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The Cumberland Islander Aug 25, 1923

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 XHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
(W
Witt irklvh li consolidated tke Cumberland Sews.
FORTY-SECOND   YEAR.—No.   34.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA,   SATURDAY,  AUG.   26th,   1923
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
FORESTERS OF THE ISLAND
INVADE CITY OF CUMBERLAND
DELEGATES FROM VANCOUVER ISLAND LODGES HOLD
ANNUAL CONVENTION—VISITORS GREATLY IMPRESSED WITH WELCOME EXTENDED TO THEM.
Tho annual Convention of the Vancouver lslnnd District Lodges of the
ancient order of Foresters was held
In this city last Monday and Tuesday, August 20 nnd 21 with approximately 200 Foresters In attendance.
The following officers and delegates
from outside points were In attendance. A. E. Greenwood, F. Smith, J.
A. Torrance, G. W. Andrews, Mrs.
H. F. Jarvis, A. R. Colby, G. S. Eden,
A. W. Jones, E. Matthews, W. A. Long
ley, Victoria; T. D. Barry, Mrs. L.
R. Barry, Miss E. A. Barf, Cobble
Hill; Mrs. W. Wilson, J. Hutchinson, A. C. Jones, L. P. Sepas; Ladysmith; S. 15. Wlsemuller, Duncan;
J. Robinson, Lantzvillo.
Monday's session commenced at
9 p.m. In the G. W. V. A. Hall and a
great deal of business was transacted
Including elect Ion of officers for the
ensuing year, the session terminating about  10.30.
Tuesday's session commenced at
9.30 a.m. and after routine business
had been transacted adjournment
wns made lor lunch, Ihe convention
going into session again at 1.30 p.m.
uml closing at 3 o'clock.
Mr. Charles Graham, Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited entertained the
visiting delegates, showing them
around the plant then taking them
out to the Power House. The delegates were greatly Interested In all
that Mr. Graham showed and explained to them mid thanked the superintendent for his kindness.
At 7 o'clock on Tuesday evening
Courts Bevan and Cumberland entertained the visitors at a banquet,
which turned out to be a great success, being thoroughly enjoyed by all
present. Mr. Frank Bond, P.C.R.,
acted as chairman and aftor warmly welcoming llie delegates to Cumberland, saying how pleased the local
Foresters were to entertain Ihem
that evening lie proposed a toast to
"The King."
The toast list and programme, ins
arranged by the entertainment committee, was then proceeded with, Mr.
Goodall, Bingliig "The King's Own"
followed by Mrs. Anderson with
"When the Great Red Dawn Is Shining." A speech by G. W. Andrews,
explaining the work of the A. 0. !?.,
followed by a toast to the order was
listened to with a great deal of attention nnd thoroughly enjoyed. Mrs.
Cessford then sang "After Sundown"
and Mr. R. Spittall delighted the assembly by singing "Dad's little blue-
eyed Boy." A toaBt "Canada' was responded to by Dr. G. K. McNaukhton,
after which Mrs. G. Johnston sang
two songs "iMother McCree" and
"Lullaby." The toast "Our Industries" was responded to by Mr. Charles
Graham, who wos In a jocular mood,
keeping (he assembly In roars of
laughter. A song by Mrs. J. Pinfold
"Eventide" was very well received,
and a toast to the City of Cumberland, responded to by Mayor Charles
J. Pariiham, brought the programme
to a close.
Mrs. W. Hudson, ncted as accompanist in a very capable manner.
A dance followed which was thor-
.(Highly  enjoyed by all present.
The delegates to the convention
wero loud In their praises for tho
splendid manner In whicli tliey had
been entertained by the local Foresters and their friends.
A great deal of credit is due to the
Indies and to the commltteo In
charge of the arrangements. The
tables and banquet were magnificent, tlie best ever seen In Cumberland. Bin. E. Jackson nnd sister
Johnson, chairman of committees,
cannot be too highly praised. Their
committees must hnve worked unceasingly to attain the result they
dhl nnd to make the affair such a
stupendous success.
CHEST BADLY CRUSHED
IN AUTO ACCIDENT
Car Turned Completely Over
Pinning Driver Under Steering Wheel.
An accident that might have had
disastrous results occurred on the
Royston Road, Wednesday evening
about 8 o'clock, when Toyo Yamada,
accompanied by two other Japanese
were proceeding to Royston
Mill in the car owned by
Yamada. As far as can be ascertained, either the steering gear or a
wheel broke, throwing the car into
the ditch, completely turning It over
and pinning Yamada beneath the
steering wheel.
On examination at the local hospital lt was found that Yamada, in addition to a badly crushed chest, had
a collar bone broken, also some ribs
on the right side which punctured his lungs. The Injured man is
resting as easy as can be expected
under the circumstances. The othor
occupants of the car escaped injury.
ROYSTON LOSE CHANCE
Bevan's Rally in   Sixth   Wins
Game.
The'last game ot the Intermediate
league In which the Royston Japanese take part wns played at Bevan
ou Sunday last before a large crowd
of baseball fans.
The snappy Royston bunch looked
like winners in the Ilrst Ave Innings
when only 15 men faced Kenchl, not
a Bevanlte being able to reach the
initial sack, while the Royston boys
scored their lone two runs In the
second.
The sixth found Bcvnn full ot revenge and light, and every batter on
the Bevan line-up batted for a total
of live runs. Two more were added
in the seventh, while Royston failed
to register another counter.
Although Bevan had a three run
lead after the sixth, the opposition
loaded the bases twice, only to hnve
the third an easy out.
Bennie pitched an able game for
Bevan, while Westlleld's arm was In
good form and cut off many of the
runners who were playing thief.
Kenchl pitched Al ball for 5 innings
but exhausted himself and had to be
re-placed In the seventh by Kana-
shia.
OLD TIME RESIDENT
OF NANAIMO DD3D
SUNDAY LAST
Mr. W. Merrifield, of the Cumberland Hotel, received word on Sunday
last of the death of his father, at Nanaimo.   The deceased gentleman wns
a well-known pioneer resident of
the city of Nanaimo, arriving there
In the yenr 1888, and worked for many years In the mines' In around the
city. He is survived by two sons,
George Merrifield, a well-known hotel
man ot Nanaimo, nnd William Merrifield, proprietor of the Cumberland
Hotel. The funeral took place from
the deceased gentleman's former residence, on Milton Street.
INTERMEDIATE BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Cumberland    Intermediates      and
Bevnn are billed to meet on the lte-
[ creation Grounds at 3.30 on Sunday.
> This game should be a hummer as
i both  teams are tied for first place,
I and to the winners will go the Prior
• Cup, Cumberland now hold this prize
j trophy  and are determined  to hold
; It  another year.    Bevan  have  been
playing good ball this year and are
j backed by a good many to win the
honors this year, soo a good contest
1 Is assured on Sunday.
PRETTY WEDDING
AT METHODIST CHURCH
WEDNESDAY MORNING
One of the prettiest weddings
Cumberland has ever seen took place
Wednesday at 9 a.m. In tlie Methodist Church, when Miss Florence
Horwood, of Minto, was united tn
marriage to Mr. Alexandra Moffatt of
Prince George .
Promptly at the. hour set, to the
strains of the wedding march played
by Mr. Edwards, the bride came up
the aisle on the arm of her father.
She made a pretty picture gowned
In white tricoshaiu, with shadow lace
sleeves and panels, her bridal veil
draped over her pretty hair, and fastened with the conventional orange
blossoms and carrying a large boquet of roses and ferns.
The groom was supported by Mr.
Morgan, or Prince George.
At the close of the ceremony,
which was performed by Rev. James
Hood, ot St. George's Presbyterian
Church, Miss Parfitt, of Victoria,
sang very beatifully. O, Promise Me.
Tho bride was the recipient of
many beautiful presents among which
was noticed a handsome cut-glass aud
sliver fern dish and cut-glass spoon
tray from the residents of Minto.
The newly married couple left
on a motor tour to Portland, Oregon
thence to their home in Prince
George, where the groom Ib a prosperous hardware merchant.
After signing the register the bridal party reformed and proceeded
down the aisle to tiie waiting cars,
where they were well showered with
confetti and rice.
Only the family and intimate
friends sat down to the wedding
breakfast, which was laid at the
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Fred.  Horwood, ot Minto.
The table decorations were pink
and white and were carried out in
streamers from the chandelier to the
corners of the long table, which was
centered by the wedding cake. Pink
and white asters formed the remainder of the decorations.
The mother of the bride wore a
satin gown with hat to match, while
Miss Grace Horwood, sister of thc
bride, wore a charming peacock-blue
satin and silver lace dress.
DESTROYED BY FIRE
The residence ot Mr. A. Brown,
Royston Road, was completely destroyed by fire at 2.30 a.m. this (Friday) morning.
Mr. Brown Ib at a loss as to how
the lire originated. He retired about
10 o'clock Thursday night and was
awakened some hours later to find
his place a mass of flames. He had
barely time to get his clothes and
reach safety. None of his valuables
were saved. We understand that Mr.
Brown only carried a small amount
of insurance.
KIDDIES' DAY
AT ROYSTON WAS
BRILLIANT SUCCESS
Courtenay Lodge No. 60, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks,
or, as many members of the Order
call themselves, the best People on
Earth, certainly earned the right fo
be called that, and a whole lot more
nice things on Wednesday last when
the members of the Order were hosts
to the children of Comox District at
a monster picnic held at Millard's
Beach. If there was a child in the
Valley who did not attend the outing
it certainly was not the fault of the
Brother Bills, for transportation had
been provided. The Children of
Cumberland went direct from the
Coal City; the Kiddies of the Valley
Hub assembled at the corner of Union and Isabel Streets and were picked
up by cars and Motor trucks and
conveyed the two miles to the picnic
grounds. Besides the youngsters
from the two towns there were many
from other points in the district. Arriving at the grounds every Kiddy
waB presented with a number of
tickets entitling each to tree ice
cream, candy, whistle and all the
sweets that go to make an outing a
good one for tbe participants. The
weather was not the best experienced this summer, for it was showery,
but this did not dampen the ardor ot
the young picnickers or of those
who had charge of the programme
of sports that had been arranged.
Alderman Bramley, Sam Arthur and
"Bill" Sutliff, were the biggest kids
on the grounds and under their guidance, the events were pulled off according to schedule. The beach was
also thc scene of much fun, a great
many of the boys and girls taking a
swim in the briny.
Captain Lloyd hnd the boys of the
Sea Scouts bn the beach in uniform
and they acted as a safety squad for
the youngsters who were bathing.
Billy Booth, Len Piket, Bill Ha-
garty and F. W. Tall, assisted by
many other members of the Elks had
their hands full at the refreshment
booth and so fast did the kiddies dispose of ■ the refreshments that the
sufiply of Whistle ran out and a second consignment had to be sent from
Court'tnay.
