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The Cumberland Islander Oct 15, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
4
With whlcb ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 42
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1921.
Train Service
Under Discussion
Board of Trade Would Curb Activities of Peddlers Who Are
Not Genuine Farmers
A well-attended meeting of the
Cumberland Board of Trade waB held
In the Council Chambers on Tuesday
evening, when several matters of importance were dealt with. President
MacKinnon was In the chair. The
train service, soldiers' settlement,
Itinerant peddlers and dealing wltb
local merchants were questions dealt
with.
The Train Service.
The following communications were
received from Mr. (3eo. I. Warron,
president of the Associated Boards of
Trade, and Mr. A. Gordon Scott of the
Victoria Chamber of Commerce:
Victoria, B. C, Oct. 6, 1921.
J. Walton,
Sec. Cumberland Board of Trade,
Cumberland, B. C.
"Acknowledging receipt of your
telegram of September 28, I beg to
advise that immediately upon receipt
of same I made a trip to Vancouver
and had a two-hour interview with Mr.
Brodie, the General Superintendent of
the C. P. R. Subsequent to my interview with Mr. Brodie, the committee from the Victoria Chamber of
Commerce had a long Interview with
Mr. Beasley, the General Superintendent of the E. & N. Railway.
The result of both these Interviews
brought forth the fact that the C. P. R.
and E. & N. are at present operating
the daily service to Courtenay at a
considerable loss, and the ollicials do
not feel justified in continuing the
dally operation of the trains when
they are losing so much money. They
have, however, agreed to continue the
dally service for another month, or
until November 1. If at the end of
that time business does not increase
they simply will be obliged to curtail
the service for the winter months.
Mr. Brodie emphasizes the fact that
no business organization would desire to continue operating at a loss.
I hope that efforts will be successful
and that at tbe end ot the month the
company will finally decide to continue the dally service to the end of
the winter.
Trusting that this report is satisfactory, and assuring your board that
lt is our aim to give every service
possible to the individual boards of
Vancouver Island, I remain, yours
very truly,
ASSOCIATED BOARDS OF
TRADE OF V. I.
G. I. Warren, President.
South Wellington
Play Here Sunday
Southern Team Has Been Considerably Strengthened and
Good Game Anticipated.
An important Upper Island League
game will take place on Sunday on
the local grounds, between Cumberland United and Soutb Wellington.
Soutli Wellington have considerably
strengthened their team and a ding-
dong game ls anticipated. The final
selection of the local team will not be
made until just prior to the game, bul
the following players are asked to
hold themselves lu readiness: Boyd.
Mortimer, Campbell, Stewart, Irvine.
Conti, O'Donnell, Bannerman, Milligan, Brewster, Sutherland, James.
Hltchens, Plump, Harrison uud Hunden. The klek-olT is scheduled for 3
o'clock prompt.        x
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
CUMBERLAND JUNIORS
PLAY UNION BAY SUNDAY
Game Starts at 11.30 So As Not
To Conflict With Senior
Game in Afternoon.
Proceedings Of       Masquerade Ball
City Council     Monday, Oct. 24
Passes Resolution Asking That
Daily Train Service Be
Continued.
From Latest Photograph of
HON. ARTHUR MEIGHEN -|
Prime Minister of Canada.
The Cumberland Juniors travel to
Union Bay on Sunday to play the
Union Bay team iu a Cumberland and
District Junior League game. This
should prove to be an oxciting game,
both teams are very evenly
matched. Tlie game will have to be
played in tlie morning owing to the
senior game, Cumberland vs. South
Wellington, in tlie afternoon.
The game Is scheduled to start al
11.30, and the following players are
requested to meet at the Post Office
at 10.30 prompt:
Lewis, goal; H. Strachan and Walker, backs; Lockhart, Mitchell (captain) and Farmer, half-backs; E.
Stevenson, Robertson, Bond, Stewart,
Freloni, forwards. All other players
reserve.
FIRST AID AND MINE
RESCUE ASSOCIATION
UNION BAY JUNIORS
WON GAME ON SATURDAY
Victoria, October 1, 1921.
J. Walton,
Sec. Cumberland Board of Trade,
Cumberland, B. C.
In reply to your wire "of September
28,1 have wired you today and wish to
advise you of the action taken by the
Victoria Chamber of Commerce.
ln pursuance of a resolution of the
Board of Directors of the Victoria
Chamber of Commerce, a strong delegation from the Chamber waited upon
Mr, H. E. Beasley on Thursday, 29th
September, and urged upon him the
necessity of maintaining the dally
service on the E. & N. Railway between Victoria and Courtenay.
Mr, Beasley pointed out to our delegation that there had been a marked
decrease ln the number of passengers
carried by the railway each month this
year, and that the service was being
maintained at a loss to the company.
The members of the delegation used
every possible argument lu favor of
the continuation of the service, and
were assured by Mr. Beasley that the
service would not be discontinued, at
least before 1st November, and that If
there was any possibility of operating
without a change, no change would be
made.
' If'you will communicate with us we
will be glad to receive from you, and
place before Mr. Beasley any further
arguments which would assist us in
our. effort to have the present service
maintained indefinitely.
Trusting that this   action   on   the
part of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce meets with your approval, and
that we may be further successful in
having the present service continued
without alteration.   Yours very truly,
A. GORDON SCO^T,
General Secretary.
One member present stated that he
(Continued on Page Two)
ADDITIONAL BOXES FOR
POST OFFICE"PLANNED
Mr. Wm. Henderson, District Resident Architect for Dominion buildings
ln B. C„ was ln town Wednesday on a
trip of inspection of the Post Office
He came up by motor and was accompanied by Mrs. Henderson,
It Is likely that an addition will be
made to the box accommodation at the
Post Office, as the present equipment
ls altogether inadequate to meet the
requirements of the growing population.
The Union Bay junior soccer team
visited Cumberland on Saturday last
and met the High School boys In a
league game, which was well contested throughout, the visitors winning by
a scoro of two goals to one. The
Union Bay team scored their second
and winning goal In the last minute
of the game.
Mr. James L. Brown gave every
satisfaction as referee.
BASKETBALL TEAM
GOING TO DENMAN
The Cumberland basketball team
will go to Deninau Island tonight (Friday), to play a game against the boys
there. After the game a dance will
be held, at which tbe music will be
supplied by the Courtenay Orchestra.
Those intending making the trip are
reminded that the launch will leave
the Union Buy wharf at 7.30, and will
make a return trip after tlie dance.
The team from Cumberland includes
Bill Kerr, R. Robertson, J. Pringle,
A. Denholmc and Joe Dallos.
Correspondence
Why Was the Cumberland and
Bevan Junior Game Called Off?
Officers Elected for New Term-
Interesting Paper Read by
President Quinn.
There was a good attendance ol
members of the Canadian Collieries
St. John's First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association in the Athletic Hall on
Sunday last. The first business of tbe
meeting was the election of officers
for tho new term, the following gentlemen being elected to All the various offices:
Mr. James M. Savage, Hon. President.
Mr. Thomas Graham and Mr. Chas
Graham, Hon. Vice-Presidents.
Mr. John G. Quinn. President.
Mr. T. W. Scott, Secretary-Treas.
Mr. A. J, Taylor, Publicity Agent.
Executive Officers: Messrs. Chas. J.
Parnham, W. Devoy and Wm. Beveridge.
President Quinn Rend an Interesting
Pupcr.
After the election of officers, the
newly-elected president read a paper
on maintaining interest in First Aid
and Mine Rescue work, which was
listened to with great interest by the
members present. Applause greeted
Mr. Quinn at the conclusion of his
very able paper, and a hearty vote of
thanks was tendered to him. The
paper is published in another part of
this issue.
Mr. Scott gave a report concerning
the International Conference held at
St. Louis on the question of standardizing mine rescue apparatus. His report was of great interest to those
present.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
.A Congregational Rally to take the
form ot a Pie Social will be held on
Wednesday next, October 19, commencing at 7.30. A good programme
has been arranged. Instrumental
music, songs, recitations and games
will be Included iu the programme.
Admission is 25 cents.
Editor Islander.—1 saw by youi
paper last week that the Cumberland
und Bevan Juniors were supposed to
play at Bevan lust Sunday, but somehow or other the game was called off,
yet neither the Bevan or Cumberland
clubs had any hand iu lt.
We were all very much disappointed, because most of us followers of
,'ootball in Cumberland have taken au
interest in tlie Junior football games
lately, as they are worth seeing, and
quite a number of us Interested in-
ended to go and see this game, but
on Saturday niglit we wero told that
he game bad been called off because
it was likely lo Interfere with the so-
called challenge game of the seniors.
Now, this junior game could have been
played and finished before the seniors'
game started.
It looks as if the seniors were
afraid it would hurt tho collection al
the senior game. I assure you many
if us felt very hostile over this action,
as we want to see the juniors encour-
iged instead of being knocked as they
were last week. The juniors all feel
hurt at this action and I hardly think
that it will be forgotten for some
time,
I hope that the parties responsible
for this will be more careful in future,
as the interest in the seniors will soon
:ie lost if this kind of business is
illowed to continue.
Yours for fair play,
JAMES T. BROWN, JR.
PARENT-TEACHER
ASSOCIATION MEETING
All Parents and  Others Interested Requested to Meet on
Monday in High School.
A special meeting of the Parent -
Teacher Association was held In the
High School on Monday evening, at
which a good representation of members were present.
Tbe meeting was called to hear th i
report of the committee appointed to
interview the School Board and con
jointly go beforo the City Council to
lay the claims of the children for better facilities in the school grounds.
The matter was discussed very fully,
quite a number taking part, and lt
was unanimously agreed that, the
Parent-Teacher Association find out
the night of meeting of the School
Board and have an Interview with
lliein relative to these matters.
Several parents from Royston dis
trict were present and requested auy
help that could be given to secure
conveyance for tbe Royston children
during the stormy weather,
The regular monthly meeting of thi
association will be held on Monday
next, 17th inst., to whicb a cordis
invitation is extended to all parent
and those interested in the upbuild
iug of conditions which will help out
boys und girls to make them bettei
citizens.
The fortnightly meeting of the City
Council was held on Monday night,
Mayor JlacIJonalil being In the chair
and a full attendance of aldermen
present.
The proposed reduction In the train
service was discussed fully and a resolution was passed asking the E. &
N. Railway to continue the present
service.
An application was received from
Miss Geoghegan on behalf of the
Human Catholic Church for a refund
ot this year's taxes, which were paid
under-protest pending the appeal to
llie Privy Council. Tho City Clerk
was instructed to write to other municipalities to see what action they are
taking In the mailer. It was slated
that Commissioner Gray of South Vancouver had absolutely refused to refund such taxes.
Some weeks ago the City Council
received a request from the Children's
Aid Society of Vancouver asking for a
tag day or some such method of raising money for the society be held In
Cumberland. The City Council asked
tlie Women's Auxiliary of the G. W. V.
A. to undertake the work, but this
body has replied that they are unable
to do so The City Council at Monday's
meeting decided to request,the W. A.
of the General Hospital to undertake
the work.
A letter was received from the Board
of Directors of the General Hospital
thanking the City Council for the
donation for a sterilizer. One had been
ordered which was to cost $825, and
the board asked the council to donate
the balance. The request was granted.
The council also acceded to the request of the Union of B. C. Municipalities for a special assessment of $5.
The Light Committee reported that
street lights  will  be  needed  shortly
tor the new bouses, also that water
will be wanted there in about three
aeks.
Aid. Francesfcinl of the Health Committee made some pointed remarks
concerning the unsanitary condition
of the City Park.
Aid. Parnham reported that the
Courtenay Council had requested that
tiie Are truck, six (lremen and 400 ft.
of hose be sent down to Courtenay
for demonstration purposes in connection with the turning on of the
water supply on Wednesday. The re
quest was granted.
First Fancy Costume Dance of
Season Will Be Held By
Junior Footballers
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS
AT ILO-ILO TONIGHT
FIRST AID WHIST
DRIVE  AND  DANCE
On Friday, November 4, a big whist
drive and dance will be held in the
Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall under the auspices
of the Canadian Collieries St. John's
First Aid and Mine Rescue Associa
tion. Thia is always a very enjoyable
dance and there should be a big attendance on this occasion.
NUMBERING HOUSES
The work of numbering all the
houses of the city is well under way.
Chief of Police Bunbury has the work
in hand and given a few tine days he
will soon complete the work. The improvement will be a decided convenience to the public.
Peggy's Pierrots Will Pay a Return Visit on Tuesday of
Next Week.
Douglas Falrbands, "the great hurricane of joy and excitement," will appear on the screen of the llo-llo tonight in "The Mark of Zorro."
He brings to the screen a wholesome, gingery mixture of melodrama
and vigorous comedy, crammed with
whirlwind action, thrills, suspense
and Irresistible funny angles.
Fairbanks is always a big drawing
card and good houses should witness
the picture Friday aud Saturday. The
regular price of 35 cents »for adults
and 15 cents for children will prevail.
There will be a matinee Saturday at
2.30, when the admission will be 25
cents for adults and 10 cents for the
children.
On Monday niglit the famous stage
play, "The Witching Hour," will be
screened.
Peggy's Pierrots Return un Tuesday.
Following the delightful vaudeville
entertainment put on by Peggy's
Pierrots on Tuesday last, the management announced that they will pay a
return visit on Tuesday next.
A full house greeted them on tbelr
lirst appearance here, and everyone
was delighted with the visiting entertainers.
