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The Cumberland Islander Jan 6, 1923

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TKffi
ISLANDER
/
With which 1* consolidated tbe Cumberland New*.
FORTY-SECOND YEAR—No. 1.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH  COLUMBI A, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
25th Anniversary
Of Wedding Of
Popular Parson
Members of Congregation and Friends
Present Rev. James and Mrs. Hood
With Musket ol Silver Coins.
The members of the congregation of
St. George's Presbyterian Church, together with a few friends, met at the
Presbyterian Church Hall on Friday
evening last, to do honor to their minister, Rev. James Hood and Mrs. Hood,
the occasion being the 25th anniversary of their wedding.
A basket filled with silver coins was
presented to the popular couple. Both
the reverend gentleman and Mrs. Hood
made suitable speeches, expressing
their great surprise.
The Misses Hood rendered a duet,
whilst Miss Jessie McDonald delighted
the assembly with one of her favorite
songs.
Supper was served by the hostess,
after which games were enjoyed by
all, the most amusing being: "How
tliey came to be married." Each person who drew a blank had to reply.
The hall had been beautifully decorated by Mr. L. R. Stevens and Mr. A.
Lee, whilst Mr. C. Parnham acted as
the pianist for the evening.
A delightful evening was brought
to a close by singing "Auld Lang
Syne," and "For He's a Jolly Oood
Fellow."
THREE NAMES
MENTIONED FOR
SCHOOL TRUSTEES
Returning Officer Mordy will be at
the Council Chambers on Monday,
January 8th, to receive nominations
for Mayor, six Aldermen, Three School
Trustees and one Police Commissioner, and election, If any, will be held
on Thursday, January 11th. The property holders will be asked to vote on
the By-law to authcrlze the Council
to borrow $15,000 tor the purpose of
erecting new Municipal Buildings.
The present Civic Building waB originally the Cumberland Public School.
Twenty-five years ago they were
moved into their present position, and
arc now almost beyond repair.
Several names have been mentioned
in connection with the Civic elections,
and uo one seems to take a definite
stand. The three names mentioned for
School Trustees are Alex. MacKinnon,
Dr. E. R. Hicks and John C. Brown.
Every young man and woman needs
a business education. The best plaee
to get It is at the Sprott-Shaw Business College, Nanaimo. Write for
prospectus.
COURTENAY BOARD OF
TRADE LUNCHEON
On Wednesday at one o'clock the
Courteuay-Comox Board of Trade held
a luncheon meeting at the Riverside
Hotel. There u-ere fifteen members
present and Mr. J. H. Maclntyre presided The minutes of tbe last meeting were read and adopted. Several
communications were received, dealing with the junior judgeship, dredging of the Courtenay River, experimental farm, etc. Tbe first question,
a letter said, would receive the earnest consideration of the Minister of
Justice. The letter re the dredging
of Courtenay River went exhaustively
Into the matter, stating that the coat
would be (126,000 to clear the channel
and approximately (6,000 a year to
keep It in navigable condition. The
letter from the Department of Agriculture stated that the matter would
receive the consideration of the Miniater. The meeting recognized fhe
need of a new post office and passed
a resolution to be forwarded to Mr. A.
W. Nell asking him to use his best
efforts to secure a new building tor
Courtenay. During the time of the
snow a few days ago the lobby of the
present building was proven absolutely too small for the accommodation
of the public.
The Board will approach the Agricultural Association and Mr. Duncan
in regard to the use of their property
for camping sites for tourists. Arrangements were started tor the holding of the annual dance of the Board
and a committee comprising Messrs.
Maclntyre, McLeod, Anderton, Endle,
Marshall, Herd, Deck, Bromley, W.
Booth, Plgott, Everett, Cleland, Helen
Cooke, J. W. McKenzie, Jr., was appointed to complete the details.
A resolution was also passed favoring some slight remuneration for the
ELK DANCE FOR
NORMAL STUDENTS
The many students of the district
who have been attending the Provincial Normal School at Victoria were
the guests of honor at a delightful
dance In their honor, held at the Elk
Hotel, Comox, on Thursday evening.
The many friends of the students,
which incidentally are all young
ladles, gathered together tor this reunion, which will not be possible
again till the Easter vacation.
BOXING EVENTS IN
COURTENAY POSTPONED
The boxing tournament which was
being held under the auspices of the
Courtenay Athletic Club on January
6th has been postponed. Jlmmle
Dangerfleld, tbe popular local boy,
who was to be one of the principals
iu the main event, bas been under the
doctor's care tor a week or so and
will not be able to don the mitts.
The bouts have all been postponed
till Tuesday, January 16th, when further announcements will be made.
HOLT A FIGHTING PARSON
HIGH SCHOOL AND
JUNIORS DRAW
Holiday Game Ends In Each Team
Getting Tally Apiece.
In a Junior League fixture on New
Years Day the High School lads split
the points with the Cumberland Junior team. It was a fast game, and
tbe Juniors were lucky to secure a
draw, scoring tbelr equalizing goal ln
the last minute of play.
The scholars secured their goal ln
the first half of play.
Jock Stevenson and W. Jones were
the shining lights of tbe scholars brigade. Cotton Miller, Dave Hunter
and Harry Jackson did the best of the
work for the Nat. Bevis eleven.
The Teams
High School — J. Fouracre, W.
Jones, J, Stevenson, R. Reid, H. Jones,
D. Lockhart. C. Michell, J. Wilcox, R.
Robertson, D. Watson and Potter.
Cumberland Juniors—Boffy, C. Miller, R. Bennie, M. Mitchell, A. Farmer,
M, Stewart, W. Taylor, Hunden, H.
Jackson, A. Sommerville, W. Walker.
MANY ATTEND
HOLIDAY   DANCE
BRACKMAN-KER
FIXTURE ON SATURDAY
New Tear's Dance Under Auspices of
Junior Football Club Well
Attended.
VIOLENT HURRICANE
SWEEPS DISTRICT
Unique  Bj)le  for  Star  In   Picture,
"While Satan Sleeps."
Jack Holt has the unusual role of
a Fighting Parson In bis latest Paramount picture, "While Satan Sleeps,"
which comes to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Friday and Saturday. He Is not actually a parson in the story, for he only
assumes that disguise In order to
safely sp yout a little towu which he
and his pal plan to rob. But even at
that, there is no disguise in the way
he fights, especially when a dying
girl shows him the error of his ways,
and another beautiful girl proves to
him that she loves him for the man
he appears to be. Then be fights not
ouly his enemies, but wages a terrific
battle for the regeneration of his own
soul. Which Is all by way of saying
that tbe picture ls one long punch
trom beginning to end, and that it
teems with heart interest. Frltzl
Brunette plays opposite tbe star.
Four reels of comedy will be
screened also.
Terrific  Wind  Storm  Pairs  Visit on
Tuesday Evening.
The weather man started the New
Year off in rather a wild fashion, paying a visit to the district ln the nature
of a violent windstorm last Tuesday
evening.
The nature of the storm was so
severe as to cause trees to fall ln all
directions. The power line supplying
the district with electricity was Intercepted and as a result for a short time
the entire district was tn total darkness, as far as artificial light was
concerned.
Roads Open
Fortunately, although trees wero
falling right and left beside the highways, none of the primary roads of
the district were blocked. Tbe storm
commenced shortly after Ave o'clock
and abated shortly after eight.
The dance under the auspices of the
Cumberland Junior Football Club was
well attended in the Ilo-Ilo Hall ou
New Year's Day.
Many were present, the attendance
surpassing the bumper crowd which
took advantage of the Christmas dance
which was held under the auspices of
the same organization.
The dancers fully appreciated the
special efforts of tbe Juniors to get
the best of music, which was further
augmented by the addition ot one piece
extra. The music was in the hands
of Messrs. Plump, Potter, Robertson,
McOulneBs and Wtalker.
Mr .Nat. Bevis acted as the floor
manager auring ibe evening.
I    The Cumberland United Footballers
! travel to Nanaimo next Sunday to play
i the Nanaimo Merchants In a Brack-
i man-Ker cup game.    The   game   is
| scheduled tor Sunday at 2:30.   This
I game ls a replay of that terrible game
witnessed on the  local grounds  recently, which the   Cumberland   boys
should have won easily, and were fortunate to even secure a draw.   The
lads in blue can be depended to put
tbelr utmost in Sunday's game, as the
team will be   somewhat    weakened.
Billy Milligan has left the club's roster
as has also Fowler, and    It    seems
doubtful if Sackl Conti will be on the
line up at present.
This is Bill Walker's crew to travel
over the road: Wilson, Collier, Camp
bell. Stewart, Brewster, Conti, Mara-
linn. Mortimer, Gougli .Bannerman,
Plump, Jarnes and Hltchens.
RING OUT THE OLD;
RING IN THE NEW
Frollckers Celebrating Givo New Year
Noisy Reception.
SENSATIONAL DRAMA,
"SHAME" BOOKED FOR
ILO-ILO THEATRE
"Shame," the William Fox super-
special which created a sensation In
New York, will be shown at the Ilo-
Ilo Theatre next Monday and Tuesday.
This ls an announcement of Importance, for the .picture Is conceded to
be one of tbe biggest of tbe year. Its
power of appeal was tested at a prominent Broadway theatre, where It drew
large crowds at every performance
and made a tremendous Impression.
"Shame" is the story of a young
man, David Fielding, born iu an alien
land, wbo Is brought back to the family home in San Francisco as a child
after his father's tragic death. He
inherits his grandfather's enormous
wealth and becomes bead of the big
Fielding shipping interests. He marries a beautiful and talented woman,
and ls expecting paternity. Life, so
far, hae been kind to young Fielding.
From the country where the young
shipping magnate was born comes a
trader of evil reputation, who had
been balked In some of his nefarious
schemes by David's father. He finds
ihe son and In revenge tells him he le
a half-caste, son of William Fielding
and a native woman In the far-away
country. The trader threatens to tell
the story unless David-agrees to enter
with him and his shapplng facilities
into a huge smuggling enterprise,
David refuses indignantly, and laughs
at the story of mixed blood. Tbe
thought preys upon him, however, and
finally drives him to take his infant
child and flee from civilization to the
snow-fields of Alaska. There be
battles with a wolf and experiences
otber wild adventures. Tbe mystery
'of bis lie Is cleared In startling fash-
Jon.
"Shame" waa directed by Emmett
J. Flynn.
REAL RUGGERS HERE
That the Cumberland Tigers have
some real ruggers amongst them Is
evinced by the fact that the Nanaimo
Hornets are making Insistent calls
on tbe local rugby team for talent.
Last Saturday tbe Hornets called on
tbe services ot Allan Nunns and Harry
Jacksoh in their McKechnle Cup fixture against the Varsity of Vancouver.
The Varsity of course won, 15-3, but
from all accounts the two local lads
did Borne brilliant work for the honey-
makers.
YOUNG FOLKS' PARTY
Miss Carrie Richardson was the
host at a pleasant party held at her
home, Camp, on Wednesday evening.
A number of young people were present to enjoy tbe evening, which was
spent playing cards, singing and
dancing. Miss A. Haywood won the
ladles prize ln whist and S. Gough the
gentlemen's prize. The ladles' consolation was carried off by Miss E.
Harbury and Jack Short was the winner of the gentlemen's booby prize.
The old year was bid farewell in
tbe many different ways and customs,
of old, as the New Year was welcomed
In. Some elected to welcome 1933 in
the land of slumber, others by the
fireside, and still a number of the
younger set by the more familiar and
noisy route.
Promptly on the Btroke of twelve
as the last lingering moments of 1922
were dying out, the flrebell peeled
forth its joyous note, soon to be ac
companied by the bells of the various
churches.
On With 192:1
This was the signal for a number
of motor car horns, shooting stars,
firecrackers and other devices of noise
tbat had been held in suspense for
this moment.
Au old music box was heard to give
forth its plaintiff music. A gr.>up of
fun-makers took advantage of the situation tn masquerade costume, while
a group of youths did a snake dance
up Dunsmuir Avenue, at the same time
giving forth a war yell.
The Wee Sma' Hours
By this time the various .parties had
gathered together for their "first footing" visits.
Later on In the flrst day of '23 the
band assembled Itself together for
their annual visits.
WHAT IS YOUR  NUMBER?
The gramophone drawn in connection with the Marshal Music Store
was won by Ticket No. 290.
DANCE FOR PIONEER
The Native SonB of B.C. have arrangements under way for a complimentary dance in honor of one of the
pioneers of Comox Valley. The full
particulars will be announced later,
although January the 11th has been
suggested as the possible date.
G.W.V.A. Notes, Week Ending, Dec. 31
CUMBERLAND  LITERARY
AND  ATHLETIC  CLUB
Soles and Breezy Bits By the Way.
