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The Cumberland Islander Nov 18, 1922

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 4
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which to consolidated the Cumberland Sews.
S-'ORT*
YEAR—No. 46
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1922
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE:  TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
€ w. v^.
Masquerade\L
Great Success
PREMIER'S STATEMENT
RE B. C. UNIVERSITY
Over 130 Persons in Costume.—
Hall Packed to the Doors
with Spectators.
The Great War Veterans' Association'has every reason to be satlsflod
with the result ot tlieir fourth nniiunl
masquerade bull held In the llo-llo
Hall on Friday ot last week. It was
a great success In every way. The big
hall wns filled to tlie doors with spectators, while no less than 131) persona
In costume took part in the grand
march. There were costumes of all
kinds, comics forming a large proportion; some very pretty costumes
were worn by ludles. Considerable
amusement was caused by the "Bootleggers' Trio." Thc "South Sea Islander" and the "Village Vamp" were
among the outstanding attraction*;.
Following are the prize winners:
Best dressed Indy  -Mrs. Covert.
Best dressed gent—Mr. McNIven.
Best National  lady—-Miss  Collins.
Best National gent—Mr. J. W. Tremlett.
Best sustained indy—Mrs. Pinfold.
Best sustained gent—Mr.  Veitch.
Best group representing Allies—Mrs.
W. M. Brown, Mrs. Wylle, Mrs. J.
Potter, Miss Blodwin Williams, Mr.
Whitehorse.
Best   comic   group—Messrs.   Walton,
Fraser Watson and F. Slaughter.
Best comic lady—Mrs. W. Brown.
Best comic gent—Mr. A. S. Jones.
Best Red Cross nurse—Alias D. Wilson.
Best hobo—Mr. Sam Henderson.
Best clown—Mr, II. .lackson.
Best advertising character—.Mrs. McKenzie, Jr., Courtenay.
Best flower girl—Mr;t. J. Miller, Bevan.
Special   prize—Mrs.  Harmlslon,  Mrs.
J. Stockton.
Prize waltz—Mrs. P. Coombs and Mr.
F. Slaughter.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien acted as master of
ceremonies and carried out his duties
in his usual genial manner.
Tho Special Drawing—Winning No.
670, unclaimed.
The tombola drawing resulted as
follows:
1st—No. 1118  (not claimed).
2nd—No. 29.
Srd—No. 63.
4th—No. 1040.
5th—No. 1025.
Judges for prize waltz: Mr. De
Coeur, Mr. Sam Cameron, Mrs. Maxwell, Mrs. Johnston.
Judge for masquerade: Mrs. De
Coeur, Mrs. C. Graham, Mr. Thomas
Jackson.
The G. W. V. A. Executive wish to
thank the public for their generous
support In making this Bnll such t
success.
Unclaimed prizes can be obtained
from the secretary. 202 Derwent Ave.
Premier Oliver's announcement that
the Government will proceed immediately with the construction of permanent university buildings at Point
Grey, came as somewhat of a surprise
to tho Legislature, which anticipated
u warm light before a definite statement of policy would bo given out.
The Government leader claimed that
the country was not In a position
hither to linanco the undertaking, but
it wns now realized that public
opinion wns behind the move. Tho
3,0(10 acres of hind nt Point Grey, set
aside for university purposes, are expected to provide sufficient revenue
lor Ihe construction nf tlie buildings
uud tlie maintenance of the Institution. Members nf both parties, as well
us some of the Independents, have
voiced support of the plan, many up-
country members agreeing that while
Vancouver might prollt more directly
thou any other place, still the whole
province was vitally Interested and it
was necessary to provide the fullest
facilities for higher education, if
young men aud women were to be
trained to play their part in tlie industrial and economic development of
Uritish Columbia.
CHURCH SERVICES.
HI. (seorifis's Presbyterian Church.
EsOltlhg service   Anthem by tlio choir
" I Will Sing."   Solo by Mrs. Colin
Campbell:  "Thy Will Bo Done."
WEDDING.
Milligan—Wood.
On Wednesday evening iu the Mnusc
Of St. George's Presbyterian Churoh,
Miss Lilian Wood wus married tn Mr.
John Mllligun. til' Sandwick. Miss
Wood was nurao for a short lime In
the Cumberland General Hospital,
where   sho   wns   a   general   favorite.
Tho bride, who was unattended,
wore n travelling suit of navy blue,
embroidered in black und while, with
hat to match.
After tho ceremony, the happy
couple mctored back to Courtenay,
where they took the train next morning for Parksvllle, the home of the
bride's parents.
Election Returns
In England
Conservatives—346.
Liberals—62.
Labor—136.
Llberal-Uulted—44.
Independents—1,6,.
An Afternoon Tea.
The Ladles' Aid of St. George's Presbyterian Church, will give an "Afternoon Tea" on December 13th. Many
Xmas novelties will be on sule. Look
for further particulars.
Popular Concert
Very Successful
The Cumberland Amateur Orchestral Society gave their lirst popular
concert in the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Tuesduy lust, and they are to be heartily
congratulated on the excellent programme provided. The theatre was
filled with an appreciative audience.
Unfortunately Mrs. M. S. Tribe was
unable to be present, through illness,
and Mr. J. Thompson, of Vancouver,
the popular exponent of Highland
dancing, was also unavoidably prevented from coming.
Mr. II. S. Baker, as a pseudo warrior, with a chest covered with
medals of all sorts and sizes, had no
difficulty in persuading tlle audience
that every word he said was true, and
thut tlie alphabet had been exhausted
111 supplying letters to describe the
many decorations his military exploits had gained for himself. He
was roundly encored, and was
equally successful in his "Ridiculous
Questions."
The bagpipe selection by Pipe-
Major Stewart was warmly received,
und as an encore he gave "Bonnie
Dundee," which set the feet of the
audience Itching.
Miss Jessie MacDonald sang "The
Carnival" in a very pleasing manner,
and us au encore sang " Until."
Tho "Cumberland Kewples" were
deservedly encored for their dainty
antl graceful dancing, and the enthusiastic manner in which tliey were received must have been gratifying to
Mrs. F. Oliver and Mrs. R. P. Christie
who had been nt so much pubis aud
trouble to teach them.
Mr. Brlcknell, who Is new to Cumberland audiences, wns given a splendid reception lor ills song, "My
Dream," and ns au encore he sang
"Sweet 'LU Fellow."
As " Hortense," Mrs. II. S. linker
fairly brought down thc house, and
ber encore, "1 Alu't Nobody's Darling," kept the house lu roars of
laughter, The audience wns insistent
In their applause, and In response she
sung "Apple Dumplings."
Mr. J. Westover, Irish comedian,
kept the audience tickled wilh his
"Description of Itnlferly's Party," at
which everything was Irish. He waa
loudly encored, and gave "I haven't
been home since morning."
The Cumberland ladles' octet, in
tlieir part song, "Ship o' Dreams,"
wore accorded n good reception, and
we hope to hear them again before
long.
The pianoforte duet by Mrs. F.
Oliver nnd Mrs. R. E. Frost, was
heartily applauded.
The orchestra was at its best, and
played with a refinement and precision which shows the result of careful rehearsals. Their various contributions to the programme were received with well-deserved applause.
Tho overture "Lustsplel" was rendered ln a particularly nice and crisp
manner, und the Hunting scene, with
vooal chorus, was roundly encored.
Altogether, the concert was an unqualified success, and the promoters
und artistes are to be congratulated
upon providing the best popular concert we huve heard In Cumlierland for
u long time.
Comox Member's Speech
In Provincial Legislature
HOLD MEETING TO
ORGANIZE B. P. O. E.
The Member for Comox Delivers
a Good Speech in the Legislative Assembly. — Discusses
Many Matters Concerning
His Constituency.
Mr. Speaker, in rising I wish to Join
with the others who have spoken tn
congratulating you upon being elected
tc the high position that you now oc
cupy.
Before dealing specifically with the
speech from Ihe Throne, I should like
to draw the attention of this assembly
to some features of the district that I
have the honour of representing, in
order that knowing the facts, the district may receive a fair share of justice at the hands of tbe Government.
The Diatrict of Comox.
The district of Comox Is the most
Important In the province. Comprising
nearly one-half of Vancouver Island,
all Islands north of Lasqueti to Mai
colm Island, and the Mainland from
Blunden Harbour to Jervis Inlet. Altogether it has a population ot over
25,000 people, being an Increase of
10,000 since the census of 1911.
The chief Industries are:
(1) Lumbering, carried on by large
companies such as the Comox Logging Company; International; Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch; Dollar; Hastings;
Nlmpkish, and many smaller companies. Their aggregate output is
several hundred millions of feet of
lumber and logs annually.
(2) Coal mining.— The Canadian
Collieries (D) Ltd., produce about
twenty-five per cent of the coal mined
in B. C, while the 200 coke ovens at
Union Bay turn out dally 75 tons of
coke ot excellent quality. Their Comox
coal is the only high grade coking
coal at present produced on the island.
(3) Agriculture. — Carried on extensively in the Comox Valley, Duncan and Hornby Island, and the la-
lands in the gulf and Sayward vall.'ji.]
The "Comox Creamery Butter" la a
household word in all the cities on the
Coast, and the Comox valley stands
second to no place ln British Columbia
in point of the number and the standard ot its pure-bred Jersey cattle.
The cultivation of small fruits, such
as strawberries, raspberries aud Loganberries, is carried on extensively
and will soon rival or surpass the
Southern part of aVncouver Island or
the Mainland,
(4) The pulp and paper industries
have come rapidly to the fore In this
district during the last few years.
At Powell River there is established
one of the best paper mills in B. C.
lt has many logging camps on the
coast to furnish It with logs suitable
for pulp and paper. This mill is expected shortly to double Ita present
capacity, and a site has been cleared
for a large sawmill, where timber not
suitable for paper can be cut into
commercial lumber, not only for the
use of the company, but alao for export.
At Port Alice, which ia situated on
the south-east arm ot Quatslno Sound,
Is established the Whalen Pulp and
Paper Mills, an Industry which Is of
Inestimable value to the province.
The company maintains Its owu mall
service, delivered over the trail from
Hardy Bay, every Thursday and Saturday. The "PrinceBS Maquinua" also
brings mall from Victoria three times
each month. A wireless station Is
service, and there is nlso a direct
located at the plant, which Is of great
'phone connection with Alert Bay.
These two assets are of great benefit
to the community as a whole. Thc
company runs its own dulry and produces an abundance of milk to meet
the requirments of all Its employees.
In the summer, the butcher meat ls
shipped from Vancouver on the hoof
and slaughtered in Port Alice, for the
reason that there Is no refrigerator on
the "S.S. Maquinua,' 'or any possibility of procuring It by awy of Port
Hardy. The general store carries a
complete stock of meats, groceries,
dry goods, boots and shoes, valued at
$20,000, while the store in connection
with the paper mills, proper, carries
supplies to the value Of $50,000.
Some of the materials used in this
pulp factory In 1921, together with
costs, may be of interest to members.
They bring home, perhaps more effectively than anything I can say, the
importance of this Industry:
Quantity.       Cost.
Limestone       4,364 tons  $ 12,159.00
Sulphur     3,015   "        85,993.00
Bleach powder   2,029   "      142,083.00
Logs   49,459 cords  814,641.00
Coal  27,764 tons    273,112.00
Wood fuel    6,257 cords    42,570.00
Manufactured—
Sulphlne pulp 19,874 tons  $1,699,996.65
Lumber.... .... 117,246 f.b.m.       3,873.78
Pay roll for 1921      463,968.33
Purchases     226,000.00
The population of Port Alice alone
has about 500 men, women aud children.
The year's operations and costs In
the "Woods Department" follows:
Legs taken off 55,000,000 f.b.m.
Pay roll $260,000.00
Purchases     160,000.00
Camps In operation  6
Average employees per month ...280
Crossing trail monthly  180
Hardy Bay Trail.—Operating aud
maintenance coats of Hardy Bay trail,
Including mall service, for 12 months,
paid by Whalen Company, $4,700.
In Quatslno Sound there are n great
many logging camps operating in connection with different logging companies ; also 40 families outside the
employees. These settlers are engaged In fishing, ranching and employed ln Government work looking
after telephone lines, forestry, Customs, etc.
Port Hardy trail la an absolute necessity for the people living In this
district,—first as a mall route and
then as a means of communication between Coal Harbour and Port Hardy.
Approximately 300 persons cross this
trail each month, coming and going
to and from Quatslno Sound. The
trail Is only ten miles In length, the
highest elevation being 300 feet, lu
(Continued on page 9).
(B. P. O. E.—Best   People   on   Earth)
One hundred persons who had
signed up as prospective members of
the Benevolent and Protective Order
I of Elks, in Comox district, attended
j a meeting on Thursday llight In
Booth's Hall, Courtenay, and, assisted
by the full roll of officers of Nanaimo
Lodge, and many other "'Brother Bills"
from the Coal City, instituted a local
of the II. I'. O. E. Interest in the organization has become district-wide,
and a splendidly enthusiastic session
was tlie result. Officers were elected
as follows:
Past Exalted Ruler- -Bro. T. Hudson.
Exulted Ruler—Bro, Ileber Cooke.
Esteemed Leading Knight- -Bro. Fred
Field.
Loyal Knight—Bro. Hugh Stevens.
Lecturing Knight—Bro. John  Sutton.
Esquire—Bro. Wm. G. Marshall.
Chaplain—Bro. Wm. Sutclifl*.
Secretary—Bro. M. B. Tribe,
Treasurer—Bro. F. C. Brock.
Inside Guard—Bro. Wm. Hayman.
Outside Guard—Bro. Jos.  Dallos.
Trustees—  (three years)   Bro.  R. B.
Dixon; (two years) Bro. M. G. Fair-
bairn;    (one    year)    Bro.    Horace
Everett.
Musical Director—Bro. Jas. Quinn.
.Many of the visitors made neat optimistic speeches, among them being
Bros. Kellington, Davies and Cautelon
(the last named being official
organizer).
PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
COMMITTEE DELVE
VICTORIA, Nov. 10.—No little discomfiture has beon caused the members of the Opposition through the
Premier aud Attorney-General Manson
moving resolutions In the Legislature
lo havo the full accounts of the P. O.
E. Railway and the Liquor Control
Hoard placed ill the hands ot the committee on public accounta. The request anticipated from Mr. Bowser in
this regard did not materialize, owing
to tho prompt steps of the Government. So for the first time In many
years the committee will have an opportunity to delve Into "anything and
everything they wiah," as the Premier
put It. "We have nothing to hide;
the Government Is the servant of the
people and we are always prepared to
give a full account of our stewardship."
NOTICE
The Board of Trade will hold their
next meeting on Tuesday next, Nov.
21st, In the Council Chamber, at 7.30
p.m.   A full attendance Is requested.
The person who took a parcel consisting of a pair of shoes from Sutherland's Dry Goods Store on Friday
last in mistake, would do well to return same.
BOOST SYSTEM OF
EDUCATION IN B. C,
"The educational system of British
Columbia la second to none in Canada
or the United States, and Is equalled
In few Instances," was the claim of
Hon. J. D. MacLeau, Minister of Education, iu discussing school questions
recently In the Legislature. Despite
criticism of the Opposition, he maintained that the young people of the
province were being afforded the fullest educational facilities, and a study
of the system would bear this out. He
said that the teachers In British Columbia were of a high standard, tlie
majority holding high class certificates. Rural schools are receiving
the maximum of support from the
Government, was the minister's contention, and he pointed out to the
House that It was necessary to sec
that the districts of small population
did not Buffer because of thc demands
of the cities.
POLICE COURT
On Tuesday last, It. Wuddell was
summoned for allowing cattle to stray
In the city. He pleaded not guilty.
and the case was adjourned for u week.
Death Of Mrs.
Stewart, Victoria
The sail news of the death of Mrs.
Marion Stewart reached Cumberland
lust Sunday evening, and is regretted
by mnny old-time residents of this
ity. The late Mrs. Stewart passed
away after a long illness, at her home
oil Bond St., Victoria, early Sunday
morning. The deceased lady was for
mauy years a very highly esteemed
citizen of Cumberland, being particularly well known to the.members of
Holy Trinity Church. As a membei
of the Ladles' Auxiliary, the memory
ot Mrs. Stewart will live on as an
example of unselfish efl'ort for the
benefit of the church.
(From the Colonist, Victoria).
There passed away Sunday morning, at her late residence, 1315 Bond
Street, Mrs. Marion May Stewart, wife
of James Stewart, aged 58 years. De-
censed was born In Hamilton, Ont.,
nil had been u resident of this city
tor the past twenty-three years. Besides her husband, Mrs. Stewart Is
survived by two sons, J. It. Stewart
and G. 11. Stewart, both of this city;
also one sister, Mrs. R. Bridges, at
Comox, and three brothers, 11, K.
Creech and H. Creech, of Victoria,
mid Edward Creech, at Courtenay, B.
". The funeral will take place from
the above uddress on Wednesday afternoon at 2.30 o'clock. Tlle remains
will be interred in the family plot at
Boss Bay Cemetery.
EASILY OUTPOINT
MERCHANTS* UNITED
The football league gaute held on
tin! Recreation Grounds lust Sunday,
turned out to he more of u practice
game for the locals, thou a strenuous
league game.