On Monday week, October 24, the
lirst masquerade dauce of the season
will take place in the llo-llo Dance
Hull under tlie auspices of the Cumberland Iiilermediate und Junior Foot-
bull Club.
Preliminary arrangements are now
complete nnd a good list of prizes has
been prepared, the value of which Is
$175, divided into 19 classes.
Dancing will commence at 9 o'clock
aud judging   at" 11.30.     Llddell's Orchestra  will   provide   music   for the
occasion.   The judges will lie selected
in the hall on evening of ball.
Tlle Prize List.
'llie prize list is as follows:
1.—Best  Dressed   Lady,   $10   cash, j
also special prize of half-dozen photo-'
graphs donated by Mr. Barton, value
$(1.00.
2.-Bost Dressed Gent, $10 cash,
also special prize of half-dozen photographs donated by Mr. Barton, value
$6.00.
3.—Best Sustained Character, Lady,
$5 lu value and $2.50 cash.
4.—Best Sustained Character, Gent;
$5 in value and $2.50 cash.
5.—Best National Couple, Lady
and Gent (each must represent a different country); $6 In value and $2.50
in cash lo each.
6.—Best Flower Girl, gold brooch,
value $5.
7.—Best Hobo, box of cigars, value
$6.00.
8.—Best Comic Lady, $5 in value
and $2.50 gold piece.
8.—Best Comic Gent, $5 in value
and $2.50 cash.
10.—Best    Advertising    Character,
conliued  to local advertisements;  $5
iu value and $2.50 cash.
11.—Best Clown, value $8.
12.—Best Old-Fashioned Couple, $5
value aud $2.50 cash each,
13.—Best Comic Group, three or
more; $2.50 value and $3 cash each,
14.—Hard-Times Costume, Lady;
value $3 and $2.50 cash.
15.—Best Original Character, Lady;
value. $5 and $2.50 cash.
IC—Best Original Character, Gent;
$5 value aud $2.50 cash.
17.—Best Artistic Costume, Lady
(variety of colors considered); $5 in
value and $5 vash.
18.—Gent's Consolation Special
Prize, goods value $7.50,
19.—Special Competition, confined
to Junior Footballers in the district,
any kind of costume, but must be
marked "Footballers' Competition;
prize, pair of football boots.
Seating accommodation will be pro-'
vlded for dancers and spectators.
Prize Drawing: ln Connection.
A prize drawing Is being   run   in
connection with the masquerade, the
prizes for which are  numerous   and
the tickets ten cents each.   Tbe drawing will take place immediately after
the  unmasking.    A morocco  leather
suit case and china tea set are among
the prizes.
Champions Beaten
But Not Disgraced
Bill   Walker's  Challengers  Get
Only Goal Scored in One of
Best Games Played Here
BURNS* CLUB ANNUAL
,   MEEUNG TONIGHT
The annual general meeting of the
Cumberland Burns' Club will be held
In the Lecture Hall of the Cumberland Literary and Athletic Association on Saturday, October 15, at 7
o'clock.
PHEASANT AND DUCK
SEASON OPENS SATURDAY
The open season for shooting cock
pheasants comes in Saturday, October 15, and closes November 30. The
bug limit is 6 for one day or 25 for the
seuson.
iaturilay also opens the duck season whicb will extend until January
3ii. Bag limit for ducks Is 20 for one
day or 150 for the season.
G. W. V. A. WHIST DRIVE
AND DANCE TONIGHT
Our readers are reminded of tiie
whist drive antl dunce to be held In the
Memorial Hall tonight (Friday) by
the Women's Auxiliary. There will no
doubt be a good attendance, as these
ladies arc noted for giving a good time.
HALLOWE'EN  FROLIC
On Hallowe'en night, Monday, October 31, "something different" in the
ivay of a Hallowe'en celebration will
iie put on by the Women's Auxiliary of
Holy Trinity Church.
The fun will commence at 8.30 and
the ladles say there will be "something doing" until 1 a.m., at which
time, no doubt, the Old Lady will leave
or her home until next year. Dancing, music and all kinds of old-time
frolics will be Indulged in.
MISRVILLE CONDITIONS
UNDER INVESTIGATION
The commission consisting of Col.
Latta, for tbe Land Sellement Board.
Hev. Thos. Menzies, M.L.A., and Mr.
Chas. Rogers, for the settlers, have
:ieeu making an investigation of conditions at Mervllle and have not yet
completed their labors, but they will
probably do so this week, and the report turned Inlo thc government.
It is upon this investigation that the
report Unit Is to be Issued which will
letermiiie the course to be taken by
be provincial government at Mer-
,'llle.
Some deplorable conditions were
omul to exist In the farming settle-
ncnt, the lack of roads to some of the
arms being a great handicap.
Mr. Menzies is striving hard to get
the government to put off the first
payment due on loans to the men for
live years, so as to give them a chance
to get on their feet. It is impossible
for the men to meet tills payment
now, II being said there Is not one in
a position to do so.
RETURNING OFFICER
APPOINTED FOR COMOX
Telegraphic despatches from Ottawa
contain the Information Unit Mr. Geo.
Buseonibe of Vancouver has been appointed returning ollicer for C'oniux
in connection with the Dominion elections.
The football game staged last Sunday between BUI Walker's Challengers
and the Cumberland United, Champions of B. C. ror the last (wo seasons,
on the Recreation Grounds, provided
some sensational play—and also a big
surprise to the champions,
How tbe niighly have fallen, The
"has beens" beat the United team 1-0,
and what is more, fully deserved their
win. All the players on Big Bill
Walker's team played the game as
though tbey meant it, and after the
lirst 15 minutes it was quite apparent
(hat the United were a beaten team.
Play had not been iu progress very
long when a penalty was given against
Sammy Gough for a deliberate trip,
•ight In the penalty area; Charlie
Hltchens took thc kick and drove tlie
sphere straight at the Penalty King.
Needless to say Walker had no difficulty in saving and punted clear.
This appeared to put a lot more
dash in the "has-beens," They carried the ball to Boyd's end, Jock
Campbell, Mortimer and Boyd having
all they could do to keep the opposition from scoring, Boyd being kept
busier than be has been for some
time. He proved equal to all demands
made upon him, being in tip-top form.
Midfield play followed for some time,
with tbe "has-beens" half-backs keeping the United forwards well iu check,
McWhirter, Carlo and Sutherland
making a splendid half-back line.
Half-time was drawing close and
both teams made desperate attempts
to gain the lead. Gough and Stewart,
however, were playing magnificent
ball, and never allowed the United
forwards to get a shot at Walker,
without hampering them. The United half-back line became very slack
just before half-time, owing to Conti's
erratic play. He plays the man far
too much to do his team any good.
Another bad fault of Conti's is punting the ball out of play after he has
been penalized for fouling a man.
Play the ball, Conti, old man.
Jock Irvine and Paddy O'Donnell
tried hard to get their forwards going on several occasions, but to no
I avail. Half-time arrived with no
score, the players being quite ready to
take a well-earned rest.
Challengers Score Only (jloul.
The second half opened strongly in
favor of the "has-beens.",. Tucker
James trying to go through on hia
own was fouled by Conti, the resultant free kick being easily cleared.
Pilling next tried to go through on
bis own, but was well stopped by Carlo
who was playing a great game at this
stage. Brewster and Milligan next
got going, playing some pretty combination; they carried the ball right
down to Bill Walker's goal; Gough
cleared them out at the critical moment. The ball quickly travelled to
the other end, where through a misunderstanding between Campbell and
Boyd, the ball wus rushed through by
Kerr, giving the challengers the first
and only goal of llie game.
This put the crowd in a jolly
line humor, and they boosted for Bill's
learn for all they were worth, and
right well the players responded,
.igain carrying the ball to Boyd's cud,
i corner resulting, which was well
placed by Harrison, and equally well
-lenreil by Mortimer.
Carle and Pilling next colho into the
Imelight, paying far too much attention to one another, detracting from
.heir play. The United were hunill-
■apped at this stage of llie game by
irewster having to leave the Held with
i bad knee. Conti next got into
rouble, Jimmy Brown, the referee,
laving bis work cut out to control
ilm. Conti at this period In the game
diowed more of bis temper when he
narched off the field to "smash" some
ine. Had it been a league game he
.vnuld probably have stayed oil*—and
(or more than a game.
Play continued fast until the final
oot of the whistle, and when the
•■eferee called time the score stool 1-0
in favor of the "has-beens."
For the winners it would be land
to single out any individual player,
)Ut Sutherland, who was about thu
iest half on the Held, Gougli and
Stewart made a good defense, Bttn-
lerman and Harrison, Ihe iwo nulsldo
men, showed lots ol* speed, and aie
(forth a place on any lenm. For llie
'osers. Boyd, Mortimer, Irvine and
TDonuell were nboul the pick. Joi k
Campbell got a nasty bump in the first
lalf, which put liliu out of action for
i time. The forwards were all disorganized; Brewster and Milligan
were about the pick. two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
6ctoW is, mt.
!W
WHEN YOUR
CAR WANTS
A new lire
And y»u Phone 4.G
Courtenay and
The man says
We keep tires of
All sizes and
He puts one on
For you and the
Car rides better
You Must Be Pleased
Corfield Motors
TIRES OF ALL MAKES AND SIZES
THE FORD GARAGE COURTENAY
Special	
CRYSTAL
WHITE SOAP
TEN   CENTS   PER   BAR
sJgpSPECIAL ADVERTISING OFFER
££ FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
We arc instructed by thc distributors of this line to
Give Free
One Bar of Soap with each  Five  Bars purchased
between October loth and 22nd
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
We are Sole Agents in Cumberland for
FINDLEY   UNITY
RANGES
One of the Best Kitchen Ranges on the Market
They have polished steel six-hole top, duplex grate,
large oven with thermometer, nickleplated trimmings
and legs—a range that would grace any kitchen and
which the particular housewife would be proud to own.
To advertise these
Ranges we have priced
them special at 	
$80 Cash
Convenient Terms Can Be Arranged
We have also a large and well-selected assortment of
COAL and WOOD HEATERS
To suit any room in the house—marked at prices that
will please you.
We have the
BAPCO PAINT AGENCY
and carry a full line of Paints, Varnishes and Stains
ROOFINGS, TAR SHEETINGS AND A GOOD STOCK
OF GENERAL  HARDWARE TO  SELECT FROM
A large  stock  of Ammunition
and Fishing Tackle
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co.
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
TRAIN  SERVICE
UNDER DISCUSSION
(Continued from Page One)
bad read In a Nanaimo paper the
statement that the train service was
to be continued as at present. The
secretary was instructed to write to
Mr. Beasley for confirmation. Failing
tills, another meeting will be called
to deal with the question,
I   I
Soldiers' Settlement.
A communication was received from
the Courtenay Hoard of Trade asking
endorsntlon ot tbelr action in seeking
to have tlle loan repayments of soldier
settlers delayed for somo years, so as
to give the men n chance to live. It
was stated lhal nol a single one of the
men at Mervllle is in n position to
make the lirst payment, which in the
case of stock has to bo paid for in
four equal yearly payments, a condition impossible of fulfilling under thc
conditions of tiie men at Mervllle.
The request of the Courtenay Board
was unanimously endorsed.
Food nnd lirug Act Resolution.
A communication was received from
the Victoria Board of Trade asking
the local board's endorsation of the
following resolution concerning the
sampling of goods carried by retailers:
Whereas the Food and Drugs Act of
1920 holds the retailer responsible for
the content of goods, over which he
has absolutely no control;
And whereas the manufacturer or
producer of such goods is in a position to analyze the contents before delivery to the trade and should be held
responsible for same.
Be It resolved that a protest he
Initiated by the Victoria Chamber of
Commerce protesting against the
present system of taking samples of
goods under the Food and Drugs Act
of 1920;
And that recommendation be made
tbat samples bo taken at the source
of production or manufacture, or nl
Ihe point of Importation;
And that copies of tills resolution be
sent to various Boards of Trade and
Chambers of Commerce In Canada
asking their support and co-operation.
The above resolution was endorsed
by the Cumberland Board of Trade.
t'nlgary People Want to Locate Here.
A letter from a Calgary man wns
read, asking for Information looking
to the purebnse of a poultry and fruit
ranch near Cumberland. If he locates
here, he says two other families
would probably also come. Secretary
Walton will put him in touch with
parties who can supply his needs.
Peddlers Under Discussion. "
The question of the number nf peddlers of meat, fruit and vegetables in
Cumberland was brought to the attention of the meeting. It was pointed out that those men pay no licence
foe or taxes whatever. They arc al
lowed to sell goods of their own pro
duction, but it is claimed some purchase goods and re-sell them.
One member said these peddlers
should tako out licences, more cspoci-
illy peddlers of stocks, some of which
was of a very doubtful variety. A stilT
licence fee might act as a deterrent
In some cases.
Mr. Bate brought up the question
of purchnhlng goods out of town. He
contended the people should try and
build up the community by dealing
with local merchants, who pay heavy
taxation towards the upkeep of the
streets and city. But how can tbey
do this and become lending citizens if
they are not supported?
Last year, said Mr. Bate, the Council
spent thousands of dollars in tarvia
and cement, which was purchased oul
of town. Mr. Bate said the local merchants should have had an opportunity to supply tbe material at say a 5
or 10 per cent, commission. Tlie merchants lived here and spent the money
In town, and as long as they were
willing to do the right thing they
should be patronized.
