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The Cumberland Islander Aug 30, 1924

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Array Tim CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
ti
•""u
'S3
With which la consolMuted the Cumberland News.
FORTY-THIRD YEAR—No. 35.
CUMBERLAND. BRITISH COLUMBIA      SATURDAY. At'CUST 30, 1924
AVG
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
PREPARATIONS FOR BIG
DAY WELL ADVANCED
Everything Is ln readiness tor u
good d.iu- for the children In Cum-
beralnd on Monday next. This being
the last holiday before the re-opening of school after the summer vacation the committee is desirous of making the day a happy event tor tlie!
children and the parents are requested to send the children to the Recreation Grounds at 10 p.m. so that each i
child will have an equal opportunity I
of getting a prize. There will be j
boys' and girls' races for all agns
from 6 years up to 15 years, Including novelty races, skipping contests,
pillow lights, cracker-eating contests,
Jumping contest, etc., etc. The grown
tips have not been forgotten either,
there will races for single and mar- j
ried ladles, also a great qunltlng competition for the men, We understand
that a large number of entries are In
for the latter competition and very
keen rivalry is anticipated as there
are a great number of good quoiters
In Cumberland.
A representation of a small coal
mine has heen erected on the Recreation Grounds where a demonstration
of the hazardous work of Mine Rescue will be given. The rescue teams
will wear self-contained breathing
apparatus and will be entirely dependent on them for the necessary
air for breathing purposes while in
the mine. Heavy tasks will be given the teams to perforin and each
team will be given a different task.
A large number of entries are in
for the First Aid Contests and a line
tlemoustratioii nf this noble work will
be given on the fleld. There nre
senior and junior teams, also a number of ladles' teams entered in the
competition and keen but friendly
rivalry is known to exist, and a very
keen competition is anticipated.
The prizes for the above competition have been on display in the windows of Lang's Drug Store and the
winners of these prizes will lie sure to
appreciate them as they are made of
the very best material and  in addition are most useful.
A very interesting part of the program will he the Boy Scout demonstration, which will include tent build
ing, etc. The Scouts under the able
leadership of the Rev. W. Leversedge.
will be composed ot Cumberland.
Courtenay and Union Bay Scouts and
their demonstration will be education,
al as well as interesting.
After the day's competitions and
sports are over, a free concert will be
given in the Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall and
n splendid program bus been arranged, during which the prizes will be
presented to the winning teams, by
the Hon. Wm. Sloan, minister of
mines, for the Province of Uritish
Columbia. Immediately after the
concert a dance will be held by the
Cumberland Centre, St. John's Ambulance Association. Good music
has been provided for the dance and
everyone is assured n good time by
the enegellc committee In charge.
There will be other attractions that
evening but the public should give
as much support as possible to this
noble cause. The First Aid Man's
activities goes unheralded and he is
constantly working to keep himself
fit to render flrst aid to any unfortunate person who might be In need of
the services of a Ilrst aid man. This
work is without remuneration other
than the Joy experienced in being able
to alleviate pain and suffering and
instances hnve occurred where tho
lives of many unfortunate victims of
accident hnve lieeu saved and Intense
suffering prevented by the timely assistance rendered by the Ilrst aid man.
The general public is hereby requested to give all the help they can
to make tbe donee a success as the
only way In which funds are collected for this great work is through so-
clul entertainments of this kind, so
come on everybody, let us help the
boys all we can and make the dance
a huge success as a proper and fitting ending to a good day's sport.
Return Match
Gives Home Club
Another Win
Malcolm Dixon
Crushed to Death
Beneath Train
PREMIER ELECTED BY
A LARGE MAJORITY
The courts of the Cumberland Ten-
I nis Club were the scene of a very fast
! and   Interesting   tournament   Sunday
, last when the local players were at
home to the Alberni Club In a return
! match fnr the one Cumberland play
j ed In  the  West Coast City the pre-
| ceedlng week.     A better knowledge
> of (lie hoards, Alberni being used to
grass courts, favored the home club
and Ihey run out final winners by a
score of 12 matches to 3.      I'nfort.i-
| nately none of the Alberni ladies were
able to  make the  trip, the  visiting
I team consisting ot eight men, Messrs
! 0. Matson, F. H. Swayne, V. C. Braml
■ combe,   H. A. Hoad,   0, Spratt,    II.
Hodgson, li. Walker. P. Payne.
Alberni arrived nt D.30 and play be-
I gun uu  hour  later, continuing until
( noon when an hour's recess was tak-
I en for luncheon in the Union Hotel.
j Beginning again  at one o'clock  the
| play continued steadily until six during which afternoon tea was served
by several lady members of the Cumberland Club.      After dinner, lu the
same Hotel, the Alberni team returned  home, expressing  themselves    as
having had a most enjoyable day and
some of the best tennis they have had
yet this season.
Following are the res ults  of the
(Continued on Page Eight)
(Special to The Islander)
LADYSMITH, Aug. 28. — Malcolm
James Dixon a 20-year-old student of
University of B.C.. met with a tragic
deatli yesterday at Ladysmith when
he walked in front of a slowly approaching train and was ground to
death by tlle Ilrst wheel of the liox
car approaching.
Young Dixon had on Wednesday
evening arrived at Ladysmith on u
visit to his brother, .Mr. George II.
Dixon whurllnger and yesterday morning uccompnnied his brother to the
wharf where he was entering ou his
day's work. Taking leave of bis
brother he started back to the cily,
w. "ig along the track apparently
lost in thought as his hend was lowered anil he was ou a clen - track when
seen by the train crew of a string of
cars whicli was being slowlj backed
onto tbe wharf.
While thirty feet away he raised
his head nnd saw the train but when
it was utmost opposite where hu wus
walking he for some reason stepped
directly in front of the can and was
run over by the heavy empty, death
being instantaneous. His neck was
broken and his shoulder blndly crushed.
I saw it a deserted city, so Tar as poli-
i ticians were concerned, the last of
j whom left the interior city on Sun-
[ day last, the day nfter the memorable
election,   wherein   Premier  John  01-
I lver was returned over    Mr.    Harry
Houston   by  (he  handsome  majority
I of 338.
The Official figures supplied by re-
I (urn ing ollicer Fnwcett are as fol-
I lows: 1124 for Oliver and 786 for
j Houston.     Oliver polled (HI) In .Net-
Fine Concert Very Poorly Attended
Flings $4,500
In The Faces Of
Detectives
(Special to The islander)
NEW YORK, Aug. 28.—Dorothy
Burns, 22 former burlesque actress,
flung $4,500 in the faces nf detectives
today and sobbed a confession which
her captors declared solved one of the
biggest and most daring gem thefts
in the history of maiden lane.
Ontario Team
Defeats Tourists
The Gideon Hicks Concert Party
on their summer tour of Vancouver
Island gave a concert in the llo-llo
Theatre on Wednesday, which was
very poorly attended. The failure
of a company of artistic singers to
draw a crowd at the Ilo-Ilo, simply
brings home the fact that it is difficult to do business without advertising extensively. The company of
artists appearing here on Wednesday
last are the most charming and versatile singers to appear in Cumberland in a long, long time, yet they
sang to vacant chairs.
The concert was Indeed a rare
treat for lovers of high class music.
Mr. Claude Anstend showing marked
Improvement since his last appearance here.     Miss Dorothy Hicks won
the hearts of her audience by her
sweet and charming voice and manner, which will assure n great future. Miss Ida New posseses a deep
and lull contralto voice and with
more study will win herself a place
in the musical world.
Mr. Gideon Hicks needs no introduction to the lovers of the best In
music, who ranks as the greaelst
baritone in Canada. Mrs. Clifford
Wain as accompanist, as usual, was
perfect In every respect.     After the
| concert the party adjourned to the
home of Mr. and Mrs. L. It. Stevens,
i where light refreshments were served. Solos were rendered by Miss D.
Hicks, Mr. Gideon Hicks and violin
selections by Miss Marjorie Stevens.
The City of Nelson has been, for
about ten days, a city amidst grenl
excitement.      Monday   morning   laut
Yesterday's
Baseball News
(Special to The Islander)
Coast League: —
Seattle 7, Vernon^ 4.
San Francisco 1, Salt Lake 3.
Portland 4, Oakland 5.
Los Angeles 16. Sacramento
American League:—
Chicago (1-7, Cleveland  7-6.
Plladelphia 3-7, Boston, 6-.S.
Washington 11. New York 6.
National League:—
Boston 0-3, Philadelphia 1-0.
Cinclnnatti 5, Pittsburg 4.
St. Louis 2-3, Chicago 5-8.
son City nnd 175 in Kalrvew, the residential suburb, while Housten had
(127 ln the city and 159 In Falrvlew.
After the results were made known,
the defeated candidate. Mr. Harry
Housten, was one of the first to congratulate Premier Oliver. He climbed on the running board of the Premier's car and shook hands with him
publicly. Tbe defeated candidate did
not make any comments on the result beyond the statement that he had
done the best he could and that he
felt it no disgrace to have been beaten by the Premier of tlle Province on
his Ilrst plunge inlo politics.
11.
BIG CLASSY DANCE
HERE ON MONDAY
NEW HIGH SCHOOL
PRINCIPAL FOR
NANAIMO APPOINTED
Mr. De Mecedo, at a special meeting of the Nanaimo School Board was
appointed Principal of the .Nanaimo
High School.
"Old Timers"
Put Up Great
Fight Sunday
Old Father Time, present ut Inst
Sunday's ball game, to ring down tlie
curtain on the 1924 baseball season,
received a rude shock. He frowned
nearly all through the game and no
wonder! Those old ball tassel's
whom Dad Time had earmarked as
"through" as far as baseball Is concerned galloped In open defiance on
the ball park, gave the senior aggregation a severe fright and had hanl
luck to lose 18-10. A substantial
crowd of the fans were present to
look over the "has-beens" and at (lie
same time witness the last game on
the local grounds this season. Everybody was out for a good time and
they certainly got it.
Four Pitchers I'sed
"Coal Oil" Johnny Stant hurled an
Invincible game until the end of the
fifth frame when the senior team
touched him up a bit. He allowed
ten runs and as many hits during his
stay on the mound. Malinger Farmer realized Johnny was out of training, chased the latter to the showers
and rushed Bet Davis Into    III!    the
(Continued on  Page Five)
(Special to The Islander)
FORT WILLIAM, Aug. 28.—The
new Ontario team composed of picked
players of Fort William and Port Arthur defeated the visiting Corinthians
Soccer team tonight 1 to nil.
Innacuracies In
Letters To Britain
Interesting Boxing
Tournament At
Fanny Bay Sunday
Fanny Bay was the scene of an interesting boxing tournament on Sunday last, August 24th. Mr. Gibbs, of
Waterloo Park had erected an outdoor
platform for the occasion and quite
a large crowd turned out; a great
many ladles being present.
The first preliminary was two 2-
niinute rounds between L. Larson and
D. Stewart, and the second, three 3-
minute rounds between J. McKay and
T. Ferguson. Both these bouts were
very even, the judges djecluring :i
draw In both cases.
The main event between two local
boys, Wade McLauchlin aud Charlie
Tweedle, was a "hum-dlngcr." Five
2-minute rounds were boxed and a
fast pace was set right frnm tin'
sound of the gong until the final
round, when McLauchlin wus awarded
the decision. The first, second.
fourth and fifth rounds went tn McLauchlin, while the third round was
declared even. Messrs Sialisic and
Bruce of Bloedell and Dollar Camps
were the judges, with Mr. Bally of the
Forestry Service acting as referee.
Revelstoke Settler Says Alberta
Farmers Clothes Are
Flour Bags
Miss W. Miller
Died Saturday
LONDON,—The attention of the
Canadian High Commissioner's office
has been drawn to the fact that while
the Canadian Government is attempting to attract settlers, others who
have already settled in Canada are
writing British newspapers discouraging reports of conditions and prospects there. One writer in a letter
from Revelstoke, B.C., affirms that
Alberta farmers are reduced to wealing flour bags in lieu of orthodox
garments.
"Apart from stch Inaccuracies.'
says an official of the High Commissioner's office, "writers of letters to
newspapers studiously avoid such
facts as last year's record harvest
and Ihe equally striking immigration
returns. Unfortunately those who
succeed rarely think of backing Ottawa's efforts by writing to thc British press about their success. Tliey
leave the letter-writing to others who,
while grumbling, still find Canadu a
desirable country to live In."
