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The Cumberland Islander May 5, 1923

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Array **"**»,
TK2 CUMBERLAND ISLANDER^
With which U consolidated tbe Cumberland News.
FORTY-SECOND  YEAR.—No.  18.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 6th, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:   TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Mine Strike Ends;
Cle Elum Union
Men Agree To Cut
Decide by a Vote of 2 to 1 to
Take $1.00 to $1.50 Reductions; 2,000 Men are Affected
By a vote of two to one, union miners of the state have agreed to accept the compromlst offer of the
mine operators calling for wage reductions of from $1 to $1.60 per day
for day workers, it was announced
last night by H. J. Allsop, secretary
of the Washington District, United
Mine Workers.
This acceptance by the mlnerB
ends a strike of 2,200 men in the Cle
Elum; Tono and Roslyn fields.
Struck On April 1
The miners struck on April 1st,
when the operators offered to replace the wage agreement which expired on March 31 with one in which
day workers' wages were reduced a
flat $1.60 a day. After more than a
week of conferences between union
officials and representatives of the
coal operators, held In the L. C.
Smith Building, the operators presented a revised wage scale.
The new scale was similar in many
respects to that in effect in Eastern
coal mines. Wages ot tracklayers,
tlnibermen and miners were the
same as in the East.
Cut Varying Amounts
Wages of day workers, instead of
being reduced a straight $1.60 a day,
were reduced in varying amounts
from $1 to $1.50 a day, according to
thc work done.
HIGH SCHOOL
CLUE ENTERTAIN
Lost Friday evening the Girls'
High School Club proved excellent
hosts at a social dance held in the
Anglican Hall. Some fifty guests
were present. Those who contributed towards the musical programmo
were Messrs. Hector Stewart, Jack
Fouracre and the Misses Hood,
quartette; Miss Connie Bird, piano
solo; Miss Olive Bird, vocal solo, and
Miss Christina McKinnon, Piano solo. These numbers were much appreciated by thoso present; also the
old college songs sung by the Club.
Dainty refreshments were served,
after which dancing was indulged in
until midnight, bringing to a close a
most enjoyable evening for Um young
people.
Corfleld Motors limited are unloading another rurloiid of Fords this
week.
G.W.V.A. NOTES
■ 4...MU.S.
Meetings are held every
tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
visiting members of
all ex-service organizations are welcome.
•    *    ss
Club and reading
room ls open daily
from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.
TO HOLD MAY TEA
St. Oeorge Presbyterian Ladles'
Aid will hold a May Tea at tbe home
of Mrs. Hicks on May 8th, between
the hours of 3 and 6 o'clock.
A splendid programme has been
arranged for the entertainment of the
guests and a silver collection will be
taken,.
City Council Held
A Busy Session
We are Inserting in this weeks
notes the address of the D.S.C.R. and
the overseas office, as requested by
several enquiries.
"J" Unit, British Columbia-
Head Office: Duncan Building,
Vancouver, B. C.
sS * •
Branch Office:   Post Office Building, Victoria, K C.
Overseas Office:—
103 Oxford Street, London W. England.
•    *    »
The address of the following Comrades Is sought by the Dept. and relatives,    '
266891,  Hugh Urquhart, Pte.  Sea-
forth Highlanders.
Charles Henry Hibbert, 6th & »th
Siege   battery.
809009, W. M. Johnston, D.C.M, & M.
M. 60th Battalion.
1000052, George E. Mitchell, C.E.F.
1727 O. R. McNutt, Pte. No. 6. C.A.
S.C.
Information to Local Secretary.
ss       ss       ss
Found, two Class A-Servlce Buttons.— Owners can have same by applying to the G. W. V. A. secretary,
202 Derwent Avenue or at the O. W.
V. A. Hall.
SMOKER CAUSED
CUMBERLAND
DISASTER
VICTORIA, May 1.—Jung Tow, a
Chinaman, was so hard up for a
smoke that, like some other miners
who have been caught recently, he
dodged behind a pack-wall, pulled
out a cigarette, then a match, and
proceeded to light up.
That was the cause of the disaster
of February 8 last nl No. 4 mine of
tbe Canadian Collieries, Cumberland,
when an explosion snuffed out the
lives of Jung and thirty-two other
coal miners.
The Cause of the disaster was sifted down even to the finding by George Wilkinson, official investigator,
of the match which from its appearance had ]ust been lighted when the
charged atmosphere exploded and
the flames shot out.
Inspectors Report
Mr. Wilkinson, coal mining authority, was rushed to the scene by the
minister of mines as soon as word
was received of the disaster. He sub
mltted his findings today,
Hon. William Sloan, minister of
mines, said today that as a result of
the revelations In the Wilkinson report, legislation would be Introduced
at the next session to stiffen the penalties on persons who disregard
the law and take matches and tobacco into mines,
Mr. Wilkinson, in his report, commends the Canadian Collieries tor
employing a safety engineer with
twenty-seven years' experience and
an efficiency committee which devotes its time to safeguarding operations,
"The majority of accidents In
mines of British Columbia is readily
traceable to laxity or Indifference on
the part of officials in charge of the
workings or the employees themselves," he added.
Increased Penalties.
Besides recommending an Increase
In the penalties for Infractions of the
law, he urges the standardization of
fireboss reports pn Inflammable gas
so that they will have to give In cubic feet the quantity ot explosive gas
found down to a fraction of an inch.
Mr. Wilkinson adds:
"The practice of employees taking
matches and smoking materials into
the mines in B.C. is getting so serious that some drastic measure will
have to be taken to stamp lt out.
There were eight convictions at the
Cassidy mine during 1922, and the
maximum penalty was a fine of $10
and costs. Six ot these eight were
caught on one day. In addition to
these there were two mentioned at
Cumberland, three at Coal Creek
and one nt Nanaimo. When ordered,
searches result in finding so many
men carrying matches and smoking
materials that It Is safe to assume
that on the many that were not
searched during the year there would
he a great deal more of the same material carried."
With a full Board present, His
Worship Mayor Parnham opened the
proceedings of the regular session of
the City Council on Monday evening.
The communication from the City of
Nanaimo on the Returned Soldier's
better housing scheme was adopted
with very little comment.
The City Clerk read as follows:
Nanaimo, B. C. April 24th, 1923.
The Clerk of the Municipal Council
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir:—
The enclosed resolution was adopted by tbe Municipal Council of this
City at their last regular meeting,
and I am directed to ask that you
kindly place the same before your
Council for their consideration.
Should they endorse this resolution, lt Is suggested that such action
be forwarded to the proper authorities at Ottawa.
Yours truly,
H.  HACKWOOD, City Clerk.
Copy of a resolution adopted by
the Municipal Council of the Corporation of the City of Nanaimo, on the
16th day of April, 1923.
WHEREAS the Better Housing
Scheme as inaugurated by the Federal Government and adopted by the
different provinces and Municipalities of the Dominion was also adopted
by this City, and
WHEREAS in the administration
of this scheme, lt ls becoming more
apparent that it Is impossible to get
the best results from the present
mode of administration by Municipalities, and
WHEREAS this Council is firmly
of the opinion that the administration of this scheme should rest solely with the Federal Government who
are primarily responsible for the rehabilitation of the returned soldier,
the chief beneficiary under the
scheme, for the following reasons,
viz:—
1. Administration ot this scheme by
the Federal Government through one
of its returned soldier departments,
would Insure uniformity of treatment
to those who have taken advantage
of this scheme throughout the whole
Dominion.
2. Thnt It Is essentially a responsibility of the Federal Government and
not of communities; tho Federal
Government has greater resources
than many of the smaller municipalities to aid or extend leniency to deserving coses, which would incur a
hardship on small communities.
3. Under Government Administration the beneficsries under this
scheme could be relieved of the administrative charge mede by the Municipalities, by employing their present officials ln their public offices
in the administration of the scheme.
4. ln order to preserve this scheme
to returned soldiers, foreclosure by
power of sale Is not feasible and lt
has   been   found  that  where    fore
closure measures are necessary, any
personal service upon the defaulter
cannot be made, that the Municipality has to put up a bond for double
the amount of the mortgage at Issue,
a circumstance which further Increases the responsibility and lessens
tho borrowing powers of the Municipalities on whom the burden of the
administration of this scheme haB
been placed.
5. The continual changing of the
personal and policy of Municipal
Councils also tends to mitigate
against the effective administration
of the scheme.
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED
thnt the Federal Government be respectfully asked to seriously consider the advlslbility of taking over
the administration ot the Better
Housing Scheme, making such adjustments with the Provincial and
Municipal Governments as may be
necessitated by this change.
♦   *   *
Cumberland, B. C. April 30th, 1923.
Statement of Bills and Accounts
for the month of April 1923.
Cumberland Puhlic and High
School.
Bills and Accounts.
Electric  Light  Co   $4.80
C. & U. Waterworks Co    26.00
R.  Lang      41.24
A. MacKinnon (freight and tel.)   8.00
Clarke & Stuart  21.50
The Richmond Arts  70.90
C. H. Tarbell & Son    53.60
LINEN SHOWER
The Trent Road Girls' Club held n
linen Shower on Wednesday last in
honor of Mrs. Prldge, formerly Miss
Margaret Logan. Mre. Prldge was
the recipient of many beautiful and
useful gifts. The presentation was
made by the President of thc Club,
Miss Margaret Hannay.
MEETING OF THE
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Certified correct,
J. C. BROWN, Pro Chairman
A. McKINNON, Secretary.
FRANK PARTRIDGE, Trustee.
ss      ss     •
Accounts were referred to the Finance Committee for payment:
Canadian  Collieries    $8.30
Cumberland Motor Works     8.40
C. H. Tarbell & Son     5.70
Thturfslander Printers  52.93
A. .T. Merry      110.00
James   Baird       130.00
A.  J.   Fouracre    60.00
Victor   Fouracre    65.90
Jos. Tobacco      64.80
H.  Knappet         7.60
Salaries and  Ace.  Publ.  School ordered paid.
In connection with tlie report of
the Chief of Police, His Worship said
that he had investigated the Union
Hall an dthought it advisable to notify the trustees of that Building to
make certain repairs hefore renting
it to the public. The Council also
authorized the Chief to write the
Police with reference to Bradley.
The Chief's report was as follows:
Cumberland, B. C. 30th April, 1923.
Gentlemen,
I respectfully submit herewith my
report for the month ending 30th
April 1923.
(Continued on Page Two)
The members of tho Cumberland
Volunteer Fire Department held their
regular meeting In the Council
Chambers last Tuesday evening. Fire
Marshall Parnham presided at the
meeting and there were 26 members
presnte. The chief topic of the evening was the question of Blanket Insurance in "case of accident to any
one member of the brigade. After
securing rates from the various companies, it was found that the annual
premium for a Blanket Policy would
amount to $250.00. After giving the
matter careful consideration. The
Brigade decided to carry their own
Insurance. It was decided to leave
$250.00 deposited ln the Bank for this
purpose, and to Increase that amount
from time to time, thus Insuring
their own protection against any accidents. To further this cause a Benefit Dance will be held on June 4th.
Let us all attend the dance and help
the Boys along in securing their own
protection against accidents.
Plans For 24th
May Celebration
Well Under Way
Arrangements Completed so
Far For Big Parade, Indicate a Jubilant Time For
Youngsters.
FANCY DRESS BALL
ON FRIDAY NEXT
The Children's Fancy Dress Ball
to be held under the auspices of the
Womens' Benefit Association of the
Maccabees, on Friday next, May the
11th, given every indication of being
a brilliant success. The promoters
are working hard to make it so and
the young children and their parents
have entered Into the spirit of the
affair. The children will hold the
floor from 7.30 to 10 p.m. Adults after 10 p.m. Price of admission for
children will be 26c tor adults 50c.
Home-made candy will bo soltl
during the evening, also raffle tickets
for a handsome box of home-made
candy will be sold at 10c each.
SHOWER FOR
BRIDE TO BE
SHOWER FOR
MISS D. BOFFEY
At th home of her parents on Monday evening last, MIsb Carrie Richardson entertained at a Miscellaneous
Shower in honor of Miss Dolly Boffey
who ia to be married shortly. Some
thirty five guests were present. A
white waggon prettily decorated with
ribbon and streamers, drawn by little
Edna Watson and Mary McMillan contained many beautiful and useful
gifts. With these, Miss Boffey received
the best wishes of all those present.
Dainty refreshments were served
and a very pleasant evening waa enjoyed by all.
ANGLICANS WILL
FEATURE SALE OF DAYS
AT THEIR BAZAAR
The ladles of Holy Trinity Intend
Introducing at their Bazaar to be
held on May the 16th a novel Idea
in Bazaar stalls, namely: "Every-day
In-the-week stalls." Each day In the
week will be represented as "Washday" stalls, "Ironing-day" stall, and
so on. Some great Ideas are promised to happen, so put the date, Wednesday, May 16th, open tor a visit to
this Interesting Bazaar.
Cumberland School Report
DIV. I.—Entrance Class. No. on Roll
34. Lata 2.
Attendance 97.207c Teacher Geo. E.
Apps.
Neither absent nor late.:—Jessie
Baird, Josephine Bono, Ellen Burns,
Lome Campbell, Elizabeth Cunlllfe,
Oreste Freloni, Marjorie Grant, Leland
Harrison, Beth Horbury, Mabel Jones,
Arnold MacDonald, Leslie Merrifield,
Olga Owen, Vera Pickettl, Olive . RI-
chardson, Norman Robinson, John
Straehan, Mary Walker, Caroline Ooz-!
zano, George Brown, Priscilla Clou-
tier, Albert Gomm, Beryl Hudson, To-1
shlko Iwasa, Helen Parnham,
Honor Roll:—4 for proficiency, 2 for
progress.
First Rank, Edith O'Brien 76-4%      j
Second rank, Beth Horbury, CO.O'.'r
Third rank, Mabel Jones, 69.7%
Fourth rank, Caroline Gozzano 69.5%
Percentage increase, 54% to 65.7%.
Mary Walker.
Percentage Increase 46% to 53.8%
Beryl Hudson.
DIV. II.—Marian II. Poarsc. No.
on Roll 38. Percentage 97.52. Lates 1.
Pupils making perfect nttendnuco
for month:—Lilian Banks, Willie
Bennie, JeaBle Brown, Mary Conn,
Willie Devoy, Archie Dick, Norman
Gomm, Margaret Halliday May
Hughes, Alastalr MacKinnon. Low
Yuen. May Taylor, Charlie Bobba, Isao Abe, Jack Bird, Mary Gozzano, Jessie Grant, Jean MacNaugh-
I ton, Willie  Mossey, Gordon  Walker,
Kate Robertson, Robert Yates.
Honor Roll:—Seniors.
May Hughes, Charlie Bobba, Thelma Grey.
Juniors:—Jessie Grant, Norman
Gomm, Knte Robertson.
DIV. III.—H. E. Murray.
Number of Roll, 42. Percentage of
attendance, 95.07.  Lates 3.
Perfect attendance.
A. Class.—Norman, Bateman, William Davis, Sam Davis, Chas. Francioli, Joo Frelone, Victor Marinelli,
Geo. McLellan, Jeen Peters, George
Rnga, Margaret Richardson, Chas.
Walker.
• B. Class.—Peter Rardessonn, Annie Beveridge, Victor Bono, Andrew
Brown, Ella Conn, Harold Conrod.
Edna Cawdell, Joe Ducca, Lena GaleazzI, Jack Horbury, Tatsumi Iwasa, Low .Now, Low Man. Willie Mc
Nell, Josie Plrozzini. John Sweeney,
Chas. Tobacco, Toshlo Yamamurn.
Honor Cards:—A Class.—Sam Davis. Marguerite Struthers, Victor Marinelli.
