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The Cumberland Islander Jan 21, 1922

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Array Provincial Library
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
«
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland Sews.
FORTY-FIRST YEAR—No. 3.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA., SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1922.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
First Meeting of 1922
Council Held On Monday
Mayor and Aldermen Sworn in By City Clerk Mordy—Various
Committees Named By His Worship—Meetings to Be Held
On Alternate Mondays—Proposal to Engage City Solicitor—
Aid. Maxwell Wants Estimates in Early.
BASKETBALL
NEW SECRETARY
ELECTED BY LEAGUE
Alex. Denholme Occupies Position—Postponement of Games
Will Not Be Allowed
The first meeting of the newly-elected City Council was held
in the Council Chambers on Monday night, all the Aldermen being
present, and Mayor MacDonald occupying the chair. City Clerk
Mordy, as Returning Officer, administered the oath of ollice to the
new council, which is comprised of:
MAYOR—D. R. MacDonald.
ALDERMEN—T. Bannerman, Wm. Beveridge, A. Maxwell, C.
J. Parnham, F. D. Pickard and Duncan Thomson.
Following the swearing in, Mr. Mordy congratulated the Mayor
and Aldermen on their election, and extended a haarty welcome to
the new council, hoping that tlie year would be a happy one.
Mayor MacDonald thanked the City Clerk for his welcome. He
said the city had a good council nnd he hoped they would have a
first-class year. Last year the business of tho city was carried on
well and it was up to the new council to keep the good work going.
He mentioned that last year the aldermen had missed very few
meetings and he hoped the new council would do as well.
His Worship said the City Clerk had
had a great deal of work to do In tlle
past year, much of which was outside
of his duties, such as all the details
iu connection with the new houses for
the loldiers, which had taken up a lot
of time. He hoped the men would appreciate this work.
The Mayor hoped the work of the
council would be carried on harmoniously and without friction.
Each alderman spoke in a similar
strain,
City Clerk He-Appointed.
The lirst business taken up was the
appointment of a City Clerk, thc Mayor
culling for nominations. Aid. l'arn-
hum moved and Aid. Pickard seconded a motion that Mr. Mordy be reappointed City Clerk, at the same
salary. There was no other nomination and this motion carried unanimously.
Aid. Beveridge moved und Aid. Bau-
nerniun seconded, that Mr. Baird be
re-engaged at the same salary. This
was also carried.
On motion of Aid. Pickard, seconded
by Aid. Thomson, the Mayor and City
Clerk were empowered to sign cheques
on behalf of the council.
Court of Revision.
Notice wns given that the Court of
Revision of the Assessment Roll will
be held on Wednesday, Februnry 8, in
the Council Chambers. A motion wus
carried that tho council as a whole
sit as n Court of Revision.
Loan Bylaw.
Permission was granted to bring In
a loan bylaw to get necessary loan
from the Royal Bank of Canada for
current expenses.
Aid. Maxwell said he would like to
see the school estimates in before tliey
started borrowing money. Ho claimed
they should have estimates nnd try
nnd live within them, lie wou'd like
the School Trustees to get the estimates In by next meeting,
A motion wns carried Instructing the
City Clerk to request the secretary of
the Hoard of School Trustees to have
the estimates In as soon ns possible.
Medical Health Ollicer Rc-Appollltcil.
Dr. E. It. Hicks was re-appointed
Medical Health Ollicer for 1922, on motion of Aid. Pickard, seconded by Aid,
Thomson.
It was suggested that the poll-tax
be collected soon, ho that the council
would luiuw thc amount to be derived
from this source, thus assisting them
ln Axing the tax rate for the yoar.
iiowever, on consideration it was decided to delay the collection until a
more suitable lime, on account of the
.scarcity of work iu recent weeks.
Would Engdgo lily Solicitor.
Aid. Beveridge said he would like
io hear the aldermen's views as to
engaging a City Solicitor, in order to
avoid Irregularities iu the business
done. One thing he thought that was
not done li^ht was the annexing of the
additional school grounds without a
vote of the ratepayers, He said this
was outside the city limits, nnd a vote
of the ratepayers was necessary to in-
vadilate It.
Alderman Parnham agreed that
there were a number of things that
cropped up during the year on which
tlle council need legal advice. He
moved that the City Clerk write to Mr,
P. P. Harrison asking hlm to state his
fee to act aa City Solicitor for tlie year,
f'h is was seconded by Aid. Thomson
and carried.
Wunts Financial Statement Frum the
-    Klre Brigade.
Aid. Maxwell said there was on the
minutes of the last meeting of the
council mention of payment to flre-
laitm. He claimed lhat tlio Fire Brigade or nny other organization thnt
collected public money should publish
a financial statement. He moved that
the Fire Brigade be asked to give the
council a statement of receplts and
expenditures for the past two years.
.Aid. Parnham seconded the motion,
lie said he was connected with the
Klre Department, ami il" there was any
Irregularity he certainly wauled lo
know about it. The motion carried.
1'u ils'ii on Alternate Holidays
It was decided lo hold the regular
council  meetings   on  iilternale   Mondays, the lirst of which will lake pluce
nuxt Monday, commencing at 7.
Committees for the Your.
The following committees were
named by the Mayor for V.i'22. the
first-mentioned in each Instance being
chairman:
FINANCE- Aid. Parnham, Pickard
and .Maxwell.
BOARD OF WORKS-Aid. Thomson,
Pickard and Maxwell.
BOARD OK HEALTH—Aid. Maxwell,
Beveridge and Parnham.
WATER—Aid. Beveridge, Thomson
and Bannerman.
FIRM WARDENS -Aid. Bannerman,
Parnham and Thomson.
I IGHT— Aid. Plckardj Bannerman
and Beveridge,
Library Assn.
Meets On Monday
The annual general meeting of tho
Cumberland Public Library Association will he held on Monday nlghl ut
8 o'clock, In the Lecture Hall of the
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association,
lt Is most importnnt (hat n good attendance of members be present ut
this meeting as organization work for
the coming year will be gone Into.
The annual congregational meeting
of St. George's Presbyterian Church
will be held on Wednesday evening.
January 25, at 7.30 o'clock. All members and adherents ot the church ure
asked to be present and take part ln
the business of the evening.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
TONIGHT BY WOMEN'S
AUXILIARY OF G.W.V.A.
The Women's Auxiliary of the G. W.
V. A. will hold another of their popular whist drives und dances tonight
(Friday) in the Memorial Hall. Whist
starts promptly at 8 and dancing at 10.
Refreshments will be served during
the Interval. The attendance at these
socials Ib increasing each time and
there will likely be a "full house" tonight.
ANNUAL MEETING OF
HOI Y TRINITY CHCRCH
The annual meeting of the parishioners of Holy Trinity Church was held
iu the Church Hall on Tuesday evon-
Ing, Hev. W. Leversedge, Vicar, occupying Uie chair.
The reports ami financial statements
of the different branches were submitted and were of a satisfactory
nature.
Election of officers for the year resulted as follows:
Vicar's Warden, T. II. Mumford,
People's Warden. .Mr. G. E. Apps.
Church Committee— Messrs. J. Walton, J. Shortt, II. Bryan and W. P.
Synions.
Synod delegates will be elected on
Sunday evening, after service.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF AT UNION BAY
Week Kniling January 11),
Progressive, coastwise; Plunger and
Scow, Vancouver; Ypres Maru, Japan;
Charmer. Vancouver; Canadian Observer, Nanoose; Wireless, coastwise;
Canadian Traveller. Fraser Mills; Canadian Rover, Ocean Falls; Mont
Cervin, Vancouver; Palthvlus, Seattle; Coutil, Vancouver; Clayburn and
Scow, Vancouver; Masset, coastwise;
Newlngtpn, coastwise; Joyful, coastwise; Wulhemo, coastwise; Active,
coastwise;- Marvin, coastwise.
A meeting of the Comox Basketball
League was held lu the Athletic Hall
on Monday last, when much Important
business wus transacted, Including the
election of a Becretary-teraBurer to
nil the position vacated by Mr. Pringle,
who Iiub left tho city. Mr. Pringle did
excellent services while secretary and
his services will be greatly missed.
Mr. Alex. S. Denholme was elected to
till the position ot secretary-treasurer.
The withdrawal of the Waverley
senior team from the league was announced, on account of their Inability
to Held a team, some of their players
having left town. It was decided that
all points won and lost In the games
played with the Waverley team be
null and void. The first half of the
schedule Ib now almost over, and lt
will be necessary to re-arrange the
senior schedule.
The postponement of games will not
be permitted In future. Once the
second roun dot the schedule is drawn
up all teams must either play on the
date specified or forfeit their points.
The league was very emphatic on this
point. **
Players to Be Re-Registered.
lt was also decided to re-register
all players on teams, as some teams
wish to drop players and others wish
tu sign new ones on. Team managers
and captains are reminded tbat they
are only allowed to register eight
players. The re-registratlou should be
eut to the secretary at once.
The league standing, Including the
games played on Wednesday, ls as
follows: ~
SE.MOR.
'earn. P.
Five T's     3
Keystones    3
luminal!  Island     1
Brownies     3
INTERMEDIATE,
Teum. P.   W.  L. Pts.|
Owls      4     4
High School     4     3
Deniuan  Island     3     1
Methodists     4     1
Riff-Raffs       4     0
Band Concert
Sunday Evening
City Band, Assisted by Singers,
Will Give ntertainment in
Ilo-Ilo, at 8.15 P.M.
Pts.
2
OWLS DEFEAT RIFF-RAFFS
The Cumberland City Band will hold
another of their popular concerts ln
the llo-llo Theatre on Sunday evening next, after church hours, the entertainment being timed to commence
st 8.15.
Being close to the 25th of January,
ihe anniversary of the birthday of
Bobbie Burns, the Scottish poet, the
band will render a few Scotch selections. Including some of Burns'
songs. Also other artists will render
.■icoltlsh boIos.
This should prove to be a splendid
entertainment and all lovers ot music
should take advantage of this opportunity. The programme as arranged
is as follows:
"God Save the King."
1. March, "Swinging Along," arranged by G. Hawkins; City Band.
2. Grand selection. "A Day wi' Robbie Burns," by J. Ord Hume; Band.
3. Violin Solo, "Echoes of Ayrshire,'
Mr. G. Liddell.
4. Song, selected, Mr. R. Splttal.
5. Cornet solo, "The Cottage Where
Burns Was Born," Mr. H. Murdock.
6. Selection by Liddell's Orchestra.
7. Song, selected, Mrs. J. Baird.
8. Selection, 'Gems of Scotia," H.
Round; Baud.
9. March, "Will Ye No Come Back
Again?" arranged by F. Llnter; Band.
Mrs. W. Hudson will act as accompanist and Mr. A. Waddlngton will be
band conductor.
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
MEETS NEXT FRIDAY
The annual meeting of the Women's
Auxiliary ot the Cumberland General
Hospital will be held ln the Anglican
Church Hall on Friday, January 27,
at 3 p.m. It ls hoped for a large attendance of members for the election
of officers.
AMY SCOTT, Hon. Sec.
The Owls and Riff-Raffs basketball
teams settled their differences In the
big hull on Wcdnesdav last, the night
birds coming out on top. The Owls
started off well, netting 6 baskets before the Riff-Raffs got started. The
score at thc end of the flrst halt was
23 to 5 In favor of the Owls
Tlie second halt started with lots of
pep and close checking, the whole
gallery being on Its feet. This was by
tar the best half. The lads In maroon
•becked heavily and with excellent results. When tiie smoke had cleared
[he Owls wero ahead of the game 33
lo U,
Dangerfleld was the pick of the
winners, netting 14 baskets, whilst
Foster also did some good work.
Dalby and Hunden played well for
the losers.   Thc teams were:
OWLS.—Deuholuie, Farmer, Sommerville, Dangerfleld and Foster.
RIFF-RAFFS.—Dalby, Stewart, Hunden. McNIven und Richards.
FIVE T'S PILeTTp BIG SCORE
Immediately after the Intermediate
game, the Keystones and Five T's took
the held for a senior game. The first
half wus exceedingly close and It
looked as If the boarding-house boyB
Would have to taste defeat at last.
Conti and Plump were closely checked,
with the result that the score was only
11 to 12, in favor of the Five T's.
The league leaders started out in
the second half with a determination
io win, and they were loo much In this
period lor tho hoys wilh keystones on
their chests, Hie final score standing
41 to 14 in fuvur of the Five T's.
Conti and Plump starred for the
winners. The boarding-house guards
are a little too rough at times, with
the result thnt they give away too
many fouls. Prior and Robertson
were good for the Keystone forwards
anil Kennedy was excellent at guard.
The teams:
FIVE T'S.—Conti, Bannerman, Mortimer, Ryall nnd Plump.
KEYSTONES. — Prior, Tremlett,
Robertson, Kennedy, Nuuhb and Rod-
gers.
Mr. Jones refered both games to the
entire satisfaction of all.
HIGH SCHOOL TEAM
BEAT DESMAN ISLAND
Two Teams Made Trip on Friday
Night, the Brownies Going
Down to Defeat.
Two of tiie local basketball teams
made a trip to Denman Island on Friday night last to try conclusions with
the intermediate and senior teams of
that place.
The High School team displayed
their ability In the basketball game by
defeating  the  Denman  Intermediates
"BITS OF LIFE" IS A
NEW TYPE OF PICTURE
Four Epistides Combined in a
Continuous Theme of Dramatic Construction.
Marshall Nellun's latest feature production, "Bits of Life," which Is heralded as a genuine novelty in motion
picture entertainment, comes to the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre Friday and Saturday
of this week.