Five o'clock found everybody preparing for the homeward journey.
As a strictly "Kiddles'. Day" it
wns a novel event, the flrst event of
the kind for the children of the entire district and It Is safe to say that
aB the years roll by, the ranks of
the B. P. O. E. will be swelled by the
boys to whom they were hosts on
Wednesday afternoon.
PROCEEDINGS  AT THE
• * * * * * *********
REGULAR MEETING OF COUNCIL
VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS REPORT PROGRESS. — MRS.
BRADLEY'S CASE COME S UP AGAIN.
Mr. J. Bansfield returned home on
Saturday after spending a week In
Vancouver.
Mr. G. Hunden returned home on
Thursday after spending two weeks
in Vancouver and Victoria.
CUMBERLAND FOOTBALL
CLUB HAVE GOOD PROSPECTS
RETURNS FROM
PLEASANT MOTOR TOUR
G. W. V. A. NOTES
A most enthusistic meeting was held this week in the Lecture
Hall of the Cumberlahd Literary and Athletic Association when
the Cumberland United Football Club met on the occasion of
their annual general meeting.
The balance sheet was adopted as read, and the retiring officers thanked for their efforts during the last football season.
The club finished up with a balance in hand of $99.69, the first
time in a good many years that the club finished a season on the
right side of the ledger.
Mr. Thomas Graham becomes the Hon. President with Mr.
Charles Graham, Hon. Vice-President.
The officers elected were: J. L. Brown, President, Robert
Brown, Vice-President, R. Strachan, Secretary-Treasurer.
The position of manager of the team will be decided at a later
date.
The club are in communication with several new players
and it is confidently expected thnt a championship team will be
created at the north end of the Island.
CUMBERLAND UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB
Balance Sheet for Year Ending 31st July 1923.
Receipts-
Balance from season 1921-22 28.05
Gate receipts    1,132.10
Prize  Drawings,  Masq  1,171.10
T. HEYLAND WINS
STEVENS' SHIELD
Loans    	
.Membership Cards    ...
Insur.  (players coll.)
Miscellaneous    	
150.00
65.00
28.35
61.411
Mayor C. J. Parnham, Fred D.
Pickard, and J. Bennie returned |
from a most pleasant motor tour
spent ln the Btate of Washington
and Oregon, arriving back In Cumberland In the early morning of
Sunday laBt.
The G. W. V. A. Hall, Cumberland,
may be rented for parties, meetings,
whist drives and dances at a very
low figure. Keys may be obtained
from the Secretary, Mr. J. Walton of
Mumford and Walton, who will be
pleased to give any further Information.   Phones 71 or 138.
Disbursements-
Travelling expenses      744.45
Equlpm.   (Boots, Balls, etc) 340.75
Insurances    *   287.40
Laundry       42.00
Printing      170.95
Percent, of gates to League 65.00
Repayment of loans    151.00
Onstandlng accounts from
season   1921-22       393.40
Entrance fees      35.25
Exp. for prize drawing   ami
Masquerade         236.60
! Miscellaneous      63.70
1 Balance on baud   99.69
Brilliant Tennis At The Cumberland Courts in Final For
The Stevens' Shield.
The tennis tournament for the
Stevens' Shield which has been creating so much Interest during the past
few weeks came to an end Thursday
night last when T. Heyland, of Courtenay defeated O. T. Corfleld after the
hardest fought battle of the series,
6—3, 9—7, 9—11, 7—6.
Corfleld was defeated, but he certainly went down with colors flying
as many of the spectators who witnessed the game declared it the finest exhibition of tennis ever played
on the local courts.
At the conclusion of the game, Mr.
J. Spicer, in the absence of Mr. Stevens presented the winner with the
Stevens' Shield, which becomes his
property for one year. "
The next contest brings together
players of the local club only. The
tournament will start on Monday,
August 27th. MIsb Olive Bickle held
the ladies' cup last year, and Dr. R.
P. Christie the gentlemen's trophy.
Both these cups are up again this
year for competition and some roil
good games are anticipated.
COAL OUTPUT
SHOWS INCREASE
The government, through Hon. T.
D. Pattullo, minister of lands, will
shortly place on the market additional acreage In the South Okanagan
reclamation distr'ct. Already nearly all of the lands sold..there, lands
brought under water by the govern-.
ment, are under cultivation and the
magnificent crops reaching market
are a striking testimony to the wis-'
dom of undertaking this project.
•     •     •
Figures just issued by Hon. William Sloan, Minister of Mines, show
that the cool output for July was
26,649 tons greater than for June.
The total output of all coal-mines in
British Columbia last month was
212,000 tons.
The strictest supervision and encouragement are being furnished by
the department. Marketing facilities
are better and working conditions in
the mines have occupied a great deal
of the minister's attention this summer.
.     *     .
Among the many blessings which
a beneficent Providence has showered upon British Columbia, not the
least Important is her wealth of
game animals and birds. No other
part of the civilized world has such
a variety of big game, birds and fur-
bearers. The approaching open season promises to result in the killing,
legitimate and otherwise, of a larger total of game than any former
season and this year the government
has determined to enforce fully the
game regulations which are felt to
he at once liberal and yet strict
enough to ensure conservation.
Attorney-General Manson has sent
Colonel McMullen, chief of provincial police, on a tour ot organization
In connection with enforcement of
game laws, and the minister and
members of the Game Conservation
Hoard, through their statements, are
appealing to the spirit of fair-play
III sportsmen to protect the game of
British Columbia.
Attorney-General Manson has written Premier Mackenzie King asking
fnr information regarding the possibility of the United States providing for the transportation of liquor
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held on Monday at tlle
Council Chambers. Present, His Worship, the Mayor K". J. Parnham)
Aldermen A. Maxwell. T. II. Mumford.
F. Partridge, J. J. Potter, J. Ledlng-
linni and F. Dallos.
Amongst tlle communications dealt
with, was a letter from the Deputy
Provincial Secretary to Mrs. A. E.
Bradley, who had lately removed1
from the City, and who had applied
to the Provincial authorities for relief. The Deputy Provincial Secretary informed Mrs. Bradley that she
could inform the City Authorities thnt
as she had beeiY a resident of the City, the City Is responsible for the
maintenance of herself and children
and the Government will not make
any allowance in her case as it holds
the City must support her.
The facts as brought out show that
Mrs..Bradley has been a resident of
•Ihe City for the last 3 years. Her
husband left his wife and family entirely destitute C months ago. She
was very greatly In arrears with rent,
and found It impossible to obtain a
smaller dwelling ill the City, and as
soon as one could be obtained outside the City, the authorities in consideration of her destitute condition
removed her household belongings
thereto, and paid her rent and maintenance for a month. Apparently the
City are to be compelled to continue
to support her nml her family, although they are residing outside the
City.
The matter was referred to the
City Solicitor for legal advice, as if
the contention of the Deputy Provincial Secretary is tn be upheld, tt will
mean that In future the City will be
under no obligation to afford relief
to persons who arrive here from tlle
Provincial district but can refer
them to the Provincial Authorities
for relief.
Klre Hull
The   tender   of    tlle    Cumberland „
Electric   Lighting   Co.   for   re-wiring
the City Fire hall, was accepted. The
work to he done in accordance with
the   specifications   submitted.
Bills and Accounts to the amount
of $227.21 were found correct and
ordered  paid.
Aid. Potter (Chairman of the Board
of Works) reported that since last
meeting all main sewers had been
flushed and alley ways cleaned up.
A new man-hole had been built at
the junction of the sewer in First
Street.
The premises of James Gibbs had
been connected with the sewer.
Fire Hall
Aid. Partridge reported progress
In the rebuilding of the Fire Hall.
The deferred application from the
Committee of the Anglican Church
for a rebate of a portion ot. the
amount of taxes paid for the Church
hall wos thoroughly discussed. The
Council unanimously regretted boing unable to accede to the request
of the Church Committee.
A special Council meeting will lie
held on the 27tli August to confirm
the appointment of Mr. A. J. Msjrry
as City Clerk, subject to the approval
of the Police Commissioners.
HELD PLEASANT
SOCIAL EVENING
Total     £,632.09 •
Total     2.632.09
A pleaaanl social evening was held
nt the home of Mr. and Mrs. It. Walk
cr, Bevan on Saturday last when
aboul thirty of their friends gathered together on the occasion of their
leaving to take up tlieir residence
in Cumberland. The evening was
spent in music, singing and dancing
and the wo smV hours of tlie morning had crawled around before tlie
from British Columbia points through   g||e|)(s ^ „„,,,. my |mmo
Alaskan territory to Atltn. Unless
American regulations are changed
the supply of liquor In Atlln will lint
carry the government liquor stoic
over the winter, hut Hon. Mr. Manson Is determined to break down the
barrier If that Is consistently possible. .
Action probably will be taken by
counsel for British Columbia, as well
as for other provinces, before the
Supreme Court of Canada regarding
"blue sky" legislation In the near
future.     Recently Ave judges of the' ly.
Saskatchewan appellate court agreed
thnt the Saskatchewan blue sky law,
known   ns   (he   Sale   of   Shares  Act,
wns ultra vires of Ihe province, This,
states Attorney-General Manson, wlm
has given a greut deal of attention
to the matter, makes it appear that
the  province's  hnnds  are  tied.  But
It ls likely, ho holds, that the provinces will nsk permission to Intervene at Ottawa in the hope of having the matter adjusted satisfactorl- TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
IDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
DON'T GET TOO GOOD
Whatever you do, brother, don't
get too good. There Is a piety that
is depressing, and which Immediately breeds suspicion and distrust.
Most every man has his faults and
if our secret acts and thoughts, or
even those things people know aboul
us, but which we think they don't
know about us, were held up to the
public, we would shrink, cut to the
quick, and flee to hide our moral and
spiritual  nakedness.
Some of us get drunk, and that's
hnd; some of us lie like dogs, and
that's worse; some peddle vile talk
and that's worse; and some of us love
money more than we do truth, honor
and goodness, and that's worse;
some ot ub cheat, steal and dodge
our taxes, and that's "worser" still,
though among the elect It Is sometimes considered a virtue. But the
crowning sin of all is a hard unloving heart and a soul without charity
for the frailties of others, which rejoices when others are crucified and
which attempts to hide its secret joy
with sniffling and pious deprecation.
Men dislike such people, and God
despises them.
No, whatever you do, don't get too
good. Heaven is going to be a big
surprise party to most of us.
THINGS TO FORGET
If you woiisjd Increase your happiness and prolong your life, forget
your neighbor's faults. Forget all
the slander you ever heard. Forget
the temptations. Forget the faultfinding, and only remember the good
points which make you fond of them.