Mr. Sutherland thought there was
a point where a line had lo be drawn,
It was the corporation's duty to do the
greatest good to the greatest number
—If by purchasing goods out of town
they can save large sums to the taxpayers he would not disturb that procedure. The benefit of all the taxpayers should lie considered, and not
a 10 per cent .commission to an individual.
Mr. Bate wanted the people to help
each other and work hand In hand
for the community's good. Tlie merchants were expected to beautify th(
town and they should get the public
support.
Mr. McCarthy reminded the meeting that the dollar should be spent In
town—one man gets it, another gets
it, and the dollar Is still here; send it
out of town and it is gone for good.
A resolution was carried that the
question of purchasing goods out of
town be brought up at the next meeting.
The peddler question took up considerable time, being discussed from
different angles. It wns agreed that
tbe board should take action looking
to the placing of a "blue law" on the
statute book stopping the peddling of
wildcat stock.
LOSE EDITORS BECAUSE
OF GOOD HEALTH
VANCOUVER.—Quite often an editor quits because of poor health of
himself or his paper, but here is a reversed condition. The Tranquilllan
is tlie organ of the tubercular sanitarium near Kamloops, 11 has a new
•ditor in II. R, Farmer, who editorially explains his coming with the
statement that his predecessor left,
cured, leaving Mr. Farmer to follow
lu the palh of other editors who took
.lie job on convalescence ni.s* even-
ual cure.
The Tranquilllan takes occasion to
express gratitude to Chinese and
lapiiuese who have, 11 seems, given
generous support voluntarily, De-
-.pite the atmosphere of morbidity lhat
me might suppose would linger
iroiind nu organ of the kind, the
iiltercular patients' paper is ehoor-
ul and breezy.
You'll Laugh
At The Rain
We have a complete line
of new Rubber Goods . in
stock, including—
LADIES' RAIN COATS
MEN'S EAIN COATS
CHILDREN'S RAIN COATS
CHILDREN'S   RAIN   CAPES
MEN'S HIP HOOTS
MEN'S KNEE-HIGH BOOTS
BOYS'   KNEE-HIGH   BOOTS
Men's Mackinaw Coats
Men's Mackinaw Shirts
10
Per  Cent.   Discount
on  all   Merchandise.
W. Gordon
Phone 133
Cumberland
ESTATE IS TIED UP IN
SEARCH FOR OLD COAT
Until nn old coal is found, llie os-
lato of tho late .Martin Bernard Davis,
n Fraser Valley resident, cannot bo
probated. A son, Martin lt. Davis, Jr.,
went to Vancouver to witness the
Funeral, and bought a new suit for
ihe occasion, lie left tlie old raiment
;.t the store, which sold it to a junk
man. The second-hand tailor, in turn,
told it the samo day, not thinking Die
"old papers amounted to anything."
He could not read. Now the heirs
seek the old coat and offer a reward. |
Certain features of tho last testament
make it impracticable tn settle tho;
estate in regular next-of-kin order.
The Rexall Store
For Rexall Quality
Neilson's
Bulk
Chocolates
Nuts, Fruits, Creams and
Hard Caramels, special
60c, per lb.
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
HIGH RENTS CLOSE STORES
' High rents arc closing snme big
stores in Vancouver. Closing sales
sUinnunccnients take tho public into
the confidence of distressed merchants who say: "No use; we've got
to close up. Rent is too high." Five
stores on two principal streets ore
closing out for this stated reason.
One store on  Granville Street has
been  asked  to  pay $1000  a  month;
.everal otlier small stores, mado out
of an ordinary-stzed store eut in two,
pay $500 each per month. Is it any
wonder the price of goods is high?
LOST
NEW VETERAN PARTY
TO ENTER CAMPAIGN
VANCOUVER.-Reports current in
political circles hint ut the organization of a now veteran party to take
nn active hanil in polities;. Details
are enshrouded in secrecy at present,
hat, it is said, the now soldier party
aims at certain concessions for the
returned man, with demands for employment of veterans in every possible
government job.^and also bonus reforms.
The veterans say they arc not Belling their rights, nnd accuse certain
political leaders oE double-crossing
ihem with pledges Hint aro not Intended to he carried out.
GOLD SIGNET RING LOST IN Cumberland, with initials "A. J. W."
Suitable reward. Apply Islander
Ollice. 1-40
SPARE TIRE EOll CADILLAC CAR,
between Courtenay and Cumberland; size 3(1x4%; belonging to
Peggy's Pierrots. Finder please
notify Tlie Islander.
U. S. AGENTS VISIT B. C.
ON JAPANESE QUESTION
That the United States evinces
anxiety on the Japanese colonization
of British Columbia is proven by the
visit o[ American investigators who
are sounding the sentiments of Japanese residents along the boundary line
lately. Several prominent Japanese
bave been approached by Americans,
who have interrogated them closely.
Norwegian scientists claim Greenland Is moving slowly westward at the
rate ot 10 yards a year.
Waiter, this coffee Is nothing but
mud."
"Yes, sir; it was ground this morning."
FOR SALE
1900 MOTOR WASHER; ALSO PinE
Screen.   Apply Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
HOUSE AND LOT ON ALLEN AVE.,
now occupied by Mr. Prior. Por
further particulars apply A. MacKinnon, Furniture Store, Cumberland, or Mrs. Simms, Galarno Ranch,
Campbell River,  B.C. 4-43
ONE PAD-SEAT ARM CHAIR AND
Rocker. Apply Box 573, Cumberland.   . 1-40
1920 CHEVROLET, $450 CASH. IN
first-class condition; model 490. Can
he seen at the Cumberland Motor
Works.   * 2-40
FRESH VEGETABLES, DELIVERED
to your door. Green Tomatoes, Jam
Marrows, Carrots, Potatoes, Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddtngton, Calhoun
Ranch; Sandwick, P. O. 2-40
PIGS AND POULTRY
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIOS
and Poultry. Kwong Ylck, Chinatown, Cumberland. Telephone 5-F.
P.O. Box 282. 13-52
James   Gardner
Mens Tailoring Specialist
ALL OUR GOODS ARE HONEST IN PRIQE
WORKMANSHIP AND QUALITY
WE HAVE ALSO A CHOICE UP-TO-DATE STOCK,
OF READY-MADES   THAT  WILL STAND COM-
PARISON WITH ANY ON THE MARKET
'Prices cR^nge from
$25.00 up
COME AND SEE OUR NEW OVERCOAT SAMPLES
They Are Dandies'.
Cleaning,   Pressing,  Alterations
and Dyeing
I ^,.^uujj.'fi.M -^jp.*R^Jl^i^^ •'.■•JMiiHBEg'
I  nIW       i ij.IJPi.jpi.   J'."——^^PPWMHU,i j ■^WPWC
'      October ItS. 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
t
'i'hree
tf
HUSBANDS MADE
HAPPIER
LET'S SUPPOSE your husband's name is Jim.   We
know he's a likable chap   (particularly  so when
well fed).   Does he come home after the day's toll
feeling fine or feeling fagged?
Why should YOUR Jim be allowed to come homo
fagged—If it is jUBt a matter of diet?   Would you mako
him happier—'tis easily done.
Tbe   appetizing  dellclousness  of  home-made  bread
from
ROYAL STANDARD
Flour will cause him to Bmile and smile. You of course
know Royal Standard ls the famous Made-in-B.C. flour
that supplies more energizing nutriment per pound
than meat. It gives you bread that sustains and keeps
folks happier and healthier, too.
Try It and See
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Highet, Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C. Telephone 33
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
an WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS,
Dunsmuir
Avenue
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
SkM Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
VOTERS' LIST
October 31st is the last day for the
registration of Householders, Boarders, Roomers and Holders of TradeB
Licences to get on the 1922 Voters'
List. The list closes at 6 p.m. at the
City Hall on Monday, October 31st.
A holder of an Agreement of Sale
must lodge a statutory declaration
that he is the last registered owner,
before 5 p.m. on the 30th day of November in order to be registered on
tha Voters' List.
T. MORDY, City Clerk.
Liddell's Orchestra
— la —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Function's
of all kinds.   Any number ol
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.0(
YOUR TEETH
HINTS ON THEIR CARE
W. A. Brierley, D.D.S., Denver Col.
It is fast coming to be an accepted
fact that good health depends largely
on good teeth aud a clean mouth.
A well known life Insurance company recently issued a letter to Its
employees from which tho following
Is an extract: "As the healthy and
continued life ot tlie whole body depends upon the air it breathes and
the food it assimilates, and ns both
of these are directly affected by the
conditions of the mouth, it is not an
exaggeration to say that many of the
Ills of mankind will be banished as
soon as the teeth und mouth receive
tlie care and attention they require."
Decay of the teeth is seldom classed
as u disease, it should be considered
as such, as the decay from broken-
down teeth Is of a particularly virulent character, for tt is connected with
disease of the bone. This diseased
bone being in the mouth is mixed with
the food aud swallowed every time the
patient eats. If this pus matter and
diseased bone were outside of the
mouth one would never willingly or
knowingly cut it, yet that is what
happens when people neglect their
teetb.
It has been found that eighty per
cent, of all children have decaying
teeth. It a child has decayed teeth it
cannot properly chew its food. Improperly chewed food and au unclean
mouth cause bad digestion, and consequently poor general health.
Parents can greatly aid the children
by seeing that tbey cleau their teeth
regularly, and that they are kept supplied with clean and serviceable tooth
brushes,
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C
PACKING HOUSES ARE
JAMMED TO ROOF WITH
APPLES IN PENTICTON
NOTICE
Warehouses of the Co-Operative
Growers Contain 25,000 Boxes
And Tide Just Set In.
Maintaining Interest in Mine Rescue
And First Aid Work In Coal Mines
A Sho* I, Paper Head hy Mr. John G.
Quinn nt ix Meeting of the St. John's
First Aid and Mine Rescue Association, Cumberland, October 9, 1921.
The person or persons who by being prepared to meet such emergencies as arise in the industrial field
will, without doubt, draw upon himself the plaudits of the multitude by
his outstanding ability to render
assistance while he Is engaged ln tbe
carrying out of Ills effort. However,
without his preparedness he would
have simply been ln tbe position of
one of the helpless and astonished
bystanders.
This period of preparation represents a long and continuous portion
of Ills spare time and is usually performed without any thought of remuneration other tban the rather lofty
Intention of alleviating unnecessary
suffering and probably saving the life
of some fellow creature. There is
nothing of the spectacular In this preparation to cause any people to gather
around and encourage his effort. You
do iiot Hud the people generally taking tlie keen Interest in the relative
merits of First Aid or Mine Rescue
men or teams that you do in the
athletic world. The ability of tht
First Aid man Is not measured in batting averages nor ln the number ol
goals he has scored. He Is not the
god of the little children nor the idol
of the gentler sex. In short, there It
uo glamor about his work that attracts
attention, except during an accident,
aud then for a brief period he is the
centre of attraction, and when his
work is completed he ls promptly
forgotten.
With so little to encourage or enliven liis path lt ls to be wondered
that men are to be found who will
endeavor to fit themselves for this
work, lt ls pleasing to note, however,
that this work Is appealing to an increasing number of men and women
who are willing to sacrifice a considerable portion of their leisure hours
that they may be enabled to act
promptly and intelligently in case of
accident.
Having admitted that there ls nothing of excitement in this training, let
us consider what may be added to encourage the students or by what means
the general public may have their attention directed towards, this important movement and their assistance
obtained.
The various operators have been
quick to recognize the value of this
work and have as far as possible encouraged and fostered by material
assistance, in the shape of financial
aid, construction and maintenance ot
suitable meeting and lecture rooms
and committees, specially detailed to
detect dangerous conditions, and by
promoting competitions among tbe
different classes and centres; all of
which have gone far to attain the
present standard which exists among
the comparatively few who have undertaken this work. Tbe troublo ls
that tlie work Is not sufficiently attractive to the average person unless
there call be added some other interesting features. In looking Into the
methods adopted by some of the most
successful districts, we find that the
system of competitions is the best
method of creating efficiency in the
work. This entails some expenditure
tor such prizes as may be awarded
,or these events.
Social events such as dances, whist
drives, open to such members as attend the classes, are held at regular
Intervals aud many are induced to attend the lecutres for the privilege of
attending the dances, and thus are
brought Into first contact with the
work and very often become interested in a subject which at first seemed
unattractive.
Debates can be arranged covering
lubjects within the scope of the work
und ideas brought out as to the best
nethods of treating accidents and
dealing with problems of Mine Rescue.
Papers can also be submitted at such
meetings showing how accidents may
bo prevented, because, after all, pre-
Parties having houses or camping
liltei on Comox Lake are requested to
call and sign a lease at the Companies'
Office on or before October 1st, 1921,
otherwise the Company will take
possession ot the property.
' CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR), UNITED.
Its packing houses heaped to the
oof with thousands of boxes of rosy
.ed apples, Peuticton is this season
iiandling more fruit than ever before
ii its history. More thau 250 persons
ire at present employed In the can-
lery and the four packing houses.
It is said there will be 40 per cent,
nore apples than even In 1919, the
banner year. The 1921 output will
be 100 per cent, greater than last
season.
Nearly all the packing houses ex-
oect to keep operating until Christ
nas. At present they are running
light and day to keep up with the
orchard harvest pouring ln on them.
Prices are also holding up reasonably well and unless conditions very
a great deal the growers' returns for
this season should be excellent. Last
season the net returns to the growers
for apples averaged about $1.50 or
$1.60 a box. This year the average return will be from $1.20 to $1.30.
vention Is the primary object. Useful
ideas are thus brought to attention
and demonstrated when they would
otherwise be overlooked.