The High Commlslsoner's ollice reports that the Alberta scheme for
training young farmers from Great
Britain Is receiving favorable attention here,
SERVICES
AT
HOLY TRINITY
Services at Holy Trinity Anglican
Church for Sunday, August 31st will
be:
Mattlns and Holy Communion nt
11 a.m.
Evensong 8 p.m.
Sunday School re-opens Sunday,
September 7th at 2.30 p.m.
Mrs. James Nicholson, Mrs. Ernest
Doherty und Miss Gordon of Vancouver, were the guests of Mrs. Wm.
Walker during tho past week.
Campers Are
Leaving Royson
iWitli the camping season drawing
to a close for this year, and school
commencing on Tuesday, September
2nd, many of the families who have
been camping at Royston for the
.summer, have moved back to Cumberland during the past week.
Among those reluming were:
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. T. Brown and family; Mr. and Mrs. J. Westfield and
family; Mr. and Mrs. John Sutherland; Mr. and Mrs, A. McKinnon; Mr.
and Mra. Thos. Mordy, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Kceler and others.
Miss Willamena Miller, daughter ot
Mr. and Mrs. H. Miller, of Minto Valley, Cumberland, died, on Saturday
morning last. The deceased girl
who was 23 years of age, had been
an Invalid for the past eighteen years,
an accident at the tender age of live
years depriving her of any assistance
of a healthy life.
The funeral took place on Monday
afternoon at 2.30 from the family
residence at Minto. Interment took
place In the Cumberland Cemetery
with the Hev. James Hood the officiating clergyman. The pall bearers, all
friends of thc deceased girl, were:
Jim Hutton, Erwin Mergict, Bill Grey,
Laurence Wain, John Pearse and
John Monks. Many beautiful floral
tributes were received, the following
being a list:
Pillow—Mother and Father.
Wreaths—Sisters and Brother, Uncle Archie, Mrs. Whltehouse and Billy, Mr. and Mrs. J. Idlens.
Crosses—Sisters-in-law. Mr, nml
Mrs. J. D. Davis.
Sprays—Brothers-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Jim Monks, Nellie I. Margarcl
Monks, Mr. and Mrs. Dillman, Mr. and
Mrs. A. Watson ond family nephews
and niece, Mr nnd Mrs. John Nullcs
Sr„ Mr. and Mrs. John Nulles Jr..
Mr. and Mrs. II. F. Wallace, John
Monks, Mrs. Embleton. Mr. and Mis.
Thos. Pearse Jr., Nancy Williamson,
Mrs. Walter Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Pearse.
Four Houses Are
Destroyed By Fire
(Special to The Islander)
NANAIMO. Aug. 29.—Big lire reported at Ladysmith this morning, in
the residential section nf town, four
houses being burnt down, Is now
under control.
The Cumberland Centre St. John's
Ambulance Association are giving a
free concert In the Ilo-Ilo Hall on
Monday (Labor Day) commencing al
8 p.m. followed by a big. classy dance.
Tlie admisison to the dance will be
Gents. $1.00. Ladles 25c. Tlle concert and dance are being run as tit-
ting terminations to what Is expected to he the best fleld day of the Vancouver Island Mine Saftey Association
when teams from all over the Island
will compete In First Aid nnd Mine
Rescue Work.
Gold Medal
Is Presented To
M. McNaughton
On behalf of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsuuir) Ltd., .Mr. Thomas Graham this afternoon presented Miss
Margaret McNaughton with the C.C.D.
Ltd., Medal which is awarded annually by the Company to the Matriculation student making the highest total in the final exams. Miss McNaughton, who lives in Minto, was
this year's successful winner. The
presentation was made in the Council
Chambers at 4 o'clock in the presence of representatives of the School
I Board and the Parent-Teachers Asso-
' elation. Miss McNaughton responded to Mr Graham's presentation address with a very neat speech of
thanks
The reason for the hurried presentation wns because Margaret Is
leaving for Victoria tomorrow morning to attend Ihe Normal School there
Fire Destroyed
Royston Home
Last Sunday
Last Saturday morning at 11
o'clock, the residence of Mr. and Mrs.
P, Wilcock, of Royston, was completely gutted by fire. The origin of
the blaze is uncertain, but it I
thought that defective wiring or a
flaw In the chimney may have been
the cause.
At about 10.45, Mr. Wilcock lit «t
fire in the rang*, prior to preparing
the mid-day meal, aa Mrs. Wllcok WQJ
visiting at Nanaimo and while in thr
bouse at this time smoke was d>.
tected. Ou entering other parts ol
the house Air. Wilcock noticed more
smoke aud by the time he had reached the outer parts again, neighbors
seeing the dense smoke, bad appeared on (he scene in an fltidenvoi
to render assistance.
In less than three-quarters of au
hour, while friends had cleared out
most of the furniture of the lower
portion of the house, what was once
among the most beautiful residences
of Royston, modern in every respect
and located on the sea shore, with
pleasing surroundings, was a mass of
ruins. ,
The loss Is estimated at $2,000 and
is partly covered by Insurance. Mr.
Wilcock is not certain whether he will
build again this fall or next spring,
but Intends to erect as modern a
house as the one desrtoyed and take
this opportunity of thanking all those
who so willingly gave tbelr assistance
and sympathies.
F. R. SHENSTONE
OF COURTENAY IS
NEW PRINCIPAL
At a special meeting of the Board
of School Trustees on Monday evening to consider the High School vacancy, Air. Frederick Robert Shenstone was appointed Principal of the
Cumberland High School at a salary
Of $2,500.00.
Mr. Shenstone comes highly recommended from the Royal University of
Ireland. He was teaching in the
South Vancouver High School under
Mr. Palmer for twelve months aud a
similar period with the Courtenay
High School and it is generally expected that Air. Shenstone will be able
to deliver the goods.
In our Puhlic Schols, Aliss McKinnon and Miss Hood were appointed to
take the places of Aliss Harrison ond
Mrs, GatZ, resigned.
Afr. ond Airs. J, Idiens of Koyston.
were hosts to a few friends this week,
in honor of Air. Leslie Moody, Of
Moody's Orchestra, who will soon
join the Benedicts.
Victoria Takes
Baseball Title
FromCourtenay
Playing un airtight brand of bull
behind Pitcher Mnlcora, the C P. It
bull team, Victoria champions, trounced Courtenay, Up-Ialand \vtnnerB, 6-11
In the final and deciding game ror the
Island chiinipjoiiHliip ul Niiniiiinii Sunday afternoon, The game was closely
contesjed and wus watched by a large
crowd of fans. As » result of their
win (ho Railroaders cum the right to
meet either Hammond Cedars or (he
Young Liberals of Vancouver In tho
final series for the B.C. title. The
Ilrst game of the series will be played
In Victoria today.
Mattle Malcom, for the ('. I', It..
pitched a great game Sunday, allowing bui six liils anil funning six
men. Boyd, for Oourtenay, also was
In great form and allowed five hits,
striking oul seven. The big up-is-
Itind imrler wns inclined to he wild
at limes nnd the support he received
from his tenm mules was poor.
Score:
R. H. E.
Victoria     5   5   2
Courtenay        2   6   :i
Battries: Malcom and Minnies;
Boyd and Wowney. PAGE TWO
IHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924.
faiBiaaiim'ggE'giaiiiBiBi^^
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
Produced-in-Canada
To The Fore Again
ilrablllty of buying produced-ln-Can-
adn goods is being renewed. These
shows, at which so many of the finest
products of the (arm and factory aro
exhibited, afford un ideal opportunity
With the advent of the exhibition ' through which to drive   this   lesson
Inline.      As  in  previous years, agricultural     societies     and     exhibition
and fall fair season, the efl'ort to impress on (he Canadian people the da-
McBRYDE'S  BAKERY
The White Store The White Bakery
How to live a hundred yenrs—Bury the Pepper dish
and the Vinegar bottle and eat McBryde's 100 per cent
Whole Wheat, Bread
Always a nice selection of cakes to choose from, which
you know.
Not How Cheap—But How Good
First Class Certificate (Upper Grade) for bread baking
guarantees the quality
The Holding-on-to Quality Store
THE COURTENAY TEA ROOM
HUNTERS!
Before buying your Guns and Ammunition for the
coming season which opens September 13th, call and
inspect our complete line of Shot Guns, Rifles, Hunters' Clothing, Compasses, Knives, Cleaning Kits, Rust
Removers, Oils, Etc., Etc.
All kinds of Metallics and Shells, comprising the
famous Black Shell in 3 grades: Ajax, Climax and
Homax, Superex and Dominions.
THE
Piket Electric
Telephone Hi I
Courtenay
Canadian National Railways
EDWARD W. BICKLE    AGENT
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"WHERE QUALITY COUNTS"
MEATS   POULTRY   FISH
  AND VEGETABLES 	
Telephone 143 P. 0. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
boards having charge of the arrangement are co-operating with the Canadian Manufacturers' Association In
causing cards to be placed on all exhibits of Canadian products, so that
(lie attention of visitors will at once
be drawn to the fact these are the
fruits of Canadian industry, both agricultural and manufacturing. As
approximately 500 exhibitions and
fairs are held In Canada each year,
and as tho total attendance is very
large, the extent to which the fads
£,BMy«CM Promts!
!.OMe.lMl.>|tfmmn
Rh» rtm tresCtaan, Char and fSsaMsT.
Writ* for FrwIreCira Book.
HMMti<aM<rs>.«tM(awot««i.cuuio
DR. .11.   B,   DIER  AND   DR
W  .BRUCE  GORDON
Dental Surgeons
Office:  Cor. of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
of Canada production are brought to
public attention Is correspondingly
great.
The objects of the produced-ln-
Canada campaign, inaugurated loug
ago and carried on vigorously every
year by the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association, are threefold.—-First, to
call attention to the excellence of the
products which come from the farms,
factories, forests, mines and fisheries
of Canada. Second, to induce Canadians to encourage the development
of such products In Canada by purchasing them whenever lt Is possible
to do so. Third, to divert a portion
ut least of the large sums spent in
purchasing imported goods Into Canadian pocliets and Canadian bank accounts. During the twelve months
ended May, 1024, Canadians spent
$873,367,752 In other countries than
their own.
afflaasiaMiBMaiBaiaaiaaisiBaHai^^
COURTENAY PERSONALS    NEW OF DENMAN ISLAND
£feGft
French Organdie
|J WritiQgPaper'
[   " Ihppb'per lhats good :
!>v      . to uirifp upon "__j»
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO OKDEH.
Pressing    ■     dunning    •    Hepalrs
Telephone 1.     ■     P. O. Box 17
CUMBKRLAND,  B. 0.
I King George Hotel
Victor Bonora, Proprietor
FIRST CLASS
ACCOMMODATION
Excellent Cuisine
Heated Throughout
i Dunsmuir Avenue -Cumberland, B.C.
To Improve Canada's
Statistics Of Industry
ConferenceH are at present in progress between the Director of the Dominion Bureau of Census and Statin
tics and officials of the Canadian .Man-
ufacturers' Association with a view to
improving and simplifying the schedules used in compiling the statistics
of industry in Caniulfi. The importance of securing accurate statistics
of the industrial activities of the
country la generally recognized, and
the present discussions are intended
to determine tlie type of information
that will be most useful and the most
effective way of obtaining the figure.-
both from the standpoint of those having to fill out the forms and those engaged in consolidating the particulars. Members of the Canadian
.Manufacturers' Association are being
asked to give their views on the subject for ihe guidance of those taking
part in the conferences,
JABS SAe. * .Mfc-TUBES J0t.-At til Drill Stern
JOS.   DAMONTE
CENERAL   DELIVERY
Delivered tu All I'arts of District.
Conl, Wood and (ioods of Anr Kind
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHAItOES
TELEPHONE   M   TELEPHONE
CUMBERLAND, B.C
11	
Auction Sales
iVHIIM.SD.U' NEXT. SKIT. «
Por Mr. C, .1. Moore, at Ills Residence. Noli Hill, Comox.
All that charmingly situated sea frontago property, known ns
the Nob Hill Farm, Comox. comprising house anil outbuildings
and 2li acres ol* land, nbout 100 bearing (rult trees. This Is n
chance, seldom in be met wltb, to make a snfe and lirst class
Investment Sale nl 2.30 p.m. Pull particulars from tlio
Auctioned',
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
For Mr. J. Q, Quinn. who Is leaving for .New Zealand, ut
his Residence. Ileviin. The whole of his household furniture
and effects, Including radiophone, being the contents of his six-
room house. Por Ihe convenience of those wishing to attend
thc sale, u special train will leave Cumberland for Hevan at
1 o'clock. Sale to commence at 2 o'clock prompt. Particulars later nnd In Posters.
WKDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
For Mr. Charles Pearse, who is leaving the district, at hia
Residence, Happy Valley. All that well built and newly erected Bungalow with half acre of land, situate at Happy Valley,
Also the whole of his new household furniture and effects; team
of horses, harness, etc. Particulars next week end in posters.
Sale at 2 p.m.
G. J. HARDY
Phone 10 Auctioneer Courtenay
Mr. \V. Hodgson left Monday on a
business trip to Victoria.
ss     ss     ss
Mrs. R. Laver returned at the beginning of tlie week from Seattle.
4       *       SS
Mr. B. P. Allard has returned from
a trip up the West Coast,
ss     »     ss
Mr, P. R. F BIbcoc who left foi
Vancouver on Monday, expects to return home this afternoon
* •     ss
Miss Minnie Leighton nf Vancouver
is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
O. B. Leighton,
»     ss     ss
Mr. Chas. Winchester, of Coombs,
has been paying a business visit te
Courtenay.
• ss    ss
iMrs. P. Peacock and her sons, Mr.
Hughie and B)|d Peacock of Seattle,
are visiting with Mrs. Robt. Cessford.
• ss     ss
Mr. R. Ramsay returned on Sunday
from a trip to the Red Deer district
In Alberta.
.   .   .
Miss Edith Crockett, accompanied
by her mother, left f01' Victoria on
Wednesday where she will attend
Normal School,
»   t   t
Mr. 13. M. Huynes, Post Office Inspector, of Victoria, paid a short visit
to Courtenay on Monday afternoon,
returning  Tuesday morning.
»     ss     ss
Mr. R. H. Perrott is away on n
week's lishing trip. Miss M. Cessford is on the Post Office slatf in his
absence.
♦ *   *
MrB. Van Hnmert and family have
returned home from Everett, Wash.,
where they have beeu visiting friends
for the past three weeks.
♦ ♦   ♦
Miss P. Dougan. who Is staying
with her parents, has Joined the
teaching staff ot the Coqultlam school
and will be going there shortly.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. P. Q. Marsh, manager of the
Royal Bank at Cranbrook, ls spending a vacation in the district, motoring up the Island l)y car. Ur. Marsh
was formerly manager of thc Royal
Bank here and left for Cranbrook
four years ago. Ho sees many Improvements lu Courteuay.
«   •   •
The Rev. J. W. Fllnton motored to
Victoria to attend the executive committee meeting there on Monday
night. He is now spending a holiday
at Victoria antl w|l) return home the
end of next week. Thc Rev. C. P.
McGaflln, of St. Mary's, Kerrlsdale, ls
officiating at the Anglican churches
in the district this Sunday.
Mr. A. W. Neill, member of parliament at Ottawa, visited here on Tuesday evening and gave a very interesting account of the work done in the
"House." In flrst addressing the
audience he thanked all those wha
had voted for him at the last Dominion election and wus glad to meet
them again. He spoke on several
subjects amongst them being the lowering of the tariff and its effects,
food stuffs, Oleo Margarine, tho Chln-
j ese expulsion, the old age pensions,
| Denman Light house, the wharf aud
j its repairs, which are urgently needed, the float drifted away the otlier
day but was fortunately recovered before It had gone a very great distance
A very appreciative audience listened attentively, Afler several other
remarks and singing of the National
Anthem, the meeting adjourned.
Mrs. Peacock and family of Seattle,
! are visiting relatives here.
! Miss Rosa Balkie has gone to teach
at Head Quarters, Camp 3,
|    Mr. and Mrs. Caesar Scott are now
'. living here and are engaged In build-
| ing their house,
Mr. James Daheiel Is building on the
j Dnlzlel estate.
; Last Friday the LadieB Aid of the
Presbyterian Church held a pionii!
on the East Coast on Mr. DaUlel'u
property, The weather was Ideal.
Thero were races for both sexes,
young aud old. Games were Indulged in and refreshments were dainty
and abundant.
Eileen Kelsey Is to attend Cumberland High School.
AMBI0V0U8
Thc baiiQuet ball was adorned with
many beautiful paintings, and the
President of the little college wu.
called upon to respond to a toast. Desiring to pay a compliment to the
ladies present, he designated the
paintings w|lh Bii eloquent gesture
and said:
"What need Is there of these painted beauties when we have so mnny
with us at the table?"
No wonder girls learn to swim more
easily than men. Who wantB to
teach u mnn to swim?
A negro charged with stealing a
watch had been arraigned before the
court. The judge was not convinced
that he was guilty and aaid:
"You ure acquitted, Sara."
"Acquitted" repeated Sam doubtfully.    "What's dat mean judge?"
"That's the sentence; you are acquitted,."
Still looking somewhat confused
Sam said; "Judge! do dat mean I hab
to gib de watch back?"—Christian
Evangelist.
Said n bald-headed man to a waitress bold:
"See here, young woman, my cocoa's cold!"
She scornfully answered: "I can't
help that,
If the blamed thing's chilly, put on
your hat."
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Optometrist and Optician. . Reg*, by Examination for B. C.
1st and Srd Monday and Tuesday
MEDICAL FUND BUILDING
Hours: 1.30 to 6.30—7 to 9p.m.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite llo-llo Tftaefr*
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber, and  Hairdresser,  Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
rUMBKKLAND, B.f.
==•
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Publie
CUMBERLAND • • B. C.
^TVVgERRY
fri
'9 /■/f
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924.
f HE CiTMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE THREE
,
August 28th to September 8th
THIS IS NOT A MONEY RAISING BUT A ROOM
MAKING SALE.      SOME SENSATIONAL BARGAINS
We are crowded for room.   We expected an extension to our present building to take care of much of our
Fall Goods on arrival.   This has not materilized, therefore we are compelled, to put this sale on and have
marked the goods so low that it would not pay us to sell for other than cash.   We have listed below a useful
line of goods as near to cost price as it is safe to go.   Come early as you cannot repeat on these prices.
$L45
$1.35
SOc
$150
$1.65
Gent's Furnishings
Assorted lot of Men's Blue Bib, Black Bib and Black Pant Overalls, Limited number only
All going at, per pair	
Men's Drey Flannelette Shirts, Fall Quality
To clear at 	
Wen's Work Socks d»-|   AA
4 pairs for  tPJL»UU
Men's Casey Jones Dollar Gloves
Per pair 	
Men's Canvas Gloves OK/»
'I pairs lor  swOC
Men's Tweed Pants, in Grey and Brown (JJi   Qf*
Per pair    tpJL.t/U
Men's Tweed Pants, Grey Mixture d»0 OP
Per pair    «P^.oO
Men's Merino Shirts and Drawers
Per Suit 	
Men's Merino Combinations
fer Suit _	
Men's Pit Caps CLi\n      Men's Dress Suspenders/; A _
Each  OUC      Per pair   OUC
Men's Work Suspenders PA _      Men's All Leather       /IA^»
Per pair  OUC     Belts, each   ^HJC
Men's Mottled Underwear, Kali Weight d»-|   OP
Per Garment    t^L.LiU
E? irmCaps 75c, $1.00, $125, $2.00
Job Line, Boys' Odd Pants -d»1   QP
Per pair, from  tPA.sv/0
<1 only Men's Irish Blue Serge Suits (P "I "I   AA
Per Suit   tHl.UU
Odd Line of Boys' and Youth's Suits, sizes 26 to 34      (t»P  PA
Your Choice per suit for  »P«J»tlU
Men's Bachelor Suits, C**)1   AA
This Sale only  '.  tP^l.UU
Men's Rain Coats "Gaberdine" 3 only, C*1 7 K(\
worth $25.00.     Now   tpl I   U\J
A few only Mackinaw Coats (P/? PA
Values $10.00 and $12.00 for  tPU.tJl/
Men's Sweater Coats, in Fawn, White, and Maroon     ri»/|  H[\\
Worth $6.00.     Now  «jVI:. I D
Odd Lines Men's Fancy Ties
Each 	
i
E
B
I
I
IS
E
I
e
E
E
E
E
E
40c
IIOUSK   FURNISHINGS
Pillows MatlrtxtwM and Sprlnus
Here are Splendid Bargains lu
Bedding   (.'rah (lipin quick
12  only   Pillows, good  quality,
Each     $1.00
6 only  Pillows,  better quality,
Bach  -  JJ.M
2 only Comforters, each,.,, $8.7*i
Felt  .Mattress, 4 and 4-6. each
at   $9.00
Coll Springs .extra strong, each
at    $9.00
Suit   Cimes,  Drown   and   Ulai'k,
Each     $2.25
Suit  Cases,  Hrown  and   Black.
Each     UM
Suit Cases,  Hrown   and   Black,
Each     W>0
Suit  Cases,  Brown  and   Black.
Each  •SasVI
2 only Club Bags, each... $2.!».*>
Thermos  Bottles,  lo cleor flue
Ladies' Wear
;', only Voile Dresses, to clear $0.7*1
V. doz. Ladies' Blue Serge and Tricotine Suits, to clear al  %i\.»o
A few Ladles Coats, suitable for full
wear, each   $S.no
A few Ladles' Coats, suitable for fall
wear, each  $ll.3."s
Ladles' Fall Coats, all new and
splendid quality. We will allow
vou 2Xirlr on each coat.
Ladles' New Fall Hats, just arrived.
We will allow you 20r/r on nny hat.
Ladies' Sweaters. These are tho
newest yet In combed wool and vnr-
lety of colors.      No. 742. only $2.(1*1
Ladles' Button Sweaters, without
collar, assorted colors. No. 7B0 $8.7.1
Ladles' Pull Over Sweaters, all
wool.     No. 378
pur
$2.1!
as
Boots & Shoes 1       DlT ^oods Department
An odd lot of Boots, Shoes and Slipper pair  f  «pl.00
Men's Mine Shoes, with nails, 12
pairs only rtjrt AP
Per pair  <P^.t/D
Men's Work Shoes, no nails, no toe
cap rf»Q syjr
Per pair  tffO.m^O
Men's Work Shoes, in Black and
Brown Grain (J»t} qp
Per pair  «pO.*/D
Men's Box Calf Blucher Shoes,
only aq r»p
Per pair  tpO. I *)
Men's Brown Calf Blucher Goodyear
Welts, Rubber Heels <J*A nr
Per pair ,  <p4*^D
Ladies Patent Slippers, 1 strap, medium heel fl»Q f\t\
Per pair  tp-O.UU
Ladies' Kid Slippers, 1 strap, Rubber Heels, for house wear d» -f Af\
Per pair  Jpl.'lU
Ladies' Fancy Strap Shoes in four
styles.     To clear at (gn Qf
Per pair  JpO.t/O
Boys' "Sterling" Shoes, Splendid for
school, sizes 3 to 5 d» Q O P
Per pair  tpO.^O
Youth's "Sterling" Shoe. Splendid for
school, sizes 11 to 1 d»Q AA
Per pair ...-.  tpO.UU
Boys' Strong Black Grain Shoo.
"School" !V£ to 5 No. 623 ti>() AP
Per pair  t£)m\t.Uv
Boys'  Strong Brown  Grain  School
Shoe, V/., to 5, No. 624
Per pair	
Boys' Strong Box Calf Shoes, sizes
I to 5, No. 110X (J»rt OP
Per pair r  tp&.OtJ
Girls' Strong Box Calf Shoes, sizes
8 to 10"/;., No. 743X
Per pair	
Misses' Strong Brown Calf Shoes,
sizes 11 to 2, No. 662X d»A AP
Per pair  tpUtVD
Little Girls' Brown Calf Shoes, sizes
8 to IO'/;., No. 932 rt»A AP
Per pair  •PiU.LO
Girls' Strong Box Calf Shoes, sizes
8 to 101/2, No. 914 d»n AA
Per pair  «J)^»UU
Girls' Strong Box Calf Shoes, sizes
II to 2, No. 646
Per pair	
$3.00
$2.35
Anderson's Assorted Ginghams
4 yards for 	
Assorted Prints,
0 lards for	
Blue and Pink Striped Flannelette, Reg. 35c.
Per Yard 	
Grey Flannelette, good quality, Reg. 35c.