Forget all personal quarrels or stories you may have heard by accident,
and which, If repeated, would seem a
thousand times worse than they really are. Blot out, as far as possible,
all the dlsagreeablcness of life. Such
things will come, but will only grow
larger when you remember them. Obliterate everything disagreeable from
yesterday; start out with a clean
sheet tomorrow, and write upon lt
for sweet memory's sake, only those
things which are lovely and loveable.
PLASTERERS IN EASTERN
.STATES RECEIVE HIGH
WAGES—$100 PER WEEK
Writer in Wall Street Journal
Pens Pathetic Picture Of Passing Of Last Plasterer.
According  to  an  Eastern  Report,
plasterers in Chicago, receive (100.00
per week and professors and university men are forsaking their cboseu
professions and taking up the plasterers trowell.
Commenting caustically on the Increasing shortage of skilled bricklayers, plasterers and other expert
artisans in the building trade, which
is becoming an acute problem ln
the eastern States, the Wall Street
Journal draws the following sarcastic pen-picture of the passing of the
laBt plasterer:
"Thero Ib reason to apprehend
that bricklayers will become as uncommon as veterans of the war ot
1812. When one reflects on the princely wages of bricklayers, It ls a lamentable thought that they have to
die, but as with all the world's great,
no way has been found to save them
this unhappy fate. An occasional
veteran of the war of 1812 is recruited by fraud, and an occasional
apprentice is admitted to membership
In the Bricklayers' Union, but In
neither case does the number of recruits begin to equal the mortality
list.
The National Association of Manufacturers says that the number ot
apprentices admitted to the Bricklayers' Union last year was less than
the number of bricklayers taken by
death. At this rate, bricklaying will
soon become a lost art, and our
grandchildren will marvel at our
skill in laying brick as we wonder
at the lost proccses of our remote
ancestors who understood and practised the tempering of copper,
"The passing of the plasterers
gives even greater reason for apprehension and disquietude, because
they are passing even faster thau the
bricklayers. We replenish our
streams with trout and we protect
our song birds from extermination,
but we take no thought to our plasterers. By reason of the limitation
of apprentices, most of our plasterers are aged men and will not be
with us long. The years are not
many when we shnll regard with awe
tho last survivor of the Plasterers'
Union very much as we regarded the
last survisor of the charge of Balaclava.
"With the growing scientific Interest In those matters, it Is not unllksily
that (he professors at our Institutions  of  learning  will   soon   under-
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
VVM.MERRIFIELI),   Proprietor.
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
l'nion Bay Road
A good assortment of colors and patterns from
12 '/2c a roll.
FLOOR COVERINGS—
Linoleums by the yard, Congoletim and Linoleum
squares, Carpet squares and rugs.
WINDOW DRAPERIES—
A full range of Muslins, Scrims and Madras, in
plain and fancy colors, ranging from 25c yard.
Cretonnes in beautiful designs and fast colors.
Lace Curtains in fine net with d»0 QC
crochet Borders. Reg. $2.75. Special pair tffsmt.OO
And other shipment of Wonder Wool, due to arrive
next week.
Special in Ladies Hose—in Black, Brown and
White at 9P|f»
per pair
25c
Ladies Vests, each
New Fall Goods are now arriving.—Call    and
examine the goods and get prices.
A. MacKinnon
Cumberland
take the study of this disappearing
type as they do the small remnant
of some ot the aboriginal tribes.
While there Is yet time we suggest
that there be preserved on the phonograph for future generations the
voice of a plasterer discussing long
hours and slave wages, for the era
ls not remote when all we shall
know of this species must come from
a study ot the fossil remains.
"What antiquarian Interest there
will be ln a fragment of freshly
spread plaster. We can see the last
plasterer, a centenarian on his
deathbed painfully, but skillfully
spreading this fragment—at the rate
permitted under union rules—for
preservation In the Metropolitan Museum of Art, alongside the fragment
of King Tu'ts flagon."
DEAFNESS CAN
BE CURED
DEAFNESS, NOISES IN THE HEAD,
AND NASAL CATARRH.
Tke lew Continental remedy called
"LARMALENE" (Regd.)
Is a staple harmless home-trwilment
which absolutely eons deafness, noises in the head, etc Ne Expensive Appliances Needed for this new Ointment, Instantly operates npon the affected parts with complete aid permanent success. Scores et Wonderful
Cures Reported.
RELIABLE TESTIMONY
Mrs. K. Wilkinson, ol Slad ltoad,
Ntrond, writes:—"Please could I
trouble yon ta send me another box ol
the Ointment; It b not for myself, but
for m friend of mine who Is as bad as
I was, and cannot get any rest for the
noises In tke head. I feel a new woman, and can go to bed now and get a
good night's rest, which I had not
been able to do for many months, lt
Is • wonderfnl remedy snd am most
delighted to recommende It"
Mrs. E. Crowe, of Wbltehorse Road,
Croydon, writes!—"I am pleased to
tell yon that the small tin of ointment
yon sent to me at Ventnor, has proved
a complete success, my hearing Is
now quite normal, and the horrible
head noises hare ceased. The action
of this new remedy must be very remarkable, for I have been troubled
with these complaints for nearly ten
years and have had some of the very best medical advice together with
other expensive ear Instruments all
to no purpose, 1 need hardly say how
very grateful I am, for my life has
undergone an entire change."
Try one box to-day, which can be
forwarded to any address on receipt
of money order for #1.00. There Is
Nothing Bettor at any Price.
Address orders to:—
THE "LABMALENE" CO,
10, South  View, Walling St, Dart-
ford, Kent England.
The Gem
Barber Shop
Opposite llo-llo Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
ALBERT EVANS
Practical Barber, and  Hairdresser, Shampooing, Singeing,
Massaging,   Scalp    Treatment.
NURSING HOME
Courtenay now boasts of a
private institution where maternity casei will be given the very
best attention under the most
homelike and pleasing surroundings-
Call or 'phone for appointments.   Inspection invited.
Mra. A. Attree
Courtenay, 'phone 145.
18 TEARS' EXPERIENCE
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Gleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 48 . Cumberland
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Atk for
Charlie Dalton
Showing  This Week
the Newest Creations
in
FALL MILLINERY
THE NEWEST AMERICAN MODELS IN LADIES', MISSES AND
CHILDREN'S
FALL COATS
AT POPULAR PRICES
TRICOTINE, POREET TWILL   AND   CANTON   CREPE   DRESSES
NEW SILKS— j
KING TUT AND EGYPTIAN CANTON CREPES. ILLUMINATED
RADIUM SILK AND BROCADED METAL CLOTHS.
DOUGLAS FIR DOORS
WANTED IN BELGIUM
Brussels.—Following an inquiry
received from Victoria asking if
there is a possibility of doing business iu this country for good-class
fir doors and submitting prices, the
illustrations and prices were placed
In the hands of a firm in Brussels
doing a large business In these doors
I received from the Slate of Washington on the Pacific const.   It has been
ascertained that tlie Canadian prices
were approximately the same as tlie
I priccB  ot American  doors delivered
to the users in Belgium in   lots   of
twenty.    The firm in quest Ion Interviewed stated that If Canadian doors
I could  compete in price with    those
| trom the United States a considerable
' business   could   be  done.    This  one
concern was selling $10,000 worth of
these doors monthly. Arrangements
were mnde by this firm with n local
contractor to build the frames and
architraves for the doors of suitable
material. The American doors are
made of Oregon pine.
The doors are scientifically dried
nnd are guaranteed not to warp,
bend or open at the Joints, even In
enses of extreme dampness.
Men's "Astoria" and "Slater"
SHOES
We carry a complete line of these famous makes,
the best made in Canada.—A style for every taste and
a shape for every foot. New stock just in and offered
at special prices.
CAVIN, THE SHOE MAN CUTS THE MARGIN—THE   PROFIT—ON   EVERY
PAIR.
Why? Because we hire no help and our expenses are low.   We can afford to sell
for less.
Sec our Wndows—Price our Shoes—They Tell the Story.
Vi to 5    $4.75
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Ladies Vici Kid low heel
Oxfords,
sizes 2 Vi
Ladies' Pat. Leather flat
heel Oxfords    &S\ rjf?
Sizes 2\'-i to G   tfitU.iO
All Tennis at   less   than
wholesale cost.
MEN'S BOOTS
5.50
We believe this is the
greatest value offering in
Cumberland.
Five Dollars and a half
buys a pair.
In Brown or Black, recede round or wide toes.
Men—See these boots in our Window—6 styles
to choose from.
If they don't give good honest wear, we will make
it right.
CAVIN'S SHOE STORE SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
THREE
ffl
CHAM1E t~rlWH>
WjtW
) HERE'S SOME-"
THIN6 THAT'S ,
1 8EEN DROPPED'.
-I ^
'
*-%IB         v
\/fe\\
^^'(^^Sh&
/ tr   ir/ W \r?i
f    / 1   1       «*/
1    llmr*      '*           '
-*tAh*.^,,^t,A^lz_mMiii\^~&
\Mt,tiA>%tt-*"**-:i/
—-,  .    i*»TgT|Q     fflS
JC^ . -
A-
^^     _jrniet!..
i/i mEic - -^ .'^
, OH MR.CHUHP, '
fARE VOU SVJRfe ?
H.Eb'Vs/esrt~'
ELECTRIFY
WE WANT YOUR ELECTRIC WORK
Headquarters For
ELECTRIC WASHERS, RANGES, IRONS,
.    TOASTERS, GRILLS, ETC.
RADIO SETS and SUPPLIES
Specialists in Wiring and Construction
THE
Piket Electric
Phone
164
WIFE SAVING STATION
COURTENAY P.O. Box
B.C. 71
DOROTHY PHILLIPS
*    SCORES IN HER
LATEST PICTURE
"Slander The AVoman" Ranks
Among Best Films Seen Here
In Many Weeks.
One of the most Interesting pictures that has come to town in many
weeks Is being shown nt the Ilo-Ilo
theatre Friday and Saturday. It is-
a First National production, entitled
"Slander the Womon," directed by
Allen Holubar and starring Dorothy
Phillips in a role that    gives    full
scope to her exceptional dramatic
ability. In every way "Slander the
Woman" must be classed among
really big motion pictures that serve
Iheir Ilrst purpose In supplying genuine entertainment of a kind that is
beneficial In character.
Story, acting and settings, all call
for more than passing notice In Director Holubnr's lnteBt production.
As a basis for the continuously diverting action, most of which Is laid
in tlie northeastern section fff Canada, the-producer selected Jeffrey
Deprend's gripping tale of a young
woman whose good name wns sacrificed hy an ambitious judge.
