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The Cumberland Islander Nov 5, 1921

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10V   8 1921
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Iff
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 45
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLIi/lKS PER ANNUM.
i
Clements Addressed Largest
Audience Ever in Sayward
Meeting Enthusiastically in Favor of Representative of National
Liberal-Conservative Candidate—Indications Point to Big
Majority for Veteran Member of Federal House—Mike Man-
son Greeted With Storm of Applause.
SAYWARD, Oct. 31.—The largest
audience that ever greeted any political speaker In the history ot Suyward
waa that held last evening when Mr.
H. S. Clements, candidate for the
National Liberal-Conservative Party,
and Mr. Mike Manson, veteran of a
hundred political battles, appeared on
the platform at the hall here. From
the hearty welcome accorded by the
people of Sayward to these representatives of the National Liberal-Conservative Party it would not be difficult
to Bee and feel the trend of sentiment
Insofar as Sayward is concerned, and
that there will be a big majority for
Mr. Clements on polling day Ib a tor-
gone conclusion.
Mr. Clements expounded the views
of himself and the leaders ot the
National Party in a most comprehensive manner, and his arguments in
favor of a high tariff for the protection of Canadian industries admitted
ot no rebuttal.
As Mr. Manson rose to speak there
was a veritable storm of applause,
showing that he had not lost the confidence of the people ot this district
ln the slightest degree. He made an
excellent second to Mr. Clements in
hia exposition of the great issues before the people of the Dominion in the
present election, and had no doubt
whatever as to the outcome.
The speaker stated that from his
own observations throughout the
Comox riding the people will support
the National Liberal-Conservative
Party and safeguard the Interests ot
the people of Canada by so doing.
BASKETBALL GAME
AND DANCE TUESDAY
AT DENMAN ISLAND
League Takes
Drastic Action
GOT GOOD RECEPTION
AT CAMPBELL RIVER
CAMPBELL RIVER.—A large and
representative audience greeted Mr.
H. S. Clements, the National Liberal-
Conservative candidate for the Comox-
Alberni riding, when the meeting was
calle dto order at the Lilclana Pavilion
on Saturday evening. Mr. Clements
arrived here on the launch Leonard
M., from southern points in the afternoon and was ln particularly good
shape after his long sea trip to expound the political gospel of the great
Conservative party which he represents. The speaker dealt largely with
the tariff reform question and de-
declared this election to be one of the
most important in the Dominion of
Canada since Confederation,
His arguments were most convincing and it was apparent that the big
audience was in entire sympathy with
the speaker. Mr. Clements was frequently applauded and at the end of
his address signified his satisfaction
at the enthusiastic manner in which
he was received at Campbell River.
The speaker was confident of tbe return of the Meighen administration to
power, which, in his opinion, would
fully safeguard the Interests of the
people of Canada in the years to come.
SALE OF WORK
The Women's Benefit Association
will hold a sale of work in the O. W.
V. A. Hall on Wednesday, November
23. Afternoon tea will be served. In
the evening a whist drive and dance
will be held, commencing at 8 o'clock.
Admission 50 cents, refreshments
served.
The Cumberland Basketball team
will pay a visit to Denman Island on
Tuesday evening next to play another
game against the islanders. The team
will include J. Pringlc, A. Denholme,
W. Kerr, R. Robertson and Joe Dallos.
Following the game a dance will be
held, music for .which will be supplied by an orchestra from Cumberland, comprising Messrs. C. Graham,
Wlnnlugham and Robertson.
The launch will leave Union Bay at
7.30, and it is expected that quite a
number of Cumberlandcrs will make
the trip.
HUNTERS WILL SPEND
HOLIDAY IN THE FIELDS
Taking advantage of the holiday,
many hunters are leaving for their
favorite hunting grounds for a few
days over the week-end.
"Bill" Merrifield and Neil McLeod
left this morning, taking the Charmer
from Union Bay and going to Hornby
Island. They took a motor car along
to do things in style. Postmaster
Cooke and Charley Grant will leave
Royston on Saturday in the launch
"Murbos" to join the party at Hornby
Island in the hunt for pheasants particularly.
Tom Ripley and Charlie Dalton returned last week-end from a week's
hunting expedition on Hornby Island.
Both secured good bags of pheasants,
and report the birds very plentiful but
hard to get. They experienced a pretty
rough time owing to the big storm,
which prevented the Charmer calling
at Hornby Island. However, they
managed to get a launch to bring them
back.
Two ot Cumberland's most persistent deer hunters met with success
on Wednesday afternoon. They ran
Into a "herd" of 'em—two bucks and
two does. After the cannonading had
ceased it was found that they had
secured a big buck. Later in the day
they bagged another, by heck!
MOOSE LODGE MAKING
EXCELLENT PROGRESS
Secretary  Hobson Resigned  to
Take Up Position on West
Coast of Island.
Twenty candidates were .initiated at
tlie meeting of Cumberland Lodge No.
1662, Loyal Order of Moose, at the
meeting held on Thursday night. The
young lodge is making very good progress and working smoothly.
Win. Henderson Now Secretary.
Mr. Wm. Henderson, Jr., is now secretary of the lodge, as the former
secretary, Mr. Francis W. Hobson, bas
accepted a position as teacher ln a.
deaf and dumb school on the West!
Coast and had to resign. He was a
very energetic worker on behalf of
the organization and will be greatly
missed.
The next regular meeting of the
lodge will be held on Saturday, Nov.
12, when several new members will receive the rite of Initiation.
Flander's Poppy for Armistice Day
Everyone Will Wear a Poppy on
Armistice Day as a Tribute
To the Glorious Dead.
As each successive anniversary of
Armistice Day has passed the sentiment has been expressed among the
peoples ot the Allied nations that there
should be some tangible evidence of
the reverence in their hearts for the
heroic dead who made peace possible.
The children of the devastated areas
ot France gave the nucleus ot an idea
which ls rapidly gaining recognition,
when they gathered the red poppies
which grow in profusion ln Flanders
and Northern France, and decorated
the graves of the fallen heroes,* near
their homes. The suggestion from
childish hands wub seized upon by the
French Children's League, which had
i been endeavoring to formulate plans
in order to provide for the thousands,
of orphan children in their country.
They placed the women and children
of the war area at work making Bilk
replicas of tbe poppy, with the idea
ln mind that they could be sold and
the proceeds devoted to this need.
Last year the proposal was advanced
In the United States. The wearing of
the poppy as an expression of deep
reverence for the memory of the dead
was met with sympathetic approval
throughout the country. So, on November 11th of last year there were
very fow citizens ot the great republic
who did not pay their tribute to the
dead in this way. The poppy will
again be the flower of remembrance
this year.
Sentiment In Cnnada in tills desire
to honor The Fallen, is even stronger.
The Great War Veterans' Association
of Canada say in the poppy Idea the
means of achieving three worthy objects:
(1) The inauguration of the custom
of wearing a poppy as a memorial
tt.ower on Armistice Day, and thus
cherish in perpetuity the memory of
the Sacred Dead.
(2) A means of provtding local
branches in 857 centres in Canada
with relief funds to meet the distress
occasioned by unemployment during
the coming winter.
(3) Extending much needed assistance to the orphan children of France
by purchasing at a reasonable price
the product of their handiwork.
The Cumberland branch of the G. W.
V. A. is arranging for the sale of 1000
small poppies and 100 large ones, at
the modest price of 10 and 26 cents
each. Popples can now be obtained
from Mr. A. J. Fouracre, Derwont
Avenue, and from Mr. J. C. Brown,
Maryport Avenue.
Mr. Wood, principal of tho High
School, and Mr. Burbrldge, principal
of the public school, have promised
to speak to the children on -the subject next week. It Is expected iiiui
the teachers and girls of the High'
School will assist ln the sale of the
popples next week.
Mr. J. W. Tremlett, secretary of the
Literary and Athletic Association, has
also some for sale.
Suspends Manager Brown, Conti
und Irvine—Wanted to Suspend Club for 4 Months
A meeting of the Upper Island Football League was held in Nanaimo on
Thursday night to consider a complaint lodged by the Nanaimo Football
Club against tlie Cumberland Club ln
regard to David Kenny.
The Nauulmo Club charged the Cumberland Club with poaching a signed
player, claiming Kenny had signed on
for them.
President Jas, L. Brown Resigns.
President Jas. L, Brown opened the
meeting, but objection was raised to
Mr. Brown occupying the chair, and
upon motion he vacated In favor of
the vice-president, Mr. McGregor. Mr.
Brown took exception to this action
and immediately wrote out his resign-
nution. A motion of confidence was
passed, and he was asked to reconsider his action, but refused.
Mr. Watson, on behalf of Nanaimo,
stated the case for the Nanaimo Club,
claiming Kenny was a registered
player, having signed Form L tor Nanaimo.
Mr. Chas. Graham, on behalf of
Cumberland, asked for proof ln the
form of the counter-foil, which Nanaimo was unable to produce. Cumberland's representative claimed that the
whole case rested on Nanaimo showing ptoof, also claiming that Kenny
was a professional player not yet released from Bristol Rovers, for whom
he played and acted as manager last
season, and could not therefore be
legally signed by any club in British
Columbia until he had been reinstated
as an amateur with the English Football Association. This contention was
acknowledged by the delegates present.
Mr. Watson, manager of the Nanaimo Club, claimed he did not know
that Kenny was a profesional player,
ln spite of the fact that he had placed
In evidence a copy ot a telegram to the
secretary of the Dominion Football
Association asking for Kenny's reinstatement as an amateur.
Yet in spite of all the evidence, and
lack of proof by the accusers, the
lower Island delegates passed sentence ot fourteen days' suspension on
Manager Brown, Conti and Irvine uf
the Cumberland team.
Showing the intense feeling that
prevails tn Nanaimo over the matter,
a motion was made calling for the
suspension of every player of tlle
Cumberland Football Club! However*
the motion failed to carry. Had this
motion carried, Nanaimo would have
taken tiie place of the champions for
league honors.
Kenny Will Be Tree Agent.
When Kenny's reinstatement comes
from Wall, secretary of the English
Football Association, London, he will
he a free agent to sign on with whomsoever he pleases, but cannot take
part in organized football until he Is
reinstated.
Iluuble Schedule to Be l'liijed.
A motion was passed to play a
double schedule In the Upper Island
League, Nanaimo objecting, giving no
reasons. This means fhe schedule now-
being played will be repeated, which
will continue the games until the end
of January.
Cumberland United will play the
Granby team on Sunday in an Upper
Island League fixture. This ls the last
home league game In this schedule
for the locals and it is expected that
a record crowd will turn out.
It has also been decided to stage
this game as a benefit for Fred. Bed-
dlngton, one of the Granby players,
who had the misfortune a short time
ago to lose his home by fire, causing
him heavy loss. The whole of the
proceeds of the gate will go to Mr.
Beddlngton, and lt is hoped the local
football loving public will turn out in
large numbers and give freely to this
worthy object.
The team selected to play for Cumberland will Include: Boyd, Stewart,
ICampbell, Brewster, Mortimer, CDon-
jnell, Hltchens, Milligan, Sutherland,
lAppleby and Harrison.
PSECONO DIVISION GAME
AT NORTH WELLINGTON
FIRST AID WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE
Tonight (Friday) in the llo-llo Hall
a whist drive and dunce will be held
under tlie auspices of the St. John's
First Aid Association. This Is usually
one of Ihe biggest functions of the
kind held during the season, and no
doubt It will be very largely attended
on tbls occasion. During tile evening
successful candidates lu First Aid
work will be presented with certificates and medallions.
Motor Service For
School Children
Efforts to Secure Transportation
for Children on Royston
Road Successful.
On the first of the month the moto.
transportation of the children livini
on Royston Road was put into opera
tio.li. if will be remembered that the
Parent-Teacher Association, working
In conjunction with the Board of
School* Trustees, worked hard for this
service for the winter months, and ll
Is a source of grallllcallon that thc
arrangements were completed so soon
The Department of Education  hn
promised to provide one-half the cost
and the City Council granted the deputation's ilem.'inil for the other halt.
Several tenders were received for
the work, that of Mr. Joe Damonte be
ing accepted at $60 a month. Other
bids ran much higher.
Eighteen children are on the schoo'
register from the district affected.
T,'iese, or ns many of them as attend,
arc brought to school In the morning
and, taken hack in the afternoon.
Registration Days
November 23 to 26
This Applies to Towns and Districts of Less Than 2500
Population.
Voters arc notified that the olliclal
days" upon which registrations are to
be made for the new Voters' List to
be used in tlie Dominion election will
he the days following nomination up
to November 26. Nomination day Is
November 22. Announcement will be
made later as lu hours and plaee of
receiving registrations.
Bickle Appointed Registrar.
Mr. Edward W. Bickle has been appointed Vtegistrur for the Cumberland
Polling Division, No. 10, and Mr. Thos
E. Bate deputy returning officer.
Tuesday, November 22, is the day
on which nominations will bo received
for the Comox-Alberni constituteucy,
betwen the hours of 12 noon and 2 p.m.
at the Court House, Cumberland.
Polling will take place on December
6, betwen the hours of 8 a.m. and 6
p.m.
1,480,000 Gallons of Water
Hoisted in Twenty-four Hours
Pumping Station at No. 6 Mine Lifts Enormous Quantity of Water
—Runs 24 Hours a Day and Makes 2400 Hoists, Each Trip
Bringing Up Three Tons of Water—Drains Miles of Tunnel*
ln Mines No. Five and Six—Adds Its Quota to Cost of Coal.