Per Yard	
Shirtings, in various Stripes, 36 inches wide
Fer Yard	
Spun Silk at
Per yard 	
Mah Jong Silks, in various patterns
Per Yard	
Art Muslins, variety of designs
Per Yard	
Cretone, variety of designs
Per Yard	
Open Mesh Curtain Goods, White Cotton
Per Yard	
Curtain Scrim
Per Yard 	
Ladies' Fibre Silk Hose, 6 colors
Per Pair	
Ladies' Hole Proof Hose, 6 colors
Per Pair 	
Ladies' Fibre Silk Hose, 6 colors
Per Pair 	
Ladies' Silk Lisle Hose
Per Pair 	
All of our Silk Butterfly Hose, Reg. $1.95
To Clear at, per pair	
Boys' Black Hose for School, wear extra strong, 7 to 10  A P
Per Pair     ^xDL
Girls' Black Princess Hose, 4'/,, 5, 51/2, 6, 6Vi
Per Pair	
The same in sizes 7 to 10
Per Pair	
Babies' Crib Blankets <J»1   OP
Kach  «pl*£t)
White Flannelette Sheets, Limited number, 12-4
Per Pair 	
$1.00
$1.00
27%e
26»/2c
40c
95c, $1.25
 $1.25
 25c
35c
 75c
20c
40c
 $1.75
80c
40c
$1.35
38c
42c
$2.65
Ladies' Wear
Ladles' Silk Jumpers, to clear i>iM)
Ladles' "Warners"
sizes,     each 	
Corselette,    all
 $u;>
$2.75
 REMEMBER	
with every pair of Boys' or Girls'
Shoes we will give one Pencil Box
and Scribbler Free.
A few assorted corsets, each $2.2.">
Ladles' Fall Undervests. V neck, no
sleeves, each   -    7.">c.
Ladles' Undervests, worth $1.00. to
clear   at   -    Wc.
Ladies' Fall Undervests, Wool with
Silk thread  $1.00
6 only Ladles' Silk Dresses, lo clear
at   -..- -   $IN.*'«
3 only Lndles' Tweed Hulls, to clear
at  -   *I'->..HI
Ladles'    Brushed    Wool    Sweaters
These arc dandles. Sale   W.76
A    few    early    foil    Tweed    Hols.
Eoch      $l.«">
A  few  odd   lines   Boys'  nnd   Girls'
Swcnlers. to clear at   tlJiS
HOUSE   FURNISHINGS
Hugs,  Lino  and   Lino  Nquiirrs
Here tins Splendid llurgalns In
Hugs—Grab Ihem  quick!
3 only Jute Ruga . . $1.75
2 only Ijirge All Wool Kiiks.
each  . ..   . $;.,M|
4 only  All  Wool    Hubs,    from
Ifislli lo         $7.."iH
2 only All  Wool    Huns,    rroni
DUO to    *.-,.imi
6 only  Large Juts-  Rugs, from
$2i'i> lo  $2,9*,
Lino Rugs 9x9     $111,011
Linn Hugs, 9x12 . . $111,110
Lino Rugs, lOHxl! 118,00
Linoleum, 6 fi. wide. Per running yard         Il.flf,
Linoleum,   16-4,   Per   running
yard     14,00
Floor Oil Cloth, li rt. Per run -
ning yard    $1.1.1
The  Mercantile  Store   Company
STORE HOURS
MONDAYS,   TUESDAYS,
THURSDAYS,   FRIDAYS,
8 a.m to fitM p.ni.
WEDNESDAYS 8 a.m. to 12lil0 noun
SATURDAYS 8 a.m. to  10:00 )>.ni.
Remember, the Mercantile is the leading Home of Fashions
DUNSMUIR AVENUE, CUMBERLAND
STORE HOURS
MONDAYS,   TUESDAYS,
THURSDAYS,   FRIDAYS,
N iliii Ui sii.'IO p.m.
WEDNESDAYS S n.m. to 12:30 noon
SATURDAYS 8 a.m. to  10:00 p.m.
rniiiiiiiiiii in iiiiiiiiiiiinii iiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiii
IlllllPlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllhlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
lllllllllllllllliiiiilllllllllllllllHMlllllllllllllllllllllllll9llllllllillllllllllllllllilllllii;l PAGE POUR
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
BATl'RDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924,
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924.
THE LOUD GIRL
BUY AT HOME
It is just as much in the interests
ot* this community for business men
to Imve tlieir printing done by their
local printer, as it is for residents of
this district to patronize their local
business men. Those who fail to
support their home newspaper can-
nut logically complain about the inroads of the mall order house.
NOWS THE TIME
IfurliiK the past few weeks we have
come across a number of men out of:
work,  because  tliey  are  looking  for
something that does not exist—looking for n soft job.
The unemployed off the pay roll is
no menace as compared with the unemployed on the pay roll,
it is hard for some men to understand thai the war is over and the
real battle for success is again at
hand.
Looking for an easy berth, or u
better job in the next town, is like
looking for a guyastlcutus. There is
no such animal.
Right In tlie midst of the dull, be-
tween-seasons period, we know several men who were then making the
biggest strides toward success tliey
have ever made.
They have paid no attention to the
complaining (if the growlers and
chronic seekers for soft snaps. They
nre pitching in and earning the confidence of the management by the
right kind of co-operation and tlie
best kind of service.
In a time like this, the man that
has in his heart the disposition to be
dependable, and in his head the ambition to he successful, has a more
favorable season in which to become
a conspicuous example in success
than when we were crazy with cash
and insane with the idea of spending
it.
Scarcely anything is more attrac
live in a woman than a sweet well
modulated voice. She may be intelligent, educated and beautiful, but if
she speak in a loud voice, we instinctively feel that there is a lack of natural refinement or thorough good
breeding, or that unfortunate manners have led her beyond real ladylike demeanor.
Let young girls remember that
loud talking and laughing in public
places is Indicative of want of refinement and good hqme training;
that it brings upon them criticism
which, though uot unnatural, is often
unjust, lor many really modest girls
unknowingly form the bad habil of
using a loud tone of voice, and of
laughing not only too loud hut too
much.
It is not easy to overcome an unconscious fault, but much can be done
to correct this one hy thoughtfulnes*
1 iu regard to one's own deportment,
and by noticing well the demeanor of
others, The best way to utilize tbe
' ratlings of others is to correct similar
ones in ourselves. Gossiping about
the defects which are conspicuous iu
our neighbors does not remedy them,
. it only blemishes our own characters.
Nature does not bestow her gifts
alike; but eveu if there is any natural imperfection much may be done
in early life to cultivate that sweet
and pleasant, voice which is always a
charm in woman, (jirls, watch you; ■
selves a little. Learn to .speak gently
Do not let impatience, anger, or any
impetuous feeling so rule you that
you lose the power to keep your voice
In th eright key and under proper
control. In these days, when so
much freedom is given you in regard
to education and pursuits, do not let
it be said that our young girls are
losing any of the lovely graces tbat
rightfully belong to true womanhood.
and the father called her "Wild." A
Wild Rose, theu, she was to all, the
sweetest flower that bloomed and
grew on breezy hill, in woody dell,
midst daisies kissed by dew. The
years were numbered one by one, with
much of ill and much of good, until
our Wild Rose, fresh and fair, blushed into womanhood. And then there
came the clouds of circumstances, tho
murky fog of actual life, and she was
wed—her husband's name was Hogg.
■
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiu
"M
Sidelights on a Great Industry
■■■■■■■■■■■■ill
Specials for
TOPS ALL
PREVIOUS
ESTIMATES
PAYROLL    OK    POKES'!    IMHS-
TIMES IN  HW8 HOW SHOWN
TO UK $011,111111.0011
SCHOOL OPENING
=E
i Special Sale of Boys' Suits and Odd Pants
SuriirlsiiiK Vnstncss of Amount Drill.
onsli'iili's   All-Importance   ol*
l,u in brrlnit
Just received a large shipment of Boys' School
Shoes in Black and Brown to be sold at Sale Prices
WORDS AND MUSIC
Though the silver-tongued orator
made the most eloquent and flowery
speech that lips ever uttered, ami
nn artist on the violin came along
and played "Home, Sweet Home"
across the street from where the orator waa pouring forth eloquence, the
musician would steal the crowd, leaving tlie silver-tongued orator speaking to the empty air. A speech, no
matter how flowery and eloquent, enters the ear. and like a homeles.;
tramp walks sluggishly down the byways of memory, knocks at tbe door
of the heart, is refused admittance
and lies on the way to the graveyard
of forgetfulness. But a song like
"Silver Threads Among the Gold"
comes slipping along, with her apron
full of flowers, jumps into the pathway of memory, throws roses right
and left, and kisses to the birds, until she grows weary with her frolic
with human nature, theu passes in
front of the mansion of things to be
remembered and knocks at the door
of the heart, goes in and lives there.
"Home Sweet Home" will live long
after the most powerful) gifted and
eloquent speech ever uttered by the
lips of man has been buried in tbe
minds of men, aud forgotten.
PUT ON YOUR MUZZLE
What a glorious place this town
would be if no one of us ever said an
unkind word. No more scolding, nagging or bearing false witness. Did
you ever stop to think how many
neighborhood quarrels have started
from the hasty word? How many
family differences have had their be
ginnings iu scolding aud nagging?
A group of so-called friends will
be together and suddenly someone
drops a word of criticism about an
absent one. In a few minutes they
are all off like a pack of dogs, snapping and snarling. Their muzzles
are oft and they all take a bite at the
under dog. He is criticized as a
tightwad when perhaps no one know?
the financial burdens he is hearing.
It is so easy to say unkind things
about the one who is not present to
defend himself. Then a talebearer
carries the criticism, a coolness thai
grows into an estrangement follows
and another friend is lost . Put on
your muzzle and keep the unruly
member between your teeth. In that
way you will avoid being misquoted
aud misunderstood and you will keep
your friends .
Recent official investigations show
that the industrial payroll ot the Forest Industries of British Columbia for
1923 was far greater than the original estimate.
It has now been ascertained that,
the sum actually paid out in wages
last year to the workers in the woods,
in lumber manufacturing and re-mau-
ufacturlng plants and in pulp aud
paper mills exceeded the truly htcred
ible sum of $r>(i,:miUMH).
It must be remembered that thi?
figure does not include wage pay-
ments to office and administrative
stuffs and to persons employed iu tha
sale and distribution of the finished
article, nor doen it take into account
the transportation forces exclusively
engaged iu handling the product on'. Sj=
land and  water.
$00,000,000 Distributed
When all these are included it ia
safe to assert that in 1923 the amount
of money disbursed in wages by tho
Forest Industries of B.C. approximated to $60,000,000.
Every day fresh evidence comes to
hand demonstrating the extent lo
which British Columbia is dependent
on tbe unhampered working of its
great basic industry.
Some idea of the magnitude of tho
lumbermen's payroll may he gathered
from the fact that in 1923 it was more
than three times as great as the total
revenue of the province.
Special   Sale  Prices in Boys' Caps, Khaki
Shirts, Shirt Waists  and  Blouses,  The
Famous "St. Margaret's" Sweaters and
Stockings, TurnbulPs Two-Piece Under-
Wear     -    and Penman's Union Suits
i
A COMPLETE LINE OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES
See Windows
m    'tl
Watch for Saturday Evening Specials
from 6.30 to 8.30 o'clock only
Campbells    -    Cumberland
WHAT'S IN A NAME
"The best laid plans of men anil
mice," the poet says, "gang aft agley,"
and though a poet sometimes lies, in
this ease truth holds swny. There
was a man deep In whose soul poetic
fancies held high plaee. His name
was Hose; a pleasant name, with
more or less of graee. Unto this
nose the angels brought a dear delightful child, a very bud of promise
This series of articles communicated by the Timber  Industries
Council  of  British  Columbia.
•fflBMBISJ
Work Glove Specials
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
MW B.C. PemiMient Loan Bldg.
PHONE MIS      VICTORIA, B.C.
Jam Special
Leather (Moves, Reg. BOc,    Special per pair 42c,
Leather Gloves, Reg. 65c.    Special per pair        57c
Leather Gloves, Reg. $1,00,   Special per pair 87c.
A new line of medium weight underwear for men at
per garment   $1.15
A heavier weight at per garment   $1.50
Roys' Rlack Cotton Ho.se, suitable for school wear
in all sizes.
Roys' Golf Hose, in shades of Black, Brown and
Heather Mixtures, with fancy tops.