The  elemental  human   appeal    of
IWCT'PII ||Wllllllllll 1*11111111 II11
bin An n ua I
±91!
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
i'Z.Sa'^
nmVWCrllt*
Ihe Beer Withoul a her
and
U.B.C. BEER
Products of
B.C.'s Million Dollar Brewery
Perfectly brewed to maturity,
bottled direct from spotlessly clean
glass enamelled tanks, in sterilized,
light-tight bottles, and delivered to
you in prime condition.
ORDER TODAY AND GET
FREE DELIVERY TO YOUR
HOME
Vancouver Breweries
■'iVI/F'F'slto!
i vv ti sC .c rvi
Cumberland Joins In The
National Demonstration
With Paramount Week the greatest motion
picture season the world has ever seen gets under
way.
Paramount week offers the opportunity for a
grand review of 1923's achievements and a foretaste
of the great Paramount Pictures coming.
Celebrate Paramount Week at your own theatre
as millions have celebrated it during five previous
annual Paramount Wjeks.
"Its Paramount Week al your theatre now I"
. HAVtM-^KVCOsVOssAsTOWa
If K'i ■ Paramount Picture lt'§ tha beat ahaw In town
Monday and Tuesday—Sept. 3'
POLA NEGRI
—in—"
"BELLA DONNA"
Wednesday and Thursday—Sept. 5th
AGNES AYRES
— in —
"THE HEART RAIDER"
Friday and Saturday—Sept. 7th
GLORIA SWANSON
— in —
"MY AMERICAN WIFE"
'■zx.^,1^... . —anaS
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control  Board or  by the  Government  of  British  Columbia.
Is It Worth While
Keeping timber I'm' Bi 0, Industries?
Keeping alive a prosperous payroll?
Keeping fur and feather in B. C?
Keeping timber for manufacture?
Keeping a green forest for posterity?
THEN—
Prevent Forest Fires
IT PAYS
I the character of the girl, suffering
under the mlsjudgment of her
friends, but determined to fight until the wrong Is righted, is brought
out to the full by Miss Phillips, who
strengthens her place as one of the
screen's foremost emotional actresses. Occasionally there are touch's
of natural humor to enliven the
picture, but In the main It depends
upon conflict of character and the
strange pranks played by fate in the
development of the lives of the principal figures In the action.
Although there is no obvious moral to burden the story, it does point
-an inspiring lesson in the pluck of
the girl who refuses to be beaten
even when everything appears to be
against her. And up there in the
wilds of Canada we see that justice
finally operates in tho most unexpected fashion. That is one of the
strong points of the plot. The unexpected Is always happening, and
then-It seems logical. "Slander the
Woman" Is a truly line accomplishment, reflecting credit on the star
director and all the members of the
cast.
SOCIETY'S NEW DIVERSION
You'll See The "Swimming and
Tea Party" Next Week in
"You Can't Fool Your Wife"
Creating a sensation as an entertainment novelty, the "Swimming
and Tea Party" has been Introduced
into society in Paris    and    London,
where It seems to have come to stay.
Following Its appearance among the
Elite of the Old Country, the affairs
have been tried out In New York and
Atlantic City wifjli such success that
they promise to become almost n mania in America.
Lady Astor, whose political and
social activities have made her the
talk of Europe, is said to hnve given
tlie Idea for the swimming and tea
party to a very close friend, who appealed to the noted Englishwoman
fnr something unique in the way of
a social affair.
Descriptions  of  the    party    Itself
were  obtained  by  a   foreign  olllcial
of the Paramount  Picture Corporation, who recognized lu the affair n
marvelous Idea for a motion picture
sequence.
In part, Ills letter follows:
"We were all advised by the invitation that this was to be au unique
I entertainment.    A   letter   which   accompanied the more formal cards instructed men and women    alike    In
wear bathing suits beneath their regular apparel.
"The scene of the party wns the
big  lawn    whicli    surrounds    Lady
j L 's  Manor.    It  wns just  like  a
setting for the usual Japanese tea
! pa'rty, except for the swimming pool
j In the center, where a chute, diving
. board and trapese were hung.
"Light wines   were  served  toward
: the middle of the afternoon. A faint
j hint of what was to come  was tbe
apparel worn by the serving maids,
i (Continued on Page Four)
"SAFETY FIRST"
STAGE LINE
Cumberland--Courtenay
and Nanaimo
Ask for "Bill Hyde"*
Phone 9 Courtenay or 13 Nanaimo
Leaves Cumberland every morning for points
South at 8.20 a.m. returning, arrives 5.40 p.m.
Leave
TIME TABLE
Arrive
8.00  Courtenay  6.00
8.20 Cumberland 5.40
8.35 Royston 5.25
9.00  Union Bay 5.00
9.10 :  C. Johnson's  4.50
9.30 Grant's Camp ,....4.30
9.40  Robert Dollar 4.20
9.45  S. A. Lumber 4.15
10.00 Bowser 4,00
10.25 Dashwood 3.35
10.35  Log Cabin  .....3.25
10.45    Parksville    3.15
11.25  Straits L. C.- 2.35
11.45  Wellington  2.15
12.00  Nanaimo  ....2.00
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
carries passenger Insurance, Connects with all stage
lines and C. P. R. Boats.
SAFETY FIRST STAGE LINE
CUMBERLAND—COURTENAY AND NANAIMO
Car  For Hire
At Reasonable Rates
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason,
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R f'OUlt
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
Safe for Washing Dainty Fabrics-
Economical for All Laundering
<J\b Tabbing
PRINCESS SOAP
S
Made In Canada
Wear and use your daintiest things
—now. Wash them often as need be,
without injuring the fine, sheer fabrics
or dulling the delicate colorings.
Crepes and chiffons, satins and silks,
laces, expensive cottons — they come
from laundering with new beauty.
Because Palmolive Princess Soap
Flakes were perfected to cleanse these
daintiest fabrics without harming
them.
They are the purest of soap, these
curly, snow-white flakes. No harmful
ingredients rot threads or fade colors.
The stiff, creamy suds dissolve dirt
gently.
And because they are all soap, all
pure soap, Palmolive Princess Soap
Flakes actually last longer than ordinary laundry soaps. Ideal for use in
the washing machine. So economical
that thousands of housewives use
them for all household and general
laundering purposes.
Get some today from your dealer. In
handy 1-pound packages, or in bulk.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont. Winnipeg, Man.
lin
ICE CREAM
IF IT'S COMOX JERSEY ICE CREAM—IT'S GOOD    -
MADE FROM PURE JERSEY CREAM—Cane sugar and the highest
grade flavorings possible to procure. You want the Best when entering
refreshment for your Best Girl.
COMOX  CREAMERY BUTTER
— THE   STANDARD   OF   QUALITY —
EiSHSEEMSHaiBEISEEEIBSl^^
Our Strawberry, Raspberry and Loganberry Jam ean be obtained at the
Best Stores
IBHErcyEMHEJSIiMHBKHaM
COMOX   POTATOES   IN   A   CLEAN   BRANDED   SACK
Graded to Quality—"Look for the Tag on the Bag"
SOCIETY'S NEW DIVERSION
Continued from Page Three)
Ji	
who were clad in very pretty bathing suits, and the iced cream, which
was molded in the form of fish.
"Not uptil the latter part of the
afternoon did Lady L  spring hor
sensation, however. As the party
was nearing .the climax, attention
was suddenly attracted toward the
pool, where a figure of a man, with
the flowing robes and beard of Neptune, slowly aroBe to the surface. In
one hand he held a three-pronged
golden spear. The other hand .lie
lifted, then said, slowly and clearly:
'After the drinks, my friends, comes
the chaser—water.' With that, Lady
1.  jumped to her feet,    ripped
her evening dress loose and dropped
lt to the ground, remaining clad in a
very remarkable swimming suits
Others caught the spirit ot the thing
nud soon men and women on all shies
were literally undressing, of course
wearing their bathing suits beneath.
It was at once tho sensation of the
year and tho most novel idea in the
form of a tea party that has ever boen
introduced Into Kngland.
"For (he remainder of tho afternoon the party remained centered
about the pool. Fancy divers, expert
swimmers and novel water sports
made the time pass all too rnpidly
and, as the flme for leaving drew
close, it seemed that all present for
once hated the Idea of going home.
"I thought this would make a wonderful motion picture. That Idea
came to me as I gazed on the men
nnd women loosening their outer
clothes. 'What a wonder of n film
sceno, I sny,' Bomeono called to me.
and'at once I thought of writing to
Amcrlcn with the Iden, so  "
So impressed were the ofllclnls of
the Famous Players-Lnsky with the
thought that Ihey made use of it m
a special big sequence of "You Can't
Fool Your Wife," a George Melford
production for Paramount, which
comes to the Ilo-Ilo theatre on Monday and Tuesday. The featured players, Nlta Naldl, Beatrice Joy, Lewis
Stone and Pauline Garon, were
among those who took part ill the
scene. The final result has been
pronounced one of the most startling,
scenes ever flashed on the screen
and has created as much of a sensation among American theatre-goers
as did the orinigal swimming and
teapnrty which took place in London.
PROVINCIAL POTATO
FAIR TO BE HELD
IN VICTORIA
The Provincial Potato Fair will be
held ln the city of Victoria from November 12th to 17th, Inclusive under
the auspices of the Department, of
Agriculture, working In co-operation
with the Victoria Chamber of Commerce.
Prizes will be given for certified
and uncertified seed potatoes and also commercial stock.
One Important fenture ot tho fair
will be the district Potato Kxhiblt,
since this class proved so popular at
Grand Forks last year. Koch district
must show eight samples of potatoes,
not representing more than two varieties and exhibited by different
growers. The cup which wns presented for this special class by the
Advisory lionrd of Farmers' Institutes Inst year will become the
property of the winners for one year.
Any district coming first in this clnss
three yenrs in succession becomes
the iiermiinciK holder of the cup. In
11122 the cup wns won by the Comox
district.
. We understand the growers of the
district Intend making n desperate
effort to ngain lift the cup.
AFFILIATION FEE
IS NOW DUE
The British Columbia Junior Football Association would remind all
Affiliated Clubs that the Affiliation
Fee of $3.00 tor season 1923-24 Is
now due and should be remitted to
the Secretary, Mr. H. J. Kdwards,
5784 Fraser Street, Vancouver, B. C.
before taking part In any League or
other competition.
Any new Clubs or Associations desiring to affiliate should make application to the Secretary.
Automobile owners are getting so
lazy that they will not even walk lu
their sleep any more. They call a
taxi.
The Lone Wolfe girl who never
has been tardy or absent from school
In twelve years probably will druw
a husband who never gets home on
time for his meals.
t    .    .
A Cumberland  woman    who has
lived on party refreshments all her
life is beginning to look like a lettuce sandwich.