This photoplay offers (our episodes
in a manner which, lt is claimed, haa
never before been attempted on the
screen, three ot the four scenarios
being adaptations of short magazine
stories by well known magazine
writers.
The Initial episode Is taken from
The Bad Samaritan," a short dramatic story which appeared In "Tbe
Popular Magazine" and written by
Thomas McMorrow. The second story
ts a picturlzation ot Walter Trumbull's
tale entitled "The Man Who Heard
Everything," which appeared In
Smart Set." The third episode ts an
adaptation, of Hugh Wiley's popular
story, "Hop," which originally appeared in the "Saturday Evening Post."
For thc final episode Mr. Neilan presents bis own story, "The Strange Adventure," written especially for this
picture.
The four stories are bo combined
that a continuous theme ot great dramatic construction Ib displayed leading
up to a final punch.
Although the magazine or short
story Idea In photoplays has been done
before, It Is pointed out lhat the manner In which Mr. .Neilan handles the
presentation of this Idea discloses
something entirely novel in the way of
entertainment.
Thc largest cast of prominent players ever assembled In a Neilan production Is offered In this picture. Including Wesley Barry, linn Chaney,
Noah Beery, Harriet Hammond, llork-
cllffe FelloweB, James Bradbury, Fred
Burton, Teddy Sampson, Anna May
Wong, John Bowers and others of
equal popularity.
Besides this feature thero are tour
reels of comedy.
"The Passionate Pilgrim."
On Monday and TueBday a Bpeclal
feature will be "The Passionate Pilgrim." A Fox Sunshine comedy will
be screened In conjunction with this.
by 18 to 12. The play was lively
throughout and the decision was uncertain until wel) on In the second
halt. The High School boys aro very
proud of their well-earned victory,
Senior Team Loses Out.
The BrownlcB of Cumberland wore
not so successful In their game against
the senior team, the home boys securing the long end of a 17 to 10 score,
iu a good game.
Mr. Colin Campbell refereed both
games to the satisfaction of all.
After the game a dance was given
by the Island people, which added to
the pleasure of the trip.
"Origin of Mountains" Was
Intensely Interesting Lecture
Dr. Schofield, of the University of British Columbia, Gave Splendidly Illustrated Lecture to Members of Cumberland Literary
and Athletic Asociation—Proposal to Have Future Lectures
Open to General Public.
An intensely interesting lecture, which held the keon attention
of the audience from beginning to end, was that given on Saturday
night in the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association. The Board of Management lias arranged with the
University of British Columbia Extension Course Committee for
a series of lectures to be given this winter, and on Saturday Dr.
3. B. Schofield delivered the first of these.
While the Lecture Hall was large enough to accommodate all
who attended on this occasion, it is a sate bet that in future a very
much larger hall will have to be used, so highly pleased were all
who attended with Professor Schorield's masterly talk, which was
couched in language none could fail to understand.
The lecture was profusely illustrated with greatly enlarged
photographs, showing the formation of mountains, etc.
With smooth-flowing oratory and
simple language, the facts of the early
history of the physical world in the
making were presented in such pleasing form as to make the lecture a delight throughout.
The beginnings of lite on the world
were pictured as first appearing In the
sea. Then after millions ot years
amphibians, which lived part ot the
time ln the sea and part on land, appeared.
The geological structure of the
earth was then explained according
to its formative periods. Fire rocks
such as granite, formed the mountains.
As these disintegrated, sedimentary
rocks were constructed.
Among the many beautiful pictures
the speaker threw on the screen lu
the early part of his lecture was that
of a map of British Columbia, representing the mountain-forming periods.
First came those of the Coast Range.
These mountains had all the characteristics of the early fire-rocks. Without atratiation, the huge granite
masses arose ln their Irregular forms,
varying In their structure only when
the hot molten dikes ot mineral matter were forced up through the cracks
In the rock.
The peaks of these early mountains
were Invariably triangular In shape.
The Selkirk Ranges of mountains, occupying tbe central portions of British
Columbia, were also shown to be of
similar structure.
Not so those of the Rocky Mountains. These belong to a period some
three million years later, and their
twisted, twirled and folded masses
were all of stratified rock. The sedimentary deposits of ancient mountains
that had turned to rock under tho
seas, had been shoved skyward by
cosmic forces, bearing the untold
wealth ot fossil forms with them. Ouo
does not And much mineral wealth
among these stratifications.
Dr. Schofield lucidly oxplalued by
pictured illustration and graphic word
the different characteristics of these
two structures of mountain ranges-
the fire-rock and the stratified. Peaks
like Stephen and Robson wero of thc
"horn" variety, thus differing from
the peaks of the older formations.
And these newer mountains hore on
their highest summits the fossil forms
of ancient sea beds, millions of years
old.
In explanation as to how Ihe mountain ranges were thrown skyward, the
learned doctor showed that the volcano had no more to do with mountain making than do boils with the
building up of the human body, but
that all mountains arc horn of the
ea. He showed that the present
mountain systems border the oceans,
with the exception of the Alps aud
the Himalayas, and even they are
standing on the border of ancient sea
beds.
Dr. Scholleld then illustrated how
the mountains arose. At first the deposits made from disintegrating mountains of earlier periods were laid horizontally along valley bottoms aud on
tlle sea floor. Thus the prairies at
one time were covered by the sea,
which stretched from the SelkirkB to
the mountains of the Atlantic, atirt
from the North Pole to the Equator.
As these deposits were made, their
weight gradually pressed down this
sea floor till the fossil shell llsh and
other inhabitants that only existed In
shoal waters were buried over fifty
thousand feet deep. This sagging
down of the earth's crust weakened it
at the sea borders. Here is whero
the new mountains, like the Rockies,
were formed. Thc gradual lateral
pressure, caused by the continual
shrinking of the earth, puckered up
the crust of the earth at these places.
Thus continents arose, and have mountains only bordering the sea beds.
At the conclusion of the lecture Mr.
Thos. Graham moved a hearty vote of
thanks to Dr. Scholleld for hia vory
able and highly Interesting address.
Incidentally Mr, Oraham suggested
that on future occasions Ihe Hoard of
Management give ladles the privilege
of attending these lectures.
Rev. O. Kinney, who besides being
a minister of the gospel has made au
enviable name for himself as a mountaineer, and Is a Fellow of the Royal
Geographical Society of Loudon, in
seconding the motion extended Ills
words of praise to Dr, Schofield for
his magnificent address. Mr. Kinney
himself hud scaled some of the mountains shown on the screen, notably Mt.
Robson. being Hie Hist person lo do so.
It Is hoped to have a lecture in the
near future dealing with the different
forms of life existing on the earth in
prehistoric days.
Another lecture, probably the nexl,
will lie on Geology, having particular
reference lo the formation of coal.
There is no doulit that these lectures
will be luoked forward to with ke».i
anticipation.
VERY ENJOYABLE TIME
AT MEN'S CLUB SOCIAL
A very enjoyable whist drive and
dance was held last Friday, January
13, in Ihe Anglican Church Hall, under auspices of the Men's Club. Friday being the 13th, and considered by
'uiine to he a moat unlucky day. the
committee decided to make It 13 all
right. Whist Bturted off with 13 tables
ibut was soon made up to 18), and 18
games wore played, and for the dance
end of the evening. 13 dances were Indulged In.
Some very high scores were made
in the whist competition, and on the
,tore cards being checked up It was
found that Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Fyvle
had tiod for first place, with a score
of 102. It was decided lo cut the
cards, when Mrs. Fyvle won out. Mr.
Del Alexander received the gent's first
with a good score. The consolation
prize for the ladles wont to Miss
Plcrcey, but a certain lady, who Is
very popular, hud such a low score
that she decided not to turn her score
card In. Mr. Hassell received thc
gent's consolation prize.
After refreshments, dancing was Indulged In to the strains of a first-clasH
[orchestra, which had been augmented
for thin occasion by Ihe introduction
of Mr. Plump, on drums nnd traps.
Midnight arrived all too soon, everyone voting It one of the best.
Mr. Robert Splttal has purchased
the barbering business ot Mr. G. Liddell on Dunsmuir Avenue. The new
owner intends to give the best possible
service to his customers.
Fire Investigation
Commences Soon
Delay Caused By Failure nf (he
Government U* Re-Appoint
Fire Marshal Thomas
Tbere hun been considerable delay in
commencing ihe investigation Into thi
Ore which took place on ilio morning
•if January Si wben three business
places on Dunsmuir Avenue were entirely demolished by lire.
tbe cat|B8 ol tbe delay la entirely
the fault of ihf Provincial Government At the last session of tbe
Legislature the powers of the Provincial The Marshal were enlarged, and
the new art came Into force on Janu
ary 1 of thia year. However, the government overlooked the matter of re
appointing Mr. J. A. Thomas as Fin
Marshal, consequently when tlio first
Ure of tbe year took placo In Cumberland, Mr. ThomaB was absolutely without any authority to conduct an Investigation,
A meeting of the Cabinet was held
thin week and Mr. Thomas was reappointed. He is expected hero tonight and in all probability ho will
commence his investigation right
away.
Miss. i>. C. Wilson, stenographer of
the loeal Provincial Government oftloo,
visited Xnnnlmo on December 10th
and took the Civil Service Examination. Information has been receive.I
that she was one of the successful
candidates, Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDEtt
January 21, 1922.
iillllllllllllllllllllllllll
aAR THIS
N MIND
No rough work on our installations.
Fire Underwriters' specifications are followed to
the letter.
Materials exactly a:; called t'or.
Results al! that are expected.
Our installations take just long enough to do a
GOOD JOB—no longer—no shorter.
We invite expert criticism and minute examination of any installation we make.
On a recent tour of inspection in this city, the
Provincial Inspector of Electrical Energy pronounced our work Al.
WYANDOTTE PULLET
LAID 325 EGGS IN YEAR
Good Results of Careful Breeding and Selection Shown at
Experimental Station
CIVILIZATION BAD FOR
NATIVES OF FAR NORTH
S    L
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 £<■>.. Ltd. p. O. 314
m
WhoreiiR certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
with the v lives of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish lo point out that it is a serious olfonce to tamper with such
valves, ami should the offending partieB be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RA1MVAT STATION.
first Cla^.s Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM. M EH RIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B.C
k'EEP TO THE RIGHT
Now the New Year is begun, "Keep to the Right"
is  a  very  good  motto.    Follow   it  to  avoid     all
accidents.
Kepp to the right, too, when you telephone. That
is, he right in the way you telephone, be right in courtesy, in short, be right in all those practices which
make for good telephoning. Keeping to the right
means good service.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
TORONTO
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
SOLID STEEL TRAIN
Across
Canada
Leavei Vaneeuver 7.45 p.m.
Every Day
SHORT LINE
FAST TIME
Experimental Farins Note.
"Lady Out," a White Wyandotte at
the Dominion Experimental Station,
Invermere. B. C, completed her yearly
record on October 31, producing 325
eggs during the preceding 365 days.
She was hatched on March 25, 1920,
and commenced to lay in October. She
was placed iu a permanent laying
house and trap-nested from November
1. The following is her monthly egg
production Tor the year:
November 27, December 27, January
27, February 37, March 29, April 25,
May 27, June 29, July 29, August 31,
September 30, October 17.   Total 325.
During the four winter months
"Lady Dot" produced 10S eggs, which
is more than many pullets do in a
year. From August I to October 17,
whon she quit laying, she laid 7S eggs
iu 78 days. Commencing on May IS
and continuing until October 17, a
period of 153 days, she produced 150
eggs. "Lady Dot" did not go broody
during the, year, but commenced to
moult on October 11, and quit laying
on the 17.
Unfortunately there is no trap-nest
record of her eggs prior to November
1, 1920, otherwise her yearly record
would have been more. As an indl
vidual she is, if anything, small for her
breed, but is tlie most active bird in
the Hock.
"Lady Dot" is from an Experimental
Farm flock that averaged 197.5 ln their
pullet year, and is the result of six
years' breeding and selection.
CANADA HAS FASTEST
WIRELESS SERVICE
Recent achievements in wireless
telegraphy in this country show that
Canada continues well to the fore in
this important phase of international
life and give rise to further optimism
as to the possibilities of wireless.
During the past two months wireless
messages have been going out of Glace
Bay. Nova Scotia, across the Atlantic,
at the rate of eighty-two words a minute, a record of speed which was
scarcely thought possible to attain
twelve months ago. It is the fastest
wireless (or telegraph) circuit of its
length anywhere in the world. It
represents 410 letters per minute
against the cable's 300 letters per
minute. This is an inherent improvement in the accuracy of reception an*
the recording on the tapes is abso
lutely clear.
GREAT OIL GUSHER
PRODUCED IN TEXAS
Roar of Oil Rushing Up 4000 Ft.
Was Heard for Miles—Flow
Snid to Re 30,000 Barrels
Oilfield workers at Orange, Texas
are battling to throttle what is de-
lareil to be Texas' greatest oil
gusher. The Humble Company's
'Cresson No. 3," when brought in tore
iway the choker and other machinery
at its head and threw a giant spout of
oil that wrecked surrounding derricks
is,it fell., The roar of tlle oil as it
came up from a depth of 31160 was
heard for miles. All around the well
was a sea of oil.
Competent men declared that the
flow totalled at least 30,000 barrel:
daily. The well is 500 feet deeper
than any other in coast territory.