B. Class:—Kathleen Cooke, Josie
Plrozzini. Tntsuml Iwasa.
DIV.  IV.—M. E. Beckwith.
4tli Term. Inter. Grade.
No.   on   Roll   31.—Percentage    attendance, 97.7. No. of Lates 5.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Sndaki Asao, Tsuneto Asao, Louie
(Continued on Page Nine)
The home of Mrs. John Thomson
was the scene of a very Jolly gathering last Wednesday evening when she
entertained some thirty-five guests
at a Miscellaneous Shower iu honor
of Miss Lena Bono who is to be married ln the near future. Predominant In the scheme of decoration
were blue and white streamers und
spring flowers, which were wonderfully effective. A prettily decorated
basket contained many beautiful as
well as useful gifts for tlie bride to-
be. With these were conveyed the
best wishes of all those present.
There were dainty refrshments during the evening at which Mrs. Andrew Thomson served ten. The remainder ot the time was pleasantly
passed in dancing, etc. and a very
enjoyable evening was Bpent by all.
APPOINTED EYE
EXAMINER FOR
LOCAL EMPLOYEES
Mr. R. Kaplansky, O.D., ot Nanaimo has been appointed by the members of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, Medical Board, as the
official Eye examiner of the employees of the Colliery Co. Mr. Kaplansky
is opening a personal office In this
city and will be here thc flrst and
third Monday and Tuesday of each
month. Any member of the family
of an employee of the company, may
have a consultation free on these
dates.
The Committees In connection
with the 24th of May sports to be
held on the Recreation Grounds ot
tills city held special meetings on
Friday and Wednesday of -this week.
The Meeting decided on an expendi.
ture of $150.00 for thc May Queen,
her attendants and pages. The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. has
kindly consented to loan the Sports
Committee their motor truck for that
day. and Mr. W. A. Owen will attend
to the decorations. The Canadian
Collieries with their usual generosity
will furnish free transportation from
Union Bay and Bevan on the day of
the Sports. The Finance Committee
estimated that their collections would
be In the neighborhood of $1,700.00.
The Cumberland City Band of seventeen pieces offered their services for
$120.00 which was accepted. It was
decided to supply each of the School
Children with a silk flag, and the
Committee in charge of that work will
purchase 250 Canadian flags and
250 Union .lacks which will be used
lit the Grand Parade commencing at
1:30 p.m. Each and every pupil of
the Public Schools will be given 10
cents. Tho Secretary will have six
hundred for distribution.
Programme Adopted
The programme of thirty seven
events was adopted as presented,
with the exception of three , $10.00
footballs which will be added to the
list of prizes for tlie Junior Football
Competition.
C.W.V.A. will  Handle Refreshments
The members and ladies ot the
G. W. V. A. have kindly consented to
take charge ot the refreshments.
Owners of Motor trucks are requested to decorate same and attend
thu parade. Let us nil endeavor to
make lt a real day for tho children."
The progremmc will be published ln
our next issue.
WEDDINGS
LETCHER—CLARK
A wedding of much Interest took
place al Brule. Alberta on"' Friday,
April 27th, when Miss Jean Clark,
formerly of Cumberland was united
In marriage to Mr. Leo. Letcher of
Brule. The young couple are very
well known, antl were the recipients
of many beautiful gifts, testifying to
the high esteem In which they were
helil. Thc honeymoon Is being spent
in Edmonton and oilier prairie cities,
after which Mr. and Mrs. Letcher
will lake up their residence ln Brule.
Mrs. Letcher has two sisters residing
in town, Mrs. E. Jackson, and Mrs. J.
T. Brown; "Jock" Clark who gained
a reputation as a flrst class goalkeeper whilst playing for the local team,
ls also a brother of the bride,
NEW DENTAL PARLORS
TO OPEN HERE
MONDAY, MAY 7TH
Drs. R. B. Dler and W. A. Neen
Will open their newly appointed
Dental Parlors in this city on Monday next, with Dr. Dicr In personal
chargo and ho will be here for two
weeks. Dr. Dler has had considerable experience and has made a specialty of crown, bridge and plate
work. He will give a special" rate on
this class of work. The office la situated at the corner of Dunsmuir Avenue and Third Street, where Dr. Dler
will be pleased to meet nny of bis old
or new patrons.
MORDY-HILLHOUSE
A very pretty wedding of local interest took place at St. Paul's Church
Vancouver on Saturday evening last,
when Bessie Margaret, eldest daugh-
ler of Mr. and Mrs. W, A. Hillhouse ot
Vancouver become the bride of   Mr.
- William Mordy, eldest son of Mr. and
Mrs. Thonins Mordy of this city. Rev.
Harold King officiated at the ceremony, the wedding march helnR played
by Mr. F. W. Robinson.
The bride given in marriage by her
father, wore a gown ot grey canton
crepe with hat ot grey and navy blue
trimmed with French grey velvet
flowers, antl carried a bouquet of pink
roses. Miss Grace Lee, as bridesmaid,
wore a frock of cerise canton crepe
embroidered In white beads with hat
; to match, and curried a bouquet of
primroses antl forget-me-nots. Mr.
Cyril Hodge acted as groomsman. As
thc bridal party emerged from the
Church tliey passed beneath an archway formed by the Btaves of the boy
J scouts, of whom Die groom was former scout master.
Following the ceremony a reception was held at the home of the
bride's parents. Mrs. Hillhouse, mother nf the bride was nttlrorl In a smart
navy tricotine suit wilh blnck hat and
French flowers. Mrs. Mordy, mother
of tlio groom wore a handsome suit of
brown, richly embroidered with lint to
match.
Mr. and Mrs. William Mordy left for
San Francisco, Cal. where thc honeymoon will be spent and on their return
1 they will reside in Vancouver.
V TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDW.UID W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, MAY 6th, 1023.
:ITY COUNCIL HELD
A BUSY SESSION
(Continued from page 1)
WE WORRY TOO MUCH
There is, according to the geologists, less than eighteen years' supply ot oil, and this is frightening
Borne folks. Our great-grandfathers
worried over the shorlngo of whales.
Pessimists are pointing to tlie short
coal supply, while scientists smile
■-and picture llie Immeasurable resources of electricity. Every time
the pessimists mention the. shortage
of something up goes the blood pressure of some people.
Humans are short on hard work.
but out of the brain conies some labor-saving machine, and then humans
hump to get another job. The law
ot supply and demand in genius
seems to be working.
We worried over our super-navies
but now battleship building Is unpopular. We got all "hot up" over
Bolshevism, but it Bhot its bolt. We
have worried over taxes, and worried
through the outgoing tide of business.
We hove wept and worried over the
world, and left n lot of our tools out
in the rain to rust.
It is time to stop worrying and
buckle down to your Job. You have
great faith in the ultimate result of
most things that arc right, and this
is exactly tho way millions of other
folks feel. You have confidence in
tbls city, and we all have. Any day
that you lack courage or confidence,
just turn your proxy over to thc
Highest Authority and let Him run
tlie world until your courage cames
back. You will find, when you come
to reflect, that He has been a reliable
and a resourceful manager from tho
day he started the sun to shine. You
will find that folks got ahead by keeping their heads—by minding their
own business.
The military men that set out to
change the map of the world are
most of them on the other side of the
River Styx. A few are hiding behind
some picket fence In a friendly coun-
try.
God still rules In a mysterious, but
masterful way.
Sanitary   Inspections—
The back alleys and domestic premises are In fair condition, although
several  cases  exist  where  accumulations of ashes etc, have not   yet
been removed.   The carters however
will remove same aB soon as possible.
] Union Hall-
No steps have been taken to carry
[ out instructions conveyed in my letter of the 26th ulto to Mr. Naylor, re-
: quiring the Union Hall to bo placed
in a sanitary condition.
In turther reference to this building, which Is occasionally let for
public mecliiigs, I have to point out
that the rear door does not open outward as required by Sec. 5 of the
Fire Marshal Act of 1921, Cap. 15. 1
therefore submit for the consideration of the Council lhat this building
should lie closed until such timo as
it is placed in a proper sanitary condition, nnd such alterations nre required by the Fire Marshal Act are
complied with.
Infectious Diseases—
No case ol' Infectious disease has
beon reported during the period.
Caltle Impounded—
Four bead of cattle have been impounded, nud the pound fees handed
to tlio City Clerk.
Defective Street Lamps-
Three defective fuses, and two defective   street   lamps  have  been   reported during the month.
Collections-
One traveller soliciting orders for
tombstones  was  escorted to the office and required to take out a trades
licence. Dog taxes to the amount of
$3 was collected, making a total of
$0,7.00 for the current year.
I am Gentlemen,
Your  obedient  servant,
ALBERT   J.   MERRY,
Chief  of  Police.
Cumberland, B. C. 30th April, 1923.
To His Worship, the Mayor,
and Aldermen, City of Cumberland.
Gentlemen,
Re Mrs. Arthur Bradley.
I find on enquiry thlB day, that Mrs.
Bradley has heard nothing more
from her husband, Arthur, for the
past three weeks. She has had but
one letter from him since he left five
weeks ago, and that was sent trom
"Ruperts Creek," Province of Saskatchewan.
Mrs. Bradley Informs he took
with htm $70.00, and left her with
SOc (fifty cents) to keep and maintain herself and 3 children.
No rent has been paid tor the last
six months, and a notice to quit expired on the 5th inst. Mrs. Bradley
has made uo effort to obtain another
house, although she may expect to
be ejected any day. Sho stated that
tbe City Clerk gave her to understand that the City Council would
arrange to pay her rent. I Informed
her that such is not likely to be the
case and I advised her to look for
another house as Boon as possible
ln case she is ejected, and also informed her that tho Council would
permit the City teamster to remove
her household effects, as soon ns she
obtains another house.
I find she was offered tbe use of a
two roomed shack outside the Cily
limits, rent freo for two months, by
Mr. George Brown, but she refused
to take It as the Chimney required repairing, and It waa too far from the
City.
She states her only means of livll-
hood Is by taking In a certain amount
of washing which enables her to
earn $1.50 per week.
1 suggest that I be au lorized to
write the Chief of Police at Ruperts
Creek, Sask., requesting him to Inform Bradley that unless he arranges for something to be done for his
wife and family, a warrant will bo
taken out for his arrest on the charge
of deserting them and leaving them
chargeable to the City. I am convinced that neither Bradley or his
wife are likely to do anything towards helping themselves as long as
they can optaln assistance from other
quarters.
Under present conditions, Mrs.
Bradley and family are likely to become a charge upon the City for au
Indefinite period, unless Bradley is
brought to a sense of his responsibilities, as, under the Municipal Act
of 1914, Sec. 496, the City must make
provisions for their support.
Your obedient servant,
ALBERT  J.   MERRY,
Chief of Police.
(Continued on page 9)
TO THE FLAPPER
If the so-called "flapper" of varying ages could know how (lie worthwhile young man really feels about
her and her clan, we believe sho
would flap less and think moro. A
line young chap said: "Oh, the flapper Is good fun but a fellow doesn't
think very seriously about her when
he plans for the future. A freshman,
in all seriousness, expresses the opinion that the flapper Is tt queer kid,
necessary, he supposes, to the new
order of society, but not nearly so \
Important to a fellow's summer vuca-
tion after a college term as she pro- '
bably thinks she ls. And from the
ranks of the working class, llie hoys
who are climbing thc ladder of
achievement without the polish of advanced education, comes this
thought: "Lord, whoever lold them a
fellow likes a girl who is bold and
forward? No fresh flapper for me; |
no sirrec!"
COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS WILL FIND LONG
DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE A TIME
AND EXPENSE SAVER
Travelling men can save themselves and their
funis endless time and travelling expense by regular
use of our Long Distance facilities.
Within a few minutes, direct personal conversation can be had with any desired number of customers
or patrons who could not ordinarily be "covered" and
"spoken to" without the loss of many days' time and
the many discomforts, inconveniences and delays incidental to country travelling.
In addition to these factors it will be found cheaper to telephone than travel.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Corfleld Motors Limited arc unloading another carload of Fords this
week.
You'll like our cars, You'll liko
our method of doing business, and
you'll he satisfied.
Corfleld Motors Limited
Fortl  Dealers
With The
Churches
c-
SUNDAY, MAY 6th
HOLY TRINITY, ANGLICAN
Rev. W. Leversedge
Services 11  a.m.  unless otherwise
announced and 7 p.m.
Sunday School 2.30.
8T. GEORGE'S PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. James Hood
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class 1.30. Sunday School 2.30
Evening Service 7 p.m.
Anthem by the Choir, "Safe Harbor's". Solo. Mr. Goodall "De Pro-
fundls".   Everybody Welcome.
GRACE METHODIST
Rev. George Kinney, B.A., F.R.O.S.
Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Suuday
School 2.30.
Visitors Welcome.
Special White Shoe Sale
GORDON'S
offering a timely opportunity to purchase thes seasonable goods at very low prices.
We only mention here a few of the lines, if   its
childrens or grown ups, we have it at less money.
Childrens Varsity Extra strong    tpleZt)
Youths Varsity, Extra Strong    «pl. i t>
Childrens White Canvas    tpleOU
Misses White Canvas Flapper Slipper        (PO S\f?
Sizes 13—2 at     tpeU.Lo
Misses Brown and White Oxfords dJO   A A
with Heel     tP4/ftU
Ladies White Canvas.   One Strap d»0 f? A
Low Heel        tPtUeUii
Boys Balmoral, Brown, Double Sole &f) nr
and Extra Strong    *PtU MO
Try us for your next Pair.—We can save you
Money
Gordon's
Special Sale Lace Curtains
and Curtain Muslins
laaaaHEicMEiaiaeMiEaiaaaisiBMSft^^
36 inch Ecru Marquisette Hemstitched border with Lace Edging. Reg. A(\g,
60c. Sale price, per yard        41UC
36 inch Cream Voile Curtain Muslin with
colored Border in small floral design. Reg.
75c. Special Sale price A fr ..
per yard         4DC
36 inch Cream Voile Curtain Muslin Hemstitched border with Filet Lace   Insertion.
Regular 90c.  Special Sale price
per yard    	
36 inch Ecru Spot Curtain Muslin Frilled,
cial sale price, per yard	
55c
Regular price 90c. Spe-
54 inch Ecru Madras Curtain Muslins. Regular $1.25. Special Sale
price, per yard	
Nottingham White Lace Curtain 2M> yards. Regular $3.50. Special Sale
price, per pair 	
White Marquisette Curtains Lace Insertion Border, 2Vfc yards, reg.
$4.50. Special Sale price, per pair	
HOSIERY SPECIAL—
Special Value in Ladies' Black and Brown Mercerized Lisle Hose sizes
8V2 to 10. Special value, per pair	
MILLINERY—
The Balance of our stock of Ladies* Trimmed and Ready-to-wear Hats at Half Price.
60c
90c
$2.45
$3.45
50c
MENS' DEPT.
SWEATERS—
Mens' All Wool Tape Neck. Pull over Sweaters in Cardinal, Brown Emerald and Navy.   Regular $5,50. Special Sale price  	
$3.75
WORK SHIRTS—
Mens' Khaki Drill work Shirts. Values $2.50. Special sale d»-|   AT
price     «pj.*«79
Mens' Blue Gingham Shirts. Regular $1.75 value. Special sale fl»-|   1 A
price, each  tpXaXU
Special Values in Mens' Clothing. Light and Dark Tweeds and Striped Worsted.