»       ss       ss
/
Man  spends  half his  llfo cussing
the old  fogies nnd the other    half
worrying  about  the  rsllng    generation.
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING  MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Slab Wood
(Double load)
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
 $4.50
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
IJ. SUTHERLAND
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
YICTOBU, B. C.
Tht Lari.it and Moil Up-to-date Dry
OlMBlng aad Dy*tug Ksubllibment
on Vsnswuv.r l.laud. W. Cltan or
Dr* all kind. *' Ladl.i' and Genii'
Weiring Appar.l, Hous.kold Furniih-
lan, .tc. Drop tn and in Mr. Sutherland, our Af .nt In Cumb.rland, who
will advti. you on any work you wtah
to have done.
Onr  Work and  Service
Will Hew* Tea  n   n    -
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
I VICTORIA, B. C.      i      Phone Site
*.mmitm
■9MSH
Cheer Up
Tbls world is full of sunshine
This world la full of cheer,
If we but tried to find It
Throughout each day and year.
WINTER
Is Coming
Why not be prepared by repairing those leaky roofs
and sides of your house and barn with .
Gwilt's Famous Shingles
$2.00 per Thousand
Second Grade
While they last.—Terms strictly cash
Gwilt Lumber Co., Ltd.
PHONE 79L
COURTENAY, B.C.
BUY HERE AND SAVE DOLLARS
"The Superior Grocers
Where  Most  People Trade
Preserving Peaches
LEAVE YOUR ORDERS
NOW
TO ENSURE YOUR SUPPLY
ti
Mumford's Grocery
THE SUPERIOR GROCERY
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
SYNOPSIS OF
L10ACTMN01NTS
.Minimum price of first-class laud
reduced to $5 an acre; second-class
to $2.50 an acre.
Pre-emption now confined to surveyed lands only.
Records will be granted covering
only land suitable for agricultural
purposes and which Is non-timber
land.
Partnership pre-emptions abolished, hut parties of not more than four
may arrange for adjacent pre-emptions with joint residence, but each
making necessary improvements on
respective claims.
Pre-emptors must occupy claims
for five years and make Improvements
to value of (10 per acre, Including
cleurlng and cultivation of at least 6
acres before receiving Crown Grant.
Where pre-emptor In occupation
not less than 3 years, and haa made
proportionate Improvements, he may,
because of Ill-health, or other cause,
be grunted intermediate certificate of
improvement and transfer his claim.
Records without permanent residence may be Issued, provided applicant makes Improvements to extent
of $300 per annum and records same
each year. Failure to make Improvements or record same will operate as
forfeiture. Title cannot be obtained
In less than 5 years, and improvements of $10.00 per acre, including
5 acres cleared and cultivated, and
residence of at least 2 years are required,
Pre-emptor holding Crown. Grant
may record another pre-emptlou, if
he requires land in conjunction with
his farm, without actual occupation,
provided statutory Improvements
made aud residence maintained on
Crown granted land.
Unsurveyed areas, not exceeding
20 acres, may be leased as bomesltes,
title to be obtained after fulfilling residential and Improvement conditions.
For grazing and Industrial purposes
areas exceeding 640 acres may be
leased by one person or company.
Mill, factory or industrial Bites on
timber land not exceeding 40 acres
may be purchased; conditions Include
payment of stumpage.
Natural hay meadows Inaccessible
by existing roads may be purchased
conditional upon construction of a
road to them. Rebate of one-half of
cost of roa'd, not exceeding halt of
purohase price, Is mad..
I're-Kmptors' Free Grants Aet
The scope of this Act Is enlarged to
Include all persons joining and serving with His Majesty's Forces. The
time within which the heirs or devisees of a deceased pre-emptor may apply for title under the Act ll extended from for one year from the death
of such person, as formerly, until on.
year after the conclusion, of tbe great
war. This privilege Is also made re-
trocatlve.
No fees relating to pre-emptions
are die or payable by soldiers ou preemptions recorded after June 26,
1918. Taxes are remitted for five
years.
Provision for return of moneys accrued, due und been paid since August 4, 1914, on account of payments,
fees nr taxes on soldiers' pre-emptions.
Interest on agreements to purchase
town or city lots held by members of
Allied Forces, or dependent!, acquired
direct or Indirect, remitted from enlistment to March 31, 1920.
Siili.PuriluiBers of Crown Lands
Provision made for Issuance of
Crown grants to sub-purchasers ot
Crown Lands, acquiring righta from
purchasers who failed to complete
purchase, involving forfeiture, on fulfillment of conditions of purchase Interest and taxes. Where mb-pur-
chaneri do not claim wholo of orlg-
Inal parcel, purchaae price due and
taxes may lie distributed proportio-
nately over whole area. Applications
must be made by May 1, i»20.
(iraxlng
Grazing Act, 1919, for systematic
development of livestock Industry
provides for grazing districts and
range administration under Commissioner. Annual grazing permits Issued based on numbers ranged; priority for established owners Stock-
owners may form Associations foi
range management. Free, or partially ree, permits for settlers, camper,
or travellers, up to ten head       *"* SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Ilo-Ilo Theatre
CUMBERLAND
Friday and Saturday, Aug. 24th and 25th
Dorotte
WWW-
Adapted t'rohi "The White Frontier" by Jeffry Deprend
EXTRA ATTRACTIONS
"THE CITY CHAP"
Al. St. John Comedy—and
"RAILROADING"—a novelty reel ,
Matinee Saturday 2.30 p.m. !
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
NO, SIR!—It Simply Can't Be Done!
Here's a whizzbang of a picture. With a story clipped from the Pages of Life—amazingly human, vigorously truthful—and, above all, abundantly entertaining.   One o fthe really big pictures of the year.
Incidentally, it takes you behind the scenes at
reckless society revels that will dazzle and shock you
with their sumptuousness and daring.
Produced lavishly by the man who made 'The
Sheik." With one o fthe greatest casts ever assembled.
A Mighty Drama of the
Canadian Northwest
A Drama of Storm-
Swept Hearts and Snow-
Swept Places!
Robbed of her good
name! Beating back
against the pointed fingers of scorn! A beautiful girl, innocent—but
slandered — faces the
problem that is woman's
burden! A tempestuous
' draina of great emotions and great human
problems, staged against
the grim background of
courts of law and the
picturesque sweep of
the far North country
—a tale of woman's love
and woman's vengeance
—and the unexpected!
five/7 V
The Great Western Stampede
mh Liiai eutt*n,fi/yr.y
G€ORG€ M$tfW\lO
* «. o  o u t//<%*"*
%YOU CANT
FOOL YOUR
rWIFEL
LeATraice joy
NITA  NALDI
LeWIS STONE s«i
'-PAULINe CARON-
We Give the Best-
Electrical Installations
There is no doubt about it.   We are here to prove it.
On the 19th of May 1921 we received from the Provincial
Inspector of Electrical Energy a set of Rules and Regulations
governing the Installation of Electrical Wiring were immediately adopted and have been lived up to in every smallest detail.
We carry the largest and most complete stock of any
Company or Arm ot its size in B. C. and so can take Immediate
care of your Job without subjecting you to any annoying delay
waiting for special material, etc.
We gladly invite inspection b ythe highest Electrical
Authorities ot any installation we have made since the Provincial Regulations were inaugurated and our most convincing
argument as to why we should do your wiring is the fact that
of the jobs we have had Inspected ALL have been pronounced
perfect. And then we have'the knowledge of Electricity acquired through many years of experience an dthis should
surely count for something with you when you are selecting an
Electrical Contractor.     ■■""
A man may know how to drive a nail precisely, but he Is
a dangerous man unless he knows the effect of the driving
upon the material into which the nail enters and so It is In the
Electrical Contracting business, It Is not only, necessary to
understand the practical installation of wires, switches, fittings, etc., but It Is doubly necessary to be able to make the
calculations that will ensure maximum safety, economy of
operation, and the proper functioning of the Electrical Energy
fnr which the wires, switches, etc., are meryly paths.
If ynu want High Class Electrical Installations, go to the
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Courtenay
Auto Painters
Bring your cars ln tor an estimate.
Prices reasonable. Work guaranteed.
Workshop at the Condensary.
C. G. WILSON
Uncktng »teeri and unbroken horwi featured tha HtaapUa.    lop  rlgbt,  Mar*'   *tM»  inter routes a  bravo.
SECOND-HAND
FURNITURE
Comox Exchange
Caurtenay, B.C.
-   S. DAVIS
UP-TO-DATE SHOE REPAIRING
.Special prices on White Shoes
During the Season
PROMPT SERVICE
—AT—
THE FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Dunsmuir Avenue
For Results Advertise in The Islander
The EYE
EXCLUSIVELY
Refraction and Muscular
R. KAPLANSKY, 0. D.
Graduate Aptometrist and Optician.   Reg. by Examination for B. C.
1st and Srd Monday and Tuesday
Cumberland Hotel Parlors
Hours: 1.30 to 5.80—7 to 9p.m.
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    .    Cleaning    .    Repairs
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUNBEHMMD, «. C.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Ollice aad  Residence:   Willard
Block.   •   'Phone 116.
PLATTERING  horses of  the  cow-boys,  nodding
head-dresses of tbe Indians with their stolid
iquawi and families, cow outfits, real old-time chuck
wagons and other figures of the last great west, led
the modern motor about the streets of Calgary, during the great stampede. Cow-boys and cow-girls,
decked in ail the bright colors which their predecessors wore in the early eighties—these were the prominent notes in the great symphony of color.
Calgary took on the appearance of frontier days
with hitching posts along the main streets and the
old cow-town ponies stood in front of the sky'
scrapers of the modern city.   .
In the great parade in which several thousand
participated, Mayor George Webster struck the key'
note in his wonderful leather chapps, blue silk shirt,
pink handkerchief and huge Stetson hat -The stimulating contrast of the new and the old was evident
in the roar of the big airplanes overhead while the
pioneers' and old-timers section of the parade, venerable Red-river carts, original Hudson s Bay vehicles, squeaked their way over the pavement that
covers the virgin sod they travelled many years ago.
They were driven by the men of I860, 1870 and
1880 and drawn, in many instances, by venerable
nags that looked as if they, too, had survived the
days of the rutted prairie trails to walk through
city that was but a dream when their work began.
There was tbe real old-time prairie schooner, complete with trailer. The stove in the ancient wagon
was going  full blast and all the housekeeping re-
Suirements were there. On the trailer were a load of
ucks and geese, some spare firewood and tied behind, walked a white goat and a cow. The Sarcee,
Blackfeet and Stoney Indians, resplendent in all
their feathers and war-paint, beaded garments and
ermine tails, were everywhere in evidence.   Clerks
in gaudy-colored shirts, telephone operators as cow*
girls, cow-boy sports, cow-boy yells, bucking horses,
made a week, famous, in the annals of sport in the
world.