Leckies' School Shoes for Boys and Girls. These
are of the best quality and will give good wear.
A new line of Hats and Caps for Men just received.     Call and inspect these lines.
Many lines of new goods coming to hand and being
placed in stock.
Another shipment of wall papers just received.
A, A. Brown
General Hauling
A. McKinnon
FREIGHT, COAL AND WOOD
Any part of City or District
ASHES TAKEN AWAY AND
RUBBISH REMOVED
Please  leuvo your orders at  office,
Mrs. King's Stationery Store
Phone (6.
SERVICE IS OIK MOTTO
Or Phone 1.1 Union Hotel
CUMBERLAND TRANSFER
A. A. Brown
Comox Strawberry
Jam
High grade Comox Valley berries plus pure sugar and made under
perfect sanitary conditions.    For sale at all local grocers at
85c per 41b. Tin
To those who have used this delicious jam this advertisement may
have no appeal, except so far as the price is concerned, but if you
are one of the unfortunates who have not as yet partaken of this
delectable local food product, you would be wise to try a sample
tin.
Every tin carries our own guarantee as to quality.
Get the habit of using local produce on every opportunity. You
not only get the best products on the market but you help keep
your money in local circulation.
REMEMBER-
It's Guaranteed
Christmas Cards in great variety will soon be arriving at
The Islander Office. See our samples before placing your
order    Our Slogan "Cards a little better than the rest" if
SATURDAY, AUGUST SO, 1S24.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE FIVE
M
The   Famous   McClary
Electric Range
Protected Elements    —    Indicating Lamps
—Reciprocating Switches—
Seamless, easily cleaned ovens
To cook electrically with one of these ranges
IS CHEAPER
than using coal.
No soot, no ashes, no hot kitchens.
25 per cent, saved on your meat bill owing to
non-shrinkage.
Everything in favor of the busy housewife.
Let us show you.
Fans       —       Washing Machines       —        Irons
Vacuum Cleaners —       Toasters
Grills        —        Etc.
Everyappliance sold by us of the best make only and
we   are   HERE   TO   MAKE   IT   RIGHT   should
you be in any way, shape or form disappointed.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
"OLD TIMERS"
PUT UP GREAT
FIGHT SUNDAY
(Continued From Page One )
SPRINKLING NOTICE
Hours for Sprinkling and Irrigating purposes are
Morning 7 to 8 a.m.
Night 7 to 9 p.m.
Watering Sidewalks, Streets Etc, must be discontinued
Effective July 6th, 1924.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS CO.
Limited.
G. W. CLINTON, Managing Director.
■■■■■■IIIBMIIM^
jftbrd
ma FORD TOUHING-
Selt Starter, newly painted in High Luster Oreen .JM^K
Bumper, Foot Accelerator, etc   '"t I O
1921 KORO TOUR1NG-
Self Starter, newly painted, seat covers, shock AMAH
absorbers,   etc ,  «D**UU
IWO FORD TOURING-
Self Starter CQAsO
Sale Price   -  *BO\JV
FORI)  SEDAN— *A.rV7r\
Sale Price   9DID
FORI! LllillT DELIVERY— COOK
Sale Price  ffl^3
FORD BUG- C7K
 Sale Price   VtlO
Every Used Car Sent Oue is Ready for the Road
Gas, Oil, Etc.
-FREE DEMONSTRATION-
TERMS  ARRANGED
Corfield Motors, Limited
Phone Ifi FORD DEALERS   Courtenay, B.C.
breach. He waB taxed for eight runs
and six hits. Bert's team-mates let
him down bad. Fred Mclntyre hurled for the seniors for the first five
innings. However, Buck Gibson fell
for "IJed's" wicked slants and immediately proceeded to tether that
young gentleman's angora outside the
diamond by enacting startling movements very much like those of an
Ingersoll   timepiece   and   yet   resem
bling those of a snake charmer. "Red"
fell in the fifth inning and Dave Hunden replaced him. The Old Timers
did not score off Dave.
•Coal Oil" Has a Floater
The Old Timers had tough luck.
They had five runs scored ngain.;!
them with two mun out, tliey failed
to hit in pinches and a couple of the
boys threw their arms away before
the game when they were warming
up. Then Stant blew up and he waa
their big bet. The senior boys say
his floater wafted across the plate so
slowly they could read "Spalding'
and count the stitches on the hall as
It went by. And again "Bumpy" Gordon and Stanly Lawrence could freeze
onto the fast grounders but couldn't
arch them across to first base. Bumpy nearly knocked a board out of thc
right field fence behind first base aud
scattered a few of the rail birds in
one attempt. "Buck" Gibson had
tough luck in his attempted oue hand
ed spear in centre fleld. Buck, tht
Nick Altrock of baseball here has tlie
same Nick cheated three different
ways when it comes to a comedy.
They Can Still Play
Writing in a serious vein, however,
the Old Timers played u fine game. It
I?D 17 IT     15c tnaI bottle
r I\.mi/ See coupon below
Make your hair    jj
beautiful
with this shampoo
You know women whose hair is always
beautiful — no matter how plainly arranged. Think for a moment and you will
agree that this beauty lies altogether in
softness, the healthy gleam of natural color.
That is something every girl and woman
can have. By simple care in shampooing.
This way recommended hy authorities.
Now you can test it at our expense.
Use an olive oil shampoo. It never
leaves hair dull, brittle, dead-looking.
Because it cleans mildly, yet thoroughly,
each hair, down to the tiny scalp pores.
Leaves scalp and hair healthily clean.
PALMOLIVE
* All the lovely natural lights and glints
of color are brought out. Vour hair is
silken soft, pliant, with that lovely sheen.
Use olive oil in its dainty, modern form
for the hair — as blended in Palmolive
Shampoo. Not the least bit oily. And it
has the additional advantage of economy.
Get free 15c trial bottle. Simply send
coupon.
And see how delightfully the first shampoo improves your hair.
SHAMPOO
Made in Canada
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
Toronto, Ont.
15c TRIAL BOTTLE FREE
Fill in and post to the Palmolive Co. of
Canada, Limited, Toronto, Ont.
Name...
Address..
City Prerincc	
WANTED
WANTED—TO RENT OR LEASK,
MOTION PICTURE THEATRE OR
HALL IN SMALL TOWN ON VANCOUVER ISLAND. WOULD PURCHASE ALL EQUIPMENT AT LOW
PRICE. WRITE STATINO THE
TBRM8 TO P.O. DRAWER 430
THE ISLANDER. It
FOP.
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prloea to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
OBIce tm Brldf* Street, Victoria, B.O.
Lumber
In every sorts of building materials,
MOULDINGS,
WINDOWS, DOORS,
SHINGLES,
KILN DRIED FLOORINGS,
AND    FURNISHINGS.
WE DELIVER TO ANYWHERE IN SHORT
NOTICE WITH REASONABLE CHARGES.
Royston Lumber Co.
Limited.
PHONES
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Night calls: 134X Courtenay
| Office: 11)9 Cumberland
SYNOPSIS OF
LAND ACT AMENDMENTS
It Pays To Advertise In The Islander
PRE-EMPTIONS
Vacant, unreserved, surveyed
Crown lands may be pre-empted by
British subjects over 18 years or age,
and by aliens on declaring intension
to become British subjects, conditional upon residence, occupation,
and improvement for agricultural
purposes.
Full Information concerning regulations regarding Pre-emptions is
given in Bulletin No. 1, Land Series,
"How to Pre-empt Land," copies of
whicb can be obtained free ot charge
by addressing tbe Department of
Lands, Victoria, B.C., or to any Government Agent.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes, and which is not tlmber-
I land, l.e, carrying over 6,000 board
(eet per acre west of the Coast Range
and 8,000 feet per acre east of that
Range,
Applications for pre-emptions are
to be addressed to the Land Commissioner of the Land Recording Division, in which the land applied tor
is situated, and are made on printed
forms, copies of which can be obtained from tbe Land Commissioner.
Pre-emptions must be occupied for
Ave years and improvements made
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing and cultivating at least Ave
acres, before a Crown Grant can be
received.
For more detailed information see
tbe Bulletin "How to Pre-empt
Land."
PURCHASE
Applications are received for purchase of vacant and unreserved
Crown lands, not being timberland,
for agricultural purposes; minimum
price of flrst-class (arable) land is ID
per acre, and Becond-class (grazing)
land 12.60 per acre. Further Information regarding purchase or lea.se
of Crown lands Ih given In Bulletin
No. 10, Land Series, "Purchase and
Lease of Crown Lands."
Mill, factory, or Industrial sites on
timber land, not exceeding 40 acres,
may be purchased or leased, the conditions including payment nt
stumpage.
HOMESTEAD LEASES
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding SO
acres, may be leased as liomesites,
conditional upon a dwelling being
erected In the first year, title being
obtainable after residence and Improvement conditions are fulfilled
and land has been surveyed.
LEASES
For grazing and industrial purposes areas not exceeding 640 acres
may be leased by one person or a
company.
GRAZING
Under the Grazing Act the Province ls divided Into grazing districts
and*, the range administered under a
Grazing     Commissioner. Annual
grazing permits are issued based on
numbers ranged, priority being given
to established owners. Stock-owners
may form associations for range
management. Free, or partially free,
permits are available for settlers,
campers and travellers, up to ten
bead.
Is true fame Is but a bubble and reputation but a shadow but last Sunday's
game was sufficient to convince us
there were some real fast ball players among the "Old Boys". Solo
fielding honors must be awarded to
Stan. Lawrence on the hot corner. He
made a couple of errors but, mister,
that grand one hand spear of "Mug-
gins' " sizzling liner was alone worth
the money. Bumpy Gordon out at
short stop looked and acted as natural as a big leaguer. On the Initial
sack Seymour Abrams stretched a
lone greedy right hand and even
scrambled hack to thc sack on hands
and knees and ball in hand in a grand
efl'ort to beat out delinquent pegs over
his way. These boys In particular
looked the most active in the fleld although we must not overlook a nice
natural catch Georgie Richardson
made in the first frame. Ab In the
fielding department the Old Timers
led in the individual totting honors.
Tommy Robertson came up from
Courtenay and he was on no fool's errand. He brought ancient memories
back when he connected with four
singles In four trips to the plate.
Ting Bono and the veteran umpire
Joe Horbury marshalled the boys on
the diamond, calling them the right
way at the right time.
Box-Soore
Old Timers AB R H PO A E
Gordon, ss     6   112   12
Wlestfleld, c     5   0   3   3   2    1
Farmer, rf     4   0   0   0   0   0
Abrams,  lb     4   117   0   0
Lawrence,  3b      4   2   14   2.:
Richardson, If     2   2   110   1
Gibson,  cf      4   2   2   0   10
Robertson, 2b     4   2   4   10   1
Stant, p     3   2   10   12
•Davis, p      10   0   0   0   1
••Little, 2b     10   0   0   0   0
Totals     37 10 14 18   8 10
•Davis replaced Stant last of fifth
inning.
••Little replaced Farmer    first    of
seventh inning.
Cumberland AB R H PO A E
Plump, 3b .:.    5   112   10
Bannerman, ss     5   4   4   0   3    1
James, 2b     5   4    4   0   2    1
Richards, o     5   3   1 12   l   3
Conti,  If     4   13       10   0
Harrison,  cf      3    10   0   10
Robertson,  rf     4   0   0   0   0   0
Farmer,  lb      4   116   0   0
Mclntyre, p     2   110   0   0
•Hunden, p     2   2   10   10
Totals     39 18 16 21   9    5
•Hunden replaced Mclntyre in last
fifth inning.
Score by Innings
12 3 4 6 6 7
Old  Timers    0 4 4 2 0 0 0—10
Cumberland    5 0 0 5 5 0 3—18
Nummary
Two-base hits: Conti; Three-base
hits: Farmer, Hunden, James; Home
run: James; Stolen bases: Richardson, Gibson, Conti (2), Plump and
Bunneriuuu; Left on bases: Old Timers 8, Cumberland 4; Double plays:
Plump to Farmer; Struck out by
Stant 3, hy Mclntyre 11; Bases on
halls oft* Mclntyre 2, off Stant 1. Umpires Bono and Horbury.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
VVM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning aud Dyeing Establishment
ou Vancouver Island. We Cleau or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and set Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our   Work   and   Service
Will Please Tou t i     : :
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B.C.      -      Phone UM ^""
^""
PAGE SIX
THE CUMRERLAND ISLANDER
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924.