Traveller Predicts That Eskimo
Tribes Will Be Extinct in
The Near Future
.Members of the Eskimo tribes, who
total upwards of 5000 persons, will
be extinct during the lifetime ot people now living, according to a prophecy made in Toronto by S. Salns-
bury, who spent ten years in the Arc-
tic regions of Baffin's Land and Hudson Day. He declared the effect of
civilization on the Eskimo was appal
ling, their health and stamina break
Ing down completely. The chief
cause of their physical deterioration
is the introduction of civilized foods
white llour being particularly disastrous In its effects.
3ENTS MAY INCREASE
IN TERMINAL CITY
VANCOUVER.—Tenants of this city
ire fearing the increase of rents, and
.he fear prevails in business and rest
lentlal sections alike With the ex
ceptlon of some of the hotels, which
had to decrease rent with the closing
of bars, a number of tenants along
Granville and Hastings Streets have
received hints that they must not be
surprised if their rents will be raised
before spring.
Several big stores have cleared up
bargain sales and closed, with the
frank statement that they cannot
make ends meet with high rents.
B.C.
MAN LEAVES TO
CLAIM EXTINCT TITLE
SOUTH VANCOUVER.—Willard B.
Errtngton, who recently came here
from Winnipeg, Is leaving to present
claims for the extinct baronetcy that
died out with the demise of Sir John
Stanley Massey Errlngton, who died
many years ago. All efforts to trace
the next-of-kin failed, and the crown
then declared the title extinct.
The claimant says a secret marriage
in the family left doutaf for some years
but proofs, he claims, have been
cleared up. The late baronet married
the daughter of Baron Talleyrand,
famous French statesman, and left a
fortune amounting to more than i
million pounds. Legal counsel hat
been retained by the claimant in Victoria and In London. It is believed
that, a hard legal fight will be waged.
A Montreal capitalist, It Is reported, Is
putting up the money, as Errlngton ls
a poor man.
OPENING UP NEW
RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY
MOTOR CARS FOR BRANCH
LINE PASSENGER TRAFFIC
The demand for more frequent service on branch lines where passenger
tralllc Is not heavy, is something the
railways have long had to contend
witli. The heavy expense of running
frequent trains to accommodate a,
limited number of paaengers on branch
lines has given railway men much
1'uod lor thought. The Canadian National Hallways, on Us Brockville aud
Westport Division, has for some time
been experimenting with motor driven
railway cars. Instead of the regular
engine and heavy train of passenger
coaches, the Canadian National Hallway has adopted equipment much like
a motor bus. which runs on the regular railway tracks. It is operated by
one man. gives a frequent service and
so far appears to be extremely sue
cessful, 11' continued use proves sat
Isl'actory, tho plan will be adopted on
other branch lines of tlie government
roads.
Composed of "Men of a Type"—
J. C. Appleby of Vancouver
At Head of Project
VANCOUVER.—British Columbia is
to have a large, new religious com
munlty, composed of "men of a type,'
as the prospectus states. It is not a
stock-selling proposition, hut each
colonist is expected to pay his own
way, acquire whal land he is able to
buy, and receive aid If he needs lt.
A church will be erected, but no places
of amusement will be there. The com
.nunity will engage In fishing or
3ueen Charlotte Sound, near the colony site, and also lumbering and
farming. Goat raising may be another
industry.
Heading the community is Mr. J. C.
Appleby, pioneer merchant, of 438
Richards Street, Vancouver, The com.
nunity children will be educated by
the colony's own teachers. A newspaper  will   be   established,  and   the
tores will be co-operative, states Mr.
Vppleby; and the bank is expected to
e conducted along similar lines. Mr.
Vppleby is responsible for the statement that 600 people are expected to
ettle In the community before long.
Applications are coming in from distant parts.   All nations may be repre-
ented no color line Is announced.
The town will be called "Salem," Its
.neaning of "peace" being the symbol
if the colony.
SIRL WORKERS AFFECTED
BY COURT TEST CASE
A man who had had one drink too
many saw a sign, "Please ring the
bell for Iho caretaker."
Hi- walked up and gave the bell such
a pull that it nearly came out. In a
lew momenta an angry man appeared
at the door.
"Are you tho caretaker?" asked the
!l-puller. v
Yes. What do you want, making all
that racket?"
"I saw the notice, so I rang the bell.
I want t;i know why you can't ring it
yourself."
VANCOUVER. — Several prominent
merchants of the province are watching with interest the outcome of a test
■use that is about to appear In the
court of Magistrate Shaw of this city.
It affects the satus of a working girl,
and the decision will go far ln governing her legal wage scale. Toe law
defines a minimum of (14 per week for
a young woman above the age of 18
but there seems to be a loop-hole
t imewhere. This pjjlnt has been raised
by Gordon S. Wismer, barrister, who
is acting for a Vancouver merchant
charged under the code. The question of "experienced help" is raised.
I'h decision will practically affect
every working girl in this province.
Mistress:  "Mary!  Mary!"
Matd-servant: "Yess, ma'am."
"Come and  take the parrot downstairs.   Your master has lost his collar stud!"
You never got such lasting
pleasure at so small a cost
Kodaks from $9.00 up
Brownies from $2.00
Headquarters  for   all
Photographic Supplies
Bring your Developing Work to
us—We will do it right.
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
The minlter who made the following announcement seems to have been
prepared for untoward results from
his preaching:
"There are some flowers here," he
said, "for those who are sick at the
close of this service."
He meant to Insure his house, but
it burned down before he got around
to it.
"Hullo, uncle," exclaimed the nephew
as he warmly grasped the old man's
hand. "Glad to see you looking so
well. How Is my dear aunt, and all
my charming iiltle cousins—"
"Here, my boy," interrupted the
wise old gentleman, as he pulled out
his note-case, "how much do you want
this time?"
REAL
BARGAINS IN
SHOES
We are selling a lot of our stock
lines at cost
We must reduce our stock and in
order to do so, we will sell you
REAL BARGAINS IN SHOES
Don't be foolish and buy your shoes in the grocery
or dry goods stores. Buy them at a Real Shoe Store.
We are in the shoe business, and must give satisfaction
in shoes.
Cavin's ShoeStore
Agent for SLATER'S "STRIDER"—the Real Leather
Shoe for Men and Women
We will pu,t Protectors free of charge on every pair of
Children's Shoes you buy here. January 21, 1922.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
(6
iVed
9MB
MONEY   SAVING   STOCK   REDUCING
DRY GOOD
GENTS   FURNISHING
A  Great Opportunity to Save
Real Money
OUR LOSS IS YOUR GAIN
WAY DOWN PRICES FOR THIS SALE
Stock is Much Ton Heavy and
Must lie Reduced Considerably.
LOW PRICES WILL UO IT
For one week only, commencing Saturday, January 21st
House Furnishings
CURTAIN SCRIMS
Vi 11111* a\Sv  lliliA.u Celsius  a"ET — 88  incues,
wiue,   ou.ui.,ic- iur i.tjaiuuiu euriaiud. Vlisf*
buse iJriee, per yttru  ? ssyUv
itlSAVI Ultttjuil .ttux—Comes iu VvliHe ami Aitg.
cream; goou iiuumy.   bale rnce, per yuru ^tvC
HisiAiA »tiu.u— svuu iieuo isomer; 30     <Jr\r.
nieiies wiue.   buie Price, per yard   . tJ\/
\tiuifc jitslsiii—2a inches wide, with loops; suil-
auiu lor kitchen windows. /Hlsf"
Sule Price, per yard frUl/
.UAlHt.S J11SL1N—Cream; 'M iut-lies wide;   Cr«
manes u nice suit drape!   Price, per yard.... UtIC
111U YAICDN CuiAJl  (011.E CURTAIN NET Uftp
Very nne quumy; per yard  UUC
50 PAIRS PILLOW CASES—42 inches wide.   C A_
Special Sale Price, pair tll/l/
WHITE BATH TOWELS-Size 36x18.        (PI   AA
Special Sale.Pricc, per pair «])A,Vl/
URE1*   ULAiNKETS — Penman's   make;   size   GOxSD.
Kegular ifll.HU llfrj AC
Sale Price, to clear  «' « •*'«'
OBEY.  BLANKETS—Peninau's make;  a    (P/? TA
good serviceable quality;  52x72.   Sale   «DU.UU
PILLOWS—Full size, well iilled. At„
Sale Price, each  ! VOX/
PILLOWS—Oood quality ticking, well       <P"|   OP»
tilled.   Sale Price, each &1..UO
FEATHER PILLOWS—Full size, line       fl»1   »7K
covering.   Kach  &X.IO
PADDED QUILTS—Full size; a really     (IM AC
good quilt.   Sale Price  «•*•«/«#
UNBLEACHED HOUSE LIKING—1000 yards, lip
Extra special.   30 inches wido.   Per yard.... XJ.V
PLA1S   WHITE  SHEETING—fcxtra wide;    rjr_
good quality.   Sale price, per yard   • Uv
Ladies' Nightgowns
LADIES' NIGHTGOWNS—Fine quality      (SI   OK
goods aud well trimmed.   Price UJJ..UU
LADIES' .NIGHTGOWNS—Pink Nainsook; (PI   CA
a really good gown  lOX.tFV
PJMK NIGUTGOWNS-Einbroidered flJO 9ft
front; a really good garment. Sale Prloe•UM.tdtj
WHITE   NIGHTGOWNS — Front   all   embroidered;
made ol line quality .Nainsook.   A sped- (PO C A
ally line garment.   Sale Price  W^.UV
LADIES' 1'LANNELETTE NIGHTGOWNS (PI   OK
-A really good quality.   Sale Price  liM-.U-.J
Ladies' Wear
LADIES' COATS—Every Coat must go—the price
will do it! One only, Pluahette Coat, size 40.
Regular price $49.50. (£QO AA
Sale Price  vIOaUAIV
ALL-WOOL VELOUlt COATS-In Dark Brown and
Dark Green.   Prices to $35.00. $91   AA
Sale Price  OeilL.VV
ALL-WOOL VELOClt COATS-Only a d»1 (T AA
few left, and the price will clear them   «D±U.UU
(.'lHL'S COAT—Dark Tweed;  for 12
years.   Was $17.50.   To go for 	
LADIES' BUNGALOW APKONB-Made of heavy Unbleached Cotton aud trimmed with (PI I7C
Check Gingham.   Sale Price  9L.IU
GIRLS' ENGLISH RAINCAPES-Quaranteed Water-
$3.95
proof.   Regular price to (8.50.
Sale Price 	
$6.50
Ladies' Waists at Bargain
Prices
All lllgli-l-'ritdc Goods, By (lie Bent Makers.
SOME BEAUTIFUL VOILE WAISTS—Regular up
to $11.50. For this sale tliey aro all (PC AC
marked at ono price  wv.t/O
GEORGETTE AM> CHEl'E DE CHINE    <1M AR
WAISTS—Exlra special value  fDt.VO
GIKLS' BED FLANNEL MIDDIES-AU    (Pq OK
wool; regulation style.   Sale Price toO.UO
LADIES' ALL-WOOL MIDDIES-
Sale Price 	
$4.50
Dress Goods
BKOWN SERGE—48 Inches wide; a flue  dj-l   PA
quality.   Sale Price, per yard ©A.Dv
$2.25
SAXK BLUE SEIIGE-Wldo width.
Per yard 	
BATH
size;
TOWELS—Size 24x45; large
one of the best Towels on the
market today.   Special    d»1   Off
for this sale, per pair .... y)M-ttdO
SEE THIS EXTRA SPECIAL
NAVY SERGE—Fine Botany finish; 54
inches wide.   Marked      d»0 PA
very low at, per yard tPsmi.*J\)
LADIES' HATS—The balance of our stock      QKp
will be cleared out at ono price tWU
LADIES' UNDER VESTS—Long sleeves. Kf\n
Kegular 05o each.    Sale price  tWv
LADIES' 1)1,00.11 ERS-In White and Pink. AK„
Special price, pair  ., tOVi
EXTRA   HEAVY  CREAM FLEECE- (PI   OC
LINED BLOOMERS  tBLtidO
GIRLS' WHITE COMBINATIONS—Sizes 30 and 32.
Itegulur price $2.05. (£1   OK
Salo Price to clear  OI..UU
LADIES' BRASSIERES—Gossard aud La      (ZKp
Diva; Pink nnd White.   Sale Price \JOKa
CORSET COVERS—Trimmed with lace and fKp
insertion.    Sale Price   * tFV
CORSET COVK11S—Nicely trimmed and a QKp
good (|iiallly ot Nulusook.   Price   »uv
Big Bargains in Towels
BURGUNDY COATING—64 Inches wide.   Very heavy.
Regular $6.50 per yard. (PQ QK
Sale Price  WO.UD
CIRCULAR  JERSEY   CLOTH-Ready   for   Skirls;
very little making. &» Qr
Sale Price, per yard  vrkiUU
NAVY CA8HMEHETTE-36 Inches wide.
To clear at, per yard 	
35c
M YARDS BRIGHT PLAID-Sultablo for Children's
Dresses; 30 inchos wide. KAsf»
Sale Price, per yard  OUI/
DRESS GOODS—In a line Repp; 30 yards Light Blue
and 30 yards Light Rose. Regular price 'JKg.