Back about 1905, Alberta cow-boys visiting Calgary, gave up the practice of hitching their ponies on
Eighth avenue but during stampede week, the chuck
wagons were parked In front of modern retail buildings, horses were tied in front of dignified banks-*'
the cow-boy literally "pitched camp on the main
drag.". To add to the great wild west picture was to
see "Tony," a black pony ridden by a typical westerner, make his wny through a cufe or to see Mrs.
Duck Thief making her way up Eighth avenue, just
previous to winning the first prize for travois turnout. The tepee poles crossed over her horse, dragging
behind and the family followed, quite comfortable
except for the car track crossings.
The buffalo barbecue was a new Interest to the
present generation, even if old-timers were quite at
home In enjoying their buffalo sandwiches. Five
buffalo were obtained from the Wainwright herd
and the committee served over twelve thousand sandwiches.
Of all the stalling pictures of the old, wild west,
that have ever been presented to the world, the
great Calgary stampede will live forever in tho
minds of those whose Imagination grasps In significance of the passing of the last great west. And
it Is thus passing in pictures that are a dazzling succession of brilliant colors..
The new Banff-Windermere motor highway, forming as it does a link in a 6,000 mile chain of good
roads, was used by hundreds of visitors who motored
from the western States aad from British Columbia,
and who afterwards toured the Canadian Pacific
Rockies. From every viewpoint the great Stampede
wai aa unprecedented success.
THE COAL SITUATION
There will be warm commendation
ot the action taken by the U, S. Government with tho oiiji'i i ot* eliminating the menace of a soal strike. Tlie
call to operators and minora to meet
the Coal Commission  In  conference
is a friendly move, holding no ostensible concealment of motive or intent. When two parlies to a presumptive quarrel arc brought face
to face In the presence of a third party whose Bole object Is to establish
friendship mul a good understanding
between   thcni, It   would  be   nothing
Why Send to Vancouver
for Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
nt the Lowest Cash Prices.
Trade Willi ns and We Will Save You Money
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone fifi—We Deliver.
J. EMILY
AUTO HIRE
Leave Poat office Daily except Sunday for Comox
Lake at 12.15 and 5.15 p.m.
Available for hire between 1 p.m. and 4 o'clock,
also after 5 p.m.—Phone 56 Cumberland.
short of tfinlicious to suggest any but
honest designs, 'flic actual issue is
ii big ono, but bigger bones of contention have been removed with n minimum of friction In the past,
It should lie distinctly understood,
however. Hint tlio U. S. (Inveiiimciit
is now committed definitely u> action
of some sort In tlle regretnhle but
mil Impossible eventuality of a failure on the purl nf tlie operators uml
minors to urece. What lino such nr-
lion will follow, uml of whin miliiie
II  will lie. Is unknown.    All opinion.
Indeed, Ih purely speculative, though
there is sound presumptive ground
tor the belief nun President Coolldgu
is unlikely in rely upon official gtiu-
rani i of protection for tlie opera-
Inrs ns calculated to ensure tho country nn adequate supply of coal for
Hie winter It* u strike should develop. At tlie snme lime, it is Impossible nol tn realize the powerful effect nf uii alternative nf coercive
nieusiiie upon both parties to the dls-
agreemont.
No hiirin enn come of n full-dress
debate on grievances, existing and
Imaginary, It will serve to clear tho
atmosphere, ami it will define the
real Issues sharply. That Ib always
n good thing when tlle public welfare Is Inlimnlcly concerned, And In
this particular Instntiee over n hundred million people will be watching
the deliberations nf miners, operators,
nnd commissioners wit ban interest
Inlo which the personal clement enters to nn unusual degree. There must
lie sonic psychological value lo such
a weight of public opinion. Neither
side can afford to disregard It.—
i Montreal  Dally Star, Aug.  14. SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   AUGUST   26th,   192S
THE FARM FLOCK
Go To The
Royston Motor Co.
For
REPAIRING,     OVERHAULING,     ACCESSORIES
GOODYEAR   TIRES,    GASOLINE   AND   OIL
A.J.EDWARDS       ....        Royston
Phone 134M Courtenay Exchange
DR. R. B. DIER AND DR.
WM. A. NEEN
Dental Surgeons
Off ce:   Cor.  of Dunsmuir Ave.
Opposite  Ilo-Ilo  Theatre
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
EftSTI IREIJ LAKES
Enjoy the
combined pleasures
or a
Rail and Water
Trip
TBAVBL OR 1MB
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
From Vancouver 0:50 p.m.
and
j    NOttinfcM navigation its ambus (ran port aim huh
BUMMER TOURIST FARES
tm.lttt. tkU Hositl.g
E, W. HlcklP. Agent   ('. K. Kurlo, D.P.A.
Cumberland victoria
A TELEPHONE PERSONALITY
In your face to face contacts with people, your
appearance, your bearing and many other things help
you to make the right impression. But in your telephone contacts, there is only one thing by which you
can be judged—your speech.
Do you cultivate an effective telephone personality ? Your voice is you. In the intimate contact which
the telephone gives, let your voice express all those
qualities which will induce favorable action on the
part of the listener.   It is worth while.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
aa
UNION   HOTEL
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Comfort and  Homelike  service.
26  rooms,  electrically  heated.
Excellent cuisine—
For reservations Phone IB.
R. VATE8, Manager.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Synons   • -    Proprietor
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Ceal, Wood and Goode ot An/ Kind
Delivered to All Parte ot District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE Bt%    TELEPHONE
er Leave Orden at Vendome HeteL
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
(By Thos. P. MacKenzie)
Grazing Commissioner
Tho number ot Inquiries being received by the Department Is Indicative ot a renewed interest In the small
farm flock by the ranchers of British Columbia. In order, therefore,
that those already carrying a few
sheep on the farm and that those
who are contemplating the venture
into the business may be enabled to
raiso the thrifty and profitable flock,
lt Is essential they keep in mind
certain facts. Like any other business on the farm, care and attention is required to a certain extent it
loss and discouragement are to he
avoided. These progressive days are
requiring that the farmer, as well as
others, be progressive in business
methods, so it is developing that the
farmers, in studying the possibilities
of their farms, are discovering that
they hnve room for a flock of Bhecp.
Those starting in the business, as
well as those engaged In It, should
contemplate it from the \ lew-point
of staying with the sheep year in
and year out. A very high percentage of losses In connection with farm
flocks that we hear about are not Incurred by the man who constantly
carries a flock on the farm and gives
it reasonable attention, but by the
man who rushes into the business
without giving it serious consideration and who buys in when sheep
are high and sells out as soon as
prices begin to drop a little. Those
men who have stayed with sheep do
so because they are careful and their
flocks are profitable.
She of Flock
One of the first things to consider
when a man has determined that his
farm is suited to sheep is the size
of tbe flock. It Is wisdom to make
the start on a small scale, or with
nbout twenty ewes and a good ram,
and gradually increase the flock as
experience and confidence are gained
The ultimate size of the flock will
depend on whether the farmer intends to make the sheep business the
main source ot Income or merely as
secondary to the main farming operation, which may be dairying. On all
farms there ls a place for the profitable small flock without It displacing
other operations, and as experience
is gained and returns compared Ihe
fanner will be able to decide If he ls
warranted in giving the flock a primary place on the farm.
Sufficient Attention Not Usually
Given
Sheep have always been recognized
as very profitable consumers of the
low-grade and the otherwise waste
Enduring  Values
'THE trade-in price of a 1921
Ford is equal to the trade-
in price of other 1921 cars
which cost 30 to 50% more
than the Ford when new.
This is proof of the Ford
quality and the guarantee
that the purchase of a Ford
is an investment as dis-
tinquished from an expenditure.
Corfield Motors Ltd.
Courtenay, B.C.
ills
tOK> MOTOR COMPANY Of CANADA LIMITED, FORD, ONTARIO
New Strength and Vigor
In Every Drop of
Rainier
Pale Beer
Made From Good British Columbia Hops, Grown at
Agassiz and from Canadian-grown Grain
Brewed in Kamloops under direction of experts. Owned
and operated by Canadians
This advertisement is not published or displayed by
the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of B.C.
products of the farm that It Is difficult or Impossible to have utilized
by other stock; consequently their
value as weed-destroyers and waste-
converters ls Invaluable. One reason
why eo many flocks have not shown
a profit ls that the owners have been
too apt to consider them as mere
scavengers on the ranch and have allowed them to look after themselves.
It was easy to do this because the
sheep ls bo self-dependent and can
rustle Its sustenance much better
than other animals. This quality of
self-dependence mukes the sheep a
very profitable animal when but a
fraction of the attention demanded
by other farm animals is given ll.
They are just as much entitled to the
little attention and careful management they demand, and when given
their proper place on thc farm will
be a source of sattsfactlory and regular profit.
WHO'S TO GROW THE
NEXT NEWSPRINT CROP
By John W. Dafoe, Managing Editor,
Manitoba  Free   Press,   and   Director, Canadian Forestry
Association
The question "Who's to grow the
next newsprint crop?" is not as idly
speculative as It sounds. More than
thirty nillllis)ii newspapers are run
off the presses of thc United States
and Canada every week day. Their
raw material is really a flattened-
out log of spruce and balsam. We
forget sometimes that newsprint is
not a synthetic product. Ninety per
cent ot every ton Is fibre from wooden logs and logs are the harvest of
a forest tract.
It the rapid destruction of our forests by human-caused fires proceeds
at the present pace of four thousand conflagrations n year, It takes
no prophet to foresee a newspaper
Industry driven into a corner by
scarce and costly newsprint, with no
hope of relief until new forests have
been allowed to grow.
I think the time has arrived when
the problem of forest conservation
must be taken aboard b ythe newspaper publisher of Canada. Pulpwood
Is growing alarmingly scarce and
prices will be liicreaslngfy guaged by
the factors of forest supply and accessibility. We have left forest conservation to the mercies of lumbermen and politically-minded governments, heedless of the fact that the
lumberman operates for a living and
it Is doubtful If he has any more moral or patriotic responsibility for
the state of the forests then a publisher. On the other hand the governments formulate forest policies as
public opinion drives, and public
opinion, to a greater or less degree,
takes Its mould from newspaper Information.
The newspaper publishers ot Canada today are, If they choose to be,
the principal actors in the new campaign to stop forest vandalism and
place the timber resources on a basis
ot permanent production.
Something
Good to Eat
Something made of good
flour, of good milk, of good,
nourishing compressed yeast, of
good shortening!
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a line, natural
flavor, with a satisfying slice,
with a crisp crust. ,
What could it be but Bread—
the perfect food.
Bread is your Best Food-
Eat more of it.
