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The Cumberland Islander Sep 29, 1923

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Array 1 fi£T CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
fH
V*'/ With which Is consolidated tlie Cumberland Sews.
FJRTY-SECOND    YEAR
No. 39
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUM B1A, SATURDAY SEPT.   29th.   1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM:-
Runaway Victory
For .Local Team
Sunday Last
Visitors   From   Northfield   Are   No
Match (or Blair & Co. iHome Forwards In Scoring Mood— Notch
Seven Goals to Visitors One
Tbe Upper Island League game
played on Sunday last on the Recreation Grounds was of a desultory nature,
little or no combination tootball being
displayed by either team. Had the locals played the game they are capable
of, it ls hard to say just what the score
would have been.
During the first half the home team
scored twice, "Toots" Plump and
Cummins being the scorers. The visitors rarely troubled Blair ln the first
half, he only handling the ball on
four occasions, once when he ptckod
the ball out of the net after the visitors
Inside left had scored, whilst the gonl-
er~was appealing to referee Jones for
offside. Blair muBt surely bave forgotten himself, when he went so fa"r
as to actually stop playing while appealing to the referee. There is not
the sllghest doubt but what the inside
man was offside, but that Is no excuse for a player to stop playing the
game, whilst the opponent scores.
The old, old adage Is as good to-dtiy
as It was years ago, "Play , to the
Whistle."
Halt-time found the score as indicated, two—one In favor uf the homesters.
The teams, crossed over without taking a breathe, evidently being anxious
to bring the game to an end. The
The min which hud "been coming down
Incessantly during the first half became worse, making it extremely difficult for the players to Judge and
control the boll. After about IB
minutes play, Tucker James scored a
pretty goal, heading the ball well oui
ot reach of the custodian. Right from
the centre kick tbe Cumberland forwards went down, and ln the best
play of the whole game, in whicb Milligan, James and Plump took part, tho
centre forward scored another
goal, less than one minute after his
previous one. The game became a
farce, so far as football was concerned, the home forwards going through
at will and scoring three more goals,
making the final core 7—1.
Tucker James signalled his return
to the game by scoring three goals,
whilst Plump and Cummins obtained
two each.
A. S. Jones refereed the game In his
usual efficient manner, the only mistake he made being the offside position he allowed of the visitors forward
when their lone tally was scored.
Perhaps the error of the referee
taught the goalie a lesson/ Let's hope
so.
ENJOYABLE  BIRTHDAY  PARTY
A most enjoyable party was held at
the home of Mrs. Oeorge Johnson on
Friday last, ln honor of the fifteenth
birthday of her eldest daughter, Ella.
About tw;enty-flve young guests spent
the early part ot the evening in songs
and games, after which they sat down
to a most sumptuous repast, the children thoroughly enjoying themselves.
Miss Klla Johnson was the recipient
of many beautiful and useful gfts,
testifying to the popularity of tho
young lady.
The latter part of the evening wns
taken up by the older people when a
farewell surprise party was given by
Mrs. Johnson ln honor of her sister,
Mrs. C. Patterson, who left for Alberta on Tuesday last. A very pleasant
evening was spent in singing, games
and dancing, supper being served at
midnight, about twenty guests sitting
down.
The evening came to an end with
everybody wishing Mrs. Patterson tho
best ot luck In her new home.
ENTERTAINED LADIES'
FIRST AID TEAM
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bond entertained the Ladies' First Aid Team, No. 1,
and MrB. J. Graham at a Chicken Supper on Monday evening last. During
the course of the evening the ladles
presented to Mrs. Bond a beautiful
cut glass berry bowl and to Mr. Frank
Bond a silk scarf, as a small token of
appreciation for coaching the tenm.
Correspondence
Cumberland, B. C. Sept. 24.
Editor "The Islander"
Your correspondent "Observer" according to his communications In recent issues of the "Islander"
appears to be very much agitated because of the business , as he thinks,
local merchants are losing through
closing their stores at eight o'clock
Instead of the later hour, Saturday
nights. '
It is to be hoped business men will
not take "Observer's" observations too
seriously.
It was at the urgent and unanimous
request of the merchants themselves,
a year or so ago, that the City Council* passed the by-law entailing on us
tbe'neeesslty ot closing at the earlier
hour. The change was very much
commended then.   It ts still good.
Much is made of the supposition
that considerable business Is being diverted to Courtenay; but this idea is
altogether exaggerated.
Looking back into the past, Cumberland merchants could always say that
they have kept abreast ot tbe times,
in so far as the conditions regulating
retail merchandising were concerned,
particularly with reference to the
weekly half holiday, and the six
o'clock closing. These two advantages were in force here years before
they became general elsewhere. It
would be interesting to know what
"Observer's" attitude was to these bylaws, In the distant past,, when they
were first introduced.
Now, once again Cumberland merchants have led the way. Is a working day of twelve hours not long
enough. In the near future, It may
be that the Retail Merchants Association of B. C. will recommend to the
Legislature the passing of a law compelling all stores to close not later
than six, every night. The tendency
in' all pursuits ts to curtail the working day. A working day of fourteen
hours should certainly be outlawed
In these progressive times. More
time for recreation will never retard
the progress of one's business. We
should endeavor to get more out of
life than standing behind a counter
or sitting at desk for ever. More time
away from business will not harm
one's credit, aud will stimulate his
physical and mental being.
Campbell Bros.
COMMUNITY CLUB
ANNUAL MEETING
Royston Community Club held their
annual meeting in the school house
on Wednesday evening. The chief
business of the evening was thc election of officers. Capt. J. Carey takes
the place of F. J. Dalby, the retiring
president. Gordon Thomas was elected secretary, and Miss Ogilvie, treasurer.
, The Club is looking forward to a
prosperous season.
Profesor Gibson, of Victoria, gavo
a very interesting lecture at Hoyston.
on Wednesday evening, illustrated
with lantern slides, on the "Beautifying of Public School Grounds."
COURTENAY BADMINTON
CLUB RE-ORGANIZED
An enthusiastic meeting of the
Courtenay Badminton Club was held
on Wednesday night at the Sun Drug
Company's store. There was a good
attendance and Mr. J. H. Maclntyre
wns ln the chair. This was a reorganization meeting and the following
ladles and gentlemen were elected to
act as Directors: Mr. H. Ashe, Mr.
Frederick Fleld, Mrs. L. S. Cokely and
Mrs. Theed Pearse. The Agricultural
Hall will be secured for the season
and it is likely that play will begin
next Monday. Mr. Ken. B. Dalby was
elected secretary.
STRAWBERRIES  IN  ..SEPTEMBER
Cumberland girl at football game
last Sunday, "Hold him Jack, I know
you can."
As a testimonial to the fertility of
the soil and the mildness of the climate of Comox District. Mr. Alfred
Smith, a resident of the Lake Trail,
Courtenay, has on show in Booth's
store, a box of strawberries which he
picked last Tuesday. They are largo
well flavored berries, not of the everbearing variety, which would make
them no novelty in some parts, but
ordinary strawberries of the Magoon
species. Mr. Smith had three thousand plants this year on two acres of
ground. During the summer he sold
several boxes In which there were only nine berries to the pound. No better evidence than ths could be forthcoming as to the suitability ot Comox
District for the growing of small
fruits.
BRILLIANT SUCCESS OF
**************
FIRST AID BANQUET AND DANCE
WINNERS IN RECENT FIRST  AID   CONTEST   HONORED
AT G. W. V. A. HALL ON   MONDAY   LAST
A large aud happy crowd of people
gathered at the G. W. V. A. Hall on
Monday evening last, the occasion being the banquet tendered to the local
winners In the recent First Aid und
Mine Reseue Coutest, held at Ladysmith' on Labor Day, September 3rd.
Tho large hall of the Great War Veterans presented a pretty sight as the
many guests took their allotted seats,
and soon the hearty laughter, mingled
wltb the clinking of glasses was testimony enough that everything was go.
ing off O.K.
Mr. Edward Hughes acted as chairman, and ln his opening remarks, Immediately after the banquet, he welcomed all there that evening. He
briefly outlined the splendid achievement of the different; teams in tbe recent contest and congratulated the
winners most heartily. The chairman
said be would not tire them with a
long speech as there were several
gentlemen present, who had been prevailed upon to come there that evening and address the assembly. He,
then called upon Mr. Charles Graham
General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited to
say a few words. Mr. Graham, ln rising said how much pleasure it gave
him to be amongst them that evening,
and to add both tor himself and the
company he represented, congratulations to the winning teams In the recent contest, and the large number of
prizes won by them testified to the
great skill they possessed in rendering First Aid to the injured.
Mayor Parnham was the next speaker, and said that his task of adding
congratulations was made comparatively easy, after the very able adi.
dress of Mr. Charles Graham, but on
behalf of the city he added his congratulations tq. the winners, and also
for the great honor they had brought
to the city of Cumberland.
Dr. G. K. McNaughton and Dr. E. R.
Hicks also spoke, giving n very lucid
address ou the benefits of First Aid
to the injured. The addresses of both
doctors was listened to with a great
deal of attention, as the clear, concise
way in which the subject was dealt
with held the listeners from start to
finish, both doctors receiving an ovation at the conclusion of their speech.
Mrs. Walter Hudson, captain of the
winning Ladles' First Aid Team was"
the next speaker, and In a few well-
chosen words said how pleased she
was that her team had been returned
winners, and that It was Indeed a
great pleasure and a great honor to
be captain of such a magnificent
team, every member of which had
put in an enormous amount of work,
and study to perfect themselves for
the recent contest. Mrs. Hudson then
asked the chairman to present to Mr.
A. ,J Taylor, the coach of the team, a
fountain pen, as a small token of appreciation iu assisting the team to become so efficient. Mr. Taylor responding said he was only too pleased
to have beenof service to the team.
■ He thanked the ladles for their kindness in presenting him the fountain
. pen, and said, he only hoped that
more would come forward and take
up the Interesting work of First Aid,
! and if at any time his services were
required he would be only too pleased
to assist them.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, Safety First Engineer of the Canadian Collieries then
delivered a masterful address which
' was listened to with attention.
Songs were rendered by Mrs. Pln-
' fold, Mrs. Anderson and Mr. Goodall,
I after which dancing was indulged in
to the strains of Plump's orchestra.
, Thn banquet, which was a brilliant
success, was In the capable hands of
Club Notes
Now that the weather is becoming
favorable for indoor exercises and
sports, and evenings growing much
longer, Mr. J. W. Tremlett, Instructor
at the Athletic Club is opening the
gymnasium classes and other activities. It is to be hoped that as much
interest will be taken In the boxing
as last year, so that Cumberland may
be represented ln the tournaments,
which will likely be held in the neighboring towns, as well aB in Cumberland.