$1.50 yard.    Sale Price    '***'
CREAM OH WHITE CA8HMERETTE- C A-
Sale Price, per yard  DVL
Men's Furnishings
MEN'S COLLARS—Sizes 10, 10',i anil 17; W.G. & It.
makes; different styles. Regular Q tor OC,
25c each.   Sale Price  O        tUOL
MEN'S PLEATED.B0SO.il SHIRTS —        l>*   (in
Sizes 15, 16, IOVj. and 17.   Sale Price ....wl.UU
MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS—Soft cuffs. (PI   Ar
Sizes life to 17.   Sale Price  <Bl.'ii)
BLACK SHIRTS—With collar for mine.     (P*|   fJK
Regular $2.50.    Sale Price  -dJl.lO
TIGER BRAND UNDERWEAR—All wool, guaranteed to give good wear. Sizes 42, 44 d»j AC
and 46 only.   Clearing Price  «5J..si7D
Tl'RNBULL'S NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAI!
FOR MEN—All sizes. For one week (PI AE
only, per garment _ wJ-ssi/S
MEN'S WORK SOX- A Prs. <f>-|   AA
Special Sale Price *  for «iJl.UU
MEN'S BROWN HEATHER SOX-A11 wool.   JE»
Splendid quality.    Price, pair  luv
MEN'S HEAVY SOX—Guaranteed to wear PA.
well.   Regular 75c pair for  OUI/
MEN'S  MULESKIN   WORK   GLOVES- ri\
Regular 75c pair.   Salo Price  OULa
MEN'S CAPS-Mado of d»l dj-l /TA (Jt nr
good Tweed.   Prices ..«)1> «5X.t»U> iDL.UO
A
MEN'S BRUSHED KELT HATS Brown, (J/O AC
Orcy, Green and Black.   Sale Prlca    jQ.tjO
MEN'S WATERPROOF COATS-Grey Tweed. Two
only left.   Regular price $18.60. (PO r A
Salo  Price    •tDO.UV
MEN'S HEAVY BLACK MOTORING COAT Rubber
proofed. HiirIIsIi mah-.    Regular (PI P AA
$25,011.   Sale Price      WxOtVV
HOYS' CASHMERE SWEATERS Mostly all sizes,
Splendid quality. Wire from $1.75 to (PI AA
$2.75,   All one prico for this sale, each   dJissV/V
1)0 On Tl  fur These.
J'i^
100 KITCHEN TOWELS —Made of a
good quality Holland, some in checks.
Sale Price, to clear—
3for $1.00
This sale is for one week
only, commencing
Saturday, Jan. 21
„ A
HUl'K TOWEL?—Size 1Sx3U; a really good   CA«
Towel at a very cheap price, each  UVtJ
BATH TOWELS-Size 14x34. /»C«
Sale Price, per pair  uut
GOOD  ((IAL1TY   BATH  TOWELS-Size  (PI   AA
lSx-12; large size.   Sale Price, per pa!r....«I>l.W
Serge Skirts
LADIES' ALL-WOOL SERGE SKIHTS (PC QE
Sale Price  •DO.oO
LADIES' ALL-WOOL SERGE SKIHTS Fine quality
Serge; large sizes; waist (Pry PA UP (PQ fTA
30, 32, 34.   Sale Prices.... WI .OU TO «B»7.3U
HOYS'   HEAVY   STIIirH   COTTON   SIII.'IIS   Sizes
UU to 1314.    Valuos n» 11.60, RKi*
Bale Price     "Jt
I10VS' WOOI, HOSE   Blzes si.', to 10; regular H£(,
price 06C to $125  pair.    Sale  Price t OX
BOVS'UNDER WEAK   TurillinlUl HtZf, 111 QKst
good quality.   Sale Pi ice     ' OKa-yd .IOVa
100 Yds. Plain Sheeting—Was
$1.25 yard.   Sale Price
Not more then ten yards to a customer,
50c
REMNANTS
See Special Counter Remnants at Sale Prices
SPRINGS, MATTRESSES, LINOLEUMS-
ALL REDUCED FOR ONE WEEK ONLY.
rtA PER CENT REDUCTION ON
uM EVERY BOY'S SUIT IN THE
STORE.      SEE THESE  BARGAINS.
SUTHERLAND'S
CUMBERLAND Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January 21, 1922.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Sate- la}   morning at Cumberland, B. C.
RDWARD W. BICKLE     .Manager and Publisher
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21. 1922.
WAS IT MADE IN  Li. C?
Before you buy another thing from the store—except, of
course, foodstuff or something that has to he imported-
ask the dealer: "Was it made in B. C?" The shoes you
wear, your clothing, your gloves, your furniture, your
canned goods—in fact everything that might suggest the
question.
This advice means much more than loyalty to your home
province. It means something, indirectly or directly, to
you! Remember, we are importing millions and millions
of dollars worth of things from tlie United States and elsewhere, and the very same products can he bought from the
made-in-B.C. market. There is, for one thing, the tariff
saving and freightage. Other considerations must be re-
nembi n ■;. r*«mber, also, that half the things you buy
from the States can he made quite as well in British Columbia! We owo no great debt of gratitude to Uncle Sam.
especially when recalling Uncle Sam's selfish policies in
cur rem ; and other thing But we do owe a debt to ourselves aa loyal sons and daughters of British Columbia.
Then, please, why buy from American markets when our
own good market of B. C. has things to sell us?
It Is true thai this province-is young in some industries,
and it is imperative to buy some things from a nalien market, but this   :ondition is passing.   British Columbia's fue
lling out widely, are becoming able to
■ pything they are able to turn out across
■where else.
e things raised In foreign lands but pre-
ihis province, such as tea, coffee, sugar,
dyes, etc. Then, why not make sure we get them from the
B. C. wholesalers, instead of from some other source?
Buy B. C. goods, from yuur local merchant, and help
yourself and your fellow   liUzens to better conditions.
tories, now
furnish aliwi
the border or
There aiv
pared for Uae
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM  TOO COSTLY
Auditor Crehan, speaking to the ratepayers of Enderby
at a meeting last week, severely criticized as too extravagant the educational system of our Province, and ques
tioned if tho more costly system was turning out men am
women of equal ability and strength of character as were
turned ou; under less pretentious systems of our fathers
and grandfathers, Our educational system, said he, i
sapping thu life out of our communities and adding a burden upon the ratepayers that is not justified by results
The system, he said, came into vogue at a time when all
of us had inflated ideas on civic affairs and requirements,
and now that the tendency of tiie public mind is in the
opposite direction, there is no doubt that our educational
requirements will be brought down to a less extravagant
basis. There is going to be a greater demand for 100 per
cent, service not only iu the matter of education, but also
in connection with the handling of all civic affairs.
Thore is not a ratepayer, not a parent sending three or
four children to school, thnt does not realize the truth of
Auditor Crehan's remarks. Our "free school" system looks
"free" on paper, but in practice it is more costly tban ever
before. And there Ip, indeed, a serious question if it is
producing re nils to ;. tlfy the expenditure. We seem to
have made the system costly enough to hurt yet not practical enough to get rt sul s
GOD BLESS IRELAND!
Tlie dove of peace is cooing on Erin's far famed isle, no
longer war is brewing, and murder's not in style Their
hatred now they smother, they call each other "brother"
and speak to one another in accents free from guile.
They've scrapped their rusty rifles and broke - their
..words in two, no longer mob rule stifles or men their
brothers hew. Each sweetheart Irish Mary, each manchee
alf and fairy, from Cork to Tipperary are making Irish
stew.
And Irishmen are working, as in the days of yore, no
wild spalpeens are lurking to spill each other's gore. At
peace amongst their neighbors, they ply their honest labors,
it's better far, be jabers, than feeling mean and sore.
For Irish eyes are smiling through tears of deadened
pain, each fond heart now beguiling a reign of love again.
Through square and honest dealing, their future welfare
sealing, a Free State Irish feeling our true respect to gain.
The river Shannon's flowing, the spuds are doing fine,
the rose and thistle growing the shamrock leaves entwine;
he world looks on in wonder, still seeking for the blunder
hat's kept such friends asunder ou Britain's pareut vine,
Witli sane aud patient shrewdness Lloyd Geo.ge and
Collins too, have overlooked the rudeness that we're accustomed to. Though foreign interference gave things a bad
appearance, with tact aud perseverance they've brought the
old ship through.—D. E. Melrose.
NOW—AND THEN
Tbe tumult and the shouting dies, the candidates now all
lepart. We have thu usual crop of lies, how every voter
played his part. No more the smile which once would
greet each man entitled to a vote; their manner wheu
again you meet is very apt to get your goat. They made
you think that every gent, whose name was on the voters'
list, was really most intelligent, and they were glad to
shake your fist. They called upon you at your home,
smiled at your wife and said to her: "Madam, you have
a noble dome, but don't forget to register!" At once all
household tasks were stopped, and was the weather wet or
line, into the Council Hall you dropped and signed upon
the dotted line. And when the day arrived, forsooth, they
called for you with a motor hack and took you to the polling booth and then, of course, you could walk back. The
polling clerk, whom you have known since first into this
world he came, with whom from boyhood you have grown,
will gravely ask you: "What's your name?" Each
.seemed to be your greatest friend, to hurt their feelings
you were loth, you nibbled at the pencil end and—marked
tlie ballot for them both. And when at last the count was
out theu every mortal, saint and sinner, raised on high a
gladsome shout and swore he voted for the winner. But
one thing I would like to know, that I may add it to my
notes, if this fact is really so, how did the other get his
votes? —C. J. BUNBURY.
The Canadian Merchant Marine is a Canadian institution
—built with Canadian money-operated to further and
facilitate the foreign commerce of this country. Somehow or
other a report was circulated to tlie effect that "outsiders"
were employed hy the Canadian Merchant Marine to the
exclusion of Canadians and British suzbjects. In denial of
this report, the management of the Canadian National
Railways offer tbe statement that of thc 1674 employee
on the payroll at December 31, 1020, exactly half were
Canadians by birth or adoption, and the balance were of
British birth. It is tlie invariable practice of the management to employ only British subpects in the management
and operation of this government-owned line of steamships.
"The statesmen of tlie Empire are at last awake lo the
folly of allowing British citizens to go to foreign countries
when the empty lands of Australia, New Zealand and
Canada are crying aloud for population." says the Auckland
News. "On the further development of such a policy the
future of the Empire wry largely depends. The United
Kingdom has capital and mrplus population, the Dominions
offer la md opportuni rite problem of redistributing
population and conservli British capital for the development ' the young countries overseas will not prove Insuperable if it is approached in the Empire spirit, and IN
solutiv1^ will contribute much not only to tlie safety but
the prosperity of tbe British nations."
Well, well, se<
ing witli our '■
ventions from
part of their t..i
elusion in  Va
east metropolis,
everything will
now popular British Columbia is beconi-
80 cousins these days! Fourteen con-
.tates are scheduled to nominally spend
n Seattle, winding up the "social" con-
,cr. Por years tbey have chosen some
Thai shows you what fine scenery 'n
0  tor a  place, when   it becomes known.
O, you government permit!
Advertising pays if you know how to advertise, So does
any other enterprise If yuu know bow to conduct it. There
were other stores, with 1110,1- capital and larger stocks, in
Toronto when Eaton started. They let the people come to
them; Eaton went after the people. Eaton expanded; they
contract' 1. Eaton let people know he had goods to sell
and gave the prices; they didn't. That Is the whole story
of the Eaton success.
Nanaimo wishes to exclude Chinese children from the
public schools, and to provide accommodation elsewhere
for the Httli ( ' inks. We are in accord with Nanaimo on
this matter, and hope that the Victoria School Board will
follow suit at an early date. "East is Enst and West Is
West, and nev-r tbe 'twain shall meet."
Tho Camels an- coming! B Is the name of the latest
fraternal order of "Dry" America, and it Is composed of
"Wets" who wiil he in British Columbia next month to
Btudy the working of government control. No tiling like
practical study of a condition,
WAR HEROES GO BEGGING
a Montreal dispatch under date of December 27 reads
"Conspicuous on the streets of this city Saturday were the
figures of scores of unemployed, penniless ex-soldiers who,
laden with small tin boxes and packages of green tags,
were timidly soliciting aid for their starving companions,
The tags they are today selling are inscribed with the
words: "Help keep the man who fought for you from
starving."
Posted on the walls of London the other day a poster
set in these lines tells of similar conditions there:
The landlords of England are chasing their foxes,
The heroes of England are shaking their boxes;
Tlie landlords of England draw millions in rents,
The heroes of England are begging for cents.
Ihey fought for their country; though none may regret it,
rhe question remains, "Why in hell don't they get It?"
CARELESSNESS
"I'm not much of a mathematician," says Cerelessness,
'but I can add to your troubles, I can substract from your
earnings, 1 tan multiply your aches and pains, I can take
interest from your work and discount your chances for
safety, besides this, I can divide your thoughts between
business and pleasure and be a potent factor in your
failures. Even if 1 am with you only a small fraction of
ihe time, I can lessen your chances for success. I am a
figure to be reckoned with. Cancel me from your habits
and it will add to your total happiness."—Kansas Official.
S££SrSsS'S'Sra^SS^iSS-S$S<V£S<?S^S£SS$SSS*reS$
Just received a large Shipment
of the
FAMOUS ST. MAGARET
BRAND
Men's and Boys' Underwear
c
Cashmere, Lisle, and Cotton Socks.
Boys' All-Wool Jerseys in Button Shoulder and Polo
Collar Styles in Cardinall, Navy and Brown
Special Values in Ladies' Lisle and Cotton Hose in
Black, Tan and White at 50c. and 75c. per pair
lie fair to your local merchants. Ask to see his goods
and compare prices before sending your money to the
mail order houses.   You will find that it pays.