Tho forward line nt the homesters
simply ran uway from tlieir opponents
and were apparently aide to do almost
anything they wanted. The score ut
litilt'-llme stood 8-0; two gouls being
scored by Fowler and one by Hitcliens.
Tlm second half was n repetition of
the first, as far ns play wus concerned.
Hut no gouls were scored. Brewster
■pissed a penally, shooting for the top
uf the goal, the goalie conceding n
cm iter.
On lust Sunday's exhibition, it wns
easily to be seen that the management have at last found a good forward line, and we have always held
thu contention that Mllllgiui and
rititiip on the right, form the best
riglit wing in B. C. Hitcliens and
Home on the left also muke an excellent wing; nnd with Fowler fitting In
nicely us pivot, we look for a succession of wins for thc locals.
► .^NOTICE.
Impounded ul  the City Pound,
Cumberland.
One Black Horse, one white fetlock,
near hind foot, white pntch on forehead; also I Chestnut Mare.
If not claimed by the 25th November,
will lie sold by Public Auction at tiie
City Pound.
A. .1. Merry. Pound-keeper,
Crook Fights
To Save A
Young Princess
Thrilling Story is Developed in
"The Face in the Fog."
At the Ilo-Ilo.
Fancy a crook fighting fnr a princess!
You don't have tn fancy it, though.
Vou can see it If you go lo see "Tlle
Face In the Fog" ut the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
next  Weduesilny uml Thursday.
Lionel Barrymore, playing the part
ot* Boston Blackle Dawson, Is the
crook, and Ills princess, the Grand
Duchess Tatlana of Kussia, is In real
life beautiful Seena Owen.
Seldom bus Mr. Barrymore bad a
more advantageous opportunity for
the display of Ills histrionic talents.
In this picture he depicts the change
of a crook into a peaceful citizen and
hack into a crook ngain—but this time
he is not a crook for tlio crook's sake
but a crook for u woman's sake. It
Is the only way In which Boston
Claekle can save the life of the Grand
Duchess Tatlana.
Jack Boyle, author of this story,
which appeared In Cosmopolitan Magazine, has made artistic and effective
use of every opportunity to stir the
emotions. He throws ruffians together, mixes blue blood anil red,
shows where Bolsheviks and the
United States Government stand—and
he doesn't leave out love.
"The Face in tlie Fog" is a first-
class production. Nothing of thc sort
is likely to be seen here again for
many weeks. No one who likes a rattling good picture will miss seeing it
CAMPBELL RIVER NEWS
On Saturday, Nov. 4th, the Ladies'
Auxiliary of the Campbell River hospital held a very successful bazaar
and dance, which was opened by the
Rev. and Mrs. Scott. The affair was
one of tbe best attendetl functions
ever held In tho district, nnd the substantial sum of $500 was presented to
the matron, Miss Robson, for the benefit of the Campbell River aencru!
Hospital.
Miss Robson, president of the auxiliary, with the following ladles who
bad charge of the different stalls, wish
to convey their hearty thanks to all
those who so kindly helped them to
make the bazaar such a success..
Home cooking stall—Mrs. Higgins
and Mrs. Glanvllle.
Needle work nnd fancy sewing-
Mrs.  (Dr.)  Shaw aud Mrs. E. Smith.
Candy stall—Miss Wlddowson and
Mrs. J. McNeil.
Afternoon tea—Mrs. C. Thulln and
Miss Robson.
Fish  pond—Misses Glanvllle.
Young men's stall—Messrs. Chlsholm, Dawson, Flawes and Mr. S.
Huge, secretary of the hospital.
The dance was well attended, ull
local residents turning out for tho occasion; and a great many boys from
Duncan Bay and Menzies' Bay came
down especially for the dunce. The
music was furnished by the Head-
'litnrters orchestra. Everyone seemed
tn enjoy themselves to the utmost,
and regretted the parting hour.
CARD  OF  THANKS
To Ihe Editor of The Islander:
(in behalf ot* the young men of
Canipliel] River I wish to ask the following merchants of Courtonay to uc-
oept my sincere thanks for the great
kindness they gave tne towardi niuk-
ing the recent bazaar ami d&ncs held
by tho Ladles' Auxiliary hi aid of the
hospital the grand Buocesa it wus.
Fred Jeune, Sun Drug Co., Jeffrey
lluuiiuy, G. R. Miltrle, Malpuss &
Wilson, Riverside Hotel, ('. II. Plgotl,
Comox Co-Op. Society, Modern Shoe
Store, Farmers' Produce, J. Rickson,
C. Kent & Co.. and J. N, McLeod.
II.  Chlsholm.
Willows  Hotel, Campbell  River.
Sale Of Work
December 6th
A Bale of work will be held in tlio
Anglican Church Hall on Wednesday,
December 0th, under the auspices of
the Ladles' Auxiliary of Holy Trinily
Church.   Look for further particulars.
Fuller measures of conservation
for the timber wealth of lite province
will be provided before the end of tlie
present session, staled Hon. T. D,
Patitillo, Minister of Lands, in the
House lust week. TWO
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1122
News of Courtenay District
COMOX DISTRICT TEACHERS
HOLD THEIR FIRST
CONVENTION.
An educational convention whose
results should have a far-reaching
effect upon methodB of instruction,
was held in Courtenay last Friday and
Saturday   in   the  auditorium   of   the
Public School.
'y
That ls was thorough-
n.„pi,ell River in the north, was
shown by the attendance of nearly
fifty pedagogues. Just aB Comox took
the lead in holding a School Fair last
year, she has now taken the lead In
he   matter   of   holding   a   District
■MIIIIIlllllllllllllll
Geo. J. Hardy
NOTARY PUBLIC
REAL ESTATE AGENT
INSURANCE AGENT
AUCTIONEER
Phone 10
Teachors' Convention. That It wo
able to attract many Inspectors and
professor) from other parts ot the
province Is turther evidence that what
the educationalists of this valley have
•cproeetilative of the district lying undertaken Is boing closely obeerved
ce Cocmbs 'o the south and by the ,elk(ung 8Cbolars of the prov
lnce, who will carry the ideas gleanei
from this meeting to their own pupils
and schools ln various portion of the
country. The effect must be beneficial
for all that was said and doue wat
tor the advancement ot the welfare ot
the scholars, young and old, of the
entire province. The convention was
opened on Friday by Mayor Charles
! Simms, who in welcoming the teachers said that he was gratified to know
that so much Interest was being taken
In the education ot the young. He
thought the boys and girls of to-day
were very fortunate ln having available such congenial surroundings and
tcld his audience that they must never
forget that the election of school
trustees was Just as important, and lu
many cases more important, than the
selection of a mayor and Council to
govern the city. While he was glad
that these modern Influences prevailed, he thought he would like to be
Just a little bit old-fashioned and welcome back Into the schools the old
familiar Scripture lesson. His remarks were listened to with the utmost interest. Mr. Simms was followed by Mr. J. M. Paterson, inspector
for Comox district, who thanked His
Worship for the many kind things he
had Bald regarding the profession.
As president ot the Comox Teachers'
Institute, he congratulated the teach
era on the very keen Interest they had
taken In their work during the past
year. The holding of the convention
was proof that their work was being
taken seriously. Mr. Paterson spoke
of the benefits.that had accrued, not
COURTENAY
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Don't Delay.—Send application in as early as possible
The Cumberland Islander
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
CROCKERY
p££'.97pke9' $16.50t0 $45.00
Glass Sugar and Creams, per pair  $1.00
CUPS AND SAUCERS
Plain White, per dozen  $2.50
Gold Line, per dozen  $2.50
Fancy Flower Designs, per dozen  $4.75
TUMBLERS
Plain, per dozen  $1.50
Grape Design, per dozen  $2.25
T. BOOTH  & SONS
Courtenay, B.C.
WATAGOOD
TEA
Per Ib. 70c.
WATAGOOD
COFFEE
Per lb. 50c.
only to the scholars, but to the teachers as well, through the School Fair
that had been held. Results were apparent in the work of the boys and
girls at the entrance examinations
and the general betterment In work
since the fair was held. This condition was district-wide, and he hoped
the splendid work would be continued.
"Teaching of English" was the
subject of a short discourse, but
nevertheless a most Interesting one,
by Mr. H. H. McKenzie, inspector of
schools, Vancouver. He outlined
many of the most noticeable errors of
common occurence in composition.
The speaker's words contained much
constructive criticism and concluded
by urging teachers to keep their minds
refreshed with modern thought by
wider reading. He very briefly and
cleverly demonstrated the methods of
approach In prose and poetical selections In literature. He urged the
teachers to develop a greater love of
the subject.
" School Administration" was the
subject of an address by Mr. E. S.
Martin, principal of the Public School
at Nanaimo. Hia remarks were keenly Interesting, particularly when he
introduced the thought of card-indexing every pupil so that a correct record could be available at once regarding hie characteristics, abilities
and attendance. As the pupil advanced from grade to grade, he could be
more closely watched. The advantages of outlining the school course
for the year were dwelt upon, and the
speaker pointed out that better results
could be obtained by this method than
by the haphazard conditions now ln
vogue In so many places. He also
made the assertion that better business methods were necesBary to secure best results.
Friday afternoon was taken up with
the discussion of two papers, moBt
ably written and presented hy Mr.
W. P. Weston, of Vancouver Normal
School, and Mr. Wm. O. StubliH, principal of Courtenay Public School. The
former took as his Bubjccl, "Design
and Its Application," and by means of
many Illustrations and examples gave
a very helpful address on tho principles and development of design. He
traced its origin and development
from the earliest times and primitive
peoples, showing that the same development could be brought about In
the present day school. Mr. Weston
said that a systematized outline Is now
lu course of preparation and would be
of the greatest assistance to the teachers of the province. "How, to raise
pupils from the monosyllabic to the
composition stags," was the subject of
Mr. Stubbs' greatly interesting paper.
He presented some advanced methods
of improving composition and laid
great stress on the enlargement of the
pupils' vocabularies, and encouraging
greater freedom In correct conversation. He said Robert Louis Stevenson
learned the great art ot writing correctly from a study of the best authors
of his and previous times. Mr. Stubbs
argude that the copying of successful
authors was one of the best ways to
become proficient, and showed ln this
way that literature was an aid to the
oductlon of composition.
Miss Ault, of the Courtenay School
itaff, presented a class of primary
pupils and with tfieir aid gave a most
nterestlng demonstration of a black-
loard writing lesson. Progressive
essous were presented, and the child-
en showed a keen Interest in their
vork. Miss Ault's demonstration was
he object of much favorable comment
iy inspectors present.
Mrs. Pearce, of the Cumberland
Public School, also had a class of
pupils and gave a demonstration of
listory, geography and nature study
The class showed the same careful
training as did Miss Ault's scholars,
and their speaking and well-formed
sentences called forth great praise.
"Local Problems" was the subject
for the final session on Saturday I £|
morning, being in the able hands of: =2
Mr. II. Chnrleswortb, president ot thejs=j
Canadian Federation of Teachers,, jg
The speaker showed a wide knowledge 3|
of tho problems that confront educu- j |j|
tlonlsta, and his address was favor- Eg
ably received. {||
Although not on the programme n.*i §j§
arranged, Mr. Stewart, Inspector of E
Public Schools, Victoria, wns given =
an opportunity to speak. He spoke of g
the value nf conventions like the, i=
present one to the teachers of the B
province, and said that tlie one being =
held marked nu epoch In tlie advance-: g|
ment of education in thc Comox Val- B3
ley and district, .lie said that Oka- g=
nagan. Chililwack and Comox were. =|
the three greatest districts ln the best
province ot thc Dominion' of Canada,
and said that from the efforts that
have twen put forth by teachers of
Comox the district deserved to be flrst
educationally, and. he hoped it would
be so.
At the close of the regular business,
plans were laid for the holding of
another School Fair next year.
Hearty votes of thanks were passed
to the Courtenay School Board for thc
use of the school for the convention
and to the Cumberland School Board
for the transportation of pupils for
Ihe demonstration classes.
While the teachers assembled transacted much business and listened to g|
a great many interesting papers and g|
able addresses, the local mebers of thc g
association had not forgotten the en- =
tertatnment features, and on Friday g
night held a dance in tlie auditorium °S£
of the Public School; an event thnt =
was thoroughly enjoyable.    Previous =
to the social event, the pupils of the s=
Courtonay   school   presented a num- 5=
ber   of   folk    dances    which   were ==
grently enjoyed, especially the "Skat- |j
Ing Dance" and the "Dutch Dance";  £|
Mr. Stubbs pointing out that this form E
of recreation Is taking the place of S
the physical training as being equally =
healthful   and   possibly  more   enter- s
tninlng.   "The Sneak" song was also ==
generously applauded. B|
The  following officers   havo   been £***=
elected for the ensuing year; s=
Hon.   President—Mr.  S.  J. Willis, E
Supt. of Education, Victoria. =***£
President—Mr. A. H. Webb, Cum- gl
berland.
Vice-president-Mr. O. il. Stubbs,
Courtenay.
Sec-Treasurer—Miss C. B. Dalton,
B.A.,  Cumberland.
Committee—Miss M. Beckwith, Mr.
C. B. Wood and Mr. G. E. Apps, of
Cumberland; Mr. J. W. Young and
Miss Hildebrand, of Courtenay; Mr.
Bralthwaite, Minto; Mr. Jay, Bevan;
Mr. Hlldrldgc, Union Bay; Miss Preston, Denman Island; .Miss Shaw,
Comox; Mr. Williams, Morvllle.
iflllllllllillllllllllill
■■mill
McLeocPs Store
HllllllIlllllliHHiil|
>    1
m GENTS'
FURNISHINGS IN  AVL LINES
BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.
—Sole Agent for—
TIP-TOP
TAILORS
In This District
Including Cumberland
STANFIELD'S RED & BLUE LABEL UNDERWEAR
In all Sizes.   Specially Priced on Saturday only
JUST ARRIVED!
BOYS' SLICKER COATS AND HATS
ALSO A CHOICE LINE OF HOUSE SLIPPERS
FOR LADIES, GENTS AND CHILDREN
J. McLEOD
Courtenay, B.C.
lilllillllllltlltllllilllllllllllll
I
m JUST  ARRIVED
j A new assortment of
§ Ginghams, Prints, Muslins, Serges
| Underwear aed Stockings
8 in all Colors and Sizes in Silk Wool and Cashmeres,
■
j=f and many other Beautiful Things for Xmas Presents.
= Call in to see them.
Mrs. L. Francescini
LECTURE IN COURTENAY
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
On Tuesday lost uu entertainment
arranged by the Hev. Mr. Beattie, of
the Courtenay Presbyterian Church,
and the Itcv. o. Kinney, of Ornco
Methodist Church, Cumberland, wns
givon at the Courtenay Presbyterian
Church. Part 1 Included a song by
Mr. O. namBell, "Oo lo Sea," and as
lin encore "The Fishermen of St.
Ives." A quartette by Mcsdames
Finch nnd Mumford und Messrs. Finch
and Mumford. "The Long Day
Closes"; song, "The Slave's Dream,'*
by Mrs. Lymn; a violin solo by Mr.
R. Walter, and songs by MIbs Crawford and Mr. Mumford. The various
items were enthusiastically received,
t"art II was devoted to a lecture on
the Canadian Rockies by the Rev. O.
Kinney, and was Illustrated with
lantern views, the operator being Mr.
Wood. This popular lecture was well
received, and after a very successful
evening, thc artlsties were regaled
with refreshments hy friends of the
church.
Coffee and Tea will be served as
usual on Saturday night
l!lllllll!lll]lill!IIIllll!l!lllllllllllttllHHIli!IHIIIllll[!(Jnilllllii]l!i)l!l!IJI IKIIIIillllilFillllliyillimillllllllllrlllJiyill
MISSOURI  BLUES.
Uttle Paul swat the mule with a maul,
While stealing with Btealth past his
stall;
The mule put his heele
When Paul put his meals—
And bo tar aB we know that's all.
Men's Suits
and
Overcoats
$22.50
Men's Heavy Grey Tweed Suits will
give very good wear, well cut and
well    tailored.      Price    fl»10 C A
at   Sutherland's  •■lOeWV
Men's   Stripe   Tweed   Suits,   Young
Men's    Model,   closely
fitting,   Sutherland's at
Fine Tweed Suits, well tailored and
finished, made ot vory   good   quality
tweed   and    will    give   flJOQ CA
every satisfaction. Prloe   WsfiO.tMJ
Men's Flue Tweed Suite made ot a
really superfine quality of cloth for
the price, and will give good service.
Fine fitting, extra good <8Q7 EA
Mning. Sutherland'* at VOI.tjV
Men's Overcoats, made ot a very heavy
Tweed Coating. Extra good value,
and lined throughout. COE AA
Price at Sutherland's.... VtiiOMV
Men's Reversible Tweed Overcoats,
smart and snappy, cut on very line
lines and look well. ©0*7 AA
Price at Sutherland's... &**• ,VV
Men's Heavy Leatherette Raincoats.
Just what Is wanted to keep tbe rain
out. With belt. An Eng- fri rj EA
llsh-made  coat.    Price    wllttfV
DRYGOODS
& GENTS FUR.NISHIN09
For Results Advertise in The Islander
mm SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1922
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
i
■SHM
CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at
Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
I SUBJECT OF MINE
INSPECTION DISCUSSED
IN LEGISLATURE
SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER  18th,  1922
GUARD THE TONGUE.