Benefit Football
Game on Sunday
Granby Will Play Cumberland
On Athletic Grounds in Last
Home Game of Schedule
Cumberland City Second Division
League team travels to North Wellington on Sunday next to meet tlie
team of that town. The strongest possible team has been selected, and the
executive have every confidence that
thc team they have chosen will return
with two points. This is tlie first game
and the boys are out to win. We wish
them every success. Following Is the
team: FoBter, Gough, McWhlrter,
Bobby Brown, Courtenay, Slaughter,
Hunden, Kerr, J. McWhlrter, Gibson,
Scott. First reserve and official coach,
E. Jackson.  Second reserve, R. Fyvie.
All players and reserves are requested to meet at the Waverley Hotel
not Inter than 8 a.m. Sunday. In addition to the accommodation for the team
there nre a few vacant seats in the
motor bus, and those wishing to accompany the team should hand lu Iheir
names to Nat Bevis, secretary of the
club.   The return  fure is $2.60.
TWO JUNIOR GAMES
Two Junior League games aro on
the schedule for Saturday. The Cumberland Juniors will meet the Union
Bay team on the local grounds at 3.30.
Great Interest Is being taken ill tbls
game, as only one point separates Ibe
two teams In the league standing.
Munuger field of Union Bay says his
boys are in the best or condition anil
tliey will kep the Juniors going all the
time. There should he a big turn-out
of fans nn fnnetles to see the game.
The Cumberland team will comprise
Boffy. strachan, Walker, Lockhart,
Mitchell, Farmer, Stevenson, Robertson, Bond, Stewart, Freloni. Reserves,
Gibson, McNutt and Lewis.
High School vs. Ileum.
The other gnme is between tlie High
School and Bevan Juniors, which takes
place at Bevan. Like the other game
this, contest will have an Important
bcarihg on the league standing and Is
being watched with Interest.
RAN INTO TYPHOON
CROSSING THE PACIFIC,
The steamer Morristown which arrived at. Union Bay this week for coal,
diows the effects of being in a terrific
dorm. She left the Philippine Islands
beginning of October, loaded with
sugar for New York. Ordinarily she
should have made the trip to Union
Bny In 22 days, but owing to the had
weather encountered the trip occupied 32 days.
She ran into the typhoon which did
so much damage to shipping on the
North Pacific recently. The slorm
broke considerable deck gear and gave
the vessel a terrible shaking up. After taking on coal she proceeded to
Seattle for necessary repairs before
continuing her journey through tlie
Panama Canal fur the Atlantic port.
Happening to call at No. 6 Mine
Hoisting Shaft, the old mine close to
the city belonging to tlie Canadian
Collieries (DuuBUJUlrj Limited, tlie
oilier night, tlie Junior Reporter saw
some figures, 1,480,000, in white chalk
alongside the operator then ou duty,
thinking possibly Mr, T. H. Carey,
who was then operating the levers,
aad been figuring out his income tux,
or maybe the number of votes Mr.
elements will get when, the final re-
urns ure in, the J. It, asked the why
and wherefore, llo wus informed that
lie figures represented the number ot
gallons of water hoisted the previous
lay of 24 hours. Oue million four
uundred and eighty thousand gallons
orought up In one day! Just imagine
he possibilities if some wizard could
instill a lively "kick" into all that
svater—live bottles to a gallon! A
sittle healthy competition like tbat
svould knock the high spots oil the
prices charged by "Bobby" Thomson
ior hiB "Elixir of Youth," "Mummy
Reviver" and other more or less high
oltage medicine.
Heavy ltuinfull Keeps lloisliuen Busy.
The big figures quoted above are
somewhat above tlle average, owing
so the heavy rainfall of recent weeks,
ihe seepage of which has increased the
usual volume of water in the underground workings. Consequently the
noistmen have to keep things going
at top speed to keep tlie water at a
mfe level, otherwise some of the tun-
lels now being worked would be
looded.
No. 6 Mine has been abandoned for
some years as a coal producer, but
he big shaft is used for lifting the
water out of that and No. 5 Mine. The
jig 600-gallon tanks are ascending
and descending almost every day iu
lie year, 24 hours each day, for three
eight-hour shifts are worked. At the
present water level the tank descends
over 300 feet before striking water,
when it automatically fills itself, and
is then hoisted up while its mate is
descending. On reaching the top tbe
tank automatically empties itself, the
svater running uway, eventually reach
ing the Trent River and into the sea
at Royston.
The bottom of tbe shaft is about
J50 feet from the surface, aud at present there is about 300 feet of water
here.
liver Two Thousand Hoists in u Day!
Running af practically full capacity
the operators make about 2400 hoists
in 24 hours, each hoist bringing up
JOO gallons, or three tons, of water,
mil draining many miles of underground tunnels of No. 5 and No, 6
.Mines.
Tlle operating machinery, which is
extensive, is run by electricity gener-
ited ut the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. Hydro-Electric Power
citation at Puntledge. A huge 350
Horsepower motor, running at 480
revolutions per minute, does the heavy
work.
To the novice a very interesting
eature of the apparatus is a liquid
heostat. This Is one of the very latest contrivances, permitting of gentle
tartiug of the machinery, which has
io be stopped every time a tank
reaches the top or bottom of Its 300
bot wind, which II dees In about half
i minute, lt can be readily understood Hint If Ihe power necessary to
lilt three tons of wnler as well as thc
heavy tanks and i-ibles, etc., was applied suddenly- -as Is the case wllb
iinnll motors -something wuuld happen, and happen quickly.
registers every hoist made, but tha
lime It takes to make it. This is done
by a pen working on a big scale sheet
around a cylinder, the scale being
divided into minutes. The apparatus
ls operated by delicate mechanism.
While this shaft is remote from th*
actual working areas, it has a direct
bearing on the cost of coal produced,
as In the course of a year the operating expenses run Into big figures. The
heavy wear and tear of hoisting such
vast quantities of wator 300 feet or
more is considerable and a crew ot
men is employed regularly doing the
necessary repairs, etc.
Mr. T. Mordy haa charge of this
plant, and his task Is no easy one.
When something goes wrong, he and
his men have to attend to lt, and tha
trouble ls just as likely to be at the
bottom of the shaft as at the top, or
anywhere between. Tbat is why our
City Clerk is sometimes to be seen
arbed in hip boots, rubber coat and
iou'-weBter hat, for the climate down
there is not altogether dry, especially
If one of the tanks ls above with Its
contents draining on the workers.
Sulphuric Acid Flays Havbc with
Metals.
Tbe visitor asked why the water Is
raised by means ot tanks Instead ot
by large pumps, and was Informed that
it was because of the destructive action of sulphuric acid on all metal
I substances. The water ls heavily
charged with this acid, and experience
has shown tbat pumps very quickly
lose their efficiency. In one Instance,
when a pump was Installed at a cost
of thousands of dollars, its usefulness
was ended ln 24 hours.
The action of the sulphuric acid on
the tanks ls as destructive but the
construction being simple tbe conse-
i quences are not so great, and furthermore reupairs are more easily accomplished. At that tbe lite of the tanks
is very short.
Lost Articles Recovered.
Some time ago one of the tanks, liko
I some of the big fish we hear about,
got away and dived Into the deep
water below. It Imbedded Itself ln
the soft mud, hundreds of feet below
the water level, and it required a lot
of cureful "fishing" to book it. When
brought up It was found tbat the Impact of the heavy tank on the soft mud
bad filled with that stuff, In addition
to which a number of articles which
bud beeu dropped in the'shaft, some of
them years ago, were found in the
tank. The City Clerk was surprised
indeed to recover a gold watch he had
lost some months previously!
So next time you "kick" nt tbe price
of coal—and, doggone It, everyone has
a right to "kick" sometimos—just remember that a necessary part of that
eost is pumping the stuff that Prohibitionists rave about out of the
places where the miners do their
part iu keeping folks warm and supplying energy for industries, and,
more important as far as the Comox
.Mines are concerned, supplying with
fuel the ships that ply on tho waters,
from the little tug running to Comox
to the giant Blue Funnel liners and
ither leviathans of the ocean which
travel to Ihe remote parts of tho
world. s
Steamship men say Comox coal is
he finest steam coal in the wurld, but
ihe Cub Reporter agrees to this with
i mental reservation. He happened
io bo born lu a country where the
steaming qualities of its coal his
uade history thut will stand for all
lime, by beck!
'Ilio Turliiigriipli.
Another very interesting instrument
is the Tachograph,   which   not  only
The Girl Across the Road says
Many a girl doesn't know a man's n
had egg until he's broke."
A. W. Neill Independent Candidate
Courtenay Convention Had Applicants for Jul), But Neill
Made Unanimous Choice
A convention of nil parties opposed
to the present government was held
n Courtenay ou Saturday for the purpose of nominating n candidate to opt
pose the National Conservative-Liberal
Party.
Six names were placed before the
convention: J. Martin, K.C; J. S.
Cowper, Vancouver; J. Navy, Union
liny; J. M. Swan, Fanny Bay; J. F.
Bledsoe, Alberni, and Alan W. Neill?
Alberni.
The candidates were allowed twenty
minutes In make their appeal for the
nomination. Mr. Neill received a majority ul* the votes on the lirst ballot,
and ou motion the nomination was
made unanimous.
Thi! convention was a decided success in every way. Sixty-three delegates were in attendance, coming
from all parts of the riding, and the
best of feeling prevailed throughout.
Major R. J. Burd'c, M.L.A., Alberni, and
Rev. Thos. Menkes, M.L.A., for Comox,
vere present aud addressed the meeting.
Mr. Neill Is- a successful business
nan and farmer of Alberni District.
Ie was bom in the town of Forfar,
Scotland, but has spent the greater
lart of his life on Vancouver Island,
to also sat as an Independent mem-
ler of the Provincial House for five
,'cars. being elected for Alberni in Ihe
vear 1898.
Organization   Formed   Here.
On Wedneday evening a meeting fo*
irganizntion purposes Io support Mr.
Vein's candidature was held In the O.
W. V. A. Hall. While Ibe number
present was not large, the deficiency
vas made up by Ihe enthusiasm of
hose attending. So optimistic werb
tome of Ihem that they figured Mr.
"lenienls was wasting his timo nad
mergy campaigning. There's nothing
o ll. dontyerknow!
Mr. F. Pickard was elected presl-
lent and Mr. T. II. Carey, secretary, Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 5,1621.
A Phonograph to
Suit every Pocket
IN our show rooms we have a wide variety of
Phonographs, ranging in price from $5 to $500.
No matter how large or liow small your purse, we
have an instrument to fit your special requirement,
and can arrange very convenient terms of payment.
Below are listed prices and terms of various models.
Let us hear from you today. Choose your instrument
while we have a full stock, as in a few weeks our
Christinas rush will start and we may be sold out on
the particular model you want.
$   5.00—TERMS, $ 1.00 CASH, $ 1.00 PER MONTH
10.00
»»
1.00
»*
1.00
12.50
»l
1.50
»
1.00
20.00
»»
2.50
»»
2.50
25.00
»»
3.00
»»
3.00
30.00
»*
4.00
J»
4.00
35.00
)»
4.00
"
4.00
50.00
>•
5.00
J»
4.00
60.00
»»
5.00
)»
5.00
75.00
»»
7.00
»»
7.00
95.00
"
8.00
»»
7.50
115.00
»»
10.00
»»
10.00
135.00
»»
12.00
»>
12.00
185.00
>»
20.00
»»
15.00
215.00
"
25.00
»»
16.00
We are listing the above in order to give prospective
customers an idea of our easy terms. They can see
how easy it is to have music in their homes this winter.
CALL TODAY AND LET US
TALK OVER YOUR PROPOSITION
You are under no obligation to buy
THE
G. A.
CO.
LTD.
FLETCHER MUSIC
CUMBERLAND - COURTENAY
Pythian Sisters
15th Anniversary
Many Present at Banquet and
Dance Held in the G.W.V.A.
Hall Monday Night
LEGAL NOTICE.
432-1921.
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
On Monday night last a large number of invited guests met at the O. W.
V. A. Hall on the occasion ot the
fifteenth anniversary of Benevolent
Lodge No. 9, the local lodge ot the
Pythian Sisters.
The celebration took the form ot a
banquet and dance, the former being
Interspersed with speeches and songs.
Four long tables the width ot the
hall had been set out, and were loaded
down with good things to eat such aB
the ladles of Cumberland know so well
how to prepare.
Mr. John Thomson, who ls a Past
Grand Commander of the Knights of
Pythias, occupied the chair on behalf
of the ladies' lodge and in a few appropriate remarks welcomed the visitors,
und briefly explained the work of the
order. Concluding his few remarks he
asked those present to stand in silence
for the space of one minute in memory
of those members of the lodge who had
passed to the great beyond.
Greetings from Other Societies.
All present then turned their attention to the delicacies provided, which
were done full Justice to by all pres
ent. After the inner man—and inner
woman, if there ls such a person-
had been well satisfied, a programme
of songs and brief speeches was gone
through.
Mrs. Stewart, Mistress of Records
of Benevolent Lodge, was called on by
the chairman tor a tew words and ln
response outlined the life and work
of the lodge. Starting with a modest
number of sisters the lodge had made
good progress, though it had passed
through years ot trial, such as the
strike and the Great War. Nevertheless the order had accomplished much
good work and waa always ready to
extend a helping hand where needed
The speaker said the lodge was animated by altruistic principles and did
charitable work in many directions,
but the sisters were very quiet about
the work they did, said Mrs. Stewart
She extended a hearty welcome to th*
representatives of the other societies
present.
Many of the lodges of the city were
represented, and delegates extended
fraternal greetings and wishes for the
continued success of the Pythian
Sisters. Among tbose who spoke were:
Mr. Thos. Eccleston, representing
Cumberland Lodge No. 26, A.F. & A.M.
Mr. Toman, of the Ancient Order of
Druids.
Mrs. T. Eccleston, of the Woman's
Benefit Association of the Maccabees
Mr. Joe Zinia, of the Fraternal Order of Eagles.
Mrs. Aitken and Mrs. Covert, representing the Grand Lodge of Pythian
Sisters.
Mr. Rowland Astor, of the Knights
of Pythias, Courtenay.
Mr. Bennie, ot the Cumberland
Lodge, Knights of Pythias.