MANN'S   BREAD
is Bread at its Best—insnst on
NEW HOME BAKERY
JOHN MANN, Proprietor SATURDAY,   AUGUST   25th,   1923
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
J*
SEVEN*
1
Durant & Star Car Depot
The following Models are now ready for delivery:
STAR TOURING 5 PASSENGER       <POa5*UU
STAR ROADSTER    *p7«75.UU
STAR 10 CWT. EXPRESS DELIVERY     *bo75.UU
(Equipped with Cord Tires $25.00 extra)
DURANT SPECIAL TOURING, 5 Passenger       JplOlO
All the above models are fully equipped, fi Hed with oil and gas, serviced and tuned up
by us and ready to drive away.
The prices quoted are for delivery at any point north of Parksville
WE   INVITE YOU TO CALL AT OUR GARAGE AND LOOK AROUND
We aim to give courteous, prompt and efficient service at a reasonable price, and all
work done by us is guaranteed.
ESTIMATES   FREE
MEREDITH BROTHERS
Phone 182
Opposite Liquor Store, Courtenay
P. 0. Box 121
News Of Courtenay and Surrounding District
HERD OF ELK SEEN
A lew days ago in the vicinity of
I Camp Three, o fthe Comox Logging
& Railway Company there was seen
a small herd ot five elks. There were
two old bulls, a young hull and two
females. Hunters who have watched
I the habits o fthese animals say that
It is customary ror them to make an
annual trek from the direction of
the headwaters of the Oyster River,
coming down to the vicinity of Nor-
dy's Lake, or swamp, aB It ls sometimes called. The animals are rightly protected for in the past they
have disappeared very fast. Only two
years ago a set of horns was found
GORDON'S
GROCERY SPECIALS
7 lb. boxes, asstd. Honey Dew Bisc. reg. 1.75 for $1.35
Pure Dutch Cocoa, res. 2 lb. for 35c, 2 lbs. for 25
Burn's pure Lard, 5 lb. for     .95
Purity Flour, 4!) lb. sack, per sack  1.95
4 lb cans Pure Strawberry Jam  85
Swills Washing Powder, large pkts. each  30
SHOE SPECIALS—
Children Canvas Oxfords, ACkn
per pair      rK/C
Boys' Black Canvas Shoes QQ/»
per pair      wOt
Men's English K Shoes (3»i A AA
per pair     «pA"»""
Men's Stetson Shoes d»/» ("A
per pair         «pOetlU
Men's Heavy Pit Shoes <J»Q AA
per pair     vO.t/U
DRY GOODS SPECIAL—
New Gingham, good selection 40       d»-|   AA
inches wide, 3 yards for      tJJ A »UU
English Broad Cloth, 40 inches (\f\n
wide, per yard   UsDC
GORDON'S
WE SELL FOR LESS
Phone 133
Cumberland
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND ■ - B. C.
McLeod's Store
Be WESTERN!
STETSON HATS
New Styles in
Blue — Black — Iron-Grey — Brown
These Hats are selling very fast.   Come in early and
get a good choice
J.' McLEOD
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Courtenay, B.C.
Before Buying Your
Building Material
Phone, or write us for quoMions
OUR SERVICE TO YOU
We will gladly assist you in planning any building you have in mind, also tell you the amount of Material you will require for the job.
Express Delivery Anywhere
Prompt Attention to All Orders
EDWARDS & ORR
Phone 17
COURTENAY, B. C.
P. O. Box 62
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
m
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
»     ■■■■
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B. C.
AUGUST CLEAN-UP
SALE
New FALL CLOTHING--Afcn SHOES
MOTHERS AND DADS!—NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY YOUR SHOES AND CLOTHING FO RTHE BOYS AND GIRLS FOR FALL SCHOOL DAYS AND CHILLY NIGHTS
WILL SOON BE HERE.
We have still the cut prices in our Shoe Stock, as We must reduce certain lines. But
we are adding new lines   of   Boys   Shoes. Something to stand the wet weather.
LOOK AT THE PRICES—Boys School Shoes, Made-for Hard Wear.—Every pair guaranteed to give long service and the price is right. Priced at
$2.95, $3.50, $3.95, 50c, $1.00
per pair below regular prices.
Girls Strong School Shoes, 11 to 2's in Calf and Dongola. High laced, what you need
for wet weather.—On sale for   $3.50 and $3.95
50 pairs Brown and Black, High Cut Laced Shoes for Women and growing girls, 3 to
7's on sale at half price  $3.95
Boys Fine Dress Shoe in Brown Calf. Regular value $5.50, on sale at $3.95. Sizes 1 to 5.
15 pairs, Mens Miners Nailed Shoes, regular $5.50. Saturday only $3.95
Men'sHigh Cut Shoes in Brown and Black (firj f?£\
For Hunting and Wet Weather.—Per pair         «p f .0\J
Men's White. Hipress Rubber Boots, 5 eyelet Get our price.
CLOTHING DEPARTMENT—
50 Boys' Suits on sale, marked down at our July prices in Navy. All wool Serge,
Brown Tweed and Mixed Tweed       &A   f?(\      (j*H ffA      flJIA t*(\
effects.—Priced at per suit tp4.t)U,    tp I .911,    tplU.OU
50 pairs Boys' Bloomer pants in Navy Serge, Brown, Grey and Mixed Tweed Effects.
Regular value $3.50—On sale per pair     $2.50
- Striped Cottonade and Striped Tweed Blooimer Pants on sale at Half Price.
Boys' and Men's Caps, at nearly half regular prices at this sale.
Boys' Dress Shirts at   $1.50 and $1.75
IMMENSE REDUCTION IN MEN'S SUITS
50 Suits thrown into this sale. Regular prices $27.50 to $35.00. Navy Serge. Nice
shades of brown and Tweeds. Men's and (I»i D f?(\ (POI PA (POH PA
Young men's style, the latest fall models «£!0.DU,  tp&L.OlJf  v)£e I **J\3
Men's Fine and Heavy Sox, on sale.   P cr pair  25c
Men's White Hemstitched Handkerchiefs 2 for     25c
Men's Red and Blue ditto, large size, 5 for $1.00
Men's Knitted Ties in all late shades, and Striped and fancy effects, on sale 50 and 75c
Men's Dress Shirts, regular value, $2.25 on sale for     $1.50
Men's Blue Gingham Work Shirts, on sale for     $1.25
HOSIERY DEPARTMENT—
We are cleaning up the balance of our Cotton Hosiery in Black, Brown and White,
in Ladies' and Misses and Children's at prices that it will pay you to make your purchases in these lines here. They are all on display at this sale and priced as low at
15 cents a pair.
Ladies all Wool Pullover Sweaters.—The latest fall styles in the Newes't Shade in this
sale, cut from $4.75, to $3.75 and from $3.75 to $2.75.
Ladies' Summer Vests on sale at  35c, 50c and 75c
Men's Black Overalls, only a few pairs left. On sale Saturday for   $1.50
Men's Grey Underwear, regular $2.00.   On sale Saturday and Monday at $1.50
Buy while the prices are like this.
Men's BALBRIGGAN Underwear, on sale at    TKn
per garment ,       I DC
The CASH CLOTHING & SHOE STORE
Frank Partridge
CUMBERLAND (Opposite The Post Office)
in the wods, ono of these nomadic
animals having undoubtedly fallen
prey to a poacher.
OLD TIME RESIDENT
LAID TO HER REST
The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Fletcher was held yesterday
afternoon from the family residence,
Union Bay Road, and was attended
by a large concourse of sorrowing
friends who had known the late Mrs.
Fletcher for many years. The deceased lady came to Comox forty
two years ago when only four years
of age, being a niece of Mr. Alexander Urquhart, with whose mother
she came to Comox Valley. She was
the daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Alexander McDonald, of Inverness, Scotland, both parents still residing
there. Her husband the late Mr. Daniel Fletcher, who died about twelve
years ago, was In the employ of the
Cheuiis)lnus Lumber Company. Besides her four children Donald, Norman, Marjorie and Dorothy the late
Mra. Fletcher leaves six brothers,
Farquhar McDonald at Guelph, Ontario; John McDonald In Oregon; Daniel McDonald In California; Alexander and William McDonald at home
In Scotland; and Harold McDonald
of Portland, Oregon. Two sisters,
Mrs. Donald McKenzie of South America nnd Mrs. Wiggins, of Trent,
England.
The funeral service was conducted
by the Rev. Thomas Menzies, M.P.P.
and the pallbearers were Messrs.
John McKenzie, Sr., William K.
Swan, William J. and Robert McQuillan, J. N. McLeod and William Dun-
n.
There was a large number of beautiful floral tributes that testified to
the esteem In which the late Mrs.
Fletcher was held, and the sympathy
of the entire community Is extended
to the bereaved family.
Miss Catheart and Miss Wilson, of
Victoria, have been motoring In the
district visiting friends. Miss Catheart was teacher at the Comox
public school, twenty-five years ago.
Oreat progress ts being made on
the new bridge hy the construction
company, the heavy crane belling the
clear thing for lifting the heavy
steel Into position. Much satisfaction is being expressed ou the advancement of the work.
Mr. Maurice Pigolt has gone to tlie
prairies for the harvest season.
Mr. Mike alazebrook, brother of
Mrs. F. C. Brock Is visiting his sister in Courtenay. He is on the staff
or the Canadian Bank of Commerce
at Mexico City. Mike has not forgotten how to piny liaseball and Is
third baseman for his team at the
southern city. He also plays golf,
tennis and does some bowling.
FINED $200.00 AND COSTS
On Thursday night in the Provincial Police Court, Magistrate Hames
sentenced Jack Holt, storekeeper ot
Bowser, to pay a Hue of two hundred dollars, nr in default to serve
four months as a guest of the government at Okalla. Jack was prosecuted by Constables Russell, Matthews and P. P. Harrison, of Cumberland was attorney for the Province while Mr. Frank Morton, of Vancouver, appeared on behalf of the
accused.
Mr. William Rickson left ror his
home In Vancouver on Monday morning after spending a week ramping
nt Little River. Mrs. Rickson and family will remain for several days,
returning to Vancouver liefore tho
beginning of the nexl school term.
Mr. J. W. Coburn, President of 'he
Associated Boards of Trade nf Vancouver lslnnd visited Courtenay un
Monday, returning tn Xanainio on
Tuesday.
Chlcr or Police Attree wns a visitor to Vancouver nt tlio beginning ot
the week.
The BrncUninn-Ker Milling & Grain
Company's Courtenay agency havo
shifted headquarters rrom the warehouse they have occupied ror the
past five years to (he McPhee Block
nt the corner or Union and Mill
SI reels.