Vxact^printing
LITTLE TOUCHES OF CORRECTNESS
SJ-J AVE you ever considered the quality of your work from the standpoint of
careful type composition and efficient proofreading? The reputation of this house
for food printing has been established
through accuracy and attention to the little
details. Send your printing here and we
' will do it right.
The Cumberland Islander
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland, B. C.
=gja|g|jj!|i!!P3IB^^
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRER.
It pays to have your shoes repaired as they wear longer
after repairing than when new.
I aim to give the best in Material, Workmanship and-
Service at—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRERS
Note address— Opposite the Drug Store.
H    THE TELEPHONE IS A DAYLIGHT SAVER §§
Saving daylight is a big topic at this time §jf
' of the year.    Everyone endeavors to make |H
the most of the daylight hours.     In these §s
modern times, life each day is fuller, and B
each hour must mean far more than it did 5
yesterday. §|
^              There is no better aid to daylight saving than the =
sm     telephone.     Nothing can help you more to make each §S
=£     successive hour of greater value. m
§|            Whether you telephone one mile or one hundred |=
if      miles it is all the same to the telephone.     The tele- j3
gj      phone saves you hours.     It lengthens your day, giv- |§f
g     ing you time for many things. =
|     BRITISH   COLUMBIA   TELEPHONE  COMPANY I
HI!
Illllllllllll
PETER McNIVEN
...TRUCK AND GENERAL DELIVERY.
Coal, Wood, Ashes and Hauling of Every Description
At Reasonable Prices.
=     PETER McNIVEN—CUMBERLAND
rHONE 1(0
■
inn
MANN'S
BAKERY
The Home of High Class Cakes and Pasteries
Grand selection — See our window
APPLE, PINEAPPLE AND RAISIN PIE
to tickle tired Palates and awaken sleepy appetites
Fresh Every Day.
SATURDAY SPECIALS
DOUGHNUTS
Just a Treat
Lemon Slices — Lemon Custards — Lemon Pies
with a crisp brown outside and a tender flavored inside.
Hot Pies.
Telephone 18 Cumberland.
llllllllllllllllllllllll
WESTERN CANADA'S RIVER OF WHEAT
A NEVER-ENDING stream of gold,
flowing   from   the   farms of   the
Prairie Provinces to thc consumers
of bread stuffs in all parts of the civilized
world, is represented by the movement
of the farmers' grain to thc world mar.
kets.   Beginning in August each
year    and in some years flowing
constantly forward until August
of the following year, this everlasting river of wheat is Western
Canada's contribution to the feeding of the civilized world.   In thc
movement of this crop from the
country    elevators   and   loading
platforms  of   the   Prairie  Provinces,   the   Canadian   National
Railways year by year are playing a more important part.
Long before the weBtern farmer
has finished his seeding In the
spring, preparations have been he-
gun by the railways to move his
crop. Cars must be ordered, foi
each year more equipment is needed
for the movement of the grain; othei
cars, which have been in service,
must be brought into the repair
yards and overhauled or rebuilt according to their needs, for thc movement of grain is a strenuous work
and grain cars show the effects of a
season's haulage. And, since cars
could not move forward without mo.
tive power, new locomotives of immense hauling power are necessary
and must be ordered, while thoso
which have already seen service in
this  strenuous work must also be
of the company through the western
region, compile a report on the
loadings and movements of grain
cars at the close of each day. These
reports are telegraphed to Winnipeg
where, with advices from the lake,
head and Vancouver, they are assimilated. Hence, with one single
report  simply compiled, the  entire
Canadian National lines in the Western region almost continually, and
that every movement of these cars
must be checked in order thst there
shall be no confusion or delay in
their handling, the enormity of the
work of handling the grain movement may easily be realized. And
to handle over 175,000 cars of grain
being prepared
harvest work,
in this,
Farmers' Grain at Line Elevators
for the rush of the   grain situation is shown for the
Constant vigilance
every other great
movement, is the price of safety and
nothing is left undone to ensure that
the movement forward shall bc
rapid, even, and unhampered. An
important department, whose work
is little seen outside of railway
circles, is the Car Service Department, whose eye is watching night
and day to see that grain cars are
properly distributed and that once
loaded, they move forward rapidly
to the lake or ocean port from which
further shipment is to take place.
During thc grain rush each fall
the Car Service officials meet a difficult situation, for instead of an
even balance of haul back and forth
through the west, there is an over-
preceding day throughout Western Canada. Figures for previous
years are also kept on record with
the reports as they come in and
at any time comparisons may be
made to show the progress over
ALBERTA
GRAIN
Lake Carrier Loading at Terminal
brought in to the huge repair shops
and overhauled and made ready.
Nor is this all. In preparation for
the movement of heavy trains loaded with wheat and in order that
there shall be no delay en route
from the farmer's hands to the lake-
head or to Vancouver, roadbed and
other facilities must be in the best
possible condition. Therefore during
the summer months every foot of
the track over which the grain must
move is subject to careful inspection
and improvement; ballasting is done
wherever it may be required and nil
parts of the system are keyed up to
the highest pitch in order that no
hitch may occur in the movement of
the crop.
Weeks before the crop itself he-
gins to move, there is another movement under way which hns an important bearing on the steady flow
of grain to the markets of the world,
und this is the gradual concentration
of locomotives and grain cars ut
strategic points on the western lines,
so that they will be available for
rapid distribution wherever they are
needed.
whelmingly large exodus from the
grain fields with a proportionately
small freight movement back toward
the prairies. Here the Car Service
Department faces the task of moving these empties back from the lake
or ocean ports, to line elevators at
thc lowest possible cost and it is
only by wise and careful scrutiny of
thc situation that it is possible for
this work to be successfully carried
out.s
An elaborate system of tabulating
the grain situation daily is operated
by officials of this department. Each day through
the press there appear reports on the grain movement, both on lines
through the west and at
the head of the lakes
where ships are fast loading from terminal elevators as cars discharge
their cargoes.
To   make   this
possible     agent;
Loading Wheat into Box Cars
the same period
each successive
season for Ave
years.
When it is realized that upwards
of 50,000 grain
cars   are  on thc
to the two outlets, the Great
Lakes   and   the   Pacific  ports,
means that train loads of grain
must be kept constantly on the
move, both eastbound and westbound.      The growing importance of the   Pacific   outlet is
shown by the fact that Canadian National car deliveries   to
Vancouver during the
grain year just closed,
have been almost five
times as great as during the season
of 1922-23, and
as more facilities    are    provided   for   the
handling bf the
westbound shipments it is expected that the
next few years
will   see   enormous gains
still    being
made   year
by year in
this   movement.
t V*.'A:
Canadian National Train of Wheat Bound for Terminal Elevators
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS        ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
"The Moat of the Best for the Least"
Marocchi Bros.
The Pioneeer Bakers
and Grocers
THE STORE THAT'S ALWAYS BUSY
PHONE 11
CUMBERLAND
For Results Advertise In The Islander
Migratory Birds
Convention Act
A summary of the Migratory Birds
Convention Aet Is given below. This
Is the law which Is based upon the
Treaty wllb tlle United Slates. The
District Ollicer Is Mr. 1, A. Munro,
luGo St. David St., Oak Bay Vlctorln,
B.C., and enquiries mny be addressed
to him or to the Commissioner ol* Canadian National Parks. Department ol
Ihe Interior, Ottawa.
Open Seasons
(Both dates inclusive)
British Columbia:
Ducks, Geese, Brant or Rails—
Northern und Eastern Districts, September 15 to December 30.
Ducks ond Hulls—Western District
south ot the 53rd parallel of latitude,
October 15 to January 20.
Geese and Brant—Western District
south of the 53rd parallel of latitude
November 8 to February 23.
Wilson or Jacksnlpe, Black-bellied
nnd Golden Plovers and the greater
and lesser Yellow-legs—Northern and
Eastern District, September 15 to December 30.
Western DlBtrlct North of the 53rd
parallel of latitude, September 13 to
December 28.
Western District South ot the 53rd
parallel of latitude, October 1 to January 15.
There Is a closed seoson In the Pro-1
vlnce of Bi'itish Columbia on swaiu, j
wood duck, elder duck, cranes, curlew,  wlllet,  godwlts,  upland  plover.'
nvocets, dowltchers, knots, oyster-
catchers phuluropes, stilts, surf-birds,
turnstones, and all the shore-birds
not provided with nn open season in
above schedule.
There Is a closed season throughout
the year on the following non-game
birds: Auks, auklets, bitterns, fulmars. Bonnets, grebes, guillemots,
gulss herons, jaegers, loons, murres,
petrels, pullius, shearwaters and tenrs
ami there is a closed season throughout tbe yoar on the following Insectivorous birds: Bobolinks, catbirds,
chickadees, cuckoos, flickers, flycatchers, grosbeaks, hummingbirds,
klnglelH. martins, mendowlarks, night
hawks or bullbats, nuthatches, orioles, robins, shrikes, swallows, swifts,
lanugers, titmice, thrushes, vlreos,
warblers, waxwings, whlppoorwills,
woodpeckers and wrens, and all other
perching birds which feed entirely or
chiefly on insects.
No person shnll kill, capture, injure, take or molest migratory game
birds. Sales of these birds is forbidden.
The killing, capturing, taking, Injuring or molesting of migratory In-
sectivoorus and migratory non-game
birds  Is prohibited.
Penalty
Every person who violates any provision of this Act or any regulation
shall, for each offence be liable upon
summary conviction to a line of not
more than three hundred dollars ami
not less then ten dollars, or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six
months, or to both fine and imprisonment i*
i**1
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30, 1924.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
PAGE SEVEN
ii
Have Good Beer
In the Home
—It's the best drink for you, for your
wife, for your guests.     Good beer
is endorsed by foremost medical authorities throughout the world.
Drink
and
U.B.C. Beer
They're real good beers—produced at
B.C.'s model brewery—on sale at all Gov't.
Liquor Stores.     Have a case in the house.
VANCOUVER BREWERIEf. LIMITED
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
STAR LIVERY STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.   Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
1
"SATISFIED"
When policyholders unsolicited, write and congratulate the Company on results, "there must be a
reason."
F. H. Buker of Brockville, Ont., writes:
"Dear Sirs: Enclosed herewith you will find
cheque for $62.94, being one year's premium on
Policy No. 24,179. I may say that I am surprised at the large reduction in my premium.
This is much better than I had hoped for in this
respect, and I wish to congratulate the Company."
The Dominion Life Assurance
Company
T. HUMPHRIES, Manager for Vancouver Island.
406-7 Pemberton Bldg., Victoria, B. C.
SEALED TENDERS addressed lo
the undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for replacement ot wharf ut Sayward, B.C.," will bc received at tbls
plflce until IS o'clock noon (du)llglil
saving),Thursday, September II, Ilk!I,
for the replacement of wharf at Sayward, District of Comox-Alberni, B.C.
Plans and forms of contract cau be
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at this Department, ut
the office of the District Engineer, Old
Poet Office Building, Victoria, B.C..
and at the Post Offices, Vancouver, II.
G, and Sayward, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and iu accordance
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, payable to the order of the
Minister of Public Works, equal to in
per cent of the amount of the tender
Bonds ot the Dominion of Canada or
bonds of the Canadian Natlnal Hail-
way Company will also be accepted
as security, or bonds and a cheque If
required to make up an odd amount.
Note—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted cheque for the sum ot $10.00
payable to the order of the Minister
of Public Works, which will he returned if the Intending bidder submit
a regular bid.
By order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works.
Ottawa, August 14, 1924.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
tho undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for wharf repuirs at Denman Island, B.C.," will be received ut this
office until It o'clock noon (lUi)llghl
saving),Thursday, .September II, llkil.
for the construction of wharf repairs
ut Denman Island, District of Comox-
Alberni, B.C.
Plans und forms of contract can be
seen aud specification and forms of
tender obtained nt this Department, at
the office of the District Engineer, Old
Post Office Building, Victoria, B.C..
and at the Post Offices, Vancouver, B.
C, and Denman Island, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied
by the Department and In nccordunce
with conditions contained therein.
Each tender must he accompanied
hy an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, payable to the order of thc
Minister of Puhlic Works, equal to IU
per cent of the amount of the tender.
Bonds of the Dominion of Canada or
bonds ot the Canadian Natlnal Railway Company will also be accepted
as security, or bonds and a cheque if
required to make up an odd amount.
Note—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted cheque for the sum nf $10.00
payable to the order ot the Minister
of Public Works, which will be returned If the intending bidder submit
a regular bid.