A number of visitors from the
Courtenay lodges came up for the
celebration.
This part of the programme completed, the room was cleared and
dancing was indulged in to a late
hour, to the accompaniment ot music
provided by Mrs. R. E. Frost and Mr.
W. A. Owen.
Waitress (observing customer's dissatisfaction): "Isn't your egg cooked
long enough, sir?"
Patron: "Ves, but not soon enough."
"All the world's a stage	
"Yes, and  women  are  rapidly
coming thc stage-mauagers."
bo-
"l bear your husband has given up
smoking. Doesn't thai require a strong
will?"
"Well, I hnve a strong will."
There arc :I3,200 registered ships on
the oceans and seas of the world. Tbey
have a tonnage of nearly 62,000,000,
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
WIFE SAVING STATION
Electric Vacuum Cleaners
ELECTRIC WHITE CAP WASHING MACHINES
ELECTRIC DURO WATER SY.STEMS
ELECTRIC STOVES, PLATES, TOASTERS
ELECTRIC FLASH LAMPS, PERCOLATORS
Complete Line of Batteries
Hells, Fixtures of every description.   Complete line of
Lamps in Stock.
EXPERT WIRING OF OLD AND NEW BUILDINGS
Estimates Given Upon Application.
LEN D. PIKET
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR—DEALER
Phone 131-R COURTENAY
BETWEEN:
SPENCE HIRBEN, Plaintiff,
and:
J. C. McGREGOR, Defendant.
Before   the   Honorable   Mr.   Justice
Murphy in Chambers:
VIonday, the 17th day of October, 1921.
UPON the application ot the Plain-
lit and upon hearing Mr. P. J. Sinnott
Solicitor for the Plaintiff, and upon
■eading tbe Affidavit ot Patrick J.
{llnnott sworn the 16th day of October
1921, and died herein;
IT IS ORDERED that the Plaintiff
ie at liberty to serve the Defendant
vith the Writ of Summons ln this ac-
.lon by the publication by advertisement of the said Writ ot Summons
ind ot this Order ln one Issue ot the
Victoria Dally Colonist newspaper for
.wo successive weeks and ln one issue
if a newspaper having a circulation
n the City of Cumberland, British
'olumbla, for two successive weeks;
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
that the time for appearance to the
laid Writ of Summons Bhall be within
eight days after the final publication
by advertisement ot the Baid Writ ot
■summons, inclusive of the day of such
lervice.
V.C.F.
B.C.L.S.
60c Victoria,
D. MURPHY, J.      Oct. 17, 1921
Registry,
entered Vol. 38, Foi. 733
Date 19-10-21
By J.S.G. t
FIND PURE IRON ON
SHORES OF ATHABASCA
The Edmonton Bulletin recently
carried the following story of another
mineral find in the North:
A whole valley of almost pure iron
lying on the shores of Lake Athabasca,
with deep water approach to the
claims, has been discovered ln the
North by Norman C. Butterfleld and E.
A. Butterfleld. An analysis shows that
It Is 64.36 pure iron, 154 tons having
been measured off, while 5,000,000
tons in the shape of loose blocks is lying on the surface of the ground close
to the lake, ready for shipment with
out any mining operations being
necessary.
The iron was discovered accidentally in the north by the Butterflelds,
father and son.
"To what do you attribute your success?" a drygoods merchant was
asked.
"To this," he replied. "If a cus
tomer does not see what she wants,
I make her want what Bhe sees."
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
B. C. L. S. 52.00
H. No. 432
1921
IS TIIE SUPREME COURT OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
BETWEEN:
SPENCE HIREEN, Plaintiff,
and:
J. C. McGREGOR, Defendant.
Victoria, Oct. 6, 1921.
Registry G. H. M. •
GEORTH THE FIFTH, by the Grace
of God, of the United Kingdom of
Great Britain and Ireland, and of the
British Dominions Beyond the Seas,
King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor
ot India.
To J. C. McGREGOR, Cumberland,
B C
P. J. Sinnott, Plaintiff's Solicitor.
WE COMMAND YOU, that within
eight days after the service of this
Writ on you, Inclusive of the day of
such service, you do cause an appearance to be entered tor you ln an action at the suit of
SPENCE HIREEN, Douglas Hotel,
Douglas Street, Victoria, B. C.
AND TAKE NOTICE that in default
of your so doing, the Plaintiff may
proceed therein, and Judgment may be
given ln your absence.
Seal of the
Supreme Court ot
British Columbia.
WITNESS THE  HONORABLE  GORDON HUNTER, Chief Justice, the
6th day of October in the year of
our Lord one thousand nine hundred
and twenty-one.
N.B.—This   writ   la   to   be   served
within twelve calendar months from
the date thereof, or, If renewed, with
In twelve calendar months from the
date of the last renewal, Including the
lay of such date, and not afterwards.
Appearance ts to be entered at the
jfflce of the District Registrar of this
Court at Victoria, B. C, out of which
this writ Is issued.
Statement of Claim.
The Plaintiff's claim ls tor the sum
jf $286.46 due by the Defendant to the
Plaintiff and being (1) the sum ot
(250.00 the amount of the cheque made
by the Defendant In favor of the Plaintiff and dated the 16th day ot September, 1921, payable at the Bank of Italy,
-ian Francisco, California, which
cheque was duly piesented for payment and dishonored; (2) the sum of
{28.25 being the amount of exchange
paid by the Plaintiff on or about the
■laid 15th day of September, 1921, ln
respect of the said cheque and due by
the Defendant to the Plaintiff; (3) the
mm of $4.00 for lodgings supplied by
tbe Plaintiff to the Defendant at the
Douglas Hotel, Victoria, B.C., on or
about the 15th day of September,
1921; and (4) the sum ot $4.20 being
,'or telegrams and long distance telephone tolls paid by tbe Plaintiff for
the Defendant.
PARTICULARS:
Sept. 15.
1921.
To dishonored cheque  $250.00
" exchange paid thereon    28.25
" lodgings at Douglas Hotel..     4.00
"  telegrams and telephone....     4,20
Total  .K. $286.45
Place of Trial, Victoria, B. C.
DELIVERED this 6th day of October, A.D. 1921.
P. J. SINNOTT,
Plaintiff's Solicitor.
AND the sum of $40.00 (or such sum
as may be allowed on taxation) for
costs.
If the amount claimed be paid to tbe
Plaintiff .or his Solicitor or Agent
within four days from the service
hereof further proceedings will be
stayed.
MEMORIAL CAIRN
AT SANDWICK
The proposed war memorial cairn
at Sandwick ln memory of tbe men
from Courtenay-Comox dsltrict who
gave their lives In the Great War, Is
beginning to take definite form. On
Monday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, the
foundation will be laid. Mayor Simms
of Courtenay will lay the cornerstone
and it is hoped that every man, woman
and child who can do so will lay at
least one stone upon the calm as a
pledge of rememberance ot the men
who sleep in Flanders Fields,
One of
thegood
things
to be thankful for at THANKSGIVING time is a pair of
our Good Shoes for Men. They combine conservative
style with solid wearing qualities, and they are noted for
fit and comfort. Splendid holiday value at $6.50, $7.50
and $8.75 per pair.
Attractive Prices on Fall Shoes
MEN'S BROWN AND
BLACK BOOTS
In Black or Brown Calf,
medium weight, easy fitters.   Price
to clear	
$5.50
BOYS' STRONG SCHOOL
SHOES
Will give good wear and
perfect satisfaction.
Sizes 11 to 13 $3.25
Sizes 1 to 5 $3.90
SEE OUR MINERS'
SHOES
In Brown or Black full
chrome leather; with heel
and toe plates. (J»rT FA
Special price... «P I oil"
MEN'S WORK BOOTS
In Brown or Black Elkola
Leather; all sizes.   Priced
to clear,
per pair ..
$4.95
WOMEN'S HOUSE
SLIPPERS
In leather one-strap, also in
felt.   Priced up
from 	
$1.50
WOMEN'S STRAP SLIPPERS AND OXFORDS
In Brown and Black Calf
and Dongola; Slippers in
cross and 2-strap designs;
Cuban or French heels.
Regular $6.75 to $8.50 per
pair. On sale
at 	
$5.50
MEN'S WHITE RUBBER
SHOES
60 pairs, six-eyelet, at the
special price
of, pair	
$4.90
MISSES* AND CHILDREN'S FELT SLIPPERS
Cosy and warm.   Priced at
$1.25, $1.50 and $1.75 pair.
EVERYTHING IN FOOTWEAR AT LOWEST PRICES
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
F. PARTRIDGE
Phone 152
P. O. Box 343
The mouth of the Amazon is over
one hundred miles wide.
The proverbial "abBent-minded professor" is put quite in the cold by the
dentist who, when applying a monkey-
wrench to his automobile, said, soothingly: "Now, this is going to hurt Just
a little!"
Who killed old Dobbin?
Who dealt the fatal blow?
"I," sold tho flivver,
"With my little shiver,
I laid him low."
The largest farm in the world ls
nt Nobleford. Alberta. It has2 more
than 18,000 acresa under cultivation.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small sums, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End End End
Deposits of IstVr. 2ndYr. SrdYr.
$ 1.00 Weekly       $ 52.69 $106.95 $162.84
10.00 Monthly         121.65 246.92        375.98
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
•      $15,000,000
■     $15,000,000
GRAINGER, Manager.
THE value to the public of telephone service is based
on the reliability, promptness and accuracy of that
service. Quality of service depends *on the economic
operation of all telephone activities. From the time
raw material is produced until the furnished equipment is complete, it is a matter of continuous exhaustive tests to get the best. After installation, ceaseless
vigilance is maintained to get the best character of
•service. All efforts are directed toward the highest
standard.
Some fellers lose their bes', trlej .4
IW. P. Symons   •  •    Proprietor by marrying her.
British Columbia Telephone Co. ... - .     .-..-...
p"a,'m'-> ■■■' ■ "'**	
tmf^gtg^m^mj^f/mm^mgmggfttmJnfMmmmu^tms^stm
November 6, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Three
Everybody knows
that la Canada than ara mora
Templeton'i
Rheumatic Capsules
Sold thaa all other Rheumatic
Ramedica combined Ior Rheumatism, Meuritls, Neuralgia,
Sciatica, Lumbago, etc.
Many doctor* prescribe them,
most druggists sell them. Write
for free trial to Templetou, Toronto.
Sold by R. E. FROST.
Jim&Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sack! Conti
Proprietors.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District.
Bobbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  CO TELEPHONE
or teare Orders at Vendome HoteL
GOOD EATS
Vendome
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish Md Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Duj and Night
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While 0 Wait
PHILLIPS* MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
MEXICAN MARKET FOR
B.C. MEANS MILLIONS
Vast Trade Being Expanded By
Means of the Government-
Owned Merchant Ships
VANCOUVER.—Nearly every point
of this province, with most of its products, are affected by a new market
that Is being opened up in Mexico by
Canada, especially by British Columbia. Government-operated vessels
will ply between Pacific Canada and
tlio southern republic.
A vast trade is being expanded,
and millions of dollars of new trade
Is expected to bo thrown open. President Alvsru Obregou of Mexico is taking u close personal Interest In this
Important development, and that republic, through Senor Ricardo P. Medina, Mexican consul at Vancouver,
has entered into plans witli the Dominion.
Hon. H. H. Stevens, Minister of
Trade and Commerce, has taken up
tbe matter. Several officials from Ottawa are about to leave to confer
with the Mexican president. This will
affect all Canada, but, owing to the
closer accessibility of Uritish Columbia to the Pacific points of Mexico, the
development will mean more to this
province than to auy other part of
Canada.
Among the B. C. products that will
gain a wider and newer market there
are pulp for paper making, timber,
apples, machinery, canned footstuffs
and other commodities. The import
will include turpentine, copra, rubber,
hardwood, dyewoods (formerly serving the exclusive German market),
and other things.
This is regarded as one of the most
Important international undertakings
ever taken up by this province. It Is
being featured widely by the Mexican
presa and special articles on the subject are going out to papers of the
I%ciflc and Atlantic coasts, as well as
to Europe,
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE  INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C
Wood for Sale
$•1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92K
SEE
Wm* Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
BIG MARKET LIKELY
FOR B.C. PULP INDUSTRY
Things are looking bright for the
pulp industry of this province. Two
new markets are gradually opening
up. Mexico and Japan are both in the
fleld with demands for this product
Japan wants a great deal for paper
making, which ls becoming a great
factor iu Nipponese commerce, and
Mexico haB announced that a ready
market ls opening there. Japanese
exporters here say the demand will
be greater than ever In 1922, and expect a heavy call to supply new mills
that are opening up in Japan.
U. S. ALARMED AT B. C. AS
COMPETITOR ON PACIFIC
VANCOUVER. — "Unless wo watch
ourselves, Uritish Columbia will become a formldablo competitor of, not
only Puget Sound, but of otlier parts
of tlie Pacific Coast," says an editorial In The Trade and Review, a well
known shipping journal in Seattle
and Portland. The paper goes on to
point out that Mexico is apparently
transferring much of her trade to tills
province, and that millions of dollars
are slipping away into li. C.
SAILING FOR ORIENT
IN VERY SMALL CRAFT
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, TZe1
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a SsecMtf.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTEH.-Oscar Eng-
blom, vctornn of the Great War, and
for years in the coastguard service, is
setting forth on a trans-Pnolilc voyage
In u power-cruft only fifteen feet in
length. Ho will be accompanied by
Captain Victor Long, Puget Sound
pilot. They will stop at Honolulu and
plan to visit the Orient. Both are going into the pearl-llshlng business, if
tfiey reach the Orient.
JAPANESE OF B. C. DRILL
WITH GUNS, SAYS REPORT
VANCOUVER.—Japanese of this
province are drilling In their spare
time, with wooden dummy guns, suys
a report filed with the Asiatic Exclusion Leugue. It is said the Nipponese
are tuking part iu private armory
manoeuvres lu thoroughly military
fashion. Under questioning, one leading Japanese said: "We take exercise
for healths, for it is pleasant and good
for recreation—no more, please. We
bave exercise same like Canada boys
like militia drills."