There is a lot of good material in
town to-day, which only training and
practice can bring out.
Another sport, which has many followers, Is basket ball and an endeavor is being made by the Club to organize a league schedule for girls,
boys, ladles and men. Arrangements
for teams to practice in the band hall
which was suitably fixed up last year
for basket ball, are already under way
by the Juvenile teams of the public
school and churches and It is the
hope of those who are trying to foster the sport, that sufficient teams
will be organized to make an attractive schedule possible.
The Literary Committee of the Athletic Association are negotiating with
the University Extenson Course, for
a series of lectures to be held tn thc
Lecture Hall during the winter
months.
The increased interest shown last
season over the previous season left
an Indication that these lectures were
being looked forward to. The lectures
are to be as usual of an instructive
nature and the general public, who
ore welcome as well as the employees,
should have the hall tilled to capacity, as the speakers are all experts ln
their respective subjects, aud all residents should be proud of an opportunity 'to hear them.
Keen Game Is
Anticipated
On Sunday
Cumberland  Travel    To    Ludysniltli
For Their Third Gnme In
I'pper Island Schedule
The football game between Cumberland and Ladysmith to be played on
the letter's ground on Sunday, promises to be of a very high order. Whilst
the locals have the disadvantage of
playing away from home, they are full
of confidence, and expect to take the
measure of their old rivals. Cumberland rely ou the same team that
so decisively defeated Northfield
last Sunday, viz: Ulair, Stewart, Conti, Gough, Hltchins. Mnnahan. Bannerman, Milligan, James, Plump and
Cummins. The Ladysmith team are
reported to be ill Al shape, and their
line-up will probably Include two old
Cumberland players In Jock Campbell
and Archie Boyd.
RALLY DAY AT GRACE
METHODIST CHURCH
11 a.m. Rally Day Service. A bright
program will be given by the boys and
girls and young people consisting of
choruses, readings etc.
Short address by thc Pastor on
"Fourfold Growth" and a solo by Edith O'Brien.
7 p.m. Young People's Service With
opening song service. Subject: "Our
Greatest National Asset."
Special music. Everbody welcome.
Come and enjoy these helpful services.
Sunday September 30th.
.Mrs. R. Yates of the Union Hotel.
JAPANESE SUBSCRIPTION
LIST AT CITY HALL
The following donations have been
received at the City Hall for the Japanese Relief Fund:
Mr. Thomas Graham   $2.*>
Mr. A.E.Colman   20
Mr. F.A.isfcCarthy     5
CURFEW BELL TO
RING AT EIGHT
Commencing on October 1st. Cumberland's curfew will ring at 8, instead
of at 9, and will continue to do so for
the winter months.
SCOUT RALLY TO BE       „
HELD OCTOBER 5th.
The local Boy Scouts will hold a
Rally in the Anglican Church Hall on
Friday, October 5th, at 8 p.m., when
a demonstration of scout work will be
staged. Also the presentation of badges. Parents and friends are cordially invited to be present on this occasion.
TO HOLD AUTUMN TEA
The Ladies' Aid of St. George's Presbyterian Church will hold an Autumn
Tea at the Manse, October 10th. from
3 to 6. Everybody welcome. Be sure
to attend. The ladies also intend holding a Sale of Work on December 5th.
Negotiations For Agreement
***************
Ended  Satisfactory  To Both  Parties
MEETINGS HELD WITH THE MANAGEMENT DURING THE
WEEK PLEASANT AND CORDIAL.    OLD AGREEMENT ADOPTED FOR ONE MORE YEAR.
The m§ss meeting of the employees of the Comox Mines and
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited held in the Lecture
Hall of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association to select an agreement committee to enter into negotiations with the
object of establishing a new working agreement has been highly
satisfactory to all parties concerned.
The Comjnittee selected at the mass meeting were Daniel
Stewart, Chairman, James Smith, Secretary', representing Number Four Underground, M. McAdams, Number Four Surface,
John Bond, miscellaneous, and Thomas Conn for Number Five
Mine. Several interviews were held with the management
of the Canadian Collieries during the past week, which were cordial and pleasing in every respect with the result that a further
meeting was held between Thomas Graham, General Manager,
and Charles Graham, General Superintendent, of the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, and the above agreement committee representing the employees of the Comox Mines on Saturday
when the agreement that has been in force for the past two years
was renewed in its entirety for another twelve months without
any change whatever.
This is very gratifying to the employees and citizens as a
whole and is only further evidence of the pleasant understanding
that, has existed between the present management of the Canadian Collieries and the employees of the Comox Mines which has
been a source of gratification to the residents of this community.
PROCEEDINGS OF
THE CITY COUNCIL
German Field Gun
At the last meeting of the City coun.
cil a communicaton was read from
the caretaker of the Cumberland Post
Office to the effect that if the city
Council would supply the paint, cement and gravel, the caretaker would
supply the labor and renovate the
German Field Gun that stands at the
sleps of the Public Building. This
matter was left In the hands of the
Board of Works, and one of the aldermen suggested that the Fleld Gun
should he removed to a point ndnr the
Memorial Arch nnd just outside the
G. W. V. A. Hall.
Cost uf Repulrs Dunsmuir Ave.
Alderman John J. Potter, chairman
of the Board of Works and his associates will Inspect Dunsmuir Avenue
and Fourth Street, with a view of ascertaining the approximate cost of
needed repairs and report the result
of their investigation at the next mee'-
Ing of the Council.
Slight ('use of Small-pox
The Sanitary Inspector reported
that the quarantine on the case of
small-pox had been lifted, and the
city was again free from all Infectu-
ous deseases.
Kstlniutfd Expenditure
The City Clerk was Instructed to
prepare a detailed estimate of the expenditure of secondary highways for *
1023 and 1024.      /
New Fire Hull
Aid. Frank Partridge, chairman of
the Fire Wardens handed in his re-
I port on the construction of the llew '
\ Fire Hall and said that It was Hearing
I completion and stated that arrangements wore almost completed for the
wiring of the building and the Insinuation of electric heaters..
Japanese Fund ..;
His Worship the .Mayor Informed
thc Cily Council thnt the employees of
the Canadian Collieries had agreed to
donate fifty cents a man to the Can-
adian lied Cross Society for the relief
of the Japanese, and that the Japan-'
esc around Cumberland hnd donated |
nnd forwarded to headquarters thc
sum of $219(1 for Ihe relief of their
fellow countrymen. Thc City Council
decided to open a subscription list
and Instructed'thc Cly Clerk to re.j
ceivc donations, nnd also to post notices to that effect.
Club Licenses
Albert J. Merry was appointed License Inspector, and requested to Inspect all premises that had made application for a license and report at
the next meeting of the Council, when
SHIPPING
Shipping at the Loading Wharves
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited at Union Bay.
Charmer, Vancouver; Peerlcs, coast
wise; Flyer and Scow, New Westminster, Dauntless, Coastwise; Linda,
Vancouver; Chrlstin, Vancouver;
Swell and Scow, Vancouver; Beatrice,
Cosatwlse; Joyful, Coastwise; Dranco,
Anyox; Wireless, Coastwise;    Dornu
King, Coastwise;   Otter,   Coastwise;
Active, Coastwise.
FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION
MET ON WEDNESDAY
The Upper Island Football Association held a meeting in Nanaimo on
Wednesday last when the constitution
and by-laws wore finally read and
passed. Referees were also allotted
for each game, Mr. A ,S. Jones being
appointed to look after all games on
the local grounds. Mr. R. Strachan
attended the meeting In the interests
of the Cumberland team.
Tlle school children of the Cumberland Public School hnve donated to
the Junior Red Cross Fund In aid of
the sufferers in the recent Japanese
disaster, the sum of $36.00.
WEDDING
Wilfert—Johnson
On Thursday last the Rev. James
Hood of Cumberland, united In marriage Miss Elsie Johnson of Herrlolt
Bay, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John-
spn of Pender Island, to Mr. Frank W.
Wilfert, manager of the Campbell
River Lumber Co. Mr. and Mrs. Wit-
fort are spending a short honeymoon
lu the district and other island points.
EVENING CLASSES
Announcement Is made of a reduction of 257, of the total Tee for any
student taking two or more subjects.
Book-keeping, Arithmetic and Shorthand nre the subjects to be taught und
the classes commence on Tuesday,
October 2nd. nt 8 p.m.
they expect to denl with thc applications.
Returned Soldiers' Mouses
This bin question that has been under discussion for sonic months without nny satisfactory results, and His
Worship the Mayor is apparently determined to effect a settlement. The
hooks and accounts of thc various
tenants have been examined und the
City Clerk has brought In an Itemized
and detailed account of every loan under the Better Housing Scheme, when
the Provincial Government advanced
$11,000 and thc city another $3,000. It
is the Intention of the Council to give
every returned man a detailed account
of his indebtedness nnd will expect
him to make a settlement without delay, or make some arrangements that
will satisfy the Council. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
8ATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 1923
uable books with dreary gaps in
their ranks, or to bo branded as hateful or disagreeable if they have moral
courage to withstand the borrower's
tyranny.
IN SEPTEMBER
THE BORROWERS
It may have teen true ln that long-
ago realm of Israel that "the borrower ls servant to the lender;" and it is
said to be eminently so still in regard
to the unfortunate beings compellod
to deal with those of the wise king's
co-relgionists, who do a thriving and
prosperous business under the baleful shadow of three golden balls.
There ls also a servitude—not to be
escaped—legally binding upon thoso
who gave a note for money loaned,
and in all financal transactions of any
magnitude tlie saying holds good, rt
species of moral bondage being Imposed until the loan Is repaid with interest.
But in tho everyday affairs of life
thero are petty, oft-recurring trials
which make slaves of the careful souls
who have friends or acquaintances akin to the foolish virgins. Doubtless
those women ln the parable were of
the Indifferent, easy-going kind, pithily designated by a Southern colloquialism as "trlflng." Expecting always to be helped In every emergency,
they felt very Ill-used when they wore
refused the aid which would only have
been given by the ruin of their wiser
friends
Personal belongings are sometimes
asked for without scruple, used wth
reckless diregard, and when returned
are often so lacking in freshness a3
to bo almost distasteful to thc owner's
nice Ideas. Umbrellas are fugitive belongings—so much so that Emerson
once referred to his umbrella as "that
thing which people always borrow and
never return.'"
Borrowing ls positively forbidden
by judicious housekeepers, and the
rule works well in more than one way.
Its enforcement promotes neighborly
good feeling, and also teaches tiie
thoughtless or wasteful domestic lo
be more cheerful, she must do without
thc desired article, or make confess- j
lon of her carelessness. An Independ-
ent, self-respecting person does not
Indulge in the pernicious habit of borrowing.