The Matter of Gas in the Mine
at Time of Explosion on
August 30th.
You would not think ot taking your
neighbour's life or wounding him with
any physical weapon. But you perhaps do not realize that when you say
an evil thing about him you are
wounding bim more grievously than
you could possibly wound him with
gun or dagger. You may be killing
his reputation, which may be a worse
calamity to him than killing his body.
It is strange Indeed that this terrible Item of wrong-doing ls so easy
and so wide-spread. It Is hard to
understand tho peculiar pleasure
which many people seem to feel ln
saying unkind things about others.
Bad as lt is simply as a breach of
good neighbourliness and good citizenship, it Is unspeakably bad from the
standpoint ot Christianity and the
teachings of Christianity's founder.
A great many start for Heaven as
if more depended upon speed than
direction.
DUTY.
Most of us are ln the habit ot associating hardness with duty. We
might relieve ourselves of a great deal
of strain and trouble and unhapplness,
if we realized that our duty in this
world ls not the hardest thing to do
by any means. The most difficult
thing is to decide what our duty Is.
When any one Is sure and clear about
that, the doing of it is a compartlvely
easy matter. What wears us out and
disheartens us is not the performance
of it, but the hesitation and the half-
hearteduess which comes trom going
to one duty with a suspicion that It
would be more profltbale to be doing
aome other. It Is natural for every
one to wish to do what will count for
most, and It is while we are deciding
that question that wc nre torn and
distressed. Once let it be clearly settled which thing demands our first
attention and our highest effort, and
thc clamour of the other things subsides and we have peace.
As Julia Wedgwood says, "The
whole of duty Is modified when we
change the hierarchy of duty. How
significant is the etymology of 'per-
rogotive,' the section that was asked
flrst for its opinion! There lies the
whole force of our Ideal. Which do
you consult flrst? Everything else
will be different. That which gives
life Ita key-note Is not what men
think good, but what they think best."
HEDGES.
The advantage of a hedged road is
that it keeps our eyes on a track that
goes somewhere and our feet moving
forward. What Ib the use lu complaining ot the hedges If there are no
barred gates across the road? Must
we come to our Journey's end this very
evening? There are many roads from
various starting places and through
different regions; shall it not be
enough for us to be assured that thoy
all lead to one goal and home at last?
Our road may seem rough and stoney
and shut ln by wall and hedge, but
what do we really know of another
man's road? Our envy will not change
the conditions; it will only turn us
about to walk away from the goal. Ot
all the wasted energies that keep men
from the progress they were meant to
make on earth the power diverted and
dissipated In complaint of circumstances in most pitiful. What does
Ihe neat matter, It the bird haa wings?
I; may be narrow, liko the vesper
sparrow's, shut In by grass tufts; or
dug out of a bank like tbe sand
martin's; or sunk ln the tree trunk,
like the wood-pecker's. It is only a
nest after all, to be left when the
hour has come to fly—that is If the
nestling has used his time aright for
growth of heart and lungs and wings.
•Something for Everybody
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star of Montreal, seem to have a
genius for collecting, or at least for
giving us the gest of everything. It
is because all needs are catered to,
and all minds receive what they need,
and all households are given from the
experience ot the past and the wisdom
of the present what Is necessary for
to-day and for to-morrow also, that
none can afford to be without the
Family Herald and Wjbekly Star, particularly aa the subscription price of
$2.00 a year Is within the means of all.
VICTORIA.—The Labor member for
Newcastle does not make a very good
member ot the Legislature, for he cannot listen. If there is anything with
which he disagrees, he has to say so
and wantB to make little speeches here
and there. During the debate on the
Address, he challenged Hon. .T. D.
Pattullo's Immigration policy, and did
It In a loud and very assertive voice.
It was almost a bullying voice, and
the tone Indicated that he was open
to udmlt of no opposition to his own
pel  views, and those views are Red.
During Hon. W. J. Sloan's speech,
he kept up a running fire, contradicting and objecting until warned by
thc Speakor. Mr. Sloan charged
Qui nric with designating Inspector
Wilkinson as a "Liberal Heeler," yet
that official had been appointed by the
Conservative Government on recommendation of William Manson, of
Prince Rupert, whose letter Mr. Sloan
read. Wilkinson was also the Socialist nominee for the position. He was
a coal miner who had reached- the
position of chief Inspector, and he resented an attack on his integrity.
Guthrie denied having used the expression, but refused to retract anything he had said.
Mr. Sloan also told of the merits of
die other Inspector, and said the staff
was loyal to the miners and enforced
the regulation against both employers
and men. During the present regime,
the fatalities had been cut down one
hundred per cent, and he hoped to cut
them down another hundred. Also he
reminded Outhrle that he, Sloan, had
already been endorsed a second time
by the miners of Nanaimo, and he Intimated that he expected to remain ln
politics long after his friend from
Newcastle had disappeared.
Discussing tho matter of gas In the
Cumberland mine where the explosion
had occurred, Mr. Sloan said it had
been shown that there was no sign of
gas there prior to the explosion, and
very booh afterwards It had again disappeared. He showed that the statement of Mr. Guthrie that the gas committee wns afraid to report, could not
he correct, because gas had beon reported In two other levels but not In
this one. The use of powder had been
forbidden in the coal, but unfortunately the human element entered Into all
accidents. Men as well as employers
were often negligent In enforcing the
regulations, and it was necessary for
the Inspectors to keep both up to the
mark. Unfortunately they could not
employ enough Inspectors to be on
the job nil the time and see that
everyone did his duty.
Mr. Sloan's speech was well received and was listened to with attention. He showed that he was
master of the situation throughout.
GOOD FEELING EXISTS
BETWEEN PARTIES
VICTORIA.—More noticeable than
has been the ease for several years,
ls the harmony existing In the Government ranks at present. During tho
first week's session of the Legislature
withering attacks were made upon the
Oliver administration by W. J. Bow-
sor, K.C, the Opposition leader, and
members of his Cabinet. Although
there had apparently been some dls-
sonslon among members of the party,
dissatisfaction exhibited even on the
floor of the House, with regard to certain details ot policy. Tho results obtained since tlle Legislature last met
have unified the Liberals and resulted
In u solid front being shown to the
Opposition. Several divisions have
arisen already lu the House, but thu
Government ims had a good majority
on each vote. These tests of strength
serve to exemplify the (act that Premier Oliver has a solid party behind
him.
Pearls come from oysters, but
diamonds usually come from some
poor fish.
Fashion note: The new long skirt
will have more hooks but less eyos
on It than the short skirt.
THE JOKE WAS ON THE ARTIST.
An artist once staying in the coun
iry thought to have a Joke at an old
farmer's expense. So he proposed to
paint tho farmhouse for live dollars
The farmer agreed, but was very particular he should be painted standing
at the door.
When the painting was finished, to
tho farmer's disgust, he found the
carelesB artist had omitted "to paint
him In." But the wily artist passed
It off sb a great Joke, saying:
"Oh, you have Just gone In to get
the five dollars."
"Oh, have I?" Bald the old farmer,
Irately; "that's all right. Just hang
It up and wait till I come out with the
money!"
HOW TO BE HAPPY B
THOUGH POOR
Happiness doea not depend upon
outer conditions but upon the Inner
lite. It is a matter of disposition, not
of position; ot temperament, not of
temperature; ot grace in the heart,
not the sum in the bank. It was Paul
and not Nero who said: "I have
learned to be content."
Poverty haa Its compensations. The
ment not possible to the bisque doll,
and the cart made of spools will outlast the toy automobile. The poor
man has fewer delicacies, but a better
appetite; longer hours, but less ennut;
a smaller house, but a better chance
for "the many mansions."
Money may be consecrated to noble
uses and may minister to happiness
in many ways, but it is not the essential thing people suppose. The
serenest, most useful life was that of
Him of whom It was said, "He became
poor"; whose birthplace waa a
stranger's stable, and whose burial-
place was a borrowed tomb.
—Rev. Edward B. Bagby.
Old Country
FOR
CHRISTMAS
And New Year
Canadian National Railways
will operate a
SPECIAL  TRAIN
Leaving Vancouver, 7.45 p.m.t
December 4th,
To Ship's Side, Halifax, for
Sailing of
S.S. "Megantic" to Liverpool
December 10th, 1922
S.S. "Andania" to Liverpool
December 11th, 1922
S.S. "Cassandra" to Glasgow
December 11th, 1922
— ALSO —
TOURIST SLEEPING CARS
for the following Sailings:
8.8. "CANADA"  (Montreal) Not. 18
8.8.  "Antonln"   (Montreal)   Not.  18
8.8. "Metagamn" (Montreal) Not. 18
8.8.   "Regina"    (Halifax)    Dee.   8
8.8.   "Canada"   (Halifax)   Dee.   10
•8.8. "Jletagama" (St. John) Dee. IS
• Passengers transfer at Moncton
Full Information from
E. W. Bickle, Agent
Cumberland, B. C.
1
Begin Today to Plan for
Christmas Shopping
HOLIDAY  GOODS ON   SHOW THIS  WEEK
Xmas Handkerchiefs, in fancy boxes, from 25c. to $2.25 per box
SILK   LINGERIE,  CAMISOLES,   BOUDOIR CAPS, CUT GLASS, HAND BAGS,
IVORY  SETS.   FUR  AND  FUR  SETS.    ALSO   A   COMPLETE   RANGE   OF
INFANTS' WEAR.
Special Showing this Week of Dress Velvets
DRESS VELVETS, DUCHESS MESSALINE SILKS IN ALL SHADES, SUITABLE FOR EVENING WEAR. RADIUM ALL-OVER LACE AND LACE
FLOUNCINGS IN BLACK, NAVY, BROWN AND GREY. ALSO DRESS ACCESSORIES  OF  ALL  KINDS.
SPECIAL  DISCOUNT  OF  25  PER   CENT   ON   ALL   READY-TO
WEAR  AND TRIMMED  HATS.
'    ' • =•=mm=^=^=- ' -       i    ■■■   -rr'-i/r.'   .        ■     m. ■ ■■■■■■■■3..V   j jr        . .i!--_i--i BMgBanwng    ■fl   ffl-flf
Grocery Department—Specials this Week
Oranges, 3 dozen for 95c
Peters' Marmalade, per tin  65c
Best Japan Rice 3 lbs. for 25c
Small White Beans, 3 lbs. for 25c
Canned Corn 6 tins for $1.00
Horseshoe Salmon, small tins  25c
Horseshoe Salmon, large tins SOc
Fels Naptha Soap, per carton 85c
"Nonsuch" Stove Polish, per bottle 25c
Fresh Tomatoes, Grapes, Grape Fruit,
Table Figs, Celery, Cauliflowers, Sweet
Potatoes, Poping Corn, Roasted Peanuts, Mixed Nuts, Spanish Onions.
Public School
CONCERT
December 11th and 12th
SPECIALS
For this Week
Big Sale of Aluminum Kitchen Ware, only $1.49 each.
See Window.
AIm Clearance Sale—20 to 30 Per Cent—All Kinds/
of Aluminum Ware.
COAL     AND    WOOD    HEATERS,
BAPCO PAINT,  VARNISH, STAIN,
WALL  FELT,  ETC..  FOR  XMAS  DECORATIONS
CROCKERY,     HARDWARE,     SPORTING
GOODS AT REASONABLE PRICES       ::
Tommy Nakanishi
A Suitable
Gift
HAVE YOU ORDERED YOUR
Personal Greeting Cards
WE   HAVE   THEM   IN   EXCLUSIVE   DESIGNS
CHRISTMAS CARDS IN GREAT VARIETY
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
SUNDAY HOURS: Morning, 10-12; Evening, 6-9.
Notice of Sale
TAKE NOTICE that under a Distress, levied by
me, as Landlord, against Robt. Fyvie, Tenant,
I will, on Wednesday, the 22nd Day of November,
1922, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, at the rooms over
Laver's Store, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, B. C,
sell by Public Auction all the Household Goods, Furniture, Cook Range, Etc., of the said Robt. Fyvie, to
.satisfy certain arrears of rent.
Dated at Cumberland this 15th day of November, 1922.
R. G. LAVER
Landlord. THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVfcMBElt  18th, 1>22
BUILD  FOR  HEALTH
-*«
OVER
KING'S
STORE
HOURS:
2 to 4
6 to 8
How To Play Basketball
(By Observer).
E.   0.   HAUKEDAL
CUMBERLAND'S CHIROPRACTOR
VIII.-OKKKNSt.
BASKET-BALI. LEAGUE SCHEDULE
1    Heater Time
WE HAVE THEM IN ALL SIZES.
Call and Inspect Our Stock of Fixtures & Accessories
A   Nice Line of Inexpensive Shades Just Arrived
Electric Washers on Easy Payment Plan
 Wiring  ______
Box 71
The Piket Electric
COURTENAY       ::
hone 164
READ 'EM AND GRIN
30 x 31/2 Gregory  $12.00
30 x 3i/2 Cords  $17.50
— AT —
BOOL and WILSON
WE REPAIR
RUBBER BOOTS
VULCANIZING
GAS and OIL
TIRES, ETC.
COURTENAY,  B. C,
Farmer's
Boarding House
Dunsmuir Avenue
CUMBERLAND
Since this establishment has changed hands, many
great improvements have been installed.
One advantage is an Up-to-date Shower Bath.
 ALL  HOME  COOKING	
Reasonable Rates
High-class Cooking
A Comfortable Home
MRB. HARRY FARMER
When your Telephone is left accidentally
off the hook, it registers the same as a
call at Central. If the operator gets no
response to her " Number, Please," the
^^^ number is handed over to the Repairing
Forces as being out of order. All this involves tests,
reports and time. In the meantime, no one gets you
on your telephone.
" Off the Hook," is a very common cause of interruption to Telephone Service. By the exercise of care
in this connection you will protect your service and
avoid inconvenience to yourself and others.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Under the Post Office, Courtenay
You will find us here whenever you want anything in
the Building Line.   We make a Specialty of Interior
Finish, and can furnish Cottonwood Panel, Fir Veneer
or any other Material of a like nature on short notice.
Prepared Roofing or Shingles at Right Prices.
.Sash and Doors of the Best Quality, made by
Returned Soldiers.   Come in, let's talk It over.
COMOX   VALLEY   SUPPLY,   LIMITED
COURTENAY, B. C.
The Northern Radio Co. Ltd. has an office with us,
Some Radio News for you shortly. Radio Supplies that
are positively guaranteed, furnished on short notice,
THE STAR PLAYER.
Practically every art of the game,
such as passing, shooting, handling
one's self while dribbling, pivoting,
dodging, jumping and starting, must
be well executed In offensive formations. One sllp-up or one act of Indecision is likely to make Ihe whole
formation useless. Strong offensive
ploy always comes as the result of
combined efforts. One star, or a team
composed wholly of stars, can not accomplish the greatest results if their
efiorts are individual. Highly developed team play, with formations
built around a star player, will work
out exceptionally well.
Successful offensive play requires
the working of the ball down the floor
through the opponents defence by a
serlesi of passes or dribbles so as to
secure a point of vantage for shooting. Failure lo start an offensive play
nn soon na tlie ball ls secured is
usually due to the team-mates not
coming around in front to receive a
paBs nud allowing the man with the
ball to advance his position. Someone
tion to receive a pass, but the others
should alwisyn be In an advanced posi-
should get in motion in case he ls
covered.
There are times when close guarding prevents sucli movements and
back-passing must be resorted to.
Under this condition back passing is
good basketball. Usually the stationary or back guard Is uncovered
and In excellent position to receive a
pass when the play ls blocked near
the centre of the court. The running
guard should be on the look-out for
back passes.
The style of offence which a team
ls using can often be Judged by the
style of passing used. Many teams
resort wholly to a variety of long
passes endeavoring at all times to
have the ball beat their opponent to
tlie basket. We have noticed that this
Is not effective unless developed very
highly.
A dribbling game effects the same
style of play, while the short-passing
game j» usually played with the ob-
pect of creating an opening near the
basket for an Incoming player to receive a pass and shoot. The most successful offence Is that which combined
long and short passes with the dribble
used occasionally.
Starting; Points.
Though the long pass may reach the
centre, and tbe forwards be on hand
to receive the pass out, still every man
might be covered and unable to shoot.
Short, snappy passing around the
basket will aid in getting a mau un
covered under such circumstances, but
It means that every man must be on
the move.
Players may be drilled ln offensive
formations with specific starting
points during practice, but experience
has taught that conditions aa outlined
in practice rarely occur in games.
However, the drill work ls exceedingly
valuable, as It forms good basketball
habits and also wakens within the
player a recognition of the possibilities for the start of team play.
The tip-off at centre Is practically
the only formation where specific
starting places can be set. It must be
remembered that forwards and guards
must be constantly on the move to obtain advantage of position. A ball
held out of bounds, a held ball, and
the line-up for a free throw, all hold
splendid possibilities for the start of
an offensive formation. If the players
have been drilled In such formations
team-play will result In a game, lt
can not bo expected that formations
will work out ns specifically planned,
but a Htnrt or an attempt to do so will
eliminate loss of time and indecision.
A team should master Ils selection
of plays exceedingly well und not try
to acquire a large number ot half-
learned plays. Tills end can be accomplished by starting with a very
few plays and gradually perfecting
others as the season progresses. Plays
should remain as simple as possible,
for the fewer the passes, the more
likelihood of completion.