The 1923 board of management has
found its feet and the new committees
have been selected. The board assisted by the newly appointed committees
Is out to make 1923 a banner year.
Everyone Is on the job and every
Indication points to n most successful
year.
New Committees
The committees that have been recently appointed have been announced
as follows:
Recreation Committee (Billiard Hall
only)—W. Braes, H. Walker aud A.
Thompson; (Indoor and Outdoor
Sports)—H. Waterfield, R, C. Walker
and II. Jackson.
Literary Committee—A. C. Lymn, T.
W. Scott, W. Walker, E. Hughes, P.
.McNIven.
Finance Committee — Charles
O'Brien, Charles Parnham and Allen
Nunns.
The Association Is fortunate In being placed on the Itinerary of the University Extension Courso this year
again. It is the intention ot the Literary Committee to hold the first of
these lectures during the latter part
of January.
Billiard Tournament Results
The Christmas billiard and snooker
tournaments were run off very successfully. The winners are as follows: Billiards—Winner and also high
break prize, Caerge Brown; second
iprlze, J. Vaughan. Snooker—First, T.
Plump; second, W. Braes; third, J.
Kirkbride. Junior billiards—Winner
and also high break, flrst prize, Hec
Stewart; second prize, J. Bevis.
LIBRARY MEETING
The Public Library Association will
hold a meeting on Monday evening at
7:30 p.m. The business of the evening at 7:30 p.m. The business of the
evening Includes the reviewing of
last year's work, and also the discussing of plans for the future.
SCHOOL OPENS
AGAIN ON MONDAY
Next meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 3rd, at 7:30 p.m. A fu'l
attendance of members is requested.
Auditors will -present their report
Will the members please note that
during January and February alt
business meetings will commence al
7:30 p.m.
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of
Courtenay. It was thought that the
services of the men to tbe public
should be recognized In some manner
and the resolution went through unanimously. The Board will be reorganized before the next annual meeting,
bureaux replacing the conventional
committees. This arrangement will
give wider scope to the activities ot
the members.
The election ot officers (for 1923)
held on Tuesday last, resulted aB follows:
President—J. C. Brown.
Vice-president—O. W. Roberts.
Second Vice-president — M. M.
Brown.
Secretary-treasurer — A. J. Four-
acre.
Sergeant-at-arms—D. Somerville.
Finance Committee—G. O'Brien, M.
G. Brown, A. Bird.
Reception and Entertainment Committee—Frazer Watson, T. Armstrong,
W. T. Brown, F. Slaughter, J. Emily,
J. Bird, J. W. Stalker, S. Cameron.
Librarian and Steward—W. Hutchinson.
Executive—T. Scott, A. S. Johnston,
W. Graham.
The Ladies' Auxiliary arc lo bo
congratulated for the very successful
Christmas tree and entertainment
given to the Veterans' children on
Saturday last. Great praise is due
their executive.
We are asked by the trustees to
state for the Information of the public
that they have added to the conveniences of the hall a ladleB' cloak room
and new heating arrangements for
upBtalr dance room.
The public and high schools commence again after their Christmas vacation. During thc vacation electric
fire alarms have been Installed. This
is a necessary measure now in all
public buildings. This will be an additional safety device, emphasizing the
moderness nf our public school In
Cumberland.
Mr. H. A. Murray, of Armstrong.
B.C., has accepted the position on the
teaching staff of the Public School,
made necessary through tho increasing attendance. Mr. Murray has been
assisting bis father In business, having taught at Powell River previously.
In reply to several enquiries re the
Mervllle and District Relief Fund collections, we are informed by the Secretary, Rev. Mr. Leversedge, that a
public statement will be issued in tlie
near future, soon as all details are
forthcoming.
A joint conference of ex-service
men's organizations has been arranged to be held lu Victoria on Saturday,
January 13th, to meet Comrade C. G.
MacNell, Dominion Secretary-Treasurer, who Ib visiting the coast, making preliminary arrangements for the
forthcoming visit of the Royal Commission on pensions and re-establishment.
The Cumberland Volunteer Fire
Brigade held their usual monthly
meeting In the Council Chamber on
Wednesday evening, with eleven firemen present. Fire Marshall Parnham
was in the chair. After the usual
opening proceedings a discussion ensued with reference to the purchase of
light fire hose, without any definite
action being taken. The passing of
banquet expenses, amounting to (70.20
brought the meeting to a close.
ANGLICAN CHURCH
PARISHIONERS TO MEET
The annual meeting of tho parishioners of the Holy Trinity Anglican
Church will be held ln the Church
Hall, January 8th. Everyone connected with the church It Is hoped will
make It a point of keeping this date
open.
Corporation Of
The City Of
Cumberland
Annual Police Report and Statistics
for the- Year Ending Slst
December, 1932.
The adjourned meeting of the Police
Commissioner was held in the Council
Chambers on Wednesday evening. His
Worship D. R. MacDonald ln the
chair; Commissioners Parnham and
Pickard present. The chief business
of tbe evening was the reading of the
annual report of the Chief of Police,
which was adopted as read, with a
very small amount of comment.
The report was as follows:
To His Worship, the Mayor,
and Board of Police Commissioners,
City of Cumberland.
Gentlemen:—In submitting the annual police report for the City of
Cumberland, I beg to notify, that,
except where otherwise stated, the
report only covers the period from
1st June, 1922 (on which date I was
appointed), to the 31st December,
1922, as no reliable records prior to
my appointment are available:
Police Statistics
During the period 26 persons have
been iprcsecuted, with the following
results:
Disorderly Conduct—Prosecuted, 9:
Bound over, 4; convicted, 3; escheated
bail, 2.
Liquor In Possession—Prosecuted,
2: Convicted, 1; dismissed, 1.
Lrunk in Public Place—Prosecuted,
1:   Convicted, 1.
Offences Against the Motor Act —
Prosecuted, 8: Convicted, 7; dismissed, 1.
Cruelty to Animals—Prosecuted, 1;
Dismissed, 1.
Prosecutions Under City By-laws-
Prosecuted, 5: Withdrawn, 2; dismissed, 3.
Total Amount of Fines (Less Costs)
(312.66.
The cases dismissed under the Bylaws were so dealt with owing to the
irregularity of the By-law in question.
Two cases were appealed. One
where an offender had been convicted
for plying for hire in the City with a
motor ear without having previously
taken out a trades licence. Appeal
upheld.
The other case was an appeal entered by direction of the Attorney-
general against the dismissal of a
caso where liquor waa* found In a
motor car for an unlawful purpose.
This appeal was dismissed.
Stolen Property Recovered—Goods
to the value of (60; cash, (98.60.
Lost Property Recovered and Restored to Owners—Three articles, approximate value, (25.
Summonses Served for Other
Forces—7.
Motor Drivers (Juniors) Permits
Issued—Three.
Weapon Permits Issued—One.
Missing Persons Traced—Three.
Investigations for Other Forces —
Fifteen.
Special Permits Issued by Liquor
Board—Seveu.
Liquor Forfeited by Order of Magistrate—Three barrels of bottled beer.
As Chief of Police, I have endeavored by constant vigilance and attentloi,
to duty, to prevent crime. The prosecutions show a marked decrease over
tbose of the corresponding period of
last year. Complaints are very few,
and have been promptly attended to.
Although undoubtedly a certain
amount of Illicit drinking and gambling is still in existence, It Is only
what can be expected among certain
sections of the community.
It must be remembered that the Introduction of the present Liquor Control Act automatically turned hotels
Into private residences, as they ceased
to jiay a licence either as hotels or
for the sale of refreshments. Therefore entry to such places can now
only be made by warrant. I am single
handed   here,  and  bave  to be very
COMOX  BASKETBALL
The Comox Ladles' Basketball team
slipped It over the Courtenay ladies
quintette on Thursday night, romping
home with a victory, 22-2. The game
was followed by a dance, which as
usual, was one of those pleasant times
where everyone present enjoyed themselves to the utmost. The Courtenay
lineup was: Mrs. Russel and Jeanette
Hayman, Muriol McPhee, Flora Beeton
and Margaret Duncan.
Comox—Margaret McLenan, Minnie
Ryan, Jean Falrburn, Kathleen McLenan and Flora Piercy. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND.  ISLANDER
mtt
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1921
SymphonyJbawn
Loo\for the Water Mar\
Ever pick up a sheet of writing paper so invitingly
beautiful to the eye and the touch, that it seemed
to say to your fingers, "You must write on me!"?
Symphony Lawn is just such a paper. It comes in
three exquisite finishes and several smart tints. Sheets
and envelopes in the newest shapes. Also correspondence
cards to match. May we show you Symphony Lawn?
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
SUNDAY HOURS: Morning, 10-12; Evening, 6-9.
For Results Advertise in The Islander
CAMPBELL RIVER SEWS
Good Roads Meeting.
0. W. Smith, District Engineer, attended the good roads meeting held
at the school house, December 30th.
Mrs. Cobb at Willows.
Mr. R. L. Cobb, of the I. T. Camp,
spent New Year'B at the Willows
Hotel.
Other tluests.
Miss E. and Miss I. Johnson, of
Harriett Bay, spent the week-end at
the Willows Hotel.
Olllcial on Business.
II. C. Whitmore, of the Geographical
Department, was at the River and
Forbes Landing last week on official
business.
(iimiiiiiiiltj Bance.
A community dance was held at the
l.llleland 1'avlllon Saturday, December 30th. A fair slaed crowd attended
music being furnished by the DawBon-
Brunton three-piece orchestra.
Going Home.
W, C. Tomlinson, of Grassy Bay,
will be leaving the hospital this week
having fully recovered from his sickness.
POLICE REPORT
(Continued From   Page One)
Christmas nt Lund.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Timlin spent
Christmas at Lund, returning to the
river for New Years.
Will Gordon run
for Mayor?
Having been approached by certain citizens inviting me to offer my services in the interests of Cumberland as Mayor for the year 1923. I declined this
honor, owing to the fact that my big January Shoe
Sale is now on in full swing. I have decided to sell
every pair of Shoes at wholesale cost, which will ensure
a speedy clearance, to enable me to make room for
spring goods arriving February 1st.
Citizens, you cannot afford to miss this big sale.
It will mean a wonderful saving in Footwear to you all.
I feel that my sale is as big a service to the citizens
of Cumberland as I could possibly offer in any other
capacity.   Faithfully yours,
W.   GORDON
15 p.e. OFF
We are offering our entire stock, excepting dinner
war and curtains, at a discount of WU. until January
13th. You can now furnish your home at less than
pre-war prices.
Jeune's Furniture Store
Opposite the Big Double Arrow Sign
Phone 144
COURTENAY
Visitors lo Courtenay.
Mr. and Mrs. Bob McQuaig spent
their Christinas holidays at Courtenay
with Mrs. McQualg's relatives.
Return From Cumberland.
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Maynard returned
to tlle River after spending Christmas
al Cumberland with Mrs. Maynard's
sister. Mrs. West Stochand.
Taken to Hospital.
Mr. Fred Anderson, of Duncan Bay,
was taken to the hospital Saturday,
December 30th, with a badly crushed
ankle, and is doing as well as can be
expected.
Holidaying In Vancouver.
Dr. and Mrs. Shaw and family have
been spending the Christmas holidays
in Vancouver with the doctor's people,
and are expected home this week.
Dr. Ilriggs nt Hospital.
During Dr. Shaw's absence Dr.
Briggs, of Courtenay, was in attendance at the hospital. s
Sunday School Progressing.
Sunday School attendance at the
Annex is gradually increasing each
Sunday afternoon new faces appear
and the Rev. Scott seems very well
pleased.
.1 iriiiii III Hospitable.
Mr. Smith, of Campbell River, was
again admitted to the hospital last
week, having suffered a relapse from
his recent sickness, and is now doing
very well.
careful in handling liquor cases, as
no magistrate will convict on the uncorroborated evidence of a single
police officer. This state of affairs I
have endeavored to overcome by vigilant observation of suspected places,
and drinking which previously took
place with a certain amount of impunity. iB by no means bo prevalent ns
lt was.
As regards gambling. I have kept
strict supervision over pool rooms,
etc., and can find no evidence that
such places are conducted otherwise
than in a satisfactory manner. Tbere
has, I understand, been one or two
complaints mado that the game of
"Black Jack" has been played In a
certain place, but If any person concerned will make his complaint to
mo ot any such occurrence I will take
Immediate action, but anonymous complaints, which are generally made to
gratify personal animosity, are generally ignored.
Generally speaking, the conduct of
the City Is of a high order, and, speaking from a police experience of nearly
30 years, the City of Cumberland is
tlie most law-abiding community in
which I have ever had the pleasure of
serving as a police officer.
