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The Cumberland Islander Nov 4, 1922

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TSJ" CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
^y    ■ WMfc  ss.hl.sk   lis  ssimssolMabrf  th.    r.assWrlss.J  V—.
With whteh U consolidated the  Cuberlud Newt.
FOR1Y-FIR8T YEAR—No. 44
CUMBERLAND, .BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th, 1922
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Cumberland Public School
Report For October
Strathcona  Shield — Div. I, 99.13%.
School, 96.7%.
DIV.. I—Teacher, Alb. H. Webb.   No.
on' roll, 29.   Percentage attendance,
99.13.   Lates, 5.
HONOR ROLL
Drusllla Wilson, 72%; Margaret
Roblnaon, 72%; Edith O'Brien, 69%;
Arnold Macdonald, 69%; Elizabeth
Cunlllfe, 69%; Caroline Gozzano,
69%; Elizabeth Horbury, 67%; Leslie
Merrifield, 66%; Onesto Freloni, 66%;
Ella Burns, 66%.
Entrance Pupils. — " Never Absent,
Never Late."
Alexander Bevis, Josephine Bono,
Wm. Brown, Ella Burns, Dick Choe,
Alex. Clark, Elizabeth Cunlllfe, Marjorie Grant, Mabel Jones, Arnold Macdonald, Ernest Macdonald, Leslie
Merrifield, Olga Owen, Vera Picketti,
John Richardson,' Margaret Robinson.
Norman Roblnaon, John Strachan.
DIV.   II—Teacher,   George  B.  Apps.
Junior and Senior Fourth Reader.
No. on roll, 36; Percentage 94.73;
Lates, 1.
Perfect attendance: Lillian Banks.
William Bennie, George Brown, Evelyn Carey, Priscilla Cloutier, Mary
Conn, Leslie Dando, Archie Dick, Albert Gomm, Norman Gomm, Thelma
Gray, Jack Hill, May Hughes, Walter
Hughes, Toshiko Iwasa, Tom Little,
Rosle Manlncor, Edna Smith, Winnie
Young.
HONOR ROLL
Senior Fourth: Toshiko Iwasa,
69%; Priscilla Cloutier, 66%; Rosi?
Manlncor, 66%;.
Junior Fourth: Mary Conn, 60%;
May Hughes, 60%; Walter Hughes, 66.
DIV.  Ill—Teacher,  M.  E.  Beckwith.
Senior Grade, First Year.   No. on
roll,    31;    Attendance    percentage
96.9; No. ot lates, 6.
Perfect attendance: Isao Abe, Norman Bateman, Irene Bates, Elizabeth
. Bates, Jack Bird, Janet Bogo, Sam
Davis, Charles Enricl, Mary Gozzano,
Jessie Grant, Johnny Lockner, Victor
Marinelli, Dorothy Maxwell, George
McLellan, William Mossey, Ruth
Oyama, Jean Peters, George Raga,
Margaret Richardson, William Stant,
Marguerite Struthers, Chas. Walker,
Gordon Walker.
HONOR ROLL
Jessie Grant, 74%; Charles Enricl.
71%; Irene Bates, 68%; Sam Davis,
64.7%; Isao Abe, 64.3%; Marguerite
Struthers, 03%.
DIV. IV—Teacher, Mrs. M. H. Pearse.
Fourth Term Intermediate.   No. on
Roll, 28; Percentage 98.41; No. of
lates, 3.
Perfect attendance: Peter Bardes-
sono, Victor Bono, Ella Conn, Kathleen Cooke, Joe Ducca, Norman Hill,
Shigeo Kawagucki, How Low, Reno
Peretto, Josephine Plrizzini, Toshio
Yamamura, Annie Beveridge, Andrew
Brown, Harold Conrad, Edna Caw-
dell, Lena GaleazzI, Jack Horbury,
Lllah Lewis, Man Low, Emma Pickettl.
John Sweeney, Wilfred Colling.
HONOR ROLL
Kathleen Cooke, Ella Conn, Chas
Tobacco, Edna Cowdell, Lena GaleazzI, Josephine Plrizzini.
DIV.   V.—Third   Term   Intermediate.
Teacher, A. J. Colman.   No. on roll,
34;  Percentage, 96.09;  lates, 6.
Perfect attendance: Sadukl Asao,
Willie Bergland, Eleanor Bergland,
Mary Clark, Reggie Davis, Eleanor
Davis, Kathleen Emily, Margaret
Hughes, Charles Macdonald, Mah
Shun, Dick Marpole, Yaye Nagal.
Sarah Oyama, Fusayo Suglmorl,
Fusayo Suglmorl, Sakayo Suglmorl,
Bert McLellan.
HONOR  ROLL
Eleanor Bergland, Margaret Hughes,
Mah Shun, Agnes Bruce, Tadashl Doi,
Norma Parnham.
DIV. VI—Third   Term   Intermediate.
Teacher, Marjorie Mordy.    No. on
roll, 44; Percentage, 93; lates, 6.
Perfect attendance: Jean Braes,
James Brown, Robert Bums, Fred
Cswdell, Robert Colling, Fee Leung,
Norman Freloni, Margaret Gibson,
/'Ian Glen, Klshio Kaga, Sarah Lawrence, Lem Jum, Alex. MacDonald,
Lena Merletti, Dorothy Redmond,
Margaret Salmon, Sbizue Tahara,
Charlotte Stant, Mary Sweeney, Annie
Walker, Doris Waterfield, Jackie Wat-
eon, Josephine Wolsh.
HONOR  ROLL
Jackie MacLean, Jean Johnston,
Klshio Kaga, Sarah Lawrence, Nor-
ma rrbfctoi, Mary Sweeney.
DIV. VII—First Term Intermediate.
Teacher, M. C. Bannerman.   No. on
roll, 34; Percentage, 92.78; lates, 6.
Perfect attendance: Willie Allara,
Jean Brown, Isabel Brown, Beatrice
Cavallero, Norma Frost, Hazel Gibson, Mary Jackson, Sadako Iwasa,
Yoshlo Kawaguchi, Chlyeko Kija-
yama, Mildred Lockner, Edison Mann,
Jemina Mitchell, Margaret McDonald,
Kathleen O'Brien, Hitoshi Suglmorl,
Minora Tahara, Victor Tomassl,
HONOR  ROLL
Isabel Brown, Norma Frost, Katn
leen O'Brien, Mary Jackson, Rena
Bonora, Chiyeko Kijayama.
DONATIONS
Sandwick Cemetery Fund.
DIV. VIII—Junior Grade. Teacher, I.
McFadyen. No. on roll, 48; Percentage, 94.41; lates, 6.
Perfect attendance: George Bird,
Rudl, Bonora, Annie Brown, May
Brown, Josie Burgheimer, John
Coombs, John Davis, Alven Freloni,
Dorlno GaleazzI, Dorothy Gordon,
Low Hong, Mary Mah, Ellen McDonald, Hugh McNeil, -Tom Mossey,
Tokio Nakano, Bessie Nicholas, Delina Peretto, Kitty Prior, Willie
Shearer, May Smith, George Strachan,
Willie Sweeney, Rosina Thompson,
Tom Tobacco, Lena Tomassl, Nellie
Walker, Elsie Waterfield, Violet
Zanlnl.
HONOR ROLL
1 Mary Mah, 2 Rudl Bonora, 3 Nellie
Walker, 4 Dan Lee and Violet Zanlnl,
6 Hugh Braes, 6 Kitty Prior.
DIV.   IX—Teacher,   Edith   Horbury.
No. on roll, 41; Percentage, 96.78;
lates, 7.
Perfect attendance: Esther Allara,
John Burgheimer, Catherine Brown.
Olga Bonora, May Beveridge, Mollle
Cooke, Tommy Conrad, Irene Davis,
Cyril Davis, Alden Francesinl, Donald
Graham, Doris Hannay, Cazuko
Iwasa, Takeru Kawagauchi, Second
Merletti, Eunice MacKinnon, Ellen
Morrison, Hlsako Nakano, Muriel
Partridge, Jacky Patttnson, Viola
Reese, Margaret Smith, Bernice Stant,
Mary Small, Edna Watson, Hatsue
Matsukurn, Norlo Herose.
HONOR ROLL
1 Nina Shields, 2 Hilda Anderson,
3 Cazuko Iwasa, 4 Takeru Kawagauchi, 6 Mollle Cooke and Muriel
Partridge.
DIV. X—Junior Grade. Teacher, C.
Richardson. No. on roll, 36; Percentage, 95.58; lates, 0.
Perfect attendance: Irving Banks,
Quou Chong, Marlon Coombs, Foo
Lung Chow, Willie Graham, Sidney
Hunt, Chow Him, Alfred Jones; Jamie
Joe, Jennie Lawrence, Bobby Marshall, Mary MacMillan, Masao Naghi,
Bennie Nicholas, Hlroshi Okuda, Irene
Oyama, Christina Small, Chijako
Suginiori, Masalu Sora, Malia Tomassl, Archie Welsh, Joe Whyley, Dick
Yeun, Shijeura Yazauchi, Alice
Taylor, John Zanlnl.
HONOR ROLL
Jamie Joe, Chow Kee, Chow Him,
Quon   Chong,   Alfred  Jones,   Jennie
Lawrence.
DIV.   XI—Teacher,   H.   I.   Harrison.
No. on roll, 36; percentage, 91.09;
lates, 3.
Perfect attendance: Richard Bates,
Lola Biggs, William Brown, John
Dunyluk, May Graham, Fung Him,
Walter Hunt, Hideo Imasko, Takeshi
lyein, Mnsalte Kaga, Susumo Kawagauchi, Clyde Lewis, Gertrude Mann,
Jackie Marpole, David Marshall, Akea
Mutsunnga, Klkuye Nlskikawa, Bryson Parnham, George Salto, Mary
Sniiduluk, Muriel Thompson, Harvey
Hurd.
HONOR ROLL
Gertrude Mann, John Earl Banner-
man, Bryson Parnham, Fung Him.
Harvey Hurd, Mary Sanduluk.
The Manse, lake Trail.
Courtenay, Nov. 2nd, 1922.
Previously    acknowledged   in
Islander, Oct 21st  ....1 80.00
Mrs.   Ledgerwood      2.00
Mr. J. McPhee      26.00
Mr. A. Hogg     6.00
Mr. Geo. A. A. Robinson     5.00
Mrs. M. S. McQuillan      2.00
Total subscribed  .$119.00
(Rev.) Walter T. Beattie.
SPECIAL SUBSCRIPTION
OFFER.
A special Club offer Is being Bade
for a short time of the Family Herald
and Weekly Star and ihe Cumberland
Islander for a period of one year for
12.90. The Islander alms to give all
the news of the district for the week
In the most attractive form possible.
The Fa-ally Herald and Weekly Star
Is well known «U over Cauda for the
world-wide news aid valuable Information that ls contained ln Ms seventy
odd pages every week.
Dont miss this opportunity to get
two good papers for the price of one.
Hallowe'en Celebration Huge Succes
DIV.     XII—First    Reader,     Senior,
Primary   Grade.     Teacher,   J.   E.
Robertson.    No. on roll,  37;   percentage, 95.07;   lates, 4.
Perfect  attendance: William Clou-
thler,   Charles   Gomm,   Chow   Ho?,
Charlotte   Hoffelnz,   Harold   Hughes,
David Hunden, Manabl Iyeirl, Chang
King, Dong Leong, Ollie Lyunggren,
Leslo   Mah,   Mah   Lon,   Hah   Wool,
nichard Marshall, Insugno Matsukurn,
(Continued on page 8).
.Tlio action of the Police Commissioners are very commendable ln allowing Chief of Police A. J. Merry to
take nn active part as leader in tho
Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society, and Is appreciated by the citizens ot Cumberland.
The Holy Trinity Church Choir
Hold a Most Enjoyable Frolic
—Proceeds Devoted to Organ
Fund.
There is perhaps no night In the
year which popular imagination has
stamped with a more peculiar character than the evening of October 31
known as "All Hallow's Eve" or
"Hallowe'en." Such ls the description
of Hallowe'en given ln the "Book of
Days." Many parties and Hallowe'en
celebrations were held in the district
on Tuesday evening.
The "Frolic" held at the Anglican
Church ball under the auspices of the
Holy Trinity Church choir, lived up
to, if not surpassed, the one held last
year. The hall had been tastefully
decorated for the occasion, the recognized symbols of Hallowe'en forming the base of all the. decorations.