The Recreation Hall, situated on the
grounds,   is  to  be  completely over-
hauled and renovated, a heating system is to be Installed, and repairs are
now under way to make an increased
seating capacity, in order that the
vnrious basket-ball teams may play
to an advantage.
The 11)22 Basket-ball League schedule Is as follows*.
Saturday, Nov. 11.—High School
boys vs. Bevan boys; High School
girls vs. W. H. O. Club.
Wednesday, Nov. lfs.—W. H. O. Club
;s. TeacherB; Firemen vs. Five T's.
Saturday, Nov. 18.—Teachers vs.
Public School PUtters; Keystones vs.
Firemen.
Wednesday, Nov. 22.—Teachers vs.
VV. tt. 0. Club; Owls vs. KeystoneB.
Saturday, Nov. 25.—High School
girlR vs. Public School Putters; Owls
vs. Firemen.
Wednesday, Nov. 29.- -High School
boys vs. Riff Raffs; Five T's vs. Firemen.
Saturday, Dec. 2.—W. H, 0. Club vs.
High School girls; Puhlic School
Putters.
Wednesday. Dec, 6.- High School
girls vs. Teachers; Five T's vs. Owls.
Saturday, Dec. 9th.—Teachers vs,
High School girls; Keystones vs. Owls,
Wednesday, Dec. 13.—Bevan boys
vs. Htgli School boys; Five T's vs.
Keystones,
Saturday, Dec. 16.—Rift RaffB vs.
High School boys; Public School Putters vs. W. H. 0. Club.
Wednesday, Dec. 20—Riff Raffs vs.
Bevan; Keystones vs. Five T's.
Saturday, Dec. 23.—W*. H. 0. Club
vs. Puhlic School Putters; Firemen
vs. Keystones.
Practice Schodnle for Recreation Hull
Mondays and Fridays—6.00 to 7.00,
Owls and Bevan; 7.00 to 8.00, W. H.
O. Club and Teachers; 8.00 to 9.00,
Keystones and High School Boys; 9.00
to 10.00, Firemen and Riff Raffs.
Tuesdays and Thursdays—Cumber
land United Football Association.
DID YOU EVER STOP_
TO THINK	
That If tho business men want better business, they must keep alive and
go after lt.
That If they Bit and wait for it to
come to them—they will have a long
wait.
That their business will be what
vision, determination, effort and good
horsesense make it.
That If their business Is not growing iis they would like to have it, they
will have to broaden their vision and
use more good horsesense.
That the greatest business getter is
advertising.
That liberal advertising has made
many businesses a big asset to their
city.
That the Bame opportunity to ad
vnnce to greater proportions is before
your business men to-day.
Thut no merchant has ever made
any marked success ln business with
out tlie aid of liberal advertising.
That all should strive to build t
greater city. Every citizen should
lend a hand. H^^
That If your citizens make up their
tninds   they  can't  do a thing, it's
cinch they can't do It.
That If they make up their minds
they can do a thing, it's a cinch they
can do it.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Wm. Douglas
FOR
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ALL KINDS OF FERTILIZERS
Leave Orders at
Tommy's Hardware Store
For Results Advertise in The Islander
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
Dentist
Office and  Residence:   Willard
Block.   -   'Phone 116.
Union Tailor
U. WATANABE.
Ladies'  and
Fashionable
Gents'
Tailor
Cleaning and Pressing
P.O. Box 43 - Cumberland
Cumberland
TAILORS
SUITS MADE TO ORDER.
Pressing    •    Cleaning    ■    Repairs
Telephone 1.     •     P. 0. Box 17
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
((
The Superior Grocers
Whets M08t People Trade
tt
You have tried
the rest - - -
NOW try the
best   -   -   -   -
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
"THE SUPERIOR GROCERS."
T. H. Mumford
J. Walton
Campbell River
Courtenay  Stage
Frank Lalonde, Proprietor
Meets all trains at Courtenay
daily, taking pasengers for
all points between Courtenay
and Campbell River, also
for Headquarters
Leaves Campbell River
every morning at
7.45
Reasonable Rates
OMOX
TAILOR
DYE WORKS
CLEANING
PRESSING
T. YONEDA
COURTENAY
Phone 14 I!       P. O. Box 123
Theed Pearse
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Jnion Bay Road
COURTENAY, B. C.
Wood for Sale
DOUBLE LOAD
for	
$6.00
FRED McKENZIE
Phone 92L Happy Yullty
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers uid
Bakers
PHONE 11      CUMBERLAND
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Donimulr Are.       Cumberland, 8. C SATtmbAY, ttOVEMBER isth, mi
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
$
Gun Repairing
SHOTGUNS
Re-borcd, Re-stocked,. Repaired
RIFLES
Overhauled,   Repaired,    Sights
Fitted.
E. T. ELLISON
GUNSMITH
14 Yrs. Old Country Experience
-   Agent for   -
Cleveland, B. S. A. and Paragon
Bicycles.
Complete Line of Accessories
Repairs a Specialty.
COURTENAY, B. C.
Union Huy Rend : 0|>p. Ford Gui'itgc
Royston Lumber Co,
M/VNUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood  (double load)  $4.50
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE  RAILWAY STATION.
First Glass Accommodation.     Heated
throughout hy EleetrlcUy.
WILLIAM JONES. Proprietor
Moir's
High Grade
Chocolates
FttESIl STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments) ot these high-
grade cua lections arrive every
lvs'0 weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all tlie time.
Henderson's
CITY MEAT
WE TAKE CARE OF
YOUR BATTERY
We seo that they are charged and in
good working order, and deliver to
you when you want them. Our Butteries are standard and give complete
service to car owners and others who
must have a Battery that ls dependable.   Also Dry and Wet Storage at
CUMBERLAND GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
I    HOTELS AND CAMPS    |
| SPECIALLY CATERED TO
* ———i
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
VV. P. Syraons       -    Proprietor
K. 3
^T.WHERKY
1       Send (or price lilt ot
i      wor k—m ouotinv
1               heads,  «tc
'       129 Pandora Ave.,
Victoria, B, C.
W. T. GOARD
I'lANO TCMKll
Leave Orders at Marshall Music Co.,
Cumberland and Courtenay.
Cascade
OR
I  U. B, C
■        PURE    FULL-STRENGTH    BEERS
1ICHARD BURDE
GIVES SPEECH
IN LEGISLATURE
Says Liquor Act Needs to be
Prosecuted Rather Than
the Bootleggers.
VICTORIA, Nov. 8.—Richard Burile
'•ad the ear ot* the Legislature Tuesday afternoon when he gave an interesting contribution lo ihe debate on
tho Address. He said he liked to take
ti fliiif; a: members on both Bides ot'
lie House but be liked to he fair.
Taking up lirst the lisheries qucs-
tion, Mr. Burde blamed tbe Conserva-i
tlvc3 for neglect ot the fisheries and ,
said directly tho new Government
came into power it gave heed to tho
advice of McNeill and Stork, members lor Comox-Alberni and Prince
Rupert, and the Fisheries Commission4
was appointed and acted promptly
like Intelligent men. The report thoy
'iad submitted showed that the Oriental must be eliminated. He resented
Iho referenee ot II. H. Stevens and
his bedmate, Clements, to him and his
rieiids, in which tbey were eharacteii-
:ed as Reds, Socialists and Bolsheviks.
It thc canneries could not be con-
lucted without Japs It would be necessary to eliminate the canneries.
The province would be better off to
s:'loi,c tbe canneries and let B. C. Mess
go to Japan if lie wanted to.
Mr. Burde scored tho Provincial and
Dominion Governments for not pass-
in,'; an eight-hour law, and said that
1,801) worka in thc lumber camps were
demanding the passage of the Bill, and
he commended this legislation to the
present Government for action.
Taking tip then the liquor question,
Mr, Buvde commended Attorney-
General Manson, whom he facetiously
called "Thc young man from the
North" and said he admired the way
In which he had tackled the question.
He thought if he had been a little
older he would have been more cautious. He was advised in Vancouver
half the people were bootleggers, and
wben he said he would clean up tho
bootleggers he had a difficult Job. He
urged that the Attorney-General bring
down a Bill to give the people a
chance to secure lighter drinks and in
mallei- quantities, else they would
likely go back to the bone dry system.
II was the Liquor Act that needed to
be prosecuted rather than the boot-
logger. He thought the Moderation
Vet was doing harm to the country.
Laughs and Romance
In the Dana Picture
They Wear Wel
On the market as long as the oldest
inhabitants remember and still
the most
Popular Beers
Sold in British Columbia
"They Like 'Em Rough" is the title
of the latest Metro picture starring
Viola Dana which will come to the
llo-llo Theatre on Monday and Tuesday for a run of two days. Miss Dana
plays the role of a girl whose aver-
Bton to discipline and authority is almost n mania. Discovering that her
mint and uncle, with whom she lives,
are plotting (o marry her off to a certain young man, whom they regard as
a most desirable husband, Katharine
decides to take matters Into her own
bands.
"I'll show 'em," she says. "I'll go
ont and marry the Ilrst man I meet
I »l bring him back as my husband lo
Ilio wedding."
Now It happened that the first man
thnt she met was a big, bearded, rough
looking customer dressed in lumberman's garb. Nothing daunted, Katharine ori'ers him $100 to marry her, and
after tbe ceremony says: "Thanks a
b I, see you again some time, maybe."
Ho informs her that sho will see him
from now ou, jumps into her car and
carries her off to a lumber camp In
(he mountains, The resulting com-
plicattonH furnish much fun and
Ihrills lo everyone but Kntharine
I      OLD  FRIENDS   ARE  BEST
Leave Your Order at any Government
Store-WE DO THE REST
alaniaifej iianlai ifafc DanlanEnia SCTsisEnHi Dai ns ua il
that their destiny is fixed hinders
some people in realizing the best
thing-, in life. Some men consider
themselves doomed to fall. For such
men life has little encouragement.
The trouble is with many that they
attribute failure lo destiny. Success,
tliey say, is the result of study, of application, of will power, and hard
work. Wben we take the lite of a
great man and note the obstacles
Which be overcame in his efforts to
rise, we need not wonder If he felt at
times us though he were doomed to
fall. But tlie motto of a great man is
just the opposite, "Doomed to succeed." For surely the man who
seizes opportunities, who studies,
works, and applies himself cannot,
Irom Ihe nature of tilings, do otherwise Hum succeod. For success is the
Ilxed destiny of such a life.
That man is tbe architect of his fate;
Uml he is largely responsible for the
way in which his future shall terminate is presupposed by tlie freedom of
the will. Man Is not a machine. He
ls not nn impersonal force as the
natural elements that, surround hlm.
He is not a puppet. He ls a power.
He controls circumstances when they
exist Independent of God. He acts
from motives within. The liberty of
his will enables hlm to do it. So the
whole matter resolves Itself Into the
thought that life is what we make it.
and its end will be determined by our
conduct. In view of this fact, what
kind of a life will we try to live?
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
ON FORESTRY.
Q. What Is the latest estimate ol*
the stands of white and red pine In
Ontario and Quebec ? I say somewhere that each province contained
not loss than thirty billion feet (30,000
million feet) of pine.
A. These figures are a huge exaggeration. Estimates of these most
precious Canadian woods are falling
rapidly as exact Information becomes
more evident. Mr. R. O. Sweezey, n
well-known forest engineer, bas just
issued a statement claiming that Quebec has not more than two and-a-half
billion feet, Instead of thirty billions
It is generally accepted that tlie Ontario pine stands will hardly exceed
eight billion feet. Other provinces
add little to the total, so that on thc
basis of these figures, Canada, once
the land of "inexhaustible" pine
forests, has about fifteen years' supply left. ThiB will, of course, be replenished to some extent hy the young
growth which in many places Is
abundant.
Q. I have been reading that the
wretched living conditions, poor
farms, torrential rivers, etc., of Asia
Minor are due to total destruction of
forests.    How far Is this true ?
A. So true that the deforested parts
of Asia Minor, Palestine and much of
southern Europe will never regain
vigorous commercial conditions until
they rebuild their forests. The drled-
up streams washed out valley lands,
etc., etc., are tbe direct results of
forest neglect.
Q. What Is Ihe opinion of technical
foresters and fire inspectors regarding the recent lire disaster In Northern Ontario ?
A. That it was not really a forest
lire at all, hut a ground (ire fanned by
a tremendous wind. The area was
not under tlie supervision of rangers.
ENTIRE TOWN
IS DESTROYED
BY HURRICANE
iVith   the   Exception of "The
Old Homestead," Ganzey,
N. IL, Is Levelled.
Ganzey, N. H — A terrific windstorm
which swept through the valley almost demolished the town yesterday
and practically the only building not
destroyed was tlie old homestead on
Ihe farm belonging to Joshua Whit-
(omb. Seemingly, it was prool
(gainst the fury of the elements, nnd
while its neighbors suffered greal
damage, it remained almost unharmed.
This was particularly noticeable
and was commented upon by all he-
cause il was simultaneous with the re-
lurn of Reuben Whiteonih who had
been arrested for tho theft of ¥2.500
from tlie safe of Ephrailu Holbrook'fl
'tore, a year or more ago, and having
escaped jail in company of a tramp
sained Happy Jack, had been lost to
bis family and tbe   authorities   evor
inec. Willi him came Rose Blaiuo.
formerly of this place, whom he discovered in destitute circumstances in
tbe city.
It has just developed tbat Reuben
■vas guiltless of tbe crime for which
ho was arrested and the money which
Ills father had boon able to return to
Kolbrook, the latter will restore, lt
is rumored that Reuben Whltcomb
will shortly marry Ann. an adopted
daughter of Joshua's and who was
saved from death at Lover's Leap In
the height of the great storm by her
suitor.
Happiness lias come to the old
homestead, and even Ganzey will soon
be restored. But tlie more seriously
inclined attach a spiritual significance
to tlie fact that the home of the Whit-
combs refused to surrender to the
elements—seemingly standing as a
symbol of the grenest Institution of
civilization—the home.
sat down to rest on tho margin of a
well As ho sat there his eye fell
upun the atdie well curb and he began to wonder how lt happened that
ther? was a deap gioove* aero.:.? the
itone. He asked an explanation of
a girl who came to draw water, and
was ama'azed tu learn tbat the groove
had not been cut in the stone by men,
but had been worn tbere by tlie constant rubbing of tbe rope which held
the water bucket.
The little circumstance sank deep
into his mind. He argued that if a
soft rope by daily uso could force its
way through a hard stone, then there
was nothing that could not be accomplished by perseverance, and be
learned bis first lesson in the meaning and value of mental discipline,
He returned to his tat Iter's house and
'o thc school from which he bad lied,
and proved the same truth In his own
cose, for he not only passed thrrhiqh
tlie school wilii credit, but became a
great teacher and preacher.
Home of us are quicker than others,
but not always is mere quickness a
sign of superiority. Slow, plodding
persevertance will often outdo quickness that is easily discouraged.
PERSEVERANCE.
There is a mediaeval legend of a
Spanish boy who was dull at school
and who was so much discouraged by
the severity of his teachers that he
ran away from home. After he had
wandered a long way he was tired and
A very absent-minded professor,
who's thoughts were usually In the
clouds, was left iu sole charge of his
large family for one evening while his
wife was out.
On her return she found him alone.
"Well, my dear," she said, "did you
get the children to bed without any
trouble?"
"Ves. all except one red-headed
little creature. He struggled and
kicked the whole time, nnd I've had
to lock him in. He's quietened down
now."
"Good gracious," exclaimed his horrified wife, "why that's the little boy
who lives next door!"
Tho raw recruit was ou sentry
duly for the Ilrst time. All went well
until he saw someone approaching.
"Halt!   Who goes there?" he cried.
"Ollicer of the day," was the reply.
The ollicer had not gone far when
tlie challenge was again given.
"What next will you do?" roared the
olTicer.
'Never you mind what I'm going to
do," replied the recruit. "My orders
is to call 'Halt!' three times, and then
shot!"
AM MUSIC.
DESTINY.
II Is said or some men that their
do. tiny Is fixed. "There always
seemed to he sume power impelling
bim onward and upward," said one of
the first teachers of Dr. Charles A.
Berry, whose talent early ln life
seemed to Indicate his future greatness. What was that great power?
Destiny? God? Somo great purpose?
Or was It tlie power of the will? Many
young men early in life have given
promise of a career of usefulness wbo
failed to realize any worthy purpose.
Were they not the makers of their
destiny? Perhaps their opportunities
were better than those of Mr. Berry-
However, they did  not  exercise  the
Yot the term "fixed destiny" is not
samo degree of will power,
a misnomer altogether. Ours is a
world of cause and effect. The pursuance of unholy things will not result
in «• life of holiness. If a man lives
In a certain way, either good or bad,
n«d persists In so living throughout
Ihe days of his life, It will not be
difficult to ascertain the nature ot bis
end. Our manner of life determines
our destiny.
But apart from that, the  delusion1
Servant and Master am I; servant
of those dead, and master ot those
living. Through nie the spirits Immortal speak tbe message that makes
tho world weep, and laugh, and wonder, nnd worship.
I tell the story of love, tlio story of
halo, the story that saves and tbe
story that dnmns. I am the Incense
upon which prnyers liuat to Heaven.