In the course of my police duties, I
have to acknowledge the very great
assistance I have received from time
to time from Provincial Constable
Dunbar, and which, as far as lay in
my power, I have endeavored to reciprocate.
Night Watchman—It is respectfully
submitted that the question of the prober protection of the City from Ure
or crime at night is one that should
receive the serious attention of thc
authorities. At present the night
watchman's duties are confined to the
main street, and the rest of the City
is not patrolled at night. The suitability of the nightwatchman. who is
an old man, for tbe responsible duties
devolving upon him, has formed the
subject matter of former reports. 1
consider it my duty to again refer to
the matter, as the proper saieguar.1-
ing of the lives and property of citizens at night is of as much, or more,
importance than in the daytime, especially in cases of fire, which, under
present conditions might assume
alarmin gproportlons before an alarm
could be given.
ln this connection I may state that
contributions to the night watchman's
salary have decreased to tho amount
of 15.50 per month.
Extraneous Duties
COLLECTIONS
.Municipal Trade Licences—$682.50.
Increase for half year, $50.
Dog Taxes—$45.00. Increase for!
year, $11.
Pound Fees—$16.65. Increase for
year, $16.65.
Night Watchman's  Salary—$364.00.
Increase for half year, $4.
Weigh Scales—$2.35. Decrease for
year, $0.40.
Fire Calls—Five: Four in daylight
hours, 1 at night. Alarm bell rung on
each occasion.
Defective Street Lights—Five.
Sanitary Notices Served—One.
Fire Prevention Notices Served —
Two.
As Sanitary Inspector I have made
Bud Accident
Mr. C. Carlson, who met with a serious accident Christmas eve, by falling from the hay loft in Mr. Thulln's
barn, fracturing his spine and also' periodical   Inspections   of   the   City
receiving a bad scalp wound, is resting  Occupiers and owners have removed
easily.
Mr. Carlson Popular.
Mr. Carlson has been In Ihe employ
of Timlin Bros, at their camp for
several years, so Is quite a familiar
figure at Campbell River. He has the
sympathy of a large circle of friends
who were sorry to hear of his sad misfortune.
Twitter! Twitter! Here's Spring.
Campbell Itiver Is looking natural
once Miorc. The snow has dlsBappear-
cd and the lumber jacks are drifting
back, each boat bringing in a load,
and from all reports the camps will
all lie lu full swing In a short time
now. '
Midnight Dunce.
A midnight dance was held at thc
Lillelnnd Pavilion New Year's eve.
Dancing commenced as the clock
struck tlie midnight hour and to the
merry strains of Dawson and Brun-
ton's three-piece orchestra the folks of
Campbell River tripped the light fantastic toe for the ilrst few hours of
1H23.
CHINAMAN SUSTAINS
BROKEN LEG
Jobn Yew, of Chinatown, Cumberland, met with a painful accident
while working In the old s'opo, Four
West Landing, No. 4 Mine, on Friday
last. A large piece of rock fell on
Yew, breaking Ills right leg. and causing several bruises about his shoulders and arms.
rubbish, etc., as required. No contagious or epidemic disease has been
reported.
Incidental Duties
Other Incidental duties, such as
keeping the time of Municipal employees, repairs and renovations of
City property, the proper exhibition
of warning lights when streets are
blocked tor repairs, assistance to the
City clerk when necessary, etc., have
been carried out.
Recommendations
It Is respectfully suggested that a
counterfoil "Dog Licence Book"
should be provided, so that an official
"Dog Licence" can be Issued In place
of the existing system of issuing tags.
The latter are seldom worn by dogs,
and an official "Dog Licence" book,
such as Is ln use by the Provincial
Police, would ensure an accurate official record of all dogs licensed, together with a description of each,
The Christmas festivities have passed with no trouble, nnd the City Is
remarkably free from serious offences.
1 beg to thank your .Worship and
the Board of Police Commissioners for
the kind and considerate manner In
which 1 have been supported Blnce my
appointment, and trust that my efforts
to carry out my duties with tact and
discretion havo met with your approval.
1  have the honor to be, gcntlemon,
your obedient servant,
ALBERT J. MERRY,
Chief of Police.
HEINTZMAN & CO. LTD., VICTORIA
REMOVAL
SALE
GRAND PIANOS  : PLAYER PIANOS  : PIANOS
ORGANS and PHONOGRAPHS
We will be moving to our New Showrooms at end of
November, and in the meantime are making Prices
that should
CLEAR OUT OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Any person thinking of purchasing an Instrument in
the next six months or year should not fail to take advantage of these bargains.
Suitable Terms Arranged     : :
Full Particulars on Application
Heintzman & Co.
Opposite Post Office
VICTORIA
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries past were heavy because the
human race did not know liow to lighten them. An enlightened
age has gradually brought now labor-saving devices to ubbIsI
her—the greatest of which is the Electric Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features that further reduce women's burdens,
saving time, labor and anxiety.
There is tlie Protected Element—the Element is the burner,
where thc heat comes from. Like other Electric Appliances, tlle
heat Is radiated from wire coils, but the Protected Element
snugly encloses these coils in porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element lasts longer, as acids, moisture and grease cannot harm
it. It heals quickly and holds the heat long after the power Is
turned off.
The wonderful samless, round-cornered Oven—not a nick
or crevice In its smooth, even, impenetrable, glassy enamelled
interior. As sanitary as any enameled utensil, rust resisting,
cleanly. Hacks and rack holders removable. Elements swing
on hinges, so that entire surface of oven is clear for cleaning.
The Oven has a 1% in. insulation around the side and a Hi
In. magnesia block insulation in the door—this holdB the heut
in oven. Rousts ami baked foods retain their full flavor. The
result ls better baked foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small clement inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven Is on or oft*.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
.Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.
Fubcs easily accessible.
I'Ol'R TYPES (IE McCLARY'S RANGES
a   S— E   S. C—and E.—supplied in the Immaculately clean
battleship grey enameled finish, nlso black japan—see all these
features—have them demonstrated to you ut
E.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltcl.
NOTICE
WHEREAS certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered with the valves of the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount ot water to run to waste, wc
therefore wish to point out that It is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
THROUGH SERVICE TO EUROPE OR EASTERN
CANADA ON THE
CONTINENTAL LIMITED
Leaving Vancouver 7.45 p.m. daily.
Compartment Observation Cars.
Standard and Tourist Sleepers
Alternate Route via Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships!
to Prince Rupert and Rail Line t
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
Canadian Narional Rjiltuaqs
Full Information—apply to E. W. Bickle, Cumberland
For Results Advertise in The Islander SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923.
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
V
THREE
J. SUTHERLAND
GENTS'   FURNISHINGS
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop in and Bee Mr. Sutherland, our Agent In Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wish
to have done.
Our  Work  and  Service
Will   Please  Vou   ti   ii
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, H. I.      :      Phone SS02
D. Campbell's
.. Meat  Market
My endeavor is to please my
customers, and that with but
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vefe-
tables and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland. B. C.
New Car Service
Car for Hire Day or Night
Phone 24 or 100
Cumberland Hotel
Ask for Charlie Dalton
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Car  For  Hire
at Reasonable Prices
Phone the Cumberland Poolroom
Phone 141
Ask for Geo. Mason.
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods of lay KM
Delivered to AU Part* of District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  CO  TELEPHONE
or Leave Orden at Vendome Hotel.
KEEP SMILING
^CHIROPRACTIC
I KEEPS YOU
ff c.^rcpiT^.)
Residence, near Union Hall. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, from 4 to 5
p.m.
Courtenay Office-- Plgott Black, Up-
ntulra. Dally from 12.30 to 3, and
7 lo 8 p.m.   Sundays by appointment.
E. 0. HAUKEDAL
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAIL WAV STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heats?
throughout by Blectrlc'ty.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor
COOPERATION ISN'T ON
TEST; FARMERS ARE
Method ls Sound, But It Is Not a
(•uarauty of Profit Under
Adverse Conditions.
WE TAKE CARE OF
YOUR BATTERY
We see tbat they are charged and in
good working order, and deliver to
you when you want them. Our Batteries are standard and give complete
service to car owners and others who
must have a Battery that is dependable.   Also Dry and Wet Storage nt
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
T.WHEROT
1DHMBTOTANNER
lead fer prie. nn oi
w.rfc—m.unt I a s
hub, .tt
M» Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B. c. »
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    •    Repairs
Telephone 1.    ■    P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers .and
Bakers
PHONE 11       CUMBERLAND
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these hlih-
grudo confoctloiiu arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the tlm*.
Henderson's
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEBRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Are.        Cumberland. B. C
Co-operation as a method of marketing crops and products profitably is
not on test. Tbe test Is of tbe ability
of producers to co-operate. In some
places the producers meet the test
satisfactorily and in others they fail
—and blame the system. The answer
to failures is offered in the success of
many co-operative organizations
which have existed long enough to experience the inevitable ups and downs
of business. One mistake many bave
made in going into co-operative enterprises is the assumption that the
organization was a guarantee of satisfactory profit under all conditions.
This Is not expected by those that go
into other lines o business. There
never would be any failures If things
worked out this way—if there was a
sure method to follow for success
under any conditions. But despite tbe
failure of many co-operative projects
and consequent repudiation of the plan
by those thus disappointed, the number of organizations is increasing. A
summary recently made by the department of agriculture gives these statistics:
Excluding patrons of profit-sharing
concerns as members, there now are
about 1,500,000 farmers who are members of purely co-operative enterprises In the United States.
Commodity associations — about
650.000 members.
Elevators on the Rochdale plan —
about 300,000 members.
Local dairy associations, cheese,
creameries, etc.—about 300,000 members.
Local fruit and vegetable groups—
about 100,000 members.
Local shipping groups, live stock-
about 150,000 members.
As showing liow widespread is the
co-operative movement the last few
years, among the non-profit-sharing,
non-speculative associations especially, these facts are interesting:
California has 80,000 farmers, of
whom approximately 30,000 are in
three dried fruit associations; 20,000
In fresh fruit associations; 30,000 In
associations handling nuts, beanB,
poultry products, livestock .alfalfa,
honey and other products.
In Washington, Idaho, Oregon and
Montana there are approximately 12,-
000 growers in the Northwest Wheat
Growers' Association.
In Oregon there are approximately
0,000 in fruit growers' associations.
In Washington there are more than
8,000 ln fruit growers' associations.
In Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, West
Virginia nnd Tennessee, the Hurley
Tobacco CrowerB' Association has
more than 58,000 members.
In Virginia, North and South Carolina, the Tobacco Growers' Co-operative Association has approximately
72,000 members.
Tho Oklahoma Cotton Growers'
Association exceeds 36,000 members.
The Texas Farm Bureau Cotton
Association more than 23,000 members.
All other cotton states have co-operative associations.
In addition, there are various cooperative associations lately organized by the Texas Farm Bureau Federation with approximately 8,000
members.
In the Oklahoma' Wheat Growers'
Association are 5,000 growers.
Tlie Kansas Wheat Growers' Association numbers 5,000.
The North Dakota Wheat Orowers'
Association lias 3,000 members.
The Dairymen's League of New
York has more than 60,000 members.
While enlisted in the co-operative
dairy groups of Minnesota, Wisconsin
and New England, are supposed lo be
more than 200,000 members.
No
other our
lasts so long
and
costs so little.
BUY A
FORD.
Foad Touring
Car$535f.o.b.
Ford, Ontario
Corfield Motors
Ltd.
Phone 46       Courtenay
Cascade
OR
Be avaricious of time; do not give
iny moment without receiving It In
value; the use of time la a debt we
contract from birth, and It should
only be paid with the Interest that our
life has accumulated.
COMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING      ■ •      PRESSING
T. YONEDA
COURTENAY
Phone 14      ::    ::       P. O. Box 123
Theed Pearse
RARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Union Bay Road
COURTENAY, B. C.
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS'
CHRISTMAS PRESENT
One of the Christmas presents given
to Douglas Fairbanks by Mary Pickford will have a deal to do with the
working out of Doug's new pirate
story, as yet un-named, upon which
he will commence production soon
after the Ilrst of tbe year.
Just as a novelty, and to sort of be
in key with the spirit ot the new Fairbanks film, Miss Pickford instructed
Santa Claus to give her husband the
model of a pirate ship—sails, guns,
fantastic decorations and all. That
this object would prove surprisingly
useful did not occur to her. However,
Doug at once saw great possibilities in
the model, for with It he could plan
much of the action of this story
especially those sequences which
would bo enacted on shipboard. He
Immediately Bet about devising stunts
which could be worked out feasibly,
using the miniature as a means of
estimating distances and calculating
spectacular effects.