USEFUL WORK
It will not be the fault of Agent-General Wade If the
people of Great Britain are not convinced of the fact that
llie construction of the Panama Canal has reduced the
nautical distance between this Province and British ports
by something like six thousand miles. The suggestion ls
offered that the partial paralysis of shipping enterprise
which lias been brought about by the high cost of construc-
lion can he held responsible for the lack of interest that
ihe shortening  of  any  arterial   route   would   otherwise
rente. At tlie same time when conditions are more nearly
normal it can be taken for granted that the missionary
work of tills Province's representative In London will bear
fruit, lie will at least have impressed upon the people
of Britain and Europe the Immense Influence which the
anal should have In developing British Columbia's resources ami the trade of Western Canada by way of Cana-
llan Paclllc ports. It may be some time before Victoria
mil Vancouver can be regarded as the "front door Instead
nf tlie postern gate" ot Canada; but the Panama Canal
ought one day in the not too distant future to rank second
iu Importance to the Suez Canal as an international highway.—Times.
GOAT RAISING FLOURISHES
VANCOUVER.—Goat raising is becoming a great industry in this province, and two new large goat farms
are starting up near here. Nubians
are being shipped in, and the government is encouraging the industry.
Hanish Thuiro, for many years engaged extensively In goat-raising in
Armenia, has bought 125 acres on the
Delta for this purpose. Messrs. Amos
and George Webb, overseas veterans
and brothers, have acquired a large
tract ot land In the Fraser Valley and
will stock it with goats.
The goat market is brisk, states gov
ernment reports, and there Ib a de
mand (or practically all the goat but
ter and milk that can be raised.
MENTAL GYMNASTICS
If it takes a four months old woodpecker with a rub'jer bill nine months
and thirteen days to peck a hole
through a cypress log that is large
enough to make 117 shingles, and it
takes 165 shingles to make a bundle
worth 95 cents, how long will it take
a cross-eyed hopper with a cork leg
to kick the seeds out of a dill pickle?"
If your car hasn't power enough to
negotiate a hill even in low gear, as a
last resource try backing It up the hill.
You may be surprised to ilnd that tho
car will climb the grade without much
effort, the reason being that reverse
sliced is of the lowest gear ratio of all
transmission speeds.
Women always have the last word
but seldom get to lt.
B.C. BACHELORS ORGANIZE
VANCOUVER.—Started as a joke
several months ago, a Bachelors' Club
here ls being formally chartered, with
a large and growing membership.
Its members Include some well known
professional and business men. The
organization, however, has no aim at
preserving permanent celibacy, but ls
only a social society formed of congenial sprltts who are unmarried.
WHY HE TURNED OUT.
FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT!
(Special by Greased Wire to The Cumberland Islander)
Must have some pretty strong apple-juice In tlie Okanagan. A correspondent of a Vancouver dully tells of
$17,00D being made by one orclianllst in a season from eight
acres containing 300.0 trees. There's money in apples, but
pot all that!
As uncomfortable as a red nose to
a temperance worker, as fleas to a dog,
as inflammatory rheumatism to a jelly
Ash, so is the Chrltmas necktie around
the collar of a natty dresser.—Kits!
lano Times.
The Cumberland sinner had just arrived In Hades and
was laking liis bearings, Approaching a venerable shade
who was smoking an asbestos pipe, he said:
"Any amusements down here, dad?" f
"A baseball game every afternoon," replied the oldest
nliabltant, whisking a spark from his flowing beard.
"Baseball game! Fine! I used to be a baseball fan myself when I lived in Cumberland," replied the new arrival,
with the first smile since his arrival. "This place Isn't
going to be so bad, after all!"
"Wait till you see, son," said the ancient shade, bitterly.
"The home team lose every game, and will keep on doing
It for 1,901,052 years."
And, with u shriek of despair, the Cumberland sinner ex-      ...  ,,,„  „ .    ,,.„   ,    ,.,,,,
, ,     , ,, . ,, ,   ,        , .... All the  people who don t fall for
claimed the name of his new abode, as he realized that he flattery could hol(1 a convention ,„ a
was certainly there. (telephone booth.
"Why do you turn out for every
ioad hog who comes along?" she said
'o her husband, rather crossly. "The
right of way is ourB, isn't it?"
"Oh, undoubtedly," her husband replied calmly. "As for turning out, the
reason Is plainly suggested ln the
epitaph which appeared in a newspaper recently, which read:
'Here lies the body of William Jay,
Who died maintaining his   right  of
way;
He waB right, dead right, as he sped
along,
But he's just as dead as if he'd been
wrong."
Royal Standard
Poultry Mash
You can't push yourself ahead by
patting yourself on the back.
The woman who invented the
shimmy" says she is Borry, so that
makes it unanimous.
Ingredients:
Bran, Shorts
Feed Cornmeal
Pulverized Oats
Oilcake Meal
White Feed Flour
Non-Forcing
Mash
Analysis:
Crude Protein....lG.OO p.c.
Fat  7.79 p.c.
Fibre   7.59 p.c.
Royal Standard
Dry Hopper
Maximum
Egg Producer
Ingredients:
Bran Alfalfa Meal
Ground Wheat Screenings
Feed Cornmeal
Oilcake Meal
Bone Meal
Fine Charcoal
Darling's Beef Scrap
Pulverized Oats
Analysis:
Crude Protein....20.50 p.c.
Fat	
Fibre 	
G.00
39 p.c.
p.c.
Both Mashes can be used
DRY OR MOISTENED
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co.
LIMITED
Campbell Highet, Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C.
Telephone 33 .lamiary 21, W2i>.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Kiv
FIRE
Insurance
Best Rates and Service
for Insurance of all
Description
EDWARD W. BICKLE I
representing |
Royal Exchange Assurance, London, England. §|
Great American Fire Company. |j
Canadian Fire Insurance Company, Winnipeg. §|
Newark Fire Insurance Company. §|
London Guarantee and Accident Company. 1=
Boston Fire Insurance Company. g
Queen Insurance Company. jg
National Fire of Hartford. si
Edward W. Bickle
ISLANDER  BUILDING
18.10
Ye Olde Firine
1921
PLACE IN YOUR HOME THIS CHRISTMAS
Heintzman & Co. Piano
or Player-Piano or Gramophone
Make your choice NOW.   Pay a small deposit, for
delivery later.
Can You Imagine a More Delightful Christmas Gift!
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICK'S, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Hot. W. Leversedge.
Sunday, .Inniiiirj ii.
Holy Communion. 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Church
Iter. Fullicr ltcntmi.
Sunday, Juniinry ii.
.Mass at 11 a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
ller. sins. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday ovonlng.
Grace Methodist Church
Itcv. fl. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Cumberland City
Team Defeated
Slushy Ground Made Good Display of Football Absolutely
Impossible.
The Cumberland City football team
were defeated by two goalB to one by
the Soulh Wellington Second Division
team on Sunday last. The game was
played at South Wellington.
Cumberland was at a disadvantage
through Bobby Brown and Somerville
being unable to travel with them, thus
weakening the team. Waterfield was
placed at outside right to make up
llie eleven, and the following were
the teams that faced each other at 1
o'clock:
South Wellington—Bowater, Shor-
wood, Martin, Linn, McCormlck, Gibson, Lauderbach, Jackson, Brown,
Leithwaite, Nesbit.
Cumberland City.—Foster, Gough,
Cairns, Courtney, Carle, A. McWhlrter,
Waterfield, Jackson, J. McWhlrter,
Slaughter, Scott.
Mr. M. Guinness of Nanaimo wan
referee.
The weather was ideal but the field
was In a deplorable mess, owing to a
hard frost of the previous night; the
ground was hilly and bumpy. During
the game the ground got very muddy
owing to the sun thawing the frost.
The game was fairly well contested
but it was impossible to play good
football under the conditions. The
rush-and-kicli game was best suited
to tlie ground, and South Wellington
adopted that style of play, which
helped them to win out.
Jackson scored tlie flrst goal tor
South Wellington in the first five
miuutes of the game. Cairns slipped
when attempting to kick the ball, letting Jackson in. Ten minutes before
half-time Cumberland had an opportunity to even up the score, when
given a penalty kick for Sherwood
andllug the ball within the penalty
area. Jackson took the kick and
missed the goal by two feet, being unable to steady his kick on the slippery
ground.
South Wellington again scored after
llfteen minutes of the second half. Foster, Cumberland's goalkeeper, ran out
to get the ball and after having gained
possession stumbled when about to
kick, the ball rolling out ot his hands.
Brown, tlie centre forward, stepped
right in and scored an easy goal. The
Cumberland boys pressed for the rest
of the game, having corner after corner given them, off which Carle headed Cumberland's only goal from a
corner kick, well takeu by JackBon,
thus ended the scoring.
B.C. Champions
Annex 2 Points
Thousand Spectators Were Out
To Sec Cumberland Play
South Wellington
ILOIL0 THEATRE
1 FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Jan. 20 & 21
WESLEY (Dinty) BARRY
and a notable cast of 14 famous stars in
Bits of Life
A Satire, a Comedy Drama, a Drama, and
a big surprise.     Four fine stories in one
unique feature
4 - Reels of Comedy -- 4
I    MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30
•mikst lioAii GUtLS' euro
The vice-president held a birthday
party on Friday Inst, instead of the
usual meeting. On Wednesday the
club was held as usual at the home of
"Mrs. Jones. On Thursday the club
members held n shower of useful
thing for .Miss Saunders, the basket
being decorated with the club colors.
For Reading or
Writing
good, clear, unstrained eyesight Is
essential. You cannot be your best if
your eyes arc not right, nnd It's so
easy to make Ihem right. Our eye ex-
amlnatton is thorough, expert, unbiased and reliable. You can depend
upon our eye advice. Consult us before your condition gets worse.
Louis R. Stevens
Eyesight Specialist
Cumberland, 1). C.
Cumberland United also had an engagement at South Wellington on Sunday last, wheu they played a First
Division fixture In the Island League.
I'his game followed immediately after
the Second Division game, and the
ground was then very much broken
up and muddy. Mr. Guinness also
refereed this game.
South Wellington won the toss and
decided to kick down hill with the sun
at their backs. When Sutherland
kicked off for Cumberland nearly 1000
spectators were on the field, mostly
coming from Nanaimo by auto and
train. The Cumberland team Is the
big drawing card in the lower districl,
I hough the spectators were probably
disappointed at the class of football
displayed, owing to the bad condition
of tlie ground. However, the game
was well contested, both teams playing the rush-aud-klck game, and the
ball travelled at a fast clip from goal
to goal. Corner kicks were the order
of the day on both sideB, through the
unsteady kicking of the backs, owing
to tlie slippery nature of the ground.
South Wellington was the first to
score. The Inside left pulled Boyd
out of bis goal and then he crossed to
Dallle. the outside right, who sent In
11 good shot, but Campbell saved right
on the goal line; nevertheless, the
referee gave a goal; ln any case Campbell, while attempting to Bave, gave
away a penalty, therefore thc South
Wellington boys may have scored it
given (he opportunity to take the free
kick.
From tlie kick-off Cumberland boys
pressed the South Wellington goal.
Brewster scored a good goal for Cumberland from about 15 yards out; live
minutes later Cumberland was given
a corner, Harrison taking the kick
and placed the ball well; Toots Plump
connected with his head and scored
Cumberland's second goal, putting his
lenm iu thc lead, the score at half
time being Cumberland 2 goals and
South Wellington 1.
The second half was just a repetition of the lirst, corner kicks being
lim rule. South Wellington equalized
aften ten minutes' play. Leigh scoring
from a corner kick. Five minutes later
Hitcliens took a corner kick for Cumlierland, Toots Plump again connecting with his head and scoring, thus
putting Cumberland ln the lead, which
llioy maintained until the final whistle
blew. The South Wellington boys
pressed hard thc last five minutes but
were unable to make any further score.
The game ended, Cumberland 3 goals
and South Wellington 2.
Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30 p.m.
COMING   MONDAY   AND   TUESDAY
"The  Passionate  Pilgrim"
An Extra Fine Special
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
BUCK JONES
IN —
Forbidden   Trails
SOME FAMOl'S IAST WORDS
The last words of famous men and
women are always reported, but it Is
the last words of the men in the streets |
-the  Smiths,  the  Browns  and   the
Jones—that the world gasps   for   in j
vain.
Just Imagine poor little Freddie
Flank and his little chum, Willie Wilt,
aline in a room with a gun. Freddie's |
mother heard a bang, but Bhe did not
hear thoBO pathetic lata words of her
venturesome son;
"Let's look down the muzzle to see
if it's loaded!"
Old Steve Specdhard was a rabid
motorist. Only one man heard his last
words, and ho did not live to tell the
tale. They were approaching a level
crossing, and Speedhard said:
"There's a train whistle—we can
get across ahead of the train!"
Then there's another, bo often heard
at the seaside, only it Is Bald III a
scarcely audible tone by the Bpeaker
to hlmBelf, bo no one ever hears theso
last words:
"The water Isn't deep enough. I'll
just swim round that buoy!"
But perhaps the saddest of all comes
from our living dead. The clergyman
says:
"Will you take this woman to be
/our   wedded   wife?"    And   the   last
LADY FORESTERS' WHIST
DRIVE AND DANCE WAS
VERY WELL ATTENDED
The Lady Foresters of Cumberland
held a most enjoyable whist drive and
dance on Friday last, when upwards
of one hundred people attended. The
lirst part of the evening was occupied
with whist, andatter refreshments
had been Berved, the floor was cleared
tor dancing, which wan kept up until
alrout 2 a.m. Liddell's OrcheBtra supplied the muBic. A most enjoyable
time was spent by those present, and
hopes are entertained that the Lady
Foresters will hold another ot these
popular dances in the near future.