I nm the smoke which palls over the
Held of battle where men llo flying
with me on their lips.
I am close to the marriage altar,
and when the graves open I stand
nearby. I call the wanderer home, 1
rescuo thc soul from the depths, I
open the lips of the lovers, nnd
through me the doad whisper to tlie
living.
One I serve as I serve all; and the
king I make my slave as easily as I
Bubject his slave. I speak through
the birds of the air, the Insects of the
Held, the crash of waters on the rock-
ribbed shores, the sighing of wind in
the trees, nnd I am even heard by tho
soul that knows me In the clatter of
wheels on city streets.
I know no brother, yet all men are
ray brothers; I am the father of tho
best that Is In them, and they are
fathers of the best that is in me; I
am of them and they are ot me. For
I am the Instrument of God.
—I am Music.
She—I wouldn't marry you if you
were the only man In the world.
He—Of course you wouldn't You
would be killed In the rush.
McCLARY'S
Electric Ranges
Women's burdens for centuries past were heavy
because the human race did not know how to lighten
them. An enlightened age has gradually brought now
labor-saving devices to assist her—the greatest of
which is the Electic Range.
McCLARY'S ELECTRIC RANGE
has exclusive features that further reduce women's
burdens, saving time, labor and anxiety.
There is the Protected Element—the Element is
the burner, where the heat comes from. Like other
Electric Appliances, the heat is radiated from wire
coils, but the Protected Element snugly encloses these
coils in porcelain to save them from carelessness or accidental upsets. Therefore, McCLARY'S Protected
Element lasts longer, as acids, moisture antl grease
cannot harm it. It heats quickly and holds the heat
long after tho power is turned off.
The wonderful seamless, round-cornered Oven—
not a nick or crevice in its smooth, even, impenetrable,
glassy enamelled interior. lAs sanitary as any enameled
interior. As sanitary a*, any enameled utensil, rust resisting, cleanly. Racks and rack holders removable.
Elements swing on hingos, so Mint entire surface of
oven is ckar for cleaning.
The Ovt a has n IV,. in. insulation around tho side
and a A In. magnesia block insulation in the door—
this holds the heat in oven. Roasts and baked foods
retain their full flavor. The result is belter baked
foods with minimum shrinkage.
Warming Oven with small element inside.
Signal lights to show whether current for Oven
is on or off.
Switches for elements plainly marked.
Extra plug for other Electric Appliances.
Mercury or Compensating Thermometer.
Fuses easily accessible.
FOUR TYPES OF McCLARY'S RANGES
E. S.—E. S. C.—D.—and E.—supplied in the immaculately clean battleship grey enameled finish, also black
japan—see all these features—have them
demonstrated to you at
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
WHEREAS certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered with tlie valves of the mains of this Company, thereby
allowing a considerable amount of water to run to waste, wc
therefore wish lo point out tbat it is a serious offence to tamper
with such valves, aud should the offending parties be apprehended, they will be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of
the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED the Cumberland Islander
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1922
$>
!«
A GIGANTIC
CLOSING OUT
13
GREAT SALE
DAYS
SALE
13
GREAT SALE
DAYS
NOTE.—The Entire Stock of Men's and Boys' Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Ladies'
Hosiery, Etc., Will Be Included in This Great Closing Sale.
■■IIIIIIIIIIIi!!I!lll!!|l!
A Sale without a Competitor. Thousands of Dollars' Worth of High-grade Merchandise, the best that money
can buy, will be placed on sale. Positively without doubt the Greatest Bargain Event ever held in this part
of the Province. Every single article will be marked in Plain Figures; a Marvelous Saving Opportunity.
The most thrilling exhibition of modern retailing ever known in this town or province. Make preparations
to attend and be here when the sale opens.
Look These Prices Over—Then Judge Them for Yourself
MEN'S OVERCOATS
One lot of Men's Heavy Winter Overcoats
in Heavy Milton Cloth, latest styles.
Guaranteed All Wool ,in Grey and
Brown.   Regular $40   fl»0/|  AC
Now for    «P«*»0O
1                  BOYS' MACKINAWS
One lot of Boys' Heavy Winter Mackinaw
Coats.   Sizes 8 years to 16 years.  In
various patterns.    Sell   d» A Qf?
regular for $7.50.   Now   tP*»t/«J
MEN'S GREY WOOL UNDERWEAR
One lot of Men's Heavy Grey Wool Undershirts and Drawers that sell regular
for $2.25.   On sale now   d»-|   AS
each for    tpl.ftO
CHILDREN'S HOSE
One lot of Children's Black Ribbed Hose,
in all sizes, that sell regular for 50
cents pair.  On sale now   AM   AA
4 pairs for    «Pl.UU
STANFIELD'S UNDERWEAR
One lot of Stanfield's Fine Ribbed Undershirts and Drawers.   Regular $3.50
per garment.   To go on   dJO fJC
sale each for    *P»« ' *•»
MEN'S OVERALLS
One lot of Men's Overalls, in Black, without bib.   Regular $2.00.   fl»"l   OK
Now a pair for    tpl»Ot)
MEN'S WOOL SOX
One lot of Men's Real Heavy Wool Working Sox.   These are real good sox.
They sell regular for 50   d»-|   AA
cents pair.  Now 4 pairs   «?■*■•""
STRIPED FLANNELETTE.
Striped Flannelette ln various patterns.
Regular 35 and 40 cts. yd.   OCC
Now for    mlO
MEN'S SUITS
One lot of Men's Suits in Winter Tweeds,
Serges and Vicunas, in Navy, Brown
and Mixed Patterns.   These Suits sell
regular for $25 and $35. Now for
$17.50AN0 $12.50
MEN'S PANTS
.Special lot of Men's Tweed Pants, in various patterns.   These pants never sell
less than $5.50, but they   d»9 AA
go out this sale for          tpO.t/U
MEN'S UNDERWEAR
Special lot of Men's Fleeced-lined  and
Merino Shirts and Drawers.   Regular
$1,50 per garment.   To go   ACC
on sale per garment for         *,t'
LADIES' ALL-WOOL HOSE
One lot of Ladies' All-wool Cashmere Hose
" in Black and Brown. Regular   Off C
$1.25 pair. Now    "O
SALE STARTS 9 A.M., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18
MODEL CLOTHING
AND
SHOE STORE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND
13
GREAT SALE
DAYS
# SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER  18th, 1922
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
a
I
A $10,000.oo
STOCK OF SHOES TO
BE SOLD AT COST
AND BELOW
COST
in
■Mil
IIIIIIIIIIIIIII!
Illllllllllll
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Illllllllllll
This Stock consists of   $10,000.00 worth   of  the finest  of  Men's, Women's   and
Children's Shoes, and will be sold positively regardless of cost.
lllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllil
iiiiiiiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
mil
ill
iiiiiiiiiii
These few Prices give you an idea of the Reductions:
MEN'S WORK SHOES
One lot of Men's Work Shoes, Heavy Grain
Leather.    A real All-Leather Shoe.
That sells   regular for   d»q JC
$5.00, to go on sale at    *PO *iv
MEN'S DRESS SHOES
One lot of Men's Dress Shoes in Brown
and Black Calf, Lace and Button, in
Bal and Blucher Styles.   Values to
$8.50, to go on sale at   (JJJ? PA
■    this Closing-Out Sale at   VW.WV
LADIES' SHOES
One lot of Ladies' Lace Shoes in Black
and Brown Calf.   Easy   &A   Af?
fitters. Regular $7.50 for
" DOCTOR"—SPECIAL SHOE FOR MEN
Special lot of the famoim "Doctor" Special
Shoes for Men, in Black and Brown
Calfskin,   leather   lined.     An   ideal
winter shoe.   Sell regu-   (Tjiy At
lar for $11.50.   Now ....    «D * eOO
LECKIE'S MINER SHOES
Special Lot of Leckie's Miner Shoes.   Arc
Solid Chrome Leather, nailed.   Considered the Best Shoes on the market.
They sold   regular  for   (J»P r?S
$7.50.   We will sell for    «P«J« * O
MEN'S SEMI-DRESS SHOES
One lot of Men's Semi-dress Shoes, in
Brown  and  Black  Calf.    Bal  and
Blucher Styles.    Regu-   &A   Af?
lar $7.00, on sale at          VTX&O
BOYS* SHOES
One Special Lot of Boys'  Shoes.   Real
good   solid   leather,   hard   wearing
School Shoes, in Brown and Black.
Regular $4.50, to go on   (j»0 QC
sale at      tp,Q.\uD
LECKIE'S FINE SHOES
Special lot of Leckie's Fine Dress Shoes
in Tan and Mahogany Calfskin.   In
Recede and Round Toe.    Regularly
$10.50.    On   sale   now   djrj   AS
MEN'S RUBBER SHOES
One., lot., of.. Men's.. Five-Eyelet.. Rubber
Shoes, in all sizes,  that  sell in  the
regular way  for $5.50   (go   A P
to go on sale now     tpO.'xU
LADIES'  SHOES
50 Pairs at One-Half Price.
Fifty Pairs of Ladies' Shoes, Strap Slippers, Pumps  and Oxfords.    Patent
and Dongola Kid. Regu-   <1»Q ns
lar $7.50, on sale for....    «PO. 1 tl
GIRLS' SHOES.
Very special lot of Girls' and Misses' Shoes
in all sizes.   These are the famous
"Weston" Shoes, in Black Calf. These
Shoes   sell regular for   (Pi   Q(?
$4.50.   Now on sale at ..    «Pl.i«/t)
BOYS' HIGH-CUT SHOES
One lot of Boys' High-cut Winter Shoes
in Black and Brown,   Regular $5.50
and $6.50   values.    To   &A   AS
go at this Bale for            «jrx.*r«)
MODEL CLOTHING
AND
SHOE   STORE
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND
13
GREAT   SALE
DAYS
Illllllllllllllll
Make a note of the time, date and place. Do your shopping early
A real gigantic selling event. This is not an ordinary out of season sale, nor just something to have a little
excitement. The purpose and reason for this sale is genuine—we mean business; we want to close out this
stock and we know we must do business in a big way. We are advertising as we have never advertised
before—and crowds will come as they came before—but we feel sure that this sale will eclipse any sale ever
put before the people of this province.
SALE STARTS AT 9 AM, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 THE!   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
SATOJlDAY, NOVEMBER lSth, 1923
P. G. E. RAILWAY
AFFAIRS DISCUSSED
Chief among the worries of the administration has been the settlement
ot the fate ot the P. Q. E. railway.
Although adverse reports were submitted by Messrs. Sullivan, Dennis and
Ulnton, the experts engaged to examine the line and Its possibilities,
the Government did not appear satis-
tied, and a determination waa reached
to continue to operate the line for at
least one year more. With the appointment of Hon. Dr. Maclean as
Minister of Railways, an opportunity
has been provided for a minister to
devote more time to the affairs ot the
line than the Premier was able to give,
with his manifold duties. The new
head of the department favors the
completion of the road to Prince
George, and next Spring will no doubt
see construction commenced on the
last lap. Hon. Dr. Maclean also proposes to have a thorough survey prepared of the natural resources of the
country contiguous to the railway, so
that colonization work may be carried
on successfully.
PASHAS WITHOUT
AND WITHIN
By Robson Black, in Canadian
Forestry Magazine.
If Mustapha Kemal Pasha, stole a
shipload of lumber from one of John
Bull's merchants, the whole British
Empire would be on Up toe to Bee who
gave Kemal his first trouncing.
We like to see our national frlendB
and enemies draped becomingly ln
flags and bunting. We seem to recognize antagonists only when they
have heen passed upon by a Cabinet
Council. Then commences the flood
of telegrams: "Every man and every
last dollar"; "Count on the whole battalion"; and much more of a like and
worthy sort.
Meanwhile, a hundred Kemal
Pashas work vast mischief to the
economic life of this Dominion. They
wear no uniforms, they trouble no
Foreign Ollice. They raise no alien
flags. The pillage they do pays perpetual dividends of misery. But because these evil forces are not rigged
out in the uniforms of foreign tyrants,
vfe fill up our days with turning furrows and laying bricks and thank the
Lord that Canada has nothing to
worry over.
Well, Canada as regards her forest
problems can free her mind from
worry only by shutting off her Intel
llgence. The heaviest drag on the
progress of Canada has not been a
National Debt but a neglect of the
natural resources. The needless sacrifice of white pine by lire in Ontario
and Quebec alone would unquestionably have matched the present provincial debt. The squandering of timber through unobstructed fires in the
Prairie provinces has doubtless been
equal to the bond issues of the three
Administrations. Month after month
the reckoning of forest lire losses
would astound and stir to action any
board of directors of a private company, but leaves untouched that peculiar Company of Citizens in charge
of forest assets valued at several billions of dollars.   Why is it so?
The Canadian citizen is no dullard.
He Is accustomed to act promptly on
what Is put up to him as a "public
Issue." But we are not a nation of
political  or   economic students.   Wc
.valt for the newspapers to tell u
what the " Issues" are. Sometimes we
pick up a hint from our politicians
That ls why the American continent is
so readily swayed by propaganda. An
issue not backed by organized propaganda is elbowed out of the main road
by issues that are. This may explain
why the great basic policies—the sane
conserving and developing of the great
natural resources, for example—have
had to give away ln legislative halls to
less Important but more emotional Issues of social reform, road construction and the Import tax on mouse
traps. Inaction by our governments
on the really vital matters is a precise
barometer of public opinion. Until
public opinion on forest preservation
takes on the glow of an evangelistic
cause, we will continue to take our
seats about the arena of blazing
forests with the same unconcern that
we apply to 34 cents worth of
Rodolph Valentino.
The Canadian Citizen owns eighty-
five per cent of the forest area. And
he does not know it. The Canadian
Citizen being the forest owner is the
responsible forest conservator. He
does not know it, The Canadian
Citizen is a personal trustee for his
grandchild's forest inheritance. He
does not know It. The Canadian Citl-
icn as forest owner, holds In his hands
the responsibility for the greatest in-
dustrial expansion that lies In the
pnl'i 0," this nation. But he is unaware of it.
The moment the simple convincing
facta of his partnership In the profltF
and penalties of orest management an-
put in possession of the Canadian
Citizen, the jubilee of forestry will be
at hand.
ABOUT PROVINCIAL
MONEY MATTERS
The financial standing of any Government Is the test of its strength, and
thc rehabilitation of the credit of
British Columbia through the careful
borrowing of Hon. John Hart, has
been largely responsible for the growing feeling of optimism with whlcb
tho bond purchaser views the offerings
of this province. Though dire calamity was predicted by Mr. Bowser and
bis supporters, who claimed that the
loans of the past few years would
eventually cost the tax-payers from
IC to 20 per cent, the province has
been saved several million dollars
The favorable exchange conditions
have materially lowered the Interest
rates which have to be met, and
should American money depreciate
still further, British Columbia's loans
Alii take on something of the nature
ot good Investments.
THE BEST CHRISTMAS GIFT
Christmas for the Boy !
Christmas for the Girl !
Christmas for tlie Fathers I
Christmas for the Mothers !
Christmas for one and all bound up
in the 52 weekly issues of "The
Youth's Companion" for 1923. No
other pcrriodlcal can take the place
of The Companion at the family fireside—no other reflects so truly the
homo spirit.
The 52 issues of 1923 will contain
from eight to a dozen serial stories,
nearly two hundred short stories, besides sketches, special matter for the
boys, the girls, the domestic circle.
The Children's Page and the Doctor's
Corner will, as they have for years,
prove indispensable features of the
paper.   Subscribe now and receive;
1. The Youth's Companion—52 Issues
in 1923.
2. All the remaining issues of 1922.
3. The Companion Home Calendar for
1923.
All for $2.50.
4. Or include McCall's Magazine, the
monthly authority on fashions.
Both publications, only $3.00.
THE YOUTH'S COMPANION
Commonwealth  Ave. &   St. Paul St.,
Boston, Mass.
Cubscriptions Received at this office.
So when a great man dies, for years
beyond our ken.
The light he leaves behind him lies
upon the paths of men.
—Longfellow.
Thc leaves are turning red, and the
girl who dusts the liilies says they
are blushing to think how green they
were all summer.
BOOK-KEEPING   AND   ARITHMETIC   CLASSES
will be held in the
CUMBERLAND PUBLIC SCHOOL
ON TUESDAY EVENINGS AT 7.30 P.M.
Fee: $5.00 the Season.
LUMBER
ALL   BUILDING   MATERIALS,   MOULDINGS,
SHINGLES,  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,
HIGH  GRADES  AT  LOWEST PRICES.
We Deliver to Anywhere with Very Short Notice and
Cheap Charges.
Ring up for Quotation at Our Expense.
Royston Lumber Co.Ltd.
R( Ri No. 1 Cumberland
Phone  159
Night—134-X  Courtenay
SLAT'S DIARY
Friday—Pa dirove out In to the
lountry to a sale today where they
was a selling stock &
furniture and things
and a fellow tuk his
robe out- of the ford
and   drove  away  with
it.
him
and
the
Pa    sed   he   seen
going with
ma sed Why in
erth dlddent you
holler at him and tell
him to bring it
back. Pa replyed and
sed he wood of only
he dlddent no the
fellows name and he
dlddent want to appear
Fresh.
Sat.—1 was In the store tonite looking at sum stoes and they was a man
num lu twlct as big as pa is and his
,'t. was a like a little boys ft. I go!
small ft .but 1 of his ft. was smallern
both of mine put to gather.