Mr. A. H. Webb had charge ot the
entertainment In the early part ot the
evening, which was devoted to glees,
games, competitions, etc., all of which
were thoroughly enjoyed by the many
people present. The competition, pining   the   cat's   tail   on,   blindfolded,
caused quite a lot of fun, tbe prises
being won by Miss Margaret Robinson, flrst, and Mrs. Fraser Watson,
second.
Hat old, old dance, "Sir Roger de
Coverley," brought the first portion ot
the evening to an end, after which re
freshments were served.
Dance Largely Attended.
After refreshments, the room was
cleared and dancing to music supplied
by Mr. R. Robertson, piano; Mr. Mc-
QuinesB, violin, and "Toots" Plump,
drums, waB indulged in. Promptly at
12 midnight, the hall was darkened
and the proverbial Hallowe'en ghost
made his appearance, (but did not
stay* long, evidently wanting to get
back to the spirits). The dance was
continued until 1 a.m., thus bringing
to a close a most enjoyable-evening.
M.uch credit for the success of the
evening was due to the untiring efforts
of the entire choir, consisting ot:
Mrs. Mumford, Mrs. Robinson, Mrs.
Mann, Mrs. Bryan, Mrs. Pickard,
Mrs. Leversedge, Mrs. Finch, Mrs.
Hewlett, and Messrs. Webb, Mumford,
Walton, Finch, Apps, and young Harry
Webb.
Greek Candy Makers
Arrested For Fraud
COMOX DISTRICT
TEACHERS
ELECT OFFICERS
The annual meeting of the Comox
District Teachers' Association was
held ln the Anglican Hall on Saturday, Oct. 14th. The following olllcers
were elected:
President—C. B. Wood, B.A.
Vlce-presidente — Miss  Dougan and
Mr. Wallis.
Sec-Treasurer—A. H. Webb.
Committee — Miss   Dalton   and   G.
Stubbs.
Mr. Webb, of the Cumberland Public School, gave a demonstration on
the teaching of music ln school, which
was well received by those present
This was followed by a social hour
and refreshments, when the teachers
ot the district were the guests of the
Cumberland statf.
A convention of teachers will be
held at Courtenay on Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 10th and 11th, for the
reading and discussion of papers on
subjects of vital Interest to the conduct of the schools and the well-being
ot the pupils. Schools in the district
are allowed by the Department of
Education to be closed to allow teachers to attend this Post-Normal course.
The teachers will be pleased to see
any trustees or others interested in
the children, at the convention.
Surprise Party for
Mrs. Wnddlngton.
A surprise party of considerable interest took place In tho G. W. V, A.
Hall on Wednesday evening In honor
ol Mrs. Waddlngton, who Is leaving
Cumberland In the near future to take
up her residence at Cassidy, B. C.
Tho nodal evening was arranged by
the Ladies' Auxiliary of the G. W. V.
Association. At the conclusion of a
vory pleasant evonln, dainty refreshments were served. Mrs. Waddlngton
was presented with a handsome hand-
painted china bon-bon dish.
• •
• *I5.WI AND tSO.00 CASH •
• •
• The   posters   advertising  the •
• O. W. V. A. Masquerade Ball, •
• announce that the prizes for •
• the Best   Group, representing •
• the Allies, 4 or more, and tho •
• Best Comic Group, 3 or more, •
• will be $20.00 and $15.00 Value •
• respectively.    This should be •
• $20.00    and     $15.00    CASH. •
• Friends  are  asked  to  make •'
• this wldoly known as possible •
• •
G|.W.V.A.NOTES.
November 11th — Armistice Day —
will be commemorated throughout the
Empire as " Poppy Day." In this town
popples will be on sale on that day;
proceeds will be devoted to the use ot
disabled veterans and their dependents.
Ab stated In our last week's notes,
these popples are made by disabled
comrades. We again ask your kindly
help and sympathy ln making this
"Poppy Day" as successful as last
year.
We are glad to state that arrangements are being made by tbe principals and teachers of the Public and
High Schools to assist In disposing of
these poppies.
Do your share.—Wear a Flanders
poppy In honor of the men who fought
so bravely and In memory ot those
who lie amid the crosses.
It ls interesting to note that our
comrades of the British Legion have
undertaken to distribute over twenty
million of popples In the British Isles,
proceeds to be devoted to Earl Halg's
fund for disabled soldiers.
Let us not forget that Armistice
Day is a day of rejoicing. The poppy
Is a note' of remembrance for the comrades who gave their lives that the
nation might rejoice on Armistice
Day.
The poppy Is the emblem of sacrifice
—wear one.
We wlBh to correct an error ln our
prize list for the masquerade ball.
Two Items as follws:
Best group representing Allies, four
or more, should read $20.00 cash
prize, not "value $20.00."
Best comic group, three or more,
should read $15.00 cash, not value.
Will comrades and friends kindly
make this widely known.
To (ihe a Lantern Lecture.
After the evening service of Sunday,
November 12th, the Rev. Kinney will
give a lantern lecture In Grace Methodist Church. For further particulars
watch The Islander.
St. George's Presbyterian Church.
Special anthemB by the choir: "The
Lord Is His Name"; "I Will Magnify
Thee." Special solos: Miss Crawford, of Union Bay, Miss Jessie MacDonald, lately of Toronto, by special
request will sing "The Holy City."
Subject of discussion: "Health and
Religion."
Thanksgiving   Service.     Everybody
wolcome.   Como and give thanks.
If Uver'tv, Cumberland, beVe  «_
ft* It thtta-20% OS.
Arrest of Rigas and Antipas
Leads to Unfolding Series
of Frauds on Banks.
During the past week the bank
frauds perpetrated upon the local
banks and other centres ot the Island,
are astonishing ln the least, ln which
Geraslmos J. Lambrinos, as he was
known here, plays a prominent part.
He arrived tn Cumberland about
March of tbls year and secured a position with the Royal Candy Company
of Dunsmuir Avenue, as cook, of
which Jerry G. Antipas was the owner.
Mr. Lambrinos severed his connection wltb the Royal Candy Company
about two months ago, wben
Richards & Wain purchased the business. During that period the whereabouts of George J. Rlgas, alias Lambrinos has been uncertain, but apparently he appeared on the scene on
Thursday, Oct 23rd, and presented a
draft to the local branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce tor $276.00,
supposed to be issued at the Commercial National Bank of Vallejo, California, and drawn on tbe Hanover
National Bank, of New York. He gave
the name of George J. Rlgas to Mr.
J M. Kent, the manager of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, here. The
draft had every appearance of being
genuine, and was cashed. Lambrinos
deposited $85 to his account, and taking $190 in cash. He proceeded to the
Royal Bank of Canada and presented
a similar draft, answering to the name
of Mr. Lambrinos, as be waB known to
Mr. T. A. McCarthy, the manager. A
draft for $275 was cashed, again depositing $85 to his account and taking
$190 in cash. Mr. Kent, ot the Bank
of Commerce, appears on the scene,
and hears Mr. McCarthy, of the Royal
Bank, call him Lambrinos. "Why,"
he says, "that man gave me the name
ot Rigas, and cashed a dratt for $275."
Then the managers of the two banks
egan to think there was something
wrong and commenced to investigate,
with the result tbat George J. Rlgas,
alias Lambrinos, was arrested in
Victoria.
(From last Sunday'B Colonist).
As swift and daring a series of.bank
frauds as was ever attempted ln the
province was brought to book in the
Police Court yesterday, the police
authorities allege, when George J.
Rigas, alias Lambrinos, and Jerry
Antipas, Greek candy makers of tlila
city and Cumberland, were charged
before Mr. W. W. Northcott, J.P., with
fraudulently obtaining money from
the local branches of the Dominion
Bank and the Bank of Toronto, by
uttering forged drafts on banks In the
United States. The accused were remanded until Monday.
Back of these specific charges is
the story of an extraordinary succession of bank victimizations extending
along the route of the Island Highway
from Courtenay to Victoria, according
to the allegations of the police. A
warrant for the arrest of Lambrinos,
issued on the Information of the
manager of the Cumberland branch of
the Royal Bank of Canada, was already in the hands of the Up-Island
Provincial Police officers before thc
accused, as the result of prompt work
by local olllcers of tbe Provincial and
city forces, were arrested here late on
Friday afternoon.
Charges already laid or pending
against the men, In respect of tlieir
alleged operations In this city, charge
them with obtaining amounts from
local banks as follows:
From the Dominion Bank, $109;
Bank of Toronto, $350; Canadian
Bank of Commerce, $359.40; Royal
Bank of Canada, $200.95; Union Bank
of Canada, $172.
These sums, it Is alleged, were all
obtained wltbin a few hours, last Friday, following the arrival of the men
in this city from Cumberland; and
after they bad practiced a similar acl
of fraud en route, in Cumberland,
Courtenay, Nanaimo and Duncan.
Modus Operandi.
The specific details of the charges
laid In the Police Court supply the
clue to the method of operation which
the police authorities will allege were
practiced, at any rate by Lambrinos.
Antipas' sbaro in the game, If any,
Is not yet clear; and ho asserted in
the Police Court yesterday that all
ho knew of the matter was that he
had driven LambrlnoB from Cumberland to this city.
It Is alleged that the forged instruments purported to bo drafts by tho
VUlUit Co'mmWclal Bank; Of Vallojd,
California, upon the Hanover National
Bank of New York. The bank officials
have reported to the police that Lambrinos had deposited a small amount
to his credit in each of the banks
victimized. His method, as alleged, Is
Illustrated by one instance, In which
he is said to have tendered a draft for
a sum in the neighborhood ot $900;
and to have deposited $600 of it ln the
bank, and takeu the rest In cash. In
this way, it is said, the banks have
been defrauded to the tune of $1,900.
Lambrinos bad $1,100 in currency
upon his person when he was arrested
here, on Yates Street, by Chief ot
Police John Fry. On the receipt of
reports from Cumberland, the city
police notified the local banks; and
while lt was too late to prevent the
operations ln the banks mentioned,
officials of the Imperial Bank, on
Yates Street, were able to Identify
Lambrinos when he appeared there
and to hold him ln conversation until
the police made the arrest •
Changed Large Notes.
Of Antipas lt Is alleged tbat he is
known to have changed Canadian currency of various denominations lato
$1,000 of United States currency and
two Canadian notes of $500 each. As
against this allegation is the fact that
Antipas had only $300 in his pockets
when arrested.
Antipas was arrested by Provincial
Police Constables Owens and Mc-
Pball, on the Gorge Road, as he was
making his way by car back to Cumberland, i The alarm was given in this
city by the local office of the Provincial Police, on tbe receipt of a report
trom Cumberland tbat a warrant for
the arrest of Lambrinos had been Issued there. Co-operation between the
local Provincial and city officers resulted in the two arrests within a few
hours.
Antipas told Mr. Northcott that he
would have no difficulty In proving
his innocence. It Is known that he
has operated a candy store ln Cumberland for some time. Lambrinos
has been employed ln Victoria as a
candy-maker; and It Is alleged that
he left here last Wednesday and went
tc Cumberland. The entire series of
frauds, according to the police officers, was contrived last Friday, in the
course of the motor trip of the two
men from Cumberland to this city,
In which they arrived about noon.
(From Tuesday's Colonist).
Antipas Admitted to $£,000 Ball.
George J. Rlgas, alias Lambrinos,
and Jerry Antipas, Greek candy
makers, of Cumberland and this city,
charged on five counts wltb uttering
forged cheques upon Ave different
banks of the city, appeared on remand
before Magistrate Jay yesterday, and
elected for trial ln a higher court
Mr. Frank Higgins, K.C., appeared for
the defence.
Speaking to the question of ball,
which was applied for by Mr. Higgins,
ir. behalf of Antipas, City Prosecutor
Harrison said that it would be necessary to show, either by evidence taken
on commission in California, or by
bringing witnesses from that state,
that the drafts purporting to be Issued
by the Commercial Bank of Vallejo,
California, on the Hanover National
Bank of New York, were all forgeries.
The prosecution would allege, said
.Mr. Harrison, that Antipas had as-
sited in the forgeries; that he had
changed some of the money obtained
by means of the frauds; and that he
had previously served a term of Imprisonment on a conviction of theft.
There would be evidence enough to
Justify the magistrate In committing
Antipas for trial, Mr. Harrison asserted.
Mr. Higgins said that aB far as the
specific charges were concerned there
was no evidence that Antipas had
uttered any of the notes in question.
The accused had a candy business in
Cumberland, and was known in this
city. There would be no difficulty ln
arranging ball for a substantial
amount; and counsel submitted that
Antipas should be admitted to bail.