SPECIALS
GREY  WOOL  BLANKETS— <t> \   re*.
Each   M.OU
LARGE WARM COMFORTERS— & A   rr\
Each   M.Ol)
RUGS—Assorted colors, size 30 by 60 d»n  PA
inches.   Each   t^^.tjX)
WASH RUGS—Assorted colors. dj f)  r fi
Each        •!>»>.DV
"IS,™*1? 35c, 50c, 65c, 90c
TAPESTRY TABLE COVER.S—A good range of colors
and prices.
ART SATEEN—A few pieces to clear at,        l'f\n
per yard  151/C
BABY BLANKETS—Blue and Pink. d»n (|A
Each, up from   tp£.\j\)
"2*!~Z $5.00
KITCHEN CHAIRS— rt»-J   or
Each   «P 1 .OO
A COMPLETE LINE OF FURNITURE,  BEDS AND
BEDDING
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon _
Six
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January Si, 1922.
Wiring,  Protection
and Operation of
Coal Cutters
Paper Ileal! Hy Mr. E. Hughes at a
Meeting (if Ihe St. John's First Aid
und Mine Rescue Association of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.
">o you know that bread conti ins many times the nourishment of other foods?
Do you know that bread and
butter' or bread toasted with
good coffee in the morning is
the most .substantial breakfast
on which to start the day ?
Don't stop with one slice. Eat
several.
Halliday's bread has a really
delicious flavor and lots of nourishment.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The Bread That Builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Dunsmuir Avenue     •     Cumberland
YOUR  BATTERY  WILL
READY
BE
when you call for it unci it will be
properly recharged. We re-charge all
makes of batteries, call for and deliver
tbem. SERVICE Is our motto or
sir   ui, nnd we certainly live up to It.
CUMBERLAND   GARAGE
A. H. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
JNTEIUOit* TRIM AND
CCNEHAL  FACTORY  WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Oftlee 2620 llrlslge Sireet, Victoria, B.C.
Notice
Pending erection of new
premises opposite the Post
Ollice our business is being
carried on in the Basement
of
CAMPBELL BROS..
STOKE
where we will give you the
same service and satisfaction as in the past.
Phone 1<>
D. Campbell's
Meat   Market
Basement, ( impbell Bros.'
—A*-- ■■■■'■■■$35
r         ■>.
. .'. ■
for Sale
■   ,.'-.'
Single Load.
Si
00 per
Double Load.
• i> 1. n
t4tli UiHiulrod.
w. c
WHITE
13
Valley
Phone 92R
.
,in    yOU
think  about Japan
To my mind the wiring and protection, electrically and mechanically, ol'
coal cutter motors Is one of the most
Important points to be looked after in
llie mine.
The operation of the coal cutter
must of necessity take place at the
coal face, where it is subjected not
only to tiie mechanical strains on the
connecting wiring and motor, due tn
rough handling, and ut times being
hulled under tlie coal, but also to
gasoous atmosphere, which is at times
laden with coal-dust.
The trailing cable is often unavoidably laid at the side of tlie road in
wuter, therefore all precautions should
he taken to protect the wiring and
motor, nud to avoid fire and keep the
coal face working. The electrical
protective device should be placed as
far as possible from the coal face
Fuses should be eliminated and automatic circuit breakers operating in
oil, In gas-proof cases used.
ily the term automatic, I mean the
type of circuit breaker that will open
automatically at a predetermined load,
and close automatically after a predetermined -time lias elapsed. There
are several types of automatic circuit
breakers which will operate under
various conditions.
The setting of this circuit breaker
should be done under tlie instructions
of the chief electrician, after consultation with the mine manager, and
then locked.
As tiie wiring from the circuit
breaker to the trailing cable is of a
temporary nature, a three-wire cable
with an outer braiding thoroughly
painted with waterproof paint, should
be used. This cable should be supported nt suitable timbers by an insulator, that may be removed quickly
when the line is moved further along,
and the standard three-wire construction is brought forward.
From the point whore the three-
wire cable is connected to the trailing cable, the trailing cable should be
run in flexible armor conduit. The
'armor being flexible will allow the
trailing cable to be handled easily
when letting out or taking in is necessity. Where the cable enters the
flexible conduit, a smooth metal bushing should be used to protect tlie cable
from abrasion.
It Is one of the underwriters' rules
that the bushing used at the end of
the conduit should be of an insulating
character, but In the case of coal
cutter work, the probability of the insulation being broken is so great that
it is far better to use a metal bushing.
The flexible conduit should be fastened at the coal cutter by a strong
metal clamp, in such a way as to
ground the motor frame. The reason
for this is lirst to protect the trailing
flexible conduit to act as a ground
connection, thus helping to protect
tlie miners from accidental shock.
The grounding of the motor by this
method Is not the best method, but as
the practical methOtT would be to run
a fourth wire back to a standard
ground plate, which is not altogether
feasible, the grounding of the motor
by tills method Is better than no
ground connection. The flexible conduit would protect the trailing cable
from injury, by falling rock or coal
and from injury by miners using tlie
vnrious tools.
Fuses should be eliminated from the
coal cutter itself, and the switching
gear operated in oil. The coal cutter
as constructed can be operated at half-
speed approximate, full speed ahead
or reverse. There arc many conditions where to my mind a variable
speed motor could be used to advantage, gaining time in cutting and saving renewal uf picks; under some
conditlons it may be advantageous to
use a small strea*m of water to help
Ihe picks when cutting.
To secure u variable speed motor li
would be necessary to replace the
'squirrel cage" winding, now used,
with a wound winding, which would
require collector rings and brush gear,
similar to the arrangement used on
llie hoist motors. Tho speed controller could be made so that there would
be no making or breaking of contacts,
with the subsequent elimination of
dangerous sparking.
•     ol   .ap?"
t,el her nine it, hut In rclurn make
ber give the Li. M. California."
SIIK KKI'T IIKit WORD
With a stormy look ou his face the
master of the house waylaid the servant in the kitchen.
"Look here," he began, angrily,
"how dare you tell my wife wbut time
I came homo this morning, after I bad
told you not to?"
The Irish girl eyed him steadily.
"Shure. an' Oi didn't," she replied,
calmly, "She asked me pwbat tolnie
yez enme In, an' Ol only tould her that
0! was too busy gettln' breakfast to
lookm the clock,"
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second
and fourth Wednesdays of each mouth,
iu the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
-Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Ranger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F. Slaughter,
Treasurer.
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
S. DAVIS, %s*
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
. and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN   BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood  (double load) §.1.50
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY   STORE
(soud Selection of Pipes, Cigar and
(iirurcllc Holders.
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
(uniherliiiiil
Thos. H. Carey
I'lltK  AND  1,11'K   INSURANCE
Cumberland, II. C.
The kind of elastic currency most
people want is the kind that will
stretch from one payday to tho next.
—Now Vork American.
A Higher Key
Thorwaldsen, the famous sculptor,
was busy one day adding a few blushing touches to one of his masterpieces
a statue of Christ—when a friend
called upon bim, and found him in an
exceedingly despondent and unhappy
state of mind. On asking him tbe
reason, Thorwaldsen, pointing to his
work, said: "1 can see no fault.in it;
my genius is decaying; it is tbe first
of my works I have felt satisfied with."
There is a profound aud far-reaching truth iu the sculptor's statement,
.self-satisfaction is a sign that should
not pass without reflection. It is
mark of arrested development, or of
• ntellectual, moral or spiritual decay.
Whatever is not growing and building up its strength is undergoing a
process of decay, There ls no point
whero there is rest and continuance.
sVe must be either going forward in
the way of nobler achievements or
lulling backwards ln a sense of loss.
sVe may, perchance, be losing unconsciously; the loss ls so small; lt is
going on among a multiplicity of
affairs, that we are Insensible of it,
and take no note of it till we have
been deprived of so much thai we are
startled into profound alarm. The
usual precursoor of this undesirable
discovery is a self-content that ls
without any concern or anxiety. The
healthy, growing, expanding mind is
full of hungry desire. It is like the
infant that must have milk; it craves
nourishment; it must have food; it
looks out beyond all that lt has at-
tallied to, a fulness and completeness
which demands greater exertions and
a larger growth. If there come to lt
occasions on which it is tempted to
rest, there come also, and that speedily, hints that hold forth its need ot
betterment.
Such a hint was given to Dr.
Thomas Arnold, of Rugy, in this wise:
"He said that he had been much
troubled to And that the change from
attendance on the death-bed of one of
the boys of his house to his school
work had been very great; be thought
that there ought not to be such a con
trast, and that it was probably owing
to the school work not being sufficiently sanctified to God's glory; that
if it were made really a religious work
the transition from it to a death-bed
would be slight; he therefore Intended
for the future to offer a prayer before
tlie lirst lesson, that the day's work
might be undertaken and carried on
solely to the glory of God and their
improvement—that he might be the
better enabled to do his work,"
Wheu Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton
was full of philanthropic activity, doing his utmost for the poor and needy,
his soul was not satisfied. His letters show the eagnerness of his desire
to be employing his energies ln warring against the evils around him. "I
want to be living in a higher key," he
remarked; "to do something good be.
fure I die." His prayers, too, we are
told, were incessant that God would
employ him as an instrument of
spreading His kingdom, and of doing
good to mankind. He had great de
light in the service of his Lord and
Master; nor did he ever forget to
thank God with deep gratitude when
any opportunity, however trifling,
was afforded him of exerting himself for others. This fine spirit ran
all through his life. He was ever
striving upward, and ever seeking
better things for his fellowmen. Ab
the soul grows, and Its noble powers
develop and put themselves forth,
there Is always the living embodiment
of Longfellow's "Excelsior." Not al
ways in death 'mid snow and ice, how
ever; but in grand and glorious
achievement.
We are impelled onward, If we are
dealing honestly by ourselves. We are
ever striving onward, like a strong
swimmer, that we may have the joy
of reaching something better than we
have hitherto attained. That is the
lumper of our hearts and the tendency
of our nature. In other words, it is
ihe God-given impulse. God works ln
us through the constitution He 1
giveu us. We are not made for means
and low ends. We are made for mll-
lenlums of progress. Our capacities
have an expansive power beyond all
wc can conceive of them now. They
discover this, too, when acted upon
by the right motive force and wben
presented with the proper object.
, bey exert a magnetic Influence on
ihe capacities of our nature. They
are like sunshine to the bud, or
warmth and moisture to the seed.
One, therefore, may never know his
powers till he gives himself a fair
chance of growth. Look at the palm
tree In a flower-pot in our cold, un-
invorable northern latitudes, and then
iii ink of its stately majesty in the
south or In tho burning desert, where
it rises like an Eiffel Tower, forming
a guide to the traveller and a storehouse to the needy. Who would lm-
igine that the palm ln the flower-pot
.vas the same tree as that wbieh is
the glory of the desert? The conditions in which it Is placed make all
iho difference. In the north the cold
hills it so that lt cannot grow; ln
bo south the heat calls It forth to its
fullest development. Could lt but
peak while it sojourned In the cold
latitudes, it would say: "I want to
grow, but I am cramped and held fast
fetters of iron." It is keyed up to
tho stature and strength of the tree
in the sunny south, but its conditions
arc killing it. And terrible is the pain
it endures. It ls a veritable martyr
in the vegetable kingdom.
And so many men are held back by
the unfavorable conditions in which
they are, either by force of events
over which they bave no control, or by
Savings Bank Deposits
Money deposited in the Savings Department
of this Bank earns interest at the rate of 3
per cent, per annum.   Credited semi-annually.
We Welcome Small Accounts
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GUAINQER, Manager.
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
We handle everything in the Electrical line.
EXPERT  HOUSE  WIRING
Don't throw your broken irons away.   Have them
repaired.
WHITE CAP ELECTRIC WASHERS, $135
LEN D. PIKET
Phone 131R
P. O. Box 21        Courtenay, B. C.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do lt.   We know how to make your car behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on the subject if you ask us.
Harling & Ledingham
Telephone 8
Cumberland
P.O. Box 349
their own choice, not being brave
enough to break forth and strive after
better things. Do they require to be
divinely gifted to do this? Tennyson
sings:
As safe divinely gifted man,
Whose life In low estate began,
And on a simple village green;
Who breaks his birth's invidious bar,
And grasps the skirts of happy chance,
And breasts the blows of clrcumstauce,
And grapples with his evil star;
Who makes by force his merit known,
And lives to clutch the golden keys,
And mould a mighty state's decrees,
And shape the whisper of the throne
And moving up from high to higher,
Becomes on Fortune's crowning slope,
The pillar of a people's hope,
The centre of a world's desire.
This Is a finely painted picture of
progress. And is true of a few chosen
ones. It portrays the accomplishment
of an inwrought purpose in the face of
tremendous disadvantages. Do not
all things bow to the force of an Indomitable will? Do not circumstances
themselves, though at flrst adverse,
change front, nnd become helps? Very
often. A faithful use of the gifts men
have, and also an obedience to the
monitions of one's own nature, in a
word, dealing honestly by one's self,
would change the face and color of
many a life.
Apart from genius altofether—every
man bas a sufficiency of divine gifts to
enable him to live on a bigber key,
and be an Infinitely better man and do
greater and grander things in his life,
if he only will. "Ye would not" will
one day sound out the judgment of a
terrible condemnation to all the dis
obedient. Hence It ts proper that we
should utter the old prophetic cry,
'Turn ye! Turn ye! Why will ye
lie?" Ye die morally, intellectually,
spiritually by resisting the God-given
impulse of your nature, and the everyday opportunity of your life. To all
who will advance the way is open. To
all who would be nobler every assistance is offered.   By whom?  God.