One of the most distinguished audiences ever to view a photoplay watched with Interest the unwinding of the
twelve reels of Robin Hood in tbe
home of the society leader, Mrs, Edward McLean, at Washington, D.C,
where the Fairbanks picture was
shown as a holiday feature to a group
of the nation's foremost officials.
The audience included Vice-president Coolidge, Secretary of State
Charles Evans Hughes and Mrs.
Hughes, President Lasker of the Shipping Board, Lord Geddes, British Ambassador, and Lady Geddes; Jules Jus-
serand, French Ambassador; Attorney-
General Daugherty, Secretary of tbe
Treasury Mellon, Gen. John Pershing,
Assistant Secretary of tbe Navy Theodore Roosevelt, Congressman Nicholas
Longworth and Mrs. Lougworth, formerly MIbs Alice Roosevelt; David
Elklns, ot West Virginia, and many
others.
Great praise waa given the picture
by all who witnessed it and a telegram of appreciation was sent to
Douglas Fairbanks tor courtesy extended In aiding to arrange for the
show.
The Publisher's Responsibility
More and more difficult every day
Ib the choice of good reading—the
kind that nourishes the young and refreshes the old. One way to avoid
mistakes is to choose the book or
periodical that stands for something
that is not everlastingly supplying
the sensational and silly. The Youth's
Companion has always been published
by men who felt a keen responsibility
to their readers, and they havt held
steadfast to one purpose: To familiarize Companion readers with the beat
things In the world, and by means of
original articles and stories to Illustrate the truth that the practice of the
old homely virtues brings the greatest
satisfactions in life. Try It for a year
aud see.
The 52 issues of 1923 will be crowded with serial stories, short stories,
editorials, poetry, facts and fun. Subscribe now and receive:
1. The Youth's Companion—52 issues
in 1923.
2. All the remaining issues of 1922.
3. The Companion Home Calendar for
1923.
All for 12.50.
4. Or Include McCall'a Magazine, the
monthly authority on fashions. Both
publications, only 13.00.
The Youth's Companion,
Commonwealth Ave. ft St. Paul St.,
Boston, Mass.
(Subscriptions Received at this Office)
W. T. GOARD
PIANO TUNIS
Factory Experience
Leave Orders' at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland and Courtenay.
U.BX. Beer
PURE    FULL-STRENGTH    BEEKS
They Wear Well
On the market as long as the oldest
inhabitants remember and still
the most
Popular Beers
Sold in British Columbia
OLD FRIENDS  ARE BEST
Leave Your Order at any Government
Store-WE DO THE REST
LUMBER
ALL BUILDING  MATERIALS, MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PBICM.
'      "■ J
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumlierland
Phone 159 Night—134-X Courtenay
tt
"The Superior Grocers
Where Most People Trade
Just Arrived, a full line of
Perrin's Biscuits
The Quality Biscuit
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
"THE SUPERIOR GROCERS."
T. H. Mumford J. Walton *OUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAV, JANUARY 6, 1921
SSi'l^^jThe Friend O' Man-The Dog
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923.
THE NEW YEAR
Compiled by a Weil-Known Fancier From Observations
Of English Experts
sporti.no dogs
Coming events cast their shadows
before. Tremendous social changes
nre imminent. We can but dimly conjecture what may be the world's social
complexion of the tomorrow.
Thc past year in many respects was
n wonderful year for Canada. We
have forged forward along almost
every line of material progress. Nature bas poured for us an almost continuous stream of blessings from her
copious stores, and our commerce has
caught up this treasure, distributing
it throughout this land and through
the lands across the seas.
1922 was a good year to us as a
nation, and, though sorrow came to
many, there still was more of joy
than sorrow, more of laughter than of,
tears. The echoes of the great war
have largely died away and we have
definitely set to work to secure a last-
ing peace, and that peace is near.
Our labor troubles, our social unrest, the menace of Bolshevism —
> these are the results of the wars reactions. These dangers will be overcome by the sound sense and patriot-
ism of our people. We are Canadians.
And when that is said all is said.
We greet the Xew Year bravely,
hopefully. In tlie days to come we
wish to live better than we lived tu .
the days that are gone. We desire
to be of greater service to our fellow
citizens and to all those who are in
need. We hope to continue to strive
for the attainment of the noblest individual and national ideals. We would
work In harmony with each other efficiently, so that the cumulative result
of our efforts shall loom large when
1923 Bhall have followed all the otlier
years of departed time into the sepulchre of the ages. In our homes, in
our business, in our communities, we
wish to do and be all that it is possible for men and women to accomplish. We hope to find the wider,
nobler vision.
One moro year during which we,
have lived, strived, loved, suffered, has
gone, to be lost in tlie mists of past
eternity. Another year greets us with
smiling, happy face. All too soon It
will reach maturity, then halting age,
and so follow all the brotherhood of
years into the twilight of the gods.
We must accept the gage of Fate.
We shall not weakly cower before any
phantoms of fear in the near unknown.
Let us highly resolve to do our best
in the works our bands fiud to do.
Let fools laugh at these sane, peni-
A PLEA FOR HOTELMEN
  i    The title should not lead the reader
How many people in thc ordinary j to believe that one must necessarily
walk of life, or even men in business, j bo an active sportsman to justify tbo
are close enough in touch with tlle! ownership of the sporting dog. Sport-
liotelmen of the Interior of British ijng dogs are born with sporting in-
Oolurabia. to really understand tho Stinct, a love for the wild, but pro-
difficulties these men are up against | vlded they can be given plenty of exercise, preferably in open country, there
is no reason why they should not be
ns  much  "home"  dogs  as,  say,  the
in their efforts to carry on?
Hotels such as we have In the Okan
agan are types of the hotels in every
town In thc interior.   They were built
and furnished on a scale far in nii-
vance of the hotels in the other provinces of the Dominion in like localities, for they had to conform to regulations laid down by law  under the
I old  license  system  which   permitted
i tbem to run  bars under certain restrictions   which   guaranteed   to   the
i public Al accommodations and service.
1    Under tlie Government Control Ll-
, quor Act, these bars are. of course,
dosed, and yet the botelmen are required  to  continue   tlie   expense  of
! operating these finely appointed
bouses. Worse than this. The Liquor
Act opens any room in the hotel to
1 anyone purchasing liquor at a Government liquor store where lie may
[ go and hold a "party" at the hotel-
1 man's expense.
At the last session of tlie Legislature
an effort was made to induce the Government to bring down a bill making
it lawful to sell beer and light wines
at hotel bars. This was opposed by
the liquor ring to such an extent that
the Government weakened and refused
to give the people what was asked for.
The liquor ring and the Liquor Control Board both are determined to keep
beer and light wines away from the
public, so as to increase the demand
for the "hard stuff," which means
greater profits to the liquor ring.
Bootleggers cannot handle beer and
light wines profitably. They call
handle whiskies and make big money,
and it would seem as if the Liquor
Control Board were part of the liquor
ring, so determined are its members
to keep thc light wines and beer away
from lite hotels.
And who is profiting by tills? Only
tlle bootlegging ring and liquor men.
who seem to have a "stand iu" with
the powers that be.—Oknmigan Commoner. Dec. 28th.
tent resolves of ours. There are many
wounds in tlle world to ileal. Perhaps we may iie able to do good to
others bearing hurts and so heal our
own.
We wish  you all  a  happy and a
prosperous New Year.
Si
Get the Boys
Ready for School
-NOW
BOYS' SUITS AT SPECIAL PRICES
Get the boy a new Suit before he goes back to school,
and get it at a reasonable price. Our Suits are of strong,
sturdy Tweeds and Worsteds, in popular styles and
colors. All sizes, 24 to 35. Grouped in three special
prices  $6.95, $8.95 and $10.95
BOYS' WOOL JERSEYS AT $1.75
Every boy needs a Sweater for school wear.   Here
are pure wool ones, with button-up necks in brown,
maroon, grey and heather mixture.   Sizes 22 to 32.
Priced at $1.75
BOYS' BLOOMERS AT $2.50 PAIR
Strong hard wearing Bloomers for boys, in neat dark
shades. All sizes, 24 to 34, in a splendid range of patterns.   Specially priced at, per pair $2.50
SHOES FOR THE BOY TERROR
Boys' School Boots in heavy black kip leather, with
oak tanned soles and triple stitched seams. Will stand
up to hard wear. Sizes 11 to 13, at $4.00; 1 to 5, at $ 1.15
SKOOKUM SHOES FOR BOYS
A wet weather Shoe in oil tan chrome leather, with
heavy leather top soles.   Sizes 1 to 5, at $4.50
BOYS' WOOL STOCKINGS AT $1.00 PAIR
Heavy wool stockings for boys and girls.   Double
heel, toes and knees.   A neat stocking that will wear
well.   Sizes 7'/2 to 10.   Reg., $1,25.   Special, pair $1.00
Agent for THE TIP TOP CLOTHING, the world's
largest tailors for men. Made to your measure. Hundreds of samples to select from.   Price $27.00
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
F.  Partridge     ::      ::      ::      ::     CUMBERLAND
smaller terriers.
If you get a dog purely for sporting
use. please don't Imagine that he, it a
puppy, Is going to be a huge success
straight away. To a puppy a gunshot Is nothing but a loud and rather
upsetting noise, while thc presence of
game of any kind would be something
to advertise to the fullest extent of
his vocal capabilities. A sporting dog
has a latent instinct for sporting work,
but whatever his job, must be trained
to it. One and all are good learners
with a real liking and aptitude for ths
work. So the training process is not
arduous, in fact, you will find it a
real jolly game to see, under your
tuition, your dog getting wiser and
wiser to your sporting law demands.
The Setter
The English Setter, with which are
.grouped the Gordon aud Irish Setters,
is one of the most handsome of sporting dogs. Training should commence
at-the age-of four or live months to
accustom him thoroughly to the report
of a gun. In general, this class of
dog is not taught to retrieve. The
three Setters differ in coloring. In
tlie Englisli breed white, with various
markings, is usually the predominating color, while In the Gordon Setter,
white is considered a blemish to his
lilack and tan coloring. The Irishman
favors a red coat.
Tlie points of the three are very
similar—well feathered legs with long
narrow heads and low set ears being
the most noticeable features. Generally, the Gordon Setter is more strongly built than his English cousin. All
have fine silky coats, and are faBt and
graceful movers!
In choosing a Setter, if you study
good looks, see that his forelegs ore
liead straight. Feet turned out or in
constitute faults. But wc humans
sometimes make good even with a
fault or two. and a Setter is' nothing
our inferior in this respect.
Next week wc will publish a few
notes on the Pointers and the Retriever.
PROVINCIAL NEWS
As an illustration of how thc agricultural industry Is developing in
British Columbia, Hon. E. D. Barrow,
Minister of Agriculture, in the Pro-
■vinclal Government, states that in 1910  past five years
Corsets
tt
Well, My Dears—
follow my advice—you cannot
possibly buy better than
Corsets
"They not only have all the grace of fashion and comfort
that comes from perfect designing, they also have
those other priceless attributes of perfect corsetry,
softness and durability of materials. Consequently
they  fit well  and  give long and  satisfactory service.
"1
rise you to go to the store whose name appears
be-low at^d ask to see their new models. They have them
>n a full range of shes in bust ind skirt lengths."
' 4
farm production was only worth $11,-
000,000, while In 1919 it had increased
to $60,000,000, and has since been
steadily growing. He says that cooperation has increased the output of
butter fat 1,000,000 pounds during the
The Wind Pass Gold Mine, a few
miles from Chu-Chua. on tbo Canadian
National Railways in the Thompson
River Valley, central British Columbia,
is to be actively developed this winter
by Major R. D. W. Leckie, Vancouver,
nnd associates. The mino has already
shipped four cars of ore to the Trail
smelters, running respectively forty-
three, fifty, seventy and one hundred
and ten dollars in gold to the ton. A
shipment of 1,800 pounds of sorted ore
assayed $437 per ton in gold. The
gold occurs free and as a telluride
associated with magnltite.
Cumberland Night School
Classes in  Book-keeping
and Arithmetic
Commencing January 9th, 1923
Join Now Fee, $2.00
A. H. WEBB, Teacher
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Royal Candy Co.
Give Us a Trial.
ICE COLD DRINKS OF ALL KINDS.
HOME-MADE CANDIES AND CHOCOLATES.
LUNCHEONS SERVED.   SERVICE THE BEST.
PHONE 25.
CAR FOR HIRE.
PHONE 25
Valued at $11,500,000, the 1922
British Columbia salmon pack aggregates 1,290,320 cases. It haa been
exceeded on only four occasions since
statistics have been compiled during
thc last 2C years and the most recent
was in 1919, when the total was 1,-
393,156 cases.