$17.50 $22.50 $25.00
ijgBjsiisiaisjgigiaKSistUBiss^
GROCERY  DEPARTMENT
Potato Flour, 2 pkgs  35c
Jelly Powders, asstd. flavors, 5
pkgs. for  50c
Asstd. Jams, 1 lb. glass jars, 3 for $1.00
Cherry Jelly, 1 lb. glass jars, 3 for $1.00
Assorted jams, 4 lb. tins in Loganberry
Blackberry, Apricot, Peach. Damson,
Greengage and Gooseberry, per tin$1.00
Canned Apricots, 2 lb. tins 30c
3 for 85c
Canned Pears and Peaches 21/2 tins
45c, 2 for 85c
Canned Greengages, 2*4 lb. tins
30c. 2 for 55c
Canned Pineapples, tall tins, 5 for $1.00
Corn Beef I's 35c. 3 for 85c
Canadian Sardines, 3 tins for 25c
Norwegian Sardines, 3 tins for .... 50c
Carnation Milk, tall tins per doz. $1.60
- Canned Vegetables, Peas, Corn Tomatoes, 5 tins for 95c
Canned tomatoes, 2's, 6 for $1.00
Sesque and Maple Leaf Matches pk. 40c
Van Camps Pork & Beans, 2 tins .... 25c
Shelled Walnuts, Vi's 40c lb. 2 lbs. 75c
Sunlight Soap cartons, 3 for 85c
Palm Olive !3oap, cakes, 3 for 25c
Lux, pkgs. 2 for   25c
Royal Crown Cleanser tins, 3 for 25c
Daddies Sauce, bottles 25*
White Cooking Figs, 2 lbs 35c
Evaporated Peaches, 2 lbs 45c
.Seeded and Seedless Raisins 15 oz.
pkgs., 2 for 35c
Sugar, special, 20 lb. cotton sacks
Friday and Saturday only .... $2.45
CAMPBELL'S   ■   -   ■  CUMBERLAND
Try The Cumberland Islander for Job Printing
The Home of the Better Kind of Printing
Daily They Come To Me
Tattered and Torn
Back They Go Looking
Like New The Next Morn.
From The
Family Shoe Repairer
S. DAVIS, ■ft*
Veteran's Wood
Supply
DOUBLE LOAD
tor 	
$6.00
Any length required.
PHONE YOTJB ORDERS TO B-«.
A. A. BROWN,
Royston Road
This Week Its
Mats
«.'8T LOOK IN   AT   THE   STORE
AND SEE THE DISPLAY
YOU WILL BE REWARDED It
Jeune's Furniture Store
By the Double Arrow Sign
PHONE 144 COURTENAY SATURDAY. MAY 5th, 1923.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE        0
News Of British Columbia
Indicative ot the Industrial and agricultural development ot B. C. la
the announcement of the opening ot
new post offices at Blewett, West
Kootenay, with Mr. Blewltt in
charge; and at Harrogate, Columbia
Valley, Thomas Alton, post master.
The office at Thurston Harbor,
Queen Charlotte Isles will be reopened with Wm. Harker In charge.
Hon. Dr. MacLean, minister of education announces an essay compe-
tion tn B. C. schools on "Our forests
and why we should protect them."
There will be forty-eight prizes.
* * •
Mr. J. W. de B. Farris, K.C. M.P.P.
will go to London in June ln connection with the B. C. appeals before the
Privy Council. Authority was granted at the last session of the legislature for Mr. Farris to represent the
province. B. C. Is Interested in two
cases before the Privy Council and
there may possibly be a third. The
court of appeal has granted leave to
appeal to the Privy Council in the
case of Lee Mong Kow v. Registrar
General, which has reference to n
claim against the assurance fund of
the province.
* •     •
Instructions for more rigid censorship of pictures have been Issued
by Attorney-General Manson who
has arranged a conference with the
film managers to discuss this important phase of public welfare.
* ♦     *
The automobile clubs of B. C. are
seeking uniformity in signals indicating direction, left, rlgbt etc.
* * .
Applications for clemency on behalf of persons convicted for infractions of the liquor act have been
numerous lately, but are receiving
little consideration from the Attorney-General.
* *     *
Further Improvement in the number of returned men absorbed into
Industry is noted in the past week.
«    •    •
The aid of the B. C. authorities
has been asked to assist in putting
a stop to the smuggling of liquor
across the boundary for bootlegging
purposes in Alberta,
♦     *...*
B. C. chicken farmers have
achieved the highest scores over
other provinces according to the official report on Canadian egg records. B. C. has also the lowest chicken mortality.
..:..'.'.
Efforts are being made to induce
President Harding to make an official visit to Vancouver when on his
way to Alaska about July 1.
ss       *       ss
A buyer from Hong Kong Ib ln B.
C. to select high class bulls for dairy
stock breeding. Prof. W. T. McDonald will take him round B. C.
farms.
.    .    .
Complete reorganization of the B.
C. Horse, cavalry unit, will be undertaken by Lt. ol.  G. S.  Pragnell,
D. D. 0. It ls Intended to bring the
squadron up to tull strength.
.     .     .
British Columbia mining   produc
tion for the past year, with a total
output vnlued nt $35,158,843, Bhows
mi increase of 25 per cent, over the
previous year, according to the annual report of Hon. William Sloan, minister of mines. The actual increase for 1922 over 1921 was $7,-
092,202. It the rate of production
which was reached last year and so
far this year, continues, 1923 will set
a new high record. At the rate of
acceleration mining is now making
the total will run over $40,000,000
and perhaps up near the $50,000,000
mark, it is estimated.
Hon. Mr. Sloan states that mining
conditions are such now that a fair
margin of profit ls being made by
the miner. He adds:
"It Is extremely gratifying to note
that the output for the year has only been exceeded three times ln the
history ot mining In the province. In
1916, when production reached over
$42,000,000; in 1918, when the figure
was nearly as great, and In 1920,
when the value was $35,600,000.
In thc first two years the production was the result of wartime stimulus and wartime prices for the
metals.
"In the face of the explanation of
tho cause of these higher years, the
Be Paris-Gowned at Low Cost /
Your Craving fora
pretty SILK FROCK
or SPORTS DRESS
~Whynot indulge it?
A "Dress by McMullen"—so chic, so smart—
and the cost so very reasonable/
BEFORE a single McMullen model was conceived, the
designers studied advanced styles and tendencies—in
Paris, New York, on the Riviera, at Palm Beach and
Coronado—wherever the world's smartest women congregate.
With the one object, that YOU may this spring and summer
wear wondrously lovely and exclusive designs in the newest silk
and sports fabrics, of rare shades and colour blendings.
Impossible to give detailed description of the many McMullen
creations—so varied, so modishly original, so finely fashioned
and finished.   Really, you must see for yourself!
And because no other Canadian maker can afford to buy such
enormous supplies of imported silks .and raw materials, you
will find the prices a pleasant surprise.
The ONE frock, made for YOU, adapted to your figure, your taste, per-
tonality and pocket-book, awaits your inspection.   See the McMullen
Dresses at the store which advertises them in your local papers.
The Henry McMuiaen Co., Limited, Montreal
At Right: Heavy Weight All
Silk Clinton afternoon dress.
Straight line silhouette, accentuated by elongated design in
cntcntrcd beads. Slenderizing
effect is softened by circular
side panels giving graceful
irregularity to hemline. Novelty sleeve. Black, Navy,
Havana Drown. 16-20, 36-42.
At Centre: Colourful Deau-
ville kerchief in gypsy jashion
forms co.lar. Flaring sash of
Paisley Ctepe. Slashed sleeves
cunningly caught by bows of
Paisley piping. All silk
Canton. Black, Navy, Cdtoa.
16-20, 36-3S.
Look for this Label
en Genuine McMullen
Dresses.
MCMULLEN
sc\wk\?2)resses
Stores with a reputation for Fine Merchandise,
will gladly show you the neweit
McMullen Styles.
output of 1922 Is very creditable and
indicates that normal conditions are
returning and may be expected to remain," states the minister.
"As noted In last year's report, and
still true, Europe Is the world's metal market, to which practically all
metals find their way. As Europe Is
the consumer, the industrial conditions of Europe regulate the consumption of, and demand for, the
metals."
That Europe ia still in a decided- j
ly unsettled condition cannot be
question, but despite this, the consumption of the metals seems to have
Increased and the greatly overstocked metal market on this continent, which accounted for the tremendous drop in prices ln 1921, has
been somewhat relieved, with the result that metal prices ln 1922 have
been materially higher than ln 1921.
• •    *
Hon, W. H. Sutherland, minister ot
public works states that the government will spend $1,396,000 on highways this year and $700,000 on bridges, together with $200,000 for settlers' roads in the newer districts of
British Columbia. The votes endorsed
by the executive council will do a
great deal to improve transportation
conditions in tbls province. Much of
the work will be done by day labor,
states the minister, so that those living tn a certain district will prollt
by the roadwork done In a doubte
manner.
* *    *
Premier Oliver is continuing his
fight for cheaper freight rates for
British Columbia in a Berles of addresses. This week he spoke at Kam
loops, Revelstoke and Golden and
states that he will spend all bis spare
time addressing audiences on the subject. When the House of Commons
prorogues, probably within a month,
Premier Mackenzie King has promised
to have the freight rates question
fully considered b ythe Federal cabinet. At that time Premier Oliver
and Mr. G. G. McGeer, K.C., council
for the government, will visit Otta-
Talk of an impending general election in British Columbia is characterized as "poppycock" by Hon. J. D.
MacLean, provincial secretary and
minister of education, as well as
other ministers of the cabinet. Enemies ot the government are the only
persons demanding an election, and
their predictions are based upon
false hopes, ls the minister's statement.
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Heats, Vegetables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
ISLAND AND LOWER MAINLAND NEWS
Cumberland, B. C.
Quality =
Is the Only Honest Policy and this car
rlea all the way down the line, from
tbe raw material makers to the manufacturer, through to the retailer.
None can shirk the responsibility
to give the people purity, quality and
Goodness.
If the other ingredients you use be
of the same high standard as
Busy Bee
Confectionery
they will carry Quality right down
the line—from raw material to tho
tickling of the people's palate and to
the protection of his stomach—
against impure, hard-to-dlgest products.
FOR  SALE  BY  CAMPBELL'S,   CUMBERLAND
Busy Bee
Confectionery
COCRTENAT, B. C.
Important repairs to the Reeces
and Puntledge River bridges, Comox district, to strengthen them
sufficiently to carry an eight ton
load will be undertaken by the department of public works. Under
tlie recent decision to eliminate the
temporary bridge during the construction ot the Courtenay River
bridge, traffic north and south into
the Reeces and Puntledge bridges.
Courtenay will have to detour over
•     •     »
Repairs to the Eburne bridge,
Richmond district, recommended by
Mr. Peck, chief machinery inspector,
have been authorized by the department of public works.
ss       ss       ss
River bank protection work and
important bridge repairs will be carried out ln the Alberni district shortly. Cameron River will be cleared ot
logs and debris.
SS SS SS
The government is considering
giving superannuation allowance to
ex-cherlff F. G. Richards of Victoria,
who has been In the service for a
long number of years.
SS SS SS
The liquor board has renewed the
lease on the six-storey warehouse In
Victoria for a rental of J9.999 a year
as against $15,000 per annum previously. A warehouse is needed In
Victoria and In renewing the lease
the board kept In mind the need for
economy.
ss        ♦       ss
Small fruit growers are advised to
dry their produce this year instead
of canning, to combat the high price
of sugar.
ss       ss       ss
Four B. C. boys sre leaving shortly
for the lirst cruise of their seafaring
career on tho S.S. Virginia Dollar
from Vancouver. They are Messrs.
Ellis. L. S. Simpson, Richardson and
Simpson. They were trained by the
Boy's Naval Brigade.
ss        ss        »
The "liquor fleet" at Vancouver Is
lying idle these days. An investigation ls in porgress and upon its result is said to depend whether Vancouver ceases to be a base of operations for the liquor export trade.
ss       *       ss
The P.G.E. has revised its time
table so that residents along the
lower part of thc line will be able
to go to Vancouver and return on the
same day. Work on thc Squamlsh
wharf is advancing nnd soon trains
will go down to the end of the wharf
to meet passengers and baggage.
B.C. SETTLERS AS FOREST FIRE WARDENS
British Columbian settlers, realizing that their homes, crops, and
woodlots are annually threatened
with destruction by Forest Fires,
arc proving themselves willing to
assist the authorities in Fire control.
Many of these Public spirited citizens arc volunteering their services as Honorary Fire Wardens to assist Forest Officers In the prevention, detection and suppression ot
Fires.
They realize that it is to the mutual benefit of all to combat a menace
which threatens the destruction of
the country's Forest wealth.
Previous years have demonstrated
that where communities have been
organized under Forest Officers, prior to thc fire season, quick action is
assured in attacking a fire while It
Is in an incipient stage.
.-JEsSL
2FF
► WW?
Eat Bread
with butter!
Eat Bread
with jam!
Eat Bread
with milk!
Eat Bread
by itself!
or with anything at all!
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
There is no food on earth so
tempting when it's really pure
and wholesome like
—the loaf that's all Bread.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
Is Bread at Its Best—Insist on it.
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY FOUR
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
Shoes = Shoes
During the next 30 days we must_reduce our Shoe
Stock at least $5,000»FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
We need the money. Cash Buyers, this is your
opportunity to get your Footwear at a reduction of 20
to 35%.   Below are some the lines to be slaughtered
$3.75
100 pail's Boys School Shoes I's to 5's. reg.
$4.90,
On Sale at 	
50 pairs Boys If s, 12's antl 13's at
$2.90   and $3,50
Mens Oxford in Brown and     &f* f?f\
black Calf, reg. $9.50 sale pricetpO.OU
Misses and Childrens School Shoes   at a
cash discount of 20 per cent.
50 pairs Ladies Black and Brown 2 strap
Slippers in Patent Leather (J» A CA
and Kid.  New price per pair   «D^*»OvF
Mens Strong Working Shoes <$>A  f?A
solid leather on sale at, pair   «prl.t)U
Miners pit Shoes
nailed, per pair ..
$450
We carry everything   in   SUMMER
FOOTWEAR, Rubber and Leather soles.
ALL MENS and BOYS   CLOTHING at Sale Prices
Mens Working Shirts
$1.25, $1.50, $2.50
Boys Shirts in Strong Denim
and Khaki from 	
$1.00
Gfeat values in Mens Sox in Black and
Brown at OP\/»
per pair     .iiOK/
Mens Heavy Work Sox at—
25c, 35c, 50c, 65c,
85c
SPECIAL in Towels, Brown Striped Turk
ish Towels at—
75c, $1.00, $1.50
per pair.
GIVEN AWAY FREE A CASH PRIZE OF
$25.00
for every one dollar purchase in any Dep artmenttOfou get one chance to win thjs
amount. ^
Model Clothing and Shoe Store
P. O. BOX
343
Opposite the POST OFFICE.
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,   MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT  LOWEST  PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. U. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
i
LISTEN! LOOK!
STOP
sending your films away to be developed and prints made. Bring, send
or mail them to
F. B. ELLS
COIHTENAY, B. C.
All work left at the Union Hotel
Cumberland, will receive careful attention.
While They Last
A HUGE SUCCESS attended tho sale
ot flowers, bulbs nnd plants at
QRACB      METHODIST        CHURCH
grounds Wednesday afternoon;
PEOPLE RUSHED lo socuro selections of the choice varlotics offered
with which tn set off their homo gardens.
HUNDREDS LEFT behind will bo
disposed of until all are gone. These
mis' iiabiln bulbs and plants that
will go at BARGAIN I'RICES. Hanging baskets will be made up to order.
Call At The Parsonage
|      Important
\ Announcement
Having completed arrangements
with a well known Optical concern
whereby wc are able to supply your
optical requirements at 2,1 per cent,
less than Vancouver, Victoria or Nanaimo and wilh overhead expenses
loss on account of concentration on
our SERVICE IN CUMBERLAND.