Mr. Higgins would not apply for ball
In behalf of LambrlnoB, he said.
Maglstrote Joy fixed ball for AntipaB
In the Bum of $5,000, In two sureties
of $2,500 each, and remanded both of
the accused until to-morrow.
Tlie Special Harvest Thanksgiving
sorvlco nt tho Methodist Church on
Sunday next win i,0 worth attending
by all who are fond of bright congregational singing, as tho Orchestral
Society will accompany the hymns
with instrumental music. TWO
THE  CUMBERLAND,  ISLANDER
SAjTPRDA^, *N£,VI!sMBEs,R j\th, 1^22
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LET'S GO!
WHERE?
To the Cumberland G.W.V.A.
4th Annual
MASQUERADE
BALL
To be held in the Ilo-Ilo Hall
Cumberland on
Friday, Nov. 10th
Commencing at 9 p.m. - Grand March at 10.30 prompt
5-Piece Orchestra in attendance
PRIZE   LIST
Best Dressed Lady Cash $15.00, Value $5.00
Best Dressed Gent Cash $15.00, Value $5.00
Best National, Lady Cash $5.00, Value $5.00
Best National, Gent Cash $5.00, Value $5.00
Best Sustained Lady Cash $3.00, Value $5.00
Best Sustained Gent Cash $3.00, Value $5.00
Best Group representing Allies, 4 or more, Cash $20.00
Best Comic Group, 3 or more  Cash $15.00
Best Comic Lady Value $8.00
Best Comic Gent  Value $8.00
Best Red Cross Nurse Value $6.00
Best Hobo Value $5.00
Best Clown Value $6.50
Best Advertising Character  Value $6.50
Best Flower Girl Value $5.75
Prize-Waltz, Lady $5.00, Gent $5.00
(Entrance fee for Prize Waltz, 50 cents.)
TOMBOLA PRIZES FOR SPECTATORS
Only those in Masquerade Costume allowed on Floor
until after Grand March.
Gents in Costume $1.00
Ladies in Costume .50c
Spectators  .50c
GRAND   DRAWING
will take place on night of Masquerade.
Tickets now on sale at 	
J. SUTHERLAND
GENTS*  FURNISHINGS
—Agent for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
on Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' and Gents'
Wearing Apparel, Household Furnishings, etc. Drop ln and see Mr. Sutherland, our Agent in Cumberland, who
will advise you on any work you wlah
to have done.
Onr   Work   and   Service
Will   Please  Yuu   t:    It
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, II. ('.       :      Phone 8802
WHY BABIES CRY
It's often hard to find tbe trouble
—It may be teeth —it may be
stomach—but oh I so often it is
just a chafed irritated skin on
which poor Soap has been used.
The remedy for this is so simple!
Hours of suffering—night after
night of disturbance—have been
avoided by mothers, who have
insisted on—Baby's Own Soap.
Of course it costs a little more,
a very little more, however—
than what is often bought and
used—but four generations of
Canadian Mothers are there to
vouch for its purity, for the
soothing healing effect on Baby's
delicate skin, for the lovely pure
flower fragrance it leaves when
Baby fresh and clean is taken
from his bath.
Don't you think, Madam, it's worth
paying the 15c. a cake, a little less il
you buy a box (3 cakes) which your
aealerasks for Baby's Own Soap. Adv.
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Ne^s Of Campbell River
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
10c. |
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil
Wonderful Offer
If you want to get the Best Magazines on the Market,
take advantage of this Wonderful Offer. Take your
choice of one of the four following:
The Youth's Companion  $2.50i A_       _
McCall's   Magazine   1.00 JkV (III
Thc  Islander   2.00J ",U'VU
The Youth's Companion  $2.50'| _
Pictorial Review  1.50 - $Q 9^
Tho  Islander  2.00! V*J.tUU
The Youth's Companion  $2.50]
Modern Priscilla*  2.00l d»Q Br
* Add 2.1c. for Canadian Postage                   [ tj)sOs> I tj
The  Islander   2.00)
The Youth's Companion  $2.50]
Woman's Home Companion  1.501 (JJC Wp»
American Magazine   2.50f* ty<d. i *J
The  Islander r.  2.00J
Don't Delay.—Send application in as early as possible
The Cumberland Islander
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
iw^iWi.^^^m.'A^^mt^ii^i^^^
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietor
tmr
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e •: other less nourishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit il
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
Wood for Sale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Any Length Requhed
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
W.T.GOARD
PIANO TCNER
Factory Experience
Leave Orders1 at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland and Courtenay,
A BBAtT N1CHT.
A farewell dance and a HaUowe'en
celebration ln honor ot the Sutherland
brothers was the attractive program
that brought over a hundred people to
Forbes' Landing on Saturday evening
last. It may be said that there are
tew places on Vancouver Island where
one can have a better time and be
more hospitably entertained than the
popular resort managed and owned by
Mr. and Mrs. "Jimmy" Forbes at the
lower end of Lower Campbell lake.
Every Fall, the Sutherland boys,
brothers of Mrs. Forbes, betake themselves to the "tall timber" to trap the
fur-bearing animals that roam the
great uninhabited country lying to the
westward of Forbes' Landing, and do
not emerge till the early months ot
Spring. The celebration on Saturday
evening was partly on the old order
and partly given over to the younger
elements with their fox-trots and one-
steps, while the old-timers made free
with their limbs In the more strenu
ous "eights" an,d Highland flings,
Catching tho flying apple and diving
for the fruit, and other Hallowe'en
customs, were followed with keen Interest and enjoyment by the guests
Speeches, songs aud recitations were
also on the programme. The story
of "Ye Olden Days at Campbell
River," and other outposts of civilization, by Mr. George Verdler, the well
known timber cruiser, was especially,
Interesting and edifying to all thosi
present on this occasion. Mr. George
Wise, ex-Councillor of Esquimalt, wa:
a prime favorite when he appeared nr
the stage and sang many old-time
songs. Mr. Wise possesses a very
fine voice und has contributed largel>
to the success of many entertainments held ln the district during the
past two months. Mr. Ed. Masters
was another line singer, and was applauded and encored frequently. The
music for the dancing was provided
by our local Dawson-Brunton orchestra and was quite equal to any-
ThanksgivingConcert
Under the Auspices of the
Ladies of St. George's Presbyterian Church
will be held on
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 6th, 1922
8 p.m. sharp. ,
PROGRAMME :
1. Piano Solo Selected Miss C. Bird
2. Song  (a) " Temple Bells " Mr. Carr
(b) " Less Than the Dust."
3. Reading " Fate of Charlotte Russe "
Miss Eleanor Bergland
4. Song " Love's Coronation " Mrs. Tribe
5. Reading " Things in the Bottom Drawer "
Mrs. Perizzine
6. Song  " Beyond " *.  Mrs. Crawford
7. Reading  Selected Mr. Armbister
8. Song   Selected   Mrs. Tribe
9. Violin Solo Selected Mr. Walker
10. Song " For All Eternity ".. Miss J. McDonald
11. Reading Seltced Mr. Armbister
12. Song Selected Mr. Spittall....
13. Duet " Watchman, What of the Night"
Miss Crawford and Mr. Carr
"GOD SAVE THE KING"
Collection at the Door.
■——^^—8——■g-gnSSSSSSJUSSSSS.—S— I II
NOW
That the Winter Evenings are approaching is the
TIME
to instal in your home one of our New and Latest
Grafonolas
Will exchange your old machine or give you a new one
FR0M $60.00 up
ON EASY TERMS
Have our representative call and demonstrate to you.
MARSHALL MUSIC
CUMBERLAND AND COURTENAY
thing in the same line imported trom
time to time from other localities,
One ot the outstanding features of thf!
evening was ths very exc^Jlent supper
provided by Mrs. Forbes, wha ls renowned throughout the district for
ability to successfully cater to the
most critical ln the food line. All
those who attended this great Hallowe'en celebration at "Jimmy's" are loud
lu their praise ot the splendid manner
In which the function was carried out.
WELL-KNOWN PIONEER DEAD.
Mr. "Jack" Bryant, one of the best
'mown men In this part ot the country
and a pioneer of Valdez Island, died
nn Saturday morning last at his old
homestead on that Island. British
Columbia owes much to such men as
the late Mr. Bryant, who have ln the
early days blazed the trail and car-
lied civilization to the furthermost
ends of the world. Coming to Valdes
Island over thirty years ago, accompanied by Mrs. Bryant, the pioneer
quickly made a home for himself and
his hard-working partner, and has
since prospered well on the fertile
soil for which the Island Is famed.
The hundreds of loggers who have at
various times worked in this locality
have often partaken of the generous
hospitality of the popular couple, and
In a great many cases of sickness and
accident these men have received that
"first aid" that has frequently saved
their lives. Mrs. Bryant has been
identified with every movement thnt
has been started on Valdez Island for
Its benefit and has worked unceasingly for all pralsworthy objects. Besides his widow, Mr. Bryant leaves behind him to mourn his loss two sous,
William and Richard, and a daughter,
Mrs. Frank Gagne, of Quathiaski
Cove. The funeral, which took place
on Sunday afternoon, was attended
by a very large crowd, showing the
esteem in which the deceased was
held by all classes of people living in
these parts.
HOME AGAIN.
Mr. Cecil Fitzgerald, son of Mr. and
Mrs. C. E. Fitzgerald, of Campbell
River, arrived home on Thursday last
from Ireland, where he has attended
school for the past seven years.
CONE TO VAN-ANDA.   v       ,
Mr. C. S. Fitzgerald left on Friday
evening's "Cowichan" for Van-Anda,
where he will supervise the building
of a wharf at that point.
Courtenay Furniture Store i
Come in and see our line of
EASY CHAIRS
Just what you want for these long evenings.
OSTERMOOR   MATTRESSES
are guaranteed for a lifetime.  Why not have one and
a good Coil Spring fitted on your bed,
CONGOLEUM RUGS
fo rany room in the house.   They are made in very
nice patterns.
We Deliver.
Phone 55     tn
C. BROWN, PROPRIETOR
Phone 55
PARENT.TEACHER8' ASSOCIATION
The formation of a Parent-Teachers'
Association at Campbellton recently
will result in much good work being
accomplished by the energetic ladles
who inaugurated the idea. Several
meetings have already been held and
officers elected, besides the formulation of a programme for tbe ensuing
year. Mrs. Fitzgerald has been
elected as president; Mrs. David McDonald, vice-president, and Mrs.
Herbert Pldcock, secretary-treasurer.
I', is worthy of note tbat the above organization has started on the road for
the building, ln the near future, of
a Community hall, and has already
succeeded in securing a site for the
proposed building. Mr. Cobb, president of the International Timber Co.,
on being approached by the ladles,
generously offered them a site which
is most central, and no doubt before
many moons have come and gone the
structure will be an established fact.
POPULAR STAGE MAN
TOURS ISLAND.
Mr. Frank Lalonde, accompanied by
Mrs. Lalonde, started out on Monday
morning on a trip to Victoria and
other interesting points throughout
Vancouver Island. Mr. Lalonde has
put in a strenuous summer keeping
his stages coming and going with express regularity, and feels tbat he ls
due a " let-up" from the continual
grind. It Is to be hoped that Mr. and
Mrs. Lalonde will greatly enjoy their
well-earned holdlay.
HOSPITAL PATIENTS.
Messrs. Henry Tomchuk and James
Butler, of the I. T. Co. camp; Messrs.
King and Dodds, of Menzies Bay; Mr.
J. Sarlstrom and Mr. Broadway, of
Heriot Bay, are at present receiving
treatment at the Campbell River hospital. Mrs. Otto Sachs, of Sayward,
a recent patient, left the hospital on
Friday last. Mr. Hall, of Menzies
Bay, was discharged ou the same day.
RADIO RADIATES.
With the Inauguration of a broadcasting station at Courtenay in a few
weeks, the people living on this end
of Vancouver Island will be enabled
to receive news bulletins every evening, besides "listening in" for the
sweet strains of music that are continually being wafted through the air
hy hundreds of high-class artists in
this country and the United States.
The station at Campboll River picks
up a great number of cities and towns
every ovenlng whose broad-casting
operators are sending but excellent
programme's nightly. SATURDAY, NaVEMl**tER ,4tl\, 1«2
THE  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
4
Basketball i SPORTING NEWS OF THE DISTRICT IBadminton
Football
Etc.
Nanaimo-Cumb&laiid
Game Ends In A Draw
Over two- thousand football enthusiasts were present on the Central
Sports Orotind yesterday to see Nanaimo City and Cumberland, the two
old rivals for football honors, battle
for the full period with neither team
being able to score a goal. The play
during the entire game was very even,
lirst one team would be pressing for
a goal, and then within a few second i
the ball would be at the other end;
the play being fast throughout.