Sunday—I half to laff at Ant Emmy sum times. Behind her face tho.
Today pa cum in and Ant Emmy aot
him where had he ben at and he sed
he had went out In the Country for
a Tramp and she up and sed Well did
you ketch him and what had he done.
Pa & me both laffed.   Silently.
Monday—Mr. Glllem is a mixing up
In polatix this yr. and he told pa he
had saw a Bobtleger and ast hlm to
deliver him a qt of wisky on Election
Day. But the Bootleger answered
and sed he cuddent do lt because it
was vs. the law to sell lt on Election
day.
Tuesday—Went to a vawdeville
show tonite and amongst other things
they was a girl witch was danceing
In the latest fashions and when we
cum home pa sed he bet she cuddent
feel a erthquake if it cum wile she-
was danceing.
, Wednesday—We had Co. tonite
witch was lernlng pa and ma how to
play Bridge so they can go and join
the golf club. Pa balled out ma fnr
trumping on his Ace and the way she
looked at him is nobuddys business.
But she cuddent afford to say nothing.   In that Case.
Thursday—We past a man on are
way home from the futhall slirimigc
and he ast Blisters wood that road
take him to the Cemetery and Blisters
told him it certnly wood it lie kep on
driveing that away. He was going
like CO. Blisters genrolly all ways
answer.
ancad to second reading. It is underload that at tho close of tho Address
the remainder of tho Government
mils will be introduced, and this will
unable thorough consideration and
will give even the far-away sections
ol the province a chance to make representations In regard to proposed
legislation.
possibly before this reaches Cumberland, the Budget will be brought
down and the business of the House
should be completed within about live
weeks. There is a splendid spirit
noticeable among Government supporters. Premier Oliver seems to be
firmly in the saddle, and up to this
time the efforts of the Opposition have
done nothing to disturb his poise or
equilibrium.
Rumor has It that the Opposition
will try to unearth something to the
iliscredit of the  Government ln  the
Public   Accounts   committee, but the
action of the Attorney-General at thc
beginning of thc session ln at once
submitting ihe Liquor Board accounts
to the committee and Inviting the fullest   Investigation,   is   an   indication
tiiat the Government lias nothing to
orry  about,   The  Attorney-General
tated In the House that lie would wel-
ime the bringing  to attention  any
"egularlties by members of the Pub-
■   Ancpunts   committee   or   by   any
ember of the liouso.
lias
SPECIAL  SUBSCRIPTION
OFFER.
A special Club offer is being mado
for it short time of the Family Herald
and Weekly Star nnd the Cunibcrlnnd
Islander for n period of one your for
$2,011. ilie Islander alms In givo all
Hie nows of tlio diatrict for tlio week
in tho must attractive form possible,
Tlie Family Herald and Weekly Star
Is well known all ovor Canada for the
lvorlil-wlclo news and valuable Information Hint Is ciiiitiilneil in IN seventy
odd pages every week.
Don't miss tills opportunity lo get
Iwo good papers for Hie price of one.
ATTORNEY-GEN ER AL
A VERY BUSY MAN
VICTORIA.— The Attorney-General
and member for Omlncca, who has
been somewhat of a storm centre for
the past few weeks, takes finite a different role In thc Legislature. There
lie is quiet and earnest and not easily
ruffled. His desire, to servo every
section of tlie province without fear
or favor is winning him tho approval
of members on both sideB of tho
House. Following his fair and judicial atttitudc In tho Speaker's chair
last session, this was to lie expected.
Tlle whrk of the Legislature at Uie
time of writing Is further advanced at
the end of ten days than it has boon
In the same period for many years.
The Attorney-General already has
some twenty Hills to his credit before
tho House; nud most of them have ad-
JOS.   DAMONTE J. SUTHERLAND
GENERAL   DELIVERY QMItV FUBNISHDfGS
—Ageiu for—
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
VICTORIA, B. C.
Cetl, Woo* ni floods of Any Klni
Delivered to All Farts of District
ASHES REMOVED
MODERATE CHARGES |
TELEPHONE  FO TELEPHONE
or Lmto Orders at Tendome Hotel.
SONG POEMS
WANTED
It you have a Song or Song Poem,
Words or Music, which yuu have
written, let us hear from you.
YOU CAN MAKE GOOD MONEY
We will Publish and Market
Them   for  you      :    :    :    :
DO NOT DELAY
WRITE NOW
ve Men Than Women
Have Appendicitis
.Medical reports show men are more
object to appendicitis although many
udden cases occur among women.
Ii can be guarded against by preventing intestinal infection. The Intestinal antiseptic Adler-i-ka acts on
HOTH upper and lower bowel, removing all foul, decaying matter which
■night cause Infection. It brings out
matter you never thought was in your
system and which may have been
poisoning you for months. Ad!er-l-ka
is EXCELLENT for gas on the
stomach.
B. E. FROST.
The Mcsher System
OF CANADA
MUSIC PUBLISHERS
Hi x ',18 WESTVILLE, N. S.
Car   For
DAY OR NIGHT
The Largest and Most Up-to-date Dry
Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment
ou Vancouver Island. We Clean or
Dye all kinds of Ladies' aud Gents'
Wearing Apptrel, Household Furnlsh-
Irgri, Drop in and see Mr, Suther
land, our Arent in Cumberland, who
will aihise you on any work you wish
to have done.
(Inr   Work   and  Non-Ire
Will  Please You   i:   ::
PANTORIUM DYE WORKS
. .<):..;, Ii  C.       i      Phone 8802
PRICES REASONABLE
From S a.m. to 12 Midnight, Phone 24.
From 12 Midnight to 8 a.m., Phone 22.
Geo. Mason
CUMBERLAND, B.  C.
Pat, who had been lighting, arrived
home with his left eye badly discolored.
His wife asked who had injured him.
"Mike Murphy," he replied, sadly.
"What!" she exclaimed. "Do you
mean to sny you let a little undersized man like Mlckle Murphy black
your eye for you?"
"Martha," said Pat, holding up his
hand reproachfully, "don't spake dis-1
respectfully of the dead."
Joe & Mac's Place
will be open from now
on with a supply of    ::
TOBACCOS, CANDIES.
SOFT  DRINKS,  ETC.
Waverley Hotel
FOR SALE
.   PIANO    IN    GOOD   CONDITION.
$150 cash.   Apply
P. O. Drawer 430
or Islander Office.
D. Campbell's
Meat   Market
My endeavor ia to please my
customers, and that with best
"Service," reasonable prices,
and best and freshest quality of
goods.
Fresh and Cured Meats, Vege-
ta >"•-; and Fruits
D. CAMPBELL
Cumberland. B. C.
BUY  SEA-FRONTAGE   LOTS
—at—
Royston Beach
Lots, cleared or otherwise, from
$200.00
UP
Further Particulars from
F. R. Fraser Biscoe
Real Estate
Phone 64     ::     COURTENAY
I!o=Ilo Theatre
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Nov. 17 & 18
THE "OLD HOMESTEAD"
With Theodore Roberts as " Uncle Josh."
Forget your troubles and come along back to "The
Old Homestead." Back where love is clean. Where
stout hearts conquer the sorrows of life.
Laugh and cry and thrill at this most beloved of all
Human Dramas. See Theodore excel himself as
Uncle Josh.
You'll thrill at the mighty cyclone scene that dwarfs
any storm ever seen on the screen before.
Tritai Ridgway
htiie Paramount Picture
llhe. Old Homestead'
EXTRA—Round of "The Leather Pushers"
and Comedy Pictures.
MATINEE—SATURDAY AT 2.30 P.M.
USUAL  SATURDAY   NIGHT   DANCE—9,30   P.M.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Viola Dana in the Best Picture she ever appeared in.
" THEY LIKE 'EM ROUGH."
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
Lionel Barrymore in the Thrilling Crook Story
" THE FACE IN THE FOGs"
" THE STORM " IS COMING—MONDAY AND
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4th and 5th
Seena, Owen
s»«. Qammount picture
'Tne Face in ttie Foe'
Otnttd bu OjMoolstaV SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1922
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
*\
HEINTZMAN & CO. LTD., VICTORIA
REMOVAL
SALE
GRAND PIANOS  : PLAYER PIANOS  : PIANOS
ORGANS and PHONOGRAPHS
We will be moving to our New Showrooms early in
November, and in the meantime are making Prices
that should
CLEAR OUT OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Any person thinking of purchasing an Instrument in
the next six months or year should not fail to take advantage of these bargains.
Suitable Terms Arranged     : :
Full Particulars on Application
Heintzman & Co.
Opposite Post  Office
VICTORIA
XMAS
is coming.
Stock especially bought
for this Season is now arriving.
Prices are much lower, while the
Quality of our Furniture and Furnishings is better than ever   ::   ::
Comox Member's Speech
» In the Legislature
(Continued from page 1)
the winter months It la all but Impossible, and It takes four hours to cross
it. If the trail was such that a vehicle could run over It, the traffic
would greatly Increase aud the country would soon be opened up for settlement and all parties concerned
would feel that the Government was
taking an Interest in them.
District of Sayward.
Having brought Port Hardy Trail
to the attention of the House, I would
like the members to become acquain-*
ted with conditions In Sayward. This
White Rivers, and Includes several
district lies along the Salmon and
thousand acres ot agricultural land,
Borne of which has been under cultivation for years, and 2,000 acres at
tbe head of the valley are open for
settlement. The present population
I am told Ib about 200, There are two
public schools and a general store
and post office In the valley. Tears
ago the Hastings Logging Company
built a logging railroad through the
valley, and built two large bridges,
oue at the second crossing of the Salmon river and the other over the
White river. The first took six weeks
te complete, and was used by the settlers after logging operations had
ceased, until six years ago, when lt
I was carried away by a flood. The | leaving many families destitute, as
Government after some delay threw the Are consumed their buildings.
across   the   river a three-foot cable! household  effects,   farm   Implements,
Jeune's Furniture Store
Opposite the Big Double Arrow Sign
Phone 144
COURTENAY
HEALTH SERVICE!.
E. O. HAUKEDAL
Doctor of Chiropractic
(8 Years Experience)
Ollice Hours: 12 to 3 p.m.; 5 to 7 p.m.
Over Mrs. King's Book Store
Dunsmuir Ave. CUMBERLAND
rJpP
Ml?
STAR    IVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
 »   —t
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Cumberland, B. C.
BREAD!
Do you eat it for lunch with
fresh fruit and milk?
Or do you e • *, other less nourishing foods ?
The way you feel is a matter
of the kind of food you eat.
Natural foods are the best.
Bread is nourishing.
Bread with milk and fruit is
delicious.
Eat right and feel right.'
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
—is the Bread that Builds
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
bridge and also established a canoe
ferry. All the goods had to be carried over the bridge on the backs ol
settlers, and one man bad to pack his
cook stove over in this manner. Last
Fall the Government decided to erect
a traffic cable bridge in place ot the
old railroad; but delay followed delay
and the bridge is not yet completed.
Two weeks ago I visited the valley aud
saw conditions first-hund, and although difficulties were encountered
ln driving the pileB for the Government bridge, yet the fact remains that
the Hastings Company put ln a railroad bridge and completed It ln six
weeks.
The valley needs the present road
extended six miles up the valley tn
tap 2,000 acres of good agricultural
lands; and the hope entertained by a
goodly number that soon the Island
Highway will be continued on from
PorbeB' Landing to the valley, thereby
openln gcommunlcation between Sayward and the rich Comox Valley.
The need of a trans-provlnclal highway is quite apparent, but the rural
districts of the province need roads to
open up tbe sections that are avail
able for agricultural purposes. Roads
ln my district are badly needed from
Lund to Powell River—15 miles—and
then on to Grief Point. Lasqueti island needs a road 12 miles long, or
from end to end of the Island, as the
only means the settlers have of getting to the wharf is on horseback or,.
by sled. In fact, every outlying part
of the district is suffering from lack
of transportation facilities.
The Mervllle Settlement
The history of the Mervllle settlement is fairly well known, but lt ls
well to refresh our memories with regard to it. The area consists of nearly
14,000 acres, purchased by the Land
Settlement Board for a little less than
(70,000 or (5.00 per acre. About one-
third of this area is practically worthless; one-third fair agricultural land
and one-third good—that is, after lt
has been stumped and made fit for the
plough. The whole area has been surveyed and divided Into lots averaging
about forty acres each. The Board
undertook to clear ten acres on each
lot, and perform other Improvements.
The clearing was expensive—the cost
amounting to (according to the report
of the Board) nearly (400 per acre.
Some 200 acres were cleared. This
method was discontinued and the settlers were placed on the improved and
slock, poultry, crops—In tact, every
thing tbe settlers possessed. A certain umount ut rellfc has been forthcoming from the Government and the
public, but a great deal still remains
to be done if Ibe tire-striken people
of Merville and Lang Day—another
settlement, 15 miles off Powell Kiver,
whicb suffered as greatly as Mervllle
—and of otlier similar unfortunate
districts, are to be kept irom severe
distress this coming winter. 1 trusl
tbat tbe generosity of tlie public will
not be witheld from the suffering fire
victims of the district.
Ab far ns Mervllle Ib concerned,
there are a few things I believe ought
to be done If the settlement is to be
a success; and the first is a re-valuation of the land; second, deeds given
ts' the settler and a mortgage taken by
the Land Settlement Board; third, a
lower rate of Interest charged by tho
Bourd; fourth, re-valuatlou of took
and all payments made according to
plan adopted by Soldiers' Settlement
Board.
minister could then keep ln touch with
the youth of the country and they
would be safeguarded. Surely the
country ought to knuw how Its youth
are being taught, what Is being taught,
and the results of such education—not
only in our Public, but also private
schools.
Workmen's Compensation Act.
I believe that the time hus now arrived when there should be a more
comprehensive Act than that known
as the Workmen's Compensation Act;
an Act that would affect nil classes of
workmen—even to the farmer, who Is
factor In the life of a country. I
acknowledged to be a very Important
trust that such an Act will be forthcoming, bo that the farmers and others
will benefit In a like degree as those
who now come under the operation of
the Workmen's Compensation Act. ln
fact, 1 hope the time is not far distant when there shall be some system
operating whereby all citizens In the
province by paying a certain sma'l
sum annually will be entitled to receive medical attention for the same.
Iron Ore Resources.
I   notice  In the  speech   from   the
Throne that It is the Intention of the
Government to  survey the iron ore
resources of the province.    I would
respectfully draw to the attention of
the Government that when that survey
Is completed, It would be well to carry
on the Investigation In tbe line of establishing an iron and steel Industry,
so as to make use of our rich Iron ore
deposits, 00 per cent of which appears
to be on Vancouver and adjacent islands.   All are ln close proximity to
Union Bay .which naturally lends itself to be the centre of the iron industry of the province.   Here we have
au  unlimited supply of fresh  water
and a deep sea harbour, capable of
berthing ships from all parts of the
world; 200 coke ovens that.turn out
the finest coke on the Coast, the coking coal coming from the coal mines
at Cumberland, where, if necessary,
4,000   tons   per  day  can   be  mined.
Electricity can be supplied from the
plant on Puntledge river, which at the
present time supplies all the lectrlcal
energy used by the Cumberland mines,
Courtenay and the whole ot Comox
valley, and there ls as yet an unde
veloped source ot supply near Campbell   River   where   lt   is   estimated
100,000 horse-power can be generated.
Our Private Schools.
Let me suggest to the Minister of
unimproved lands; houses and barns Education tho advisability of having
were  built  and  some  out-buildings, the Private Schools of the province in-
Thls summer, in July, a disastrous lire spected by the department through its
swept over a large portion of the area, I'"l'lic or High School inspectors. The
Phonea 4 and 61
GORDON'S
Cumberland
Offering Exceptional Values this week in
Crepe De Chene
Coming in White, Navy, Shell Pink, Sand and Peach
BRASS BEDS
Satin Ribbon Finish, Ranging in Price from $25 up
Another Shipment of Ayrshire Blankets due to arrive
this week.
Flannelette Blankets in 10, 11 and 12 Quarter Size*
COMFORTERS
Good Large Sizes, at $4.75, $5.50, $6.50 and $7.35
Down Comforters at $25 and $28
BED SPREADS—A Good Range of Prices.
SHEETS AND SHEETING, PILLOW CASES—Ready
jnade and by the Yard.
SEE OUR LINE OF HEATERS BEFORE BUYING
AN "OSTERMORE" MATTRESS FOR COMFORT
PRICE     -    $25.00
Wood for S.ale
$6.00
DOUBLE LOAD
FOR	
Wash Satin in Pink and White.
Spun Silk in Natural and Pink.
Ladies' Shopping Bags in Morocco Leather
Any Length Requited
W. C. WHITE & SON
Happy Valley Phone 92R
The Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
For Results Advertise in The Islander
FOR SALE
AS A GOING CONCERN - 10-ACRB
Farm, well situated on the main
Cumberland - Courtenay Road, ltt
miles from Courtenay and within 3
minutes walk ot Flag Station on C.
C. (D) Ltd. Railway, connecting
dally with the E. & N. at Royston.
Approximately 4tt acres clearest
and cropped and seeded to timothy
and clover; two acrea nearly cleared and balance slashed and burned,
very easy clearing and now seeded
to clover,
Young bearing orchard — apples,
pears, plums and small fruits.