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 66
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton;
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef! It ls delicious.
British Columbia
Coastline of 7000 Miles—Wonderful Mineral, Forest and
Fishery Resources.
CAR GONE BAD?
Leave it to us and come back
when it's ready for you to take
the wheel. Stop worrying about
it and let*us do that for you—
that's our business. No matter
what the trouble is we'll make it
right and keep it right. Anything from a loose nut to a
broken axle.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES.
1NTERROR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOOUE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBOR CO. LTD.
Offlco L'lt'il Bridge .Street, Victoria, B.C,
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRE&ED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C
B. C. INVENTOR'S DEVICE
IS ADVERTISING IN SKIES
VANCOUVER.—If you happen to
gaze skyward one of these dark winter nights and see the astringent smile
of Lydia Pinkham tn starland, don't
be scared. Just blame Peter Stewart
for it. Mr. Stewart, returned soldier
of Victoria, is the inventor of a new
idea for flashing "ads" in the sky. He
believes It will work finely. If his
device works, we may expect to seo
skyland education in all kinds of soap,
dope, medicines and other widely-
advertised commodities. He has applied for a patent.
SHE'S NO WALTOX
He: "No luck at all on that fishing
trip. I only got a few nibbles."
She: "But, dear, why didn't you
bring them home? At least there
would have been enough for your
breakfast."
"Healthy?" said the proud resident.
"I should say tho town is healthy.
Why, there's only been one death here
In ten yenrs."
"Indeed," replied the visitor. "And
may I ask who it was that died?"
"The undertaker; he died of starvation."
"Do you like indoor sports?"
"Yes, but father won't let them stay
long."
Special Trade
Discount
of
10 PER CENT.
ON ALL MERCHANDISE
except flour, Sugar and Feed
Redeemable on Cut Glass,
Silverwstre, Tea Sets and
Fancy Goods
We   will cimtinue this Discount
Until Christmas'
WE SELL FOR LESS
No province of the Dominion possesses in itself such a wealth and
diversity of natural resources as does
Uritish Columbia, and ull those resources may lie said practically to be
hi tbo initial stages of development.
The fisheries account for almost half
thc total catch of Canada; tho province ranks second t'or its mineral output, and thousands of square miles of
mineralized ground are not yet prospected. Its three hundred und fifty
billion feet of standing merchantable
lumber far exceeds the resources of
any other province, and, in fact, is almost equal to the limber of all the
other provinces put together; its agricultural and fruit lauds, hardly
scratched, bud a yield of more than
sixty-eight millions of dollars in 1920.
While the population stilt is small,
approximating 729,000, the province
has accomplished much, lteniarkahlo
progress has been made in the last
decade in manufacture and industries,
and still they are only at the beginning of things. In addition to its vast
area of 355,000 square miles, British
Columbia has a coastline measuring
seven thousand miles, while au estimate of the extent of inland navigable
waters totals 2500 miles.
Timber of Unsurpassed  Qunlity.
One of the remarkable facts about
this prodigious water front is that
along the whole of it Is tlle British
Columbia forest, a forest which rises
from the water's edge to the top of the
mountains of the Pacific Slope. Here,
and on Vancouver Island, is found tbe
giant timber that is remarkable for
its size and its unsurpassed quality as
lumber. The Douglas fir grows to a
height of three hundred feet—the
average tree being 125 to 150 feet.
There are also thousands of miles
of pulp and paper-making woods
which are still practically undisturbed. In water-power, too, the province is rich, having a developed capacity of more than three hundred thousand horsepower, the undeveloped
capacity amounting to three million
horse-power. For the year 1920 the
total value of forest products is placed
at approximately ninety-two and a
half millions of dollars.
Again, it is the extensive coast, with
its long succession of inlets and bays
that bas contributed the important
fishing industry, the yield ot which,
in 1919, amounted to fifteen and a
quarter millions of dollars. British
Columbia stands lirst in the production of salmon; ninc-tcnlhs ot the annual output tuny he credited to thai/
llsh, while .the catch of halibut ls
many times more than Unit of the Atlantic.
Less Thnn Ten Per Cent, of Lund Is
Under ('ulllvnlloii.
Although much of Ihe economic
prosperity of British Columbia seems
to be bound up in Its phenomenal
coastline, yet it has vast areas of rich
agricultural laud, tbe extent of which
has not been calculated with any exactness, estimates varying from
twelve and a half million to thirty-
eight million acres. Whatever tbo
estimate, it is certain that ouly a very
small percentage, less than ten per
cent, of the available acreage, is under cultivation.
The progress made so far has been
confined principally to the Southorn
Belt. Here the advancement made in
fruit growing, In the Kootenay district
particularly, has been wonderful, and
the quality of the fruit is unsurpassed.
Year afler year It has taken the highest awards at exhibitions iu the Old
Country and also at International Exhibitions. In addition lo fruit-grow
ing, the province is especially adapted
for mixed farming, dairying and stock
raising.
Coal Most linpiii'liinl Minimi.
The mineral output for 1920 Bllghlly
exceeded thirty-eight millions ol dollars, which places British Columbia
second only to Ontario in Ibe ranking
of the provinces from the slandpQliii
of mineral production. Cold, silver,
lend, copper, iron ami zino arc found,
hut the most Important minora! Is
coal. The Rooky Mountain coal fields,
lying ou cither flunk of the main
main range of Ihe Rooky Mountains,
respectively lu the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, undoubtedly are the most extensive deposits
in Canada, and, what is more Important from a commercial point of view
are the only large fields of first-class
coal at present known on the Pacific
Slope between Alaska and Mexico,
There are also good coal mines on
Vancouver Island, situated at tidewater, and there are promising fields
In other parts of tbe province, as yet
undeveloped.
In the development of British Columbia, transportation lias been an
indispensable condition. With the exceptional railway and steamship facilities that the province now enjoys,
a great commerce already has been
developed with the Orient, and with
Atlantic ports. And Ihe possibilities
and magnitude of the commercial advancement of Ihe future seem almost
to be unlimited.—Uoyul Hank of Can-'
ada Bulletin.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture .tod Piano
Storage if desired.
jhones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
SAVE BEFORE YPiJ SPEND
Let your Bank Account be your
first concern.
It will more than repay you in
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
HI   THE ROYAL BANK
W       OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
Victoria's  Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made froiji malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PUKE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.  Try lt and
you will use no other.
I
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd
W. Gordon
Phone 133        Cumberland
Venus de Mllo was tho first victim
of disarmament.
"Una Ilonsle any education along
musical lines?"
"I should say so! Name any record
and she enn tell you what's on the
other side!"
1850—Ye Olde Firme—1921
MADAME MELBA!
MADAME TETRAZZINI
These two great artists have purchased HEINTZMAN & CO. Grands; Mme. Melba for her home in
Australia and Mme. Tetrazzini for her castle in
Rome.
HEINTZMAN & CO. PIANOS ARE SOLD ON EASY
TERMS
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Malinger—Box 333, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo Pour
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 5, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. OOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1921
FISCAL EXPERIMENTS
We have referred in these coIuuhib, says the Vernon
News, to the differences between the Liberal advance
notices respecting the tariff and their actual performances
in relation thereto. We have not taken the position that
the Liberals are to be severely criticized for not practicing what tliey preached. It is true that their course in
Parliament was contrary to the principles they enunciated
in opposition, but as Premier Meighen has repeatedly said,
when they got Into ollice and saw Canadian conditions at
close range tliey saw that to do what they had promised
would mean the ruin of the industrial structure ot this
country, and tbey did the wise thing It not the moral thing
in ignoring their pledges rather than injuring their country. So we llud that the tariff on dutiable goods under
the Laurier regime was higher than it Is today.
It may be asked then, "Why oppose the returns of the
Liberals to power?" Principally because, whatever their
practice has been, the doctrines ot the Liberals are those
of low tariff and free trade, and industry and the capital
upon which industry and commerce depend, will be doubt
ful, nervous and hesitant, in the face ot possible change,
and this condition will continue for years, at a time wben
Canada cannot afford unnecessary stagnation in trade.
If, by chance, the Liberals set about putting their policies
into effect, they could not abolish at oae fell swoop the
duties to which the national Industrial system has accommodated itself. Even the process of modification could not
be embarked upon without widespread loss.
Other countries that were engaged In the war have since
planned to encourage industrial development by tariffs
giving adequate, and, in some cases, high protection. Australia, France, Belgium, the United States—even England,
the classic home of free trade—all have raised protective
tariffs. They have given confidence to capital to press
vigorously forward, to plan new enterprises, to provide for
tbe employment of more workers. That stabilizing policy
ls the policy Canada needs more at this time than at any
previous time in its history. Conditions ln the Dominion
and In the world at large do not favor indulging ln fiscal
experiments.
THE COUNTRY NEWSPAPER
It is a notable fact with all the wonderful things that
here beeu written about the so-called "country newspaper"
very few of them realize all their possibilities, or what
an influence they are in the world.
It ls now up to the newspapers of the country, the hometown papers, to see the wonderful possibilities of such a
week, where in every locality readers will be asked to
subscribe for the local weekly, and in addition to the hometown paper where they were born—if they were not born
where they how live.
The home-town paper ls ever ready to "boost" for the
other fellow, to print item after item about this or that
kind of a day or week—the time has come for it to boost
and blow Its bugle for itself and all home-town papers to
put on a campaign of publicity, and take advantage of what
other papers will do.
It ls also a notable fact that very few of the readers of
those papers realize what a loss it would be to tbem and
to tbe world if the "country paper" should cease to exist.
The large papers, with Immense circulations, tell of "world
happenings" as they understand them, and display heads
telling of the latest scandals, prize fights and the misfortunes ot humanity.
But it remains for the "local paper," the "country
weekly," the "home-town paper," to really give the news
of the world, or that of Mr. Common People and his wife.
It is time that the country newspaper should do something to place itself on a higher plane, and also make some
noise. Just one paper to start something would not amount
to much, but If the 1500 country papers would Join in a
chorus, a noise that would go around the world would be
the result.—Farm and Home.
THE ASIATIC IN B. C.
When the Asiatic Exclusion League was organized in
Vancouver not long ugo, it was set down as purely labor
union propaganda and really received no serious notice in
other circles for some time. But it must now be regarded
as one of the burning questions of the hour in Pacific
Canada, says the Penticton Herald.
Primarily, the movement had its inception with consideration of the unemployment problem, and in studying
methods tor the care of thousands of workless men—many
ot them war veterans—walking the streets while few, if
auy, Japanese or Chinese were in need. The League was
formed and It grew. It now has a large, general membership, but that is not all, for it has really succeeded in
arousing concern in a measure that affects the closest
industrial Interests of the Pacific Coast.
The Aslastic problem ls now seen as a grave one. It
has assumed portentious proportions. It Is surrounded by
tacts that command attention, it Is seen as a menace thai
cau uo lunger be winked at. lt is something that la
watched with anxiety across the border, ll is a fad that
has aroused concern alike In Pacific Canada and In Pacific
parts of the United States. There are several significant
reasons for this. Study them for yourself, and search
your own mind for the answer:
1, Tho Asiatic population of British Columbia's border-line section has Increased several thousand-fold within recent years.
2. For some reason, the Japanese invariably prefer land
, near as possible to the boundary line, adjoining the
United States.   Why?
If a Japanese seeks farm land, and lias the choice of
two sections—one cheap and good in the interior, and the
other Inferior in quality but higher in price, located somewhere close to the boundary, he will pick out the latter.
Never know to fall—especially lately.
4. It is clear that the Japanese Influx affects, principally, the land along the Delta, the Fraser Valley and all
along the line that Is not so far from the American boundary. And, when he prefers city life, lie choses Vancouver
or Victoria, ln preference to other large towns in tbe
interior.
6. There are few old folks among these Asidtics. The
men are youngish, vigorous, most of tbem either brought
up ln the province, or else men who came here ln their
young manhood. Many saw service in the Japanese army.
And their womanfolk are also young—of child-bearing age.
6. The Japanese are a prolific race and their babies are
coming ln numbers that far excel the birthrate of their
white neighbors.
7. These Asiatics are imitative and are rapidly acquiring
the ways of the white man, without losing any of thejr own
native customs.
Here, then, are a few facts to leave one thinking.
One does not have to be an alarmist to sec here some
palpable proofs of an Asiatic menace. Trained thinkers,
law-makers, students—all are beginning to look grave
when this question arises. There is an apparent reason
—several reasons, in fact!
THE AGE OF THE TEACHER
This is the age of the teacher, said one of them in a
Bpeech before the institute. Not yet, replies the Seattle
Post-Intclllgencer. The teacher Is more honored today,
the place of education ranks higher than It did. Yes. But
the teacher Is lower In rank than the soldier. Our appropriations for schoolifaiid education arc a mere drop ln the
bucket as compared with our appropriations for battleships and cannon, armies and forts, rifles and bullets. Our
personal expenditures for chewing gum and cosmetics far
exceed these of books.
When the ago of the teacher really Is here, the most
beautiful buildings will be schools. These will not be
merely for children, Adults, too, will use them. Men and
women never will stop learning. The things which now
require and get a greater part of our energies, the things
that should he simple—growing and making and distributing— these will he accomplished with much less energy
expenditure thnn now. Our real energies will be turned
toward developing our understanding—of ourselves, of thc
earth, of the universe. That will he the age of the teacher,
For then the leaders of men, the great minds, will be the
teachers.
SPECIALIZE IN SOMETHING, YOUNG FRIEND
This ls a little lay sermon to you, young man, or you,
young lady. If you are soon to go out in life, to make
your own way in the world, don't make the mistake of
thinking the world has a welcome for you unless you can
do something particularly well, remarks the Penticton
Herld. Without training you will he out of luck. The
cities and towns are filled with mediocre men and women
who never learned to do anything well. British Columbia
has thousands of them—failures ull.