Cumberland had several changes in
their line-up and played the best game
they have put up this season. Fowler
filled the pivot position on the forward
line, while Milligan and Plump were
both back In the game again, and
made up a fast wing. On the defence,
Collier, a new arrival from Toronto,
was in Campbell's place, and Conti
took Kenney's place at centre half.
Nanaimo had their regular team on,
McMillan being In his old place at inside right.
Mr. Quinn acted as referee, and
handled the game in line shape, making both sides play football, and while
many free kicks were given, they were
mostly for minor offences, the game
being one of the cleanest played here
this season.
(From Nanaimo Herald of Monday).
SUNDAY FOOTBALL.
With two football games played
outside the city on Sunday afternoon,
It Is estimated that there were over
two thousand people In attendance at
the Central Sports Grounds to witness
the Cumberlaud-Nanalmo match. It
must be admitted tlmt two thousand
adults constitute a big proportion of
the population of Nanaimo, and this
consideration should, and no doubt
will, have Its due Influence with the
powers that be. It Ib, so far as we
remember, about fourteen or llfteen
years since the Lord's Day Act was
passed. The Western provlncos wore
not consulted in the matter, and for
some time the Act was uot made ap-
llcable to British Columbia. Then
sporting organizations were notified
that they would not be permitted to
charge a regular admission fee for
games played on Sundays, nnd instead
ol a regular gato entrance collections
were taken up. There has boon no
attempt to interfere with this condition ot affairs until the local Board of
Police Commissioners suddenly Issued
an order prohibiting Sunday games on
the Central Sports Grounds. Our advice Is that the commissioners cannot
enforce this order, inasmuch as it Is
perfectly legal to play Sunday games
in which there is no taint of •commercialism. Of course, lawyers differ
just as much as doctors ln their
opinions, und lt would do no horin to
have the legal issue cleared up once
and for all. At the same time, the
attendance at last Sunday's game
uiuBt be taken as a fair reflection of
the feeling nnd attitude of a big proportion of the people of Nanaimo, and
we would suggest that coercive measures of any kind would he out of
place.—Nanaimo Herald.
"A small town," says a Mainland
paper, "is a place where a man who
shines his shoes and puts on his coat
Is osked if he is going to Vancouver
to-day."
WILL DONATE RECEIPTS
OF SUNDAY FOOTBALL
GAME TO CHARITY
The Nanaimo Football Club wish to
announce that the net receipts ot last
Sunday's game with Cumberland will
be divided between local charities.
The club Is taking this action as lt
expects to have good gates during tho
football season on the Central Sports
Grounds, and as the funds permit,
further donations will ne made.—
Nanaimo Herald.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA
Sportsmen and lovers of the outdoors ought to find a lot ot solid
pleasure in their perusal of the November issue of ROD AND GUN IN
CANADA. The usual collection of
stories, articles and features is not
only extensive and generous, as usual,
but it is of particularly high quality
as well. Raymond Thompson is the
author of a thrilling tale, entitled,
"The Scourge of God," while "Mada-
wa'ska" is a charmingly illustrated article that is full of Interest. The departments are all instructive and well-
balanced. A feature ts a complete
table of tho' trapping laws of tlie
provinces of the Dominion, while tlie
Trap Line Department, edited by M.
U. Bates, offers a wealth of valuable
information which the trapper will
not want to miss.
ROD AND GUN IN CANADA is
published monthly at Woodstock, Ont-
tario, by W. J. Taylor, Limited.
Gun Repairing
SHOTGUNS
Re-bored, Re-stocked, Repaired
RIFLES
Overhauled,   Repaired,    Sights
Fitted.
E. T. ELLISON
GUNSMITH
14 Yrs. Old Country Experience
-   Agent for   -
Cleveland, B. S. A. and Paragon
Bicycles.
Complete Line of Accessories
Repairs a Specialty.
COURTENAY, B. C.
Union Hay Head : Opp. Kurd Garage
FOR SALE
AS A GOING CONCERN — 10-ACRK
Farm, well situated on the main
Cumberland - Courtenay Road, IV6
mileB from Courtenay and within 3
minutes walk of Flag Station on C.
C. (D) Ltd. Railway, connectliw
dally with the E. & N. at Royston.
Approximately 4% acres cleared
and cropped and seeded to timothy
snd clover; two acres nearly cleared and balance slashed and burned,
very easy clearing and now seeded
to clover.
Young bearing orchard — apples,
pears, plums and small fruits.
Modern house of 7 rooms. Telephone and water laid on. Two good
wells. Small creek through property. Outbuildings, cow-stable and
barn, woodshed, granary, two chicken houses, pig pen nnd root house;
fenced and cross-fonced. Cow, 40
laying hens, etc.
.Price, $3,600. Tornw: Cash, $1,500,
$400 payable monthly, $1,700 mortgage at Vic
F.  R   FRASER BISCOE,
Phone 64      :      COURTENAY, B. C.
Men Who Played Sunday
Football May Be Tried
NANAIMO.—As a result of the Sunday football controversy, the names ot
about fifty spectators and also of both
Nanaimo and Cumberland football
teams who played here on Sunday,
have been sent to the Attorney-
General by the police authorities, and
it Is understood permission will be
asked to prosecute under the Lord's
Day Act.
The Chevrolet Motor Co. announce
new models replaslng the "490."Beforo buying a car, see Blunt & Ewart
Ltd., local Chevrolet agents, for specl-
cations and prices.
Old Country Rugby Team
Is Ordered Off the Field
LONDON, Oct. 31.—An Incident unprecedented in the history of rugby
occurred on Saturday during the
match between Paignton and Newton
Abbott, early In the second half, when
Paignton was leading by 7 to 0. A
Newton player was ordered off, and
a few minutes later the referee sent
the remainder of the Newton team off,
alleging indiscriminate and deliberate
kicking by the forwards.
Try The Courtenay Garage for Repair Work. Only the beat mechanics
employed.
WE TAKE CARE OF
YOUR BATTERY
Wo see that tliey ure charged and iu
good working order, nnil deliver to
you wlion you want thom. Our Batteries nro Btandhrd nml givo complete
service to enr owners und otliers who
must huvo n Battery that Is dependable.    Also Dry nnd Wot Storage nt
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
Auction Sale
Saturday, November 18th at the
Agricultural Hall and Grounds
Courtenay, at 2 p.m.
Three Automobiles, including Overland, Chevrolet and
Ford. Milk Cows, Saddle Horse, Massey-Harris Mower,
Two Heavy Wagons, and other Farm Implements.
Heating Stoves, Farm Produce, Household Furniture,
etc., etc.
Watch this space for further particulars.
Other Entries Solicited. YOU have something you can
turn into cash !   Something you do hot use.
Full particulars may be obtained from
E FELIX THOMAS
Auctioneer
NOTARY PUBLIC INSURANCE AGENT
Office: Booth Block    :    COURTENAY    :    Tel. 151
House Phone, 24-L.
If you wish to be on my Mailiflg List for Sale Notices,
Phone or Write me your address.
((
a
The Superior Grocers
Where Most People Trade
You have tried
the rest - - ■
NOW try the
best   -   -   -   -
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
"THE SUPERIOR GROCERS."
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
For Results Advertise in The Islander
plllll^: I !i!i!!!ll|[|lll!l!lllill[l![l! 1 i Illllll Illllllllllll I Ill!lll!llt!ll!l
I The
Piket Electric
WE   DO   ELECTRIC  WORK  OF
| EVERY   DESCRIPTION    .:.    .:.
|| Our Stock Comprises of
•=    Lamps of Every Description
HJ Flash Lights and Batteries
g Hot Shots — Hot Shots
H Irons — Toasters — Grills
g Radiant Heaters — Stoves
H Washers on Reasonable Terms
HOUSE WIRING
m    Call 164 at my expense for Information and Estimates
Len D. Piket
COURTENAY
Illllllllllll
■III
HEINTZMAN & CO. LTD., VICTORIA
REMOVAL
SALE
PIANOS
GRAND PIANOS  :  PLAYER PIANOS.  :
ORGANS and PHONOGRAPHS
We will be moving to our New Showrooms early in
November, and in the meantime are making Prices
that should •
CLEAR OUT OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Any person thinking of purchasing an Instrument in
the next six months or year should not fail to take advantage of these bargains.
Suitable Terms Arranged     : :
Full Particulars on Application
Heintzman & Co.
Opposite  Post  Office      ::       ::       ::     VICTORIA
The time was when Chiropractic, a mere infant
with nothing but a pair of lusty lungs, found difficulty
in making itself heard above the roar and tumult of a
busy people. In those days there was little to build on
except a clean-cut, logical idea, which among thousands
of other ideas, attracted little attention.
The world, as is it's wont, said: " Let my neighbor
try it, and if it works, I will use it for myself." Slowly,
very slowly, your neighbor and mine, driven to the last
extremity and given up to die, allowed himself this last
final chance. Was it faith that did the trick ? No 1
It was the last frantic effort of the dying man. And
he was saved. He regained his health, his ambition,
his very life. Did he tell the world ? Alas, too often
he did not. It was a fad, a freak idea, you know, and
for fear of the ridicule of the world he closed his lips
and kept his counsel. But this was not true of all.
Many there were who, with an inherent desire to be of
service to their fellowmen, told of the wonderful experience they had had.
And then the idea began to grow; very slowly at
first, but gaining momentum day by day. The Chiropractic idea has spread with remarkable rapidity, until
to-day many of the greatest minds in the world accept
it as the foremost health-giving science of the age.
Chas. M, Schwab, John D. Rockefeller, Enrico Caruso,
Al. Jolson, Count Tolstoy, are all men who employ the
services of a Chiropractor, and being big men, are not
afraid to say so. Nor are the Chiropractors themselves afraid to advertise and tell the world of the service they have to offer. Do you realize that the Chiropractors of this country are organized and that within
a short time every man, woman and child in Canada
will know of and be talking about this thing which has
grown from the nothing of yesterday into the foremost
Health Science of to-day ? It is no longer an idea
which is ignored and ridiculed. It is a living, vital
truth which your neighbor and mine are reaching out
for. You have in your community a Chiropractor, one
of a vast organization which is educating the Canadian
public. You should know him better. You can no
longer afford to say a thing can't be done, when it is
being done all around you.
E. O. Haukedal, D.C.
Cumberland's Chiropractor
BOOK-KEEPING    AND   ARITHMETIC   CLASSES
will be held in the
CUMBERLAND PUBLIC SCHOOL
ON TUESDAY  EVENINGS AT 7.30 P.M.
Fee: $5.00 the Season. rUUR
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th, 1»22
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER HowaboutyOUrJob?
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th, 1922
The Constant Grind
The old alarm clock buzzes and you
awaken to another dreary morning.
The drip ot the rain In the downspout, the murky clouds and the hazy
dawn all recall you to the fact tha'
you must arise to another day's labor.
We confess that the constant grind
ol every-day duty wears on a man
(and a woman, too, for that matter!
but what are we to do? If we stop
tbe stroke wc shall sink from sight.
Work, and you lessen the reason for
worry and secure for yourself more
comforts.
Work ls service of Boms kind. We
may teach, preach or play for pay-
discount notes, watch for fires, wait
on tables, pull teeth, manage men and
be managed by women, but In any
calling, we are all selling service of
some kind.
We may sell postage stamps, spread
mud, dig dirt, shovel coal, shave
whiskers, huy and sell securities-
sail, trail and trade, print or paint,
rent rooms, mend sinks—ily, fish or
finance—pump the pipe-organ or
scrape a violin—but it Is ail service
of some kind that we are selling.
And no matter what the service may
be, there Is always ahead of us an opportunity for advancement—always,
always. But no person on earth can
hope to advance while watching the
clock or harboring in the heart a bitterness toward his or her Bervice.
True, "the constant grind of everyday duty wears on a man," but being
out of a Job ls much more wearing.
So get up with a smile and go to your
dally grind with a determination to
advance.
A widely-known manufacturer
startled the country before the world
war by announcing that he would
pay his laborers live dollars a day
lor screwing on a bolt or stamping a
sheet of metal.
The employee was to work eight
hours a day doing the same thing
day after day. The factory's product
was rushed by him at regular Intervals and he was allowed just suflicient
lime to do his bit. It is a grind from
ilie time he enters the factory until
lie leaves. He has no time to look up,
no time to think of anything except
i lie bolt he is putting on or the sheet
of metal he Is stamping. He has
job whore they pay him tor being a
part of a gigantic machine that is
speeded up to the limit of production.