We can guarantee you
PROMPT AND EFFICIENT ATTENTION SIX DAYS IN TIIE WEEK
Further, you are not obliged to
purchase glasses from us and we will
tell you honeBtly If jou require them
or not.
|L.R. STEVENS
Eyesight Specialist
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
. PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
OFFICE CAT
THAOt MAftK
BY JUNIUS
J. Cameron says more than the
auto owners are worried about dollar gasoline. We still clean our own
clothes.
ss       ss       ss
Maw  Creek Snjsi
"When I get to thlnkln' I ain't
much account It always cheers me up
a heap to visit Sallie Young aud sec
how haster her kitchen ls."
ss       ss       ss
R. C. Lang says the men who succeed best when they work for others
are those who see that In doing so
they are also working for themselves.
ss        ss       ss
J. Lelder says a reckless chauffeur
Is rarely wreck less.
ss       ss       ss
Live your life so that when you
die there will be at least a few
people who will miss you and 'feel
sorry that you have gone.
.    ■.    .
About the only time when wj can
not sleep late in the morning, is thn
time when we do not have to get up
ss       ss       ss
About the only thing as worthless
as a German mark, is a button on a
cont sleeve, thinks W. Merrifield.
ss       ss       ss
J. Walton says it is unreasonable,
however, to expect any motor to run
as smoothly as the agent talks.
ss       ss       ss
More worship and less warship
would aid the old world, thinks A. J.
Fouracre.
A good day's work starts the night
before with a good night's Bleep,
That is something fox-trotters should
remember.
• • •
Better to own a few true friends than
all the gold refined;
Better the love ot one real heart than
all the rubles mined;
Better the hurt of many wounds than
fear to join the fray;
Better than years of nothingness to
LIVE one surging day.
Here Comes The Ice Maul
Shot by Cupid's arrow, eh?
No, It was Tom's Pierce Arrow that
did the trick.
But Love ls blind, they say,
Yes, but Pierce Arrow    will    open
one's eyes.
Then you don't think tbat Love ls
,    entirely blind?
Well, when I gave my girl a diamond,,
I found out
That Love Is Not STONE blind, at
any rate.
. . *
There is many a man who may admit his wife is wrong or bis political party is wrong, but did you ever
run across one who would admit his
watch is wrong.
ss      ss      ss
Bobby Jacks Bays the man who
plays poker with strangers isn't
gambling, for in gambling one ls supposed to have a chance.
ss        *        *
Sometimes any decision is better
than no decision.
ss       ss       ss
It may he more blessed to give than
to receive, but the man who is playing put and take can't aee It that way.
ss        ss        *
The best results are obtained in
discussing prohibition when you
speak easy.
• ss       ss
Personally, we don't mind money,
when lt talks out loud, It is when lt
begins to whisper we get suspicious.'
• *     •
An optimist is a man who drops
twenty-six floors In a thirty-story
elevator, and remarks at the fourth
floor, "Well, I'm still alright."
Hunting Trouble
tt
it
The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People  Trade
Just Received
A fine Assortment of
Telfers Biscuits
Arrowroot
Maccaron Snaps
Ginger Snaps
Thin Arrowroot
Puffnell
Animal
Radio
Digestive
Sultana
Suzanna
Puff Creams
Fig  Bars
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
"Howdy, gentlemen! Howdy! Balu-
ted old Riley Rezzdlew, halting in
front of a little group of guests assembled on thc Veranda of the Petunia tavern.
"Good morning," someone answered.
"Well, now, do any of you gentlemen want to argy about the tariff
or the Income tax or cuss the legislature, or anything of that BOrt, this
morning?"
* ss       ss
Does a Russian girl take tt as a
compliment when her sweetheart
tells her Bhe is worth her weight In
rubles.
ss       ss       ss
Frank Slaughter soys It might be
well to hold one ot those peace conferences in a trench half full of water with shrapnel bursting overhead.
Then they would get results.
ss       ss       ss
The most completely lost of all
days is that on which one has not
laughed.
* ♦    *
A lot of women are two-faced.
There is the one they wear at 8
o'clock in the evening and the one
they wear at 8 o'clock in the morning.
ss       ss       s*
Howdy friends, the modern girl's
education Is considered finished when
she can resist a kiss Just long enough
not to miss it.
* '••        ss
Impossible
The hen exclaimed, iu accents rough
As on the nest she settled down;
"I'm trying to lay eggs enough
To hold the market prices down."
• »     »
You may not be able to teach an
old dog new tricks, but sometimes
you have a deuce of a time keeping
a new dog content with the old ones.
ss       ss       ss
And now, says the Leavenworth,
Kan. Times, they are looking for
Pocahantas's grave. And when found
will it be opened and then will we
have Pocahontas stylos? Let us hope
that Uie Poke bonnet won't come in.
• *        ss
J. V. Jones says another good way
to cultivate your powers of expression is to address Intimate remarks
to un umpire.
• »        ss
If a woman thinks she has "nerves"
she never has a very good time except when her feelings are hurt.
• •     .
"Thanks for the lift, old top," said
the truckman as he drove off with the
elevator.
• »        ss .V
J. Sutherland says Dad didn't
know anything aboul, the tie that
binds.    His was tied at the factory.
• <      ss
The old-fashioned girl didn't call
her sweetie "Papa". He was seldom
old enough to be her papa.
• •    •
J. Cameron says the only placo
where the black hood stands for pro-
press is on an automobile.
ss        ss        .
"When your 2-year-old son is determined he wants to sleep ln the
big bed and you are equally determined he shall stay in his own little
bed, and he raises a row about it
every night and the neighbors complain, which should you let go to the
devil, asks a contemporary plaintively, the baby or the neighbors?
• •    «
A man Ib worth what his Ideas are
worth.
Slogan     for   women's
"They Shall Not Pause!"
tongues:
NOTICE
CUMBERLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL
The annual meeting to receive the Director's Annual report and elect officers for the forthcoming year
will be held in the City Council Chambers on Saturday,
May 5th, 1923 at 3:00 p.m.
All Employees of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, are Specially Invited
to attend this meeting and hear how the Contract between the Medical Fund and the Hospital board has
worked out, the present situation in regard to the same,
and the reasons why the Hospital Board consider a
fresh contract necessary.
Thomas Mordy, Secretory.
Some think the millennium is
slow. Wrong! Just look how far It's
got to come, says our stenographer.
• ss       «
Submlifed for Consideration
It Is always advisable to remember
that your prejudice against a man
doesn't necessarily make him con-
temptlblo.
• .       ss
Tho stenographer was awarded the
Platinum tootplck, who sayB she Is
eating yeast In the hopes of getting a
raise.
More From the Office Cat Next Week
UNION liOTEL
CCMBERIsANI), B. C.
Comfort   aud   Homelike   service.
26   rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone 16.
R. YATES, Manager.
Nervousness
REMOVED  BY   CHIROPRACTIC
At Clarke's Residence.
Boors i Any Itajr Between 4 and 6 pau.
& 0. HAUKEDAL, Chiropractor. WSwMtmmmeMttmmStMm
SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923,
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
FIVE /. /
News of Courtenay and Surrounding  District
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Why Send to V.ancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
Sugar 12c. per lb., any quantity
Trade With us and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
Spring Time Is Electric
Stove and Plate Time
We have Them At Reasonable Price*
OUR   RADIO   DEPARTMENT    IS   OPEN % FOR
INSPECTION   DAY   AND   NIGHT
Call and Inspect Our Stock
THE PIKET
ELECTRIC
Phone 164
Courtenay
RIDE  A C.C.M.
CLEVELAND
JUVENILE
$40—45
MENS and
LADIES
$55 to $70
Get my prices on Bicycles, new and second hand. Parts
Tires and accessories, before buying elsewhere.
Tennis Rackets $3.50 up. Golf Clubs $3.50 up.
REPAIRING OF ALL DESCRIPTION
All work quickly and promptly executed. Prices right.
E. T. ELLISON
Gunsmith and Locksmith
BICYCLE AND SPORTING GOODS
Located in McBrides old Store, Courtenay
We Have Moved, and Are Now Situated Opposite the
Gaiety Theatre
Light Lunches and Refreshments After the Show.
Mrs. Corbett's Home Cookery
COURTENAY, B.C.        OPPOSITE THE THEATRE
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write Por Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Office 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
May Celebration To Be Held May 30th
At a public meeting held on Monday evening last in the Countenay
Public school with about fifty persons in attendance it was decided to
hold the May Day celebration this
year on the thirtieth day ot the'present month and enlist the co-operation ot every organization ln the district tn an ettort to make the children's festival of 1923 one that will be
long remembered by those taking
part and by those who have the best
Interests of the children and community at heart. There was a large
attendance at the meeting and the
enthusiasm shown augurs well for
the event that is to be held at the
end of the month. Mr, William
Stubbs, principal of the school was
voted to the chair and Mr, Fred, P.
Jeune was chosen to carry on the
secretarial work. Committeea were
chosen as follows with power to add
to their numbers, the executive to
be comprised of the chairmen ot the
various committees acting in conjunction with the chairman and secretary.
Programme Committee:—Messrs H.
Herd, W. O. Marshall, Miss Dougan,
Miss Hildebrand and Mrs. Heber
Cooke.
Parade Committee:—Mr. H. Brantley, Mr. W. J. Hagarty, Mr. Heber
Cooke and Mr. W. F. Young.
Sports Committee:—Mr. Wm. Wain,
Mr. Wm. Sutliff, Mr. Fournier, Mr.
Wm. Hayman and Mr. Oeorge   Tho-
the day's programme will be carried
out there. A feature of the day will
be a parade in, which besides the
children several societies and other
organizations will be represented by
decorated floats. It Is the desire of the
parade commute that as many decorated cars as possible should appear
in the parade as this will be a real
feature of the celebration.
C. J. HAGSTROM
INSTANTLY KILLED
A fatal accident occurred at Camp
Three of the Comox Logging Company on Monday afternoon about two
o'clock when Carl John Hagstrom
\ lost his life In a peculiar manner. He
and his partner had felled a large fir
tree and had stepped to safety as
usual when a giant of the forest has
met its doom at the hands of the logger. The wind was blowing fiercely
and just as the two men moved away
from their last victory a giant cedar
wis uprooted, and falling made Hagstrom the victim. He was killed instantly. He leaves a son Ernest, at
Sllverdale, B. C. but as far as known
there are no other relatives. An inquest was held on Tuesday night
wh"n a verdict of accidental death
waa rendered by the jury comprising Messrs. H. Bramley, H. Everett
R. Bailey, Spence Teed, H. Herd and
R. Selfe. On examining the body of
the victim it was found that his back
was broken.
Music and Evening: Committed—
Mr. J. H. Haclntyre, Mr. Horace Everett, Mr. H. S. Baker, Mr. Wm. Booth,
Mr. Leslie Moody, Mr. Fournier, Mrs.
H. S. Baker and Miss Dougan.
Refreshment Committee:—Miss
Hildebrand, Mrs. Walter McPhee,
Mrs. M. S. Stephens, Mrs. H. Bramley,
Mrs. E. Kerton, Mrs. F. Kerton, Mrs.
H. Herd, Mrs. Nlsbet, Mrs. Sutherland, Mrs. W. Brown an dMrs. Tylor.
Finance Committee :—Mr. H, Bram
loy, Mr. Fred P. Jeune, Mrs. Millard
and Mr. Heber Cooke.
Grounds Committee:—Mr. William
Duncan, Mr. Archibald Burnett, Mr.
Fred. Kerton, Mr. Harry Bremley and
Mr. J. M. Mitchell.
Mr. Fred Jeune, owner of the new
wooden tennis courts in this city
has kindly offered the uso of his
sports stadium to be put to any use
the executive may deem necessary
on the day ot the big festival and it
ls more than likely that a portion of
Born—To the wife of Mr. Jeffrey
Kannay, on Monday, April 30th, a
son.
The many friends of Mr. Harry
Winnlngham of the public utilities
department of the city will regret to
learn that he is seriously ill at his
home.
The  public  works   department  ot
the city has just completed the cdn-
' struction of a sidewalk leading from
Union Street to the City Hall.
i
Mr. John Sutton has bought the
Loggie property in thc Orchard at
the corner of Isabel and Victoria
Streets. _
Courtenay and Cumberland will play
an Exhibition baseball game at the
Coal City on Sunday next may 6th.
Sole Agent for
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
in thit District
Our New
Spring Patterns
Have arrived.   Make your selection early and avoid
disappointment.
LATEST MODELS IN LADIES' STETSON HATS
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
HUGH STEWART
BECOMES ENTHUSIASTIC
BALL MAGNATE
AGRICULTURAL NOTES
Courtenay Team Out for Premi-
er Honors in Local Baseball
League.
Much work is being done on the
local ball park in an endeavor to
have it In the best of condition for'
the opening game ot the season locally ea**y In June. Hughie Stewart,
has become over night, a baseball
impressarlo and declares that he is
lining up a team that will take some
beating. One or two players have
drifted into town during the winter
and they have brought with them
more than just a reputation. Hughie
says they have signified their intention of donning their baseball togs
and turning out with the boys. The
locals travel to Powell River on the
27th for the league opener with the
papermakers and Hugie says that if
the "Charmer" behaves herself on
the trip across the gulf he will bring
home the bacon. The boys at the paper mill town have the full co-operation of the company and feel consent that they can fleld a nine that
vill hold their own with the others
n the league. Besides this they
lave the services of an old sport at
their disposal to help them along.
Charlie Cullin, than whom no fairer
playing athlete ever walked on a
field is assisting the team in an executive way. Courtenay Is not wor
rylng about the competition that
Cumberland will put up, believing
that it is the better policy to "never
trouble trouble till trouble troubles
you." However tho farmers team
knows that the miners will go after
them strong. Nothing much ls gleaned regarding the Japanese except
that they may ho depended upon to
make desperate efforts to land the
cup their countrymen have offered
for competition. At this stage of the
proceedings the fight for the pennant looks aB though it will ho a hot
one all season with none ot the
teams willing to accede the superiority of the others until Courtenay
cops the cup.
It is estimated by the census department of the United States that
460,000 persons in agricultural pursuits left the farms of the country ln
1922. But compared with the farm
census of 1920, the loss in farm population since that time is only 1.5 per
cent. A more significant presentation
would be In the personality of farmers—the weeding out of misfits and
the application of better methods of
production nnd management. As one
farmer has expressed it: "Better
farming Is now being done by the
government for the farmer than ever
before, and more accomplished in tbe
past few years toward making farming a business than in all the timo
liefore." The farm Itself Is the best
expression of what the farmer is, and
It appears when judged on this basis
that there is no real loss when persons leave the farm on which they
have failed to achieve satisfactory results to try their luck ln cities.
Jack Swift says In the old days
many a man got the reputation of being bright because he was lit up a
good deal.
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
L'nion Bay Road
At Vancouver
Prices
We  carry a  fine    assortment    of
Mouldings  and  Mounts.
Call and   see them at the
MARSHALL  MUSIC  STORE
Cumberland or fourtonay
IV. Emeric
MUSIC STORE COURTENAY
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,  POULTRY,  FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
«09 B.C. Permanent Loan Bldg.
PHONE MIS     VICTORIA, B.C.
EGGS WORTH $30,000
WEEK THEIR YIELD
Through their co-operative organization egg producers of Whatcom
County are marketing $30,000 worth
a week, which, lt is claimed, Ib 40
per cent, of the total shipments made
by the Washington Co-operative Egg
and Poultry Association, which is
handling about 9,000 cases a week.
SILAGE NOT GOOD
FOOD FOR POULTRY
Although silage is a good succulent
feed, It is dangerous practlco to feed
It to poultry, according to tbe poultry husbandry department at Iowa
State College. Silage- sometimes contains a slight mold which cannot be
detected by the eye and it ls this that
makes It undesirable for poultry teed.