By order,
S. E. O'BRIEN,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, August 14, 1924,
Law Suit Possibilities
(From Canadian Forest and Outdoor
Magazine.)
Recently a firm of lumber manufactures in British Columbia was mulcted to the extent of several hundred
thousand dollars for damages caused
by a forest Are which, starting outside their boundaries, passed across
llieir limits and destroyed a soldiers'
settlement. The defence claimed they
were not responsible as the fire originated off their property and every effort to block it proved unavailing.
The court held otherwise.
Now comes a news despatch from
Duncan, B.C., Intimating that settlers
plan to take action claiming damages
for forest fires originating in the burn
ing of logging debris.
This Introduces a new problem
which, however, contulns possibilities
not altogether favorable to tbe settler, camper, cottage owner, or other
small property holder. Only a few
weeks ago a California court delivered a judgment, Imposing the entire
costs of tire lighting, amounting to
$2,500, on a pair of amateur fishermen
whose negligence had caused a difficult conflagration. It' the assessing
of costs on lumber companies is adjudged good low and In the puhlic Interest, the logical development surely
Is to apply the same medicine In liberal doses to those who, be they settlers, campers, fishermen, or others,
recklessly destroy the   timber   hold-
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road, Courtenay
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TLNKK
Factory Experience
Leave Orders al Marshall Music Co
Car   For  Hire
Dependable Car—Careful Driver
When in need of a
car
see
GEO. MASON
 PHONE	
Royal Candy                   Or Residence
25
22
(TJIIIKKUMI
When you sre ln need of a
Plumbing ft Heating Engineer, See
R. RUSHTON
Phone 124
Courtenay
Phone 167
Cumberland
Your  needs   will  receive  Immediate
atttention.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Freth and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and   Homelike  service.
26   roomi,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine-
For reservations Phone 16.
B. YAT8I, Manager.
ings, camps, or other property of the
industrial corporations. It is to be
feared that the total damages listed
against tlie settler) for example, will
far outmatch in any season the billet
doux handed to the lumberman. A
few years ago a settler, clearing land
by (ire in order to grow live dollars
worth of potatoes, let loose destructive forces that swept away a half
million dollars worth of white aud
red pine. Three years ago in New
Brunswick, fishermen accounted for
almost half the timber loss. What
about damage suits in these instance:!?
What about a joint suit of provincial
government and limit holders against,'
say, two hundred fishing parties to I
recover three million dollars worth
Of ruined resources?
The thing has great possibilities, '
It wouhl certainly bring home to the j
public the drastic truth that forest
destruction is due not to the axe but :
to the ignorance and thoughtlessness {
of thousands of woods travellers
Let's have a docket full of law suits:
The King vs. Sans Souci Campers1
Club for $850,000 worth of youmj
growth destroyed by carelessness; U. j
V.D. Lumber Company vs. Richard j
Roe, champion bait caster, for $30,000
worth of pulp logs set afire; Tho
Pulp aud Paper Workers' Union vs.
John Doe. prospector, for ten weeks
unemployment because of low water
due to forest fires. It would make a
stimulating document if we could
once place the blame for forest tires
nnd ask the carefree children of our
Personal Liberty regime to show
cause why they should not pay to the
State and Industrial companies a forfeit of $15,000,000 annually.
Martin Hunter narrates in his usual
vivid style in Circulating. All the
regular departments are up to their
usual standard of excellence and aid
in providing good, all-round reading
in ihis number of the magazine.
Rod and Gun in Canada is published by W. J. Taylor. Ltd., Woodstock, Ont.
Former Hangman
Of Britain Tried
To End His Life
LONDON',—John    Ellis,    England's
famous hangman who lost his nerve
and relinquished his sinister occupation last year after executing .Mrs.
Edith Thompson, the last woman who
suffered the death penalty In Great
Britain, was found Monday morning
last at his home seriously wounded
with a revolver lying beside him. It
was said he had spent a sleepless
niglit prior to the shooting.
Ellis, who Isolated himself socially
during nearly a quarter of a century
he served as public executioner, was
suid to have brooded over the fact
that he had sent to their doom more
murderers than any other man who
had ever held the hangman's ollice.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
The September Issue of Rod anil
Gun in Canada will appeal to evory
sportsman. A canoe trip through the
Chain Lakes from Dartmouth to Shu-
benaeadine, by R. G. Urquahart describes oue of the most alluring trips
that can he made anywhere in the
Maritime*. The Four of Us, by C.
Lonsdale is the story of a perfect two
weeks' hunting trip, while Uonny-
castle Dale gives an interesting account of How the Slim Wriggling Eol
is Taken in Winter on the Atlantic
Coast. Raymond Thompson's story
of the frozen north, entitled The Fur
Cache, is one with an unusually good
plot. Mildred Low Introduces tli';
reader to a very interesting group of
people, The Guides of Algonquin, and I
Bowser Silent
On Result Of
Nelson Fight
VICTORIA,—Returns from .Nelson
Saturday night were sought nowhere
with more curiosity than in the big
cream house at the crest of Terrace
Avenue Hill where Mr. Bowsei
"leader emeritus" of the Conservative
party, was interested in seeing how
the younger boys were getting on in
their first light.
Mr. Bowser, who had carefully
kept away from Nelson and the "Citizen' campaign, refused to make any
comment on the result of the election
"It was absolute)' a fight without
me In it." Mr. Bowser explained. "I
didn't take any part in it."
"But," he added. "Perhaps I
should he delighted to take part in
any party tight sometimes in the future if the local people should wish
me to do so."
Although Mr. Bowser refuses to dis
cus? it, it is pretty well understood
in political circles here that the
scheme of running the opposition
candidate tothe premier as a "citizen" candidate instead of a straight
Conservative would have met with
Mr. Bowser's opposition had he had
any part to play in the campaign.
Friends close to Mr. Bowser today
said that it seemed that he was not
surprised at the way the election
went as it was felt that much of the
old time Conservative vote in Nelson
was cold to the "Citizen" appeal.
Manufacturers Are
Adversely Affected
The serious nature of the situation
created by the restoration of the
Crow's Nest Pass Agreement rates on
Canadian railways is evidenced by the
fact that over 300 members of the
Canadian Manufacturers' Association
In Eastern Canada are adversely affected by the discrimination in freight
rates which has resulted. In British Columbia practically all members
are complaining of the adverse effect
of the new rates, while even manufacturers in the Prairie Provinces
are claiming that there has been dislocation of business us a result of the
application of the Crow's Nest rates.
Ever since the railway companies
issued their new tariffs, officials of
the Association bave been busily engaged iu collecting evidence proving
discrimination, 'and have now on
band a great deal of material bearing
on the question, which will be placed
before the Dominion Board of Railway Commissioners when hearings
are held at Ottawa.
It is contended by the CM.A. that
the whole rate structure iu Canada,
which was reviewed by the Board of
Railway Commissioners as recently
as 1022, has been destroyed by the inequalities Introduced through the restoration of the Crow's Nest rates.
The necessity fo rprompt action in
order to remove the unjust discriminations under which some shippers aro
suffering heavy financial looses, is
being strongly urged by the Association.
Nlghtlbus darkibus, No starorum,
Fencibus climabus, Pantibus torum.
Setzabus hootchabus, Eyesa glowrum,
Drinkabus   hootchabus,    Heavenword
soa rum.
Afloat on trie Big Water of Hiawatka
Alms,   .rs   .is-iisv-  ssl   till,  til   III.  i.rrm   l.tk*. Ms-insHhuis-
cls-ssn ss. cumfssrLlili.
Mn traveller has seen Canada   intll he has droned
thr Great Lakes Missing them he misses nut
nnly the opportunity of tracing n great, historic,
important and beautiful waterway, lie also misses
an experience which cannot be ejoyed in any other
part of the world—that of going to 'ca in the centre
(it a continent Above all, he misses nearly two days
ot delightfully cool voyaging, which if he be travelling between the eastern provinces and the prairie
region provides a welcome bre'its in the long ind
dusty  tourney
The Great Lakes ot Canada form the most re-
markn'hle groups ot lakes in the world—a group remarkable foi its extent, Its importance, its historic
interest ind Its beauty With the St Lawrence
river, they provide Canada in summer, with a stu*
pendens inland waterway by which it Is possible to
reach the heart of the Dominion from the Atlantic
ocean a waterway which, since the beginning, has
been inestimably important to the country's development This vast expanse is haunted by the ghosts
nf many ot the most famous makers of North
America As for their beauty—the loveliness of these
pine-frtr.ged inland seas Is something whicb one 'eels
right \.   baiting! In  dreams.
The Canadian Pacific Railway through its Great
Lakes Steamship Service enables those anxious to
enjoy all this to gratify their desire. Three fine
steamships thf "Assinihoia," "Keewatln'* and "Mani-
1-nhn " ar* maintained by the company in this service.
Built in and brought out from, the Clyde, they are
inini'a'ur. ocean finers
Choice may he made nf three sailings i week,
two from Port McNicoll and one from Owen Sound,
both on the Georgian Bay. a north-easterly off-shoot
i«t Lake Huron A train run of a few hours from
Toronto  by Canadian Pacific bring!   out   to   Port
ii. Aoiullsuii.    1'h, sl.il.. sr. svs spssclssu. su Ih, ratios., snid ass
McNicoll, within a few miles of tho spot whero
Chumplain and the .Icsuits made their ill-fated treaty
with the Hurons against 'he Iroquois three een-
lurles ago
The illusion of being al sej, comet rapidly. Flock!
of great gulls wheel iverhead, fearlessly settling
on rail and davit. The deck throbs beneath, "osj!
breezes drive out all unpleasant memorial, of neai.,
dust and smoke. Only two features of a life on
the ocean wave are lacking—the tang of salt, lor
which the scent of pine is a worthy substitute and
the inpleasant rolling, Instead of whicl wa have
almost complete steadiness.
Throughout an afternoon ono .tews ail iver-
changing panorama. Large Island! bearing tiny
houses, flit by. Small islands, canoes on their shallow beaches, give glimpses of white tents seen through
trees, and the smoke of campfires Night, comes
softly, gradually enveloping this picturesque i.iedley
of water, land and sky. The moon rises, casting u
restless trail of silver across the lake, a trail left
by the canoes of Kndisson, Marquette, Etienno Brule,
Father Horgues, Hennepin, MacKenzie, Henry, i. long
procession of daring men, whose paddles still make
music in thc pages of Canada's thrilling history.
Acquaintanceship begins in the dining-room and is
carried on In the verandah cafe, tho lounge, the
smoking rooms and on the decks, with card parties,
music, dancing and yarning on every conceivable
subject.
tn the morning one finds that Lake Huron has
been left behind. The ship is now in the St, Mary's
River, whose green banks, with their succession of
summer cottages and bungalows, are gliding by.
And so on. Past the Soo, througn the "Big Water
of Hiawatha," out of sight of land to thi Twin Cities
—» nev«r-to*| forgotten trip,  (* ■■(■
PAGE EIGHT
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
SATURbAV, AUGUST 30, 1MI
PREVENT FOREST FIRES-IT PAYS.
Local Briefs
Mr, John Stevenson left on Monday
morning for Vancouver,
ss      ♦      *
Mr,  and   Mrs.   Wesley  Willard  left,
for Victoria on    Saturday   morning
lust.
*     .     ss
Mr. Peter Watson, a former Cumberland resident, Is here on u visit
to relatives.
Mrs.   (I)i.i   Geo.  Ker  McNaughton
and (laughter Jean, left on Wednesday
morning Cor Vancouver.
...
Miss Gladys Jaclt, who has been tbo |
guest of Mrs. nnil Miss Scott, returned to her homo In Vancouver.
Mrs.   I).  Stewart   left on  Saturday
morning lust for Vancouver for an extended visit with her daughter.
...
Mrs. Harry Bryan and daughter
Madge left on Wednesday morning
for Vancouver for a short visit.
asja'iiK'BjT''J'S'^.^^
HOUSE
FURNISHINGS
A complete shipment of Congoleum I
Rugs, In tlie newest patterns aud de- i
signs arc now on view at prices whicli
we think will effect a quick clearance j
The sizes are 7ft-6in. by it ft.; !>ft by
!ift.; 9ft. by 10ft.-(iin.; and the large
size Hft by 12ft.
Hestmore Mattresses, Prices $9.51).