Modern house of 7 rooms. Telephone and water laid on. Two good
wells. Small creek through property. Outbuildings, cow-stable and
barn, woodshed, granary, two chicken houses, pig pen and root house;
fenced and cross-fenced. Cow, 40
laying hens, etc.
Price, $3,600. Terms: Cash, (1,500,
(400 payable monthly, (1,700 mortgage at 11c.
F. R. FRASER BISCOE,
Phone 64 COURTENAY, B. C.
....   ~.j    ... Ladies' Footwear.    Patent Leather
Flapper   Slippers,   with   Grey   Suede   frf* JTA
Trimmings, at    «pO«OU
Grey Suede Pumps with Patent Leather Vamp, $6.00
•Two New Snappy Lines in Fine Mahogany
A Dressy Shoe.   Prices ... $6.50 and $7.50
THE CORNER STORE
'We SELL FOR LESS."' :: Phone 133
Royal Candy Co.
Comox Creamery Ice Cream.
Ice-Cold Drinks of all Kinds.
Home-Made Candies, Fresh Daily
Luncheons Served.   Open Day and Night.
CAR FOR HIRE
The Forest Act.
I note that the Forect Act Ib to be '
amended to provide additional safeguards against lire. This summer has
been the most disastrous iu the history
of the province, notwithstanding the
fact that the fire-fighting apparatus
has been tbe most up-to-date possible,
it may be neceBBary to adopt pro-
cautionary measures along the lines
in vogue in our coal mines, as to the
carrying of matches, etc. I believe
that our great source of forest fires
is the cigar and cigarette stubs that
are carelessly thrown away while still
ignited. Many flies have been traced
to this source. There is a faithful
baud of fire-lighters under the department, but in case of emergency men
are pressed into service, often with
little knowledge of how to fight fires,
and still less of knowing how to lead
or direct men, with the result thnt
there is great dissatisfaction.
Again, there should be more cooperation between the wardens and
tho settler, who is endeavouring to
clear his land. The warden on the
ground should be allowed to* use his
own judgment as to the issuing of n
permit, as be is acquainted with conditions which can only be ascertained
by personal observation.
The Liquor Act.
Mention Is made in the speech from
tho Throne that a Bill should be Introduced tending to tbe better enforcement of the Liquor Act. It Is to be
hoped that as far as hospitals are concerned, the Act will be amended. At
present thero are municipalities tbat
huve no hospitals within their bounds;
others where the city municipality Is
of a very small area, and the hospital
serves a large area just outside the
city limits. Yet tbe Act only provides
for a grant per capita of the city area.
Again there are closed towns, not
classed as city municipalities, thut
have ln their area hospitals—but because the towns are not Incorporated,
the hospital receives no grant through
tbe Liquor Act. It Is therefore the
duty of the Government to Bee that
all hospitals that come under the Hospitals Act be treated alike.
Pro-Rmptlons.
With regard to pre-emptions, I believe that the regulations should be
changed. At the present time a pre-
emptor la required to clear five acres
and make It fit for the plough. Now,
there are many pre-emptions whore It
| is utterly Impossible tn carry out the
requirements ot the Act owing to the
nature of tbe land; for In a good many
cases tbere Is not that amount of good
land to be cleared, and in others, tbe
|j cost Is so great—(400.00 per acre—
that lite outlay In land clearing alone
Is (2,000.00, which sum could be spent
to greater advantage elsewhere. If
the Government is to get more people
on the land, then lis policy must be
changed to Induce people to undertake
agriculture.
11. C. University.
Thc Government Is to be commended
In ascertaining the value for university purposes of the lands set aside
for It. It goes without saying that the
university neers a home, and needs it
badly, and If It can be secured without
u heavy draft being made on thc
Trensury Department, then any
scheme that will effect this will receive my heartiest support.
The (lame Act.
I would draw the attention ot the
Attorney-General to the necessity of
changing Ihe Game Act; either by regulation or amendment. Under the
Act the proprietor of a hotel Is not
permitted to have game on the premises for his own use, and hunters.
] staying In hotols, nre not permitted to
! bring their game to thc hotels, or to
have it served to   them.   Strong   re-
: presentations have been made to me
to see that these disabilities are removed, anil 1 trust that such wishes
' will be carried out. as
.M.M
THE"   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1922
B«if I SPORTING NEWS OF THE DISTRICT I Badfcnton
SOCCER GAME TO BE
PLAYED SATURDAY
The Cumberland Juniors arc indeed
very fortunate to secure a game with
the football team of "H.M.S. Capetown," which is now lying in the
Comox harbour. There are over 400
officers and men aboard this ship, and
they have a very good football team.
They played with the Nanaimo Davenports, a second division team, and the
game resulted in a draw of 2 goals
each.
The Juniors will be somewhat
strengthened to try to overcome their
more experienced opponents, and this
will be an experience for the boys as
this is the flrst time they have been
up against a team of the senior class.
Tbs game is arranged to take place
on the Recreation Grounds on Saturday next, Nov. 18th. Kick-off at 2.30
p.m., with Mr. Jones as referee.
The Juniors will fleld the following:
Boffy, Marshall, Miller, Mitchell,
Farmer, Faulds, Taylor, D. Hunden,
Bond, Weir, Somerville.
All players be at the Atheletlc Club
at 2 p.m
Football enthusiasts—Don't forget
the date and time—Saturday at 2.30
p.m.   Be tbere.
INTERESTING DEBATE
HIGH SCHOOL CLUBS
CUMBERLAND JUNIORS
Vs. UNION BAY JUNIORS
The Cumberland Juniors will bave
the Union Bay Juniors as their opponents on the Recreation Grounds on
Sunday, Nov. Ih9t ,in a Cumberland
and District Junior League game for
the McLean Cup. The game is
scheduled for 2.30 p.m., with Mr. A.
Jones as referee.
No doubt this will be a hard tussle
for points, as tbe standing of the
teams at present ls: Union Bay leaders
of the league, closely followed by
Cumberland. If the Cumberland
Juniors should annex the two points
ou Sunday they will lead the league
table, and they are going to make
great efforts to accomplish this.
A strong team is being selected.
The Union Bay club officials are also
selecting their strongest eleven to try
to keep up their reputtatlon, therefore
this game should prove to be a regular hard tussle from start to finish.
Come out and boost the Juniors on
to victory on Sunday.
The Cumberland players are asked
to dress at the Athletic Club hall at
2 p.m.
The Basketball team of the W. H.
O. Club again covered Itself with glory
on Wednesday night last when lt defeated the Teachers' Club In the
league game. This makes them the
champions   thus   far   ln   the   league
ILLUSTRATED TALKS
A comprehensive programme of Illustrated talks hav been arranged by
Mr. Kinney to be given In Grace
Methodist Church this Fall and Winter. A splendid lantern, fixed up with
a "Medza" projector electric lamp,
which eliminates all the troubles of
the arc and acetylene or carbide gases,
gives the best pictures possible.
The following Is part of the programme, commencing with next Sunday night at 8.30:
Sunday, Nov. 19, at 8.30 p.m.—"Children's Life of Christ."
Wednesday, Nov. 22, at 7.30.—"Alasktt"
with a lecture.
Sunday, Dec. 3, at 8.30.—"Archaeology
and Bible History," with lecture.
Wednesday, Dec. 13, at 7.30.—"Nature
of Life," with lecture.
Sunday, Dec. 17, at 8.30.—"Children's
Life of Christ," Part 2.
Wednesday, Dec. 27, at 7.30.—"Towns
and Villages of England."
Wednesday, Jan.  3,  at 7.30.—"Cities
and Towns of Ireland."
Keep these dates clear, for you have
a treat in store. A collection will be
taken to defray expenses.
Sunday mornings at 11 o'clock, at
the "Junior Congregation" Mr. Kinney
draws pictures. Come and bring the
children.
PUBLIC SCHOOL NOTES
Divisions IV and XII won the half
hour play for the week ending Nov.
10th; each obtaining a perfect attend
A piano has been Installed ln the
school and stands at the entrance to
much-needed want In the school, and
the former library room. It fills a
is being put to good use every day.
A concert will be held in the Ilo-Ilo
Theatre on Monday and Tuesday evenings, Dec. 11th and 12th, to help defray the cost of the Instrument.
Teachers and pupils are expecting
a record attendance on each evening,
as everyone Interested In the children will grant tbat a piano Is a great
help, and that If tlie pupils take it
upon themselves to provide their own
instrument they should be encouraged
In every way.
Teachers and pupils desire to thank
The united meeting of the Girls' and
Boyr,' High School Clubs took place
in tlie classroom on Thursday last at
7 p.m. Thc debate which was arranged
for was a great success. The subject
chosen was: " Resolved that Queen
Elizabeth was a better queen than
Queen Victoria." Ml3s Constance
Bird and .Mr. Keith Maclean upheld
the affirmative, while Miss Mildred
Calnan and Mr. Douglas Partridge
took the negative stand, with the result that the decision was givon In
savour of the negative.
While the judges-were making their
decision, a dialogue was given by Mr.
J. Fouracre and Mr. H. Webb, and
was greatly enjoyed.
A vote of thanks to the judges,
Mrs. Maclnnon, KMlss Beatrice Bickle
nnd Mr. J. Wilcock, was proposed by
Miss ('. Bird and seconded by Miss
M. Calnan.
The Girls' Basketball Team played
a game with the W. II. O. Club on
Saturday evening, with the result
that the W. Ii. O. Club won, the score
being 14-10.
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
AND LIQUOR ACT
The most difficult situation which
this or any other Government of B.
C. has had to face, is that pertaining
to the administration of the liquor
laws. After nearly a year and-a-half
of Government control, the situation
appears much clearer. During the regime of the present Attorney-General,
Hon. A. M. Manson, bootlegging lias
been reduced materially ln many districts, and the minister in his speech
hist week reported that the bootlegging from the existence of export
warehouses had been cut down 75 per
cent. He appealed for the co-operation of every member of the Leglsla-f
Ui!',' Ill enforcing the Liquor Control
Act, and predicted that within a few
months, if all would assist, the liquor
laws would be enforced ln a manner [
to reflect creditably upon the province.
USED
CARS
WE HAVE SEVERAL USED
CARS IN THIS WEEK,   ,
AS FOLLOWS :
DODGE ROADSTER
OVERLAND - 90 - TOURING
CHEVROLET 490 TOURING
CHEVROLET 490 DELIVERY
2 FORDS - TOURING
FORD DELIVERY
All these Cars are certified to
be  in  A.l  Condition and are
Priced to Sell.
REPAIRS
Get Our Prices on Repair Work
WE   GIVE   SERVICE !
Blunt & Ewart
THE  COURTENAY  GARAGE
Phone 61     ::     Phone 61
the trustees for a grant of twenty-five
dollars towards tbe piano fund.
Lost, stolen or strayed, two visitors,
official at that, who left a P.-T. A.
meeting about a month ago on their
way to visit a public institution ln the
city. Any Information re same thankfully received, but no reward offered.
Did you sec the "Folk Dancing" exhibition put on by the pupils of tho
Courtenay Public School ? If not, you
raised a good thing. Don't fret, though,
for the Cumberland pupils are practising similar steps. You will Bee
them ut the school concert.
Auction Sale
Saturday, November 18th
AT    AGRICULTURAL    HALL    AND    GROUNDS
at 2 p.m.
THREE   AUTOMOBILES
Including: Overland—Model 81, Self-starter, Demountable Kims,
Good Tires. Chevrolet—Late model in good running order.
Ford—1919, with Good Tires, Self-starter, etc.
Massey-Harrls Mower, nearly new; Two Heavy Waggons; Two
Pitcher Pumps; Heating Stove; Six-hole and Four-hole Cook
Ranges; Clothes Wringer; Rocking Chair and Parlor Chair;
Window Shades; Churn (one to fifteen lbs, capacity); Typewriter (Bllckensllefer); Office Chair, very nice; Full-size Bed;
Child's Cot; Arcade Grist Mill; Adjustable Bone Cutter, etc.,
Invaluable to Poultrymen; Garden Tools, Etc.
LIVE   STOCK
Right now ls the time to buy if you have the feed. Three Fine
Grade Jersey Cows; Good Work Horse; Saddle Horse by
Thoroughbred Sire.
FARM PRODUCE, ETC.
Boxes of Apples; Sacks of Potatoes; Red Carrots in convenient
size lots; Three pair Dressed Fowl, Etc. Housekeepers—Here
Is a chance to save money.
Make a Note of the Date, the Time, and the Place
5 Fine Young Yorkshire Pigs, ten weeks old.   Pen of Pure-bred
White   Wyandotte   Pullets   (Solly-Dean   strain).     2   Fine
White Wyandotte Cockerels.   I Very  Fine  Plymouth Rock
Cockerel.   One 10-gallon Milk Can In good condition.
E FELIX THOMAS
Notary Public    ::    AUCTIONEER    ::    Insurance
Office: Booth Block :: COURTENAY :: Telephone 151
House Phone: 24-L.
Ill
Gracia!
" ENOUGH SAID." — THE NAME STANDS FOR
QUALITY PLUS  POPULAR  PRICES.
Ladies' "Gracia" Patent 2-strap Slipper,   <l»/» AA
with buff insert      «PO UU
-■ i  mt ■■■
Ladies' "Gracia" Patent  Slipper.    Grey   d»/» AA
inaeit.   Nice new strap     «P"»""
Ladies' "Gracia" new Open front Oxford,   d»/» AA
just enough grey to make look dressy   *PU W
Ladies' "Gracia" Patent Flapper  $5.75
For the Older Ladies who like nice dressy shoes, we
have Two Lines of "Gracias."
1—A nice Patent One-strap   $5.75
2—A nice 3 bar Kid Slipper $5.75
If you are going to buy a Pair of Two-Tone Slippers,
you would be wise to look these lines over before you
buy, as they are absolutely the best value  in town.
Cavin's Shoe Store
Agent for "The Astoria" Tailor-made Shoes.
■■Ill
1 Courtenay Furniture Store
ip Come in and see our line of
| EASY CHAIRS
Is .   Just what you want for these long evenings.
| OSTERMOOR   MATTRESSES
|H are guaranteed for a lifetime.   Why not have one and
§§j a good Coil Spring fitted on your bed.
| CONGOLEUM RUGS
=| fo rany room in the house.   They are made in very
II nice patterns.
We Deliver.
Phone 55
C. BROWN, PROPRIETOR Phone 55
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
McLaughlin
Garage
Are you troubled with Foul Slugs ? Have
you stopped to think of the loss of time and
inconvenience, and the price of the oil. We
can remedy this defect at small cost by installing a Guaranteed Oil Ring. We can refer
you to a number of highly pleased customers.
Don't wait—Come in and get particulars    ::
OIL     ::    GAS    ::    TIRES     ::    ACCESSORIES
FREE AIR AND WATER
Geo. H. Pidcock
COURTENAY .- phone 25
Teach Your Boy the Violin or
Some Musical Instrument
A Complete Outfit as above, consisting of Violin, Bow
and Case, complete, only
$17.50
TERMS ARRANGED.
Mandolins, Banjos, Saxaphones and all Musical Instruments at same prices aa Vancouver
and Terms Arranged.
Marshall Music
CUMBERLAND AND COURTENAY
Week-End
Offerings
i Dry Goods Department
p Ladies' Pleated Skirts, Special at $7.00
jgg Ladies' Knitted Dresses, Special at $12.00
§H Ladies' House Dresses, Various Styles, 25 per cent off
=§ Usual Prices.
§} All-wool Scotch Blankets, 10 per cent off Usual Prices
§= Striped and White Flannelette, 36 inches wide, 3 yards
H for $1.00.
g Paton Wool, all shades, per lb $2.95
Tailoring Department
Watch our Windows for Bargains in Ladies' and
Gents' Tailored Suits.   Fit Guaranteed.
Best Quality Goods.
How about that Old Suit of Yours ?  Let us fix it right
for you, in Our Repair and Cleaning Department.
C. Kent & Co.
Courtenay, B.C.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiraiiiii SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18th, 1»22
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
ELEVEN
m
^$#5
I
Modern Shoe Store, Courtenay
•s-.*.*.*.*.*.*.*i*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*s*i*i*i*i*i*i*i*i*i*i*i
TEN
DAYS
ONLY
LAUNCHES   SECOND   ANNUAL
SHOE SALE
Sale Prices
on Entire
Stock
Placing on Sale Our Entire $25,000 Stock of Men's Women's, Boys' Misses and Children's Boots, Shoes,
Slippers and Rubber Footwear at prices that Bring Back Memories of Years Ago. Such Drastic Price
Reductions as You Have Not Known.   Positive Savings of One-Third and One-Half.
BIG   SHOE   SALE   NOW   ON!
JUST A YEAR AGO, AND JUST WHEN YOU NEEDED SHOES—We held Our First Big
Annual Shoe Sale; and this year again—just when you need Shoes—We start our Second
Annual Shoe Sale. You remember the Wonderful Shoe Values we gave you last year. There
was no mistake about it—lots of good folks were kind enough to tell us so.
To-day Shoe Values are more stable. We are in a position to give you prices such as we could
not think of last year. At this, our Second Big Annual Shoe Sale, we are giving you Shoes at
Prices that are only memories of years ago. We know that many have been waiting for this
Big Sale. We have been asked many times just when we wonld start it. Our New Stocks are
now complete, and we are starting it at the time that will suit .everybody best. Just a word of
advice—COME IN EARLY ! Lines will get sold out which we cannot replace during the sale
—and then again, THIS SALE IS FOR TEN  DAYS ONLY.