The department advises the elimination of silage from the ration and in
its place the addition of sprouted
oats.
WHATCOM GROWERS
WILL GRADE CROP
Berry growers of Whatcom County,
Washington, have reached the view
that It pays to grade the crop instead of sending It to canneries just,
as picked. At a recent meeting ot
about 100 growers in one section it
was decided to handle the crop more
systematically than heretofore. Eight
cents is offered for strawberries by
canneries for the standard grade.
OFFERED ONLY $15.00
A TON FOR TOMATOES
Tomato growers of British Columbia have rejected an offer of (15 a
ton for canning and are planning to
operate a cannery on the co-operative basis. Business men, it is claimed
have promised to aid in financing the
project.
T.WHERKY
1BTMANNER
Sud for prlo. UK ot
work—m.u> t IRK
tssmlss, ««.
«2I Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, 8. 0. f
Tliey do not glow when blown
out. Their heads do not drop.
Tliey contain no poison. Rata
Won't gnaw them.
Sai
tie
Their added length prevent*
ecorrhed fingers when lighting
ranges and lanterns. They give
longer, brighter light In Uie
darkness.
Certain
One gentle stroke ignites tbem,
MAPLE LEAF
MATCHES
Tko Cuidlin Mllcfc Co, Urrlttd, Moulted SIX
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
News of  Courtenay and Surrounding District
BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Used Cars
20 Guaranteed Used Cars of Best
Known Makes. $25 down and
the balance from $5 per week
**USJiiMi!JiiHii!^^
Corf ield Motors Limited
Courtenay, B.C.
Baseball Meeting Very Enthusiastic
"HURRICANE'S GAL"
HAS BIG SENSATIONS
The sen and tlie air have been liberally utilized by Allen Holubar In
making "Hurrican's Gal," a First
National attraction which comes to
the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Friday and
Saturday of this week.
Dorothy Phillips, remembered
through a long line of .Mr. Holuliar's
screen   successes,   from   "Hearts   of
Humanity" to "Man-Woman-Marriage," Is starred in this production,
and has the role of a wild, untamed
girl of the sea, who had been left by
hor father a heritage nf hate and
lawlessness.
Hydroplanes, destroyers and a big
three masted schooner Hgure prominently in the stirring action of the
picture. The sea scenes were directed by Mr. Holubar from a hydroplane, from which lie controlled, by
radio, the movements of another
plane the destroyers and tlie schooner,
A destroyer wns used In a descent
upon n smuggling ship, with tin'
sailors from ihe destroyer pouring
over the deck rail ol' the schooner, and
throttling its crew into submission.
A terrific storm at sea was staged on
tiie schooner, with tons of water
tumbling over the decks. The helmsman was swept into tlie sea antl a
heavy spar struck down from aloft
by a bolt of lightning. A spectacular
lire scene marks the destruction of
the ship.
Thc three masted schooner "Apollo," which was a German, wireless
informal ion ship during tlie late war,
was used nt sea for live weeks hy Mr.
Holubar at the time when storms
were quite prevalent in Southern
California waters. For the taking ot
important scenes at the wheel of the
schooner Mr. Holubar was compelled to build platform on the side of
the ship, over the water. Tlie vessel
rocked to such a degree that he and
his aides lashed the camera and themselves to the deck rail.
ure heralded as a "milestone on tlie
highway of art," and which bears the
highest recommendations in its own
right, lt is "Oliver Twist" starring
thai adorable child actor of the
screen. Jackie Coogan; produced by
So] Lesser; directed by Frank Lloyd
and presented by a company of the
most distinguished screen celebrities.
Including Lon Chaney, Gladys Brock-
, well, Lionel Ilclmore and a host more.
The picture is described as the
! most ambitious in which the juvenile
star, Jackie Coogan, has ever appeared, and it is asserted that in It he
has registered an appeal that strike's
, the hearts of young and old and ot all
classes of picture patroiiB as well as
: those that are not usually enticed to
I the theutre. It is the appeal of innocent boyhood through the medium
of one of the greatest stories ever
penned — Charles Dickens' "Oliver
Twist." The plot hns been followed
with unusual fidelity, it is claimed,
nnd Hie characterizations will satisfy the most enthusiastic of Dickens'
readers. "Oliver Twist" is a First National Attraction — listed nmong the
biggest of the year.
WOMEN BUILD NEW
ROAD AT CAPITOL
.IACKIE COOGAN COMING
IN "OLIVER TWIST"
There comes    next    .Monday    and
Tuesday to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre a pict-
DR. R. B. DYER AND DR.  i
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Office:   Cor.   of   Dunsmuir   Ave.
Opposite   Ilo-Ilo   Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
^ffMEJBSJS'i^
Instead of buying silk dresses
when long skirts came back into
style to be ruined in crossing muddy
streets streets, the women of Capitol Heights, a suburb of Washington,
D.C, led by Mrs. Grace Stansbury,
president of the Capitol Heights'
Civic League, donned overalls recently and Improved the streets and
nearby roads.
Capitol Heights Is located just
across the District of Columbia boundary in Maryland. The State would'nt
give any aid for the muddy, rutted
oads but the Highway Commission
consented to lend a road scraper.
The husbands contributed the overalls. Then the women gave a series
of dinners, carnivals, dances, card
parties and popularity contests. In
this way they raised funds to puy a
tractor and a quantity ot rond material. Armed with these things, and
such picks and shovels as they could
beg or borrow, they wenl out and,
among other things, built a stretch
of road one nnd one-half miles long
to link the Marlboro and Annapolis
highways.    While    women    mayors,
street commissioners, Inspectors,
contractors and owners of gravel pits
have been engaged in highways work
lor some time, this Is the first Instance on record of voluntary labor
on the roads by a group of women.
—The Municipal Review of Can.
Last Sunday morning at the Riverside Hotel delegates representing
Powell River, Cumberland and Courtenay met tor the purpose of furthering the organization of the Comox
District Baseball League. Although
the Cumberland Japanese have entered a team they were not represented at the meeting. The papermlll
town wns represented by Mr. Charles
f.'ullln and Mr. Thomas Medforth;
Cumberland by Mr. J. McAllister and
Mr. Jas. Brown, secretary of the
league; Courtenay by Mr. Hugh Stewart, manager and Mr. J. N. McLeod,
president. There were other baseball
fans present and a most profitable
meeting was the result. A schedule
of games was presented by the secretary and it passed almost as presented. The flrst league games will
be played on May 27th when Courtenay travels to Powell River and the
two Cumberland teams clash at the
coal city. It Is likely that all four
teams will play at Powell River on
Dominion Day, July first. The Powell River delegates came across the
gulf on the steamer Charmer and
were met at Union Bay at nine
o'clock aud brought to Courtenay by
Mr, R. B. Dixon and returning home
they left Comox at one o'clock. It ls
a certainty that the three white
teams will be very evenly matched
but the Japanese are an unknown
quantity although they claim to have
a first class aggregation lined up.
Mr. Charles Cullin, who Is now a resident of Powell River and one of the
guiding hands of the baseball team
at that place will be remembered by
the sport fans as a member of Victoria's famous championship lacrosse
team a few years ago and they will
be glad to know that he is putting
lots of vim and pep Into the ball
team at the paper town.
Schedule of Gomes
Comox   District Baseball  Leaugue
11123. First named the home team,
*   •   •
May 27.—Cumberland vs. Japanese.
—Powell River vs. Courtenay
June 3— Japanese vs. Powell River.
—Courtenay  vs.   Cumberland.
June 10—Japanese vs. Cumberland.
—Courtenay vs. Powell River
June 17—Powell River vs. Japanese
—Cumberland   vs.   Courtenay.
June 24.—Powell River vs. Cumberland.
June 24—Japanese vs. Courtenay.
July 1— Courtenay vs. Japanese.
July 2.— Powell  River vs. Cumber
land.
July 2— Exhibition at Powell River
—Japanese vs. Courtenay.
July    8.— Cumberland    vs.    Powell
River
July 8.— Japanese vs. Courtenay.
July 15.—Cumberland vs. Japanese.
July 15.—Powell River vs. Courtenay
July 22.—Japanese vs. Powell River
July 22.—Courtenay vs. Cumberland
July  29.—Cumberland vs.  Courtenay
July 29.—Powell River vs. Japanese
Aug.   5.—Courtenay vs. Powell River
Aug.    5—Japanese vs. Cumberland
Aug. 12—Cumberland vs. Powell River
Aug. 12—Courtenay vs. Japanese
—All games to be played on
grounds oi first named club.
H,
ere an
JTh
ere
1 THE PLACE TO BUY YOUR TIRES
Bool and Wilson's
BECAUSE TIRES AND TIRES ALONE IS OUR
| BUSINESS
J VULCANIZING
COURTENAY AND NANAIMO, B. C.
gKHSJBJBEiw'-'-jaffliaiBiw^
BRIGHTER POLICE COURTS
The'judge of the Women's Court in
San Francisco opens the business of
his chamber of justice on Monday
mornings with a short musical programme. This week the bill was furnished by an eight-piece orchestra,
which played "Humoresque," "The
Rosary" and Mendelssohn's "Spring
Song" ns a stnrter. After this the
case of Maggie Higgins, charged with
shoplifting, was called.—Los Angeles.
»      —Tiie Municipal Review of Can.
FORTY-EIGHT TERM
Is there any elected official who has
been made such for over forty-eight
times? If so, he takes the record
from Reeve N. Vermelyea, who has
just been re-elected and Is now Reeve
of Thurlow Township, Ont., for tbe
48th term. He has been elected by acclamation 44 tmles and was Councillor and Deputy Reeve before becoming Reeve.
—The Municipal Review of Can,
A new post office will be opened
at Lantzville, V.I., with Alex. Ous-
sola ns post master. The Fraser River Pile Driving Co. will construct
landings and wharves for the Government at Canoe Pass ferry, Delta.
A sudden demand for wheat In
Scandinavia has caused increased activity in tbe grain movement through
Vancouver.
Nova Scotia has adopted the
"drive to the right" rule of the road,
the bill providing the change having
received the assent of the administrator of the province.
The year 1922 was a banner year
for Montreal in the number and
tonnage of ships which came to the
port, a total of 6,983 ships of 13,-
089,099 tons arriving, as compared
with 5,641 ships of 9,735,450 tons in
1921.
Canada led the world in 1922 in
the export of raw furs to the United
States. The total fur catch for thut
year was over 4,000,000 pelts, valued
at $16,000,000. While the genera!
price of furs shows a downward
trend, the total catch shows a remarkable increase.
Four of the Canadian Pacific
"Empress" liners, the Britain, the
France, the Scotland and the India,
are to load grain at Quebec during
the 1923 season, and new berths
have been provided for these vessels
near the grain conveyors, at a cost
of $300,000.
When she was alighting from a
street car in Vancouver, Mrs. Rose
McLaren received injuries which prevented her from concentrating and
temporarily did away with her earning power as a spiritualist or psychic
reader. §he was awarded $1,250
ngainst the railway company.
The addition of the 17,000-ton
"Montlaurier" to the Canadian Pacific "Mono Class" fleet marks an
important development. Not only ii
she the largest one-class-cabin ship
sailing to and from Canadian ports,
but she is the largest in her class on
the Atlantic. Her length is 613 feet
and breadth 68 feet. Because of her
size she will sail to and from Quebec.
McLENNAN—McDONALD
A wedding of much interest to residents of the district was solemnized
at Ladysmith on Sunday, April 29th,
when Miss Mary "McDonald, niece of
Mr. nnd Mrs. Philip Ryan of Comox,
became the bride of Mr. Edward McLennan, son of Mrs. E. C. Anderton
of Comox, the Reverend Father McLean officiating. After the ceremony, the happy couple took a short
motor trip on the Island, after which
the Mainland was visited. Mr. and
Mrs, McLennan returned on Thursday to Courtenay, where they will
take up tlieir future residence.
SLAT'S DIARY
Approximately 8,000 tons of silver
ore are waiting shipment from the
Keno Hill, Yukon, mines. This
quantity represents the winter haul.
Another 2,000 tons may be moved
this summer, making the total silver
shipments ten thousand tons for
1923. Such an output is worth about
$2,000,000, high grade ore running
from $200 to $300 per ton.
"The greatest feat of steam transportation to my knowledge," said C.
E. Stockdill, of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, recently, "waa the movement of the grain crop of 1922."
From Sept. 1 to Nov. 81, a period
of 91 days, the Canadian Pacific
Railway loaded and shipped an average of 1,265 cars per day. This requiring the dispatching of a train
every 45 minutes during that entire
period, carrying more than 1,000,000
bushels dally. This movement exceeded even that of the bumper crop
year of 1915.
One of the many instances of the
splendid work carried out at the
Liverpool docks is afforded by the
Canadian Pacific liner "Metagamn."
On a recent arrival at that port ahe
started the discharge of her cargo
' and coaling at 6 o'clock in the morning. Allowing for the usual dinner
hour, she took on board ln her side
bunkers 1,000 tons of coal, which
was completed by 2.45 the same
afternoon. At the same time she
discharged 1,700 tons of cargo, the
greater part of which consisted of
package freight, completing this
operation by 7.15 the same evening.
"I am running," said the pup, "because I am fleeing."
A miss in the seat ls worth two ln
the engine.
By Ross Kiirqnhiir.
Friday—We wns out for dinner tonite nt supper time and when we
was a comeing home
ma jumps onto pa &
ast him why did he
reject the Gravy when
he likes lt so much
and Mrs. Glllem had
went and made it a
specally for his Benefits sb she had always new he liked It.
Pa sed the reason he
dlddent care for none
of It was because he
seen a cupple hairs in
It and he prefers his
Gravy ball headd.
Saturday—Pn was
astlng the new Dr. how was bisness
now and if he had got many Customers yet and the new Dr. replyed
and sed they was lots of fellows
comeing in and trying to get per-
scriptions. And once in a grate wile
they was sumbuddy cums in witch
was sick.
Sunday—Joe Hix is a going to
quit smokeing he says. He red in a
paper where evry Cigaret you smoke
it nocks a week off of the tale end of
yure life und he got to figgering. He
has been useing 10 a day for the past
a yrs. since the war and it shows
that he has beat his self out ot 347
yrB.
Monday—Uncle Hen was here this
evning and he and ma was a tawking
and he sed he thot a woman shud
ought to no how to em money and
ma up and says she ems evry c she
gets a holt of and he says How do
you flgger that. She sed if you new
how hard tt Is for me to get money
out of my husbend you wood say I
emt it. Uncle Hen is a old Batchelor
and owns a race Horse.
Tuesday—I was a telling Jane that
Uncle Hen's horse hnd win the Derby laBt winter down to New Orleens,
and she sed Well what in the wlrld
does a Horse want with a Derby,
they cant wear them can they. I an-
i swered her in Latin & sed Packs of
Biskets witch means Peace be with
'■ you.
Wednesday—The   traflck  Cop  told
. pa he cuddent stop in the middle of
j the square today and pa just laffed
I and sed I gess you are not aquainted
j with this car of mine.
Thirsday—Ma woodent let me
wear my new pants today and I had
j a notion to spill ink on my old ones.
| But I dlddent. I dissided lt wassent
enny ubc to bltolng up yure face to
I spike yure nose as the proverb goes.
New Arrivals
Sport Coats and Capes in Tweeds and Velours. These
are the very latest models and moderately priced
from $14.00 up.
Dresses in Serge, Tricotine, Porie Twill, Canton Crepe
Silks, Silk Tricotine and Homespun. Large assortment
of Sport Skirts. See us for ready-mades!
Venus Hosiery in plain silk and fancy drop stitch—all
the new spring shades.
Griffiths' Gloves in fancy and plain styles.