One of Ihe greatest fields for thc inventor lies here, and attention may be
directed to some of the world's most
successful Inventions which have been
adopted solely because of tlieir bearing on the prevention of accidents;
among these may be quoted the West-
house brake, the box coupler for
railway curs, the electric mine safely
lamp, electric shot-firing devices, the
mine rescue apparatus, and others too
numerous to mention, many of which
had as obscure beginning as such ideas
as may be brought out at these meetings. Some member may havo a good
idea, hut is not quite certain as to
some point in its arrangement, but hy
bringing his idea beforo Ihe meeting
he may receive just tlie necessary
suggestion to perfect his apparatus.
On the other hand, he mny have some
defect pointed out which he had overlooked or in which his Idea was erroneous.
Unless meetings are made entertaining as well as Instructive, all the
financial aid that may be expended
liy interested parties will be of little
lvall. Let us strive, therefore, to enliven and brighten the meetings by
bringing our Ideas forward for discussion, so that the best suggestions
'liny be given a practical trial and our
Mine Safety Association be a llvo and
useful body and fulfill the purpose for
which lt was created.
MONEY TO  BURN
The savings from years of hard
■vork went up in smoke for Alex.
Nedwecky, a Kenosha, Wis., man,
vhen his three children found his
noney, $2500 in hills, hidden away In
i handkerchief In a mattress, and af-
er playing with it a little while threw
it Into the kitchen stove to see it burn.
The mother arrived just in lime to see
the last Bickerings of the flames.
The youngest child, Edward, less
(ban two years old, Is said lo havo
thrown the money into the fire while
his brothers, four and five years old,
watched. Nedwecky had feared banks
and for years had kept his money
wrapped in a red handkerchief and
tucked away under the mattress.
FIREFLIES LURE FISH
Anyone would have supposed that
fish were Immune to demoralization
ot modern scientific progress, but even
fishing is coming under the sway of
advanced and entirely original ideas of
bait and fish hooks. Izaak Walton
would have shuddered at the thought
of using the storage battery in the tail
of a firefly to lure the wily fish at
night, yet a contrivance has been used
to good advantage by Wm. P. Osborne
of the New York College of Forestry.
By imprisoning fireflies in a small
glass vial and rigging the container
with an Ingenious arrangements of
hooks, black bass bave been found to
succumb to* the scintillations of the
insect and to swallow with great
rapidity hook, line and sinker. An
ordinary tubular pill bottle Is fitted
with a harness to which are fastened
three pronged hooks, two on the sides
and one on the end. The bottle Is
then equipped with a swivel similar to
that used on a wooden minnow. Four
or five good sized fireflies are placed
in the bottle and the bottle sealed.
He saw the bridge
And tried to duck it;
Kicked flrst the gas
And then the bucket.
Everybody knows
that in Canada there arc mora
Templeton'a
Rheumatic Capsules
Sold than all other Rheumatic
Ramediea combined for Rheu-
matiam, Neuritis, Neuralgia,
Sciatica, Lumbago, etc.
Many doctor** prescribe them,
moat druggists cell them. Write
for free trial to Templcta.i, Toronto.
Sold by R. E. FROST.
. FOR THE CHILDREN'S
SUPPER
there's nothing like Bread with
milk.
Give the kiddies food that will
satisfy their appetites; food that
will digest easily; substantial
food that will build up their
little bodies.
Bread is that kind of food.
Active days! And dreamless
nights!
These are nature's priceless
gifts to children who eat.
Bread is your Best Food-
Eat more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
—the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballers
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
. prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
SAVE BEFORE YOU SPEND
Let your Bank Account be your
first coucern.
It will more than repay you In
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
Hi   THE ROYAL BANK
W       OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Manager Cumberland Branch.
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.  Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C.
AGENT
Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
1850—Ye Olde Firme—1921
Patronize your local merchant. It
will be of benefit to everyone in the
diatrict.
J. H. HALLIDAY
liunsniiiir Avenue
Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY  WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2020 Bridge Street, Vlctoriu, IU.
MADAME MELBA!
MADAME TETRAZZINI
These two great artists have purchased HEINTZMAN & CO. Grands; Mme. Melba for her home in
Australia and Mme. Tetrazzini for her castle in
Rome.
HEINTZMAN & CO. PIANOS ARE SOLD ON EASY
TERMS
Heint
zman
& Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Bon 233, Vlciorla
Cumberland
VICTORIA
Nanaimo
mmsmssm Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 16, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 15, 1821.
RECIPROCITY  A MYTH
We bave beard a lot from Mackenzie King about the
great benefits Canada will derive from so-called reciprocity
with the United States, and that in spite of the damaging
fact that thc Fordney tariff which has just been adopted
across the border gives thc Dominion an undoubted slap
in the face. Judging from past records, "All hope abandon
ye who enter here" might well be erected over the portals
of Canada If Mr. King Is to be allowed to try his prentice
band In carrying out his theories and In pandering to tbe
United States.
In bis speech at Portage-la-I'rairlc, Premier Meighen
gave a review of recent tariff history In this connection,
lt Is for the voters to say if they will be guided by that or
be beguiled by tho meaningless phrases of thoso who seem
determined to make Canada an appendage of the United
States.
The United Slnlcs offered Canada free wheat and flour
if Canada would admit American wheat and flour free,
explained Mr. .Meighen. This was reciprocity on a small
scale. The offer was accepted. Hut what happened? About
six months later, the United Stntes put a duty of 35 cents
a bushel on wheat and 20 per cent, on flour. Mr. Meighen
added that In consequence .the sale of Canadian flour ln thc
United States had practically stopped, and very little wheat
was now going over there.
PIONEER IN MINE RESCUE WORK
At the International Mining Convention, Hon. Wm. Sloan
took credit for inaugurating a mine safety meeting to
arrange for the standardization of mine rescue apparatus
and training. The standardization of training is all right
but the standardization of apparatus is all wrong. Mine
rescue apparatus is in its infancy, aud there is yet much
to he achieved before it is developed to a standard to meet
all requirements under all conditions. It is yet far from
that stage. Why, then, should an Imperfect thing be
standardized and treated as the limit of human endeavor?
What is wanted is the encouragement of continued im
provement of existing types of apparatus, with government subsidies if necessary to aid Inventors in attaining
the high degree of successful development which is desired.
Robt. Strachan, Inspector of Mines, has been circularizing
tho Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy in sup-
port of standardization of apparatus, but the unwisdom of
the suggestion has been forcibly pointed out by Mr. Thos.
Graham, General Superintendent of tbe Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. Mr. Graham is the pioneer in mine rescue
work in Canada, and one of the highest authorities on the
subject.—Mining and Engineering Record.
JOE MARTIN A FARMER CANDIDATE
Joseph Martin is seeking nomination as Parmer candidate in New Westminster. "Fighting Joe" Is no more a
farmer thau he is a horse thief, and as a factor in politics,
says Falrplay, he has had his day. The votes cast for him
in recent yenrs have been so few that they could hardly
be said to affect the general result. His seeking nomination is merely one more exemplification of his supreme
egotism. Incidentally, his charge that the government of
Canada should make it impossible for this country to
create millionaires sounds rather amusing, when one considers that it is not so very many "years ago since Mr.
Martin himself was reputed to be in that class, or very
near Iti But time, and the bursting of real estate booms,
brings many changes.
ELEVATING PUBLIC TASTE
Throughout all modern musical history there has been
an endless striving to elevate the public taste to where
the works of tbe serious minded musician would be appreciated. So long as composers remain true to their inspiration and tell us In their language the great stories ot tlie
human heart, that long will they find followers thirsty for
the best tbey can produce and eager to interpret their
gospel of good music to those who have enjoyed lesser
advantages; nnd ln the forernnks of these musical missionaries Is that great army of earnest, conscientious teachers
who are onco and all the time devoting their energies to
the improvement of the musical taste of tlieir respective
communities. To these teachers frequently comes in
somo form the question: "Can all learn to enjoy or appreciate classical music?" Interpreted, this Is equivalent to
"Can everybody learn to appreciate good music?" For, to
the untutored mind, whatever rises above the popular
"slush" with which the market is flooded, is tagged as
"classical" regardless of the nice distinctions of the
initiated as to the classic, romantic and so-called futuristic
schools of music.
In British Columbia tlie Chinese have a monopoly of
market gardening, the Japanese control the salmon fisheries, and the Hindus have all but cornered the firewood
trade. We may accept such things phlegmatically, but It's
"Up and at 'em" when the Chinese football team gives the
Royal Bank boys of Vancouver a terrible drubbing. Once
we lose out In sports we might just as well pull up stakes
and hike for Alberta.—Fair Play.
THE TWO VANCOUVER HARRYS
From a sporting point of view, the bout In Vancouver
Centre promises to be the best ot Its kind in all Canada
In tho coming free-for-all political contest. The rival
parties each met in solemn conclave, and each chose a
candidate. Each candidate was unanimously selected, each
has never tasted defeat at the polls, they are about of an
age, a height and a weight, each is an experienced politician and each is named Harry.
The Honorable Harry has tlle advantage of Cabinet rank
and ten years of Ottawa experience. He has been a diligent member and no harsher criticism of his recent
appointment can be made than tbat it should have come
two years or more sooner.   .   .   .
The Worshipful Harry has the advantage of being Mayor
of the City of Vancouver—for the fourth year in succession
—and of templing fortune at a time when he is at the
hight tide of a popularity which extends all tlle way from
Coal Harbor to the Palace of St. James. He has been an
exceedingly diligent lirst magistrate and may be countaM
upon to carry the light to his opponent.
The Honorable Harry led oil last night with some clever
shadowwork designed to lure his opponent into the tariff
corner where some Indecisive interchanges only could be
expected. The Worshipful Harry is a craft ring general
himself and will doubtless insist ou making the fight In the
centre of the ring on the more substantial matters con
nected with the port development and the enlarging of the
trade of Vancouver. A very pretty contest Is now to be
expected. -Vancouver World.
Two Brigadier-Generals are running in tlie political
race in Vancouver constituencies.; one as a National-
Liberal-Conservative and the other as a straight Liberal.
Chicago aldermen pay periodical visits to British Columbia to investigate the "cost of living." Strange that these
pilgrimages should have started after this province established government liquor stores.
A Wisconsin banker is charged with sending a threatening letter. The outcome of it will be watched with interest
by those who are 111 the habit of receiving the stereotyped
notice.
Many a man will get out and crank his head off on a
flivver but when bis wife asks him to wheel the baby buggy
around the block he yells likell.—Rosenburg News-Review.
Answer was recently made to an enquiry as to the pos
sibllities for trade betwen this country and Arizona, that
In that state they gave preference to goods of their own
production. If British Columbia would follow tbls example
there would be no unemployment.
Professor Gregory of Glasgow told scientists—they
believed him and you should—that the earth now Is already
eight thousand million years old. lie arrives at his figures
by calculating bow long it must have taken the ocean to
become as salty as it is now, hy gradual washing down of
salts from the Innd to tho sea. Tbe curth has lasted eight
thousand million years, If Professor Gregory Is right. Darwin and Kelvin conservatively figured only 20,000,000. Anyhow, we have thousands of millions of years more to go.
Nothing could he more exciting nnd Interesting, If it be
true that we come back hero and continue to murch along
with the earth and Its Improvement Where we go from
here we don't know, but that must he interesting.
As a result of a squabble between two newspapers in
Vancouver, citizens of that town are just beginning to lind
out how wicked they are on Sundays. As a consequence
"blue laws" may be enforced.
Some of our provincial candidates have no objection
whatever to serving another term. Mayor Gale, of Vancouver, in fact, being quite willing to stay in any number
of terms. But there are others who are opposed to this.
There is distinct opposition to even a second term by
residents of Okalla.
William Jennings Bryan, persistent presidential candidate, famous political farewellist and known as "The Peerless One," is coming to British Columbia, to aid in exorcising the Demon Rum. Somehow it would seem that Mr.
Bryan has now earned a new title of affection, say, "The
Dlsappearless One."
Special Showing this Week
THE FAMOUS "ST. MARGARETS" BRAND   SWEATERS,   JERSEY   SUITS   AND
KILTIE SUITS
JERSEY KNIT DRESSES HOSIERY AND HALF-HOSE
Just Received the Newest Creations in
GEORGETTE CREPES, TRICOLETTES AND CREPE DE CHINE WAISTS
Misses' and Children's "Sailor Maid" Serge Dresses  and  Flannel Middies,  in  Navy,
Scarlet, Rose and Gold.
SPECIAL VALUES IN SERGE MIDDIES AND BLOOMERS AT $1.75 EACH.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
OUR FALL AND WINTER STOCK IS NOW COMPLETE IN
Men's Overcoats, Suits and Raincoats
SPECIAL VALUES IN BOYS' SCHOOL SUITS AND ODD BLOOMERS
JUST RECEIVED A LARGE STOCK OF INVICTUS SHOES—"The Best Good Shoe
for Men."   Made on the newest lasts, in Black and Browns.
GROCERY  DEPARTMENT
WEEK END SPECIALS
Black Cherries, in heavy syrup, large size
tins, each   35c
Family Sodas, large pkgs 30c
Rogers' Syrup, 2's tins .'.. 2 for 5,5c
Seeded Raisins   2 pkgs. 45c
Bulk Currants, per lb 25c
St. James Coffee, I's tins; reg. 70c for 60c
Van Crimp's Pork and Beans.... 7 tins $1.00
Horseshoe Salmon 2 tins 55c
Squirrel Peanut Butter, tins 25c
;
lllllllllll!