Ile lias no opportunity to lease his
talents, The five dollars a day bars
lllm from individual progress. He
has no chance to climb and the Ave
dollars is the smallest item in his life.
Just earning your dally pay is easy,
but every man worth while wants an
opportunity to be interested in his
work.
Seek out the difficult thing to do
Anybody can do an easy Job,
When the management gives you a
trial at some hard job, work like a
nailer to make good, for that is your
Everybody Let Go
The ability to "let go" is a blessing
tbat few people possess. Not letting
things go that should be done? Oh,
dear, no. We all have that weakness
and we all pay for it In later years.
What we mean is learning to "let go"
ol grudges, petty Jealousies, prejudices and delusions. Letting go of
friends who have ceased to be friendly; ot selfish ambitions; habits that
annoy; opinions not founded on ren
son and Justice; memories that generate bitterness and tbe desire to got
even. Learn to "let go" of disappointments, of grievances, of envy-
to let go of all the things and thoughts
tbat make your heart heavy, and that
bring wrinkles. If you must hold
tight to something, hold tight to something pleasant, encouraging, inspiring; hold tight to thoughts and habits
tbat will keep away the wrinkles.
Mottoes by B. J. of Davenport
Rule No. 9—Don't take yourself too
damn seriously.
Be a live wire and you   won't   be
stepped ou.
There's a woman on every dollar.
She makes love only to he who winks
with system and smiles with service.
Mary bad a little lamb, but who
would have known had she not advertised ?
Not—how little, for how much,
But—bow much, for how little.
Unfortunate ls he who is born a
genius. Nobody will believe htm while
he Ib alive. And everybody Is jealous
of him until he dies.
A WINTER SUIT.
A tailored suit of grey duvetyn with
squirrel collar and cuffs, haB perpendicular self strappings on back and
front, extending to the lower edge.
chance.
Better to have a place ln tne
smaller organization qf a growing
business than to be a cog in tbe giant
machine.
The Merry Farmer
If other national groups of labor
would work as the farmer does, our
economic troubles would be over.
About one-third of the American people earn their livelihood on the farm
and this great army of labor works on
faith. He carries all the risks of
weather, heat and cold, of flood and
drought, of storm, of insect pests and
of plant and animal disease. His
wages are not paid regularly every
week or every month. Instead he
must receive his compensation at
Irregular intervals varying from three
months to a year or more, depending
upon the nature of the crop. He must
plant enough to make sure that there
will be food for all wilh Ihe certainty
tbat at the same time In unusually
favorable seasons the result may be a
lar/;o surplus and that this surplus
which cannot lie hidden, probably will
cause prices lower than the actual
cost of production. The farmer must
be willing to accept theso low prices
with the best grace possible and adjust his living expensoB to meet his
reduced Income.
How different Is the farmer's service to humanity from those groups
who think only of themselves and how
they can prollt the most at the expense of the community at large and
especially at the expense of the
farmer who Ib usually the goat. The
farmer is sick and tired of this sort
of business. He sees no reason why
such disputes cannot and should not
be settled In an orderly and lawful
way without the interruptions of service which cost him, and In fact all
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries past were heavy
because the human race did not know how to lighten
them. An enlightened age has gradually brought now
labor-saving devices to assist her—the greatest of
which is the Electic Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features that further reduce women's
burdens, saving time, labor and anxiety.
There is the Protected Element—the Element ia
the burner, where the heat comes from. Like otber
Electric Appliances, the heat is radiated from wire
coils, but the Protected Element snugly encloses these
coils in porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element lasts longer, as acids, moisture and grease
cannot harm it. It heats quickly and holds the heat
long after the power is turned off.
The wonderful seamless, round-cornered Oven—
not a nick or crevice in its smooth, even, impenetrable.
glassy enamelled interior. lAs sanitary as any enameled
interior. As sanitary as any enameled utensil, rust resisting, cleanly. Racks and rack holders removable.
Elements swing on hinges, so that entire surface of
oven is clear for cleaning.
The Oven has a 1% in. insulation around the side
and a 11/j in. magnesia block insulation in the door—
this holds the heat in oven. Roasts and baked foods
retain their full flavor. The result is better baked
foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small element inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven
is on or off.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.
Fuses easily accessible.
FOUR TYPES OF McCLARY'S RANGES
E. S.—E. S. C—D.—and E.—supplied in the immaculately clean battleship grey enameled finish, also black
japan—see all these features—have them
demonstrated to you at
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with thc valves of thc mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, we
therefore wish to point out thnt It is a serious offence to tamper
wilh such valves, nnd should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Decreased   Rates  on
FIRE INSURANCE
Insure with The Western Assurance Co.
District Agent for Courtenay and Cumberland
I    FREDERICK FIELD
§j     P. O. Box 253   :   COURTENAY, B. C.   :   Phone 53
I
P^iifNiiiiiiiiiiKii!:;;,;;;!!!!!^!!!!!;:;!;!! liiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij
Special Showing this Week
House Furnishings Department
Special Values in Scrims, Plain.   Hemstitched and Lace-Bordered Voiles.
Frilled Spot Muslins and Madras Muslins in White and Ecru from 75c to $1.50 a yard
54-inch Colored Madras Muslins from $1.25 to $1.90.
Extra Special Value in Colored sScrims for Side Curtains at 60 cents per yard.
36-in. Figured Terry Cloth, Shadow Cloths, Cretones, Art Sateens, Chintzs, Armure
and Tapestry Furniture Coverings, Tapestry Curtains and Table Covers.
A COMPLETE STOCK OF FURNITURE   IN   ALL   LINES   AT   THE
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES
Men's Department
Newest Fall Styles in Men's and Boys' Overcoats and Ulsters.   Belted Styles and
Young Men's Form-fitting Styles, from $22.50 to $32.60.
Special Values in Men's Brown and Black Calf-skin Shoes.   Regular 17.60.   Special
Sale   $5.90
Men's Regal Shirts in the Newest Patterns and Fabrics.   The Best Dress Shirt at
Popular Prices.
Special Values in Men's Light-striped Flannel Shirts, with Collar attached and detachable coltar.   Special Value $3.50
CAMPBELLS'
CUMBERLAND
Ho=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Nov. 3 & 4
JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD'S GREATEST STORY
Bigger and better than " The River's End." A gripping
Drama of great souls waging their battle of life in thc
frozen North—God's Country.
FILMED IN THE MAJESTIC CANADIAN ROCKIES
WONDERFUL SNOW SCENES FILMED
AT BANFF AND LAKE LOUISE   ::   ::
Valley of.
Silent Men
~ AlmaRutiens
agmmmtffmm
EXTRA ATTRACTIONS :
Round 4 of " The Leather Pushers" and a Fox Sunshin.
Comedy.
MATINEE—SATURDAY AT 2.30 P.M.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
MARY MILES MINTER AND TOM MOORE IN "THE COWBOY AND THE LADY
from the famous stage success.
LOOK ! LOOK 1 ! EXTRA—MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Mary Pickford and several others of your old favorites in " Going Straight," a Twt.
reel Comedy that's a scream.
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY—TOM MIX IN "FOR BIG STAKES."
•~~ri
J It
1/
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th, 1923
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
FIVE
How To Play Basketball
(By Obserrer).
V.-PA88ING AKD HANDLING BAIX
For OflenslTt*
Passes are made to advance the
ball and are therefore ot primary Importance to offensive formations, M
we shall see ln later discussions. It
In well to thllnk over, then, a few of
the essentials of good passing.
First of all, the passer should remember that the pass should be tut
and snappy. It the ball ls "lobbed"
over to a team-mate, If Its flight U
slow and leisurely, It ls sure to be Intercepted. It must travel straight and
taut in a direct line. Not only that,
nut pasBea should be short
Long passing gives unequalled opportunity for quick guards to Intercept, no matter how well timed or
placed they may be. The passer
should always remember tbls and try
to make his throws short and snappy.
The receiver of the pass can asslnt
In this by moving towards his pass,
Ab pointed out before, he should always get ln motion to meet the ball,
as this prevents an intercept and cuts
down the distance the ball bas to
travel. Always plan to cut In front
of an opponent when calling (or a
pass, never behind him.
Oood passing naturally demands
neat and expert handling of tbe ball.
Most passes are made with one hand,
though ability to make excellent
passes with both hands Is also necessary. As a rule the latter will lack
strength and speed, as lett-handed
passes will often do.
A player should practice passing
with both left and right hands. Aim
the ball at a point about chest-high of
the player to whom lt ls thrown and
slightly In advance of him. He will
cut tn across the flight ot the ball at
an angle and, lt he bas mastered the
art of catching, will snap it up and
pass ln a moment. Practice throwing
and handling the ball ln the palm of
the hand. Learn the best grip on tht
ball for a one-hand pass and the easiest motion of the arm which will give
you a speedy throw.
Catching the Ball.
A "fake" pass Ib always useful In
basketball as In rugby or football.
Many players, when closely guarded,
snap tbe ball back as if for a throw
and then loop tt over the opponent's
head. It requires great ability to get
around the opponent and pass the ball
before being blocked, however. Moat
fake passes must be made with both
hands, and the player must be careful not to take a step while accomplishing It. Tbe objective, of course,
ls to make the guard start oft on an
Intercept or block of the supposed
pass.
To be able to catch a thrown ball
with ease and confidence, one must
eliminate fear and nervousness and
acquire a proper knowledge ot the
proper method ot catching a ball.
Fumbling resulting trom other causes
than fear and nervousness ls caused
by taking the eye oft the ball. To overcome this fault, one should watch the
ball until It actually strikes the hand.
Tben, too, over-tenseness on the part
of the player making his hands and
arms very rigid, will cause fumbling,
for under such conditions a re-bound
is certain.
The hands and arms ahould fin
slightly as the ball strikes the palm
ot the hand, thereby diminishing the
shock. One should try not to catch
the ball with the fingers. The palm of
the spread hand should stop the ball
and the fingers ahould clamp around
It. The fingers should never point towards the ball as lt Is coming In. because tbe exact distance ot opening,
especially wben the player Is In motion, can not be guaged and Injured
fingers will result. The fingers
should either slant upward or downward from the open palm. It will be
found natural to have the fingers point
upward when receiving passes chest-
high or higher, and to have them
downward when receiving passes directed toward the pit of the stomach
or lower.
.TJRWOOLVS NOVEL
FINELY SCREENED
■' The Valley of Silent Men" Wm
Filmed in the Canadian
Rockies.
At the Ilo-Ilo Theatre •■ Friday aad
Sattrday.
What Bret Harte waa to the Sierras,
lames Oliver Curwood la to the Canadian Rockies. If he waa not their
discoverer, he la at least, their ro-
nancer. While acting aa special investigator tor tbe Canadian Government, Mr. Curwood was charmed by
this unspoiled section ot Nature's
vonderland, which he haa made the
icene of so many ot his stories—"Tbe
Valley of Silent Men." That little
Eden of the North, over which thm
snow-clad sentinel mountains keep
perpetual watch Is no myth.
Picture Follows Carwoed't Trail.
But with all bla skill aa a word-
painter, Mr. Curwood could only indicate the natural beautiea of this
Northern Paradise. Even the "still'
camera and the painter's canvas can
capture only Isolated bits ot natural
beauty which seem so remote that the
spectator can hardly realise their
truth. But now the motion pictures,
those marvellous simulacra ot life and
action, have followed Mr. Curwood's
trail, and in filming "Tht Valley of
Silent Men" amid the vory acenes
which the author described In bit
thrilUng romance, will bring homt to
millions of screen devotees tht natural
wonders ot the Canadian Rockies.
Company Seu* tt Moaatnlas.
Cosmopltan Productions on acquiring the motion-picture rights to "The
Valley of Silent Men." which comei to
the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Friday and
Saturday, sent a company up Into tbe
mountains in the early Spring before
the snows began to melt For twtlve
weeks they camped and took pictures
about Banff and Lake Louise, and tht
camera caught that miracle ot Nature
—the coming of Spring In the snowy
wilderness. Chester Lyons, the cameraman, and Harry Wild, hie assistant, frequently took "shots" of fifteen miles wltb the telephoto lens,
and owing to the clarity ot the air
the visibility was wonderful.
Dangerous Setae Filmed.