Fancy Sateen Coat Linings in different designs and
colors
We have the best Ginghams on Vancouver Island at
prices that cannot be duplicated anywhere
Sponge Ratines, in white, copen, pink, salmon, sand,
flame, andblue, 40" wide, 95c per yard.
LAVER'S
FOR UP-TO-DATE AND NOVELTY MERCHANDISE
Courtenay, B. C. SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SEVEN
Modern Golf
^^(^rank^hompson
NOTED CANADIAN GOLFERS
BALANCE
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,     GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A. J. EDWARDS •/ Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
The manner in which the body
plays its part decides .largely the
success of the golf swing. Balance Is
important ln every game, but In none
it is so hard to achieve as In golf.
This is mostly due to the fact that
the stance is a stationary one which
necessitates a twist ot the body resulting in a circular swing, while In
otlier games thc stance changes more
or less permitting a straight or direct
blow. Balance should be maintained at all times for without It anything
approaching consistent golf is impossible. It should also be accomplished In the easiest and most natural manner. It Is not an uncommon
sight, however, to see a player at the
flniBh of the stroke struggling desperately to maintain his equilibrium.
This causes the swing to look awkward, and at the same time makes
the shot less effective. Parfc»Uf the
energy which should have gone Into the blow has been dissipated
maintaining balance. The beginner
finds great diffuculty in controlling
his weight, whereas the accomplished
golfer impresses one with the ease
and grace with which he controls his
body. The reason for this is that tho
latter has  learned  a correct    pivot
which  will make or mar the swing
more than any other factor.
One may have a fine wrist action
and generally manipulate the club
very well, but unless the work of the
hands and arms is facilitated by a
good pivot, tlieir effectiveness will
be largely neutralized. Much misapprehension exists in regard to the
pivot. The traditional and generally
accepted view of It is that the left
knee turns in toward the right ono,
bo that the weight gets generally on
the inside ot the left foot from the
,bnll of the big toe to its end. This
method of pivoting has certain difficulties inherent in it. If one examines the movements the left knee ls
capable of, lie will discover that the
natural one is straight forward, or
that which is employed in walking.
In fact the knee joint is so constructed that it can iiot move to the Bide.
When one starts the swing by moving the left knee toward the right
there is the greatest tendency to
sway the body and the fact that swaying is prevalent among beglnnerB
may be due not In the least to their
faulty methods of pivoting. With
this method a sway Is the natural result unless the player breaks st the
waist which is admittedly wrong, for
then the whole plane of the swing ls
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delhered to All Parti of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
C. G. WILSON
fourlenay
TELEPHONE
TELEPHONE
British (iilumlila ,r LwT( orders at Vendome Hotel
changed. The hips should not go
down nor up, nor should the shoulders either. The hips should twist
around on the same level. Because
of the slight stoop at the waist the
shoulders will also twist around ln
the same way without any dipping or
raising.
The most effective blow in golf can
be delivered with the right elbow
close to the body and with the club
at the top of the swing somewhere
slightly over the right shoulder. In
my opinion the pivot that' permits
this position being reached in the
simplest and most direct manner is
not whero the left knee turns in toward the right, but rather where the
left knee points directly at the ball,
which Is its natural movement. When
this happens the weight Instead of
being on the Inside of Uie left foot j
ls directly across the whole front of
the foot from the big toe to the little
one. One has only to experiment with
these methods to realize how much
firmer the whole foundation of the
swing is in the latter method. It per
mits the swing being made without
any dipping or raising ot the shoulders or breaking at the waist, and also
reduces the movement of the head to
a minimum.
It seems to me there must always
be a slight turning of the head, not
very perceptible but nevertheless
present, for at the top of the swing
the shoulders have moved from a position ln the address parallel with
line of flight to a right angle, which
I think is impossible without slightly
turning the head unless the player Is
some kind of an acrobat. The point
to notice, however, is that that slight
turning of Uie head does not change
the plane of the swing. With the
other method of pivoting, the head
must either Bway with the body or,
worse still, must be kept stationary
by the artifice or breaking at the
waist which robs the swing of its
power and makes balance more difficult to maintain. By pointing the
left knee at the ball, the twisting
movement Is done at the hips, which
are admirably fitted for this movement. It is almost Impossible to
sway in this way or as Duncan would
say: It is easier to keep within the
circle. Furthermore, there is not the
same temptation to overswlng, and
the whole foundation of the swing
Is firmer than before. A harder blow
can be delivered by pivoting in this
method ln a smaller arc than is possible with the other.
The lengthening of Braid's tee shot,
which has always been a mystery,
might be explained by a new method
of pivoting. One bright and happy
day for Braid he discovered that he
had lengthened his drive by some 30
yards, which mnde him one of the
longest hitters of the game. To
Braid the cause was inexplicable except that he suggested that his muscles must have worked smoother. It
Is unreasonable to think that his
muscles hnd developed overnight. My
own guess Is that he necldently hit
upon some trick that helped him to
maintain his balance, so that he was
firmer on his feet and consequently
enabled to deliver a faster blow. The
strong muscles of the leg are in a
better position to pull the body Into
position when the left knee points
to the ball than the other method,
for they do all their work in this direction.
The writer hopes to hnve something
further on this subject of Interest to
beginners in a later article dealing
with their faults.
"How did you ever become such a
great orator?"
"I began by addressing envelopes."
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
RHEUMATISM
BAMSHKI) BY (UIIIIOI'R.U Tit
See Me at Clarke's Residence, Jienr
l'nion Hall, Any Dny Between
I and 5 p.m.
E. 0. HAUKEDAL, Chiropractor.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Things To Forget
It you would Increase your happiness and prolong your lite, forget
your neighbor's fault. Forget the
slander you have heard. Forget the
temptations. Forget the fault-finding
and give little thought to the cause
which provoked it Forget the peculiarities of your friends, and only remember the good points which make
you fond of them. Forget all personal quarrels or histories yon may
have heard by accident, nnd which,
If regarded, would seem a thousand
times worse than they arc. Blot out,
as tar as possible, all the disagreements of lite; they will come, but
they will grow larger if you remember them, and the constant thought of
acts of meanness, or, worse still, malice, will only tend to make you more
familiar with them from yesterday;
start out with a clean sheet to-day;
and write upon It, for sweet memory's
sake, only those lovable things
which nre lovely and lovable.
0
Kind Fate.
Younghubb: "I got caught for speeding on my way home. Have to appear
In court to-morrow morning and will
probably get $25 or ten days."
Mrs. Younghubb: "What a providence! Take the ten days, John. The
cook's Just left."
SYNOPSIS OF
L/tNDACTAMENDMENTS
Minimum price of first-class land
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class
to $2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which is non-timber
laud.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, but parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
l're-emptors must occupy claims
for five yenrs and make Improvements
to value of $10 per acre, including
clearing und cultivation of at least 5
acres before receiving Crown Qrant.
Where pre-emptor in occupation
not less than 3 years, and has made
proportionate improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause,
be granted intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
ot $360 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make Improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than 5 yearB, and Improvements of $10.00 per acre, including
5 acres cleared nnd cultivated, and
residence of nt least 2 years are required.
Pre-emptor holding Crown Grant
may record another pre-emption, if
ho requires land In conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made and residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed arens, not exceeding
20 acres, mny he leased as homesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or Industrial sites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions include
payment of slumpagc.
Natural liny meadows inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cost of road, not exceeding half of
purchase price, is made.
Prc-Kniptors'  Free  (irants  Aot.
The scope of this Act Is enlarged to
include nil persons Joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under thc Act Is extended from fnr one year from thc death
of such person, as formerly, until one
year after the conclusion of the great
war. This privilege is nlso made rc-
trocatlvc.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are due nr payable by soldiers on preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes nre remitted for five
years.
Provision for return of moneys nc-
crued, due and heen paid since August I, 1»14, on account of payments,
fees or luxes nn soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements tn purchase
town orally lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependents, acquired
direct or Indirect', remitted from enlistment lo March 31, 1920.
Sub-I'iircliiisers of Crown Lands
Provision mnde for Issuance of
Crown grams to sub-purchasers of
Crown Lands, acquiring rights from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchaae, Interest nnd Inxcs. Where sub-purchasers do not claim whole ot original parrel, purchase price due and
taxes may be distributed proportionately over whole areo. Applications
must be made by May 1, 1920.
Grafting
(Irazlng Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits Issued based on numbers ranged; priority for established owners. Stock-
owners mny form Associations for
range management. Free, or partially tree, permits for settlers, campers
nr travellers, up to ten head. EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
Friday and Saturday, May 4th and 5th
DOROTHY      P H I L L I P S— in—
tt
HURRICANE'S GIRL
it
You'll see ships stagger
and sprawl through gale
mad nights-destroyers
roar in pursuit of scur-
ring smugglers-airplanes
diving to attack.
IT MAKES THRILLS
THRILL!
Destroyers, hydroplanes,
phanton ships, slinking
smugglers all in a terrific play! Sensations, Seascapes, wonderful scenes
of tropic Isle and city underworld.
8 REELS OF THRILLS
EXTRA ATTRACTIONS
3 REELS OF COMEDY
MATINEE SATURDAY
2.30 P.M.
mmwmmmsmmmmmmmsmmmmtsy&iz
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
JACKIE COOGAN
in his first 8 reel special
"Oliver Twist"
THE THINGS YOU HAVE LAUGHED AND CRIED
OVER—ALL BROUGHT BACK
From the time Oliver .asks for more—and on
through vivid happenings in Fagins den with Bill
Sykes, Nancy and all the others, characters of Dickens
creation you'll follow the human essence of an unfor-
getable book in the scenes of a wonderful picture.
Look—Ext ra—Look
Bull Montana in a 3 reel comedy "A LADY'S MAN"
Children 25c—Adults 50c
Special Matinee Monday, 3.30 P.M. Children 15c—
Adults 35c
"FURY," THE HOTTENTOT" and Lloyd   in "SAFETY LAST" are all booked for
an early showing here, watch for them.
®orothu ffkUUfiS i«
PROPOSED NEW BASILICA STE. ANNE DE BEAUPRE
THE PROPOSED NEW  BASILICA
INSERT IS THE OLD BASILICA
IV HEN the historic Shrine and
* Basilica at Ste. Anne de Beau-
pre was burned to the ground last
year, together vith the monaatery
and the novitiate of the Redemp-
torist Fathers, the clergy did not
waste any more time than was necessary In lamenting their loss, but
set about at once to construct a temporary shrine and to lay plans for
a larger and newer church. After
a great deal of discussion tt was decided that the old church had become too small for the demands and
that the exigencies called for greater accommodation, tt was therefore decided to demolish the old
walls, and tn build a church proportionate to the needi of the future as far as they can be foreseen
The plans of the magnificent structure shown above were decided upon.
The new Basilica which has been
Al STE. ANNE DE BEAUPHE.
PRIOR TO TUB CONFLAGRATION.
designed to give the edifice an appearance compatible with its us*
will not conform to tbe architectural style of any one period bnt
will be a combination of Roman and
Gothic. An idea as to Its generous
proportions can be gained from the
following figures: Length over all
812 feet; interior length, 200 feet:
length of choir, 65 feet; width of
nave, 134 feet; width of transept,
186 feet; height of grand nave, 85
feet; superficial ares 42,000 square
feet There will be twenty-six altars, twelve of which will be in the
crypt Chapels, and the lighting of
the interior will play a large part in
the scheme of decoration of the
church and will be a telling factor
in providing a beautiful place for
the hundreds of thousands of pilgrims who Journey -arh year to ths
famous shrine.
The Cost of the Lowest Bid
The electric equipment of a home to-day, no matter how simple that home may be, is a scientific problem and warrants a few minutes attention and study.
Electricity is constantly making life easier, more
convenient and more comfortable for everybody and,
as the world is grasping the place of electricity in the
home, soon it will be the exception for a house not to
be thoroughly equipped for every phase of electrical
service.
Considering the importance of the electrical equipment of the home, nothing should be left to chance.
The wiring should beright, illumination properly provided for, electrical outlets conveniently placed and
the materials and appliances should be what experts
have decided is necessary for a safe, dependable and
permanent job. ln other words, your equipment ought
to be standard.
Your electrical instillation requires a specialized
knowledge just the same as your heating or plumbing
installation. The heating engineer or the sanitary engineer knows better than you do what your house requires. In these cases, if you are wise, you select a
man whom you know to be qualified in every respect
to give you a satisfactory installation at a fair price.
There has to be a man who knows, and the community has to have some means to find him. The man
who knows electricity, so far as it applied to the modern household, is the qualified electrical contractor,
who is in close touch with the latest: practise in electrical wiring.
For thc BEST installation go to
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
Making connections with Charmer every Sunday morning, leaving Cumberland at 8 turn.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMRER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    .    Cleaning    .    Repairs
Telephone 1.     •     1>. o. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with the valves of tho mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out Unit it Is n serious offence to tamper
with Biich valves, und should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to thc very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMRERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Health - Peace
Plenty
Recover}' of Ancient Eastern chum prsents an Inestimable
boon to mankind in bestowing Power ud Soeeeis upon all
wearers.
Evil Influences are removed, accidents warded off, planetary
malignance overcome. Its touch betokens the dawn of a new
existence. Its wear immediately releases all the powers for food
and brings that joy and bliss, love and plenty, which yon have
long hoped for and struggled to obtain,
"Trilokbejoy" or The Mystic
Charm
(Conqueror of the Universe)
A Divine Gift! Sought after tor centuries! Recovered by men
accident from the disciple of a Hindu Sage, dweller of the sanctified, mysterious, snowy heights of the Himalayas. Confirmee
sceptics testify to its miraculous powers. Men and women everywhere acclaim Its potentiality in realizing material expectations
bringing in prosperity and securing a lovers affection. To be
worn as a pendant or on the arm. Write Name and Address
legibly, stating SEX of the Intending wearer when ordering.
Health and Good Fortune Go Hand in Hand
PRICE I—Encased In copper, Inclusive postage, packing and
Registration Costs, etc, 11.80; Dos, 910. Silver, ti; doi, lit.
Oold, $4.80) doz, *M,">.   CASH WITH ORDER.
Complete instructions on how to get best results with each Charm
THE MYSTIC CHARM COMPANY
At the Hindu Talisman Cottage,
123, Lower Circular Rd., Calcutta (India)
OBSERVATIONS OF A
FEDERAL MEMBER
April 9th.—The Minister of Marine
and Fisheries outlined proposed Improvements to life saving service ln
B. C. Wireless telephones from
Light Houses to Life Boat stations,
notice Boards along Coast trail, a
steamer stationed on West Coast
during winter and a direction finding station to be established at Pa-
cheena to give vessels coming up
the Coast their location or bearings,
by wireleBB.
April 13th.—Bill passed to allow
woman to marry brother of deceased
husband.
April 17th.—General Clarke of
Vancouver moved resolution re discrimination against B. C. In freight
rates but in such a manner that it
constituted a "Want ot Confidence"
motion and Its passage would mean
the defeat of the Government.
Conservatives strong for motion.
Dr. King, Humphries of Kootenay
West, and Neill of Comox-Alberni,
pointed out lhat the B. C. Government had been collecting data on
this subject for two years, had taken
the case to the Board of Railway
Commissioners, had got partial relief and had appealed the case to the
Privy Council of Canada (which
means the Cabinet.)
That the case was still under hearing by the Cabinet as it was adjourned during the Session. That
the case could not be properly discussed in an hour or two and that
whatever happened to the motion, the
result was bound to be ngainst the
best interests of B.C.
If it passed, tho Government would
be defeated and no assurance of getting any relief. If defeated, lt would
seem as If the House had turned
down B. C's claims and It might affect the later decision of the Privy
Council and the whole motion was
entirely for partizan purposes of tho
Conservative party in B. C.