Looks borrowed by conscientious
persons arc treated with the respect
due to them, carefully used, and returned unblemished to their owner
To such friends how readily, almost
eagerly, do we lend the most precious
volumes in our library. But with what
trepidation do we hear the careless,
inveterate borrower asking for a book.
It is ever to be returned, It will surely
be In a soiled or tattered condition,
and there will be a glib, plausible apology, or perhaps none at all.
Ah, King Solomon your dictum
needs revising! Lenders must submit
to losses, to petty drains, to seeing val-
The public school graduates in
June felt themselves able to manage
the world. Those who have tried to
earn a living are finding that the
world does not show them the same
sympathy now thnt it did on the commencement niglit. Their September
view Is far less roseate than their
June vision. By June of next year
they will understand that, while "beyond the Alps lies Itnly," beyond the
schoolroom lies the world, and the
world Is a good deal bigger than Italy
and Ihe Alps and the school room
combined. The graduates who "finished tlieir education" in June may
now buckle down to the work of beginning their real education. It may
sound strange to them to talk of "beginning" a thing that tliey have "finished," but this Is precisely what confronts them.
With The
Churches
CUHBERXAND SUNDAY SEPT. SO
1IOLV TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge    -
Holy Communion at 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 2.30 p.m.
Evensong 7 p.m.
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
WAGE BOARD SET NEW
SCALE FOR WOMEN
Announce Not Regulations For Employment of Inexperienced
Workers
Thc minimum wage for women industrial workers in British Columbia
remans at $14 a week, but new scales
of basic wages for inexperienced women workers were announced yesterday by the Minimum Wage Board.
In the manufacture of eatables, soft
drinks, cans, buttons, soap, paint varnish, drug and toilet preparations,
photographs, ink. brooms, whisks.
pails, washboards, wooden boxes,
clothes pins, matches, explosives, munitions, gas mantles and window shades
and similar articles the minimum
wage is fixed QS follows:
Nol less than ?8 a week for the first
two months! employment.
Not less than $10 a week for the second two months.
Not less than $12 n week for the
third two months.
Not less than $M a week thereafter.
The second class outlined by the
Board's new order includes women
engaged in the manufacture of clothing, gloves, tents, awnings, carpets,
furniture, bedding, mattress covers
draperies, knitted goods,* blankets
brushes, machine-made cigars, dipped
chocolates, envelopes and similar arc
icles. Iu this class minimum wages
are fixed as follows.
Nol less than $8 a week for the first
four months.
Not less thati$10 a week for fhe second four months.
Not less than $12 a week for the
third four months.
Not less than $14 n week thereafter.
Tlie third class outlined in the
Board's order includes    women    em-
NEW GOODS
Carpet Squares, in sizes, 7 ft. 6 in. x 9 ft., 9 ft. x 9ft
and 9 ft. x 10 ft. 6in.. For Prices see our Windows.
A new lot of Eiderdowns, at per yard  $1.50
English Flannellettes, made from the finest
Egyptian Cotton in white and Fancy Stripes at per
yard 50 cts.
Elastop Hose for Ladies.wide and    roomy,   very
comfortable, in assorted colors.
KNITTING WOOLS
Tiger Brand, in White, Black,   Putty   and   Fancy
Colors.
Heatherbloom and Australine    Fingering    Wools
in all the best shades.
Underskirts in Black and Fancy Colors.
Stanfield's Underwear for men. Red    and   Green
Labels.
Penman's Natural Wool Underwear in all sizes.
Penman's line 71, Shirts   and   Drawers   at   per
Garment  „ $1.00
"Jason" Unshrinkable Natural Wool Shirts   and
Drawers, every garment guaranteed.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN THE HEAD,
AND NASAL CATARRH.
The new Continental remedy called
"1ARMALENE" (Regd.)
is a simple harmless home-treatment
which absolutely cures deafness, noises In the head, cte. No Expensive Appliances Needed tor this new Ointment, Instantly operates upon the affected parts with complete and permanent success. Scores ot Wonderful
lures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, of Slad Road,
Stroud, writes:—"Please could I
trouble you to send me another box of
the Ointment. It ls not for myself, but
for u friend of mine who ls as bad as
was, und cannot get any rest for the
noises In the head. I feel a new woman, and can go to bed now and get a
good night's rest, which I had not
been able to do for many months. It
Is a wonderful remedy and am most
delighted to recommende It."
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Whltehorse Road,
I'm)don. writes!—"I am pleased to
tell you that the small tin of ointment
yuu sent to mc at Ventnwr, has proved
n complete success, my hearing Is
now quite normal, and the horrible
head noises bave ceased. The action
of this new remedy must be very remarkable, for I have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
yenrs, and hnve had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instruments all
to no purpose. 1 need hardly say how
very grateful I um, for my life has
undergone nn entire change."
Try one box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for $1.00. There Is
Nothing Better nt any Price.
Address orders to:—
THE "LARMALENE" CO,
10, South  View, Watllug St,  Dart-
ford, Kent, England.
ployed hi iiook binding, embossing, engraving, printing, dressmaking, tailoring, making men's ready-to-wear
clothing, paper boxes, jewelry, furs,
leather goods, hand-made cigars,
boots, shoes and hand made millinery.
For them minimum wages are as follows:
Xol less than $7 a week for thc first
six mouths.
Not less than $10 a week for the second six months.
Not less than $13 a week for the
third six mouths.
Not less than $14 a week thereafter.
In all classes an eight-hour day and
n forty-eight hour week are ordered.
The Board's new order will come Into
effect sixty days from now. It follows
a recent inquiry In Vancouver Into
tlie condition of inexperienced women
In Qrltish Columbia industries.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - -  B. C.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
600 IM'. Permanent Loan Bldg
PHONE 2818      VICTORIA, B.C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF. VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
Special Showing This
Week
BILLY  BURKE
Dresses in Trenella
AU wool with Broadcloth finish —made in all the newest shades including Flamingo, Royal, Peacock, Co coa and Nu-Blue.
Secial value inBLANKETS, COTTON -FILLED and   EIDERDOWN COMFORTERS —
Large size Flannelette Sheets, Best Quality at
$3.25ap8ir
GROCERY  SPECIALS
Pure Malt Vinegar, Bote .30
Brown Vinegar, Bote s20
White Wine Vinegar, Bots  .20
Ramsay's Sodas, Cartons .25
Sliced Pineapple Tall tins,.... 2 for .35
Broken sliced Pineapple, 2<£s 2 for .75
King Oscar Sardines  s20
Brunswick Sardines 3 tins .25
Horse Shoe Salmon, Flats .... 2 for .45
Horso Shoe Salmon, Tails .15
Oranges  8 doi. for $1.00
Evaporated Prunes, large size, 21bs, Ai
Mixed Nuts, per lb s25
Corn Beef, ls tins 2 for .55
Florida and California Orape Fruit,
Bananas, Grapes, Peaches, Pears, Tomatoes, Finan Haddie, Kippers.
aiasEEraiBiBEEraiaraEiaff
■BEiaEraaEEiararaEffiEMaiBJEH
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for
Charlie Dalton
Connecting with Boat at Union Bay
every Sunday Morning. Leave Cumberland Hotel, 8 o'clock.
W. P. Syntona
Proprietor
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent tn Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our  Work  and  Service
Will Please Tod  t:   tl
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.      i      Phone 8803
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood ud fioodi of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parti of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE
53
TELEPHONE
LADIES!
We would draw your attention to the fact that we are
now showing a nice line of Strap Slippers and Oxfords
for evening wear; Priced Right at—
$4.50 — $5.50 — $5.75 and $6.50
Nothing newer, with Fancy Buckles if desired
TheNational Shoe week is over, but you will still be
needing shoes.—See our lines of boy's and girl's shoes
all reliable makes and satisfaction guaranteed. Leckies
Weston and Amherst Brands at $2.95, $3.50 and $3.95
Boy's Serviceable School Suits at Wholesale Prices
$7.50 to $11.50
Boy's Navy Serge Bloomer Pants at $2.50. AU Wool,
Boy's Tweed Bloomer Pants. $1.75, $2.90 and $3.50
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT— Ladies' AU Wool Black
Cashmere Hose Priced at 75 cents. —Ladies' Black
Lisle and Mercerized Hose in all Colors at 35c. and 50c
Men's Soft Fedora Felt Hats in the Latest Shapes
Priced at $3.50 and $4.60
GREY WOOL BLANKETS, Good heavy weight   at
$6.95 and $7.95 a Pair
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND SHOE STORE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
Box 343 CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Opposite Post Office
tm
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest lee Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES
Luncheons — Afternoon Teas — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
itf
THREE
VARUE CHUMP
) HERE'S SOME
THING THAT'S
[BEEN DROPPED
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.SAY, ISN'T VT STRANGE
'THAT SUGAR IS THE ONLV
——— woro WHERE
THE "S* IS
Meeting Of The Canadian Instiute
Of Mining And Metallurgy At Trail
Heretofore the Annual General
Meetings of the British Columbia Division ot the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy have been held in
Vancouver, as being, on the whole, the
most convenient centre for gatherings
of the kind. A departure Is being
made this year, however, in the decis
ion to hold a Ceneral Meeting In Trail,
with the dual purpose of enabling
Coast members to acquaint themselves with the important mining and metallurgical developments taking place in the Koot-
enays, and of Indicating to Kootenay members and mining men, the
Interest the Institute ln their concerns
nnd problems. This meeting will bo
held on Wednesday, Thursday and
Frday, October 17th. - 19th., and a
cordial Invitation Is extended to all
mining men, whether they are members or not, to attend.
The programme arrangements are
In charge of a committee, under the
capable chairmanship, of Mr. M. E.
Purcell, of Rossland, who now announce that a number of papers cov-
Palm end tlivt .ils
—»«*/«/ else—give
nature's tree, ctler
tt PtbntUvt Step.
Cleopatra Washed
Her Face This Way
She used Palm and Olive oils, the same
rare oils which are blended in Palmolive.
She knew that to b«ve a fresh fine skin,
thorough cleansing was necessary. The
crude combination of Palm and Olive oils
which was the best that even royalty could
then obtain is now brought to perfection
in Palmolive.
The girl ot today, it she would be beautiful, follows Cleopatra's practice. Every
day she cleanses the skin thoroughly with
mild Palmolive Soap. Never does she permit cold cream, rouge and powder to accumulate and clog the pores of the skin.
She knows that this starts irritation and
blackheads, pimples and other blemishes
result.
Palmolive with its mild creamy lather
is lotion-like in its action. It freshens,
revives and stimulates and leaves the skin
delightfully fresh and rosy.
Thus a great luxury may be enjoyed at
the price of ordinary soap. You can pay
more, but you can't get a finer, milder
cleanser.
You can buy Palmolive Soap at all first-
class dealers.