One especially thrilling and dangerous scene was filmed on the Klpewa
river, where the hero and heroine leap
trom their boat Just as It about to go
over tbe rapids. At another time Miss
Rubens slipped Into a crevasse In a
glacier—(according  to  directions  of
tbe scenario)—but the hero's frantic,
search (or her gave occasion for dining the icy depths of. that vast frozen
iver. Dbg sledges bore the lovers
into a veritable "Valley of Silent
Men, where their romance ended happily beneath the benediction of the
three white sentinels ot this suowv
jiden of the Northland.
Round 4 of "The Leather Pushers"
and a Sunshine comedy will be
screened also.
Double Feature Show on Monday and
Tuesday.
The Cowboy and the Lady" from
the big stage success, will be screened
these two days. This picture feature*
Mary Miles Minter and Tom Moore
Miss Minter will be seen In an entirely
different role than any of her previous
pictures.
EXTRA — LOOK ! — Monday and
Tuesday. Mary Pickford and all or
your old favorite stars in "Going
Straight," a two-reel comedy scream.
Klx Picture Coming.
On Wednesday and Thursday, Tom
Mix will be seen In his latest Dim
For Big Stakes."
"In the Days of Buffalo Bill" and a
comedy will be screened also.
HUSBAND SLAIN
DURING QUARREL
CALGARY.—William Dean, a miner,
ls in the Drumheller Hospital, dying
from a gunshot wound in the abdomen, and Elizabeth Dean, his wife, ls
under arrest at the Provincial police
barracks, on a charge of attempted
murder, following a drunken quarrel
ln their home on the "Western Front"
Saturday evening. Tbe woman, tho
police say, emptied the contents ot a
12-gauge gun into her husband's abdomen as the climax to a quarrel
which commenced following a
drunken bout earlier In the evening.
COMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING
PRESSING
T. YONEDA
COURTENAY
Phone 64
Box 123
NOTICE
NOTICE le hereby given that all
persons having claims against
the the estate of the late Joseph Peach
Davit, late ot Comox Diatrict British
Columbia, wbo died on or about the
29th day ot June, 1»M, art required
to tend In their claims duly verified,
on or before the 1st day of December,
1921, to George Charles Davis, ot
Union Bay, Nelson District, B. C,
Executor and Trustee of the estate o(
said decedent. AND NOTICE Is here
by turther given that Immediately
alter said date tha aaid executor will
proceed to distribute the estate among
the parties entitled thereto, having re
gard only to the claims o( whloh ht
shalt than havt nottct, and that ht,
the said executor, will not be liable
(or the assets or any part thtrtof to
any person or persons whose claims
shall not have been received by him
at tlmt of auch distribution,
Dattd this 17th day ot October, 1922.
GEORGE CHARLES DAVIS,
U Executor.
A VAST IMPROVEMENT.
The Family Herald and Weekly Star
ot Montreal starts Its (all and winter
campaign tor subscriptions a vastly
improved paper over what previously
looked like perfection. To those who
have read that great weekly tor years
it would seem Impossible to make Improvements. Nevertheless, the publishers seem determined regardless of
cost to make the Family Herald better
value than ever before. Every department Ib being strengthened and
new features added. In fact, the
Family Herald and Weekly Star during 1923 will be of such value that no
Canadian Home can afford to be without lt. '" '
NOTICE.
NOTICE lt htrtby given that all
persons having claims against
the estate of Albert Otto Holts who
died at Comox, B. C, on tht 12nd day
of July, 1922, art required to tend In
the claims, duly verified, on or before
the flrst day ot December, 1921, to
George Shearer, Esq., executor and
trustee ot the estate o( said decedent.
AND NOTICE la hereby turther glveu
that Immediately after eald date the
said executor will proceed to distribute the estate among tht partus entitled thereto, having regard only to
the claims of which ht shall then have
notice, and that he, tht eald executor,
will not be liable (or tbe assets or any
part thereof to any person or persons
whose claims shall not havt bttn received by him at the time o( tuch distribution.
Dated this 17th day o( October, 1922.
GEORGE SHEARER, Executor,
c-o C. H. Tarbell ft Son,
■11 j.-Dum-Butt^Avt., Cumberland, B.C.
Farmer's
Boarding House
Dunsmuir Avenue
CUMBERLAND
Since this establishment has changed hands, many
great improvements have been installed.
One advantage is an Up-to-date Shower Bath.
 ALL HOME COOKING	
Reasonable Rates
High-class Cooking
A Comfortable Home
MRS.  HARRY  FARMER
Campbell River
Courtenay  Stage
Frank Lalonde, Proprietor
Meets all trains at Courtenay
daily, taking pasengers for
all points between Courtenay
and Campbell River, also
for Headquarters
Complete line of
Kantleek Rubber
goods. Prices
from 40c to $4.75     tyJ0r*
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
SUNDAY HOURS: Morning, 10-12; Evening, 6-9.
For Service and Satisfaction, Try
GORDON'S
New Currants 2 lbs. for 45c
Jelly Powders 3 for 25c
Quaker Tomatoes, large tin, each  15c
Quaker Corn, 2 tins for 35c
Quaker Peas 2tins for 35c
Sunlight Soap, per carton 25c
White Wonder Soap 16 bars for 95c
Pure Castile Soap, 20 oz. bar 20c
Pacific, St. Charles or Carnation Milk, 7 large tins 95c
SPECIAL—Apples — Mcintosh Reds, tfjrt -J r
50 boxes to sell.   Order early  ffimmt.LU
Empress or Meadow Brook Pure Straw- d»-| -a /\
berry Jam.   4 lb. tin for  «j)A.JLU
FALL   FOOTWEAR
Our Stock is now complete. We can supply your wants
at Prices that will surprise you. See the (j*4 AA
new Canadian Rubber Shoe for Men. Pair sjprr.UU
New hand-made   Chrome   Leather Miners d»/» PA
Pit Shoe, with counter.   My price  «pU OU
We have a Complete Line of Basket-ball Shoes. We
will sell these at our Own Price, which is not dictated
by our opposition.
Men's and Boys' Raincoats and Sou' Wests.
Ladies' Raincoats and Rain Hats.    Girls' Rain Capes
Moderately Priced.
Pure Scotch Wool Blankets, from $9.50 up to $15 pair
THE CORNER STORE
No Better Place to Deal Phone 133
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
I Office  and   Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
I Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
1 PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
Leaves Campbell River
every morning at
7.45
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
■sVM.MEHRTKlEU),   Proprietor
I GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Old Country
FOR
CHRISTMAS
And New Year
Reasonable Rates
Dunsmuir At*.
Cumberlar.il. B. C
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD
for	
$6.00
FRED McKENZIE
Phone 92L Happy Valley
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Union Bay Road
COURTENAY, B. C.
Canadian National Railways
will operate a
SPECIAL   TRAIN
Leaving Vancouver,  7.45 p.m.,
December 4th,
To Ship's Side, Halifax, for
Sailing of
S.S. "Megantic" to Liverpool
December 10th, 1922
S.S. "Andania" to Liverpool
December 11th, 1922
S.S. "Cassandra" to Glasgow
December 11th, 1922
— ALSO —
TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
for tho following Sailings:
S.S. "CANADA" (Montreal) Not. 18
s.s. "Antonla" (Montreal) Not. is
s.s. "Metagama" (Montreal) Sot. 18
S.S. "Regina" (Halifax) I»cc S
S.S. "Canada" (Halifax) Dec 16
•S.S. "Metagania" (Si. John) l»co. IS
* Passengora transfer at Mom-ton
Full Information from
E. W. Bickle, Agent
Cumberland, B. C. SIX
THE   CUMBEflLAND  ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4th, 1922
Week-End Specials
Scotch 100% Wool Blankets  -   ■   ■   #9.50, $12.50
Very Heavy   -   $15.00
Wonderful Value in Suits—1 Week only
Ladies' and Gent's Suits to order
ANY STYLE, PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED
$32.50 $32.50 $32.50
If you need a good  suit for winter   don't miss  this   dpportunity
C. Kent & CO., Courtenay, B.C.
Formal Opening Of The
Provincial Legislature
Member for .Saanich ia Selected
as Speaker.—Proceedings
Attended With Pomp.
(From Tuesday's Colonist).
The customary pomp which accompanies the opening of a Legislative session was ln evidence Monday
afternoon when His Lordship Chief
Justice J. A. Macdonald, of the Court
ot Appeal ot the Province, and administrator in the absence ot His
Honor Lieutenant-Qovernor W. C.
Nichol, formally declared open the
third session of the Fifteenth Parliament of British Columbia.
There was a large attendance ot the
leading residents ot the city, present,
Including the elite of the various professional elements of the city, consular representatives, members of the
Bench and Bar, the leading clergy and
prominent members ot business and
other interests when His Lordship
appeared.
Iiarge Attendance.
The Legislative Chamber and galleries were packed with interested on-
Direct
From England
Received This Week, a Large Shipment of
FINEST QUALITY CHINA-WHITE
SEMI-PORCELEAN DINNER-WARE
These   are   specially
97-piece   Set.
marked at
$25.00
This Ware is now back to Pre-War Prices and has to
be seen to be properly appreciated.
Buy a ful! or part set, as you wish.
Jeune's Furniture Store
COURTENAY, B. C.
Phone 144
Cascade
OR
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and Gl
Cumberland, B. C.
New Lines
Now Showing
LADIES* AND GENT.S' UMBRELLAS.
MEWS UNDERWEAR, HOSE AND GLOVES
Ladies' Black and Brown Silk Hose at 90c, $1.25 and
$1.65 per pair.
Children's Hosiery in all sizes.
Penman's Combinations for Boys.
Flannelette in White and Stripes, at 25 cents a yard.
Better grades up to 50 cents a yard.
Interesting Values in Laces starting at 5 cents a yard.
A Special Line of Torchon Laces at 10 cents a yard.
Ladies' and Childhen's Handkerchiefs.   See these before buying.
Our Lines of FURNITURE are now filling up, with
many articles suitable for Xmas.
U.B.C. Beer
PURE    FULL-STRENGTH    BEERS
lookers when tlie**olllcial admintstrn
tor entered the chamber, following in;
spection of the Guard of Honor of
100 men of the P.P.C.L.I., which were
drawn up on the roadway in front of
the buildings. His Lordship appeared
in formal costume.
Proceeded by hi;, escort, the Acting
Governor - entered. by the main entrance and tool: bis scat on the (lias.
Through the" Provincial Secretary he
announced that pending the selection
of Mr. Speaker, he would not tako
the House Into his confidence as to
tho reasons which Md led to Its being
summonded. His Lordship then re
tired and tho House proceeded to
name as its Speaker Mr. F. A. Paul
ine, Liberal member for' Saanich, on
motion of Premier Oliver, seconded by
Hon. John Hart, Minister of Finance.
having selected Its Speaker, the
House awaited the return of HI3 Lordship, nnd it having 'been signified to
him that the House had selected its
Speaker, he, at the request of Mr
Clerk, promised tho House oil Its old-
time privileges, including especially
the right of free speech, nnd thereupon proceeded to road tho Speech
from tlio Throne, after which His
Lordship und escort withdrew from
the chamber.
Tlio new Speaker expressed to the
House his appreciation of the fact
that he was selected to preside, and
his determination to carry out the
duties of the office ip line witli pre
cedent.
Other routine business of.the House
was attended to, and for the first time
in years, tlie singing of' the. National
Antliem was omitted as the House adjourned.
They Wear Well
On the market as long as the oldest
inhabitants remember and still
the most
Popular Beers
Sold in British Columbia
MINERS' WIDOWS FORM
UNION; APPEALING FOR
MORE COMPENSATION
s-IANAlllO.—Xanainio has a new
union. It Is the Nanaimo Minors
Widows' Uuion. Tliey are not officially organized, but they 'are affiliated
with mutual tics'and act in harmony
with various measures. They have
just started a petition appealing to
the Government for more compensation, stating that their present dole Is
entirely insufficient.
The petition iB addressed to thi
Hon. Wm. Sloan**, Minister of jilines.
the member for Nanaimo, and to
Attorney-General Manson. Thoy ex-
Plain it is impossible to personally
call on the ministers" at Victoria, because their pension does not allow
anything to spare over bare' necessities.
SONG POEMS
WANTED
If you have a Song or Song Poem,
Words or Music, 'which you! havo
written, let us hear trom you.
YOU CAN MAKK GOOD MONEY
We will Publish and Market
Them  for you     :    :   :   :
OLD FRIENDS  ARE BEST
Leave Your Order at any Government
Store-WE DO THE REST
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
LUMBER
ALL  BUILDING MATERIALS,  MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES, WINDOWS AND DOORS,
DO NOT DELAY
WHITE NOW
The Mosher System
OP CANADA
MUSIC PUBLISHERS
Box 616 WESTVILLE, N. S.