Some girls imagine a happy, ideal marriage will come
along to simplify things and render training unnecessary,
We hope it will turn out that way, but it seldom does.
Learn to cook and keep house, anyway. You owe at leasl
that much to hlm and to the kiddles that come. But don't
be too sure about the ideal marriage. They are scarce al
best. Probably you will have to earn your own living.
Well, learn to do it to perfection. If you follow n commercial course, learn—be sure of this—to spell perfectly.
Many girls tn the cities are getting constantly "fired" and
hired and "fired" again, because the weary employer has
no time to fool with getting the same letters written over
half a dozen times. And the same thing with anything
else you learn for your keep.   Make sure you know it well.
And you, young mnn—learn a trade or some particular
method of earning a living, no mutter what it honestly is.
Without a trade you will soon drift Into the workless ranks
In town or city.' In Vancouver, Victoria, ail ovor this
province of ours, there are thousands of men, misfits,
human weeds, effigies of mankind, wastrels, wreckB, dismal
failures—the fellows who never troubled to learn something when they had the chance. Remember, you cannot
'"get by" without knowing how to do something well. The
world is exacting und has no place lor the untrained, (let
busy now, while this idea is hot in your mind, and learn
something well!
THE HEADLIGHT MENACE
In spite of the law, and warnings that It will be strictly
enforced, the headlight menace Is still unabated, and glaring lights seem to be the rule rather than the exception.
Some cars In the district are particularly bad, remarks an
exchange, and the light from them Is so blinding that it is
impossible to do anything when meeting them but draw
away to one side of the road until they hnve passed, and
even this entails some risk, as at times one is so blinded
that it Is Impossible even to see the side of the road. Every
good motorist should take a pride in obeying the laws, and
those who will not do so of their own accord Bhould be
made to do so.
"If the eighteenth amendment cannot be enforced then
lt Is time to talk about amending or repealing it," Juvenile
Judge Ben Lindsey, nationally known Jurist, declared a
few days ago at Denver. "However," he continued, "we
will have no fair test as to whether lt can or cannot be
enforced until the rich are made to respect the law Just
as much ns the poor. The greatest need ln this country
today ls to abolish 'special privilege,' ond the new special
privilege which the eighteenth amendment has created—
namely, the right of the rich to have their booze, while the
same right is denied tbe poor."
SLIPSHOD MARRIAGES
Divorce records of British Columbia show an Increase
of 80 per cent, in twelve months. No wonder. Testimony
ln some Instances reveals an acquaintance of a couple of
weeks preceding the marriage; while several Instances
show the weddings were "mail order" or matrimonial
bureau matches. Al lot these, It wus demonstrated, were
marriages made of hasty acquaintance by mull, with
hardly any personal acquaintance when brides and grooms
came from distant places of the United Slates In complete
the contract. One old mnn met an elderly relative ot his
expected blooming fiancee. He took a chance anil married her after the woman threatened lo sue him for
damages. That was only a couple of weeks ago. Now be
Is In the divorce court.
Our divorce courts will always have a constant run of
business so long as marriage Is treated flippantly. The
amazing part of the thing is that there are not more of
them, when all things are considered.
Strange, isn't it, that a man will dicker bull' a day over
the purchase of a tattered set of harness, but will rush
Into wedlock with a slatternly old shrew, open-eyed, on
the Impulse of an Ill-guarded moment!
And how often will one find a shrewd housewife clawing
over the contents of a remnant sale for a whole afternoon
to save a few cents, but who will smirkingly yield her life's
future to a beery old bum whose acquaintance a self-
respecting devil would shun!
We will always have divorces so long ns wedlock is
regarded as something that Is left to work out its own
problems In a haphazard way.—Penticton Herald,
Dry   Goods   Department
NEW   ARRIVALS  THIS  WEEK  IN  LADIES'  AND
MISSES' DUVETYNE AND VELVET TAMS—In all
....shades; priced at : $2.75
SPECIAL VALUES IN "PAILOR MAID" FLANNEL
MIDDIES, for ladies and r.iisses; in Navy, Scarlet, Rose
and Gold.
MISSES' AND CHILDRE A'S SERGE DRESSES IN
"SAILOR MAID" STYLL—From $4.75 to $11.75
SPECIAL SALE THIS WEI K OF NOTTINGHAM LACE
CURTAINS—ln White ar.d Ecru; these are odd lines
to clear at bargain prices.
SPECIAL REDUCTIONS IN SCRIMS AND CURTAIN
MUSLINS
EXPECTED TO ARRIVE VHIS WEEK—Another large
consignment of the newsst styles in Ladies' Velour
Coats, direct from the be.it Eastern manufacturer.
Men's Department
SPECIAL VALUES IN MEN'S "PROGRESS BRAND"
SUITS AND OVERCOATS, from  $29.00 to $49.50
Your inspection invited of our large range of Suitings
in our Made-to-Measure Clothing. Style, Fit and
workmanship guaranteed.
JUST RECEIVED, NEWEST STYLES IN MEN'S SOFT
FELT HATS, in Black, Navy, Bronze, Green and
Brown, at  .^  $4.50
AL^O MEN'S AND BOYS' TWEED HATS AND CAPS
TRUNKS, SUIT CASES AND CLUB BAGS
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
WEEK END SPECIALS
Brooms—Regular $1.00 each for  80c       Pacific Milk—Tall tins 7 for 95c
Sunkist Pineapple—Tall tins.... 3 for $1.00       B. C. Sterilized Milk—Baby size, doz. $1.00
Black Cherries—2M> tins 3 for $1.00       Skipper Sardines—Per tin 20c
White Swan Soap—Per carton 30c       Seville Orange Marmalade—4's tins... 85c
Oatmeal Toilet Soap  6 cakes 25c
Church Notices
Holy "Trinity Church
Kcv. W. Leversedge.
2!ird Sunday after Trinity.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Church
Hev. Father Beaton. '
24th Sunday After Pentecost.
Mass at 9 a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Itev. Jas. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30-p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Grace Methodist Church
Her. G. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Itegulur Evening Servhce, 7 p.m.
He thought he'd go n-liuntlng
And he grabbed himself u gun,
He shot the first thing he saw move,
His hunting now is done!
Fashion note says women must wear
skirts longer. Ilow much longer—six
months?
Mr. Crerar, while he rails at tariffs iu Canada, finda no
fault apparently with protection on the other side of the
line, which is of the same kidney In politics as thom elves,
because he assures us that the tariff against Canadian
agricultural products was not dictated in quite tlie sense
ot hostility. If not, It was pure selfishness on the part of
the Farmers as a class.
Thos. E. Bate
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
„   COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for sale are
asked to list same with us. Our clients'
interests will have our best attention.
I'OIl SALE—Large house on full size
lot.   A great bargain at $900; small
cash payment and very easy terms.
This will Bell quickly.
Insurance at Low Rates
The good sound, non-board English
insurance companies which we represent recognize that the rates charged
in Cumberland have been far in excess of what they should be, taking
Into consideration the splendid'. Are
protection which the city has, and
have consequently cut the rates very
materially. In some Instances ihey
nre over a third less than prevailing
rates.
Thos. E. Bate
NOTARY PUBLIC
Maxwell'* Office    Dunsmuir Avcaao,
this
Specials for
Week
2 Only, DRESSERS in ivory finish, bevel (ROP A A
plate mirror.   Specially priced at tP^Su.UU
3 Only, CHIFFONIERS, in ivory finish, (jJOfT A A
bevel plated mirror.  A snap at tpaU. \j\3
1 Only, WHITE ENAMEL DRESSING (gAP AA
TABLE, three mirrors. Priced at tptuDtAtXt
1 Only, IVORY FINISH DRESSING     $QA AA
TABLE alPBENCH; a very fine gift tDOU.UU
HEATERS
Before buying your Heater be sure and inspect our
lines and get our prices. We invite inspection and
comparison.
Nairn's Linoleum
We have just received two rolls of Nairn's Scotch
Linoleum, priced at $1.50 a yard.
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Dad (sternly): "Where were you
last night?"
Son: "Oh, just riding around with
some ot the boys."
Dad: "Well, tell 'em not to leave
their hairpins in the car."
May: "You men don't know a thing
about cooking. Now, how would you
dress a chicken?"
Howard: "With a fur collar in summer nnd pumps aud silk stockings in
winter,"
Liddell's Orchestra
— is —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions
of all kindsr* Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave. November 6, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five'
Mothers and
Grandmothers
WE HAVE JUST THE THING FOR THOSE
TIRED AND TENDER FEET
Slater's Dr. Hammond's Cushion Shole, in the best of
black kid $10.00
Aunt Mary's Outsize Shoes and Oxfords,, in good
black kid, cushion insoles and rubber heels. Priced
from $6.25 to $8.50
, The Albany Shoe, in a new last; these shoes will fit a
very wide foot and look very dressy   $7.75
CANDIDATE HAD
TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Armishaw
Had Narrow Escape When
. Launch Foundered.
Fathers and
Grandfathers
WHO HAVE TENDER FEET, CALL IN
AND LET US SHOW YOU OUR
Slater's Dr. Hammond Cushion Shoe $12.00
Murray's Army Last Shoe—We can fit the widest foot
in town with this shoe  $10.50
The older people need not think that they cannot
buy shoes in Cumberland to fit them—we have them!
It has been proven time and time again that "Chums"
for the Children are the cheapest in the long run.
We have in stock now a full line of Slater's Strider—
without doubt the best good shoe for Men and Women
Caving ShoeStore
FOOTWEAR ONLY
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of those high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERKIFIELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avo.
Cumberland, B. C
Doesn't Sound Scotch
Dcd-Slttingroom    (superior),
nice
locality; central; use of kitchen; lady
who dines preferred.   Scotch paper.
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are reOiUired in certain locations,
and new installations will not -be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
1
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, wo therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper* with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended tliey will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY,  LIMITED
llllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllillllllllll
111
A graphic slory is told in The Vancouver Province by J. B. Armishaw,
Farmer-Labor candidate in Comox-
Alberni, on his arrival in Vancouver.
Mr. Armishaw resides at Sayward aud
lias entered in the political contest, he
and Mrs. Armishaw covering as mucli
of the big constituency as possible.
Last week while campaigning tn a
launch among the islands of the tlulf,
ho had n thrilling experience and narrowly escaped with his life.
At Long Bay, Lasqueti Island, lies
the battered bulk of the fine forty-
eight-foot launch Lebannon. Floating
In the sea Is the sodden pulp of L'l.imn
pamphlets of campaign literature uf
Mr. Armishaw.
Dishevelled, and ln the clothing
tbey wore when they were niarooncil
in a terrific storm upon a dangerous
rock-bound ledge on Thursday night
of last week, Mr. and Mrs. Armishaw
arrived ln Vancouver aboard the Princess Patricia from Nanaimo Saturday
morning. The candidates ability to
sound military distress signals upon
u battered cornet, perhaps, saved the
lives of himself, his wife and their
engineer, named Meek. Despite the
horrible experience, Mrs. Armishaw,
wbo Is bruised severely, calmly announced that although her husband's
campaign went literally on the rocks
they will both be in the field snd
active again within a few days, despite
heavy financial loss and after-effects
of exposure.
Struck a Squall.
Mr. and Mrs. Armishaw for the past
month have journeyed up and down
the Bust Coast of the Island. Last
Thursday at break of day they chugged
peacefully out of Parksvllle. When
due oil tbe Balleuas Light, a sudden
squall and southeast gale struck them
with such severity that the powerful
boat was bard set to hold her head.
There was no chance to progress
against the gale and for several hours
the pilot had to keep her head-on,
afraid to make a turn in either direction because of the heavy seas. Tide
drifted the vessel toward the west
coast of Lasquleti, and as darkness tell
Thursday night all available anchors
were used to hold the craft secure
within Long Bay. At 8.30 o'clock,
however, the storm grew to terrific
fury. All tbe "hooks" failed to hold
and within a few minutes the occupants of the vesel were horrified to
find themselves pounding upon a
rock-bound shore.
Mrs. Armishaw was prostrated by
sickness, owing to the heavy buffeting
throughout the day, and as the rocks
were reached, the small vessel heeled
to an alarming extent, heavily pounding her hull. When a rocky ledge a
few feet above the waterline was
"reached, Mr. Armishaw realized it offered tbe only chance of escape. Dragging his wife, be dropped overboard,
and through terrific combers which
made his task an ordeal, managed to
drag her upon the ledge, where they
were joined by the engineer.
Cull* for Aid.
On the heights behind the ledge a
light was seen, but shouts and calls
for aid could not be heard above the
storm. Mr. Armishaw remembered that
bis cornet wns aboard, and at great
risk returned to the buffeted boat to
secure it. On liis return to tho ledge
he commenced calls for uid. Above
tlio wailing of tbe wind, thc booming
of gigantic combers and the pattering
gusts of rain his clarion calls were
heard. As an ex-suldler he knew the
military bugle calls, the "double," the
'lire call," the "stand-to" and many
others, signifying distress. For almost two hours lie blew the cornet,
while his frightened wife and the engineer crouched for shelter against
the wall ot stark rock. He was completely exhausted with his efforts,
when Mrs. Armishaw, who had
watched Ihe light In the distance, discovered that it was moving. Tlie
three watchers, amid breaking waves
upon the rock, cried hysterically when
tbey observed lhat a second light
moved to bo a lantern, which some
person ivnved as a signal that the
calls tor aid had been heard.
An hour later the marooned parly
heard a cheery shout of encouragement, as a man, who proved to be
Lorry Mason, late of the Seventh Battalion, now a farmer, came cautiously
clambering down the cliff to their
aid. The bugle calls, through the wall
of the storm, had awakened him from
bis sleep, and although there was no
path or trail from bis cabin to the
rock ledge, he made one.
Taken to Cabin.