$1(1.50, $10) and the very best mat-1
tress made by them at  $20.50 I
Restmore Springs, heavy varnished, j
well seasoned fir frame, fabric of
small double weave, well supported,
and will give good wear.    Price $5,511
Restmore  Heavy  Springs, made of
extra good quality material.    See this j
spring and be convinced. Price $(1.75
Restmore Coil Springs, in two qual- j
ities, the kind that give you the great-
est satisfaction. Prices $P2.5» • $17.1)5:
Steel Bed, finished in white enamel.
full size.      Price   $9.1)5 i
Steel Bed, made of a quality of
goods that can be relied on, full size,
well finished.      Price   $11.50 j
Steel Bed. a specially good piece of j
workmanship, and a really Kood bed,
full size.      Price  $15.09
Steel   Bed.  made  of  a   very   heavy (
qunlity   of   material,   something   tha! i
will give a good appearance to a room
and which is well finished  $1(1.50
Steel Bed, one of the very best and
a very smart appearance, a really
high class article at a very reasonable
price.    See this.      Specil Price $22.95
Pillows, about two dozen left to \
sell at, each    75c.,
SUTHERLAND'S
Cumberland
Dr, U. B. Dler of Vancouver, was
here on a visit during the week.
* *   *
Mrs. (Dr.) H. P. Christie and young
son left on Wednesday morning for
Cranbrook ou a visit to Mrs. Christie's
sister.
* *    *
Norton Carey, of Royston, left Wednesday   morning   for   Victoria,   Where
he   will   spend   a   few   days   Visiting
friends.
* *   *
Miss Hilda Watson left on Wednesday morning for Penticton, to resume
ber duties on the teacher's staff of the
Public School there.
* *   *
Miss M. Bannerman left on Saturday morning for Cranbrook after
spending tbe summer vacation with
relatives in Cumberland.
* *   *
F, Dalby. who has been holidaying
tor the past two weeks, took up his
duties us store keeper at the Company's office on Monday.
* *   *
Miss M. Brown, matron of the Cumberland General Hospital left on
Wednesday morning for Vancouver
and other mainland cities.
* *   *
Or. aud Mrs. E. K. Hicks and young
Albert, left on Thursday morning for
Spring Hill, Nova Scotia, for an extended visit with relatives.
* #   +
Mrs. Thos. Rickson of Courtenay,
accompanied by her niece, Miss Thelma Berry of Vancouver, spent Tuesday evening at Royston Beach.
* *   *
Mr. aud Mrs. C. Cawdell and family, who have been residents of Cumberland for the past few years, left
on Thursday to make their home in
Vancouver.
* *   *
Mr. Cyril Michel left on Monday
morning for Sandspit, Queen Charlotte Islands, where he has accepted
a position on the teaching staff of tbe
Public School.
* *    *
Dr. and Mrs. H. P. Swan and family, of Duncan, who bave been spending a vacation with Dr. and Mrs. R.
P. Christie at Royston, returned home
during the past week.
* •   *
Mr. and Mrs. H. Schrader_ and
daughter, who have been visiting Mrs.
Sehrader's parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Coe Jr., the past four mouths, left !
on Saturday last for their home In
Tacoma.
* *    f
Master William MacNaughton, who ;
has been staying with his uncle and ,
aunt, Dr. aud Mrs. (Jeo. K. MacNaughton,  for  the  past  year,  left  for his
home  in    Montreal    on    Wednesday ,
morning.
* *   *
Gwendoline Carey, who has been
visiting with her parents, Captain and
Mrs, Carey, of Royston during the
summer holidays, left this morning
for Victoria where she will resume
her school studies.
Dr. Sutherland of Vancouver will
assume the duties of Dr. Hicks during the hitter's absence from the city.
* *    *
Miss Agnes Potter, who has been
visiting coast cities of tbe States, arrived in Cumlierland Wednesday and
will spend a couple of days with her
parents, Mr. and .Mrs. Jus. Potter before returning to hei" home in Vancouver.
<■    *   *
Mr. P, Marsh, former manager of
the Royal Bank of Canada at Courtenay aud uow residing at Cranbrook,
accompanied by Mr, and Mrs. .1. X.
, McLeod of Courtenay, were Sunday
, evening callers on Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
S Merrifield.
* *    *
Mr. and   Mrs.  Thomas  Walton  and
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Walton and
young son, of Victoria, who have been
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. -lohn
Walton. Maryport Avenue, for the
past week, returned to their home on
Wednesday morning.
RETURN MATCH
GIVES HOME CLUB
ANOTHER WIN
(Continued From  Page One)
PUBLIC SCHOOL
OPENS TUESDAY
The Public School will re-open un
Tuesday. September 2nd. New pupils)
will be received in the Beginners
Class if they will have passed their
sixth birthdaiy by November 1st, lflM,
Parents nre asked to have these child
ren ut the new school between S::!0
and b: Hn Tuesday morning for registration.
George 10. Apps, Principal.
FOR SALE-lIANSON*S NEW HOTEL
Building at Campbelton, 12 bed
rooms, bath room, toilet, living
room, 2 stores, club room, plate
glass front, on lot 50x100. Everything for $4,000.00 cash. Addreus
T. W. Hanson, Campbell River,
B.C. M.
LOST—A SUIT CASE, WITH 2 SUITS
in, in tlie vicinity of Deep Bay.
Please notify owners immediately,
name and address In suit case.     31.
LOST—ON SUNDAY NIGHT NEAR
Union Baly, a small hrown hand
grip, containing wearing apparel,
belonging to Alberni Tennis Club,
"Will finder please return to Islander
Ollice. 35,
day's matches: T. Graham and M.
Graham vs. O. Matson and F. H.
Swayne, 6-4, 6-2; C. Graham and P.
D. Graham vs. V. C. Bramicombe and
II. A. I-Ioad. (1-3. 1-6, 4-6; H. Stewart
and J. Vaughn vs. C. Spratt and II.
Hodgson. 6-4. 4-6, 6-6; E. Bickle anil
A. K. Stacey vs. B. Walker and P.
Payne, 6-8, (1-1; T. Graham and M
Graham vs. v. C. Bramicombe and H.
A. Hoad. 6-3, 6-2; T. Graham and M,
Graham vs. B. Walker and P. Payne,
6-0, 6-1; E. Bickle and A. It. Stacey
vs. F. II. Sway.ue and O. Matson, 6-3,
6-1; C, Graham and P. I). Graham
vs. C. Spratt and H. Hodgson, 6-2, 6-1
It. Grnhnm and T. Graham vs. C.
Spratt and H. Hodgson. (1-2,4-6, 6-2;
C. Graham and P. 0. Graham vs. O.
Matson nnd F. H. Swayne, 6-5, 5-6,
6-1; II. Stewart and .1. Vaughan vs.
P. Bayne and B. Walker, 6-2, 6-1; H.
Stewart and J. Vaughan vs. V. C.
Bramicombe and H. A. Hoad, 3-6. 3-6;
E. Bickle and A. R. Stacey vs. V. C.
Bramicombe and H. A. Hoad, 2-6,
6-5, 6-5; C. Graham and P.II. Graham
vs. B. Walker and P. Bayne. 6-0, 6-2;
H. Stewart and .1. Vaughan vs. O.
Matson and F. H. Swayne, 6-4, 1-6,
1-6.
This coining Monday. Labor bay,
Cumberland will again be at home bul
this time (o the Port Alberni Club,
which is coming over with eight
strung players, four ladies and four
men. Anyone interested in tennis
may attend these matches, quite a
large gallery being present last week.
AGNES HALCROW
DIED ON FRIDAY
Agnes Halcrow. the beloved wife
of Robert Halcrow of First Street
died on Friday. The deceased lady
was iu her 65th lyear and a resident
of this city for 32 years and had been
in failing health for the past twelve
months. Mr. Halcrow left for work
as usual on Friday and upon his return home found his wife dead. Thc
coroner investigated thc death and decided that an inquest was unnecessary. Tse funeral will take place
on Monday from Bank's Undertaking
Parlors at 2.30 p.m.
PRESERVING
PEACHES
They are at their best and season is short. Order
now.
Leave your order for Preserving Bartlet Pears,
to arrive in a lew days, when they will be at their best.
Full stock of Fruit Jars, Caps, Rings, Rubber
Rings, Parrowax, etc.
Make your Jam and Jelly with "Certo" Sure Jell.
Never fails, 1 minute boiling, economical, Pure Food
Product.       Per bottle   50c.
FRESH  FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Green Peppers,   Cucumbers,   Hot  House Tomatoes,
Hard    Cabbage,    Green    Onions,    Carrots,    Beets,
Turnips, Green String Beans, Cob Corn, New Potatoes,
Dry Onions Lettuce etc.
Takay and Malaga Grapes, Cantaloupes, Water Melons,
Table Pears,  Peaches, Plums,  Eating and  Cooking
Apples,  California Grape   Fruit,  Oranges,  Lemons,
Bananas, etc.
FLY TOX
The household insecticide—Kills all kinds of insects,
etc.    Try a 50c. bottle with your next order.
Wilson Poison Fly Pads,  10c.
Sticky Fly Sheets and Coils, 3 for   10c.
Fly Swats, each 15c. and   20c.
WE ARE OPEN UNTIL 10 PJM. SATURDAY
Matt Brown's Grocery
FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
PHONE 38
TENDERS
CAIIII OF THANKS
-
No Life Wasted By This Battery
—its life starts after you buy it
We are talking about the new Willard
Charged Bone-Dry Battery. This very different battery comes dry.   No acid in it.
We keep it until you say, "Put the battery
in my car," then we fill it. It is a charged
battery.   Filling starts its life.
"A battery that doesn't .tart Its life until
sou get it, can't waste any of it! life before
you get it," says Little Ampere.
.SPARKS CO.  (COURTENAY) Ltd.
COUKTENAY
Phone 99 Phone !,<J
be
Headquarters for
•I School Supplies-
Lang's Drug Store
THE REX ALL-KODAK STORE
Our stock of Public and High School Text Books
and Supplies is complete and prices cut to the lowest
possible ligure.
See our lines before making your purchase elsewhere.
Free Ruler and Blotters
to each child purchasing school supplies at this store
School Opening Day Only.
EXTRA SPECIALS FOR SCHOOL OPENING DAY
 ONLY	
Exercise Books, for ink, 6 for 25
Supa Fountain Pens, e.tch  4S
Shamrock Pencils, with Rubber, per doz 50
REMEMBER—
it   PAYS   (o   DEAL   at   LANG'.S"
Buy Your School Supplies From us and
—SAVE MONEY
Tenders will he received by the
J Cumberland United Football Club for
I thc erection ot* a Grand Stand on the
Recreation Grounds, Cumberland, D.C.
i Plans antl specifications to be had
I from thc undersigned.
i Tenders to be ln the hands of Ss>c-
: retary on or before 6th day of Sep-
! tcmbcr. 1934.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ROUT. STRACHAN, Secretary.
i     Cumberland   United  Football  Club.
j Box 347, Cumberland, B.C.
;    Cumberland, B.C.
August 27th, 1(124. 35.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Miller and family
extend tn Dr. McNaughton, the matron nnd staff.of the Cumberland General Hospital, heartfelt thanks for thc
kind attention shown to Willnmona
Miller whilst n patient in the hospital.
I AltII OF THANKS
tt'c wish to thank all those friends
who so kindly helped us at the firs)
which recently destroyed our home at
Royston and offered other assistance.
35 Mr. and Mrs. F. Wilcock.
BY APPOINTMENT
PURVEYORS TO
HIS MAJESTY
KING GEORGE V.
NOW IS THE TIME
TO START TO OBT RllAllY FOR CHRISTMAS
Come in and see:
STAMPED PILLOW CASKS,   NH1IIT DRESSES,
HUKm' SETS AMI TEA CLOTHES
etc, at
Mrs.   L.  Francescini
Cumberland
Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
Hemstitching A Specialty
Whisky may be old yet not
matured. To be matured it
must have been aged in cask-
"@JADIAN (EisT
WHISKY
are thoroughly matured in
Oak Casks stored in rack
warehouses.
Observe the  guarantee of
age  on   the   Government
Stamp over the capsule of
every bottle.
DISTILLED AND BOTTLED BY
HlRAM WALKER& SONS, LIMITED
WALKERVILLE   -   ONTARIO
Montreal, Que.
Distillers of Fine
Whiskies slim 1858
London, Ent.
New York, U.S.A.
This advertisement iB not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia,   ^.j

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