompanied by his
daughter Angela Villiers returned to
Victoria on Thursday morning.
French Ivory
WE CAN MAKE UP SETS TO SUIT ANY PURSE.
SETS BEADY .MADE PRICED FlJO.M S10.00
Gift Stationery
OUR STOCK OF FANCY
Boxes range in price
FROM 60c. TO $6.50
Chocolates
INSPECT OUR STOCK OF FANCY BOXES JUST
RECEIVED FROM THE FACTORIES OF
MOIRS — NEILSONS — CANONS
SEfiai'iy*''!''^^
Lang's Drug Store
THE REXALL-KODAK STORE
"It   PAYS   to   DEAL   at   LANG'S" "£
UNION BAY NOTES
Mr. and Mr8. Walker of Cranbrook,
left on Tuesday morning after spending a short visit with their cousin,
Hev. A. Walker.
Surprise Party
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Glover left
for an out-of-town visit on Tuesday.
A delightful surprise party was
given to Mr. West Peters on Monday,
the occasion of his twenty-flrst birthday. The earlier part of the evening was spent at Court Whist, the
prize winners being, Ladies' lirst,Miss
Edith Brown; second, .Miss Helen
Haggart; consolation, Miss Frances
McRay. Gent's flrst prize, Mr. Russell Hicks; second, Mr. Harry Glover;
consolation, Mr. S. Nakamura. Dainty
refreshments were then served and
the remainder of the evening was
spent in music and games, the guests
taking their departure ln the "wee
smae hours."
Miss Mary Little entertained many
of her young friends on Wednesday
evening, it being her thirteenth birthday. The evening was very pleasantly spent at music and games.
Union Bay Shipping
The following boats called ut
Union Bay during tlie week: Peerless, Dauntless, Mogal, Chleftan,
Shamrock, Sheaf Mount, Plunger and
Scow, Trolyon, Pawnee, Pacific Monarch, Brunette, Hulk "100", Wireless,
and Massett.
CARD OF THANKS
Mr. James Mutter and family wish
to thank the many kind friends and
acquaintances for their ready help
and sympathy during the recent bereavement of a dear wife and mother,
also the Ladies' Aid and First Aid
Associations for their much appreciated assistance.
CARD OK THANKS
Benevolence Temple No. 9, Pythian
Sisters, desire to express sincere
thanks to all those who so willingly
assisted them, by their presence and
contributions, at the donation tea
held at the home of Mrs. V. Frelone
on Monday evening. The numerous
donations and the sum of money collected brought untold joy to the family for whose benefit the tea was Intended.
Mr. R. Hindmarsh of Nanaimo visited Cumberland this week.
NEW SCHEDULE OF
C.N.R. PROVIDES GREATLY
IMPROVED SERVICE
LOST—A »5.00 BILL ON WEDNES-
day afternoon between Allan Ave.
and the Anglican Church Hall. Will
finder please return to the Islander
office. Loser can ill afford to be
without trie money. 49.
WINNIPEG, Dec. 1.—ln line with
the progressive policy adopted by the
Canadian National Railways of bettering train services whenever possible, "Thc National," one of the company's crack trains providing service
between the cities of Toronto and
Winnipeg, on December 6 will be
placed on the fastest running time
between those two points. ln the
past Mils train has been the popular
ineaiiB of travel between those two
cities, and it has also been used, to
a large extent, by those travelling between Montreal and Winnipeg. Some
time hack, the opening of Long Lac
cut-off provided a shorter route between the Ontario city and the metropolis of the West, and now, taking the fullest advantage of the new
route, the running time of this train
will be cut down to 38 hours, a trifle
over a day and a half. The former
time necessary to reach Winnipeg
from Toronto was 41 hours 55 minutes
and coming East 41 hours' 50 minutes.
The present running time will be actually 37 hours 50 minutes coming
East and 38 hours going West. The
National provides an added incentive
for travellers, whether business men
or tourlBts in the convenience of the
new hours of departure and arrival,
westbound. The train, which is
known as .No. 3. will leave Toronto at
8:35 p.m., giving ample time for tho
filling of dinner engagements before
departure of tlie train and arriving In
Winnipeg at 9:40 on the morning of
the second day, in time for business
appointments; also providing a. full
day In that city before the departure time of Train No. 1 for points
further West.
The eastbound train, known as No.
4, will leave Winnipeg on the new
schedule at 4:50 o'clock in the afternoon, of the second day. The arrival
time at Toronto is the same as in the
former schedule, which provides opportunity for breakfast, followed by
a full day for travellers bound for
Montreal and other Eastern points,
and also gives those coming from
points west of Winnipeg four hours
additional In Toronto.