God, wbo is liberal in all His other
gifts, shows us by the wise economy
ot His Providence, how circumspect
wc ought to be ill the management of
our time, for he never gives us two
moments together.
FARM  WANTED
WANTED—TO   HEAR  FROM OWN-
crs of good farm for sale. State
cash price, full particulars. D, F.
Bush, Minneapolis, Minn.
Auction Sale
Agricultural Grounds, Courtenay,
THURSDAY NEXT, lPBH JANUARY,
At 2 o'Clock, P.M.
CATTLE,   CHICKENS,  FARM   PRO
DICE,   HOUSEHOLD   FURNITURE,
ETC, INCLUDING:
General Purpose Horse, White Wyandotte and Leghorn Puletts, Guinea
Fowls, quantity of Farm and Garden
Tools, Cow Chains, quantity of Window Plants, Primulas, etc., Gramophone Records, Alladln Lamp, new;
four hole Cook Stove, with Water
Jacket and water Tank, six hole Cook
Range, Sideboard with Mirror, Drawers, etc., 2 Bedsteads, Springs and
Mattresses, Carpet, Mats, Rocker, 4
Kitchen Chairs, Extension Dining
Table, quantity of Crockery, Kitchen
and Cooking Utensils, Blinds, Curtains
and Rods, Tennis Racket, Baseball
Bat, Lady's Astrachan Coat, quantity
of Toys and numerous sundries. Further entries tnay be made. Further
.particulars may be had from the
auctioneer.
GEORGE J. HARDY
Phone 10. Conrtenay Phone 61,
USED
CARS
490 CHEVROLET TOURING CAR -
Good  tires,  repainted and in  first-
class order.
$375.00
IWI CHEVROLET TOURING CAR -
Repainted,   good   top   and   curtains.
Mechanically Al.
$400.00
ALSO
CHEVROLET   DELIVERY   —   1922
model, in perfect condition, and fully
guaranteed. Two Ford Tourings and
one Ford Delivery, tn good running
order.
These cars are priced exceptionally
lew, so don't miss seeing them it you
are Interested In a used car.
Blunt & Ewart
The Courlctuiy Garage.
Phone 61. SATURDAY, JArttARV i 1923,
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
FIVE/
RADIO   FANS
We have in stock Radio Parts, including the N.E.
Peanut Valves.
Our Set is open for your inspection at your convenience.
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
The Piket Electric
Box. 71       ::      COURTENAY      ::      Phone 164
Financial And Market News
Gathered  by   Private  Direct   Wires
From thc World's Market
Centres.
SPECIAL SALE OF
Toys & Crockery
at Prices that Will Bear Comparison
with Vancouver Prices.
SEE MY SELECTION OF TOYS BEFORE
PURCHASING ELSEWHERE
Special Showing of Coal and
Wood Heaters
Tommy Nakanishi
The
Farmers' Produce Store
"Where Quality Counts."
MEATS,   POULTRY,   FISH   AND   VEGETABLES.
Telephone 143. P.O. Box 162
COURTENAY, B.C.
i
Why Send to Vancouver for
Groceries
When We Can Sell You the Highest Class Groceries
at the Lowest Cash Prices.
The Courtenay Cash Store
COURTENAY, B.C.
Phone 56—We Deliver.
as
January
Clearance   Sale
EVERY PAIR OF SHOES AT CAVIN'S SHOE STORE
IS ON SALE AT <
Greatly Reduced Figures
We have th elargest stock of Shoes in town to
choose from, and every pair has been carefully bought.
We must reduce our stock and we will offer you
about 50 lines, which we wish to clear out, at less than
cost.
Start the New Year right by buying your Shoes
at the Shoe Store. You can't afford not to look these
Shoes over before you buy jtmr next pair. We know
for sure that you can save money by buying your
Shoes at
Gavin's Shoe Store
SEE OUR WINDOWS FOR BARGAINS
(By Burdlck, Logan & Co., Ltd., 737
Granville  Street, Vancouver,  B.C.)
Wheat
Wheat production ol the world In
1D22 is less than In 1921. Tlle sutpply
ts ao close to probable consumption
that the crop ot 1923 Is already an object of anxious solicitude. The Importing world must depend upon
United States and Canada for its
bread supply of another year.   Inter-
! est centres upon the winter wheat
acreage in the Southwestern States,
and thc ability of thc Western Cana
1 dian farmer to increase his acreage
next spring.
Winter wheat In the United States
Is In a precarious condition, and busi
ness interests and importing centres
aro turning anxious eyes towards the
Western wheat fields. Our prairie
farmers, who are holding their wheat,
should profit greatly by the exipected
rise in price. Winnipeg May wheat
has already advanced 15 cents a bushel
since the opening of the option.
Copper
The world's consumption of copper
is 3 billion pounds per annum, while
the world's production is 2*^ billion
pounds yearly. A careful canvass of
stocks shows that existing supplies o
copper ate lowest for many years.
England, Germany and the U.S.A.
bought heavily today for prompt and
future delivery. British Columbia's
great copper properties, Granby and
Consolidated, should benefit by the upswing In copper demand. Thc red
metal ls strong at 15 cents wtib sellers
In an independent mood.
Lead
The price of lead touched "14 ceiil»
today.   Every blaBt furnace producing
lead In the U. S. is In full swing. The
battery, (paint and cable trades are
booked ahead with orders, and stocks
in first hands, which totalled 100,000
tons a month ago, have passed into
! consumption.    The Consolidated,    at
: Trail, Is the great Canadian producer
or iead.   They refine lead by the electrolytic process and the calcium-liuor-
! lde necessary in the process Is mined
north  of  Grand  Forks,  B.C.,  at  the
famous Rock Candy mine.
Gold
New York and London now recognize the Premier Mine at Stewart as
one of the great gtld producers of the
world. Another /quarterly dividend
aggregating one million dollars, has
just been declared. Competent authorities point out that in the first year of
actual operations the Premier paid
nearly twice the dividends paid by tlie
famous Comstoclc Lode in Nevada, In
Its flrst year. The Premier ore keeps
Its values with depth. Canada's three
other members of the "Big Gold Four"
are Hollinger, Dome and Mclntyre, in
Northern Ontario. London cables today tell of increasing interest In B.
C. mining properties,
Lumber
Soft lumber is steady with demand
brisk. Transportation conditions are
much Improved, labor is plentiful,
with tendency towards higher wages,
and demand Is unusually strong for
what Is usually a dull season in the
lumber industry. Orders received
last week were 7S9r higher than same
week for the last four years, shipment
40% larger, and production 199c higher. B. C. mills should have a prosperous year.
Cauiicd Salmon
Stocks moving satisfactorily. British
Columbia packers have no complaints
to offer, although prices on low grade
salmon could show Improvement.
Italy, Franco and Southern European
countries are sounding Pacific Coast
markets for supplies. A sizable order
was worked for export at Seattle this
morning.
Coal Trade
Telegraphic reports from Eastern
U. S. and Canada and South Wales
show that prices in all sections stiffened, and a strong market developed
everywhere. Britain Is doing the export trade, the American exports being lo Canada and the West Indies
only.
on
California Is producing 480,000 barrels of oil a day, with Mexico exporting 12,000,000 barrels a month. Royal
Dutch Company got a big well ln Venezuela, estimated at 50,000 barrels a
day.
Henry Ford—Chicago special says
Henry Ford is about to build at Hege-
wiscb, Illinois, a six million dollar
plant to employ 16,000 men. This
:plant to be eventually the world's
largest automobile plant.
London cable says department stores
Christmas business 15% lower and
207r more customers.
Paris cable says Russia will face
shortage of one million tons ot cereals this winter.
Brazil cable trom Rto de Janeiro \
says: "Brazil exported ten million dollars worth ot cotton In 1922."
New York flash—James B. Duke and
Sir William Price have subscribed
entire capital stock of $25,000,000, to
develop 1,200,000 H.P. on the Suquenay
In Quebec. Bigger project than either
Muscle Shoals or Niagara, Price
Bros, have agreed to take 200,000 H.P.
annually, and the balance will be distributed throughout New England.
Company's directors Include six Americans and two Canadians.
Bonds
Vancouver buying and selling prices
of Victory and War Loan bonds.
Prices are plus Interest to date of do-
livery. Bonds may be sent by registered mail to Burdick, Logan & Co.,
Ltd., and cheque will be forwarded by
return mail.
Victory Bonds—&%%
Buying      Selling
1923       100.30        101.30
1924         99.75        100.75
1927       100.85        101.85
1933       103.80        104.80
War Loan—5%
1925    98.80    99.80
1931    98.80    99.80
1937   100.50   101.50
1934   100.45   101.45
1937   105.35   106.35
1932   100.40   101.40
1927   100.00  "101.00
♦—New.
New York flash—"New York tlnan
clal Interests fear that London will
get the coming Canadian loan nt
$150,000,000."   We all hope so.
Subscribers to the Islander are invited to send their enquiries relative
to any stock, bond or company to the
editor, and by special arrangement
with Burdick, Logan & Co., Ltd., the
query will be answered in the noxt
issue.
Point Grey (Vancouver) Issues 30,-
000 6% 3-year bonds nt 100 and interest.
New Westminster 67c bonds due
1942 to 1945 stiffened during the week
owing to Eastern demand.
Leading investment stocks—Canadian Pacific, Union Pacific, American
Telephone & Telegraph, Studebaker
Motor, Bell Telephone of Canada,
Laureutlde Power and Laurentlde Paper continue to be popular investments for the cautious investor.
Burdick, Logan & Co., Ltd., will
gladly supply complete information on
these stocks to subscribers of the
Islander.
Today's closing prices of leading Investment stocks:
New York
Canadian Pacific  144Vi
American Tel. & Tel ,... 123%
Pan-American Oil      90
Union Pacific   128
Studebaker Motor  117*Vi
United States Steel   106%
Bethlehem Steel       63%
Standard Oil of N.J      42
Montreal
Boll Telephone   112%
Canada Steamships       li%
Ogilvie Milling  288
Lake of the Woods  177
Spanish River       96%
Provincial Paper pfd      94
Laurentlde Paper       94
Cons. Smelting       26%
Time should not be allowed to pass
without yielding fruits, In the form
of something learned worthy ot being
known, some good principle cultivated
or some good habit strengthened.-
Smlles.
McBRYDE'S BAKERY
TRY McBRYDE'S QUALITY BREAD.
THE PREMIER LOAF
OF
COMOX DISTRICT
COURTENAY
PHONE 154
TEA ROOMS
"I Was Run Down"
"Body was completely covered with Boils19
"If yon have ever had boils, yon
know bow painful and annoying
even one or two cau be. But imagine
having your whole body almost entirely covered with them 1 I am a
watchmaker by trade, making a specialty of repairing tlie highest grade
movements. This is probably the
most trying of auy mechauical work,
particularly for a nervous individual
like me. Working under great strata
both day and night for three months,
broughtmealniosttoastnteof collapse.
I was so irritable and nervous tbat the
slightest thing would 'bend me up in
the air.' If (managed to get a few
hours of sleep at night I was lucky,
1 bad uo appetite fur food I certainly
wns miserable During this time
boils began to appear on d Efferent pan s
of my body and the pain from them
made life a misery. My suffering was
to great at times that I felt thure was
nothing left for me to do but to end it
all. I consulted doctors but they all
told tne that if I didn't give up my
work and live out of doors, I would
ri into a decline.   As I had no money
couldn't do this.   In fact paying
doctors' bills .and buying medicines
used up all the money I made. Finally
in desperation, I decided that I would
either kill or cure myself, so I began
to study my case. I realized that I
was ascompletelyrnn down asany one
could possibly be with a bad case of
nerves. What I needed was building
up. After reading descriptions ot
different preparations, tlie one which
appeared to be the best for me was
Carnol. It haa simply performed
miracles for me. Four bottles have
done more than mouths of travel
abroad. I feel like a two-year old.
I sleep eight hours every night and
eat three good mealaa day. My skin
is like a b.iby's, free from blemishes
of any kind and I have now almost
forgotten that I have ever had such
things as nerves I want everybody
who is ailing to know about Caruof,
because I have such faith in it I believe it will cure auy human 111."
Mr.J.H. Mc. C.
Carnol is sold by your druggist,
and it you can conscientiously say,
after you have tried it, that it hasn't
done you any good, return the empty
bottle to him ud lie will refund your
money 1*628
SUCCESS FOR YOUNG MEN
AND WOMEN
is a matter of
PROPER TRAINING
Our business is training young men and women for
successful careers.   We have done it for many others.
We can do it for you.
NEW TERM BEGINS ON TUESDAY, JAN. 2nd, 1923
Write for prospectus.