—Contributed.
A woman doesn't object to a man
with a lot of go in him, provided she
goes with him.
'My husband  has  had  indigestion
the past month."
Really!   I'm so sorry!   I had no
idea you were without a cook."
for
City Youth:   "What's that the calf
Is licking?"
Farmer: "That's rock salt, my boy."
City  Youth:   "Go hon!   I've  often
wondered how corn-beef was made!"
The average man ls a happy medium between those who believe only
half they hear, and those who believe
twice as much.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood und Goods of Any Kind.
Delivered to All Tarts of District.
Ilubliisli and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  (TO TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders nt Vendome Hotel.
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Hneclaltj.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Beware of tho innn who imagines
that he owns the earth; he may try
to unload a portion of it on you. p
January 2i, 192^.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seven
wm
JUST
ARRIVED
First Shipment of
Fancy New Zealand
Creamery Butter
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
POLICE WEED OUT U. &
HOBOES ON RELIEF LINE
(Special to The Islander)
1
NEW WEEKLY FOR
SOUTH VANCOUVER
SOUTH VANCOUVER. — One step
forward In tlie growth of South Vancouver, with its blossoming into 'a
municipality, will be the establishment
of a new weekly. Overtures have
been made to The Pacific Press Service by prominent citizens who want a
newspaper of their own. The population of the new municipality is about
35,000. It Is densely populated with
modest homes and has a large school
attendance, In addition to many business houses. Several now industrial
plants are starting up.
A minister wns calling on somo
parishioners the other day. While
Imbibing afternoon tea iu ran the
lady's small hoy, holding a rat about
his hend. "Don't be afraid, mother,"
he cried, "lie's deed. Wo bent hlm and
bashed him and thumped him until—"
catching sight of the minister, he added, in a lower voice, "until God called
him home."
The worst thing about hard words
is that tbey come so easy.
Now and then a man run down by a
motor recovers. Uut not much if the
jury are motorists.
Tlieres' nothing whatever ngainst a
man marrying money—if the owner is
agreeable to a separation.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B. C.
VANCOUVER.—The police and relief committees are weeding out a
number of American wearies and
beeries who have been found in town,
with no visible means ot support, and
who have been enthusiastic in unemployed relief circles here. Some of
them told conflicting stories that did
not check up under investigation, and
Ihey are being chased back across the
border amid lamentations and Indignation. It leaked out lately that Seattle
and Tacoma relief heads had encouraged them to come this way, and were
told that Vancouver was a rich, generous city with plenty of work aud
largesse for the JoblesB. Many of the
men claimed tliey had beon encouraged to come here upon that representation. Others, Canadian and British
subjects, came from the prairies with
Iho proof that they lmd been shipped
here by way of passing them along.
HINDUS  PETITION  FOR
"SCHOOL   RIGHTS"
(Special to The Islander)
VANCOUVER.—A petition, headed
by-one Haguath Garth Singh, promin
ent in "Tlie Progressive India" movement In B. C„ is being prepared for
presentation to Victoria, asking for
'school rights" and an appropriation
for night schools exclusively for
Hindus. The petition contains this
claim:
"Wc, tlie neglected subjects of the
Empire, would arise to solicit, not demand, school rights for His Majesty's
subjects of India, now domiciled in
Ihis province of British Columbia."
The leader seeks the position of
teacher for himself, asking $1500 a
year, lie claims to he a "learned
man," who is "doing much for his
fellow subjects of the far eastern colony of Great Britain."
The police have tlieir eye upon activities of certain Hindu leaders, while
a Vancouver weekly has come out
wltb the open charge that sedition is
being preached throughout British
Columbia, among these people.
Bronchitis Sentenced to
Death by Buckley!
Amazing Free Trial Offer
Spells Disaster to Colds.
Proof! Clear convincing proof! wKhout
risking a single cent of your money,
that Buckley has the safest aud
surest way of totally destroying
every trace of that terrible cough or
cold! Justimagine! A bottleof Buckley's
Bronchitis Mixture FREE. Simply
take the coupon below to any drug
store and the bottle is yours! Try it
on your cold. It will immediately
convince you that the regular size
is all you require to smash the cold and
give you a happy relief. It's the ch;inct
of a life time; but by .all means act
quickly Right now, fill in the coupon
and exchange It at any of the drugstores
listed below;—
W K. BUCKLEY.LImltstd.MtMfictffriM Ch» hi
142 Mulnl Unit,      —      Ttmll   *
Free trini Buckley's Bronchitis Mixture.
'I liis coupon will not b» nce»ptfd if
prcBcnlcl hy n child.
LONGSHOREMEN AID
THEIR PAL IN DISTRESS
Later He Disappears—Foul Play
Is Suspected
VANCOUVER. — Waterfront tollers
lately aided a fellow longshoreman
when he came out of hospital crippled,
and raised enough money to start him
with a little lunch counter. But he
has disappeared, and as he waB hardly
able to walk without aid, lt is feared
he fell Into evil company, and some
are inclined to suspect foul play.
The man is Paddy Mack, old timer.
He was last seen iu company with several Americans of dubious appearance, and all had been drinking.
Closing Out
SALE
ENTIRE STOCK  MARKED  DOWN  TO COST TO
EFFECT A SPEEDY CLEARANCE
HARDWARE,  FURNITURE,  RANGES,  HEATERS
LINOLEUM AND CARPET'S
Selling at Cost
NOW IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO GET HARDWARE,  HOUSEHOLD  FURNISHINGS,   ETC.,   AT
COST PRICE
EVERYTHING  SACRIFICED SEE WINDOWS
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co.
BUILDING BRISK; OUTLOOK IS GOOD FOR B. C.
(Special To The Islander.
VANCOUVER.—A bright review ot
the building activities throughout the
province Is predicted in reports coming from all parts and being compiled
for reference by W. J. Sprout of this
city.   Ile says:
"Not alone In Vancouver aud Victoria it is found, but all over the province, especially In the larger towns,
there appears proofs of a bright building season. This Is due to a shortage
of houses, the Increase of settlers and
the consequent increase of business
places. Then, in some parts, new Industrial plants are opening. Another
good sign is tlie tendency to build
more community halls. Rent-payers
are also acquiring houses of tbelr own
on instalments, Instead of renting, aud
other conditions add to the excellent
prospects in building this year. Building operations were dull for months,
but a wonderful improvement ls
marked with the starting of 1922."
VANCOUVER GIRL IS
SLATED FOR IMPORTANT
WORLD'S FAIR POSITION
(Spot'lul To The Islander.
PHONE ,S1
CUMBERLAND
PORTLAND, Ore.—Miss Lenoro Ralston, popular and accomplished young
woman ot Vancouver, B.C., and who
has been associated with the Vancouver Exhibitions for several seasons,
hns attracted tho notice of principals
of the World's Fair to be held here In
1923. Despite the distant date, plans
have been started for the great event.
Miss Rolslon Is said to possess unusual qualities that are expected to
quality her as a favorable appointee
to an important secretaryship.
Will Hold Unique Position.
VANCOUVER—The Miss RolBton
mentioned In the above report Is tbe
daughter of H. S. Royston, manager of
the Vancouver Exhibition board and
known widely as one ot the most ex
perlenced exposition executives in the
West. In his office Miss Ralston has
acquired a unique training and has
demonstrated marked ability In publicity and other details rarely pos.
scsscd by a girl. She is a young
woman of culture- and charm, and is
probably the only exhibition executive
of her sex on the western continent.
Drugglil'il
Name        J
Sold in Cumberland by
R. E. FROST
TEMPORARY
LOCATION
I wish to notify my patrons and others that, since
my store was burnt down by the recent fire, I have
secured temporary premises on Third Street, and am
now getting the stock in order. The goods are being
marked at lowest possible prices, as tiie stock must be
reduced.
As soon as possible I intend to put on a big Sale of
Fire-Damaged Goods.   Watch for the bargains.
Don't forget the new address, where all patrons and
others will bo cordially welcomed.
LOW PRICES AND BEST SERVICE
T. NAKAN1SHI
Third Street
Opposite W. Willard's
"Pa. what's an actor?" i    "What does your father do?" asked
"An actor, my boy, Is a person who  the caller.
CABIN "UNKNOWN" LEFT
$4000 WHEN. HE DIED
(•Special To The Islander.
VANCOUVER.—8he dead body of an
unknown man was found ln a lonely
cabin In a poor district a few days
ago, and heirs are sought for $4000
found in cash and deeds ln the pockets
of the corpse. The man was about 40
years of age, weighing about 170
pounds, of fair complexion, neat
clothes and no distinctive marks. He
was reticent and none of his cabin
neighbors In the lowly section know
anything about him.
GIRLS ORGANIZE BAND
(Special to The Islander)
VANCOUVER. — Twenty-two young
women, employed in a local department store, are organizing a band and
orchestra. They will call it The Girls'
Oem Band. Several are skilled Instrumental performers. Former Bandmaster George McDuft, overseas veteran and bandsman for many years In
tbe British Army, Is Instructing them
free of cost until they are able to play
well enough for remuneration. Tbe
girls' uniforms will be ot vlvandlere
style, with leggings, fleld service caps
of tbe Belgian type, and otber attractive fittings to military raiment. They
hope to tour tbe province In tbelr boll-
days next summer.
MATRIMONIAL ADS FLOOD
Y.W.C.A. OF VANCOUVER
(Special lo The Islander)
VANCOUVER. — An enterprising
matrimonial bureau of the Middle West
has secured names of many members
ot the local Y. W. C. A., and the girls
are now receiving letters from distant
swains who seek mateB. It is believed
somo member sent out a list of the
young women as a joke. Although
the girls are mostly taking it in fun,
it is whispered among themselves that
more than one member Is taking the
thing seriously and getting acquainted
with Interesting, lonely correspondents
ln the American city!
UNEMPLOYED FORM UNION
VANCOUVER. — The unemployed
here are forming a union. Thoir bylaws will demand certain concessions
from employers, the elimination of
Asiatic labor, the discharge of men
who have not lived ln Vancouver for
one year, and the black-listing of men
,vho work tor less than a stipulated
cale per day, with eight hours per
day. Radical policies of the most
pronounced kind are creeping Into tho
body of workless men, and speakers
prominent in agitator circles In Seattle aud Portland are supporting their
gatherlnge,
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND  - •  B. C.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
can walk to tlie side of a stage, peer
Into the wings at a group of other actors waiting for their cues, n number
of bored stage hands, and a lot of
theatrical odds and ends, and exclaim:
What a lovely view there ls from
this window!"
"Please, sir. he doesn't live with us;
mamma supports me*."
"Well, Iben, how does your mother
earn her living?"
"She gets paid for staying away
from papa." answered the child, nrl-
lessly.
m
Notice to
Subscribers
| Subscribers  to  The   Islander 'are   reminded
I that their subscriptions for the current year are
now due, and in order to ensure the continuation
of their names on the Mailing List, their subscriptions should be paid now.
Subscription to the Islander
is only
$2.00 per year
Names of delinquent Sub-
I scribers will be struck off the
I     list.
jSP WE  ARE  TRYING  TO  GIVE  THE
BEST   SERVICE    WE    CAN    AND
M        WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR CO-OPERATION
Hill
life
SIX.' A  BONO OK ( IIEKIIH I.NKSS
Fresh and Cured Fish
Minister: "And how old are you, my
little man?"
Jack: "I am five at home, six at
school and three on the trams."
I HOTELS AND CAMPS
I SPECIALLY CATERED TO
*    *
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
Sing a song ot cheerfulness,
To brighten up the way.
Sing it when you labor,
And slug It when you piny.
Sing It, If you'ro able,
No mailer what they say.
Sing a song of cheerfulness
Every blessed day.
Just sing a song ot cheerfulness,
'Twill glorify the day;
Kor the sun Is shining earthward.
And God is In the way;
And heaven beaniB above us,
And the shining angels sny:
"Sing a song of cherctulnesa,
And sing It every day."
Sing a song of cheerfulness,
No matter what you meet;
Bring a Joyful presence
to Every friend you greet.
Confident In marching.
And hopeful In retreat;
Singing Bongs of cheortulness
Helps to keep you sweet.
—Duncan Wright
Thos. E. Bate
REAL  ESTATE,  INSURANCE
COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for Hale are
nsked to lint same with us. Our clients'
interests will have our best attention.
BIG SACRIFICE FOR
QUICK SALE
Several five-acre Mocks nn Hnysion
Road, which we are Instructed to soil
nt the very low price of $H» to JfiU per
acre for quick disposal. Exceptionally pnod locations. Ono Is a corner
near Cumberlniid.
Thos. E. Bate
Jtifdirp of the Peace
.Maxwell'*. Office     iMiiismuIr Avenue Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
January 21, 1922.
Something  to
your advantage
on page 3
-read every word of it
•
NOTICE
DRYGOODS
& GENT'S FURNISHINGS
The undersigned having purchased
what is known as LIDDELL'S BARBER SHOP, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, by strict attention to business
and best service, hopes to merit a
share of your patronage.
Robert Spittal
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE  LOAD
for 	
$7.00
Cut Any Length Required.
CHAS.  PEARSE
Phone 86F Happy Valley
NOTICE
The first sitting of the Court
of Revision of the Assessment
Roll will be held on February 8,
1922, in the Council Chambers.
T. MORDY, City Clerk.
Cumberland, Jan. 18, 1921.
Personal Mention \W
Mrs. J. A. Redmond will receive on
Friday, January 27.