ARMISTICE DAY
A DAY APART
Armistice Day has become the most
sacred day among tho anniversaries
of the Dominion, and lt is indeed a
pleasure to know that at the annual
meeting of the Associated Canadian
Clubs held recently, strong advocacy
was used iu favor of Armistice Day
being commemorated as a separate
anniversary, and not being merged In
any other national holdiay.
Armistice Day not only marks the
signing ot peace after a world war,
unpnnillcd ln history, but for thousands of Canadians It is a day apart, iu
that It recalls to memory the loss ot
so many who wore the flower of this
Dominion. Of all the days in t^o
year, Armistico Day should be set
aside not only us a holiday on which
peoplo may he froe from workaday
worries, but as a day upon which ceremonies may be held which will recall
the proud part which Canadians, in
common with tlie rest of the Empire's
forces, played in a war for freedom.
Armistice Day should ho a day ot rejoicing, not a day of mourning.
POTATO FAIR TO BE
HELD IN GRAND FORKS
JOS.   DAMONTE
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Cm!, vTaod and Goods of Any Kind
Delivered to ,111 Pnrts of District.
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHAItGES
TELEPHONE (TO TELEPHONE
ar Leavo Orders nt Vendome Hotel.
The Potato Fair to be held at Grand
Forks on November 27th to Decembes-
2nd, promises to be the most Important event of the kind evor held in the
province. In connection with tho fair,
a convention will bo bold and addressed by the loading agriculturists and
potato specialists in America, notably
Dr. G. K. K. Link, of the Dureau of
Plant Industry, Washington, D.C, who
will address tlie conference on "Loaf
Roll, Mosaiac, and other Related Potato Diseases." Others who will speak
have hnd tlie widest kind of experience with potatoes and should impart
a great deal of useful knowledge to
those who take the opportunity o!
attending ilio big meetings. Mr. R.
G. Newton, of tlio Dominion Experimental Farm, Invormere, will speak
on "Experimental Work with Potatoes." Mr. C. Tice, of the Department
of Agriculture, and a reeugnized potato specialist, will take for his subjecl "Potato improvement Work in
British Columbia." Dr. Warnock, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, will nd-
■dress tlie convention immediately
after the chairman's opening remarks.
Tlie closing address by Mr. J. A.
Grant, British Columbia's market commissioner at Calgary, should be one
of the most interesting events of the
week, and will be entitled "Organization and Marketing," in which he will
endeavor to tell of his experiences in
the Northwest in the marketing of
produce  from   the  Pacific  province.
The object of this Fair Is to encourage the raising of good potatoes
and to assist the public in purchasing
seed of a high standard. It is an opportunity for those Interested in the
potato Industry to get together and
discuss matters of vital importance.
The success of the Fair depends lo
a great extent on the potato growers
of the province making use of the opportunities given to them at this time.
Entries will bo received up to and
including November 22nd by Mr. C.
Tice. Department of Agriculture, Victoria, from whom entry forms may be
•'".cured. Entry forms sent in later
than the above date should be addressed to Mr.' Tice, care of the Provincial Potato Fair, Grand Forks. In
case of district displays, entry
terms must be received not later than
November 1st!,. Further particulars
may be secured from Mr. Tice at Victoria, or from tbo Secretary of the
Potato Growers' Association, Sandwick. Mr. H; P. Allborry.
Car  For   Hire
DAY OR NIGHT
HIGH GRADES AT LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
PRICES REASONABLE
I From 8 a.m. to 12 Midnight, Phone 2-1.
From 12. Midnight to 8 a.m.. Phone 22.
HUSBAND'S STORY WILL
AMAZE CUMBERLAND
1 lie says: "Adlor-I-ka helped my wife
for gns on thi. stomach and sour stomach In TWENTY MINUTES. It works
beyond greatest expectations." Adler-
I l-kd acts on BOTH upper aud lower
; bowel, removing foul matter which
. poliioned. stomach. Brlugs out all
Biases ami sour, decaying food. EXCELLENT for chronic constipation.
Guards ngainst appendicitis. Adle-I-
ka removes matter you never thought
was ln your system and which may
■lave lieen poisoning you for months.
Sold by Frost's Drug; store
For Results Advertise in The Islander
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R. R. No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—134-X Courtenay
Geo. Mason
CUMBERLAND,  II.   C.
Royston Lumber Co,
MANUFACTIJBI-RS OF
ROUGH AND PRESSED
LUMBER
Joe & Mac's Place
. rail be open from ngw
on with a supply of    : :
TOBACCOS,  CANDIES,
SOFT DRINKS, ETC.
Waveney Hotel
J, 'Slab Wood (double, load) *4;50jKi^^^l^ifflp
. SATqBDAY, N-qVE.M3E,E ,4th, 1^2
THE pUICBSS&ANR tS.LAND.ER
SEVEN
t4
AUCTION SALE
IN THE AGRICULTURAL GROUNDS, COURTENAY
ON THURSDAY NEXT, THE 9th NOVEMBER
at 2 o'clock Prompt.
Dairy Cattle and other Stock, Quantity of Chickens,
including 50 White Wyandotte Pullets, Solly's strain,
March and April hatch, laying. 2 tons Turnips in 100
lb. sacks. Potatoes, etc. Furniture. 6 Young Singing
Canaries, and other Effects.
Geo. J. Hardy
AUCTIONEER   :  REAL ESTATE   :  INSURANCE
Phone 10    :        :    COURTENAY
Thursday, November 16—Sale of Dairy Stock, in
Cumberland, for Mr. F. Monaco.
When your Telephone is left accidentally
off the hook, it registers the same as a
call at Central. If the operator gets no
response to her " Number, Please," the
number is handed over to the Repairing
Forces as being out of order. All this involves tests,
reports and time. In the meantime, no one gets you
on your telephone.
" Off the Hook," is a very common cause of interruption to Telephone Service. By the exercise of care
in this connection you will protect your service and
avoid inconvenience to yourself and others.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
THE  CUMBERLAND
AMATEUR ORCHESTRAL SOCIETY
Will Hold Their First
Popular   Concert
 in the	
ILO-ILO   THEATRE
Tuesday, November 14th
The Programme will include:
Songs by Popular Local Artistes.
Humorous Sketches by Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Baker.
Highland Dancing to the Skirl o' the Pipes by Pipe-
Major Stewart.
Comical Songs by Mr. Westover, the clever Irish
Impersonator.
A Double Quartette of Ladies.   The First Ladies' Octet
to be heard in Cumberland.
The Cumberland " Tiny Tots " in their Dainty Little
Dances.
And many other attractions.
The Items will be Interspersed with Selections by the
Orchestra.
Doors open at 7.15.
Commencing at 7.45 prompt
Reserved Seats,75 c. each.    Admission, 50c.
TICKETS WILL BE ON SALE TUESDAY, NOV. 7th
A plan of the Hall showing Reserved Seating
Accommodation, will be exhibited at Frost's
Pharmacy. Patrons are requested to select
their seats as early as possible.     ::    ::    ::
Under the Post Office, Courtenay
•
You will find us here whenever you want anything in
the Building Litje. We make a Specialty of Interior
Finish, and carffurnish Cottonwood Panel, Fir Veneer
or any other Material of a like nature on short notice.
Prepared Roofing or Shingles at Right Prices.
Sash and Doors of the Best Quality, made by
Returned Soldiers.   Come in, let's talk it over.
COMOX  VALLEY   SUPPLY,   LIMITED
COURTENAY, B. C.
The Northern Radio Co. Ltd. has an office with us.
Some Radio News for you shortly. Radio Supplies that
are positively guaranteed, furnished on short notice.
USED
CARS
Special for
One Week
Only
FORD TOURING
$150.00
FORD DELIVERY
$150.00
FORD TOURING (Late Model)
$450.00
FORD TOURING
$250.00
CHEVROLET TOURING
$375.00
CHEVROLET TOURING
$550.00
Courtenay News
Mr, E, E. Robinson nnd t/aff, of
Vancouver, wer* ln Courtenay qti
Thursday on their way to Campbell
River on a business trip.
A meeting ot committees representing Merville, tbe Courtenay-Comox
Board ot Trade and the Comox Agricultural Association, was held on
Wednesday nlgbt In the City Hall.
The meeting was called for the purpose of conferring with Col. Latta, ot
the Land Settlement Board, ln regard
to cqndltlons at Mervllle. Those who
were ln attendance are still reticent,
but optimism prevails to such an extent that the announcement has been
made that "things are going along
nicely." This sounds good and surely
should give tbe men at Mervllle some
encouragement. It ls confidently expected that a satisfactory settlement
of the Mervllle probleb will soon be
arranged. A definite scheme has been
mapped out and presented to Col.
Latta, who stated that the Government
would meet the committee halt-way
In any proposal tor a permanent settlement ot tlte vexed question.
Dove Creek school-house was the
scene, last Friday night, ot another of
the winter series of whist drives being given by tbe people of that section.
An enjoyable time was spent and the
"Fuel Fund" of the school was considerably augmented.
Mr. A. H. Lund, ot Victoria, was in
Courtenay on Tuesday on official business for the Liquor Control Board.
ss ~——
The next meeting of Courtenay Assembly, No. 3, Native Sons of Canada,
will be held on Monday evening next
ln Booth's Halls A debate on "Free
Trade" will be held .teams having
been chosen to talk pro and con.
Other business of importance will be
transacted and a record attendance ls
expected.
Mrs. Ashcroft, ot "Glacier View
Cottage," bad a very pleasant Bur-
prise on Tuesday evening last when
some fourteen boys and girls arrived
announcing a "Jack-o-lantern" party.
The evening was spent ln various
ways, mostly ln playing games usually
Indulged In at Hallowe'en functions.
Miss Alice Hurford secured first prise,
and Master David Smith the second
prize, in the "Donkey" contest. This
game In particular caused oodles of
fun, and the shrieks of laughter could
be heard quite clearly for blocks away
—more or less. During the course of
the evening the arrival of an old
witch, adorned in strange raiments,
laden with delicacies, caused much excitement. The party closed with the
singing ot a few old songs, and the
little guests thanked their hostess for
her hospitality, and departed.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    ■    Cleaning    .    Repairs
Telephone-1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, 8. C.
CHEVROLET B. B.
(Baby Grand)
$575.00
All these Cars are priced for
Priced for Quick Sale. If you
want a Good Used Car on Easy
Payments, call and see these or
PHONE 61.
The Courtenay
BLUNT & EWART LTD.
Phone 61
The members ot Courtenay Athletic
Club held a meeting on Thursday
night ln the City Hall, There were
twenty-live present. A letter from Mr.
Alex. Denholme, of Cumberland, secretary of the Rugby Football Club at
"The Coal City," was read, asking
Courtenay to organise a rugger squad.
After some discussion In which the
pros and cons of the situation were
advanced, It was decided to call for
volunteers to Join up. ln this way
the management will know exactly
what material they have to work on.
A reply will be sent to Cumberland
telling what is being done here.
Rugby disposed of, the meeting took
up the game ot basketball. It was
decided to form a basketball league
o' four teams, representing the
garages, merchants, county, and the
rest. Mr. H. Everett will look after
the Interests ot the garages; Mr, Robt.
Smith, the merchants; Mr, Tom Menzies, the county, and Mr. H. Herd the
rest. It ls proposed to hold all games
in the Agricultural Hall, which has
been secured for two nights a week at
u reasonable rental. The flrst game
will probably be staged on Thursday
next, the 9th Inst. It was also an
nounced that the club quarters over
the Fire Hall are open every night,
and that instructions will be riven
members ln the noble art of self,
•Sefence three nights a week. Arrangements are also being made for boys
under 16 years to be allowed the use
ot the gymnasium at stated perlodc
The club will hold a big entertainment and boxing tournament at the
end of November, arrangements for
which were left in the hands of Secretary Max Blunt and the executive
committee. The club is expecting an
exceedingly active winter, and the way
in which tbe boys are working certainly spells success.
,,.Mt: William Beech, after several
weeds' llfaess In the hospital at Co-
'ifldx'was seen ln Courtenay ou Thursday. Despite his great age, Mr. Beech
is recuperating iVatWabfcwV.
McLeod's Store
GENTS' FURNISHINGS IN  ALL LINES
BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.
JUST ARRIVED!
BOYS' SLICKER COATS AND HATS
ALSO A CHOICE LINE OF HOUSE SLIPPERS
FOR LADIES, GENTS AND CHILDREN
Ex-Service Men.—We can supply you with your
War Service Ribbon for Armistice Celebration.