SPROTT-SHAW
NANAIMO BUSINESS SCHOOL, LTD.
Free Press Block      ::    ::    ::   NANAIMO, B. C.
RADIO
Special
Introductory
Offer
The Famous Crystal
Speaker
Complete with Aerial and Headphones
$12.95
To the first ten purchasers we make this Special Offer
of a $25.00 Radio Receiving Set.
Purchasers of this set will be allowed full purchase
price should they decide later to purchase our long
range set.
We Install Transmitting Sets and All Radio Equipment.  Phone or Mail Your Order.
Northern Radio Co. Ltd.
Operating Courtenay Radio Broadcast, C.F.V.C.
Phone 162 COURTENAY, B.C. Box 78
Ife SIX
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923.
Corporation Of The City Of Cumberland
Resolution passed by the City ol
Cumberland for the purpose of introducing a By-law to raise Fifteen j
Thousand Dollars for erecting New
Municipal Buildings. j
That whereas the present Municipal,
Buildings, consisting of Municipal j
Council Chambers, Fire Hall and Ball
Tower, Police Court. Office, Cells and
Police Residence, are In such a bad
slate of repair as not to justify the
expenditure necessary to place them
In a sound aud satisfactory condition.
lt Is hereby resolved that new Municipal Buildings, consisting of Municipal Council Chambers and Office, Fire
Hall and Hell Tower, with living
quarters for one fireman, Police Residence, Police Court. Office nnd Cells,
together with suitable sanitary and
heating apparatus for the same shall
be erected at a cost of Fifteen Thousand Dollars and interest;
And It Is hereby further resolved
that a by-law be introduced for the
purpose of borrowing money for the.
Issue of debentures upon the credit
of the Municipality at large to provide
the above Fifteen Thousand Dollars
and the interest thereon.
D. R. MACDONALD.
Mayor.
T. MORDY,
City  Clerk.
Passed in open Council on the 26th
day of December, 1922.
Municipal HiilldliiKs lly-lnw No. 56
(1923)
To raise the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars for tlio purpose ot constructing new  Municipal,  Police and
Fire Buildings, and to authorize the
issue of debentures therefor.
Whereas, thc Corporation of the
City of Cumberland consider it necessary and expedient to construct new
.Municipal Buildings at a cost of Fifteen Thousand Dollars, and in accordance with Section 190, Chap. 52, of
the Municipal Act, contained ln thc
Revised Statutes of British Columbia.
A.D. 1914, passed a resolution on December 20th, 1922. authorizing and
granting the same;
And whereas it Is necessary to raise
Ihe sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars.
and in order thereto it will be necessary to issue Debentures of the said
Municipality for the sum of Fifteen
Thousand Dollars, payable as herein
provided;
And whereas it ls necessary to raise
annually during the term of ten years,
by .special rate for paying the said
debt   and   Interest   the   sum   of   One
Ilo=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Jan. 5 and  6
Jack Holt in
While Satan
Sleeps
'While Satan
Sleeps'
Jack Holt's greatest picture, a subperb v/estern
story with a trejnendous punch.
Here's drama that will capture you with its startling, gripping power.
Laughs, tears—the whole gamut of human emotions, superbly blended in the season's greatest heart-
drama.
_ Extra! Extra! Four reels of comedy will be
screened with this big feature picture. Two two-part
comedies,
MATINEE SATURDAY, 2:!10 P.M.
Monday and Tuesday
William Fox Presents the 8-part Special
"SHAME"
A story of marvelos human interest and dramatic power, which sweeps from San
Francisco to the far reaches of the Frozen North.
NOTE—This special will be screened at regular prices.
Wednesday  and  Thursday,  BEBE  DANIELS in
"SINGED   WINGS"
Thousand Two Hundred and Ninety
Dollars to pay off the Principal, and
One Thousand and Fifty Dollars to
pay the interest thereon;
And whereas the whole rateable
property of the Municipality, according to the last revised Assessment
Roll amounts to
Land  $130,000.0(1
Improvements   $264,000.00
And whereas the existing debenture
debt of this Municipality amounts to
nil, and no principal or Interest Is In
arrear;
And whereas the said sum of $15,000
is thc amount of the debt which this
by-law is intended to create;
Therefore Ihe Municipal Council of
tho Corporation of the City of Cumberland enacts aa follows:
(1) It shall be lawful for the Mayor
of tho said City ot Cumberland for
the purpose aforesaid to borrow the
said sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollar*,
and to issue debentures of Ihe sulil
Municipality to the amount of Fifteen
Thousand Dollnrs ln sums of not loss
than $100.00 each, payable at the 15th
day of February, 1933, and to bear
interest at the rate of seven per cent
per annum, such interest to be payable
annually on the 15th day of July, in
each and every year during the currency of the said debentures.
(2) The sold debentures as to principal and interest shall be payable at
the Royal Bank of Canada In the City
of Cumberland, and shall have interest
coupons attached thereto.
(3) It shall be lawful for the Mayor
of the said Municipality, and he Is
hereby authorized and instructed lo
sign and issue the said debentures
herein authorized to he issued, and to
cause the same to he signed by the
Treasurer of the said Municipality,
and the Clerk of the Municipality Is
hereby Instructed to attach thc seal
of tlie said Municipality to the said
debentures; the coupons shall have
the above signatures lithographed.
(■I) That there shall be raised and
levied in each year by special rate
thc sum of One Thousand and Fifty
Dollars for the payment of interest
(luring the currency of the said debentures, and also Ihe sum of Twelve
Hundred nnd Ninety Dollars for the
payment of said debt.
(5) The said sum shall be raised
and levied In each year by a special
rate upon all land or land nnd improvements within the Municipality.
(6) This By-law may be cited as
56, A.D. 1923, and shall take effect on
tho "Mnnlclpal Buildings By-law, No.
the   day of A.D. 1923.
Read in open council and passed Its
Ilrst reading December 26th, 1922.
Read In open council and passed ils
second reading December 26th, 1922.
Read In open council and passed its
j third reading December 26lh. 1922.
Thc abovo By-law will be voted on
on Thursday, January 11th, 1923.
Time in like a ship which never
anchors; while I am on board, I had
better do those things thnt may profit
me at my landing, than practice such
as shall cause my commitment when
I come ashore.—Feltham.
SPECIALS
Heaters reduced to clearance prices.
A special line of Rugs,   Regular $3.00.
Sale Price 	
$2.25
Linoleums, short ends suitable for pantry or bath
room.
Comforters, specially marked to clear.
Stanfields' Red Label Underwear.
Per garment 	
Flannelettes, in blue and pink stripe.
Five yards for 	
$2.00
$1.00
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
 »      ■   ,
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 ~~~~ Cumberland, B. C.
ST.  JOHN'S  AMBULANCE   ASSOCIATION
The 1923 Classes
for Men will commence on
SUNDAY,  JANUARY   7th,   AT   U   A.M
Lectiurer, Dr. G. K. MacNaughton.
The Classes for Ladies will commence on
TUESDAY, JANUARY  9th, AT 7 P.M.
Lecturer, A. J. Taylor.
The Ladies' Home-Nursing Classes will commence on
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3rd, AT 7.30 P.M.
Lecturer, Dr. E. R. Hicks,
(The above classes will bo held in the First Aid Hall,
free of charge).
J. D. Davis, Secretary.
II II     —
Acts Like a FLAW* Results Guaranteed
bronchitis
Fixture
AT ALL DRUGGISTS
Sold by FROST'S DRUG STORE
THE BATTLE OF
THREE  RIVERS
OTTAWA, Ont.—Arrangements have
heon made by tho Department ol the
interior to erect n monnment on des
Forges Street, at Threo Rivers, Quebec, to commemorate one of the most
Interesting of the minor battles that
followed tlie American attack on Quebec by Arnold and Montgomery In
1775. In the spring of tlie following
year many of the American troops
passed Three Rivers in wretched condition and Ihe evacuation of thc
country seemed to be proceeding at
great speed hut on June 8 it was
learned thai an American column was
marching on the town, which was
without garrison or defence. A corps
of volunteers was organized by Joseph
Boucher de Ntverville who managed
to hold the enemy at hay until Ihe
arrival of a detachment of Royal i.lght
Infantry from Quebec. A constant fire
was maintained hy the Canadians and
the Americans were dispersed.
The Americans had captured An-
tolne Qauthier, habitant, and obliged
film to act as tlieir guide. "Qauthier
pointed out to them." says Dr. Suite,
the Canadian historian, "the great risk
of inarching by the main road on account of the gunboats watching along
llie river, and  consequently he was
allowed to strike through the bush to
Ste. Marguerite.    He lengthened the
circuit so well lhat the troops in town
had time to cut a long trench in the
common and plant thc battery on the
I crests of the hill near-by so as to cover
| the most part of the common.    On
: June 8 the attack was made on the
j whole line of the trench but the Am-
; Orleans were ao well peppered by the
rifles  and  cannon  lhat  they  retired
without renewing the attempt."
Mr. William Mlchelin, ot Threo
Rivers, has generously donated a piece
nl ground near the site of this battle.
A monument is to be erected nnd a
memorial bronze tablet placed thereon.
COURTENAY G.W.V.A.
NEW YEARS DANCE
COURTENAY, Jan. 2.—Last night
the Gaiety Theatre was the scene of a
gay dance held under the auspices of
the Great War Veterans' Association
and Ladies' Auxiliary of that organization. . Patrons were present from
all parts of the Valley and the New
Year's snowball dance passed off In a
most enjoyable manner. The attendance was large. The music under the
direction of Mr. James Quinn was all
that could be desired and the refreshments were exceedingly delicious. At
two o'clock the throng dispersed.
FIVE DOLLARS
will place this beautiful phonograph in your home.
You can arrange convenient terms on the balance.
A GOOD SECOND-HAND PIANO—FULL
COMPASS; MAHOGANY FINISH.   $25.00.
TERMS ARRANGED.
Marshall Music Co
CUMBERLAND—" Centre of Towft."
COURTENAY—" Top of Town." SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923,
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SEVEN
f
II
NOTICE
CORPORATION OF  THE  CITY  Of
CUMBERLAND
Public notice is hereby given to tlie!
electors of the Municipality of the j
Corporation of the City of Cumber-:
land, that I require the-presence of!
tho said elected' it the Council Cham-
bars on the 8th day of January, at
twelve o'clock noon, for the purpose j
of electing persons to represent them'
ln the Municipal Council as Mayor and j
Aldermen, three School Trustees and
one Police Commissioner.
The mode of nomination shall be as
follows:
Tho candidates shall be nominator!
in writing; the writing shall be subscribed by two voters of the Municipality as proposer, and seconder, and
shall be delivered to the Returning
Oflicer at any time between tho date
of the notice and 2 p.m. of the day of
the nomination. The Baid writing may
be In the form numbered 5 ln tbe
Schedule of this Act; and shall state
the name, residence and occupation or
description of each person proposed
in such manner as sufficiently tojden-
tify such candidate, and hi tie event
of a poll being necessary suoh poll
will be opened on the 11th day of
January, A.D. 1023, at the City Council
Chambors, II a.m. to 7 p.m., of which
every person is hereby required to
take notice and govern himself accordingly.
The qualifications required by law
are as follows:
For Mujori—Be of full age of 21
years, and a British subject; and the
registered owner, for 6 monthB next
preceding the date of nomination, of
land or real property In the City of
Cumberland of tho assessed value on
the last Municipal assessment roll of
not leas than $1,000, over and above
any registered judgment or charge.
For Aldermani-Bo ot full age of
21 years, and a British subject; art
the registered owner, for 6 months
next preceding the date of nomination, of land or real property In the
City of Cumberland ot the assessed
value on the last Municipal assessment roll, of not less than $500, ov#r
Cslery King is the thing
to stimulate tht liver, cleanse the
bowels, purify the blood, banish
headaches ana make you feel the
joy of better health and strength.
Nature's own laxative and tonic
roots and herbs in Celery King,
30o and 60c packages.
News of Courtenay District
Are You Coughing?
Why not cure it this very day? A
few drops of Shiloh relieves that
tickling in the throat that maddens
you. A few doses heal up the sore
and inflamed tissues in tne throat
and really banish that cough. 80c,
60c and $1.20.   AU druggists.
SHILOHcom
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • - B. C.
Mr. W. G. Marshall, of the Marshall
Music Company, spent the week-end
at Nanaimo.
Messrs. Bert Higgins and Sid Hene-
gan have opened a pool room and confectionery in the building formerly occupied by Carbetto Cakery. They have
installed an excellent English billiard
table as well as a pool table of the
best make.
and above any registered judgment or
charge.