Mrs. J. C. Brown will receive for the
first time on Wednesday, January 25,
from 4 to 6 p.m.
Mr. W. R. Griffiths, of Nanaimo, was
a visitor to town during the week.
Mr. L. B. Toombs, of Vancouver,
arrived Wednesday on a business trip.
Dr. S. B. Schofield, of the University
of British Columbia, arrived on Saturday and returned to Vancouver on
Sunday.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left on Thursday
morning for Victoria, en route to San
Diego, California, where he will reside
Tor a couple ot months on account of
his health.
Mr. J. A. Thomas, government fire
Investigator, made a brief visit to
Cumberland early In the week, returning to Victoria on Tuesday.
Mrs. AbramB of Vancouver Is visiting her son, Mr. R. Abrams, of Maryport Avenue.
Mr. J. Bird, accompanied by his wife
and family who have just arrived from
England, returned on Sunday from
Vancouver. They have taken up their
residence at the Camp.
Mr. G. O'Brien, Safety Engineer of
the Canadian Collieries, returned from
Ladysmith Wednesday evening.
Mr. Thos. R. Jackson, Inspector of
Mines, left for Nanaimo Thursday
morning.
Mr. A. S. Killam, representing Fleck
Bros., Vancouver, was in town during
the week.
SUBSCRIPTION LIST
FOR ALLARA FAMILY
The following Is the list of subscriptions taken up by M. F. Laver on behalf of the Allara family, victims of
tlio recent iirc. There are still some
subscriptions promised but which have
not been paid.
Alex. MacKinnon, pair of blankets!
Chas. Mussatto, $20; M. F. Laver,
J. Sutherland, E. Perodi, W. Gordon,
K. Shibata, Jack lira'.. Bold V. Caval-
lero, F. 1). Pickard, '■'. ( ivallero and
Joe  Damonte. $ln.
It. E. Frost, A. Wlnningbam, C.
Dando, J. Elngltsh, Geo, Joli'r'ey, H.
Goss, Rev. G. Kinney, Royal Candy
Co., Wm. .Merrifield, T. Bannerman,
M. Picketti, Delaney, P. Monte and W.
P. Symons, $6; Henderson, ?4; Rev.
Jus. Hood, Pat Mullen. L. Freloni and
Jack Fern, $3; Jas. Hayworth, T. 11.
Carey, Geo. Mason, Frank Bradley, C.
J. Parnham, Mr. Stevenson, $2; Alex.
Maxwell, $2.25.
D. Nakamura, II. McCulloch, W. T.
Wostwood. John Berghelner, I. Hori,
V. Benora, P. J. O'Leary, A. Ronald,
11. Harrison, A. Tomassi, S. Pederzolll,
J. Shortt, Alex. Walkor, W. J. Morton,
T. Darnley, W. Kishimoto. T. E. Bate,
D. Tnsso, %2; Sam. Hatfield, $1.25.
II. Parkinson. R, Abrams, T. Conn
A. C. Lymn, li. Wilcock, T. E. Hanks,
J. J. Potter, \V. K. Wood, John Dono,
A Friend, Union Tailors, Z. Otsulo, A
Friend, Y. Nakaganl, M. Shozaki, F.
Francescini, C. Cesaro, W. Robinson,
J. Scavarda, 0. Hunden, G. Hunden,
S. Cough, W. A. Clarke, Alex. Cameron, A. Charleston, A. Raeburn, Jas.
■:1. Gray. A Friend; J. Bardessona, E.
W. Juno, 1,. Franchini, J. Morrison, H.
Gozzano, A Friend, S. Davis, J. Smith,
Hargreaves & Smith, R. Thomson, D.
Bennie, $1.
F. E. Covnrt. A. Gibson, Mrs. H.
Whyley, N. Bevis, Obsoykl, M. Sandu-
luk. M. Agaraff, M. Hood, Friend, J. V.
J., Friend, Friend, Friend, Friend, J.
Wilcock, S. Mounce, each 50c; Sing
Sing, 45c; J. Stewart, 25c.
PUT GASOLINE ON FIRE
The Kiro Brigade turned out in re-
sponse to an alarm of fire on Tuesday
ust before noon, and on proceeding to
.lie locality found that a young lady
had poured gasoline in the stove with
Uie object of starting a quick fire. In
this she was successful, t'or the imme-
liate explosion set fire to her clothes
and singed her hair. She received attention at once and the flames were
extinguished without much damage.
Aid. Bannerman called at the office
of The Islander this afternoon and
paid his respects. He also treated the
boys to a box of cigars.
HI
TS££1
=£
WE ARE
TAKING STOCK
Frorr * liis date to the 31st of January, a refund of
TWENTY PER CENT.
will ha jj;\cn on all purchases of one dollar and over on
the following lines:
On al! Heating Stoves
Enamel Ware, Tin and
Aluminum Ware
Ci ockery and Glass Ware
Second-hand Ranges
We have in stock four Second-hand Ranges, fitted
up in perfect condition. These are priced very low.
We guarantee them to give good service and to bake
perfectly.   We need the room for now stock.
C. H. TARBELL & SON
Hardware and Sporting
Goods
Phon
Cumberland
m
The Pioneer Hardware Store
EE"
Ladies' Auxiliary of the
G. W. V. A.
Whist Drive and
DANCE
Memorial Hall
TONIGHT
Cards at 8.     Dancing 10 to 12.
Refreshments Served.
Admission 60 cents
FOR SALE
FOR SALE—FAIRBANKS-MORSE 66-
light plant, with new storage batteries, switch board, 3 h.p. engine,
in first-class shape, complete and
ready to run. Price $425. Easy
terms to right party. Apply Courtenay Garage.    Phone 61. 2-4
COOK STOVE IN GOOD CONDITION.
Apply 202 Derwent Avenue. 1-2
COLUMBIA STUMP-PULLER, NEAR
ly new; complete with blocks, cable-
shorteners, 1-inch main line, etc. A
snap. Courtenay Garage. Phone
01. 2-2
Automobiles
$595
1921 Ford, 5-passenger, ln
extra good order. This car
has excellent tires, a new
top with side curtains, a re
liable self-starter and a set
of very good shock-absorb
ers. Tbe general appearance
of the car ls very good, and
it runs equal to a new one.
$200 cash, and the balance
can be arranged to suit you.
Guaranteed for 90 days.
(PPQC Briscoe 1920 model 5-pas-
«DDJ7U senger touring. This ls a
fine car If you want something a little larger than a
Ford. It has five very good
tires, a new battery, and the
paint, upholstery and top all
look like new. $200 cash,
and the balance at $35 a
month.
flJQQC Ford one-ton chassis. This
ioOoO is absolutely the best buy
on the Island; looks and
runs like new, and is guaranteed for three months
$160 cash, and the balance
$25 a month.
$350
$275
i
1918 Ford 5-passenger touring. This car Is In real
good shape, engine runs like
a charm, and can be bought
for $125 cash and $20 a
month.
Chevrolet 5-passenger touring. Here Ib a car, with a
new battery, good tires, and
motor running like new.
$100 cash and the balance at
$17.50 a month. Why walk
when you can get this car
on such easy terms?
Corfield MotorsLtd.
Ford Dealers
Courtenay Phone 46
i
FIRST AID CLASSES
COMMENCE NEXT WEEK
Those who contemplate joining the
classes In First Aid work, under the
St. John's Ambulance Association, are
asked to note that the classes will com
meuce some time next week. The date
will not be settled until the meeting
of the association tonight, but public
announcement will be made at once,
so that those intending taking part in
this splendid work will be able to
commence at the beginning of the
work.
Taylor and Bond Appointed Lecturers
By Dominion Association.
Information has been received by
the local branch of the St. John's Ambulance Association, that the general
committee of the association has appointed Mr. A. J. Taylor and Mr. Frank
Bond official lecturers of the association.
Specials For The
Week
ORANGES—2 dozen SOc, and SOc and 75c per dozen
LARGE MARMALADE ORANGES—Dozen   65c
APPLES—Cooking or Eating  7 lbs. $1.00
Per box  ,  $2.25
GRAPE-FRUIT 3 for 25c
CLARK'S PORK AND BEANS—Small tins ... (i for 55c
LIBBY'S PORK AND BEANS—Large tins 20c
Or  0 for $1.10
CANNED CORN....Tin   20c
FINEST BULK TEA—Per lb SOc and BOc
FINEST GROUND COFFEE—Per lb. 50c, 60c and 70c
MATCHES—Package 43c   2 for 85c
SLICED PINEAPPLE—Tails 25c  1 for 85c
SLICED PINEAPPLE—Flats 20c 2 for 35c
BEST HIGHLAND TOTATOES—100-lb. sack.... $2.25
FRESH STOCKS  OF  FRUIT  AND  VEGETABLES
INTERESTING MEETING
PARENT-TEACHER ASSN.
Miss Colman Read Very Able
Paper on "The Mentality
Of the Child."
The regular monthly meeting of the
Parent-Teacher Association was held
ln the High School on Monday evening, when tbere was a good attendance. In the absence of Mrs. Hood,
president of the association, Mr. Colin
Campbell occupied the chair.
Miss Colman read a very interesting
paper on "The Mentality of the Child."
This paper created a very good im-
presslon and brought on quite a dis
cussion by various  members.
Mr. Sutherland reported that the
committee appointed to collect money
Japanese and $50 from the Chinese tutor the prizes had collected $102 from
wards the prizes to be given at the
end of the term.
The executive committee of the association met the Board of School
Trustees on Tuesday evening and requested them to include In their est!
mates for the coming year the cost of
transportation for children living on
the Royston road, and also asked them
to urge upon the government the
necessity of carrying on the transportation for six months ln each year,
instead of the present period of four
months.
STAINEK'S "CRUCIFIXION"
The first practice for the oratorio,
'The Crucifixion," which will be produced by the choir of Holy Trinity,
was held on Sunday evening, when
ihere was a good turn out of interested singers. A further practice will be
held in the church on Friday (tonight)
at 8.30. Help Is still necessary, and
all those desiring to take part will be
•ordlally welcomed.
FOR SALE
TO HUNTERS AND
SPORTSMEN
One-third   Interest   In   45-foot
CABIN CRUISER
Big  and  roomy  and  good  sea
boat.   Will sell cheap for cash.
Apply Box 236, Cumberland.
CARD OF THANKS
I extend my since thanks to the
ladies who arranged the "bene'it
iliowcr" held last week for myself and
family, and to all who contributed so
generously.
MRS. ALLARA
Less 20 per cent on all
Kitchen Ware and
Crockery
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
m
REDUCTION IN PRICE
ON CHEVROLET F. B. COUPES AND SEDANS
Also on STUDEBAKEU and DODGE BROS. CARS.
New prices will be advertised later.
Courtenay Garage
Blunt &Ewart,Ltd.
Phone 61
BEVAN NOTES
A smoker was hold in the Athletic
Hall on Saturday, when a very enjoyable time was spent by all.
A Burns' banquet and dance will bo
held in the Athletic Hall en Saturday,
January 28. Tickets are now on sale
at $3.50.
A pleasant surprise party was held
nt the home of Mr. nnd Mrs. J. Thomson, ill honor of her daughter, Myra,
last Friday evening. Music and games
were supplied anil a very good time
enjoyed by the children.
Upon enquiry at the General Hospital we find that .Mrs. Dan Banner-
man Is Improving.
The many friends of Mrs. Robt. McAllister will be sorry to learn that
ihe is ill at her home in Bevan.
BIBLE CLASS MADE PRESENTATION TO J. C. BROWN
The "Naramata" Bible Class of St.
George's Presbyterian Church presented Mr. J. C. Brown, the ex-president,
with a very handsome chair on the
occasion of his marriage. Aliss Beuk-
wlth, the new president, and Montgomery Hood, the secretary, in tho
name of the class made the presentation on Thursday evening. Mr. Brown
was quite taken hy surprise and ln a
few words expressed his gratitude to
the class for their kindness and gift.
DEATH
Roboi'l M. Carter) I- yours of age.
ii son of .Mr, and Mrs. Eilgiir Carter,
well known residents of Minto Valley,
died un Thursday morning following
un illness of several months.
The funeral will take place at 2
o'clock on Sunday afternoon from the
'amity residence, proceeding to the
Cumberland  Cemetery for interment.
BILLIARD TOURNAMENT
AT ENGLISH'S POOL ROOM
Jim English, the popular proprietor
of English's Pool Room, is conducting
an interesting billiard tournament,
»vhich commenced on Thursday.
A good number of entries have been
received and thc draw made, the results of which are posted up on the
bulletin hoard. The games are 2ii0
up. Mr. Knglish was assisted by Mr.
Mortimer in handicapping the different "stars." Charlie Hitcliens is 40
behind scratch, and his opponent in
tlie first round receives over 100 start.
Substantial prizes will he given, also
a special prize for tiie highest break.
There will "also be a consolation prize
for the lirst sixteen beaten in the first
round. The sixteen will play off for
this prize. Anyone interested is cordially invited to visit the pool room
and see the tournament games.
Clearance Sale of
SHOES
BEGINS SATURDAY
and will continue until every pair of Men's, Women's and
Children's Shoes are Sold.
STOCK INCLUDES A GOOD SELECTION OF KOR-KER
AND LECKIE SHOES FOR CHILDREN.
Come here if you want to save money.   Every pair sold for
cash only.   Come early for best choice.
MY   PRICES   WILL   MAKE   THE   OTHER   FELLOW'S
LOOK LIKE WAR PRICES
W. GORDON
Phone 133

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