"The National" is one of the Canadian National Railways' all steel
equipped trains, including colonist car
wilh lunch counter service, one first
class coach, tourist sleeper, through
diner and three standard sleepers.
One of these sleepers runs through
to Sudbury on the westbound train,
being picked up at Sudbury on the
eastbound train. Another runs from
Toronto to Port Arthur on the westbound train, running from Port Arthur
to Toronto on the eastbound train In
connection with trains between Long
Lac and Port Arthur. The third
sleeper operates between Toronto and
Edmonton, running west of Winnipeg
in connection with "The Continental
Limited," Radio equipped compartment, observation, library, buffet cars
are also operated on these trains.
If Is said that "The National" provides everything that the traveler
could wish for, including speed and
comfort.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Christmas Gifts for
Ladies
When you are wondering what to select for
Xmas, come down and
let us help you solve the
problem. Come early
and you can shop in
comfort; it will be a
pleasure.
Perhaps you would like a Sweater or Knit Suit,
one of the New Blouses or an Afternoon Dress. We
can show you also some lovely Scarfs, Neckwear,
Handkerchiefs, Lingerie, Hose and lots of Novelties.
We took over a small quantity of toys from Mr.
Emeric and are selling these at cost—No room for toys
Miss E. M. E. Johnson
MASONIC BLOCK, COURTENAY
Phone 177 P.O. Box 149
Dr. R. P. Christie will be at his
Cumberland Surgery in King Block,
every Wednesday afternoon. Evenings by appointment. Appointment!-,
can be made at Mrs. King's.
Mrs. R. T. Cooper returned on
Thursday's train from a three weeks'
vacation spent with friends and relatives in Vancouver and New Westminister.
NOTICE
Will the person who took the garden hose on Monday from house vacated by Mr. T. Scott, please return
name and avoid further proceedings.
Mr. T. Scott. Mrs. Scott and Miss
Scott 'eft on Tuesday morning for
Vancouver where Mrs. Scott and Miss
Scott will remain for a time. Mr.
Scott proceeded to Cadomin where
lie will take up his future residence.
BSE
Xmas Gift Suggestions
EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY OR
YOUR FRIENDS.
Come into our store and see our complete display of
scores of Christmas Gifts.   The best obtainable at
reasonable prices.
Fancy Box Chocolates, all sizes, also special lines in
Family Sizes, Nut Bars, etc., Special Boiled Candy,
mixed, all flavors; Chirstmas Stockings and Bon-Bons,
etc., all sizes; Chirstmas Cigars; Cigarettes; Tobacco's
all popular brands and siz;>s;  Pipes and Cigarettu
Holders and Pouches, etc.
Fancy Crockery; Tea Sets; Dinner Sets, etc.; Fancy
Glassware; Berry Sets; Table Sets; Sugar and Cream
Sets; Water Sets; Fruit Bowls; Bon-Bon Dishes; Vases
Tumblers and Wine Glasses
Rogers Famous Silverplate Cutlery; A full stock to
choose from: Table Knives, Forks, Spoons, etc.; Stainless Knives; Carving Sets and Cabinet Sets.
Full Stock of Wear-Ever Aluminum Ware Kitchen
Utensils,
FRUITS
Jap Oranges; New Season's Naval Oranges; Lemons
Florida Grape Fruit; Bananas; Pomegranates; Red
Emporer Grapes; Spanish Malaga Grapes; Fancy Table
Apples, Cranberries, etc.
VEGETABLES
Hot House Tomatoes; Cucumbers; Cauliflower; Cabbage ; California Head Lettuce; Spanish Onions; Celery
Sweet Potatoes; Carrots; Beets; Turnips, etc.
BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS FRUIT NOW
Matt Brown's Grocery
.   FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
m. De
^22j$f Forest
Crosley
RADIOS
Puts the Merriment in
Merry i Christmas
If you want to be sure of Christmas delivery—
delay no longer—arrange with us for your DeForest-
Crosley Radiophone now!
The DeForest-Crosley Trirdyn is the greatest
value ever offered in radio. Five tube volume and
distance—three tube economy in both first cost and
upkeep.
Remember—anyone can operate the DeForest-
Crosley; it is simple and we supply full directions.
You can order a set from us knowing that the fortunate recipient will get wonderful radio right from the
beginning. Come in; ask us all the questions you
like.    See our sets.    Do it now.
There's a RADIOPHONE for every home
Six New Models
$22.00 to $450.00
Cumberland
Motor Works
Sole Distributor
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B.C.
!

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