For School Trustee:—Bo of full oge
of 21 years, and a British subject;
and the registered owner, for 6 months
next preceding the date of nomination,
of land or real property within the
School District of Cumberland, of the
assessed value on tho last Municipal
assessment roll of not less than $500
over and above any registered jurt;;-
Olven under my hand at Cumberland this 29th day of December, 1912.
ment or charge.
T. MORDY,
Returning Officer.
A review of the score cards received
from the officers of the Provincial Potato Fair held some time ago at
Grand Forks, tell the story of the
supremacy of the Comox spud far
more vividly than a more eulogy ot the
climate and soil conditions. Score
cards have boon received by the prize
winners and show au extremely grati-
I tying result, both for those who took
the trouble to exhibit, and to those
who arranged the exhibits for shipment, particularly Mr. H. P. AllherryT
himself, one of the two highest
scorers. The gratifying results at-
tained are attributable to the organization of the Potato Growers' Association and to the advice given by exports from tlio Provincial Department
of Agriculture, especially Mr. Tice,
who lias come to Comox on several
occasions and visited tlle potato fields
and addressed meetings in various
portions ot tlio Valley. These visits
end advice givon hnvo been a wonderful stimulus to the potato industry and
have heen the means of standardizing
the industry in this portion of Vancouver Island, tlio soil of which has,
this year, been conclusively proven
to be tlie best adapted in British Columbia for the growing of heavy crops
ol* highest grade tubers. The score
cards give the following results, tlie
chief point emphasized being thnt Comox potatoes are remarkably true to
.species and about totally free from
disease. Out of a possible 100 points,
Mr. H. P. Allberry gained 00V4; Capt.
C. P. Bates, 99%; D. E. Evans, 99;
Ii. It. Clark, 99; J. Blackburn, 99;
J. E. N. Flinton, 99; Fred Swan, 99;
Walter Gee, 98Vi- The grand challenge cup Is reposing in Booth's store
window and has been a source of the
greatest attraction.
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Wash, corner of Cumberland Road and
Lake Trail, was damaged by fire of
an unknown origin on Tuesday night
last. Prompt assistance given by the
neighbors, especially Mr. Thomas
Booth, who used a garden hose and
extinguishers effectively, saved the
spread of the flames. The damage
was not very extensive.
Civic politics are moving slowly,
with the election only a few days
away. Mayor Simms has expressed
a desire for a rest, having done duty
for two years, when very important
business, lias been transacted. He ls
not seeking re-election, but will stand
again if nobody oise cares to take on
tlie onerous duties. Alderman George
Pldcock, who has been chairman of
tho Water Committee, positively refuses to sit again, though he Is being
pressed. Mr. Pldcock cannot afford
tlie time entailed as his growing business needs his whole attention. The
otlier members of this year's Council
arc undecided and some of them are
not over-anxious to hold office again.
McLeocTs Store
GENTS*  FURNISHINGS  IN  ALL  LINES
BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.
—Sole Agent for—
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
In This District
>A\. Including Cumberland
JUST ARRIVED
The "Astoria" Shoe
SOLID LEATHER—FITS LIKE A GLOVE
Stetson Hats to suit all tastes. Boys' warm Overcoats for rainy days. Sweaters and Sweater Coats in
all styles, sizes and colors.
Mr. P. P. Heric, of Yahk, B.C., Is
visiting his son, Frederick, of the L.
r>. Cafe. His home Is in the Crow's
Nest, where he states the hClcago
Times are beginning the construction
ol a paper mill that will cost In the
neighborhood of twelve million dollars. The amount to be expended on
the flrst  unit is  four million.    Mr
Heric has had a great deal to do with j	
the lumber  industry and  looks forward wilh confidence to a great year.    r?«^ES(ii?
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
it
Messrs. Jack Lewis and Mike Wilkinson, of Nanaimo, have come up for
a few days' duck hunting on tlio flats
nnd at Oyster River.
Miss Florence Cliffe, of the Upper
Road, who Is now home on holidays
from the Normal School of Victoria,
was completely taken by surprise last
Friday, when twenty young couple
called to spend a pleasant evening.    I
Mr. J. Irvine. Victoria, is in town
on a business trip.
Mr. J. Mclvor was down from Oyster
River on Wednesday last.,
A Wonderful Discovery!
— For the Relief of ——
Stomach Sufferers
GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY HARMLESS
Relieves Distress in 2 Minutes!
Mayor Charles Simms went to Vancouver on Thursday In connection
with a project to put a freight boat
In regular service from tlie Mainland
to Courtenay.
The boxing tournament arranged to
bo held on Thursday, January 11th,
lias heen unavoidably postponed until I
tlie 14th. One of the headllners is unable to participate and a substitute
Is being looked for. The class ot the
illtrtrict will appear and the fans
should receive extra good value for
the price of admission.
.Mr. Ed. Rowebotlom, of Vancouver,
was in town on Thursday.
Mr. Sam Arthur is on duty again as
clerk at the Riverside, after having |
been   lnid   up  for several  days  with
tonsllitls.
A soothing, healing combination of
natural elements, that relieves acute and
chronic stomach and bowel complaints, is
offered to suffering humanity by the JO-
TOCO. OF CANADA LIMITED. This
wonderfully efficient remedy was compounded by a medical man after suffering for years and spending a fortune.
It has brought buoyant health and vitality to him and the many friends to whom
he has given it—now you, too, can get it.
Under the brand name of JO-TO, meaning "better or superior," this remarkable
remedy is now on sale at drug stores.
A teaspoonful, dissolved in a glass ol
hot water, relieves the most distressing
pains in the stomach and bowels, stops
HEARTBURN, ACID STOMACH,
BLOATING, SOUR, BURNING
STOMACH, and ALL AFTER EATING DISCOMFORT. IT IS NOT A
DRUG, but Mother Nature's gift to mankind of a few of her harmless healing
elements. By relieving the causes of
your suffering, it prevents more serious
complications and you thus escape years
of suffering. Heed the warning signals
and take JO-TO. If it does not give relief, your money will be refunded. It is
sold under an ironclad guarantee. It is
pure and harmless, and will not irritatQ
the most delicate stomach.
Mr. Wallace McMorran. manager ot(
the extensive property of the Canada
Western Ranch Co., has been .in the
district and left for Victoria on Thurs-'
day on liis way to Kamloops.
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e •; other less nourishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Last Friday afternoon saw the Women's Auxiliary to the Q. W. V. A. on
the job again. The ladies took good
care that the kiddles of our war
heroes were given a line big Christmas
tree. Just about seventy kiddles
were entertained during the afternoon. Father Christmas fooled the
youngsters by leaving his sleigh
somewhere out of reach. He brought
all his presents out nevertheless and
gave each child present a .present
from the tree.
The Courtenay Ratepayers' Association held n meeting last night at which
tliey decided to make a canvass of
prospective candidates for Municipal
honors at the forthcoming elections.
Every young man and woman needs
I a business education.   The best place
to get it is nt the Sprott-Shaw Bual-
! ness   College.   Nanaimo.   Write   for
I prospectus.
Go to Your Drug
Store-get a box of
JOTQ
Stop Suffering!
PRESENTATION TO
MR. AND MRS. BLIGHT
JO-TO almost instantly relieves gas pains, acid
fetomach, bloating, heartburn, sour stomach and
all indigestion and after-eating discomforts,
A pleasant little affair took placo
in Iho basement of St. George's Presbyterian Church Wednesday, when the
officers and members of the Sunday
School gathered to give a farewell I"
two of their prominent workers, Mr.
and Mrs. Wesley Blight.
During the evening refreshments
were served nnd nt tha conclusion Mr.
10. King made a short address, which
was followed by a small presentation
made by Mr. W. Duncan on behalf ot
the Sunday School.
FOR CONSTIPATION
BILIOUS .HEADACHES
JO-TO has no equal. A single treatment!
will relieve the most stubborn cases and
bilious headaches are stopped in a few
minutes.
Dnig^St 8 5    You are requested to refund the purchase price wherever.
° JO-TO tails to give relief.
JO-TO is compounded in the laboratory of the JO-TO Co. of Canada Limited, located at 456 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, B.C.
SOLD BY ALL DRUG STORES
INSTALS   RADIO
APPARATUS
Mr, Len D. Piket, enterprising manager of the Piket Electric Co., Courtenay, has Installed a radio apparatus
at his place of business on Union
Street. It Is an Instrument supplied
by the Northern Electric Co., of Vancouver, using the famous "Peanut
Valve," also manufactured by the
Northern Electric Co. It has a 3,0(10
mile radius, and concerts havo been
hoard from Los Angeles. Oakland.
Portland, Salt Lake City. Calgary,
Province. Vancouver and many other
.points on the continent. Mr. Piket
is entertaining his friends every evening and much enjoyment is given bv'
the new radio outlit.
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. DAVIS, te*
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
HEALTH SERVICE.
E. O. HAUKEDAL
Doctor of Chiropractic
(8 Years Experience)
Ollice Hours: 12 lo 3 p.m.; 5 to 7 p.m
Over Mrs. King's Dook Store
Dunsmuir Ave.      :      CUMBERLAND
Snap for Quick Sale
in Ladysmith
Kino six-roomed Bungalow (furnished
or unfurnished) Including bathroom;
Ideally situated on 3rd Avenue; large
barn, garage, chicken house, fruit
trees.
HITTING ROOM (16' x 13')-Cabln-
ot Orand Piano, Fumed Oak Buffet
with English Bevelled Mirror, Carpet,
Coal Heater, Edison Phonograph and
Records, Round Extension Table,
Leather Couch, Seagrass Chain, Curtains, Glassware, Cushions, Oak
Writing Desk, etc.
TIIHKK HKimoOJIN — Brass and
steel Beds, Day Couch, Folding Bed,
Mattresses, Dressers, Chest Drawers,
Carpets, Linen, etc.
KITCHEN—Six Ring Maple Leaf
Range. Tea Wagon, Portable Linen
Cupboard, 8 Chairs, Dinner Service,
Linoleum, Table, Oood Aluminum
Cooking Utensils and other smaller
articles ton numerous to mention.
Must he sold, owner leaving for England. Furnished, $2,000; unfurnished.
$1,250. House ln splendid repair, roof
reshlngled and thoroughly decorated
recently inside and outside, also Ford
touring car, just been overhauled and
painted. The whole can be viewed
any lime.   Apply ownar,
AIjWEN,
Ladysmith.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies' and  Gents'
Fashionable    Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
ELECTRICITY
A TABLE LAMP OR FIXTURE
SHOWING A FULL LINE AT REASONABLE
PRICES.
MacDonald Electric Supply
and Repairs
COURTENAY, B.C. EIGHT
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1923.
Household Requisites
Just arrived, a shipment of Linoleums in new
designs, comprising the 4-yards wide, which is so convenient and useful in covering rooms. No join—all in
one piece.
New designs in 2-yard wide Linoleum.
Linoleum Borders for hall and other purposes,
36 inches wide.
New Beds in regular sizes, at very reasonable
prices.
New Springs, including the Spiral Spring. Quite
a selection to choose from, at very special prices.
New Mattresses—Our stock comprises the well-
known "Restmore Mattresses," which means quality
and comfort, at prices which will prove attractive.
DRY GOODS
GENTS !it)RNISHik09
3
Social and Personal
CORRESPONDENCE
To the Editor, The Islander.
Dear Sir:—With the near approach
of our civic election, would it not be
ill order for our Mayor and Aldermen
to call a public meeting and give the
taxpayers an account of their stewardship for the City during the past year,
and at the same time tell us what they
propose doing (If elected) tor the
coming year.
Ab most of the ratepayers are from
Missouri, tliey will have to be shown
where the necessity at this*tlme, and
under present unfavorable conditions,
of spending $15,000 for the erection of
new city buildings, as is contemplated
in the new By-law, which is to he
submitted to be voted upon at the coming election.
In the Ilrst placo, wc are being told
from recent proceedings at the Council Chambers, that the present buildings are beyond repair. Is that really
so? So far as the reports of their
doings we have not been led to believe that tliey have taken any steps
to ascertain what the approximate cost
would be to have the buildings put in
shape. Therefore, until this is done
we are not prepared to accept that
bare statement. Wc have seen a number of buildings (residences) that are
much older than the city buildings,
that during tho .past summer and fall
were put in tho hands of carpenters
and painters, and as a result they are
to all intents and purposes as good
as new, and a delight to the eye, at
an outlay of probably about 25 per
cent of their original cost.
According to the fly-law published
this week in your paper, if passed, tho
City will require to raise an additional
J2.340 annually, in other words, to
pay back In ten years $2,340 for the
$15,000 borrowed, which would add 6
mills to our present high rate of tax
ntion. Note the interest, not more
than lie. I should say not. It doesn't
say much for our borrowing capacity,
when other Municipalities ln British
Columbia are borrowing nt 4 and 5
per cent.