After a severe climb over the sheei
face of the bluff, through dense timber and trackless forest, the wreck
victims readied the Mason cabin,
where fire, food nnd clothes helped
make them more comfortable for the
balance of the night.
The following morning, Friday, they
descended the cliff, aided by the Cook
brothers, alBo farmers of tbat section.
There, still pounding in tlie surf, but
afloat, was the Lebannon. The surface of Long Bay was a mass of white
pulp resulting from the release of
24,000 campaign pamphlets, which had
been part of Mr. Armishaw's hustings
cargo. Mattresses, bedding, clothe!-,
and general paraphernalia also float
ed broadcast, and Mr. Armishaw said
it was "a terrible mess." The kindly
, rarmers secured a number of empty
j gasoline drums, which they interted
IL0=IL0 THEATRE
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Nov. 4 & 5
The  Most Thrilling,  Fascinating and  Astounding
Newspaper Story Ever Conceived by a
Human Brain
The city wits shocked and panic-stricken by a hair-raising
mystery. The police wore baffled. ' It was SOME STORY.
The City Editor told the young reporter to—"GO AND (JET
IT!" Antl after the most astounding adventures that ever
befell one man, HE DID!
MARSHALL NEILAN
presented In a sensational Mile-a-illinutc Meliidruiua of Newspaper Life
Go and Get It
Extra Attraction—2-Reel Comedy
The Punch of the Irish
m  i
Children, 25c.
Adults, 50c.
MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30
Children, 15c. Adults, 35c.
|  Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30 p.m.
|   Monday—Dorothy Dalton in "Behind the Mask"
into the hull of the wrecked launch to
keep her afloat, offering to put her
on the ways and repair tho damage lo
Iter hull if the wrecked candidate
would send up enough lumber for the
job.
By Friday night Mr. and Mrs. Armishaw had been transported to Nanaimo, and next day Ihey reached Vancouver, bereft of everything except (lie
saturated and wrinkled clothiug they
wore—and the cornet.
The loss of belongings and damage
to the boat is a serious matter lo Mr.
Armishaw. It was freely and voluntarily loaned lo him by Mr. Meek, of
South Vancouver, who acted as engineer, and another man, who bad an
interest In It. The chief cause of
worry to the indomitable candidate,
,vlio said Ills lost literature was the
literary work of ten years of his life,
.vas the fact that he should have been
it Courtenay on Saturday, where an
important political convention demanded his presence.
A Double lMili'hiniinl
He claimed that till bis papers were
.aken from his when be joined the
Uritish army, and now be was neither
(englishman  nor a  lilliitchniaii.
London paper.
He Can See His
Fate
decreed for hlin on Thanksgiving Dny.
probably without glasses, hut if you
would read the Thanksgiving menu
well, you may need them. Anyway, wc
suggest a simple examination and
ocular test nt our ollice, without cost
or obligation to you.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
BREAD!
The one food that all the people want all the time.
Plain and wholesome — substantial and nourishing—
Give it the first place on your
table.
No other food has the same
food value.
Ours is a really delicious louf.
Ask your grocer to send you a
loaf today.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J; II. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir  Avenue     ■     Cumberland
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings ot the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock ln thi' Memorial
Hall.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings nre held on the second
ind fourth Wednesdays ol each month,
in the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
K Entiui, Secretary; F, Slaughter,
Treasurer,
NOTICE
Accounts owing to F. Wilcock,
formerly of thu City Meat Market, may be paid at that office.
F. WILCOCK.
P.O. Box 165, Cumberland.
Louis R. Stevens
i'yc.-ighl Specialist
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - -   B. C.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY  STORE
(.'nod Seli'climi of Pipes, Cigar and
Cigarette Holders.
* *
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
* *
James Brown
Cumberland Six
THE  CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 5, mi.
Third Annual G.W.V.A.
ARMISTICE MASQUERADE
BALL
To be held in the Ilo-Ilo Hall
Cumberland, on
Friday, Nov.   11
Commencing at 9 P.M. Grand March at 11 P.M.
PRIZE LIST
Best Dressed Lady value $6.00, cash $15.00
Best Dressed Gent value $5.00, cash $15.00
Best National Lady value $7.75, cash $2.50
Best National Gent value $8.00, cash $2.50
Best Sustained Lady value $5.75, cash $2.50
Best Sustained Gent value $5.00, cash $2.50
Best Group Representing Allies, 4 or more, cash $20.00
Best Comic Group, 3 or more cash $15.00
Best Comic Lady value $7.50
Best Comic Gent  '■■ value $7.00
Best Red Cross Nurse  value $7.50
Best Hobo  value $5.50
Best Clown  value $8.00
Best Local Advertising Character value $7.50
Best Flower Girl  value $4.00
Prize Waltz $10.00
Entrance fee of 50 cents per couple for Prize Waltz.
A NUMBER OF TAMBOLA PRIZES FOR
SPECTATORS
Only those in Masquerade Costume allowed on the
floor until after judging takes place.
GENTS IN COSTUME $1.00
LADIES IN COSTUME 50c
SPECTATORS   50c
GftAND RAFFLE
For Electric Reading Lamp
Drawing will take place on night of the -l /\
Masquerade.    Tickets now on sale at        I UCi
AMERICANS "DO"
LONDON IN ONE DAY
Gives the Old City "the Once
Over" in Short Order
LONDON.—Here Is the average daily
schedule of the United States visitor
who comes over to see what tho "Old
Country" is like, according to the
Doily Express:
Eight a.m., breakfast; 8.22, taxicab
to Westminster; 8.30-9, "do" the Abbey; 9 to 9.0, House of Parliament
and Big Ben; 9.0 to 9.21, taxicab to St.
Paul's; 9.21 to 9.44, "do" St. Paul's;
9.44 to 12, tour of the galleries—Tate,
.National and Wallace galleries;
12.15 to 12.30, "Old Curiosity Shop";
12.30 to 1.30, lunch at the Chesshire
Cheese; shopping—Regent and Bond
Streets; 3 to 3.1, rest; 3.1 to fl, see the
rest of London; 0.30 to S. dinner witlr
wine; 8.30 to 11, theatre; 11. supper,
night club and dancing nnd "so to
bed" at —?
Thus ends another "diirn dull day"
for the American tourist, who, on his
return home, will ever after be the
exalted person because he bas "seen
London" and "knows England."
The schedule is not a burlesque one
in the opinion of a number of travel
bureau officials whose nerve-racking
task is to act as ciceroni to the great
number of visitors from the United
States at present In London. ,
"It Is a fact," said an American Express Company official to a Daily Express representative, "that American
tourists come here after loafing from
six weeks to three months on the
Continent with the determination to
'do' England in a week and London in
a day. The main reason for their
rush is the cost of hotel rooms, which
are higher here than In New York."
The same official calculates that the
average American tourist spends $60
a day apart from his hotel accommodation.
The American Express Company
estimates that there are at present
about 10,000 Americans in London,
most of them spending only a day or
so here en route to the steamers
which will take them home.
OKANAGAN APPLES GO
TO NEW YORK MARKET
BY THE TRAINLOAD
Okanagan apples are moving to
New York in trainloads! Three fast
trains of 30 cars each left last week
bound for New York, the most dis
criminating fruit market on the
American continent. As soon as the
citizens of Gotham dug their teeth into an Okanagan apple this season
they demanded more, and these train-
loads are the result.
This makes a new record in apple
shipments in Canada, If not on the
Pacific Coast. To have even one train
billed for one city Is somewhat of an
achievement in tlie apple trade, hut
when three trains of more than thirty
cars each are rolling to the one market the event becomes of more than
local importance.
BABIES ARE OLD FASHIONED
An old physician of the last generation was noted for his brusque manner and old-fashioned methods. On
one occasion a woman called him in
to treat her baby, who was slightly
ailing. The doctor prescribed castor
oil.
"But, doctor," protested the young
mother, "castor oil is such an old-
fashioned remedy."
"Madam," replied the doctor, "babies
are old-fashioned things."
THE BEST BEERS
CASCADE and
U.B.C.
BRILLIANTLY clear and sparkling, with a flavor that satisfies,
CASCADE BEER is just what you want. There is no purer beer
made. It is brewed with all the care and experience of a
great plant, the culmination of thirty years' progress in brewing British
Columbia's favorite beer.
Union Brewing Co., Ltd.
Distributors
Nanaimo, - - B. C.
WORDS OF WISDOM
SPOKEN BY WRIGHT
Mr. Peter Wright, who ts. perhaps
aie most trusted and admired of all
aie British Labor leaders, and who is
trustee of the British Seamen's and
ilremen's Union, speaking recently ln
,vuox Church, Ottawa, electrified Mb
.ludience by the delivery of a power-
,ul message of hope, of Inspiration to
.•ndcavor and of manliness,
"Where are we going?" was his text.
"Many people," he said, "seemed to
ulnk that silting still and looking for
upermen to put everything right was
ne solution. When many years ago 1
./us 40 days in rounding Cape Horn
ne vessel came out from the light
,llh everything strained to the ut-
uost, every seam leaking, and every l
all torn to shreds. Yet, as soon as
.lie Horn was rounded, every soul on
ioard set to work to repair the dam-
ige; there was no waiting for super-
uen; the repairs were done by all
luiuls, from the 'old man' to the boy,
mil the sooner we followed that example the better.
.Much tiusslng.
There was a lot of "gassing" today
iy idealists and politicians who "fld-
lled while Rome was burning," and
,vho forgot that tbe past six years had
.vituessed a silent revolution that had
.'hanged their physical and mental
.uakeup. There were a lot of people
.vlio had lost their taste for work,
,vho wanted something for nothing.
there were many war millionaires on
paper; who could not realize more
ivealth than he had himself. These
people had to decide "where they were
going" as he had to do when he was a
youngster. At 17 years of age he could
not read nor write, neither did he
iiiow the alphabet. He had now
jome to Canada as the representative
of lour Welsh universities. In 1889 he
.vas sent to the "clink" with three
.lionilis' hard labor; last year he was
chief magistrate of his own town.
Personally he thought that every
magistrate should do "time"—it would
make for discretion ln dealing out sentences. He had been offered honors.
He had declined them, not because he
did not appreciate the offer but because it would be like putting a (98
collar on a 98-cent pup. That was
common sense and common sense was
uadly needed.
Where was the common sense otthe
so-called leaders? They had to
realize, as all had, that they were living in 1921, not in 1914. Everything
had changed; they were in a new
world, and what was needed most was
men and women big enough to rise to
the occasion and create a better
future. Idealists without experience
and common sense were of uo use.
Many people held tbat tlle present
economic system was wrong. Perhaps
it was, but what system was to be put
In its place? The syBtem introduced
Into IlusBla by Lenine and Trotsky?
Some said tbat they would abolish the
capitalist. Well, Lenine had tried to
do that, too. He had killed off the
doctors, the scholars and the capitalists, and the result was what might be
called something stronger than
mess, if strong language was allowed
in a church. And today these Idealists
were appealing to the Allies for a
common sense lead that would save
the starving population of Russia.
People must learn to think for
themselves instead of sub-letting their
responsibilities to professionals, for
that was what they were doing. In
(lie churches, in politics, in municipal
matters they let things slide and took
tlieir opinions ready-made from their
preachers, leaders and newspapers.
It was by education, by love Instead
of hatred, by common sense, by work
aud by unity and honesty that the
world would be awakened to the op,
portunity before it for the betterment
of mankind, for goodness and the
abolition ot wars for all time.
THE WORLD OF INDUSTRY
California leads the states In the
number and variety of its mineral
products.
Tho output of asbestos In the pro'
vlncc of Quebec Inst year amounted to
160,000 tons, valued at $10,000,000,
The largest trade union In Germany
is the metal workers' union, which
has more thnn 1,600,000 members.
Probably the greatest poultry mart
in the world Is at Petalumn, Cat, with
nn annual business of $26,000,000.
A series of experiments begun In
1914, but interrupted by the war, has
recently been resumed In Brussels on
the use of palm oil In internal combustion engines.
Glass-making is one of the great
national industries of Belgium. There
is scarcely a civilized nation ln the
world thnt is not more or less depen
dont upon Belgium for window glass,
mirrors and table glass.
Seamless boats are now moulded
nut of steel. A plate of metal is run
into a huge hydraulic press, which
forces or stamps It into the form of a
boat and turns lt out virtually ready
for the sea.
Silk substitute bas been manufactured from the web of a spider native
to the Island of Madagascar. It ls
claimed the product is far superior
In many respects to anything that has
ever been devised from real silk.
A noted German engineer states that
coal, under 200 atmosphere pressure,
heated to between 540 and 720 deg. F.,
and mixed wltb hydrogen gns, becomes liquid. As tho energy ls greatly
Increased he predicts that In the near
future it will replace the solid coal.
Many a single lady feels that she
has been double-crossed by fate.
The Man of the Hour
In this hour of Canada's most acute national
crisis, the country's greatest need is leadership—not class leadership, not sectional
leadership, but NATIONAL leadership. A
' pilot must be chosen possessing the necessary courage, foresight, breadth of vision
and determination to lead the nation safely
out of the existing economic uncertainty.
And one man stands out head and shoulders above
all others as pre-eminently fitted for the task.
Born on a farm near St. Mary's, Ontario, Arthur
Meighen is a true son of the people, a toiler who
has fought his way to eminence by sheer ability
and force of intellect. Entered Parliament in
1908; appointed Solicitor-General in 1914; Minister of the Interior in 1917; and Prime Minister
in 1920.
At the Imperial Conference he was acclaimed by
the Press of Great Britain as a great statesman,
as a strong, virile, vigorous personality—alert in
mind, keen and far-seeing in judgment, and with
a fearless determination to stand for the right.
Professor A. D. Skelton, of Queen's University,
and biographer of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, wrote of
the present Prime Minister : — " He has already
given proof of high administrative capacity. His
personal integrity is beyond question."