Made in Canada
V.lume end Efficiency
Prsdnce 25-cint
QttaHt}f.r
10c
erng a wide range of subjects of timely interest, will be presented for discussion, Including, "A Symposium on
the Mining and Treatment of Sullivan
Ores," by Messrs. S. 0. Dlaylock, W.
M. Archibald, E. G. Montgomery, R. W.
Diamond, E. M. Styles, J. Buchanan,
Oeorge E. Murray, B. A. Stlmmel and
J. 0. Flnglnnd; "Mining and Smelting
Operations at Anyox," by L. R. Clapp;
"Recent .Mining and Metallurgical Developments at Britannia," by Mr. W.M.
Brewer; "The History and Progress
of Mining in the Kootenays," by Mr.
S. S. Fowler; "The General .Geology
and Ore Deposits of the Grand Forks,
Greenwood, Osoyoos and Simalkam-
een Mining Divisions," by Mr. P. B.
Freeland; "Undiscovered Mines of
British Columbia," by Dr. W. L. Ug-
low; "Small Scale "Mining Operations
and their Problems," by Mr. A. B.
Langley; "The Sulphur Industry," by
Mr. F. W. Guernsey; and "Publicity
and the Mining Industry," by Mr .C.
M. Campbell.
In addition, visits will be paid to the
Trail Works, and possibly also to the
Rossland mines. Nor has the committee forgotten to provde for entertainment of a lighter sort, and lt may be
affirmed that the provisions in this
respect will prove by no means the
least attractive features ot the programme.
Accidents Reduced
By Mine Research
lulled States   Government,  Through
InvextgntJun and Information,
Prevented Many Disasters
I
ICE CREAM
D? IT'S COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM—IT'S GOOD
jaEiTSEKEIsMEE*^^
MADE FROM PURE JERSEY CREAM—Cane sugar and the highest
grade flavorings possible to procure. You want the Best when ordering
refreshment for your Best Girl.
COMOX CREAMERY BUTTER
— THE   STANDARD   OP   QUALITY —
Our Strawberry, Raspberry and Loganberry Jam can be obtained at the
Best Stores
gsffi*EEramsiK!jai^^
COMOX   POTATOES   IN   A   CLEAN   BRANDED   SACK
Graded to Quality—"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
Premier Oliver has completed a
rough draft of his redistribution plans,
whicli will be submitted as soon as
the Legislature convenes. He is da-
voting a great deal ef his time to tho
subject in an expressed determination
to give the electorate the best representation possible.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28.— although
the recent mine disaster at Kemmerer,
Wyoming, took a heavy toll of lives,
there has been a great reduction In
such accidents since organization of
the Bureau of Mines. The Kemmerer
disaster was only the second of any
magnitude this year, while In former
years, before the adoption of safety
methods devised by bureau experts,
life-taking explosions were not uncommon. In the month of December, 1907
600 men were killed ill two disasters
alone.
While the bureau was not organized
until 1910, it now trains annually 12,
000 coal miners 111 safe methods of
mining, rescue and first aid work; operates ten mine rescue stations and
ten safety stations; and Includes In
its mobile rescue units a .number of
fully equippeil railroad rescue cars
and a fleet of similar automobile
trucks.
Most mine disasters result from explosions, caused by the high explosives
used in the mining process. Although
American coal miners used last year
more than 220,450,000 pounds of assorted explosives, however, the numb,
er of men killed per 1.000 dropped
from 6.24 in 1907 to 4.19 in 1921.
Coal Dnst Hunger
The most Important of the discoveries of the bureau's engineers was
| thnt finely divided coal dust Is high-
1 ly explosive without the presence of
' an explosive gas, and that a spark, open light, or flame from a "shot" in a
vein can set II off. Prevention of
such explosions can bo affected by
sprinkling dry mines, or by adding to
the ever-present coal dust a sufficient
quantity of a non-explosive stone du.it.
On some mines a stone dust cloud is
let loose before every "shot."
Aside trom developing gas masks
and other Important rescue equipment,
the bureau also produced new types
of explosives whose flame Is not liable
to set off either gas or coal dust.
These explosives are known as "per-
missibles," and were first devised by
bureau researchers, although the bureau now only tests commercially
made explosives and gives instructions
as to their best use.
Improvements In mine ventilation
worked out by the bureau have contributed also to the decrease in the
number of disasters from gas explosions.
Canadian Throughout
Dominion Soccer
Champions Are
Almost Defeated
Youthful Davenport Team Hold The
Champions tn n Drawn flume
JJttBeerMoutafeer
and
U.B.C. BEER
From growing the grain to labelling the bottles, every process in
the malting of these fine beers is
the work of Canadian :itizens.
ORDER TO-DAY AND GET
FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR
HOME.
Vancouver Breweries Limited
Oh, boys! lt almost happened. Many
soccer fans in Nnnlinn on Saturday
last received the shock ot their lives
when the young Davenport team held
the Dominion Champions to a draw.
Had tt not been, for the brilliant work
of Routledge, in the Nanaimo goal,
the youngsters would have won.
It leads one to ask—"Are the champions slipping?" It goes without saying that the Nanaimo City team should
have won, as far as experience Is concerned, but as the Lancashire boys used to say, "There Is nowt that'll bc.it
a good old un, but a good young un."
The hustling tactics of the Davenports
kept the city team from settling down,
and it was only the brilliant work of
the halts and goal-keeper Routledge
that saved the day. The game ended
in a scoreless draw; Jackson of the
Davenports and Stobbart for the city
were the two best men on the field.
The Davenport team are due to
play in Cumberland on Ocober 7th and
It would be a good thing for the local
team not to hold these youngsters too
lightly.—They are arc a coming hunch
of players.
NEW LAMP
BURNS 94   AIR
Heals Electric or (ins
This advertlscificnt is nol published or displayed l>y thr Liquor Control
Board ;.r hv He- Govcrnmnnl of British Cotiimhius
EDWARDS & ORR
Dealers in Rough and Dressed Lumber,   Sash,   Doors
Mouldings
Full stock of kiln-dried Lumber   and   Mouldings,
Fir Veneer, Cottonwood Panelling.
Now is the time to buy Shingles—Our price at the
Yard $4.00
We make anything in Wood.    Phone,   Write  or
Call and get our Quotations.
P.O. Box 62
A new oil lamp that gives an amazingly brilliant, soft white light, even
better than gas or electricity, has
been tested by the 1°. S. Government
and 35 leading universities anil found
to be superior to 10 ordinary oil lamps.
It bums without odor, smoke or noise
—no pumping up. Is simple, clean,
safe. Burns 947r air nnd li'/i common kerosene (coal oil.)
The Inventor, J. B. Johnson, r>79 Mc.
Dermot Ave., Winnipeg, Is offering to
send a lamp on 10 days' I'llEE trial,
or even to give one FREE to thc first
user In each locality who will help
him Introduce il. Write him to-day
for particulars. Also ask him to explain how you can Bet the ngeney. anil
without experience or money make
1250 lo t.500 per month. -39-47.-1923.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars in for an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON FOUR
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 1923
News of Courtenay and Surrounding District
Public Subscription is invited fur
$50,000,000
Dominion of Canada
Refunding Loan  1923
5% Bonds
Dated and bearing interest from 15th October, 1923, and offered in
two maturities as follows:
,i0 year Bonds due 15th October, 1943
5 year Bonds dne 15th October, 1028
Principal payable at the office of the Receiver-General at Ottawa or that of the Assistant Receiver-
General   at   Halifax,   St.   John,   Charlottetown, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Regina,
Calgary or Victoria.   Semi-annual interest (15th April and 15th October)
payable at any branch in Canada of any chartered bank.
Denominations! $100, $500, $1000
All bonds 'nitty be registered as to principal only, and bonds in denomination of'$500 and authorized
multiples thereof may be fully registered.
These bonds are authorized under Act of the Parliament of Canada, and both principal and
interest are a charge upon tlie Consolidated Revenue Fund.
To Gash Subscribers
Offering Terms
This issue presents a most attractive investment. The security is incomparable and the
income return high. The bonds will occupy
an investment position equal io that of Canada's Victory llonds.
The bonds are offered for cash al tlie following prices:
20 YEAR BONDS
98.25 and interest
yielding .5.14%
5 VEAU  BONDS
til) nnd interest    ..
yielding 5.23%
This offer is made subject to prior sale and
to advance in price.
To Holders of 1923
,       Victory Bonds
In addition to the bonds offered for cash it has been
arranged that all owners of Victory Bonds due
November 1st, 1923, may exchange their holdings for
the same amount of the new issue. They will receive
iti cash the difference between the face value of their
maturing bonds and the purchaae price of the new
security, namely: at the rate of $l.7H per $100 for 20
year bonds and $1.00 for.5 year bonds.
Special Privilege
Interest coupons on bonds exchanged are to be retained by the owner and cashes! on November 1st.
As the new bonds will be dated October loth, holders
who exchange will thus receive an extra half month's
Interest thereby reducing the cost of 20 year bonds
from 98.25, and 5 year bonds from 99, to the following:
20 YEAR BONDS
98.02 .mi iulere.t yleMiut 5.16%
5 YEAR BONDS
98.77 and Interest yielding R.28%
Holders are urged to act promptly as this privilege is
subject to withdrawal.
Dominion  of  Canada   bonds   are   the   most   attractive   investment
obtainable   in   Canada.
Orders may be telegraphed or telephoned (collect) and exchanges made thVou-jh any of the
undersigned or through your usual dealer or bank.
The right is reserved to allot a less amount of bonds than applied for, and to sell fnr cash more than
$50,000,000:
These bonds are offered for delivery in interim form on or aboul October 15th, 1923, when, as, and if
issued and delivered to us.
Dominion Securities Corporation, Md.
Bank of Montreal
Bank of Nova Scotia
Bank of Toronto V
Banque d'llochelairii
Banque Nalionale
Weyburn .Security Bunk
/Kmilius Jarvis and Company, Md.
Hanson Brothers
Rene T. Leclerc, Inc.
Nesbitt, Thomson and Company, Md.
C. H. Burgess and Company
Wood, Gundy and Company
A. 10. Ames und Company
Koyal Bank of Canada
Imperial Bank of Canada
l'nion Bank of Canada
Standard Bank of Canada
Montreal City and District
Savings Bank
R. A. Daly and Company
Harris, Forbes and Company
Matthews and Company, Ltd.
Osier and Hammond
F. H. Deacon and Company
W. A, Mackenzie & Co., Md.      Macnclll, Graham & Co.
A. D.
National Cily Company, limited
Canadian Bunk of Commerce
Dominion Bunk
Malsons Bank
Banque Provinciale du Canada
Sterling Bank of Canada
I.u Cuissc d'lOconomie
Gairdner, Clarke and Company
Kerr, Flemming and Company
McLeod, Young, Weir and Company, Ltd.