The Studebaker
Light-Six
Vancouver husband's salary as a government employee
is attached for his wife's millinery bill. Oh, well, that's
the way of it. A man can get along with a hat that looks
like a bird's nest and never be noticed, but some wives feel
half naked unless they spend friend husband's shekels on
headgear that looks like a Christmas tree.
British Columbia is honored by the visit of another royal
personage In the Princess Alicia of Montenegro. She Is
said to be the tallest scion of royalty in Europe, being
nearly bIx feet in height. No doubt that is why they call
her "Her Highness."
Ono of the sights ot Skagway, Alaska, Is tho line collection of trained lish owned by a couple of old sourdoughs
who work for^ the Whlto Pass & Yukon railroad. Their
llsh, trout, if you please, are hand-fed nnd the greatest of
pets. The spotted beauties come thero each year, "with
the tourists," one of tlm owners declared, and make their
home under a spring-holrse that Is used for the storage of
food. Hero the fish stay, depending on tbelr hOBts for
sustenance. As soon as one of the old miners enters the
house the fish swim around to a can in the water in which
is kept ground meat, and dart from side to side when the
can is opened, scenting their dinner. The meat ls held in
the water In the hand and the llsh come up and snatch it,
often taking hold of the host's lingers In the operation. It
ls a rare sight and experience, but tbe old owner of the
pool has another oddity on exhibition—his smile. His
entire set of front teeth are gold, made from nuggetB that
he dug from the pay sands of the Yukon himself.—The
Portland Oregonlan.
We nre evidently In the midst of a process and the slowness of God's processes In the material world prepares us,
or ought to prepare us, for something analogous in the
moral world; so that at least wo may bo allowed to truBt
that He who has taken untold ages for the formation of a
bit of old red sandstone mny, be limited to threescore yearB
and ten for the perfecting of a human spirit.—Thomas
praklne.
If you happen to be one of seventeen people walking
down Dunsmuir Avenue, consider yourself entitled to an
automobile. At least that is the way ofllcinl statistics have
It—one motor car for every 17 persons in British Columbia. If you haven't got the car that Is your own, look out,
for statistics have done the best tbey can for you.
Speaking of autos, a Victoria man has invented a distilled fluid to take tlie place of gasoline. Boy, page Mr.
Pussyfoot Johnson.
Provincial ollicials are worried to know where all the
bootleg "hootch" is coming from these days, it being perfectly apparent all of it doesn't come from the Liquor
Control Board.
In Gary, the steel city, all prices are coming down with
wages. Restaurants, landlords, clothing merchants, nil cut
prices. Doctors' visits nre reduced to $2. Lawyers have
even cut $50 off the average cost of divorce. "Supply and
demand" continues at work. It Is the old system of finding
out how much a man has, then getting that. When he has
less, you take less.
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was de-
signed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks   Motors
It is said that the Government will ask the Legislature
to sanction the turning over of the Income tax to the municipalities, and at the same time abolish the tax exemptions,
making all wage-earners liable for payment. It Is also
suggested that tho Government will make a per capita
grant on the basis of the number of children attending
municipal schools Instead of assisting the school by the
payment ot $10 a, teacher.
LIMITED
a     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.
il
llllllllllllllllllllllll ^^^^^^^^^^rn* KsJjBBjJB^'-jy^CTJil
'■'ii '    ll11
'» PH
IWPPWWPI
(til
October il, 1921.
frHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDEfi
Five
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE RATTLE—
Or rather let us do It.   We know how to make your cur behave,
and will give you a lot of free advice on tlie subject if you ask us.
HARLIN6 & LEDINGHAM
Telephone 8 Cumberland P.O. Box 349
FIRE PREVENTION
People of Dominion Urged to
Reduce Tremendous Annual
Loss From Fire
Ancient Order of Foresters
Tlie next meeting will be held on
Wednesday, October 26th, at 7 p.m.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
HUGH M. DAVIDSON, Chlof Ranger.
F, EATON, Secretary.
FRANK SLAUGHTER, Treasurer.
Female Court
A few names are still needed to enable a Female Court of tho Order
to be opened in this city. This iodge will be a real benefit in caso of
sickness, and dues and foes are very low. Think this mattor over
carefully, then write to F. G. Eaton, Secretary A. 0. F., General Delivery, Cumberland.
Meeting Provincial Needs
The great increase in tbe number of telephone stations in this
province means that the telephone subscriber Is able to reach
many more people by wire, and consequently his service Is of
greater value. During tlie paBt year or two, expansion bas beeu
marked In all parts of Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, but adequate facilities have been installed, both iu regard
to outside plant and inside equipment, to meet tlie needs of the
various communities. The object of the company is to give a
telephone Bervlce second to none. The B. C. Telephone" Company, being a British Columbia concern all through, haB a real
luterost in provincial progress, and every effort Is made not only
to meet the needs ot development but to anticipate tbem.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
FOR  SALE
Acreage  on Royston-
Cumberland   Road
Price $30.00 *"
Acre       |j
APPLY—
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
By Royal Proclamation, His Ex
cellency    the    Governor-General    of
I Canada has  been  graciously pleased
' to designate the week of October 9 to
15 as Fire Prevention Week. The
object of the period thus set apart fot
j observance Is to reduce the tremendous fire waste of tbe Dominion, especially that which is directly due tc
carelessness and avoidable causes.
j Fire causes in Canada the annua
destruction of the alarming amount ol
$28,000,000 worth of property, besidet
hundreds of lives.
| There ls an old saying that "fire if
a good servant, but a   bad   master.'
I Fire cooks our food, beats our homes
In winter, makes steam to drive oui
engines and serves us ln a thousand
v. ays. But it is also fire that burns
cur houses, stores and factories, destroys our forests and every year cost!
I many people their lives. Fire cannot
be trusted. There Is no flame so small
but what it may become a disastrous
conflagration If careless people forget
its danger. Here are some interesting
facts:
(1). In Canada, during the past ten
years, lire has destroyed property
worth more than $200,000,000. Even
more serious than that, however, is
■ Ibe fact that over 2600 persons were
: burned to deatli and   thousands   oi
! others severely injured by fire.
I (2.) In the year 1020, Canada's fire
loss was $76,700 dally, or Over $60 per
minute. While in European countries the average annual loss by tire
is less than 33 cents per head of the
population, In Canada, our annual loss
exceeds $3 per bead.
(3.) Canada is made this much the
poorer by lire. Burned buildings and
goods do not replace themselves. Fire
losses are not paid by the Insurance
companies. The companies merely
collect premiums from everybody in
Canada and pay a portion of the
amount collected to the person .who
suffers by fire. Fire taxes every one
and none can escape. The cost of insurance, which represents the cost of
fire waste, Is added by manufacturers
and merchants to the price of their
goods. Fire Increases tbe cost of
everything, food, clothes, furniture,
rents, and all the necessities of life.
(4.) Saddest of all, fires ln Canada
destroy many lives. In 1916 there
were 563 persons burned to death, 235
in 1917, 261 in 1918, 239 in 1919, and
2S4 in 1920. About sixty per cent, of
these fatalities occurred in dwellings
and tbe large majority of the victims
were children under twelve years of
age.
(5.) In 1920 there were over 19,000
fires In Canada. Seventy-five per cent,
of these were caused by carelessness
and could therefore have been prevented.
Safely Itnles for Stoves and Furnaces.
1. Place stoves, furnaces and pipes
far enough from walls and woodwork
to avoid overheating.
2. Cover the nearest wooden surfaces wltb sheet asbestos, sheet iron
or tin; ll Iron or tin is used, leavo an
air space behind it.
3. Where stovepipes or heating
pipes pass through walls, enclose the
pipes in galvanized Iron, doublewalled,
ventilated thimbles at least twelve
inches wider than the diameter of the
pipe.
i. Protect the floor beneath the
stove with sheet metal, and have il
extend forward at least twelve Inches
directly beneath the door of the ashpit.
Surround the base of  the  furnace
  with brick, stone or concrete.
== 6. Make sure that all pipes are free
from rust, and that all joints and connections are sound and tight.
7. Fix a guard about the pipe in the
attic so that nothing may be stored
against it.
8. Never pour coal oil into a coal or
wood stove, even when the fire is out.
9. Never put ashes into wooden
boxes or barrels, have a strong metal
can.
10. Study the drafts and dampers.
11. Do not let tho stove or pipes become red hot.
12. Keep stoves, furnaces, flues and
chimneys clean.
13. Inspect the chimneys and flues
to be sure that they are sound.
14. Do not dry wood in au oven.
15. Do not hang wet clothing too
near'a stove.
16. Keep curtains away from stoves
and pipes. /
PERCOLATIONS
Taking the course of least resistance is what makes rivers—and some
uen- so crooked.
Ambition Is a feeling that you want
to do something that you kuow you
can't.      '
Better borrow from a pawnbroker
ihan from your friend.
Always keep your temper; it is
worth more to you than it is to anybody else.
All quacks are not hatched   from
luck eggs.
When a man begins to argue with
its conscience as to whether a thing
is right or wrong, the chances are
that It is wrong.
Listeners bear as little good about
ithers as they do about themselves.
What this country needs Is a blind
asylum for people who are blind to
their own best interests.
Few men ure
convictions.
as   brave   aB   their
No attention Is paid to a chronic
liar when he utters an occasional
truth.
Tbe opportunity of a lifetime seldom conies heralded by a brass band.
The banister of life Is full of splin-
lers and mankind slides down it with
'onsidcrnhlc rapidity.
If otlier people didn't make mistakes
we would have but littlo cause to
pride ourselves on our abilities.
NORTHERN TRIBES CEDE
TERRITORY TO CROWN
As a result of the work of the government treaty party, which has been
iu the north land during the summer,
372,000 square miles of territory has
been ceded by the various Indian
tribes to the crown, and about 1900
Indians who hitherto had not been
reached, have signified their willingness to accept the government bounty.
H. A. Conroy, Federal Indian agent,
from Ottawa, went as far north as
Fort Macpherson ln the Arctic, travelling iu a specially constructed house
boat. This vessel was pushed by the
Hudson Bay Company's gas boat Hu-
baco and the new method of travel
was quite satisfactory, states the Indian commissioner.
COAL FIELDS GOOD FOR
500 YEARS IN ALBERTA
225 Car Loads Turned Out Daily
—Yearly Payroll Amounts
To $4,000,000
There 13 suflicient coal In the Drum-
heller fleld, Red Deer Valley, Alberta,
to last the trade for 500 years, according to estimates. The output of
the 25 mines in operation (here today
will reach 1,400,000 tons this year, an
average of 225 car loads per day; and
wages paid will exceed $4,000,000.
Thirty thousand acres have been filed
on by tbe mining companies. The coal
is distributed by the Canadian National Railways throughout the prairie
provinces as far east as Winnipeg.
Underpinning Unnecessary.
The Boon coal mine at Drum-
heller. Alfa., has been equipped
throughout with electrically operated
machinery, and has been developed
to an output of 1500 tons per 8-hour
shift. Above a five-foot seam of coal
there is a solid roof of rock, making
under-pinning unnecessary. The mine
property covers 4000 acres.
Don't kick about your home town;
tho other fellow's might be worse.
"THE FELLOW THAT YOUR
MOTHER THINKS YOU ARE"
Small Bank Accounts
Many people put off opening a Savings Bank Account
until they feel they have a large enough sum to make
it worth while. This is why they never learn the habit
of thrift.
Open an account with us by depositing $1, and add
•$1 weekly or monthly until you can   increase   the
amount of your periodical deposit.
WE WELCOME SMALL ACCOUNTS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GIlAINUEIl, Manager.
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND  •
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY STORE
Oood Selection ot Pipes, Cigar and
1    Cigarette Holders.
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
While   walking   through   a   crowded
downtown street tlie other day,
I heard a little urchin to his comrade
turn and say:
"Say Jimmy, let me tell youse, I'd be
happy as a clam
If I only was de feller dat me nuidder
t'lnks i am.
"Gee, Jim, she t'lnks dat I'm n wonder,
and she knows her Iiltle lad
Could never mix wld notliin' dut wuz
ugly, mer.ii or bad.
Lots er times I sits und   t'lnks  bow
nice t'would he, gee whizz.
If a feller only was de feller dat Ills
mudder t'lnks he is."
My friends, be yours n life of loll or
undiluted joy,
You can still learn a lesson from this
small, unlettered boy.
Don't try to be an onrlhly saint with
your eyes fixed on u star;
Just aim to be the fellow that your
mother thinks you are.
Fall
Announcement
NOW SHOWING A FULL RANGE OF
Fall Underwear for Men & Boys
IN STANFIELD'S, PENMAN'S AND JASON'S
These are all marked at the new prices, which are
from 25 to 40 per cent, lesu than a year ago.
Stanlleld's Men's Winter Weight, garment $1.50 to $3
Stanfleld's Men's Combinations, per suit $3.00 to $0.00
Boys' Underwear, in Penman's, just the thing for your
boys.   Reduced irom $1.50 garment to $1.00
BOYS' SUITS
EXTRAORDINARY VALUES
Direct from the manufacturers, at our new low
prices of $6.7.5, $7.50 and upwards.
Mothers will need to see the beautiful tailoring in
these suits—to feel the splendid wool fabrics—to
realize what really extraordinary values these suits
are.   Come in nice dark Winter Tweeds and Serges.
See Our Nice Assortment of Boys' Pants, in sizes to
fit boys from 6 to 10 years, at $1.50
Boys' Bloomer Pants for the Bigger Ones, 26 to 34.