The House, generally shared this
view and when the vote was called
only a handful of Conservatives were
In their seats and the motion was defeated without taknlg a division.
Net result—One whole day wasted
and some harm done to B.Cj's claim
for better freight rates!
April 14th.—Order in Council passed bringing into force most ot the
recommendations made by the B. C.
Fisheries ommlsslon of laBt summer.
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Clothes Pressing
Cleaning and Repairing
We will call for and deliver work
of any kind.
Satisfaction   Guaranteed.
A. KINGSBERRY
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Adjoining B. & B.
CHILDRENS'
Fancy Dress Ball
will be held in the
Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall
—on—
FRIDAY, MAY 11th, 1923
under the auspices of ,.
THE WOMEN'S BENEFIT ASSOCIATION OF THE
MACCABEES
CHILDREN FROM 7-30 TO 10.00 P. M.
Dancing for adults will commence after 10.00 p.m.
ADMISSION, CHILDREN—25 cents
ADULTS—50 cents
BMBMIIMMW^
OLD BUT GOOD
A Hollander, addressing his dog,
said: "You vaB only a dog but I vlsh
I vas you. When you go mlt your
bed In you shust turn round dree
times and lay down. Ven I go mlt the
bed in I haf to lock up de place, and
vlnd up de clock and put the cat out,
and ondreas myself. Den my frou
she vake up and scolds and de baby
vakes up and cries. Den I haf to
valk him mid the house round, den
maybe ven I gets myself to bed it
is time to get up again.
"Ven you get up you shust stretch
yourself, dig your neck a leedle and
you vas up. I haf to light de lire, put
on de kiddle, scrap mlt my wife already and git myself breakfast. You
play around all day and have plenty
of fun. I haf to work all day and halt
plenty of drubble. And ven you die
you vaB dead, but ven I die I haf to
go to hell yet."
WOMEN AND CHILDREN'S
WEAR
Dainty Creations at Most Reasonable
Prices
Buy Here and Save Money
ARMSTRONfi'S-Cumbcrland, B. C.
100% DiMBmuIr Street
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity cases will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings.
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mrs. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 TEARS' EXPERIENCE
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Ctturtenay, B.C. SATURDAY, MAY 5th, 1923.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
NINE
When you have Rush Jobs
-give them to a busy firm
WE excel in those jobs where time is limited, and as a
result our plant is always busy. We solicit business not
because we need it to keep our present force busy, but
that we may grow. Buyers of printing have absolute assurance
when placing an order with us that there will be no disappointments. No job is too large or too small for our perfect equipment to handle. Try us on your next job and get some real service.
TELEPHONE
35
The   Cumberland   Islander
DUNSMUIR     AVENUE,     CUMBERLAND
Cumberland School Report
i
(Continued from Page One)
CITY COUNCIL HELD
A BUSY SESSION
(Continued from page 2)
ial in Beds II Union t*,lor
A<XY      111      U^UO        11 U. WATANABE.
A Simmon's Bed, spring and Mattres, & A A AA
complete now showing, at   «Prrll«U\l
Mattresses all grades, including the famous "Os-
termoore."
DRY GOODS—
A shipment of Ladies' Dresses in Tricotines and
tal!!  $15.50 *$8.50
House Dresses in a good range of styles   and   sizes,
priced from tpu.tUO    TOtpO.uU
A new lot of ribbons just placed on sale.
Children's Bloomer,   wash suits, a good   assort-
mentea°chco,or8 $1.65, $2.25, $2.50
Corticetti Lingerie Yarns in one oz. balls, all colors.
Princess Pat double Mesh Hair nets. "
Silk, Lisle a»d Cotton Hose in all colors.
A special in Wicker Chairs, a good
roomy chair, each 	
Buffets, each
$25.00, $45,000, $95.00
Chiffeners from
$13.50 TO   $50.00    Each
A. MacKinnon
$8.00
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable   Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Announcement
"THE MAPLES"  Ice Cream Parlors
—at—
ROYSTON
on  the  Island  Highway
RE-OPENS
for the Season
SUNDAY. APRIL 22nd
Afternoon  Teas—Light  Lunches
W. Ogllvle, Proprietor.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
AFTER WE SELL TOU
A BATTERY—
our service to you has not ended, but
bas just begun. We stand ready at
all times to see that the battery you
buy from us shall give you maximum
results without trouble. Our battery
service Is worth while.
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
J. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The
Eye Exclusively
Refraction   and Muscular
R. Kaplansky, O.D.
OPTOMETRIST and OPTICIAN*
EYESIGHT SPECIALIST
Graduate Canadian Opthomolic
College. Registered by Examination
in B, C. Government Board of Examiners, — Consultations and office
hours 1—5.30 and 7 to 9.30 p.m., or
by special appointment.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladles' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop In and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent ln Cumberland, who
will advise you nn any work you wish
to have done.
Our Work  and  Service
Will Please Ton   it   it
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.      t      Phone J802
Phone to Cumberland Hotel or
B. Forcimmer
NANAIMO, B. C.
At CUMBERLAND HOTEL PARLORS every 1st and 3rd Monday and
Tuesday of every month.
Ton Cant Indeed.
A full page head-line ln an American newspaper reads like this:
"Scent Foul Play in Death of Man
Found Bound and Hanged."
As a dear old lady remarked: "You
can't hide anything from those detectives."
Buy your used car from a rellnble
firm, where you can get the boat
terms, and a guaranteed car. Corfleld
Motors Limited.
Bartoldi, Lena Bogo, Edna Conrod,
Mary Clark, Eleanor Davis, Kathleen
Emily, Barbara Grant, Nobuo Hayashl, Wilfred Collins, James Home,
Charles MacDonald, Dick Marpole,
Sarah Oyama. Norma Parnham, Margaret Shearer, Mah Shun, Sakayo Suglmorl, Fusayo Suglmorl, Shigeo Ka-
wagucki.
Honor Roll:—Mah Shun, 73%.
Agnes Bruce 68%.
Norma Parnham 68%.
Yaye Kago! 65%.
Progress—Lily Leversedge, Agnes
Bruce.
Chow Chee, Marlon Combs, Muriel
Harrison, Alfred Jones, Jennie Lawrence, Choo Foo Lung, Mary MacMillan, Robert Marshall, Bennie Nicholas, Hlroshl Okuda, Irene Oyama,
Malta Tomassl, Joe    Whyley,    Ellen
Communications received by the
City Clerk that were received and
filed:
Rlverton, Wyo. 4—18, 1923.
Dear Sir:—
Please send information and spo-
Morrlso'n, Beralee'sUnt, Mamoru Ta"   C"" "temme « Cumberland
hara Yours very truly,
Jr.' III.   Reader. ;    „     „M        N* A' ERICKSOK,
Honor  r.ll:-Dorls  Drew,   Jennie I    ?,°X 801' Rlverton' w*>- "*• 8. A.
Lawrence, Hlroshl Okuda, Mah Duck ' . Van«"-V<»-. B. C. 19th April, 192,1
A. J. Fouracre, Esq.,
Lung, Helen  Morrison, Muriel  Har
rlson.
DIV. V.—Teacher: Marjorie Mordy.
No. on Roll: 40. Percentage 95.78.
No.   of lates 3.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Bert MacLellan, Robert Burns,
Fred Cawdell, Robert Colling, Tom
Combs, Edna Davis, Fee Lung, Norman Frelone, Allan Glen, Percy
Jones Klshio Kaga, Lem Jam, Alex
McDonald, Jack McLean, Peter Mossey, Nabourn Tahara, Margaret Salmon, Willie Smith, Charlotte Stant,
Mary Sweeney, Annie Walker, Doris
Waterfield, Jack Watson, Lou Leony,
Sadoa Dol.
Honor Roll.—Edna Davis, Nabourn
Tahara, Bessie Marshall, Tadoa Dol,
Klshio Kaga, Mary Hunt.
DIV. IV.—Teacher M. C. Banner-
man.
No. on roll, 28. Percentage 93.88.
Lates 4. Grade 2nd term Inter.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Rena Bonora, Jean Brown, Isabel
Brown, George Brown, Beatrice Cavaliers, Reta Devoy, Herbert Jones,
Hazel Gibson, Harriet Horbury, Sadako Iwasa, Yoshlo Kawagtuht, Chey-
eko Kajlyama, Margaret McDonald,
Lloyd McMillan, Kathleen O'Brien, Ta
shu Oyama, Hltoshi Suglmorl, Mlnoru Tahara, Barbara Westfield.
Honors:—Reta Devoy, Beatrice Ca-
nallers, Isabel Brown, Victor Tomassl, Herbert Jones, Harriet Horbury.
City  Clerk,
Corporation of the City of
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear Sir.—
Your letter of April 17th to hand.
-I beg to thank the Council for the
kind permission to hold a Tag Day on
some date that would be convenient
to us, I would appreciate It very much
Lem Hing, Mesake Kaga, May Mali, * l'*?" ,C0"Id1»»' U8 "' to»<* "•"» the
Jackie Marpole, Akea Matsunaga. | ™™ ,.Sod,!!!es <* >'our Ci» »»o
Agnes MacKinnon, William MacNaughton, Jessie Robb, George Salto.
DIV. X.—Teacher II. I. Harrison.
No. on roll, 37. Lates 8.
Percentage 87.5.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Cheyaka Suglmorl, Thorn Keeler,
Klyoka Abe, John Bannerman, Harry
Cunliffe, May  Graham,  Fung    Him,
might be willing to handle this for
us.
Mary Sanduluk, William   Slaughter, I    °n„° of ffe, rcaaons *« have asked
Muriel Thompson, Chow Ting, Jackie j T. C°Unc" for a grant ls be«<use of
Wong,    Chrlssle    Robertson,    Annie
Cheung.
Honor list, Div. X.:—Agnes Mac
Kinnon, Annie Cheung, Chrlssle Robertson, William MacNaughton, Muriel Thompson, Chow Ting, Fung
Him, David Marshall.
the expense of collecting from door
to door, nnd a Tag Day would not be
much relief ln this respect, unless we
were able to get some volunteer help
from citizens. If yod could let us
have the name of the ladles respons-
I ible in connection with the societies
  , doln& Service Work in your Conunu-
DIV. XI.-C. Richardson. i "'*' ,or ,WOU'(i *1° ua the ^or of get-
No. on Roll 35.  Percentage 92.95.      "f ln '<-""* "lth °n« « two for us,
No  Latea 8 a,ul secil,S if they would put on a Tag
Pupils making perfect attendance: Da> !o* th,e,taneflt °f Th° Salvation
Preston Bruce, Willie Cloutier, i ^my Social, we would appreciate
Charlie Gomme, Charlotte Hoffeinz,! ™ ™T "J™0*1 J
David Hunden, Leslie Mah, Richard i ,,We woul 8end "rinted matter,
Marshal, Insugno Matsukurn, Bruno ""• a,,d Tap. ao that there would
Merletti, Jackie Morrison, Kate Oya- I * "°° T" „! connectlon' "
ma, Henry Salmon, Heromitsu Salto.   !' w0,,ld be pmsMe "> *<* "omeone
DIV. VII. 1st Inter.—A. J. Colman.
On roll 47. Percentage 90.42. Lates
DIV. XII.—J. E. Robertson.
No. on roll 34. Percentage 92.G5.
No. ot Lates 3.
Perfect attendance:—Clarence Le-1
wis, Matsuyo Abe, Josie Burghiner,
John Davis, Dorino GaleazzI, John
Hoffhelnz, Low Hong, Elsie Mah, To-
kio Nakano, Kitty Prior, George
Strachan, Tommy Tobacco, Elsie Wa- j
terlieid, Christian Larson, Mildred i Lelana Bannerman, Peter Bono,
Lockner, Annie Brown, John Comb,! Ma°*S« Bryan, Gertie Davis, Mnrguc-
Alven Frelone, Dorothy Gordon, Ki-! rll« Larrigan, Shugiml Masiya, Met-
meyo Kaga, Low Ping, Willie Mcln- j BU0 oba"i. Blllle Prior, John Sandu-
tosh, Bessie Nicholas, Willie Shearer, t luk' M«rleI 8hortt, Robert Walker,
Willie Sweeny, Lena Tomassl, Harry | Bhoda W«,,on;,*rthJ|r J1'™?' f09',0
Westfield. "  ""'       " ""'
Honor roll:—Kitty Prior, Rudl Bo-1 r*
nora, Dorothy Gordon, Hugh  Braes,
For  Progress:— Kltliy  Prior   11%.
to run the Effort for us.
Thanking you ln anticipation.
I remain,
Yours sincerely,
H. CHAS.  TUTTE, Adjutant.
Vancouver, B. C. April, 27th, 1923
| Dear Sir:—
I beg to enclose herewith a Poster
Notice for the purpose of advertising
the   Postmnstership  of  Cumberland,
B, C.  Will you kindly display this
notice prominently In your office for
I 14 days and return It to   me   after
I completing the certificate  ln regard
to the period the notice waa displayed.
Application forms for this position
Pupils making perfect attendance. , (,on be obta,Rel, lrom thD Cumberland
Owen Abrams, Gordon    Anderson,   Po8t 0ff|ce or from (h,8 oHlcc
Echlro Shi, Alex Sommerville, Thelma Waterfield, Margaret Westfield.
Willie Home, Takeshi Iyeln. Willie
Johnson, SUBumo Kawaganchl, Willie Tobacco.
Honor List:—David Hunden, 89.%
Albert Drew, 88%.
Preston Bruce, 877"
Leslie Mah, 87%
Harold Hughes, 83%
Willie Home, 82% .
Yours truly,
J. F. MURRAY,
ss     •     ss
Acting  District  Superintendent.
Victoria, B. . April 13th, 1923.
Rudi Bonora, 11%.
Josie Burghiner, 10%.
DIV.  VIII.—E. Horbury.
No. on roll 39. Percentage 91.6. No.
of Lates, 9.
Senior Third, Junior grade.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Edith Cavallero, John Burghiner,
Catherine Brown, Olga Bonora, Jac-
ky Coe, May Beveridge, Irene Davis,
Cyril Davis, Donald Graham, Doris
Hannay, Cazuko Iwasa, Takeru Kawaganchl, Second Merletti, Eunice
MacKinnon, Hisako Nakano, Muriel
Partridge. Quong Chong, Dan Stant,
Nina Shields, Helen Saunders, Edna
Watson, Hatsue Matsukura, Norlo He-
rose, Teruko Dol, Hugh MacNeil.
Honor List:—Cazuko Iwasa, Hilda Andrson, Nina Shields, Cyril Davis, Cathrlne Brown, Eunice MacKinnon.
bert Walker.
93.S.
Wong, Melsuo Hayashl, Manabu Syei-   His Vorshlp thc .Mayor, City of
i     Cumberland, Cumberland, B. C.
Honor roll:-Rhodu Wnlton, Madge   Dear Sir.—
Bryan, Gertie Davis,  Robert  Logan.      At the requost    of    the    Citizens'
Willie BraeB, Leland Bannerman, Ro-   Committee of    Victoria's    May-Time
Frolic, I wish to extend to you and
the Council of the City of Cumberland this Invitation to be in Victoria
on the 21th of May, when the three
days of celebration begin. The complete dates are the 24th, 25th and
26th (Thursday, Friday and Saturday.)
lt has been arranged to have an
elaborate parade and the committee
in charge wish that Cumberland be
represented by n float, band, marching group or some other suitable
carnival entry which would be representative of your City.
1 sincerely hope that you and the
Council will be able to attend these
three days of festivities which are
held annually to commemorate the
memory of the late Queen Victoria
otter whom our City was named and
that you will endeavour to arrauge
to  have an nttrnctlve  entry In the
DIV. XIII.—Eva O. Drader.