Royal Securities Corporation, Limited
Greenshielda and Company
Morrow ft Co. Murray ft Company
GOLF CLUB MEMBERSHIP
ON THE INCREASE
Activities of the Courtenay tlolf
Club recently have Included some ot
the handicap play-offs in preparation
for the contests to be arranged for the
0. It. Mutric cup. There are a number of players who have not as yet sent
in their cards and the Club officers
are anxious that this be done so thnt
the arrangements may be expedited.
Although last Sunday, from a weather
standpoint, was not any too pleasant
some of the more enthusiastic members went out to the links and played n
round or two. Mr. A. B. Dundas led
ihe field, going around In eighty; Mr.
M. MonorleK was second with a score
of eighty-one and Mr. Charlie Brown
was third with eighty-seven.
It Is understood that within the next
week or two the greens and fairways,
will be rolled, putting them in far better condition than at any time since
the organization of the Club. Many
of thc players who only took up the
game last year are showing much
promise and are on the way to becoming leaders at Oolf ln   this   district.
The dub membership continues to Increase but there is still room for muny
more and the officers of the club hupc
that many of those who imve signified
Iheir Intention of tuktig up llie popular pastime, will soon lie seen on the
links.
Lund Clearing Kee
The people of Dove Creek are nothing if not progressive. This was amply shown last Sunday when a score of
the settlers in that portion of tlie valley assembled ut the site of the n<)w
school, and. despite the damp weather, undertook tlie operation of clearing the innd thereon to erect a new
building. The land Is n portion of the
Williamson ranch and was purchased
some timo ago. After laboring hard
all day the workers enjoyed refreshments at the home of .Mr. und Mrs.
Hodgklns.
Entertained Officers
Thc Elk Hotel. Comox Bay, wns tho
scene on Monday night of one of thoso
social event* for which this hostel
was renowned In thc old days of the
navy. The operators of the hotel wero
at home to a large number ot thoir
trends nnd officers of thc three naval
boats that were anchored in the bay
for ii fortnight. Thc Patrician, Arin-
entlers and Thlcpvnl arrived on the
1Mb. uud have had a pleasant visit.
An orchestra, under tlie leudershlp of
Mrs. Captain Corey, of Royston, furnished the music.
Visitors from lleuiiinii.
Residents of Denman Island who visited Courtenay this week were Mrs.
Angus Bell-Irving, Mrs. A. H. Swan,
Mrs. Paterson, Mr. Oeorge Dalzlel and
Mr. James Piercy.
Mr. and .Mrs. Richard ltushtoii returned on Monday from a motor trip
on the mainland going us far as Bell-
Ingham.
KnlerbriiiFil at Progressive Whlsl.
On Monday night Mr. and Mrs. M.
G. Fuirbairii of the Lome Hotel, Comox, entertained at progressive whist
In aid of the funds of the Community
Hall. There were ten tables utilized
In the playing and u most enjoyable
evening wns spent, Ihe gathering Including many of the men from the destroyer Patrician and the mine Bweep-
erB Thiepval and Armentiers.
Mrs. W. Edwards, of Little River
won first ladles' prize; Mr. C. W,
Leedham, playing a lady's hand won
second and Miss Gwendolyn Fatrbalrn
took the consolullon prize. Among the
men Mr. Charles Ashton won first
prize; Mr. H. Ritchie second and Captain Norden carried oft the consolation
award. Refreshments were served and
an Impromptu dance brought to a
close what is hoped will be only the
first of a series of winter socials under the hospitable roof of Mr. and Mrs.
Fatrbalrn .
JAPANESE INQUIRY FOR M.WBElt
Vancouver, Sept. 28.— Lumber Industry of the North Pacific Coast has
been tremedously stimulated by inquiries for vast quantities of material for reparation of shattered cities
of Japan. Banking circles are displaying considerable animation, since
tbe lumber industry has been at a
rather low ebb for the last few months. Immediate advances In all grades
of timber for tbe interior points of
Canada and the United States is said
to be Imminent.
Roy Cliffe to Box Johnny Morgan.
Roy Cliffe, who faces Johnny Morgan ot Ladysmith on October 6th. at
Duncan in a teu round bout for the
middleweight championship of British
Columbia, is training faithfully and
hard. Max Blunt Is handling this
promising young boxer and expects
his protege to give a good account of
himself at the Cowichan Valley centre next Saturday night. Andy Robinson is expected to don the mitts at
Duncan, against "Kid" Anderson, a
comer of Cowichan. There are quite
a number of boxing fans ln Courtenay
who have signified their intention ot
travelling south with the boys when
they leave for Ihe scene of action .
Visited Toronto und   other   Eastern
titles.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Henly of Royston have returned from their annual
vacation. This year they went as far
as Toronto and also spent some time
at other eastern cities. They were
at Toronto during the National Exhibition, which they describe as a wonderful sight. Mr. Henly was the only
delegate from'BrltlBh Columbia in at-
tendahce at the convention of lodges
of the Ancient Order of Foresters
which convened this year at Toronto.
Being the farthest west representatives of the Order both Mr. and Mrs.
Henly were royally treated by the
convention members and many favors
were shown them. On their ..way
home they visited ln Winnipeg and
Calgary, where relatives of Mr. and
MrB. Henly reside.
Miss Sutton left for Vancouver on
Wednesday where she will hold a position with the Royal Bank of Canada.
Sea Scouts Enjoy Trip.
The boys of Captain Lloyd's Sou
Scouts enjoyed a trip out to tbe Patrician last Saturday. They went across the bay In the Hoona, and enjoyed
every minute of the (rip and visit.
They were shown over the ship by the
Jolly Jack Tars.
Visited the "Nineteenth Hole."
Mesrs. Jack Scott and Roland Ashton, of Denman Island, were week
end visitors at the "Nineteenth Hole"
camp at the links of the Courtenay
Golf Club. /'
Mr. Stan. Cameron, of Victoria, wbo
spent a few days in the Campbell River district hunting, returned to his
home in the Capital City on Tuesday
last.
Dont weep over  ,your   troubles—
walk over them.
McLeocTs Store
Be WESTERN!
STETSON HATS
New Styles in
Blue — Black — Iron-Grey — Brown
These Hats are selling very fast.   Come in early and
get a good choice
J. McLEOD
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Courtenay, B.C.
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
m
SI
WINTER
Is Coming
Why not be prepared by repairing those leaky roofs
and sides of your house and barn with
Gwilt's Famous Shingles
$2.00 per Thousand
Second Grade
While they last.—Terms strictly cash
Gwilt Lumber Co., Ltd.
PHONE 79L
COURTENAY, B.C. SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29lh, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
five/   '
tt
>>
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People  Trade *
SPECIAL
Local Honey
z 40c. per Jar
Have you tried the new Empress
Logan-Raspberry Jam?
Mumford's Grocery
T. H. Mumford J. Walton
i   THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND
We Give the Best	
Electrical Installations
There ls no doubt about it.   We are here to prove it.
On the 18th of May 1921 we received trom the Provincial
Inspector of Electrical Energy a set of Rules andvRegulations
governing the installation of Electrical Wiring were immediately adopted and have been lived up to iu every smallest detail.
We carry the largest and most complete stock of any
Company or Arm of its size in B. C. and bo can take immediate
eare of your Job without subjecting you to any annoying delay
waiting for special material, etc.
We gladly Invite inspection b ythe highest Electrical
Authorities of any Installation we have made since the Provincial Regulations were Inaugurated and our most convincing
argument as to why we should do your wiring Is the fact that
of tbe Jobs we have had inspected ALL have been pronounced
perfect. And then we have tbe knowledge of Electricity acquired through many years of experience an dthls should
surely count for something with you when you are selecting an
Electrical Contractor,
A man may know how to drive a nail precisely, but be ls
a dangerous man unless he knows the effect of tbe driving
upon the material into which the nail enters and so It is In the
Electrical Contracting business, lt ls not only necessary to
understand the practical Installation of wires, switches, tit-
tings, etc., but it is doubly necessary to be able to make the
calculations that will ensure maximum safety, economy of
operation, and the proper functioning ot the Electrical Energy
for which tbe wires, switches, etc., are meryly paths.
If you want High Class Electrical Installations, go to the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS
* ARE GONE FOREVER
What the Automobile, Street Car and
Sitting Habit Have Done to tlie
.Shoe Trade
A Breesy Comment on Changing
Conditions
(From the Shoe and Leather Journal)
In our August 15th. issue "Nemo"
asked what had become of the old system adding four to the child's age In order to find the size ot the shoe and
wondered why it is necessary to-day
to carry triple A's whereas D and E
were the only extra widths carried
formerly ln adult shoes.
In connection with this we have received the following facetious but witty and appropriate reply from a maritime shoeman, which we are sure will
appeal to those who have followed I no
changes In tne shoe trade In the past
twenty years.
The Shoe and Leather Journal,
Toronto,  Ontario.
Gentlemen ;—
With reference to the article signed "Nemo" ln the August 15th. issue,
some of his remarks brought back old
times of twenty or more years ago,
when we added four to the age at ih'j
child and twenty-five per cent to the
cost ot the shoes.
In the "good old days" of hap hazard ways a shoe clerk could get three
shaves a week for thirty cents and
still hold his position.   If he chose to
wear "side curtuins" lie could use the I
thirty cents on his "night off" in hav-
ing a good time.
If on leaving the store at 9 p.m. he
(orgot to switch off the window lights
and the "boss" heard   about   it,   ue,
would learu something of the cost of
electricity the next morning.
We had smaller entrances too In
those days, and used to bar them up
with iron gates at night so as to prevent people from straining their eyes
in peering at the shoes in the dark;
sometimes at 7 a.m. if the padlock on
said gales got rusty and the key refused to work, we got the horse-car conductor to help us lift them off—Siam-.
ese twin fashion, and then looked for
the hummer. 0 temporal 0 mores!
Nearly everyone (especially women)
greeted the clerk with the emphatic
assertion that ho or she hud a short
wide foot and to suggest anything lc
tiie contrary meant a lost sale and
perhaps u customer. '
The approbation business flourished,
the paper manufacturers got rich and
bill collectors were listed among tbo
leading citizens.
The so-called "working" classes did
not drive a four-fn-hand and were nut
above allowing their young children
to go hare-footed durlpg the summer
months which may have been partly
accountable for their wide sturdy feet
as they grew to maturity.
The great majority ot people own-
ng cars to-day did not spend much on
hay and oats—they walked— and paid
$3.00 for "the rubber tired rig," per
haps six or eight Sunday afternoons
during the year, in most cases much
less frequent, as three dollars was
$3.00 and a quarter of a month's
house-rent. Aged people were timid
of "street cars" and young folks usid
them on raiuy days. The social glass
in the days of the open bar was not
conducive to thin feet but emphasized
comfort (which always meant E or
EE) in the mind of the habitual drinker.