Priced upwards from   $1.50
SHOE DEPARTMENT
The most complete and up-to-date stock of Shoes
in the city, which we are still offering at Sale Prices.
Boys' Sturdy School Shoes, Winter weight; sizes 11 to
13, per pair $3.25
,   Sizes 1 to 5s at $3.90
Leckie's Strong School Shoes at $4.90
THE MODEL CLOTHING
AND SHOE STORE
Phone 152
F. PARTRIDGE
P. O. Box 343
THIS TAKES FIRST PRIZE
Seven years ago a farmer hung his
vest on the fence In the barnyard. A
calf chewed up the vest, in the pocket
of which was a gold watch. Lust week
the animal, an old milch cow, was
butchered for beef, aud the watch was
found to be lodged iu such a position
between the cow's lungs that the cow's
breathing had kept the watch wound
up, and the watch had lost but four
minutes in seven years! That beats
Bill's fish story all to pieces.
Farmer: 'Ave yer seen a wild bull
anywhere?
Hunter: N-n-o.
Farrier: Well, if 'e comes arter yer,
just run this way, will yer?
Possibly the apex of sarcasm or
something was reached the other day
when a man took his flivver to a repair shop and asked the man there
what was the best thing to do with it.
The repair man looked the car over
in silence for several minutes, after
which he grasped the horn and looted
it. "Yop've got a good born there,"
he remarked, quietly. "Suppose you
jack it up and run a new car under
it?"
"A bigamist is a man who has married one wife too many."
"And so is a monogamist at times."
Don't expect to find a groom liko
the collar ads.—or a brido liko tho
corset ads!
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL DELIVERY
Coal, Wood aud Goods ot Any Kind
Delivered to All Forts of District.
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away,
MODERATE CHARGES
FILIAL ADMIRATION
TELEPHONE  PO  TELEPHONE
or Leavo Orders at Vendome HoteL
"You have acted In a decidedly un-
gentlemanly way, Augustus."
Thus spoke the ful her of Augustus
when he found his son hud stolen jam
from the larder.
"It may not seem n very great
crime to you, Augustus," continued
bis parent, "but little things lead to
big things. The child Is father to the
man, my boy, and the little petty theft
of today may be the great crime of
tomorrow. Besides, Augustus, you
were disobedient. You were forbidden to tuke jam, and you took it. Disobedience, Augustus, is the root of all
evil. Remember that, my boy, and
you will rise in Iho world to cast off
the blur of commonplace duplicity."
As his father paused for breath
Augustus turned a beam ng face to
his mother: "Oh, mamma!" ho exclaimed, "Isn't pa Interesting?"
In the far Arctic, summer brings a
spell of continual sunshine, heat and
myriads of Insects, and there, for a
matter of ten or twelve weeks, bird
life is more plentiful than anywhere
else ou the earth.
CHINAWARE
New Goods Just
Opened Out
TEA SETS—21 pieces $9.75 and $10.50
22-piece  \  $18.00
40-piece   $18.50
FANCY CHINA CUPS AND SAUCERS—
2.5c each, or 5 for $1.00
30c each, or  6 for $1.50
SOc etch, or 6 for $2.50
DRINKING GLASSES—per dozen   $1.25
DINNER SETS
1 only, 42-piece Dinner Set, gold and white $15.00
2 only, 97-piece Decorated Dinner Sets, each $25.00
A, FULL LINE OF
Furniture, House Furnishings
Beds, Bedding, Heaters
and Ranges    ^
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C. Six
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 18, 1921.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
By David Warwick  in  the Canadian
National Railways  Magazine.
The present-day development of
British Columbia had Its beginnings
in Oriental interest in the skin of tbe
sea-otter.
Tbe caravels of tbe peaceful Columbus were followed to the new world
by others bearing men of different
stamp—able Spaniards, restless of
mind, bent on subduing the residents
of the newly-found lands antl diverting tbe riches of a continent to the
coffers ot' Spain. Early In Ihe sixteenth century nationals of that European race had established sovereignty
over the Pacific coast from what is
now Oregon lo Cape Horn. Cortes
conquered Mexico in tB31; Plzaro,
Chili anil Peru In 1686, The former,
about the time his adventurous compatriot was subduing ihe Peruvians
any Chilians, had three ports, an
arsenal and a shipyard on Iho Mexican Pacific coast, and was. in person,
exploring what is now Lower California, which name was, in fact, conferred hy Ihe Spaniards. In 1543
Ferills attained to ihe neighborhood
of the 13rd degree of latltHde.   About
I thirty years later, Elizabeth of Eng-
j land, whose destiny it was to reduce
> Spain's maritime prowess, began to
he interested in those overseas activities of the Spaniards. Her Investlga-
I tor was the famous Francis Drake,
j who, it will he remembered, was not
too scrupulous as to the rights of
Spaniards no matter where such
Spaniards happened to be.
1 This intrepid English sailorman
j sailed up Ihe west coast of America
'some forty-three years after Jacques
| earlier made his memorable voyage
I up the St. Lawrence to the site of
present-day Quebec. The northern
limit of his voyage has been stated
variously. Some thought he went as
far as tiie 48th degree; some that the
43rd degree was the limitation. Anyway, the cold and fog diverted his
mind from any further attempt to
locate a north-eastern passage back
to the Atlantic. He turned back, made
a landing at a "fair and good bay"
some distance north of San Francisco
of today. There be remained some
live weeks, and, before lifting anchor
for tbe return to the Old Country, he
set up a post with Ills name and the
date thereon and an English sixpence
Not to use Newspaper
Advertising is to deny
yourself the most powerful trade promoter given
to the  Use  of  Man
Canada Needed Armies—
She advertised in the newspapers.
Canada Needed More Munitions—
She advertised in the newspapers.
Canada Needed War Loans—
She advertised in the newspapers.
Canada Needed Patriotic Funds—
She advertised in the newspapers.
Canada Needed Food Conservation—
She advertised in the newspapers.
Canada Needed Immigrants—
She advertised in the newspapers.
AND ACHIEVED SUCCESS
Fry's Wanted Cocoa Business—
Thoy advertised in the newspapers.
Pears Wanted Soap Business—
They advertised in the newspapers.
Ford Wanted Car Business—
He advertised in the newspapers.
Willis Wanted to Sell Tanlac—
He advertised in the newspapers.
Massey-Harris Wanted Implement
Business—
They advertised in the newspapers.
Wrigley Wanted Gum Business—
He advertised in the newspapers—
AND ACHIEVED SUCCESS
When Far-Sighted Men want anything
in Trade or Commerce that it is
within the power of the Public to
grant—
They advertise in the newspapers
AND SUCCESS RESULTS
buried beneath it. On this post be set
forth the declaration that the country
had been taken possession of in the
name of Elizabeth of England, and
named it all "New Albion."
Drake probably took this action In
ense the Queen of England might take
an interest in tlie matter. Evidently,
however, she did not, or perhaps her
royal attention was diverted elsewhere, for the records of our western
coast contain no more mention of any
Important visits by English sailors
lor almost a hundred and fifty years.
During that long period, the power of
Spain on the coast had been established firmly, and the Spanish- claim
was of tlie "blanket" order—intended
to cover all the lands along the Paci-
lic from frozen Arctic to tempestuous
Cape Horn.
Slur of Spain Iii gun In t'nilc.
In 1728, Vitus Bering, the Russian,
sailed through the strnit that connects
Pacific and Arctic waters between Asia
and America. This marked the first
real shifting of the balance of power
in tlie Pacific. For thirteen yenrs, until 1741, when lie was wrecked on
Bering Island, this Russian pressed
forward witli his explorations for his
government. Ho perished there, but
his work and his record remained, and
soon fur traders from his country
were actively engaged 111 the buying
up of furs for re-sale in Europe and
China. The brilliance of the star of
Spain was beginning to fade.
Tlie traditional control ou the western coast which that country had exercised for so long wns endangered
by the Russians from the north, and
by the rapid growth of English power
throughout the world. In 1776, Captain James Cook set out from England
on his third and last voyage around
tlie world, arriving off our northwest
coast two years later. This famous
circumnavigator had been commissioned by the British government to
examine the North American Pacific
coast from about 45 degrees north
latitude to the Arctic Ocean for
alleged large inland openings inward
I to the eastward. Because of the bad
weather prevailing In March of that
| year, he passed, unnoticed, the strait
I named after Juan de Fuca nnd con-
! tlnucd up the coast of Vancouver Is-
| land, establishing himself at Nootka
Sound.
Captain Cook Met Dcnth.
Captain Cook discovered Prince
William's Sound and Cook's Inlet, and
entered the Arctic through Bering
Strait. Considering the north-east
passage as impracticable he returned
southward on bis homeward vokage,
touched at the Hawaiian Islands and
met death there as a result of an altercation with tbe natives of those
islands which lie had named Sandwich. But his expedition returned to
England and his record remained.
Again the anxious Spaniards returned to the northwestern coast and
an expedition under Captain Quadra
advanced the Spanish claims to the
68th parallel.
The records of Captain Cook were
published In 1784, five years after his
tragic and untimely death In the
South Seas. The report contained a
description of the sea otter, the skin
of which was said by him to he the
equal of the common otter. The sea
otter was abundantly in evidence ail
along the coast, and adventurous
spirits were not long in responding
to the lure of the easy money to be
secured from their skins. At that
time, the East India Company had a
monopoly of the trade in the Chinese
Empire, where these sea-otter pelts
had a ready sale. They were soon in
the new field. Success led to emulation in other quarters, and it was not
long before expeditions were litted
out In Marseilles, Boston and Bombay,
to mention but a few points, to engage
in the new opportunity. This sort of
activity inevitably led to further exploration. The Queen Charlotte Islands were discovered. So was a large
portion of the mainland. American,
as well as British vessels were familiar sights around Vancouver Island.
Trading    was    proflitnhle    and    was
briskly carried on.
Niuilka Sound Scene uf Act iv Ily.
This sort of thing, ot course, could
uot prevail for long without some sort
of coniiict developing wilh thc Spaniards, who, it will be recalled, asserted soverignty over all tbe coastal
waters ot the Pacific side of the
Americas and Mexico. Soon tbey
came to Nootka Sound, which was llie
chief centre of activity of the fur
trade, and, seizing some Uritish vessels, projected the Nootka affair in
the international politics of that day.
England demanded satisfaction. Spain
paid an indemnity, ami restored British rights and properly. But before
tills settlement was effected) or rather
while Captains Vancouver and Quadra
of the British and Spanish governments respectively, were wailing for
an agreement to be reached, the
former carried out a three-year exploration of the waters surrounding
tho Island. Doubtless in graceful
recognition of his work, tlie island
was named after him. in later years,
so was the city of Vancouver, and
thero was, nnd is, another thriving
town iii the American State of Washington bearing the name of this well-
known navigator. And his statue may
lie noted by the observant ou the dome
of tho Legislative Buildings ut Victoria.
Spain Concedes Xoolkii ns British.
England made substantial gains, as
far as the control of the coastal lands
and waters were concerned ot the
Nootka convention. Spain recognized
the Englisli riglit of tradu and navigation on the north Pacific coast, and
abandoned claim lo a monopoly of tbe
North Pacific. England agreed not
to found any trailing station within
30 miles of a Spanish post. Captains
Quadra and Vancouver worked out the
details. By the Treaty of Madrid,
Spain recognized Nootka as an English post.
So it was that Vancouver Island became British. The mainland was
nominally Spanish, but the Napoleonic
wars ami the movement for freedom
in the American colonies kept Spain
fully occupied and prevented any
worthwhile attempt to colonize the
continental tract. In duo course, the
Republic of .Mexico replaced Spanish
authority to tlie south. The Republic
was not interested beyond California.
The way was open for complete British occupation, especially since Canada had heen ceded to the British
crown. And it was not long before
lhat occupation became a fact.
(To lie Continued).
THE BEST BEERS
CASCADE and
U. B. C.
BRILLIANTLY clear and sparkling, with a flavor that satisfies,
CASCADE BEER is just what you want. There is no purer beer
made. It is brewed with all the care and experience of a
great plant, the culmination of thirty years' progress in brewing British
Columbia's favorite beer.
Union Brewing Co., Ltd.
Distributors
Nanaimo, - - B. C.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Dny nnd Night.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEBUIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
GREAT BOON FOR
SMALL CAR OWNERS
Dnnlop Rubber Company's New
Straight Wall 31x4 Cord Tire
Users of cars taking 3tlx3V<, rims
have now available a Straight Wall
type of rim, which allows tho use of
a 31 x 1 Straight Wall Cord Tire, re-
sently developed by the Dunloy Tire
& Rubber Goods Co., Limited.
This 31 x 4 Cord Tire, as previously
stated, is made to lit the new Straight
Wall rim in 3iix3Vt> Blze, and Its introduction at this date is particularly
interesting because the 31x4 Straight
Wall Cord Tire represents au extension of the Straight Wall principle in
tire-building to the smaller car tire.
This makes II. possible for owners of
Brisco." "Chevrolet," "Ford," "Gray-
llort," "Maxwell" or "Overland" cars
to use the new Straight Wall Tire—
if Ihey so wish- -by converting their
present Clincher Kims into Straight
Wall.
ltlm makers nre now supplying
30x3% Straight Wall Kims to Interchange with 80x8$ Clincher Demountable Kims or Solid type 3(1 x 3%
Clincher Rims.