Of himself, Arthur Meighen said to his constituents the other day : — "You know where I stood
on this issue in 1908, in 1911, and as in 1911 I
stand to-day."
A Red Force   A Real Leader
Ccmadfa%lcL  %MqtWl
The National Liberal and Conservative Party
a Publicity Committee
WORTH REMEMBERING
A raw lemon works wonders when
brasswork ls very dirty. Rub the
stained parts and wipe off almost at
once with a clean flannel.
A simple cure for catarrh Is to occasionally sniff up the nose some salt
water—a teaspoonful ot salt to half
a pint ot warm water.
When polishing furniture wring out
a cloth ln hot water and wipe over the
polished surface before applying the
cream. The result will be a high
polish that will not finger mark.
Fruit stains may he removed from
table linen by moistening them with
camphor. If treated ln this manner
before they are placed ln water the
stains will disappear after the linen
has been washed.
If new patent leather shoes are
rubbed all over with a tittle vaseline
put on with a piece of soft flannel,
and polished, they will never creak.
Patent leather should be kept in a
warm dry place, and should not be
worn on wet days.
A traveller stopped to chat with a
farmer who had a large number Ot
men at work in his fields.
"Most ot these men are ex-soldiers,"
said the farmer.
"Indeed!" inquired the traveler;
"were any of them officers?"
"Two ot 'em. Owe was a private, and
that fellow beyond was a corporal, but
the man beyond -waB a lieutenant, and
that man over there ln the corner was
a captain," replied the farmer.
"Indeed! And are they all good
men?"
"Well," said the farmer, "the private
is a first-class man, and the corporal
pretty good, too."
"But what about the lieutenant and
the captain?"
"The lieutenant's only so-so," replied
the farmer, with some hesitation.
'And the captain?"
'Well, Bir, I ain't a-going to say »
word against no man who has beon a
captain in the army, but I've made up
my mind about one thing—I ain't going to hire any adjutants."
CLEARING OUT TUBERCULOSIS IN CATTLE
The accredited herd system put in
operation two years ago by the Health
of Animals Branch of the Department
of Agriculture at Ottawa has been well
received by the stockmen of the country. It is confined to pure-bred cattle
and is intended to rid as rapidly as
possible the disease of tuberculosis
from Canadian herds. Figures given
out by the Veterinary Director-General
show that thirty-six herds had up to
October 1 been fully accredited.
The accredited herds are widely distributed. Nova Scotia has 1; Quebec
9; Ontario 10; Manitoba 2; Saskatchewan 4 and British Columbia 10.
BesldeB tho herds which have been
fully accredited there are at present
558 herds which have heen tested
once or more in process of accreditation, and 54 herds awaiting the flrst
test, making a total of 648 hords. As
the herds in this lot fulfil the necessary conditions, they become fully accredited. The inspectors of the Health
ot Animals Branch are making as
rapid progress as is possible under
the circumstances, taking into consideration the limited number of men
engaged in the work and the great importance of doing the testing carefully
and accurately rather than rapidly.
The readers are always removed
from the herd at once and usually are
immediately slaughtered under veterinary supervision. Applications for
testa have been coming In faster than
they could be dealt with. A waiting
list has therefore been formed and as
soon as circumstances permit the
herds in this list will be tested, taking them as far as possible in ths? order in which applications have been
received.
"I would like some powder, please,'
she said to the druggist.
'Yes, miss; face, gun or bug?1'    „
While travelling by rail   a   fussy
gentleman began to question a girl as
io her destination. After learning she
was going to Alberni he asked:
"What motive is taking you there,
ijny dear?"
'   "I believe they call lt a locomotive,
lSIr," was the reply.
i    The "obtrusive stranger"   was   ex-
Jtlnguished. $
November 5, 1921.
•THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
For Quality
and Service
Try
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF THE FINEST
QUALITY GROCERIES
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN
SEASON
SPECIAL AGENCIES:
GREAT WEST TEA PERRIN'S BISCUITS
CRYSTAL WHITE SOAP
THE REDUCTION  IN PRICE
HAS CONSIDERABLY
INCREASED THE SALES
FORD TOURING
CARS
NOW SELL AT
$782.09
IN CUMBERLAND
GET   ONE
Corfield Motors
FORD GARAGE
COURTENAY
JUST ARRIVED AND ON DISPLAY A BIG SHIPMENT OF
Crockery Ware and
Sybil Pattern China
In stock patterns. We can supply one piece or a full
Dinner Set. The Sybil pattern is a very captivating
one and is having tremendous sales in the cities.
I
ALSO A NICE DISPLAY OF H
Hand-Painted Nippon Ware
These comprise some beautiful specimens of Japanese
high-class painting, and are very suitable for presents.
Come in and view these goods at your leisure.
Kitchen Chair Special
$2.25
Good strong, solid chairs,
at a special price, each	
We have on display some nice Cut Glass Water Sets.
FURNITURE — RANGES — HEATERS
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. H/ate Hardware Co.
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
In Clean, Well-Fough Game, the
Local Boys Scored a Win
Over Their Rivals.
On Saturday last a Junior League
football game was played on the Recreation Grounds between the Bevan
Juniors and the High School team,
which ended in a victory for the
local team by a score of two goals ti
Mr, W. Walker acted as referee and
called the teams together promptly
at 3 o'clock, the personnel of the opposing teams being:
BEVAN JUNIORS.—Walker, Robertson, Marshall, Williams, Weir, Fielding, Parks, Aitken, Keenan, Strachan
and Burns.
HIGH SCHOOL.—Fouracre, Stevenson, Hood, Reid, Stewart, Wilcock.
Potter, W. Jones, Michell, H. Jones
and Watson.
The High School won the toss and
Bevan Juniors
Lose Two Games
decided   to   defend   the   west   goal.- Asuo and TagooYamemuro
Keenan kicked off and at once sent
the ball to the right wing, who crossed
it over to the goal mouth, but Four-
acre cleared wonderfully. Midfleld
play continued for a time, tben Jones,
the Inside left for the High 3chool.
put in a terrific drive which Walker
tipped over the bar. Shortly after the
referee called half-time.
The second half started witli lots of
pep, the High School boys showing
superior football throughout. Michell,
the clever centre forward for the High
School, pulled off some fine combination work, and after a few minutes
of this period scored a goal entirely
out of reach of the goalkeeper. The
ball was centred and Keenan took 11
down In front of the goal, where he
passed to Aitken, who missed an open
goal.
Midfleld play continued for some
time, then Michell, who was playing a
rattling good game, took the ball as
far as the penalty area, where Marshall tipped the ball with his elbow,
the referee awarding the High School
a penalty. Hood made no mistake in
kicking it and scored the second counter for the local team.
The Bevan full-backs and goalkeeper
played a sterling game, but when the
whistle blew the High School boys
bad the goals in their favor.
Honor Roll Of
Public Schools
The standing of the leaders in tlle
different divisions of the Cumberland
Public School at the end of October
was as follows:
Division 1.—1, Toshio Kajiyama; 2,
Dellnn Freloni; 4, Colina Damonte;
Lottie Dallos; S, Delina Freloni; 4,
Colina Damonte; 5, Katie Bono; 6,
Mary Francioli.
Division   II 1, Eileen   Howling;   2,
Jessie Baird; 8, Winnie Young; 4,
Olive Jones; 5, Josephine Bono; 6,
Leland Harrison.
Division ».—1, Walter Hughes;
Priscllla Cloutier; 3, May Hughes
2,
4,
Margaret Halliday; 5, Jean MacNaughton ; 6, Jack Baird.
Division si.—Ruth Oyama; 2, Isuo
Abe; 3, Marguerite Struthers; 4, Gordon Walker; 5, George Raga; 0, Alice
Billon.
Division 6.-1, Kathleen Cooke; 2,
John Horbury; 3, Fatauni Iwasa; 4,
Joe Ducca; 6, Mary Clarke; 0, Tadaki
Division 0.—1, Norma Parnham; 2,
Mah Shun; 3, Mabel Hillyer; 4, Lily
Leversedge; 5, isunet'o Asao; li, Dick
Marpole.
Division 7.—Norman Frelone; 2,
Edna Davis; 3, Margaret Salmon; 4,
Sarah Laurence; 5, Allan Glen; 6,
Jean Johnson.
Division 8.-1, Eddie Cassnr; 2, Elsie
Mali; ,1, Thelma Ronald; 4, Annie
O'Brien; 5, Jlininie Chieu; C, Victor
Toniassi.
Division ft—1. Oswald Reid; 2,
Delina Peretto; 3, Nellie Walker; 4,
Lena Tomassl; 5, George Strachan; C,
Rudi Bonora.
Division 10.—1, Hilda Anderson; 2,
Nina Shields; 3, Catherine Brown and
Cazuko Iwasa; 4, Muriel Partridge; B,
Edna Watson; 6, Allien Francesclui
and Irene Davis.
Division 11.—1, Jenny Lawrence and
Alice Taylor; 2, Muriel Harrison and
Archie Welsh; 3, Nellie Nicholson; 4,
Bennie Nicholas; 6, Wilton Dalby; 6,
Ham Woo and Ung Dick.
Division 12. 1, Jamie Joe; 2, Agues
McKinnon; 3, Bripon Parnham; 4,
Jessie Robb; 5, Walter Hunt; 6, Barbara Martin.
BIG LUMBER PLANT AT
VICTORIA OPENS UP
The Bevan Juniors again went down
to defeat on Sunday last at the hands
of the Cumberland Juniors, by a score
of two goals to one. It was a great
surprise to the football fans to see
the Bevan boys again lose. The game
was clean and fast and very strenuously fought. Cumberland's defence
was good and sound and had the
Bevan forwards in check all the time.
Mr. D. Wilson refereed the game.
This reverse has made a situation
which creates a great deal of interest
in the Junior League, as all the four
teams have still a good chance of winning the cup, only three points separating the top and bottom teams In
the league standing, which ls:
P. W. L.
Cumberland Juniors 4    2    1
Union Bay   3    2    1
High  School    4    1    2
Bevan Juniors  3    12
Will Give Employment to About
200 Men—Had Been Closed
Down for a Year.'
D. Pis
1    5
SOLE RIGHT TO FISH IN
NITINAT ARM DISPUTED
BY SEVERAL PARTIES
Indians Claim the Creator Gave
Them Sole Right—Canning
Co. and Others Want It.
ALBERNI.—A great deal of interest
is being shown by local residents i>
the dispute between tbe different parties wishing to ilsh in Nitinat Arm.
The Indians claim the first riglit
claiming to have received sole privilege from the Creator, when He
placed them there. ,
Tlie Lumml Bay Canning Co. stale
that tbey received the sole permission
from Ottawa; while the Independent
fishermen, returned soldiers, and oth
ers, hsve received their permits from
the provincial government.
Tlie end Ib nut yet. Mr. E. G. Taylor.
Inspector of Fisheries, Nanaimo, Is expected hero shortly to try ond settle
the dispute.
The big mill of the Cameron Lumber Company ln the Inner Harbor at
Victoria resumed operations this
week, after a shutdown of nearly a
year.
With the reopening of the mill 201)
hands will receive employment. During the long period ot inactivity the
mechanical force was maintained
practically intact, so that nn reorganization of personnel will be necessary. The equipment has been kept
in preparation for resumption at short
notice, so thnt there will be no delays
In getting down to a normal production basis.
lOOS IN DEMAND
CAMPBELL RIVER.—A number of
men have arrived here for the International and Duncan Bay logging
camps and will be employed ln working two sides owing to tlie Increased
demand for logs from tho Vancouver
and Victoria mills. Both the Seymour
Logging Co., who have a camp near
Seymour Narrows, and the Lamb Bros.,
at Menzies Bay, are going full blast
and putting great numbers of logs ln
the water. Tbe rtee In the price of
logs ls reflected In the cheerful countenances ot the big operators here and
a continuous period of prosperity is
looked for.
A six-year-old was sealed In the
barber's chair. "Well, my little man,"
said tlie barber, "bow would you like
your hair cut?"
"Like papa's, with a little round
hole nt the top."
ALL your favorite
sa\ centers—each In
■ substantial chocolate
overcoat. You'll have
to eat one to learn how
good they ore—aad eat
many to learn that
they are alt equally
good. Come in as you
(o by today, end get
tome. Packed la a
handsome box that
will please anybody.
Vhe Chocolates "with
the 'HbnderfiUCenters
You are just in time to
order Personal Greeting
Christmas   Cards
varied selection at
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
OLD   COUNTRY
A WORD
TO
THE  WISE
FALL AND CHRISTMAS
S AI LIN G S FOR ALL
STEAMSHIP LINES
ARE AVAILABLE —IF
YOU   ARE   PLANNING
MAKE
Reservations
EARLY
A TRIP TO THE OLD COUNTRY THIS WINTER SEE OR
WRITE
E. W. BICKLE
Agent     t Cumberland, B. C.
Passports Arranged
BOOKINGS
Canadian National Railways
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
Mrs. Stewart of Oyster Bay Is 111 In
the local hospital with pleurisy.
Mr. J. Storey had his wrist broken
while cranking an auto.
Mr. Whipple, manager for Air. Anderson of Quathiaskl Cove, was badly
bruised by being hit by sn nuti
truck.   He is getting on nicely.
Miss Holm and Mr. Wolf of Mungei*
Bay were married on Saturday.
Mr. Neville Smith of Vancouver 1 =
staying with his sister, Mrs. Herbeit
Pidcock, for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Brunton have
moved from the beach to live on the
river. Mr. Brunton has just finished
his new garage, which is ready for
patrons.
A boom of logs got away from the
river the other day, but was picked
up minus one section.
Plenty of deer are being brought in
There Is a good deal of pit-lamping
going on, as shots are heard nearly
every night.
Mrs. Perkins: "How quiet Harold
and Doris are In the next room."
Mr. P.: "Ves, it remindB me of niy
army days, it was always wonderfully quiet Just before an engagement."