In these days of scientific salesmanship we say, have a chair, be seated,
sit down take lt easy, "sit down In
front" bawls the fan at the ball
games—we used to stand up, nowadays "anybody that is anybody" pays
admission to the grandstand.
Our modem theatres have comfortable upholstered chairs and are the
Inst word In extravagant luxury
throughout; many people sit through
two •shows of a picture to rest their
"tired nerves."
Struggling young couples manage
to save enough one year to make the
first payment on a car if they still
have their nerve and $25.00 next year,
they get a big chesterfield to flop Into after long "tiresome" trips in the
car.
If our churches had comfortable individual chairs instead of hard,
straight-backed wooden benches there
would be a great religious revival,
people having such a passion for sitting.
About eighty-five per cent, of people
over thirty years of age suffer from
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
SECOND-HAND"
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Csturtenay, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort  and  Homelike  service.
20  rooms, electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 15.
R. YATES, Manager.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKRRIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Muslo Co
Cumberland and Courtenay.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite  llo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS-
Practical  Barber,  and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,    Scalp    Treatment.
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
V
Dental Surgeons
Off ce:   Cor.  of  Dunsmuir Are.
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Hollo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday,  September 28th and   29th
A Sailor's Myth— Some eall the Sargasso Sea!-
—yet the atlas shows it here!' Lying beneath a tropic
moon almost at the gateway to the Gulf of Mexico!
£2l
—and the story tells of a floating island
of derelict vessels locked in a tangle of
seaweed—with a strange population—
ruled by a giant brute— and called,
Extra Attraction*
Lupino Lane in
"MY HERO"
and
"OH SISTER"
Special Music
Matinee Saturday
2.30 p.m.
Usual Dance
Saturday Night
Such is the setting for the most unusual picture of the year— the
novelty melodrama of a decade. A tale of pirate gold, and lovo,
of adventure, romance, daring; that makes you forget you've
grown up!
LOOK!
Monday and
Tuesday
The
Cheat
SELDOM—SELDOM A PLAY LIKE THIS
Pola Negri in "THE CHEAT"
One hundred per cent better than "Bella Donna"
JUST A FEW OK THE BIO SCENES
—The stupendous charily baznar—an eye-filling, breath-slopping spectacle.
—The Parisian fashion shop, with beautiful mannequins in a
dazzling style show;
—the sensational "branding scene"—the screen's greatest thrill;
—the dramatic courtroom scene, with Its smashing, unforgettable
climax.
With the world's applause still Ihundering over her thousand love triumphs, comes this hidden, undreamed-of side of Pola
Negri—revealed here for the first time—the crowning achievement ot her flashing career.
CHILDREN 25c. — ADULTS 50c.
SPECIAL MUSIC BOTH NIGHTS FOR THIS BIG
SPECIAL
SPECIAL MATINEE TUESDAY 3:30 p.m.
*m
Adults 50c.
Children 15c. -MB^^^^^
NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY— Ren   Tin
Dog in "WHERE THE NORTH BEGINS."
thc
Pola Negfi in the
Paramount Picture 'The Cheat
A Ceorje Fitzmaurice Production
constipation due to so much silting
nnd even among children wc tlnd a
passing of "hop-scotch" I friend ot
the shoeman) and "skip Uie rope."
now thought by some of the medic'il
profession to he harmful to growing
children.
All these tendencies have an ill-effect on the shoe business and perhaps
on the width of our feet. We must
popularize walking and "hiking" parlies; shoes last too long.
This is an age of sitting down; even
the motormau on the street cars is
provided with a scat (personally, I
don't begrudge It.) We think if we
can only get people to sit down and
make themselves comfortable that wo
can sell them something, whether ll
be shoes, ships or sealing wax.
They have even taken the "keep oft
the grass" sign from many of our
beauty spots as most people now
drive a Ford—Why walk? The cobbler shop Is being ousted by the garage
and the shoe business Is a waning Industry. Is it any wonder that our
feet are shrivelling up?
Compare the hands of a blacksmith
of 175 lbs. to those of the average menial worker of the same weight; are
the feet any less sensitive to action?
May I suggest as a trade slogan:
"Walk for Health's Sake."
I'rlniiini Mobile.
SYNOPSIS OF
L1N0ACTM1INTS
Minimum price of first-class laud
reduced to (5 an acre; second-class
to 12.60 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and whicli Is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than tour
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with Joint residence, but eacli
making necessary Improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must ocoupy claims
for Ave years and make improvements
to value of $10 per acre, Including
clearing and cultivation of at least 5
acres before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation
not lesB than 3 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, be may,
because of ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer bis claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
of $360 per annum aud records same
each year. Failure to make improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
in less than 5 years, and improvements of $10.00 per acre, Including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if
he requires land in conjunction wilh
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory improvements
made and residence. maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding,
20 acres, may be leased as homesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 040 acres may he
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or Industrial sites on
limber laud not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of stumpage.
.Natural hay meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction ot u
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cobI of road, not exceeding halt ot
purchase price, Is made.
I're-Emptors'  Free  (•rants  Act.
The scope of this Act is enlarged to
Include all persons Joining and serving with His .Majesty's Forces. Tlle
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act is extended frnm for one yeur trom the death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the greal
war. This privilege is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are due or payable by soldiers ou preemptions recorded after June 2C,
1918. Taxes are remitted for live
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due and been paid since August 4, 1914. on account of puyinents.
fees or taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements lo purchase
town or cily lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1920.
Sub-Purchasers of Crown Lands
Provision made for issuance of
Crown grunts to sub-purchnsers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, Involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions ot purchase, Interest and taxes. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole of original parcel, purchase price due nnd
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole area. Applications
musi be made by May 1, 1920.
G rasing
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock Industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits issued based on numbers ranged; priority for established ownerB. Stock-
owners may form Associations foi
range management. Free, or partially free, permits for settlers, campers
or travellers, up to ten head SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 1023
67>e
or Canada, Limited
has authorized a
Weekly Purchase Plan
by which
is all you need to pay
down for a
Car, Truck or Tractor
When the weekly payments, together
with interest, equals one-third the
price of the model you desire we make
delivery. The balance can be paid in
forty-eight weekly or twelve monthly
equal instalments.
Ask us about the  Ford  Weekly
Purchase Plan.
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
Courtenay ,
70M
(ORD    MOTOR   COMPANY   OF   CANADA,   LIMITED,   J. O 11 D ,   ONTARIO
MANN'S
BAKERY
FOR BREAD, CAKES AND PASTRY
Grand Selection — See our Window
HOT PIES A SPECIALTY
Once you try them, you always prefer them.—Order
early and do not be disappointed.
Wedding, Christening and Birthday Cakes to Order
DUNSMUIR AVE.
Phone 18 —
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   vVillard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tables
McPHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT — CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE SOCIABLE
38
SPORTSMEN
SEE US ABOUT YOUR SUPER—X,— IMPERIAL
LONG RANGE, CANUCK, SHELLS, IN 12—16—20
GUAGE, ALL SIZES SHOT.
Carbide Lamps for the Camp, with convenient Carbide
Containers.
Flash Lights and Batteries of all Kinds
Hot-Shots — Unit Cells — B. Batteries
RADIO SETS AND PARTS IN STOCK
Latest Radio Handbook
You are invited to call and "Listen In" to the R2000
with loud Speaker, any evening.
Everything Electrical
WIRING CONTRACTING
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
Nil
COURTENAY
B.C.
P.O. Box
71
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOOREWHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Officii'-'« Krldge Street, Victoria, B.C.
T.WHERRY
OUDOMBTftttNltfl
Ms&fttt.?
Wdss,  ssu.
M Pandora Ava.,
Vloterli, Vo..
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    .    Repair*
Telephone 1.    •    F, 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, II. ti
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
News Of British Columbia
Marked progress along colonization
lines is in evidence as a result ot the
government's announcement that
Swiss settlers will probably take up
holdings in this province shortly.
Following Hon. Dr. MacLean's activities this year as minister ot railways,
a definite plan has been developed.
The Swiss will likely establish a central farm of 640 acres somewhere a-
long the Canadian National or P.G.E.
Railway. Others of the same nationality will settle close hy, but no community settlement will be established.
Every facility will be provided by the
government to enable the prospective citizens to get located, and the
minister predicts that within a year
there will be a substantial Influx uf
genuine farmer-settlors, who will settle chiefly on the vacant lands along
the government railway.
views of the ministers may be on the
general Oriental question, they were
the first to propose substantial assistance for the Japanese, and lt Ib considered that the gift will do much towards assuring the Japanese of the
kindly regards of their British Columbia neighbors.
For the purpose of discussing taxation matters with Hon. Mr. Fielding,
federal minister of finance, Hon John
Hart, who holds the provincial finance
portfolio, called at Ottawa on his way
home from Great Britain, where he
hns placed many matters of provlncal
importance before the Imperial authorities. Hon. Mr. Hart wants to see
a combined agency for the collection
of taxes, so that expenses may be cut
to a minimum. At present both governments collect tuxes, to the embarrassment of tax-payers and officials
alike. The move has been under consideration for several years and will
probably be made effective as a result
of Hon. Mr. Hart's visit.
A shipload of lumber for stricken
Japan, as a gift from British Columbia
through Ita government, has been purchased and will leave for the Orient
Immediately. No   matter   what   the I
"THE ISLE OF LOST
SHIPS" SUPREME
ENTERTAINMENT
Maurice Toumler'n New Production
Scores Dig Success— Is Weird
and I'iiuniiiiI Tale
Maurice Tourncur's latest production, "The Isle of Lost Ships," a First
National attraction produced by M. C.
Levee, comes to the llo-llo Theatre
Friday and Saturday.
It is a worthy successor to the magnificent productions which this directorial genius has to his credit.
Fantastic, weird, unusual and
fraught with the mystery of the sea,
"The Isle of Lost Ships," is the Strang
est story that has yet been presented
on the screen, In the opinion of this
reviewer. It tells the tale ot a mysterious region where the derelict ships
of the ocean drift together, and where
upheld by the tendrils of the floating
kelp and seaweed, they float down
through the centuries to a doom In
finitely remote.
In this welter of hulks there are to
be found the lost caravels of Colum
bus and modern liners; Spanish ships
of the time of Cortez and the lost boats
ot Raleigh's Ill-fated cruises. And
thither the author, Crittenden Marriott, brings his hero, his heroine and
his villain to work out their strange
" 'Tis the heart's voice alone can
reach   the   heart."—De   Mussett.