No. on roll 38.    Percentage
Lates 12.
Pupils with  perfect attendance:—
Winnie Bird, Alex Mossey, Wardens Thompson, Aldred Biggs, Leslie Coe, Margaret Marpole, Jamoy
Mah, Shlzeo Matsunaga, Billy Merrifield, Robrt Mossey, Kiyosha Okuda, Jean Quinn, Gordon Robertson,
Manabu Shegemi, Daryl Thomson,
Jimmy Tremlett, Cheung Wong, Tommy Wong, Yasushl Yamasahi, Doreen
Beckerton, Elizabeth  Malpass.
Honor roll:—Rosle Mah, Alice
Brown, Cheung Wong, Harry Mordy,
Jean Quinn, Chrlssle Edwards.
DIV. IX— I. McFadyen.
No. on roll: 34. No. of lates 4.
Percentage 89.15.
Pupils making perfect attendance:
Lady of House—Yes, I have an old
pair of my husband's trousers, but I'm
afraid they're too large around the   parade
waist for you.
Hungry Hugglns—Well, couldn't
yer gimme a dinner dat would make
'em fit?
Saturday
CUT-RATE DRUGS, ETC.
FREE one trial size tin of Snap Hand Cleaner with
every One Dollar Purchase.
25c Zymol Tooth Powder   18c
75c. Hair Tonic and Dandruff Eradicator  52c
Pierces Favorite Prescription   78c
75c. Abbeys Salts   61c.
$1.30 Scotts Emulsion   98c.
Just received shipment of Nyals Poultry Tonic
price     25c
"It Makes 'Em Lay"
Se our WINDOW FOR CANDY SPECIALS.
Lang's Drug Store
"It Pays to Deal at Lang's"
Send us your MAIL ORDERS.
Yours very truly,
REGINALD HAYWARD, Mayor.
II. Knappet who waa instructed to
measure up the lumber used lu connection wilh the construction of the
buildings erected for thc Returned
Soldlors handed In his report which
wns accepted.
ss     ss     ss
Tenders for the new fire hall were
laid over for two weeks. In the
meantime the Ilio wardens will interview Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, of the Canadian
Collieries (D) Ltd.
ss     ss     ss
Alderman J. J. Potter, tho chairman of thc Board of Works said sev-
eral property holders were asking
that they he allowed to work out
their Cily Taxes having been thrown
out of employment by the closing
down of No. 5 mine caused by the
tremendous Influx of fuel oil, and
that It wns a difficult matter to secure the necessities of life, without
paying taxes.
You'll like our cars. You'll like
our method of doing business, nnd
you'll he satisfied.
lortleld Motors Limited
Ford Dealers TEN
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, MAY 6th, 1923.
BOYS' AND
YOUTHS' TOGS
BOYS AND YOUTHS TOGS
Boys antl Youths Khaki Pants with belt straps, also cuffs on pants, made of a good quality, duck All
sizes. Price   $2.25
Boys and Youth's Khaki Shirts, Sport collar,    with
pocket on left side, a real good shirt. Specially good
value at $1.50. Sizes 12. l2['->. 13- W/» and 14.
Boys Stripe Sport Shirts white ground with colored
spripes. Good value at $1.25
Boys Light colored Shirts, Sports collar, good quality
percale, fully made, each   $1.50
Boys Khaki Shirts with Sports collar or double fitting
collar. A really good Shirt for the price- See them
ut $1.25 each.
Bovs Wash Ties Stripe Silk just what the Boys want.
35c each or 8 for   $1.00
Boys heather sox, with Fancy tops most sizes, prices
75c to 95c.
Youth Fancy Top hose in large sizes. Price, pair $1.00
Boys and Youths Braces 35c, 40c and 50c
Boys Navy Bloomers made of "Fox Serges" guaranteed to give good hard wear. Price $1.75 to $2.45 for the
large sizes.
A shipment of Boys Tweed Bloomers real hard wearing
goods, will give satisfaction.
Boys Gvay Flannel Short pants, plain style. Price $1.95
a pair.
Boys Footballs, just what the Boys want, a really
good ball. Price  $2.50
SPECIAL—
A shipment of Ladies' dresses in Serges and Tricotines
travelers samples at greatly reduced prices. See thia
line at, each  $12.50'
PHONE 134
J. Sutherland
Dry Goods and Gents'Furnishings
Local Briefs
Mrs. L. FranceBChini will represent Uie local lodge ot the Phythian
Sisters at a convention to be held ln
Nelson on May 9th. Mrs. Francescht-
nl will leave for ,\elson on Sunday
and will be accompanied by her sister. Miss J. Balagno.
Constable Bolous ot the R.C.M.P.
who has spent the last three years in
Cumberland, has been transferred to
Victoria.
PHYTIAN SISTERS
SALE OF WORK
IS GREAT SUCCESS
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Cavin spent
last week en dat Oyster Bay, visiting Mr. Cavln's parents.
The sale of work held In the Fraternity Hall of the Phythian Sisters
Lodge last Wednesday afternoon waa
well attended and a great success
from every point of view. During
the afternoon tea was served, and
there were also booths of plain sewing, home cooking and candy. A
whist drive was held in the evening
the successful winners being Mrs.
Stanoway and Mrs. Waterfield, first
prizes, and Mrs. Shearer and    Mrs.
Lockner, consolations. The sum
realized from the efforts of the ladles will amount to over $100.00.
Mr. F. Oliver who ls at present residing at Cassidys, spent last week end
in town.
Mr. nnd Mrs. J. Enricl and family
left for California on Tuesday morning.
Mr. W. F. Povah, severed his connections with the Islander on Saturday last, April 28th.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
USED CARS
USED CARS often need some adjustment or repairs,
and by having the car examined before the trouble becomes serious you may save a big repair bill.
We specialize in FIRST CLASS REPAIR WORK,
and employ only experienced mechanics who can do a
first class job at a minimum cost. We are fully equipped to handle repairs on any make of car, and carry
accessories and springs for all popular cars.
Call and get a price on your repair job.
WE GIVE SATISFACTION
We have a few very good Used Cars for sale at
very reasonable prices. Among these are the following:
FORD TOURING only run a few miles and not marked
yet.
McLAUGHLIN LIGHT SIX—in A. I. shape.
CHEVROLET TOURING 1920 MODEL.—A Snap.
L. R. Stevens left for Vancouver
last week-end on business and was
away for several dayB.
With a load of local soccer fans,
one of the big Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited trucks went to
Nanaimo to witness the game there
last week-end.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. accompanied by
Mrs. Graham returned from Victoria
on Saturday.
iMrs. R. P. Christie returned from
a visit to Seattle, Wash, on Saturday
last.
Miss Phyllss Partridge who has
been attending the University of
British Columbia has been visiting
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Partridge. Miss Partridge returned to
Vancouver Thursday morning to attend the University graduation exercises.
Mr. Charles Graham returned from
Vancouver on Sunday.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
The St. John's Ambulance Association held another of their successful
whist drives nnd dances ln the G, W.
V. A. Hall on Saturday evening last.
Mrs. M. Yarrow was successful in
winning the Ladies' first prize, and
Mrs. Shelllto, the consolation. Miss
J. Balagno, playing a gentlemen's
hand, carried off first prize and Mr.
Wilbert Hudson, the consolation. Refreshments were served by the ladles, after which dancing, continued
until midnight. A very pleasant
evening was enjoyed by all present.
Music wns supplied by Mrs. W. Hudson, pianist, and Mr. Colvlllc Graham,  Violinist.
Buy your used car from a reliable
firm, where you can get the best
terms, and a guaranteed car. Corfleld
Motors Limited.
IN MEMORIAM
from
"i\ot dead but sleeping"
Night came releasing    him
labor—
A hand from out the darkness
Touched him and he slept.
In loving memory of William John
Colling, who passed away on April
29th, 1922. age 20 years, 11 days.
Sadly missed by his mother and
father, two sisters and three brothers.
Mr. A. H. Peacey formerly of Cumberland and now ot Victoria was a
visitor to town this week.
Buy your used car from Corfleld
Motors Limited, pay $25 or more
down, and make the car earn the
balance.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mordy returned from Vancouver on Monday
whero they have been attending the
wedding of their son William. They
were accompanied by their son, Harry, and their daughter, Miss Marjorie
Mordy.
A party composed of the teachers
of the Cumberland Public Schools
hiked to Trent nlver last Saturday
afternoon.
Mrs. Thomas Rickaon returned
from Vancouver on Wcdnsday evening.
Mr. J. T. Brown, Sr. who left for
Brule, Alta., to attend the wedding
of Miss Jean Clark Is expected to return this week end.
CUMBERLAND JUNIORS
ENTER FINAL FOR
O. B. ALLAN CUP
Local Boys Win Their Way Into
Final Round For Cup Emblematic of Junior Football
Championship.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of thai* high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeke, ensuring fresh goods
all the tlm*.
Henderson's
FOR SALE
HOUSE FOR RENT OR SALE.—AP-
ply Frank Scavarda, corner Dunsmuir Avenue and Second St.
M. 12
PUPS FOR SALE.—THOROUGH-
bred Cocker Spaniels, from splendid retrievers, ready for Fall
Training. C. B. Sturrup, Arden, opposite Urouhart's Mill.
—M.   20.
Blunt & Ewart, Ltd.
Phone 61     THE COURTENAY GARAGE    Phone 61
Agents for
CHEVROLET       DODGE BROS.     STUDEBAKER
Tho Cumberland Juniors nnd Saanich Juniors met at .Nanaimo on Saturday Inst In the Scml-Flnnl for the
Allan Cup. Thc hoys from the south
end of thc Island were completely out-
classd and only brilliant work by thc
Saanich goalkeeper, saved his team
from a severe beating. The game was
an exceedingly hard one, but both
teams showed a lack of the finer points
of the game, combination being at a
premium. Thc local boys did at times
play a little combination, but tbe old,
old story has to he repeated and that
ls that some of the youngsters think
they can beat the world and then
some. This Is not the view of one who
is "filled with an over-crammed cranium full of useleBB knowledge" (quotation borrowed from one of the Junior players), but the view of one who
has played the game In the old days.
Days when football was a strenuous
game; when the goalie was liable to
be punched through thc goal.
The Cumberland boys, as the second
half began to draw to a finish, made
determined efforts to score and Jock
Stevenson' literally carried the ball
though scoring the only and winning
goal of the match.
The local boys now meet the pick
of Vancouver on Saturday (to-day)
and If a little advice to the   Juniors
FOR SALE—GRAMOPHONE AND
records, also water-power Washing
machine. Apply P. O. Box 541 Cumberland. B. C.
-WICKER  BABY  CAR-
good     condition.—Price
FOR SALE
riage  in
$25.00
Apply, R. H, Gibson, Bevan, B.C.
FOR SALE.—BARRED ROCK HATCH
Ing Eggs, from good layers. 10c each.
.Apply Stalkers Ranch, Happy Valley. Phone 93 U,
TO LET.—THREE COMFORTABLY
furnished housekeeping rooms, corner Penrith nnd Fourth Street. For
further particulars, see Mrs. M.
Yarrow.
Special Sunkist
Week
Nice Juicy OrMges, 3 dozen for	
Also   OUC & I OC per dozen.
50c,
95c
Lemons, Large
■ per dozen.
Florida Grape Fruit, large size, 2 for
California Grape Fruit, 4 for 85c or per
dozen 	
35c
$1.00
Vegetables
Full stock arriving every freight
Fresh Tomatoes Cucumbers
Head Lettuce         .. Cauliflower
Leaf Lettuce Cabbage
Green Onions Celery
Local Rhubarb Carrots
Potatoes Onions
See Our Windows for
SPECIALS
Burns & Brown
SERVICE
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38
QUALITY
Auction Sale
AT  AGRICULTURAL  HAM.  AND  (iROUNRS-COrRTENAY
To-day, Saturday, May 5th,
AT l.:45 P.M.
If money Is scarce and you require a team of horses or n car,
why uot Bee your Banker for a loan?
Farm Horses—Karm and Garden  Produce—Household  Furniture, etc., including:—
One Bay Team, 6 and 7 yenrs, about 1350-lbs. each.
One Grey Team. 8 years; about 1300-lbs. each.
One Orey Team. 7 years; about 1300-lbs. each.
And several very useful single work horseB.
Household Furniture, ete.i—Six-hole Fawcett Range, ns new;
Extension Dining Table; "Toronto" Couch or folding bed;
Occasional Tables; Good Double Bed, complete; two Rockers ; "large Bevelled Mirror and two other MlrrorB; Dresser
with four drawers; three Cots; large and Bmall Heating
Stoves; CheBt of Drawers; Baby's Go-Cart; Man's Bicycle;
two Horse Saddles (one English and one Texas); Violet
Ray Electrical Massage Machine; three Arm Chairs; quantity of Aluminum ware; Window Shades; large Drinking
Trough tor Stock; Beddlng-out Plants; quantity of tools
and other sundries.
Also Poultry, Including: -Two separate doz. White Wyandotte
Pullets, (fine birds, Pauls strain); R.I. Reds, Burred Rocks,
and pen of Bantams.
Alsoi—To be sold at about 2.30 p.m. 1920 model Chevrolet five
passenger touring car iu good condition; Two roomed summer camp (nicely finished) close to wharf ou beach at
Royston. This building is purely on Marine Drive. Bureau;
Perfection oil heater; pure bred Flemish giant doc rabbit
with three young 7 weeks; Express wagon with pole nnd
shafts; good cheer six hole cook range; crockery, etc. and
articles too many for enumeration.
Further Entries gladly accepted.
L FEUX THOMAS
Auctioneer :: All Kinds of Insurance :: Notary Public
OFFICE: BOOTH BLOCK, COURTENAY
Telephone 1S1 House Phone 24 L
THE HOMING PIGEON
REGULATION POOL TABLE FOR
Sale—Can be converted for American Billiards. Good condlUon.
Cheap for cash. Also cook stove
4 hole.—Apply Secy. G. W. V. A.
FOR RENT.—F OUR ROOMED
House : Apply 308 Windermere
Avenue or 100% Dunsmuir Ave,
LOST—ON FRIDAY, APRIL 27th
between Comox and Cumberland.
Tire nud Rim 30 x 3%. $15.00 reward. Apply, Thomas Hudson, Union Bay, Phone 160 X.
would be accepted, the writer suggests that they forget this Individual
play; part with the ball; there are
eleven of you In the team.
It will be newB to many people to
hear that what Is known as the Carrier Pigeon haB the homing Instinct
very little developed. The real messenger is the Flying Homer, which
species, having the natural Instinct,
can be trained to a wonderful degree. Flights of 600 miles are, as
Messrs. Geo. Robertson and W. W.
Lee of the Poultry Division at Ottawa testify, by no means uncommon
with this type of Pigeon, which is
used not only for message carrying,
but also for racing and distance
flight competitions. It was the Flyer Homer pigeon that rendered distinctive service to Britain In the
late world-war. The training of the
young birds of this breed may be
commenced at the age ot three to four
months, but hefore undergoing actual training, It Is advisable to submit
them to a few preliminary fllghta In
the immediate vicinity of tho pigeon
loft, so that they may be able to familiarize themselves with the topography of the surrounding country. After this, ou a bright clear day, the
birds should be taken a short distance from the loft In n covered basket, preferably to the top of a slight
eminence, and then released. This
should be repeated day by day at
continually Increasing distances and
changing direction. In order to
train the birds to immediately enter
the loft on returning, they should be
kept slightly hungry and a littlo
grain scattered on the loft as booh
as they are released.
You'll like our cars, You'll
our method ot doing business,
you'll be satisfied.
Corfleld Motors Limited
Ford Dealers
liko
and

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