PLEADED GUILTY
It. Adams, who was to have come
up before Judge Darker today on n
charge of breaking, entering and
stealing from Miss Gwllt 1ms pleaded guilty to the charge laid, EIGHT
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY,   AUGUST   26th,   1923
NEW
MATERIALS
Our Fall range of new Coats
are gradually being added to,
and include some real smart
Coats for Ladies.'
New Fall Millinery has just
ccAnmenced to arrive and so.ni
we expect to have a very coin-
line of Smart Up-to-Ddae Hats
at reasonable prices.
CORSEia
A new shipment of D. & A.
Ladies Corsets have just arrived and include many of their
good lines as well as the more
popular ones d»1   CA
from tPl.tll/
1609 per pair
D. & A. Brassiesies with Elastic
band ,the smartest and most
comfortable for the '7'lsf*
pprice—each (Wv
NOVELTIES
New Ivory Necklaces in several very       (j»1   'Jf'
pretty colorings—each           tpJ-.ltl
Shell Beads in strings, comprising d»p Hf?
the best shades—each      tyhi.tO
Beads in a great range of colors TJ\W\0    flJO QK
and qualities at prices from I ti-Lto tpO.Ult
New Lace Collars in a good range of d»1   CA
Values from—each     «pA.tlv
New Front Lace by the yard in Q^f*
Oriental designs, per front   UUKe
New Oriental Collar material in several shades so
popular at present.
Our Fall range of new Coats are gradually
French Velvet in Black only, 36 inches wide, very line
perVard        tpD.OU
New Homespuns for Fall wear, 54 inches    fl»i   EA
wide at per yard      «pA.ilV
DRVOOODS
OENTS FURWSHINM
Big Reductions
in USED CARS
CHEVROLET BABY GRAND.—This car is in splendid condition; new top, good tires, and motor
runs like new. Regular price $650.00.—Special    ■• $575.00
FORD LATE TOURING MODEL—Complete with
self-starter; good tires, good top and mechanically perfect. Regular price $425.00.—Special $395.00
FORD 1918 MODEL IN RUNNING   ORDER.—This
car has been licensed for 1923 and is ready for
the road. Regular price $150. Special $100.00
OVERLAND MODEL 83—Complete with self-starter,
demountable rims; tires are in fair condition.
This car would make a very serviceable truck,
and is a snap at the price. Regular price $1.50.00
Special      $100.00
CHEVROLET 490.—This is a chance to get some
cheap parts.   Reg. price $135. Special .... $95.00
STUDEBAKER OLD MODEL—Regular price $95.00
Special      $50.00
FORD LIGHT DELIVERY—Here is chance for you
to do a little work and have a good car. Regular
price $95.00.—Special   $75.00
FORD TOURING—Complete with self-starter, good
tires, new battery, new radiator. This car is in
first-class running condition and is a real snap.
Regular price .$375.00.—Special  $325.00
Our fiscal year ends this month. If you need a car,
take advantage before the end of the month and save
from $50.00 to $75.00 a car.
Easy Terms Given
Corfield Motors, Ltd.
FORD DEALERS
Phone 40
Courtenay, B. C.
Local Briefs
Mr. It. Kaplansky, of Nanaimo,
paid a business visit to this city during the week, registering at the
Cumberland Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Halliday and family left on Saturday morning en
route for Scotland where they will
reside ln future. Mr. Haliday has
disposed of his business to Mr. John
Mann of Vancouver.
The many friends of Mrs. Harry
Bryan will be sorry to hear that she
has heen removed to the Cumberland
General Hospital, suffering from a
severe cold and nervous breakdown.
CITY   OF   CUMBERLAND
CLUB LICENCE BY-LAW NO.
60.
A By-Law for the regulation of
Clubs Within the City
NOTICE is hereby given that the
above by-law will come Into force
and take effect on and after the 1st
day of October 1923.
Persons Interested may examine a
copy of the said By-Law at the
Council Chambers at any time during office hours.
':)
ALBERT  J.   MERRY,
City Clerk.
Bicycle Snaps
26" Gents Bicycle   I1&00
20" Boys Bicycle, good shape .... SIMMI
22" Boys Bicycle, 1st class shape S&00
22" Boys bicycle, new tires and
tubes    VIM
22" Boys motor bicycle model, Al
shape   824)0
24" Boys bicycle 1st class condition     UM
22" Boys bicycle Al shape .... UM
GUN REPAIRING
I reborn, restock, repair Guns and
Rifles
Any kind—Any make
E. T. Ellison
GUNMAKER
COURTENAY, B. C.
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers .and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
Elliott Totty
M.R.A.I.C., B.A.
ARCHITECT
MW B.C. Permanent Lean Bldg,
PHONE Wi     VICTORIA, B.l.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Mordy and family
returned trom a two weeks motor
tour of the state ot Washington, arriving in Cumberland on Sunday
evening last.
Mr. and Mrs. Cleghorne, of Walsall,
England arrived in town on Tuesday
evening last and are guests of. Mr.
and Mrs. J. E. Spicer.
Mr. and Mra Aggasiz, formerly of
this city arrived in town on Sunday
on a business visit, and to renew
acquaintances. Mr. Aggasiz was,
when in Cumberland connected with
the Provincial Police Department.
Mr. W. Merrifield, of the Cumberland Hotel, rocelved word during the
week o fthe death of his father ami
loft on Wednesday morning for Nanaimo to attend the funeral.
Mr. J. Marocchi, returned on Monday, after spending the past ten days
In Seuttle and other coast cities.
Rev. and Mrs. A. Bischlager, ot
Duncan arrived ln town on Monday
and are the guests of Mr. and Mrs.
T.  H. Mumford.
A welcome arch In honor of the
visit to this city of the members of
Ihe Ancient Order of Foresters, of
the Vancouver Island District Lodges, who held their Annual Convention here was erected on Dunsmuir
Avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Walton, of Victoria, who havovbeeii on a visit lo
relatives In town, left for Powell
River on Wednesday, and expect to
stay In the Paper .Mill city several
days liefore returning to their home
In Victoria.
Mrs. Geo. Lowe nnd young daughter motored from Victoria on Sunday
und are guests of Mrs, Lowe's sister
Mrs. T. H. Mumford.
Mrs. Bunbury ami two daughters
left on Monday morning Inst for Victoria, where they will rcslile In
future.
Mr. Flon Llndstrom of Vancouver,
was a visitor In town over the weekend the guest of Mr. Jumes Lclder.
Mr. nnd Mrs. T, Walton, Mr. fuid
Mrs. A. Walton and young son, motored from Victoria on Sunday, accompanied by Miss Rhoda Walton,
who has been spending the past Iwo
months' vacation in Victoria.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
Write For Prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO., LTD.
Offlee MM BrMge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Miss Edith Hood, who underwent
an operation for appendlcltles on
Friday lust is making gooil progress
towards recovery.
Mr. and Mrs. James Haworth left
on Sunday last for a short motor
trip Into thc state of Washington.
Mr. and Mrs. W. McKay, of Seattle, accompanied by their son Wallace
motored to Cumberland and Campbell River last week. Whilst ' in
Cumberland they were the guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Whyte.
Mr. and Mrs. Harris and son of
Victoria, motored to Cumberland during the week and are now camping
at Qualicum Beach.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Whyte and
Mr. and MrB. J. Damonte, Jr. Intend
leaving next week on a motor tour,
taking In Victoria, Seattle and Yn-
kima.
Mrs. J. H. McCormlck, of lliililnu.
Washington, arrived In town during
the week on a visit to her relatives,
Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Wlcklc.
Young men and women should
write for our handsome catalogue ol'
Business Courses—Every graduate
employed to date. Accommodations
doubled tor Fall classes. I). C. Com
merclul and Secretarial School, 70!)
Georgia St. Vancouver, B. C. Tli*
school tlmt gets results, individual
courses. Resldental arrangements
made on request.
NOTICE
Courtenay
Billiard
Parlor
Billiard and Pool Tables
MePHEE BLOCK (Downstairs)
COOL — LIGHT - CLEAN
COME IN—
LOOK AROUND
BE .SOCIABLE
I will not be responsible for any
debts contracted by my wife, Mrs. A.
Pilling, after this date, August 21st,
1923.
(Signed) A.   PILLINO.
Cumberland, B. C.
FOR SALE
6-LID McCLARY STOVE IN GOOD
condition. Apply 201! Windermere
Ave. S. t
Ordinarily I am not curious or inquisitive, but I have wondered many
times what was under some of the
marcel waves I have seen.
CROCKERY
Specials
JUST ARRIVED
Cups and Saucers
per dozen up 	
Berry Sets'	
Tea Pots,   each—
and up
$1.95
$1.95
75c,   85c,   95c
Water Tumblers, 3 for 25c and
3 for    	
Salad Bowls
Each for   	
Jugs
50c
55c
40c
$1.75
Each for 	
Glass Table Sets
per set    	
All sizes in plates and Bowls.
Exceptionally good values in Tea Sets and Dinner Sets
New Shipment of Aluminum at Reasonable prices.
Full stock of Scrub Brushes, Shoe    Brushes,    Nail
Brushes, Brooms and Wisk Brushes Pat. Scrubs, etc.
Leave Your Order for
Preserving Peaches
Full stock of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables arriving
• daily
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
SERVICE QUALITY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
SATURDAY
CUT-RATE DRUGS, ETC.
r,(lc Shaving Stick   (Gibbs)   Cut=1tntc  price   .lie
r>0c Shaving Cream  (Vlnolln) Cut-Rato price  SKti
BOc Tootli  Paste  (Telieco), Cut-Hate price   il6r
35c Cold Cream, Cut-Itate price  Sic
COc While Liniment, Cut-Ratc price  4Se
50c  Gin  Pills,  Cut-Rnte   price  lie
25c ABpirln Tablets, Cut-Rale  price   .,  18c
50c Effervescent Morning Salts, Cut-Rato price  Hfle
50c Cod Livor Oil Emulsion, Cut-Ratc price  4Sc
BATHING CAPS
entire Mock to
lie cleared at
HALF PRICE
CANDY   SPECIALS
Allen's Toffee Week-End price per lb ttie
Nellson'n Home Maid Chocolates per lb. box   7.1c
Guth's Saturday Candy, per Ib. box  89c
Just  Received—New  Shipment
KODAKS, FILMS
AND    SUPPLIES
Lang's Drug Store
"It PAYS to DEAL at LANG'S"
S10N11 US YOUR MAIL ORDERS
t
I'll (INK  311
Royal Candy Co.
Cumberland's Coziest Ice Cream Parlor
— Comfort and Service —
 PRIVATE BOXES FOR LADIES	
Luncheons — Afternoon Teps — Home-Made Confectionery — Cigars and Tobacco
Phone 25 Cars For Hire Phone 25

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