There are more Italians living in
New York than iu Rome.
U^t
Style   -   Quality
Fit
These are the three essentials in a good Suit of
|\     clothes.   We can give you these combined with good
workmanship and comfort.
W Prices range from $25.00
'JlP GIVE US A TRIAL—WE AIM TO PLEASE.
CLEANING, PRESSING, REPAIRING and DYEING
at City Prices
1
NOTE.—Will Club members please pay at the store
in future.
J. M. GARDNER
ILO-ILO BLOCK
CUMBERLAND Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 5, 1921.
We are now showing
Whip
The Arrow
Form-Fit
Collar
for Fall
THESE HAVE JUST ARRIVED
ALL ARROW COLLARS, 25c EACH
Ladies' New
Velour Coats
Just arrived. We offer a very special line in Velour,
all shades, at our special price  $19.50 *
PLUSHETTE COAT, good quality, lined throughout.
Price   $39.00
EXTRA HEAVY VELOUR COATS, beautifully lined
and strictly tailored; guaranteed to give satisfaction.
Price   $39.00
LADIES' NAVY SERGE SKIRTS, Allwool Serge, well
made and all sizes up to 36 waist. Prices from $6.75
RED MIDDIES FOR GIRLS AND LADIES —Just
what is required for thesdtold days.... $4.50 and $5.75
Phone
134 '     A
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
ADVANCES A NEW THEORY
Dealing with a theory of mental
phenomen that Is declared to have
electrified blase audiences of the
East, Marshall Neilan's latest production, "Go And Get It," comes to the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre Friday and Saturday.
' "Go And Get It" is a newspaper
Btory in which an energetic team of
reporters unearth a mystery of startling nature. Back of the entire mystery plot Ib the pertinent question of
the day: Is the substitution of new
human organs practicable so far as
the prolongation ot life is concerned?
The audience will be mystified and
thrilled by the unusual events that
line the path of the reporter who Is
told to "Go And Get It."
The entire plot is based on this
scientific phenomen although the story
is a most truthful picture of a newspaper reporter's work.
The title is taken from a quartette
of words that strike home in the heart
ot every newspaper man—"Go And
Get it." This feature hcu more thrills
than an airplane ride.
"The Punch of the Irish."
There will also be a funny two-reel
comedy, "The Punch of the Irish,"
at each show. The usual matinee will
be held at 2.30 on Saturday.
On Monday only, Dorothy Dalton is
presented in a powerful drama, "Behind the Mask."
BUILDERS'
SUPPLIES
BEAVER BOARD—Samples of material, descriptive
booklets and prices on request. A clean, sanitary
and artistic wall covering.
SASH AND DOORS—Many sizes in stock. Factory
delivery can be promptly obtained.
ROOFING MATERIAL of 1, 2 and 3 plys.
LIQUID ELASTIGUM for repairing and re-coating
roofs.
WALL PLASTER, LIME, PORTLAND CEMENT,
BRICKS, VITRIFIED SOIL PIPE, DOWN-PIPE
AND EAVE TROUGH, PLUMBING FIXTURES
AND SUPPLIES.
BUILDERS' HARDWARE,   PAINTS,   VARNISHES.
Prices gladly furnished on application
C. H. TARBELL & SON
Phone 30
Hardware and Sporting
Goods
Thanksgiving Day
Monday next, November !th, ls the
Dominion Thanksgiving Day, and will
be observed as a general holiday. AU
stores and offices will be closed on
tlmt day.
Armistice Day.
Fi-iit::;-, the 11th, ls Armistice Day,
but will not be kept as a holiday, ln
tbe evening Uie U.W.V.A. will hold a
big Masquerade Carnival In the llo-llo
Hall.
MUNICIPAL VOTERS' LIST
HAS BIG INCREASE
The date of registration for householders, licence holders, etc., on the
city voters' list closed on Monday last.
A large number of names were turned
In but there were a number ot duplicates, and when the list was cheeked
up it was found to contain 168 names,
which ls a big increase over the num
ber on the old list. In due course the
names will go before the Court of
Revision.
DEBATING CLUB WILL
MEET SUNDAY NIGHT
To Discuss Advantage of United
States Cancelling All War
Debts of the Allies
On Sunday next the newly-formed
Debating Club will hold a session in
tlie Literary and Athletic Club hall.
The debate will be "Would it be to
the advantage of the United States to
cancel her war debts of the Allies?"
Mr. H. G. McKinnon has the affirmative, with two supporters, while Mr.
R. C. Walker will take the negative
with his supporters.
The Debating Club was,successfully
organized last Sunday, when Mr. Chas.
O'Brien was elected president, Mr. H.
G. McKinnon first vice-president, Mr.
E. Hughes second vice-president, and
Mr. Fred Eaton secretary.
It ls the Intention to make these debates a feature of the periodical
smokers,
Library Books Circulating Well.
The Public Library circulated 601
books in September and 724 in October. Many people are taking advantage of the Library,
The books from tbe International
Library of Technology, of which the
club has purchased fifty volumes, is
being made good use of. The books
cover lines of study on practically
every vocation in the district.
Personal Mention
Mrs. Smedley, of Grantham, is tbe
guest of Mrs. G. Kinney for a few
days.
MrB. Sarah Brown, of Maryport
Avenue, left for Vancouver on Wednesday last to meet her son Martin,
svho has justarrived from Cuba. He is
■xpected to visit Cumberland in the
.iear future.
Mr. aud Mrs. J. Shortt and family
.eft for Victoria by motor on Wednesday, where they will spend a week's
vacation.
Cumberland
SPECIAL SERVICE AT
HOLY TRINITY SUNDAY
Sunday being the day observed by
tb churches of Canada as a general
thanksgiving, special service Will be
held at Holy Trinity Church in the
evening.
In addition to this phase, the service will also embrace special prayers for the success of the Washington
conference. Armistice Day will also
be suitably recognized.
THANKSGIVING  TEA
IN METHODIST CHURCH
A Thanksgiving Tea will be held in
the school room of the above church
on Wednesday next, the 9th inst, from
3 to 6. There will be a stall of miscellaneous articles for sale, Including
home cooking, needlework, etc. Admission 25 cents.
MASQUERADE BALL
ON FRIDAY NEXT
Miss Reece, who has completed her
training at the Vancouver General
Hospital, is spending a holiday In
town.
Mr. J. Cameron left on Saturday
co go to Nanaimo by motor, but on
reaching Qualicum had to leave his
.:ar there and go by rail. He proceeded to Vancouver where he underwent a minor operation at the General Hospital. He is expected back on
Saturday,
Mrs. Burrell of Victoria, wbo has
iieeu visiting her daughter, Mrs. A. C.
Lymn, returned home beginning ot the
week.
Mr, Thomas Graham, General Super-'
intendeut of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
Graham, returned from Victoria on
Wednesday.
Mr. Jas. L. Brown and Mr. Robt.
Strachan wont to Nanaimo Thursday
to attend the meeting of the Upper
Island Football League. They returned on Friday.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer, Canadian Collieries, returned
from Nanaimo Wednesday.
Miss Maude Evans returned to Vancouver Tuesday after spending a
week's vacation with her sister, Mrs.
J. B. Bergland.
Mr. J. G. Quinn returned from Ladysmith and Nanaimo Monday evening.
Mr. J. G. Millichamp, representing
John W. Peck & Co., was in town during the week.'
Mr. Charles Graham motored to Nanaimo Thursday and returned Friday.
DEPARTMENT STORE SPECIAL
"Why, hello. Bill, I hear you lost
your job in the Department Store."
"Oh, yes, I got fired."
"You got fired? How did that happen?"
"Oh, I just took a sign from a lady's
shirt waist and put it on a bath tub."
"And you got fired for that? What
did the sign read?"
"It Bald, 'How would you like to Bee
your best girl in this for $2.75."
SMOKER IN ATHLETIC
HALL SATURDAY NIGHT
A smoker for the members of the
Athletic Club will be held ln the hall
Saturday night, commencing at 7.30.
It is Intended to have a programme of
longs, recitations, instrumental music
and an exhibition of gymnastics by
Mr. Jackson.
Refreshments are taking a more
lolid line this time, according to one
tt the officials, including some real
nome-made cooking. The "good old
jeer" and smokes will be provided.
MEETING OF ST; JOHN'S
FIRST AID ON SUNDAY
Considerable Interest is being taken
in the Great War Veterans' Association masquerade ball to be held on
the niglit of Armistice Day in the llo
Ilo Hail. Last year on a similar oc
caslon the hall was packed to the
doors, and judging from all reports
the same tiling will happen next week.
Valuable prizes have been allotted
for the different classes, and many
new costumes are expected to be
worn. Dancing commences at 9 and
the grand march at 11.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
NOTES
A special Thanksgiving service will
be conducted in St. George's Presbyterian Church on Sunday evening at 7
o'clock. Two anthems and a solo will
be rendered by the choir, and as Sunday evening is the nearest date tp
Armistice Day, special mention will
he made of the heroes who died in
France and Flanders in defence of
home and Empire. Come and participate in the Memorial and Thanksgiving Services.
At 1.30 the Naramata Adult Bible
ClasB meets in the church. This class
is organized for the study of God's
Word, for service to mankind and for
sociability among its members. Come
and take part in the threefold pro
gramme. _  ■
Subject for discusslan: "Does being
a Christian help a man out in tight
places?" Come and hear what men
who have been there have to say
about it.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., has promised to read
a paper at the monthly meeting of the
3t. John's First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association, to be held on Sunday.
The meeting will be held in the Lec-
ure Room ot the Athletic Hall and
commences at 10.30.
WANTED
iMALL COOK STOVE WITH OVEN.
Good price given. Address S„ Box
418, Post Office, Cumberland.
HELP WANTED—MALE
MANAGER FOR BRANCH OFFICE
in Cumberland; salary $100 per
month; no experience required but
must be willing to invest few hundred dollars. For particulars write
the Permanent Crease and Pressing
Co. Ltd., 127 Pemberton Building,
Victoria, B C.
LOST
BETWEEN NANAIMO AND CUMBER-
land, 1 tire 30x3%, tire carrier,
licence number, 18936, and tail light.
Finder rewarded on returning to
Foo Yuen, Chinatown, Cumberland.
FOR SALE
An old lady, hearing someone remark that the malls were very irregular, said: "It was so ln my young
days, no trustin' any of 'em."
We solemnly swear that we never
sold the government any booze, and
we'll go farther and say that no
member of the government ever
brought us any—worse luck.
rEN-ACRE FARM, HAPPY VALLEY,
2 miles from Cumberland; 6 acres
pasture land, 3 acres good timber;
pasture land, 4 acres good timber;
4-room house and barn; ten tons of
cheap; halt cash, balance arranged.
Chiu Yeuk, Happy Valley, or cjo Box
322, Post Office, Cumberland.     8-48
1900 MOTOR WASHER;   ALSO FIRE
Screen.   Apply Mrs. E. W. Bickle,
FRESH VEGETABLES DELIVERED
to your door every Tuesday and
Saturday. Ripe Tomatoes, Potatoes,
Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Turnips,
Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddlngton, Cal-
hottnd Ranch, Sandwick P.O.      2-44
PIGS AND POULTRY
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIGS
and Poultry. Kwong Yick, Chinatown, Cumberland. Telephone 5-F.
P.O. Box 282. 13-62
For Complete Satisfaction   Use
Cream of the West Flour
49-lb. Sacks
at 	
$2.35
24-lb. Sacks
at 	
$1.25
Green Ribbon Seeded Raisins, 2 pkgs. 45c; 5 for $1.00
Teco Pancake Flour 2 pkgs. 35c
Sunflower Salmon, flats 2 for 25c tails, each 25c
Canned Corn 5 tins t'or $1.00
Empress Cocoa, 35c lb 3 lbs. for $1.00
I   B. & B. CHOICE TEA, per lb 50c
|   OUR SPECIAL BLEND CEYLON TEA, lb. 60c
Quaker Pork and Beans   5 tins for 50c
Libby's Pork and Beami, 20c tin 6 for $1.10
Sultan Pineapple, flats 3 for 50c tails, 4 for 90c
Jelly Powders, all flavors, 2 for 25c 9 pkgs. $1.00
I	
I     FOR FLAVOR TRY OUR FRESH GROUND
COFFEE
I   B. & B. SUPREME, per lb 70c
j   B. & B. No. 1, per lb 60c
B. & B. No. 2, per lb 50c
B.C.
APPLES
Buy them By the Box and
Buy them
NOW
IT IS THE ONLY ECONOMICAL WAY
Reasonable Prices
$3.75, $3.85
$2.25, $2.50
No. 1 GRADE, ALL CHOICE
PACK, per box	
No. 2 GRADE—
per box	
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know liow to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot o( free advice on tlie subject it you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The Itegulur Monthly Heeling will be held in the Lecture Hoom
of ihe Athletic Hall on
Sunday, Nov. 6th, at 10.30 a.m.
A PAPER WILL BE READ BY MR. CHAS. GRAHAM
A. J. TAYLOIt, Publicity Agent.
Cumberland Lodge No. 1662
Loyal Order of Moose
A General Meeting of the above Lodge will be held on
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12th, AT 7 O'CLOCK*
in the Fraternity Hall.
WM. HENDERSON, JR., Secretary.
Tender Wanted
Separate Tenders wanted for
Underpinning and Re-Shingling
house on Dunsmuir Avenue.
Tenders close Tuesday night,
November 8th. Lowest or any
tender not necessarily accepted.
Apply
, EjUNCAN THOMSON.
t'liti.s- men school club
(.TESTS AT ENJOYABLE PAETI
A very enjoyable Hallowe'en social
was held In tlie Anglican Church Hall
on Frldny last by Uie Olrls' Club of
the High School. About fifty guests
and members were present. Whist,
dnncing, fortune-telling, games, singing nnd music comprised the onter-
talnnient. The hull was gaily decorated, nnd the young folks had a most
enjoyable time.

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