In addition wo will be called upon
tu raise an additional $750 yearly towards our schools, owing to the
change made in our classification by
tho Government from a third to a second class city. Another 2 mills added
tn our taxes.
If our lire department need better
facilities, by all means give lt to them.
I am given to understand that an outlay of one-tenth of the proposed loan
would be sufficient for that purpose.
If we have money to spend, or our
credit Is good enough to borrow, 1
would say let It be for something that
would be revenue producing. As an
illustration, Courtenay and Ladysmith
are with a special tax of 5 mills buying their electric light plants, and in
the former case, I am informed that,
the profits from that source is being
usod to lower the rate of assessments
and decrease their taxation. Doubtless the same would also apply to
Ladysmith. I think it goes without
saying in so far at least as this City
Is concerned, the higher the taxation
tho less valuable becomes real estate
In Cumberland.    Consequently It be-
Cmirlenu) Ledge, No. 60, B.F.O.E.,
meet second nnd fourth Thursdays of
wich month, ut S p.m. sharp, nl
Booth's Hall, Coiirteiinr.
A number of friends gathered at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. C. Dando on
Thursday night, a most enjoyable
evening being spent playing cards and
music.
Mr. Dunbar, of the Provincial Police, went to Vancouver Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Knglish. accompanied by thoir child, went to Vancouver  Wednesday.
Miss Charlotte Jaynes, of Nanaimo,
is visiting her grandfather, Thomas
Horbury.
Miss Galvan left hero on Thursday
morning to tako up a position teaching near Fernie.
Tho Bevan baseball team is holding
a concert and dance at tlio Bevan
Schoolhouse Saturday, to boost the
club funds.
EXTENSION MINE
FREE OF ACCIDENTS
DURING THE YEAR
Mr. Thomas A. Spruston, general
manager of the Extension Mines, has
been congratulated by the Hon. Wm.
Sloan, Minister of Mines, on the fact
that there were no fatal accidents in
thc mines under his charge during
tlio past year. Tlio following telegram speaks for itself:
T. A. Spruston,
Manager, Extension Mines.
Ladysmith, D.C.
Permit me to extend congratulations on your freedom from fatal accidents in tlie operation of the Extension Collieries during (lie past year.
'This showing speaks well for your
safety regulations, their administration by yourself and staff, nnd the
ful compliance with the same by the
minors and all others, With best
wishes for tlie New Year.
WILLIAM SLOAN.
Minister of Minos.
Mr. Spruston lias evory reason to
ho pleased and gratified with his record. Mining Is a hazardous occupation, nud there aro dangers and conditions, both known and unknown, 'o
be gunrded against. In a mine the
size of Extension It is something of
a record to get through a year's operation without a fatal accident. It
should also be noted that the mine
operated almost at full time all tho
year around, and thnt It is still maintaining its output, in spite of the fact
that careless rumor has foretold It's
early closure for the last ton years.
It seems good for as many more years,
and may It also maintain its inst
year's record.
Entertained Women's Auxiliary.
On Tuesday evening last, at her
residence on Third Street, Mrs. John
Thomson entertained the Women's
Auxiliary of the G.W.V.A., a most delightful time being spent by all present.
ss ss ss
Mr. J. Westover, the representative
of the Marshall Music Co. of Cumberland and Courtenay, has taken up his
residence in the city, moving In from
Courtenay last week.
ss ss ss
Miss M. Ilannerman and Miss Ida
McFadyen left for Victoria on Tuesday morning last.
.      .      .
Delightful Dinner I'nrti).
Dr. and Mrs. George Ker McNaughton entertained on Friday evening
last, tlie occasion being the anniversary of their wedding. Fifteen guests
sat down to a delightful dinner, and
afler all tho congratulations and after-
dinner speeches, bridge was Indulged
In, the following being the successful
winners:
Ladies—First, Mrs. Cooke; consolation, Miss Brown. Gentlemen—First,
F. Pickard; consolation, C. Parnham.
*      *      *
Mr. and Mrs. James Halliday entertained a number of their friends ou
Thursday evening last. Games, cards
and guessing competition were indulged in. Mr. 11. Spittall was successful lu winning the prize for the
guessing competition, with Mr. J. Halliday securing the consolation. Dainty
refreshments were served by the host
and hostess, a most enjoyable evening
being spent by all present.
ss * *
The many friends of Mrs. George
booth, of Royston, will be sorry to
hear of her illness. She is a patient
in the Cumberland Hospital.
SS       *       SS
The Provincial Government Is erecting a new bridge over the Trent River
In tlie Royston district.
Mrs. A. C. Lymn entertained a number of friends at her home laBt Monday evening In honor of Miss A. Loggie. of Vancouver. A very pleasant
evening was spent.
A very jolly evening was Bpent last
Thursday when Norma Frost entertained nine of her little friends, the
occasion being her ninth birthday. The
table was .prettily decorated, being
centred by the nine-candled birthday
cake, over which hung two huge lighted balloons, surrounded by numerous
others. The time was very pleasantly
passed with games, guessing contests,
etc. Those present were: Thelma
Ronald, Kathleen O'Brien, Helen
Parnham, Eleanor Bergland, Kathleen
and Molly Cooke, Lillian Leversedge,
Joan MacNaughton and Margaret Robinson.
On Wednesday evening last Mr. and
Mrs. T. W. Scott entertained nt bridge
in honor of Miss Loggie.
January first being the official public reception day of the American Consulate, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Clinton
were at home to a large number of
friends. The house was appropriately
decorated with the American Stars
and Stripes. Tea was served by Mrs.
L. W. Nunns, assisted by Mrs. A. R.
Nunns, Miss Tarbell and Miss J. Oraham. Among those present were:
Mr. and Mrs. A. Auchlnvole, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Bryan, Masters Jack and Gerald Bryden, Mrs. J. Cameron, Corporal
and Mrs. W. H. Cope, Mr. and Mrs. F.
J. Dalby, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Frame,
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Frost, Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas Graham, Miss Janet Graham, Rev. and Mrs. James Hood. Mrs.
A. E. Jeffrey, Miss A. Loggie, Mr. and
Mrs. A. C. Lymn, Mr. D. R, McDonald.
Dr. and Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton, Mr.
nnd Mrs. A. McKinnon, Mr. Thomas
Mordy, Mr. W. H. Mordy, Mr. T. H.
Mumford, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Nunns.
Mr. H. R. Nunns, Mrs. L. W. Nunns,
Mr. and Mrs. C. Parnham, Mr. and
Mrs. E. D. Pickard, Mr. F. Pickard,
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs.
T. W. Scott, Mr. F. Shaw, Mr. R. Shaw,
Mrs. J. Shortt, Mr. and Mrs. C. H.
Tarbell, Miss M. Tarbell, Mr. George
Tarbell, Mrs. Vrquhart, Mr. and Mrs.
J. Walton.
Miss Carrie Richardson returned
from Victoria Saturday evening, whore
she has been spending a week's holiday.
Mr. Herbert Roy returned to Vancouver Tuesday morning after spend-
Ing a week's holiday with his parents, i
Mr. and Mrs. D. Roy, of Royston.
Miss Hazel Mounce returned from
Victoria Saturday evening.
Mr. George Michell left   for   Chemainus last Saturday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dallos returned
to their homo In Newport, Wash., on
Tuesday morning.
«&««*t-w«i^^
Appreciating our Pleasant Business Relations
with you during the Past Year,
We Wish You the Compliments of the Season
and Trust that the Coming Year
will bring the Best you have ever known in
Health, Happiness and Prosperity.
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. Grocery
PHONE 38—FOR SERVICE AND QUALITY
Cumberland
B.C.
Mrs. F. Wilcox left for Vancouver
Tuesday morning.
Miss Viola Campbell left for Vancouver, where she will go ln training
at the Vancouver General Hospital.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent. Canadian Collieries (D)
Ltd., left for Victoria Wednesday
morning.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lewis returned from Nanaimo on Wednesday evening, afler spending the holiday there.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Fletcher, of Nanaimo, spent the New Year's holiday
In town,
Miss A. Loggie leaves for her home
lu Vancouver Sunday, after spending
the holiday with Dr. and Mrs. McNaughton.
Last Tuesday evening Mrs. R. E.
Frost was hostess to a number of
musical friends. The evening was
passed in music and singing, and a
very enjoyable time was spent.
Miss Connie Bird entertained a
number of friends at the home of her
parents on Wednesday evening. The
hours were spent with music and
(lancing, and a very jolly time was
enjoyed by all. Among those present
were Etta and Edith Hood, Madge
Fouracre, Grace Watson, Beatrice
Dickie, Fannie Strachan, Nell Potter,
Greta Halliday, Harry Webb, Harry
Fouracre, Jim Wilcock, Frank Potter,
Cyril Michell, John Stevenson, George
Hums, Donald Watson and James Halliday.
Miss Grace Watson returned to Vancouver Thursday morning after spending the holiday with the Misses Hood.
Charles McNaught appeared before
Magistrate Baird on January 2nd to
answer the charge of being disorderly
on Dunsmuir Avenue on December 30.
The accused pleaded guilty and was
lined the sum of $10 and costs.
Dr. E. K. Hicks went to Vancouver
on Saturday, returning on Thursday.
Mrs. F. A. McCarthy Is at present
confined to the hospital.
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons  • •    Proprietor
Miss Orpha V. Lewis, youngest
(laughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. Lewis,
of this city, was united ln marriage
to Mr. John Bond, son of Mr. and
Mrs. T. Bond, also of this city, on
Thursday evening, at Nanaimo. The
happy young couple arrived in town
last night. Both are well known lu
Cumberland.
.Mr. and Mrs. James Whyte, of Departure Bay, have been spending tho
New Year holidays with his mother,
Mrs. Thomas Bennett.
Mrs. J. W. Carthew, of Powell River,
has been spending the holidays with
her mother, Mrs. Thomas Bennett.
New term begins nt the Nanaimo
Branch of thc Sprott-Shaw Business
College on Tuesday, Jan. 2nd. Enroll
on tho opening date.
The key to success Is a thorough
business training. The Nanaimo
Branch of the Sprott-Shaw Business
College Is the best place to get that
training.   Write for full Information.
SEALED Tenders addressed to the
undersigned, nnd endorsed "Tender for wharf at Fanny Bay, B.C.,"
will be received at this office until 12
o'clock noon, Friday, February 2,
1*43, for the construction of a wharf
at Fanny Bay, District of Comox-
Albernl, B.C.
. Plans and forms of contract can be
seen and specification and forms of
tender obtained at this Department, at
the office of the District Engineer.
Post Office Building, Victoria, B.C.,
and at tlie Post Offices, Vancouver, B.
C, and Fanny Bay, B.C.
Tenders will not be considered unless made on printed forms supplied by
the Department and in accordance
with condition,,' contained therein.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, payable to the order of the Minister of Public Works, equal to 10%
of the amount ot the tender. War Loan
Bonds of the Dominion will also be
accepted as security, or war bonds
and cheques If required to make up
an odd amount.
Note.—Blue prints can be obtained
at this Department by depositing an
accepted bank cheque for the sum of
$10, payable to the order ot the Minister of Public Works, which will be
returned if the intending bidder submit a regular bid.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department ot Public Works,
Ottawa, December 29, 1922.
FOR SALE — COLUMBIA GRAMO-
phone Cabinet, nearly new. Regular price, $175. Will sell for $100,
Including 30 records. Apply to the
Islander.
comes increasingly difficult to find a
buyer when wanting to make a sale.
Therefore, that should be In Itself a
good ond sufficient reason why wc
should strenuously oppose any proposition such as tho one referred to,
that would mean additional taxation.
TAXPAYER.
Cumberland, B.C., Jan. 3rd, 1923.
A Prompt Answer Improves
Everybody's Telephone  Service
SometimeH when /ou make a telephone call, you
do not get the numbers promptly. When you tell thu
operator, she says, "I will ring them again,"
Finally, when you get the party wanted, do you
feel that the operator has not given you prompt service, or do you realize that the person you called may
not have answered the telephone at once?
It will help to provide prompt service for all if
every subscriber will answer the telephone as soon as
the bell rings.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Auction Sale
At Agricultural Hall, Courtenay.
Having already received instructions to sell a considerable quantity of goods, it will be necessary to hold
another public auction sale in the very near future.
Watch this space for particulars.
What Have You To Sell?
Phone or Write to
E. FELIX THOMAS
Auctioneer :: All Kinds of Insurance :: Notary Public
Office: Booth Block :    COURTENAY   :   Phone 151
House Phone: 24-L

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