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
liiii^uiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ iiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiyi
APPLES
FANCY  WRAPPED   McINTOSH   RED
PER BOX /.	
$2.00
TEA
TEA.—5 lb. Boxes for $2.75
Bulk Tea, good quality, 45c. lb.; 3 lbs. for $1.25
MILK
St. Charles, Carnation and Pacificjlilk, 7 tins for $1.00
Per Cace, 48 tins, $6.75
SOAP
Per Case, 100 Bars  $4.50
T. BOOTH & SONS
Courtenay, B.C.
Ladies! Attention
Truly  Wonderful  Bargains  in
Patent and Kid Pumps and
Strap Slippers
SPECIAL FOR SATURDAY
A number of nice lines of Patent and Kid Slippers,
including four lines of "London Lady" Slippers.
Values up to $8.50. On sale Saturday <I»Q QK
for the greatly reduced figure of  tpQ.tJO
See our window for these Special Bargains. You may
like them. They truly are wonderful bargains at $3.95
We have just received a number of nice Club Bags.
Priced from  $7.50 to $35.00
If you want a Club Bag that will last you a life time
see our Solid Leather, Leather Lined ourfpy mwp
aud one that you will be proud to own, see our
Solid Leather, Leather Lined Club Bag fl»QC
Price   *4>00
Cavin's Shoe Store
■Sole Agent for The Astoria Tailor-made Shoe for Men
and "Chums" for the Children.
Note.—All "Chum" Shoes are being made with a real
welt. The cheaper makes are stitch-downs and
cannot be repaired properly. EIGHT
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLAND©
yygMyiJf, NQVgMBpg *#>, wi ■
News Items for the Whole
Family
Heavy Tweed for Girls' Coats or Boys' Pants. 54 in.
wide. Good value to-day at Suther- d»*f PA
land's, at     tPl.tHJ
Boys' Heavy Mackinaw Coats. Just what you want
for the cold, wet days. At Suther- d»P QC
land's price     «PO»«/*J
Boys' Tan Leather Gloves, Gauntlet, with fringe,
wool lined. At Sutherland's the rt»"| AA
price is only     tp ■*■•""
Ladies' Undervests, not too heavy. Full size, CAC
long sleeves.   At Sutherland's, each      **"
Serge, Navy, suitable for Dresses, Skirts, d»1 PA
etc., 54 in. wide.  At Sutherland's ....    «Pl»WV
SUITS   FOR   MEN   IN   THE   LATEST   STYLES
at the New Reduced Prices.    For
your next suit — Try "Sutherland's"
Sweaters, Pull-over, in Striped Cashmere. A real good
article.   Price $3.50 at Sutherland's.
ORYGOOD3
GENTS KJRNeHftfl»
EIGHT   WEEKS   TO   XMAS
Will
There Be
A Piano or
Edison Phonograph
In Your
Home?
We will be pleased to explain
OUR "BUDGET SYSTEM"
whereby you can select your Instrument for
Christmas Now.
The G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
COURTENAY    :    NANAIMO    :    CUMBERLAND
Local Representatives :
Marshall Music Co.
Cumberland, Opposite Ilo-Ilo Theatre
Courtenay, " Top of the Town."
Samuel   Robinson,   of   Courtenay,
died In tlie Comox Hospital on Wed--!
nesday, Nov. 1st.   He wns   an   old |
timer of this district, and at one time J
on   employee   of   tbe   Canadian   Collieries.   He was ln his 65th year, and '
leaves a  widow,  five  sons:   Thomas,
Robert, David, Andrew and John, also '
one  daughter,  Mrs.  Clark.   The  funeral took place from the family residence, Courtenay, on  Friday, to the
Cumberland  Cemetery.    Rev.  W.  T. ■
Beattie officiating.
G A S
37 Vi c. Per Gallon
Buy Your Gass at Corfleld
Motors Ltd. That's where
you get your Tires inflated
everyfime you get Gas, and
consequently you get better
mileage.     ::     ::     ::    ::
g See our Representatives, or Call at Our Stores. ss
Used Cars
flj A fJC AA—Ford Five-Passenger
Touring, 1921 Model.
This Car is complete with self-
starter; demountable rims, one man
top, sloping windshield, etc. It has
been completely overhauled, and was
privately owned.
<£\ OP AA—Ford Five-Passenger
Touring, 1920 Model.
One-man top, self-starter, etc., etc.
This is a real good buy, lt has been
overhauled, has a very good set of
slip covers over the seats, windshield
wiper, tool box, and numerous other
extras.
flJQOK AA—Ford Five-Passenger
Touring, 1919 Model,
If you are ln tbe market for a good
cheap car, this will surely suit you.
It has a self -starter, good tires, Bhock
absorbers, and Is real value for the
money.
Above Cars are guaranteed for Three
Months. Buy your Car where you
get a Guarantee that is carried out.
BATTERY DEPARTMENT
We have the beBt Buy In the world
To-day
A WILLARD BATTERY
Trade-in Price,  -  $24.05
See us before you spend (20 In repairs
Community Club
Organized.
Thc residents of Royston held u
meeting In the school-house on Wednesday evening and organized a Community Club. The mothers of the
school district decided to purchase a
piano for thc use ot the club, to stage
concerts and other amusements during the winter month. An election of
olllcers will bo hold at the next meeting, when it Is expected thnt Mr. F.
J. Dalby will act as president.
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
People wonder how we can do lt at
the Price:
Wash and Polish  $1.00
KEEP   YOUR   CAR   CLEAN
Mr. Sinnott, of J. Thompson & Sons,
Is a visitor at the Cumberland Hotel.
...
Mr, Grant, of the firm Qt Miller ft
Milton, of Victoria, waa ln town
during the week.
...
Rev. W. Leversedge left for Denman Island on Sunday last, and returned on Thursday.
...
Don't forget Laver's are giving a
20% discount on dry goods this month
at their Cumberland Store.
* •      *
Mr. Pottinger, representative ot the
firm of Nlrllch Mfg. Co., of Tonorto,
was ln town on a business trip.
.      .    '.
Miss Edna Bennie was the winner
of  the  dictionary awarded  by  Miss
Kazan for progress in shorthand.
...
Will Receive.
Mrs, W. H. Cope, of Cumberland,
will receive on Tuesday afternoon
next, Nov, 7th, from 4 to 6.
* *      *
Miss J, Balagno, Mrs. Pinfold, Mrs.
Hatfield and Mrs. Francescini leave
on Saturday for Ladysmith to spend
Thanksgiving.
* *      .
Mr. G. R. Bates, of Courtenay, left
for Vancouver on Thursday.
...
Mr. James M. Savage, general
manager of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., and Mrs. Savage, arrived on Thursday and are now guests
of "Beaufort House," the official residence of the Canadian Collieries.
...
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Horwood and
daughter returned to Victoria on Friday, after spending two weeks' vacation with' Mr. and Mrs. Horwood, ot
Penrith Avenue.
...
Mr. A. E. Kelllngton, of New Westminster, Dominion organizer of the
Elks, visited Courtenay on Thursday
with the Intention of establishing a
lodge ln this district.
«      «      »
Hallowe'en Party.
On Tuesday evening last, Miss
Margaret Richardson held a delightful Hallowe'en party at her home on
Fourth Street. About twelve boys
and girls enjoyed themselves ln games
and songs.
Those present were: Misses Lillian
McLellan, Harriet Horbury, Janet
Damonte, Edna Cawdell, Doris Water-
field, and Messrs. John Richardson.
Norman Bateman, Victor Marnelll,
Leslie Farmer, Bill Dtivis and Willie
Smith.
...
Radio Party.
Something very new in the way of
entertainment was experienced by the
girls of the W. H. O. Club on
Friday evening last at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Treen, of Cumberland.
The splendid radio apparatus supplied a great deal of amusement and
something quite new to the girls.
Many news Items were heard, as well
as musical programmes from various
cities on the Pacific coast. Refreshments were Berved ,and the girls departed after spending a very enjoyable evening, and were delighted with
the privilege of hearing the radiophone.
ss ss ,
The whist drive and dance held in
the G. W. V. A. Hall on Friday evening last was a huge success, and was
exceptionally well attended. The
prize winners were as follows: Whist:
Ladles' 1st, Miss J. Balagno; Ladles'
consolation prize, Mrs. S. Hunt. Gen
tlemen's 1st, Mrs. Hudson; consola
tion prize, Mrs. P. Myers.
Corfield Motors
20% oil Dry Gotids at Laver's Store'    If  Laver's, Cumberland, have   it-
rhis mdnti). | get it there-20% on. Phone .46     ::     COURTENAY
.Limited
FORD DEALERS
CUMBERLAND PUBLIC SCHOOL
(Continued from page One)
Jackie Morrison, Takashi Ogaki, Kate
Oyama, Henry Salmon, Heromitsu
Salto, Dong Sing, Alex. Sommerville,
Joe Town, Thelma Waterfield, Akna
Herosl.
HONOR ROLL
Chow Ting, Jackie Morrison, Heromitsu Salto, Alex. Sommerville, Lome
Murdock, Willie Clouthler.
DIVISION  XIII — Receiving  Class.
Teacher, Eva O. Drader.   No  .on
roll, 41; percentage, 91.6; lates, 10.
Perfect attendance: Gordon Ander
son, Francis Bond, Peter Bono, Willie
Braes, Bessie Brown, Madge Bryan.
Nora Cooke, Willie Coombs, Gertrude
Dhvls, Margaret Larrlgan, Gladys
Miller, Alex. Mossey, Mltsuo Obara,
Millie Prior, Muriel Shortt, Wardena
Thompson, Robert Walker, Rhoda
Walton, Arthur Wong, Margaret Williams, Wong Ylng, TBuyuko Yaguchl,
Shori Kiyonaga.
HONOR ROLL
John Sanduluk, Johnny Mah, Mltsuo
Obara, Beagle Brown, Willie Braes,
Josie Wong.
LOST
CRANK HANDLE FOR CHALMERS
■  Car, brads grip,   Please return to
IttiANtlBR CD>TIC%1.
APPLES
BUY THEM BY THE BOX AND BUY THEM NOW
PRICES REASONABLE—SEE WINDOWS
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK:
Olympic Wheatlets, 4 lb. package, each 30c, 2 for 55c
Teco Pancake Flour, 20c. package, 2 for 35c
Log Cabin Pancake Flour, 30c. package, 2 for 55c
Krinkle Corn Flakes, 5 packages for 55c
Sunflower Salmon, '/a lb. tins, 2 for 25c; 1 lb. tins, 25c. /
2 for 45c.
Green Ribbon Seeded Raisins, 25c package, ....2 for 45c
Libby's Condensed Mince Meat, 20c package, 2 for 35c
Canned Vegetables,  5 tins for 95c
Peas, Corn, Beans, Tomatoes.
Finest Bulk Cocoa 25c per lb.
Van Camps' Pork and Beans, 15c tin 7 for $1.00
Pacific and St. Charles Milk, 16 oz. tins 7 for 95c
Squirrel Peanut Butter 25c per tin
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
Cumberland
B.C.
20 PER CENT OFF
WE WILL GIVE YOU
20c. off tjie Dollar on any
DRY   GOODS
IN   OUR   STORE.     THIS IS  A
*
RARE OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE
MONEY. BUY FOR CASH AND
GET YOUR VALUE   ::   ::
LAVER'S
Phone  115
Another Lot of Hats Put oh Sale
CUMBERLAND
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH, CUMBERLAND
A Special Harvest
~ Thanksgiving Service
—Will be Held on—
Sunday, November 5ih,
at 7 p.m.
Anthem: "O, Love Divine" (by the Methodist Choir)
BRIGHT AND CHEERFUL
CONGREGATIONAL SINGING
Instrumental Music by the Cumberland Orchestral
Society.
Come and Bring Your Friends.
MUSICAL NOTES.
The Orchestral Society announce
their first Popular Concert to take
place in the llo-llo Theatre on Tuesday, Nov. 14th. An attractive programme will be provided, and patrons
will be able to secure reserved seats,
which may be selected from a plan of
the hall which be on view at
Frost's Pharmacy on Tuesday next.
Wa advise early application for received seats—to prevent disappointment.
FOR .SALE
ONE FOUR-HOLE COOK STOVE,
1 Single Iron Bed, Spring and Mattress.   In first-class condition.
11 108 MARYPORT AVE.
FOR SALE-^
A   PIANO    IN   GOOD   CONDITION.
$150 cash.   Apply
P. O. Drawer 430
ot Islauddr Offltfe.

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