The new 30x3% Straight Wall rim
is exactly the same as the 32x3V3
.-straight Wall rim except that It is
twenty-three inches in diameter instead of twenty-live,
"31x1 Straight Wall" introduces
a new size in Cord Tires, one that
undoubtedly will be very popular because of the records it will set for
tremendous mileage.
One Car linker has already adopted
the now Dunlop Cord Tire for equipment purposes, and Ihe prospects are
lhat others will follow the example
Immediately,
31 x4 Straight Wall Cord Is supplied
in both "Ribbed" and the well-known
"Traction" tread designs.
Surround   Yourself
with the liost quality onto accessories
if you want RroaTcst satisfaction and
economy. Those we sell are made by
nationally known manufacturers who
cannot afford to brand flimsily made
things wilh their names. Let your
purchasuM be investments. We can
help you to jmlivious purchases.
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C
She was just a little girl, dresed in
short skirts of Alice blue, apparently
searching for something sho had lost,
just near tbe Corner Grocery. Chief
of Police Bunbury saw her from the
hack and in his kindly way, asked her:
"Is there anything I can do for you,
little girl?"
The "little girl" suddenly rose to
her feet, brandishing an umbrella.
'I'll have you understand I'm 22," she
laid, "and I think it darned funny
•vlien a girl can't fasten her garter
without sonic fresh guy butting in.
.Now beat it!"
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone <JG
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried out Tickled I'ork
nnd Cornell Deed It Is delicious.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation,     Heated
throughout by lilectrlc'ty.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE  ANI»  LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
Wood for Sale
$1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings ot the Great War
Veterans Association ara held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock ln ths' Memorial
Hall.
THE   NEW   MEIGHEN   CABINET .. IJL.WJ3F
«I|PIII«WIMW       ■
•■■^^
6ctober i8, i^i.
6UMBERLAND ISLANDER
M
II     r
I*    l<
J'
f
POLITICAL POT WARMING
UP IN VANCOUVER
THE ONE GREAT GIFT
is good Jewelry. It is the only une
that lasts forever and retains its
beauty always. If you have a gift in
mind we advise a piece of such jewelry
as can be seen here. You can make
lt as Inexpensive or as costly as you
please, but choosing It here means a
gift whose quality will be unquestionable, whose beauty will be uu
everlasting reminder of the giver.
Louis R. Stevens
Optician
NOTICE
Ib the Nannlmo County Court Holden
at Cumberland, 11. C.
In the matter of the Estate of Thomas
Briggs, deceased, and In the mutter
of the Administration Act.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
Judge Barker, made the 14th day of
September, 1921, I was appointed administrator to the estate of the said
Thomas Briggs, deceased, and all parties having claims against the said
estate are hereby required to furnish
same properly verified to me on or
before the 10th day of November, A.D.
1921, and all parties indebted to the
said estate are required to pay the
amount ot their indebtedness forthwith.
WESLEY WILLARD,
Official Administrator.
Dated this 6th day of October, 1921.
2-42
ANNUAL TAG DAY OF
THE HOSPITAL W. A.
On Saturday, October 22, a tag day
will be held under the auspices of the
Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland
General Hospital to raise funds to
carry on the work undertaken by the
ladles.
The auxiliary provides most of the
crockery and linen used in the local
hospital, which are procured here, and
all money raised is spent in town. Excepting for the dues paid by the members the auxiliary depends on voluntary subscriptions for its support, and
lt is hoped the public will accord them
a generous response. .
VOTERS' LIST CLOSES
END OF THE MONTH
October 31st is the last day for
registration of householders, boarders,
roomers and holders of trades licences
to get on the 1922 Voters' List. The
list closes at the City Hall at 5 p.nr.
on Monday, October 31.
Holders of agreements of sale must
lodge a statutory declaration thut he
ls the last registered owner, before 5
p.m. on the 30th day of November in
order to be registered on the list.
VANCOUVER.—The political pot Is
warming up here in dead earnest, after desultory doings that have kept
many in suspense. Regular organization is being perfected. Headquarters
are being opeded this week. Campaign managers are appointed. Political clubs are being formed in cities
and suburbs. Leaders are gathering
their cohorts .together. Each headquarters sees a gathering of the clans.
There is a caucus or something iu
nearly every central block at night.
Oiiiec-seekers are beseiging their pet
candidates. Petition-bearers aro out
with eager zeal and gaping blanks.
Tlie campaign has started ill fair
earnest.
Until now the campaign plans have
received only superliciul attention, so
it would seem, and, gone Into only
tentative plans. Hut now comes the
real boiling of the political pot and
the hot pursuit of tlie votes.
Old war-horses and standard-bearers of politics opine this Is thu warmest campaign yet seen In British Columbia. Every Bign in sight points
that way.
News in Brief
The development this year of mining properties located in the extensive mineralized belt about Stewart
has been most satisfactory. Considerable activity will continue during
the winter.
Sheet music will be printed in British Columbia in future. Preference
will be given to the works of Canadian composers.
IIIIIIII
ILO-ILO THEATRE   |
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, 10 REELS I
Gold production this year in British Columbia has been much higher
than last year.
Trail smelter during the flrst six
months of this year handled tio.ooo
ions more than the total for the corresponding period of 1*920.
More than 4300 building permits
of which approximately 4000 were for
lew homes, were taken out in Greater
Vancouver since January laBt. The
total value Is far more than a million
lollnrs In excess of last year's aggregate.   It Is more tliuu double the total
nr the twelve months of 1919, seven
<imes that of 1918, and fifteen times
hut of 1917. This does noHook as if
times were very hard in B. C.
10Q0 HEADSTONES FOR
DEAD VETERANS OF
B. C. AND ALBERTA
VANCOUVER.— Over 1000 bead
stones are being prepared here for
dead veterans of British Columbia and
Alberta. The "government has just
ordered them from stone produced at
Uraiilte Quarry Island, 7(1 miles north
of Vancouver. Tbey will be turned
out in tlie yurds of the Patterson,
Chandler & Stephens, Ltd. Authority
conies from tbe Hon. Hugh Guthrie.
Minister of Militia nnd defence, and
Col. M. C. Osborne, secretary of the
Imperial War Graves Commission,
These ollicials have Investigated the
quarries of Canada, and will check up
names of dead veterans with Col.
Russell of Vancouver.
Manager H. V. Knowlaml, of the
Granite Island quarries and the monumental mason firm, says work will be
rushed, but ho does not expect all tbe
headstones will be ready for several
mouths.
A supply will be kept on band for
veterans who may die later. These
headstones are for veterans who actually died of war injuries, and will
decorate their graves in Canada.
Each headstone is of simple beauty
and patriotic design, bearing the
maple leaf ln a circle. Beneath will
be the names and service of the decedent. A large cross will follow,
while the words "For His Country"
will be inscribed at tlie base. For
Jewish soldierB the cross will be substituted by tlie sign of David with a
Taluiidic text.
Vancouver will shortly witness the
unusual sight of hundreds of headstones being shipped to all parts of
the two provinces. This forms quite
tlie most extensive movement of- its
kind yet recorded in the Empire.
MASQUERADE BALL
ON ARMISTICE DAY
The British Admiralty has announced that it will let contracts for
Umber to British Columbia firms.
From January 1 to August 31 this
year 673 homesteads and 156 soldier
grants were taken up in the Winnipeg
land division.
Dr. Seager Wheeler, Western Canada's wheat wizard, has experimented
with 300 varieties of wheat on his
farm at Roshern, Saskatchewan. He
brought the seed from every part of
Ihe globe where the cereal Is grown.
His farm crop of "Red Bobs" this season ls yielding 38 bushels to the acre.
Goo. Reynolds and W. D. Oates,
Montana ranchers, have leased a whole
township of 36 sections from the B.
C. government nenr Fort James, in the
Stuart Lake district, north of Vander-
Sioof, for a sheep and horse ranch,
rhey will take in 2000 head of sheep
ind fifty Hameltonlan horses. This ls
the first enterprise of this nature in
Central British Columbia.
The city of Calgary has given a
British firm a 99-year lease on a tive-
icre site for the establishment of a
tannery and boot factory.
A plant for tbe extraction of seed
from cones of Conifer trees is to be
established at New Westminster. It
ivill combine the drying of the cones
ind the extraction of the seed in one
operation, and will handle half a ton
jvery six hours. The seed will be
used in a great scheme for the reforestation of the British Isles. The Dominion Forestry Service has undertaken to collect 120 tons of cones
yearly for this purpose. Seed will
also be furnished to New Zealand,
China and Belgium. Seed ot the
Douglas fir and Sitka spruce are the
varieties chiefly in demand.
A masquerade ball will be held in
llie Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall on the evening
of November 11, Ai iiistice Duy, under
the auspices of the Cumberland Branch
cf the Great War Veterans' Associa
lion.
I
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of Ihe Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by inter-
The Epsom salts mined at Basque,
B. C, are naturally pure, over 99 per
cent., and In excess of both the British and American standards. There
are five small lakes filled with these
salts and it is only a question of time
when the world's entire supply will be
furnished from the deposits, on account of the small expense of preparing them for market. One of the remarkable things ln connection with
the deposits ts that they are being
constantly fed from below by a brine
which is forced to the surface from
surrounding rock sources. Aided by
evaporation, the brine crystallizes into salt, which is harvested much aB
ice is taken from lake or river. Underneath tlie deposits continue to
great depths. In some instances borings have been sunk for forty feet
without reaching the limit of the salt.
Canadian factories now supply 70
per cent, of the aluminum ware sold
in this country. The value of the output in 1920 was $1,600,000. This year
t will be considerably larger.
Placer gold claims covering a distance of eight miles have lately been
taked on the Red Deer River in Al-
ierta by Calgary parties, lt ls claimed
by one of tbe locators that It obtains
values running from $1,90 to $7 to the
•ubic yard from the river bottom and
and bars.
The water power at Campbell River
will be developed by a British syndi-
late, it is announced.
A discovery of graphite near the
Skoenu river, Central British Coluiu-
bla, ls reported by Dr. Stanwood, of
Los Angeles. The ledge is said to be
l ano feet wide and six miles long.
The total amount of money spent
on sports In the British Isles ench
year is so large that if it were converted Into gold it would require a
train a mile long to transport lt.
POINTS OF VIEW
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone75 Go., Ltd. P.O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
With the valves ot the mains ot this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it ls a serious offence to tampe- with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
■1
'Anyone who doeB not marry Is a
fool. Consider the picture. My wife
and I before the fire. She Is sitting
curled on the sofa like a dear little
kitten. The dim light from the fire
is reflected in the ripples of her hair.
She is smiling and her eyes are hall
closed and sparkling. How wonderful
she is. We say nothing—are too
happy for words. Here Is Heaven on
earth.
"Anyone who marries is a fool.
Consider the picture. My wife and '.
before the Are (coal ten dollars a ton).
Hhe ts cltting curled on the soft like
a cat (which she Ib). The dim light
from the fire shows quite clearly that
most of her hair Is false. She Is
frowning and her eyes are half closed
nnd threatening. We say nothing—
there ls nothing to say. Ain't married
life awful!"
m
THE BEST YET!
EIGHT REELS OF
FAIRBANKS'   ACTION
m
5="
DougiAS
FAIRBANKS
The-great hurricane of joy and excitement    in
TheMarkofZbrrd
From the Wl-Story\lifeeklu'Novel "Ihe Curse of Cdpistrdfio'
by Johnston M&Culley  •        Directed by Fred Niblo.
Brings to the Screen a wholesome, qingery mixture
of melodrama and vigorous comedy, crammed
with whirl-wind action, thrills, suspense and irresistible
funny angles,-with never a let-up in its headlong pace
from the very start to the rip-roaring, rattling,
eminently-satisfactory climax.
and
"BANG
31
TWO-REEL COMEItt        B
NO ADVANCE IN
PRICES
CHILDREN-
ADULTS
15c.
TS
35c.
MATINEE
SATURDAY
AT 2.30
CHILDREN—
10c
ADULTS—
25c
rs*3
| Monday only, Oct.   17th—Usual Prices
I THE WITCHING  HOUR
j] From the Famous Stage Play
I 2-REEL   COMEDY
nil
OPINION DIVIDED ON
SUNDAY CLOSING LAW
VANCOUVER.—Opinion is divided
)ii the Sunday closing law here, lol-
owing action lu court instituted by an
iftonioon paper that Keeks to sell
mpers on Sunday, in tlie manner cra-
iloyed by the morning paper Hint has
seen doing It for years. The matter
3 receiving close attention from pul-
ilts. Some pastors take the stand
hat the Sunday Observance Act is not
ntended to be taken In too literal a
ense, while others want to see Sun-
•ay closing obeyed lo the Btrictest de-
ail, going to the extreme of wishing
o stop street cars.
THE SPICE OF LIFE
suppose all flsh that nibbled bait,
Were landed at our feet;
iupposo   they   swarmed    In   column
eight,
Right past our grassy seat;
I'hen Uaak's art would lose lis bliss.
/or the llshing sport is catch and miss.
I'he mountain streams we wade nil day,
Tho trout will never rise;
iVe cast and reel where eddies piny,
Our patience never dies;
The angler's sport is tang wilh spice,
llecause uncertain, like the dice.
Suppose all birds   that   crossed   our
track,
Should tumble at our pull;
suppose our gun would always crack,
Our game bag always lull;
Then Nimrod's chase would grow dead
stale,
For the huntsman's sport is hit and
fail.
And so we tramp the forest trail,
Without a shot in sight;
We climb steep mountains, plunge the
dale,
Until the darkening night;
Then homeward wend with game hag
poor,
For the chase ls often just a lure.