The invention of the telephone resulted, not from
an effort to find a means of communication, but from
the deep pity in the heart of the inventor for those
without the ability to hear the human voice.
The range of the unaided voice is only a few feet;
but the same voice speaking into the telephone may be
heard a mile or three thousand miles away. The inflections, the accents, the individuality are all transmitted faithfully.
The telephone stands ready day or night to transmit your voice to relative, friends, or anyone with
whom you have need or speech. The telephone is the
universal instrument.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.   Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
.
Phonea 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A.J.EDWARDS       ....       Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
l'nion Bay Road
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
destinies in a locale utterly new and
novel.
Milton Sills plays the role of the
hero, a condemned man sentenced to
die In the electric chair at Sing Sing.
Anna Q. Nilsson plays the role ot the
heroine, a daughter ot a New York
millionaire. Frank Campeau (Ives
perhaps the best performance of his
career ln the role of Jackson, a New
York detective. Walter Long is eaat
as the villain of the tale.
Shipwrecked on this strange island
of dead ships, the girl, the convict and
the detective find themselves In a
weird colony of those who have heen
shipwrecked In ancient days.
How the refugees escape from the
"island" and return to civilization In
told with a sweep of imagination that
stamps Tourneur aa one of the greatest producers of the age and "The
Isle of Lost Ships" as a distinct addition to the number of master works ot
the screen.
"The Isle of Lost Ships" grips the
emotions In a vise-like manner, kindles the blood as the story of adventure
and romance ls unfolded, and gives
new life to jaded Imaginations. In a
word it iB supreme entertainment, and
we take pleasure iu recommending It
to all readers of this newspaper.
"THE CHEAT' BIG
PHOTOPLAY WITH
HAPPY ENDING
Pola Negri's Star Role OeUghttul In
New and Absorbing
Photoplay
A picture story with a happy ending tor Pola Negri! That is something which the admirers of thia celebrated screen star will Bee In "The
Cheat," her latest Paramount picture,
produced by Oeorge Fitzmaurice,
which will be on view at the Ilo-Ilo
theatre Monday and Tuesday.-
The story written by Hector-Turn-
bull, ls Bald to provide Miss Negri with
one of the most delightful rolee ahe
haa ever essayed.
The story of "The Cheat" deals with
a wealthy girl of Latin-American parentage who to avoid wedding an old
man, chosen by her father, elopes
with a young American. In Paris she
Ih loved by an art swindler disguised
as an East Indian Prince who follows
her to New York. The girl ls disinherited by her father, and unused to
poverty, she accepts the supposed
Hindu's offer of money wltb which to
gamble. At first she wins, then loses
not only her own money but a charity
fund Intrusted to her. Panic-stricken,
she borrows trom the "prince" and
promises to dine with him alone in
return for the loan.
At this juncture her husband wlna
a small tortune by putting over a lumber deal, and gives her (25,000. She
writes a check for the amount due the
Hindu and carries It to his home. But
he tells her, he doesn't want the money—he wants her. When she seeks to
escape he drags her to a table and
brands her as "a cheat." She takes
up a revolver and shoots him, then escapes from the house just as her husband steps into the scene.
From this point on, the action is
rapid and races swiftly to one of the
finest climaxes ever seen on the
screen. The ending is happy. The
part of the husband Is played by Jack
Holt, popular Paramount star, while
the role of the disguised* Hindu prince
ia in the capable hands of Charles de
Roche, the famous French screen
star. -
DONT
OO -
THIS!
U$e
.LEONARD
EAR OIL
IT DOES REUETO DEAFNESS
and HEAD NOISES. Slmriyrib
ItiabaekofthesMrsaa/tiw
la nostrils.
MADE IN CANADA
Dstuittm tt\mmWettim*mm
A. (X UoMrtf, ba.
it fifth Avnw MiwTttk
For sale tn duuherUnd   by
Lang's   Drag   Store   and   ill
Reliable Druggists.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers uid
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND 0°
SATURDAY 8EPTEMBER 20th, 1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
Bring   Broadway
To Your Own
Home
Push back the chairs and table, roll up the rugs
and have an evening of real dancing to the music of
New York's famous dance orchestras.
Edison Records Re-Create every catchy variation
and tone-shading so faithfully that you might easily
Imagine yourself actually on the Great White Way—
and the Edison Laboratories constantly give you a
choice of the latest hits by their practice of immediate
release of new records.
Mail orders receive our prompt and careful attention.      Send to-day for Catalog.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
' x LIMITED
"Nanaimo's Music House"
22 COMMERCIAL STREET
NANAIMO, B.C.
J. WESTOVER,     MARYPORT AVENUE
District Representative
GORDON'S
Phone 133
ALBERTA BUTTER, is winner at Vancouver Exhibition. We have it at 3 lbs. for <£1 QQ
WALTON SHOES forBoys.. Solid Calf Leather, Welted soles of best Oak Stock, rubber heels, and re-inforc-
ed toes, the very latest in Boy's Shoes.
Priced at   $3.75and UM
MACKINAW SHIRTS AND COATS, made of the very
best material possible, double front and back, in all
colors- Shirts $g QQ Coats JQ^Q and X2.50
We are clearing out the balance of our Men's and Boy's
Suits and Overcoats at greatly reduced prices, see
these Bargains.
GORDON'S
Cumberland
u
— Additional (ourtenaj Hews -
BEN. A. D. McRAE
ADDRESSES MEETING
It is a long time since Courtenaians
have had the pleasure of attending a
political meeting to break the monotony of the humdrum of every day life,
and a couple of hundred people attended the meeting that had been arranged by tho Provincial Party, and
which was held at the Gaiety Theatre,
on Tuesday last.
Gen. McRae, leader of the new political organization was to have been
the chief speaker, but Mr. B. G. Stew.
art, ot Chilllwack, who accompanied
him on the tour of organization occupied a much longer time than did his
chief.
Mr. Stewart went Into the whys and
| wherefores of the Provincial Party,
1 telling why It was begun, the story uf
Its organization and its alms and objects. In criticizing the administration of the Conservative Party under
Mr. llowser and the Liberal Party under Mr. Oliver, Mr. Stewart declared
that they were really one party and
that iiiBtead of being a third party the
Provincial Party was really only the
second party in the Province. He repeated tiie old stuff that has been
heard from other platforms and read
in the press concerning the settlement of the disposition of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway. He alleged
collusion of the leaders of tlle two
parties in an endeavor to keep the
truth from the public. Mr.'Stewart
said that the Provincial Party was
not organized for the purpose of turning the Liberal administration out of
office for the sake of electing Mr. W.
J. Bowser to power In their stead
Rather It was for tho purification ol
the Government, and if they achieved
only ihis their work would not have
| been In vain. Mr. Stewart said he
was a farmer and made a special appeal to the agriculturalists to rally a-
round the banner of the Provincial
Party.
General McRae followed Mr. Stewart, and though he seemed serious In
his attitude, he was a veritable
"Gloomy Ous" and painted a picture
of the dire distress that he alleged Is
rampant In the province, and of Industrial stagnation. He told the
story of fifty per cent, of the settlers
in the Peace River section leaving the
country and said that in the country
contiguous to the Grand Trunk .Pacific
Railway the settlers were trekking io
the outside, many of them going III
prairie  schooners   because  they  had
S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
—AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue
no other means of doing so. The
General was severely critical of the
Government's action in carrying out
the Sumas reclamation scheme and asserted that at least a million and a
half dollars of the people's money
that had been sunk In this enterprise
would never be regained. In respect
of the scheme of immigration, he said
he did not favor the bringing in of
people to be placed on farms and
turned loose to make a living; rather
he fould favor the sane development
of our natural resources as a means
of bringing back prosperity to the
province. If this were done other enterprises would quickly follow. He.
said It was wrong for a firm of whlcn
a cabinet minister was a member to
do business with the government unit
believed that British Columbia was
the only place in the British Empire
where such a condition could exist.
In his concluding remarks General
McRae said that there had been no
constructive platform placed before
the electors by the Provincial Parly
because that would he an Impossibility
until the big convention was held in
Vancouver in December. He closed
his short address by asking if it were
not time there was a change in Government methods, and answered his
own question by exclaiming "By God
It Is.'
Captain G. Robert Bates acted as
chairman, giving ns his reason for being present In that capacity the physical incapacity of Mr .George Every-
Clayton who had been asked to act.
In the afternoon the leaders of the
new party paid a visit to Ihe Little
River District where they held a meeting at the home of .Mr. Thos. Hudson
and which was attended hy about thirty people. General McRae gave the
people present a short talk after
which they formed a branch of the
party there with Mr. Thomas Hudson
as president and Mr. Art. Vogel as
secretary.
Is This (Your   Townt)
My friend have   you   heard   of   the
town of "Yawn,"
On the banks of tlie liver "Slow"
Where the "Sometlmeorother," scents
the air,
And the soft "Goeasys" grow.
It lies In the valley   of   "Whatisthe-
use,"
In the province of "Let'crslide;"
That tired feeling is native there—
Where the "Put-it-otfs" abide.
11) Cislsssn A. J Hulls-,. K.N K.. rommssnstcr of His* "Empreef ol I'ntisda." wis* horn at Brtsdfors) in 1874. In HOB he Jelnesl
tht Canadian Pas-lflt and In ISM received hli rlrsl command. Durini Ihe svar ht commanded hospital ah|pa, noUblt tht "Eisspressj
of India" and ths- "Manitoba." Hit appointment to tht "Canada" datea bach to tha launching of Ihe liner. HI, Utt accta-
pllthmenl  srai the rapturlni  al the Blur   Ribbon if tht Pacific foi   the  fastest   journey  acron.
li) The 'Empresst of Russila" «a» Isulll or tht Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co.. Ltd., ot lilaitosr, hit ootdruole
Krtsvt tnd drlrrn I,, steam turblnea, which develop a speed if 20 knoll gel hour. She it t product of Emllih belt engineering
and hie the utmost In accommodation and Uixur?.
til The "EmprtH of Ctnadt." 21.500 tin Hnir, wu the eecond liner to give aid and shelter to deilltulet of tht Oriental
turmoil, fn addition to carrying about 100 pamngert. ihe took 1.500 more on board when Ihey received clothe! tnd medical
attention. She recently came ta the limelight when the captured the (line Ribbon of the Pacific, making the sortie from
Yokohama »d Vancouvti In • dayi, lo hourt tnd IS mlnotee. Ber nest winter program Include! in elaborate cruise if tht
world, where she will tthe I limited number of globe Irottero ti no leae than It foreign Deists with many Inland •Ionian!
Included  In thr Itinerary
14] Thr "KmprtsW tl Australia,' often called the pride ol the Pacific on tccounf ot her luxurious and comfortablt reserve.
tlone. rldet with e length of 588 feet and la an tll-burnlnl veasel of a registered tonnage of 22,000 tone.