Suppose we always found our quest,
And never mot defeat,
Then life would be a dreary guest,
Without a joy to greet;
God tempers souls with failures, strife;
This is the zest, the spice of life.
—Theodore Sharps,
There is a Big
Difference
in Buying
A CHEAP PAIR OF SHOES
and a
GOOD PAIR OF SHOES CHEAP
Patent leather or plain, whichever shoe you prefer,
you will make no mistake buying it at our shop. Our
shoes are noted for style, lit and quality, and you will
. find it real economy to pay us a bit more and get
satisfactory shoe service. A full range of sizes enables
us to lit you comfortably.
Cafe Cashier; "This is a had dollar,
sir."
Visitor: "That's all right. I had a
bad meal,"
CHUMS'   SHOES
It is real economy to buy "CHUMS SHOES" for the
Children. They are the cheapest in the long run. They
range in price from $3.50 to $7.00 a pair.
Here Are Some Real Bargains
Rorkproof White Rubbers, at less than cost, pair $1.50
The New Maltese Cross White Miners .$(1.00
Good Solid Leather School Shoes for the Youth, sizes
10 to 13; per pair $2.75
Solid Leather School Shoes for the Boys; sizes 1 to 5;
Per Pair $3.50
Nice Warm Cozy Felt Slippers for Ladies; 3 colors;
Per pair $1.50
A Nice New Range of Ladies' Spats—See these before
you buy your Spats for this Winter.
Cavin's Shoe Store
FOOTWEAR ONLY Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
October 15, mi.
ARYSHIRE
BLANKETS
Blankets with a reputation and guarantee which will
please the most exacting. Our delivery of beautiful
pure wool, downy Blankets has arrived, and already a
goodly number has been sold. The prices on these
line Blankets are approximately half of what they were
last year. We had three prices, $12.50, $14.50 and
SKi.'iO, but the $12.50 have all beon sold and now we can
oiTer you your choice of tho $14.50 and $16.50 Blankets.
Either of these will more than satisfy you. We request
you to come and see them.
A Special in Boys' Drawers
Penman's Natural Boys' Drawers, made of a good
quality, in sizes 22 to 32. QK/*
All one price to clear, pair tJtJK.
BOYS' NATURAL COMBINATIONS,        d»-j   QP
in most sizes, at, per suit  «P A .UO
TURNBULL'S NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR FOR
MEN—In all sizes. (I»9  PA
Per garment  «p£.tJU
When you get a garment with Turnbull's name on it
you can buy knowing you are getting quality goods.
For the Rainy Days
LADIES' RUBBER COATS—Trench style.
MEN'S RUBBER COATS—Trench style.
GIRLS' RUBBER COATS—Trench make.
BOYS' RUBBER COATS—Trench make.
MEN'S AND BOYS' SLICKERS.
RUBBERS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
New Prices On
McClary Ranges
No. 9-718 Kootenay—
6-9 inch covers, 18-
inch oven, with high
closet $115.00
No. 9-718 Kootenay—
With Montreal top;
price $132.50
No. 9-714 Kootenay—
4-9 inch covers, 14-
inch oven, with high
closet $110.00
All Kootenay Ranges are
built with nickel plnted
(unpolished) ovens. They
have very deep flues, a
large and heavy firebox,
and are well known for
Iheir good baking qualities.
No. 9-520 Gary—An exceptionally fine, medium weight
Range, six 9-inch covers, 20-inch oven, with high
closet   $90.00
No. 9-518 Regina—A good, low-priced Range, 18-inch
oven, 9-inch covers, with high closet $77.50
AGENTS ALSO FOR MAJESTIC MALLEABLE AND
HAPPY THOUGHT RANGES
A FULL LINE OF  HEATING  RANGES READY
YOUR INSPECTION
G H. TARBELL & SON
Phone 30
Hardware and Sporting
Goods
Cumberland
CAMPBELL RIVER NOTES
The International Logging Co. has
started up, and tilings look a Uttle
more lively.
Mr. C. Fitzgerald has returned from
Prince Rupert, where lie has been
superintending some government
wharves being built.
Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have gone to
Vancouver for a visit.
The government veterinarian has
been up here testing cows, two of
which had to be destroyed.
Tlie school inspector was up and n
school on the north hank of Campbell River is to be started.
Mr. Hanson has sold six lots on the
Campbell River townsite.
Mr. Jock Ilrunton is going to build n
gai;age.
MEN'S CLUB TO HOLD
DANCE NEXT FRIDAY
The Men's Club of Holy.Triiiily will
hold a special dunce on Friday of next
week. Dancing will be from 8.30 to
midnight; admission CO cents, includ
Ing refreshments.
CLUB NOTES
Cumberland Literary nnd Athletic
Association.
Cumberland readers are making ex
cellent use of the library that lias been
installed in tlie Athletic Club build
ing. During September about 600
books were taken out. From April
19, when the library was opened, till
November 30, 2297 hooks have been
circulated. An aditional 100 books
have been applied for, so as to bring
the permanent loan collection up to
700 books, as 600 nre insufficient to
keep up the circulation and the renewals at tbe same time.
OBSERVATIONS BY
ADAM NUISANCE
A motorcycle is like a girl—If sho
can't be made to spark there's no "go"
in her.
Arbuckle's   latest   picture   can   be
seen in the Rogue's Gallery,.
You   can   string   beans   and    kid
kid gloves but you can't bull frogs,
Two printer were arguing in the
office of our nearest contemporary:
First Printer: "Did you tell the
foreman I was a liar?"
Second Printer: "I did, not. I
thought he knew it."
He was a brave man who gave this
advice to his son: "Don't run after a
street car or a woman—there* will be
another one along in a few minutes."
It won't be long now before thc
plumber's pipe dreams will be coming
true.
Personal Mention
Mf. W. A. Owen returned from Nanaimo Sunday, accompanied by Mrs.
Owen, who has been visiting in Vancouver, and Olga, who spent the weekend in Nanaimo.
Mr. James M. Savage, General Manager, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., arrived from Victoria Wednesday.
Mr. Chas. J. Parnham motored tn
Nanaimo Thursday night and returned
on Friday.
Mr. Henry Devlin, Inspector of
Mines, ncompanied by Mrs. Devlin,
arrived from Nanaimo on Thursday's
train,
Mr. J. nnil 11. Rosier relumed from
Victoria Monday after spending twn
weeks In thut city.
Mr. I.. Marks, of the Canadian Bit-
plos.vos, Vancouver, was in town during the week.
.Mr. nnd Mrs. F,nr! Fletcher of Nanaimo visited Cumberland lasl week
end.
Mrs. Charles Grnhnm left for Victoria Friday morning.
Inspector Shoebottom of the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police visited the
Cumberland detachment on Tuesday.
Mrs. J. H. McMillan will lenvo on
Monday to join her husband in Sprin-
lield, Illinois, who has lately accepted
a position tbere.
Mrs. Robert Yates left for Nanaimo
Monday morning.
Mrs. H. Bryan returned  from Victoria on Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson nnd children,
from England, are visiting Mr. and
Mrs. A. E. Jeffrey.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. E. Bate left on
Thursday for a week or ten days'
visit to Vancouver and Sound elites.
Mr. Geo. Apps went to Vancouver
Saturday for the week-end.
Mr. T. H. Mumford returned from
Victoria on Saturday and left again
t'or the eapltol city on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ramsell, Sr., wbo
have sold their home on Maryport
Avenue, are leaving on Monday for
Nanaimo, after nearly two years residence here. Ernest Ramsell, who
played in the High School football
team, will accompany his parents; he
will be greatly missed by his team
mates.
G.W.V.A. NOTES       |
 , *
Meeting as usual ou Tuesday next
nt 7 p.m.
The auditors will present their report and balance-sheet, which has
been unavoidably delayed.
Henry Ford will never rest until he
has invented a vest-pocket Ford.
Loose auto nuts are most dangerous when one of them is driving.
Even if you can fell a woman's ago
it is best not to.
The only teacher who isn't underpaid is experience.
Not all men have their price—some
give themselves away.
A full moon floated overhead,
'Twas full as full could be;
A mongrel pup sat looking up
And whined most piteously.
He shook the midnight silence
With his canine repertoire,
In true dog fashion such as you
Have doubtless heard before.
Who'd criticize this little dog
Or hold he was to blame;
A very little moonshine, and
You'd do just the same.
Many old bachelors are trying   to
marry young,
Our idea of fun is a barber shaving
himself nnd arguing Hint he doesn't
want a shampoo.
Some live to a ripe old age; others
talk back to their wives.
—Kitsilano Times.
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Itcv. W. Leversedge.
2lst Sunday Alter Trinity.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Parents and children specially Invited to these services.
Children's Day October 161 h.
Sunday, October 16th, is Children's
Day, when there will be n service at
2.30 p.m., and the 7 o'cloclt service
will be Parent and Children's Service.
It ls hoped that there will be a good
attendance* of fathers and mothers
with their children.
Roman Catholic Church
Rev. Father Benton.
22nd Sunday nfter l'enlecnsl.
Mass at 11 a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Itcv. Jus. Hood.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Comrades are asked to advertise
well the Masquerade Ball which will
take place on November 11, Armistice
Day, in tbe Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall.
This will be the third annual Masquerade Ball under the auspices of
the G. W. V.. A., and tlie dance committee are working hard to make it
the most successful.
*\     UNION BAY NOTES     f
Miss Jean Abrams, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. B. S. Abrams of Union Bay,
celebrated her seventh birthday dn
Wednesday, when sho was host to
about twenty of her little friends at a
birthday party. A delightful time was
spent by thc guests. Jean was the
recipient of many beautiful birthday
gifts.
Thirty Years in Service.
Captain Gillespie, of tlie Kinksai
Maru, the Japanese liner which has
been taking on coal at the Canadian
Collieries wharf at Union Bay this
•veek, has an * enviable record In
marine circles. He has been no less
than thirty years with the same company, and ls today the only while
skipper in the service of tbls big
iupanese shipping company. Thirty-
three years ago Capt. Gillespie was
shipwrecked on the coast of Japan,
and was picked up by Japanese. He
has heon connected with that country
ever since,
A very enjoyable evening was spent
by some thirty odd members of the
younger set on Friday lust, when a
birthday party was given at tlie homo
of Mr. and Mrs. O. H, Kay. Tho party
was in honor of Miss Greta Kay, who
celebrated her fourteenth birthday ou
the occasion, A varied programme of
games, music and guessing contests
ivas thoughtfully arranged. Miss Eillth
Humphrey wns successful in winning
the flrst prize and Miss Katherine
Miller was awarded the consolation in
Ihe guessing contest.
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Renwlck returned from their honeymoon trip on
Saturday and will take up their residence nt Union Bay.
Choice Okanagan
APPLES
ALL BEST No. 1 PACK
Jonathans - - - - $3.75
Mackintosh Reds - $3.85
FRUITS  IN SEASON
ORANGES. LEMONS, GRAPE-FRUIT, BANANAS,
PEARS, APPLES, CANTALOUPES
CRABAPPLES
VEGETABLES
GREEN TOMATOES    HOTHOUSE TOMATOES
GREEN PEPPERS, CUCUMBERS, CABBAGE
CAUIFLOWER, PUMPKIN, SWEET POTATOES
COB CORN
Cream of the
West Flour
Is  down again in  price
21-lb. Sacks,   d»-|   QC     49-lb. Sacks,   &f)  rr
each   tPl.OO     each  $&oOO
98-lb. Sacks,
each  .'	
$5.00
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
Cumberland Lodge No. 1662 '
Loyal Order Of
MOOSE
A   General   Meeting   of   the   above
Lodge will he held on
MONDAY, OCTOBER 17
In the Fraternity Hall, at 7 o'clock.
FRANCIS W. HOBSON,
ej Secretary.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
F'or Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
Grace Methodist Church
Rev. G. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
October 6—Dauntless, Cheerful and
Active, coastwise; Daring and scows,
Bellli glinin, Wash.
October 7—Princess Beatrice, Van-
ottver.
October 8—Shamrock, Storm King
and Masset, coastwise.
October I)—Melanope, Vancouver.
October 10—Joyful and Chemalnus,
coastwise; Bellflower, New York,
j    October 11—Tyee, Active, Wireless
and Beatrice, coastwise; Moliere, Van?
couver.
October 12—Malnsplna, Norvan, An-
uucis, Cheerful, coastwise,
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons   -  -    Proprietor
BACK EAST
FOR YOUR H0LIDAY8
TRAVEL
Canadian National
Railways
All Rail or
Lake and Rail
TO
Edmonton, Saskatoon
Winnipeg, Toronto
' Ottawa, Montreal
Quebec, Halifax
and other Eastern Canada and
United States points.
CHOICE OF ROUTES
EXCELLENT SERVICE
E. W. BICKLE, Agent,
CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
will assist you In arranging details, quote lowest fares, make
reservations, etc.
Patient: "You told me to put my
tongue out, doctor, hut you have not
looked at it."
Doctor: "No, ma'am. I merely
wanted time to write your prescription."
" Something Different"
THE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF HOLY TRINITY
, CHURCH, CUMBERLAND
will- hold a
Hallowe'en    Frolic
(Something Different, Embracing Xew and Novel' Stunts)
On MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, in the Church Hall, 8.30 to 1
There will be Dancing, Music and all kinds of old-time Hallowe'en
Frolics indulged in.   Come and hnve a good time—and bring a friend.
Gents, $1; Ladles, SO cents,   itel'rcslimcnts Included.

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