(5) Captain Robinson. R.N.R.. of tht "Bnspress of Australia," whose heroic felta an the scene of tht Oriental disaster, hit
prompted the Spanish ambassador It Tokyo tt cable the King, recommending the beatowal of I decorition. Captain Robitlsen It
ont of thi most popultl oktpptri on the Pacific tnd his carved on Canadian  Pacific ahlpe since  1805.
GRAPHIC tales of the Oriental disaster are daily Muring  her propellers.    In spite ot such handicaps,
being received on this continent    Many of them ftP1"'" Rtfunson aalled hIs.blK "".« to safety where
.,-" , .       *.'!*;.'   . .  .,    later it became the home of over 4,000 destitute eur-
contain harrowing experiences  of  surviving inhabi-   vivors
tants of Tokyo Yokohama and mountain resorts near- The ..Empress of Canada," which happened to be
by, and make true the age-old adage Great disasters „„,. day out {rom Yokohama when the first despatches
have produced great men WeI.e fiashe() ncross the broafj Pacific, wasted no time
Canada » participation In rescue work in the far j„ rushing to the scene of destruction. The day was
East was the first foreign aid to reach that stricken employed in providing accommodation, foodstuffs and
country and to-day the world has learned of unaccount- clothes to those refugees whose need was most urgent,
able feats of bravery, deeds of generosity and self. [No less than 1,500 refugees found shelter on the
•aerifies on the parts of several Canadians, who at "Empress of Australia" and were conveyed to Shang.
the time of the turmoil were engaged In missionary hat where medical attention and care are being pro-
°f mercantih   fields. vided by the authorities.
To Captain Robinson ot the 'Empress ol Aus- With every available inch of heT cargo space cram-
tralia,' and Captain Kent, river pilot, the country med with foodstuffs for the earthquake stricken
stands indebted for the rescue and care of 4,000 lives, thousands of Japan, the "Empress of Russia" sailed
The report goes on to state that the "Australia" was from Vancouver on September 6th. Owing to her
making ready to sail for Vancouver, when the city of superior speed, the "Empress of Russia," Included
Yokohama was seen crumbling and smothered under in a fleet of three relief ships now under way, ts ex.J
the tidal wave The sea became so agitated that other pected to be the first to reach Japan on September)
ships broke loose and rammed tb* "Australia" Is-117th. * '
Onion Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and   Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
avel
ON THE
Continental
Limited
9.60 p.m. dally, between
VANCOUVER, WINNIPEG,
OTTAWA,   TORONTO,
MONTREAL AND   OTHER
EASTERN POINTS
Finest modern equipment, Including Compartment — Observation — Library   Carg —
Standard  and Tourist Sleeping Cars and
'Dining Cars.
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, O. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and 3rd Monday and Tuesday
Cumberland Hotel Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5.30—7 to 9p.m.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeka, ensuring fresh goods
all tha time.
Henderson's
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
E. IV. BICKLE, Agent
(umher bind
C. F. EAULE, D.P.A.
Victoria
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
4' EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 29th, 192J
CORSETS—
Gossard
Type Corsetry
•ssard
THE whole idea of Gossard
Type Corsetry is to bring
you to graceful -proportions, one curve growing out of
another with no part unduly
emphazised. When this is done
you will have an appearance of
slimness that the woman-with
a four-inch smaller waist and
your own hip measurements
can never have. A faithful following of this simple rule will
alone take pounds and pounds
away from a woman's apparent
silhouette and years away from
her apparent age.
Gossards are moderately priced—some models
as low as $2.50. Whatever price you pay for
your Gossard lt will fit
you faultlessly, will
launder beautifully,
will outwear two or
even three ordinary
corsets and will give
you a comfort such as
you never knew before.
DRY GOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
MUNICIPAL
ELECTION ACT
CORPORATION OK THE CITY OF
tt'MIIEIILANl)
On or before October 31st, every
house-holder or license-holder must
register with the City Clerk to secure
n vote at the coming Municipal elect-
Inns to be held in January, 1924, under the Municipal Elections Act The
qualifications for registration are:
Must be a British subject of the full
age ot 21 years;
Have resided in the city   (or school
district, for school vote), since Jan.
1st, 1923. (This does not apply   to
license-holders.)
Must have paid taxes (not includng
dog tax), to the amount of at least
$2.00, or a trade's license fee of nt
least $5.00.
Owners of property who have not
yet registered their property in their
own nnme, may get on the list as
house-holders under this section if
they hnve paid the current year's
taxes, and register before the end of
this month.
The declaration must be made before a J.P., notary public, stipendiary
magistrate or the City Clerk.
The City Clerk's office will be open
from 10 to 12 a. m. and from 3 to 5
p. m. dally.
-NOT1CE-
Property owners whose taxes are unpaid are reminded that a further penalty of Ti'A will lie added to all curi'-
' eut taxes remaining unpaid on Oct. 1.
Owners of dogs who have neglected
to take out licenses are notified that
unless such licenses are taken out bv
October 1st. proceedlnF* will he tak-
, en without further noils e.
Albert .1. Merry,
(Ilj Clerk
WANTED
JANITOR FOR ST. GEORGE'S PRES-
byterian Church. Duties to commence October 1st.—Apply nt the
Manse.
U>st— A WRIST WATCH BETWEEN
Cumberland Schoul and Comox Lake
Finder rewarded. Please return to
Islander office.
"LOST— BABY'S GREEN GOLD
Bracelet, and also Amethyst drop
off pendant. Return to Islander
Office. at
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Netic.e and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
$4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 : Night—184-X Courtenay
Local Briefs
Charles Oraham, General Superin- Frank Potter left on Sunday for
tendent, left for Ladysmith on Tues- Vancouver to attend the Fall session
day. ! of the B .C. University.
C. Macfarlane of Victoria, Pur-
Mr. Hugh Strachan and Mr. Waller
Hudson, Jr. motored to Nanaimo last
week-end and on tlieir return were accompanied by Miss Cunliffe, who !s
n guest of Mrs. W. Hudson for a few
days.
H. Stewart returned home from Nor-
mal School on Saturday last on ace-'
mint of sickness.
Mr. A. McNiven left on Tuesday last
for Calgary.
Thomas Graham, General Manager .
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) 1
Limited, loft for Victoria on Tuesday
morning.
Mr. nnd .Mrs. E. King left on Tuesday for Vancouver, where Mr. King
has accepted a position with the B.C. i
Electric Railway Co. 1
Miss Jean Anderson of LadyBmihh,
who has been spending a weeks' va-1
cation with Mrs. Waltor Hudson, left :
for her home during the week.
Messrs. Merrifield , 'Cameron and :
Ripley returned from a hunting trip |
on Wednesday with good results.
George W. Clinton of the American '
Consulate, managing director of the
Cumberland, Light and Water Works,
left for Vancouver on Tuesday, whore
he expects to join Mrs. Clinton, who
Is returning from a visit to Europe.
81
Earle  Fletcher,    representing    the
George A. Fletcher Music Co., of Nan-J-Monday and returned on Friday,
almo was here on a business trip on
Tuesday.   Mr. J. Westover is their representative in this city and district.
Mrs. A. Crompton Lymn and children were passengers by the S.S. H. F.
Alexander for Los Angeles on Saturday.
D.
chasing Agent of the Canadian Collieries arrived oil Tuesday and returned
on Wednesday.
Richard Bryce returned on Wednesday evening from a visit to Australia.
He has been absent from this city for
the past eighteen months.
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Macintosh returned on Saturday from a two weeks
tour of the Southern part of Vancouver Island.
Colville and Miss Janet Graham returned on Sunday from a three weeks
tour of the principal cities of Washington and Oregon.
Mrs. A. R. Stacey and children left
for Halifax on Saturday. Mr. Stacey
accompanied them as far as Vancouver.
Mrs. Murphy of Seattle arrived on
Sunday and is the guest of Mr. and
.Mrs. Thomas Graham during her stay
in this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Freeman of Vancouver arrived on Saturday and are
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Stewart.
Mrs. James' M. Savage returned to
Victoria on Monday after a short stay
at Beaufort House.
G. C. Baker ot Victoria, cashier of I
the Canadian Collieries   arrived   on
Mr. T. O. MacKay returned to Victoria on Monday. ,
Miss Genevieve .McFadyen left on
Sunday to continue her studies at the
University of British Columbia.
Douglas Partridge who has completed liis High School educntion left
on Monday to become a student of
the University of B. C.
R. D. Goodall
TEACHER OF PIANOFORTE
Is prepared to receive a few pupils.   For terms apply to
54 Camp, or Phone 139
Mr. John Sutherland, the dry goods
merchant of Cumberland left for
j Portland on Monday accompanied by
his son Douglas who will attend the
College of Dentistry.
Mr. E. C. Emde, formerly Ford
Motor Company agent at Cumberland
and Courtenay spent a few days in
town during the week.
Miss Beatrice Bannerman left on
Tuesday for Duncan, where she has
accepted a position -Willi the 1!. C.
Telephone Co.
Messrs. George and Dave Hunden
left on Tuesdny for Drumheller, Alia.
Rev. J. R. Butler returned from Van-1
couver on Thursday where   he   had
been on business In the Interests of
the Church.   While there he delivered
an address at Grace Methodist Church I
on "The Great Commission."
WEEK END
SPECIALS
At1
Seedless Raisins 20c pkg, # 2 for .35
Currants 25c pkg    2 for .45
Box White Matches 40c pkg    2 for.75
S. F. Salmon, % lb. tins    2 for .25
S. F. Salknon, 1 lb. tins 25c    2 for .45
Sardines 3 tins for .25
American Laundry Lye pkg. Each 25
i Singapore Sliced Pineapple     4 tins for .85
Bloater Paste     2 tins for .25
Hatsum Catsup, 35c     3 tins for 1.00
FULL STOCK OF FRUITS  AND VEGETABLES
Oranges 4 doz. for 95c. and 3 doz. for $1.00.—Grape
Fruit, large size 4 for 35c.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
The report of the meeting of the
Provincial Party held last Monday will
be held over until next week.
Hallow'een Masquerade
Gaiety
Theatre
Courtenay
W*       B.C.
KEEP
UP-TO-DATE!
Have your car repaired where you know only thc
best mechanics are employed, and where the repair
shop is kept up-to-date in the matter of labour-saving
equipment and machinery.
We can save you money on your repair work, no
matter what make of car you own.
CYLINDERS REBORED — WELDING — LATHE
WORK
FIRSTCLASS WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
Blunt & Ewart Ltd.
Phone 61— THE COURTENAY GARAGE —Phone 61
It Pays
To Deal
At
LANG'S
THE REXALL—KODAK STORE
\

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