MEN'S DRESS SHOES
Regular $7.50 Men's Brown and
Black Calfskin Dress Shoes.
Goodyear Welt, Blucher and
Balmoral Styles.   Price $4.95
Regular $8.50 Men's Dress Shoe,
Brown and Black Calf, Goodyear Welt, Round-toe Blucher
or Neat Recede Toe Balmoral.
Sale Price $5.85
$10 Leckie and Regal Dress
Shoes in many popular styles
and shapes. Extra Special
Values.   Sale Price $6.45
Regular $11 Fine Dress Shoes
for Men—Leckie, Derby and
other famous makes. Finest
brown and black calfskin.
Sale Price  $7.45
Regular $1.75 Men's Cosy Felt
Slippers with leather soles.
Sale Price $1.20
MEN'S WORK BOOTS
Regular $6.00 Work Boots, Sterling and Greb makes, solid
leather    throughout.      Sale
price $1.20
Regular $7.00 Leckie and Sterling Work Boots, extra
quality,   solid  leather.    Sale
price   $5.85
Regular $14 Men's 12-in. High
Top Boots of Brown Calfskin,
double soled through heel.
Sale Price  $10.85
BOYS' SHOES
Boys' Leckie Boots, red stitched.
Sale Prices, sizes 1 - 5'/a $3.95
Sale Prices, sizes ll-13«/a $3-45
Sale Prices, 8-10«/2 $2.95
Boys' Solid Leather School
Boots, extra Special Values.
Sale Prices, sizes 1 - 5<4 $2.95
Sale Prices, 11-13^ $2.65
Sale Prices, 8 - 10</a $2.35
The Famous "Tred Rite" Shoes
for Boys. Canada's very best.
Made from highest grade materials.
Sale Price, sizes 1 - 51/, $5.45
Sale Price, 11 - 131/., .... $4.95
Sale Price, 8 - lOVa $3.95
MISSES'   AND   CHILDREN'S
SHOES
(Rubbers Free with Extra
Special Lines)
Regular $5 Misses'   High   Top
Lace Boots, sizes  11 to 2—
fitted with Rubbers Free.
Extra Special  $3.85
Children's Brown and Black Calf
Boots, welted soles   on   the
Footform last.    Regular $4.
Fitted with Rubbers Free.
Extra Special   $2.95
Regular $5 Misses' Brown Calf
laced Boots. Genuine solid
leather Boots.  Sale $3.85
Regular $5 Strong School Boots,
. laced, solid leather throughout. Sizes 11 to 2. Sale
price  $3.45
Leckie's Solid Leather Boots for
Misses and Children. Extra
Special Sale Prices:
Sizes 11 - 2 $3.95
Sizes 8 - lO'/o  $2.95
Regular $2.25 Child's Fine
Black Kid and Patent, with
White Kid Top, lace and button.   Sale Price $1.45
Strap Slippers. Fine Patent
Leather. Extra Special Sale
Prices.
Misses' sizes, 11 - 2 $2.15
Child's sizes, 8 -10>/> .... $1.85
Sizes 4-71/2 $1.45
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
Extra Special, 6 Pairs Laces 20c
Regular 50 cents Men's Heavy
all wool Socks.   3 pairs for $1
Regular 35c Fine Black Cash-
merette Hose,   4 pairs for $1
SPECIAL NOTE
Thick Felt Insoles Given Free
with all Men's Heavy Rubbers
and Rubber Boots.
Men's "Polar Red" 5-eyelet Gum
Boots, sizes 6-11, Our Sale
Price   $3.65
Men's "Bing" 5-eyelet, dark grey
Rubber Boots, red sole, with
white edging.   Sale .... $4.45
Men's All-white and Smoked
Blue, 5-eyelet Rubber Boots,
rolled   and  corrugated  edge
soles.   Sale Price $4.95
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
Women's Light Gum Rubber
Boots.    Sale Price  $3.65
Misses' Light Gum Rubber
Boots.   Sale Price   $2.85
Children's Light Gum Rubbers,
8 - 10i/j.   Sale Price .... $2.65
Men's Knee-high Gum Rubber
Boots, red sole Our Sale
Price $4.85
Boys' Knee-high Gum Rubber
Boots, red sole. Our Sale
Price $.3.25
Huntsmen's Gum Rubber Laced
Boots, 15-inch. Regular $7..50.
Sale Price $5.85
Men's Hip Gum Rubber  Boots,
Red sole.   Sale Price... $6.85
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
MODERN SHOE CO
Courtenay
WOMEN'S SHOES
Regular $6 to $7.50 Women's
and Growing Girls' Brown and
Black Calf and Kid Oxfords
and Two-strap Sport Shoes;
also Black Kid Cushion Sole
Oxfords; low and medium
Cuban heels. Extra Special
Values $3.85
Regular $5.50 and $6.50 Women's Gun Metal and Brown
Calf High-top Lace Boots;
low and medium Cuban heels.
Sale Price  $3.85
Women's and Growing Girls'
heavy calf Lace Boots; medium heavy sole, low heel, full
fitters, regular $6.00. Sale
Price $3.95
Leckie's Strong Wear Boots for
Women and Growing Girls.
Full weight sole, brown and
black.   Extra Special ....$5.85
Women's Brown and Black Kid
and Calf High-top Lace Boots;
Brown Calfskin Brogue Oxfords, Flappers' Sport Shoes,
in Patent, Brown, Calfskin
and Suede. Women's Evening
and Street Dress Slippers.
Values from $7.50 to $10.
Dozens of styles to choose
from. Extra Special Sale
Price   $5.85
Regular $6.50 Women's Brown
& Black Kid Oxfords; Brown
and Black Calf Oxfords and
Two-strap Sport Shoes. Cuban
heels; New Styles. The Sale
Price  $4.45
Regular $11 Finest Brown and
Black Kid and Calfskin High-
top Lace Boots, the famous
"London Lady" make; low &
medium Cuban heels. Sale
Price   $7.45
Women's Fine Black Kid One-
strap House Slippers, neat
"Comfort" last, low Cuban
heels.   Extra Special .... $2.35
Women's Cosy Felt Slippers in
popular colors. Regular $1.75.
Sale Price   $1.20
RUBBER  PRICES
Men's Rubbers   $1.25
Women's Rubbers   $1.00
Women's Footholds   90c
Misses' Rubbers   90c
Children's Rubbers   80c
Boys' Rubbers, rolled edge $1.15
Youths' Rubbers       "       $1.00
Ask for a 1923 Calendar
If -WM
TWELVE
the Cumberland islander
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER  18th, 1922
Social and Personal
.Mrs. Have Walker, who lias been
apoudlng the last three weeks in Victoria, with her son, returned to her
borne In Cumberland last week.
* ss *
Mrs. Frank Elliott, of Nanaimo,
visited her sister, Mrs. Hurry Farmer,
on Sunday last.
ss * ss
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Banks returned
from Port Angolus on Wednesday
evening after attending the funeral of
Mrs. Hanks' mother, the late Mrs.
Trahair.
ss * *
Wills! Drive und Dance.
Tlie Women's Auxiliary ot the G.
W. V. A. Intend holding a whist drive
and dance in the Memorial Hall on
Friday, Nov. 24th, commencing at S.
Dancing, 10 - 12.   Admission al) cents.
SH * s,
itev. Miles S. Trafton, former college chum and early associate of Rev.
Ueo. Kinney, will preach in Grace
Methodist Churcb on Sunday niglit
next at seven o'clock. Rev. Trafton
ls an eloquent and powerful preacher
from New Brunswick.
S> ss ss
l'.-T. A. Heeling.
A meeting of tlie Parent-Teachers'
Association will he held in tlie school
on Monday, Nov. 20th, at 8 p.m. A
discussion on '"Manual Training in
Schools" will follow routine business.
All persons interested are invited to
attend,
ss ss ss
Halo of Work.
At a vory convenient time of the
season tlie girls of the W. H. 0. Club
of Grace Methodist Church have decided to hoid a "Sale of Work" which
will consist of every description of
needle work. In addition to the splendid display of needle work, there will
be a table of home cooking which It
is anticipated will prove to he very
popular. It is only a few weeks now
to Christmas and this is a grand opportunity to secure some useful and
pretty gifts for your friends. The
sale is from .*! to I], and during the
course of the afternoon, tea will be
served. Reserve this date—Wednesday nfternoon, November 22nd.
(live .Newly-Weds a
Host Enjoyable Snrprlce Party.
A most enjoyable surprise party was
given hy some twenty young people of
Grace Methodist Church to the newly-
mari'led couple, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Boothman, last Monday night. The
self-invited guests furnished an
abundance of good things to eat, and
happy mirth. The bride was presented with a beautiful cut-glass vase.
Everyone had a delightful evening.
ss ss ss
Surprise Party for
Departing  Resident.
A parly of much interest and a great
surprise took place on Saturday evening last nt the home of Mrs. Farmer,
Dunsmuir Ave., in honor of Mrs. A.
Derbyshire, who will shortly leave
Cumberland, taking up her residence
in Vancouver. The evening was spent
most eujoyably. Various forms of entertainment being indulged in. In the
whist, Mrs. Davis secured flrst prize,
consisting ot a handsome bojt of stationery; the second prize was won by
Mrs. Eccleston, being a huge Kewple
doll. Dainty refreshments were
served. Among those present were:
Mrs. Davis, Mrs. Ronalds, Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. Brown, Mrs. TVhitehouso,
Mrs. McNeil. Mrs. Lobley, Mrs. Mc-
Adann, Mrs. Graham, MrB. Taylor,
Mrs. Gomm. Mrs. Eccleston and Mrs.
Farmer.
Royston Community Club.
An enthusiastic meeting of the Royston Community Club was held at the
Maples Ten Rooms on Tuesday night.
From 25 to 30 members attending. It
was decided to. hold an open dance on
Saturday next for the benefit of the
piano fund. Mr. Dalby, president, took
the chair, and the meeting was a most
successful and pleasant social event.
The dance, to be held this Saturday
evening In the School, will be from
S to 12 p.m.   Gents, 75c; ladleR, 25c
Successful Donation Tea.
Our idea of misfortune is for a one-
armed man to lie calling on twin
sisters.
A successful "Donation Tea" was
held in the Anglican Hall on Wednes
day last under the auspices of the W.
A. of Holy Trinity Church. A very
nice musical programme was presented by the following well-known
local artistes: Miss Connie Bird, Mrs.
Lymn, Mrs. McAdam and Mrs. Pinfold.
A dance followed in the evening,
which was thoroughly enjoyed by
those present.
A Badminton Club Organized.
The senior scholars of Holy Triniti
Sunday School have organized a Bad
minton Club. They will play iu tin
Church Hall on Saturday evenings
and are looking forward to some good
games.
The officers are:
Hon. President—Mrs. Leversedge.
President—Miss Olga Owen.
Sec-Treasurer—Miss Olive Jones.
Committee—Fred Leversedge and Albert Gomm.
ORIENTAL QUESTION
UP IN THE HOUSE
What makes a half-bald man madder than buying a whole haircut?
An undertaker Is a man who follows
the medical profession.
Our idea of the meanest man ls tlio
bill collector who wears rubber heels.
The prisoner had been given a sentence of seven days without the option
of paying a fine.
The clerk had read out a long list
it previous convictions.
"Well," asked the magistrate, "have
ou anything to say?"
"All I've got to say," remarked the
.irlsoner, In a hurt voice, "ls that It's
a pretty mean way to treat a regular
customer."
WHY BABIES CRY
It's often hard to find the trouble
—It may be teeth —it may be
Stomach—but oh I so often il is
just a chafed irritated s*!;in on
which poor Soap bas been used.
The remedy for tin's is sn simple!
Hours of suffering—night after
night of disturbance—have been
avoided by mothers, who have
insisted  on—Baby's 0;oh Snap.
Of course it costs a little more,
a very little  more, however—
than what is often bought nnd
used—but  four gei.eralioi i   ol
Canadian Mothers arc t!
vouch for ils purily, I
soothing healing effect on !
delicate skin, for the lot
flower fragrance il le.ivei
Baby fresh and c!e*i:i  :.*
from his bath.
Don't vou think, Madam, it's worth
paying the 15c. a cake, a Utile less ii
you buy a box (3 cakesi which your
dealer asks for Baby's Own Soap. Adv.
Tlie Government has taken a decided stand upon the Oriental question. In the Legislature Friday afternoon, Hon. William Sloan, Minister of
Mines, dealt with his resolution ask-
ng the House to recommend that
Vslatlcs be totally excluded from en-
ering British Columbia. He went into details regarding the alarming increase in the numbers of Japanese,
Chinese and Hindus In this province,
ind claimed that In future they would
lave to be barred or the Industrial,
.ocinl and economic life of the prov-
nce would be endangered. Hon. Mr.
.loan showed that the Japanese and
Chinese had secured practically full
control of thc fisheries nnd market-
garden industries, and that the former were securing a strong hold upon
the lumbering Industries. He showed
how in the early years of the century
thc workers hail had to carry almost
the entire load of the fight against
Orientals, but now the Asiatics had
cntere:! practically every field of endeavor. The inroads had heen Insidious in their nature, but i he census
figures left no doubt of the dangerous
situation. This stand by the Government has met with the approval of the
electorate all over thc province, and
many commendations have heen received.
The same young gal who turns on
the porch light before marriage so
that her Sweetie won't slip and fall,
turns off the hall light after marriage
to see if he will stumble on tho stairs.
Rough Boys Well
Leathered
S. DAVIS, DAu;
I'AMII Y SHOE  REPAIRER
APPLES
BUY THEM BY THE BOX AND BUY THEM NOW
PRICES REASONABLE—SEE WINDOWS
SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK:
Olympic fyheatlets, 4 lb. package, each 30c, 2 for 55c
Teco Pancake Flour, 20c. package,  2 for 35c
Log Cabin Pancake Flour, 30c. package, 2 for 55c
Krinkle Corn Flakes, 5 packages for 55c
Sunflower Salmon, Va lb. tins, 2 for 25c.; 1 lb. tins, 25c.
2 for 45c.
Green Ribbon Seeded Raisins, 25c. package, ....2 for 45c
Libby's Condensed Mince Meat, 20c. package, 2 for 35c
Canned Vegetables,  5 tins for 95c
Peas, Corn, Beans, Tomatoes.
Finest Bulk Cocoa 25c per lb.
Van Camps' Pork and Beans, 15c. tin 7 for $1.00
Pacific and St. Charles Milk, 16 oz. tins 7 for 95c
Squirrel Peanut Butter 25c per tin
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
Cumberland
B.C.
1
*fl
fl
nsmuir
Avenue
The tramp knocked at the farmhouse door and asked for the farmer.
To that worthy he recited a tale of
»oo, and asked for a job.
"Ves, you can imve a job," said the
farmer, "You could gather eggs for
mo if you arc certain you won't steal
j any."
I    The tramp choked   with   gratitude
and emotion.
"Sir," he said, with eyes brimful of
unshed tears, "you could trust me
with any mortal tiling on earth. For
twenty years I was manager of a bathhouse, and I never took a single
bath!"
Many a small boy la kept In after
school because his father worked his
arithmetic wrong.
A Limited Number Can Join
OUR CHRISTMAS CLUB
and Obtain a Piano or Edison Phonograph on Club Terms
$150
PIANOS
A Splendid Little Practice Piano for
Children.   An instrument we would
always be willing to exchange for a more modern
one when the children are older.
d»Q'7Cv A Canadian Piano, very slightly used.
«DO I 0    As good as new.  Ten-year guarantee.
Usual Price $425.
•djyisip* Beautiful new Craig Piano, in Ma-
tp^tuU hogany or Fumed Oak Finish. Ten-
year guarantee.
450
Cecilinn Piano, in Fumed Oak Finish.
Slightly used for a few weeks.
Special Privileges of the
Christmas Club
You can call at either Our Cumberland or
Courtenay Store any day and select the Edison
Phonograph or Piano you would like for Xmas.
Just pay One or Two Dollars Down and One or
Two Dollars Every Week until Xmas. Then we
will credit your account with all you have paid
and draw up a contract allowing you very easy
Terms on the balance.
Will hold for Xmas Delivery if you desire.
Full credit within Three Months for Larger Models
Free delivery to your home.
IF YOU WANT A SNAP IN A
PIANO, LET US KNOW, AS WE
MAKE IT OUR BUSINESS TO
LOOK" OUT FOR BARGAINS.
SEE OUR REPRESENTATIVE
TO-DAY. HE MAY HAVE JUST
THE INSTRUMENT YOU REQUIRE, AND AT A PRICE THAT
SUITS YOU.     ::    ::    ::   ::    ::
(J»/?9   A Genuine Edison  Phonograph, with
(PU.6   Diamond
Christmas.
$102
$135
$195
$1.00 per week till
The G. A.
LOCAL   REPRESENTATIVES
FLETCHER MUSIC CO.
Limited
Point.
A real snap.
Edison  Phonograph,  with  diamond
point.   $2.00 per week until  Xmas.
Edison Diamond Disc Phonograph.
"Chalet" Model.
Edison Diamond Disc Phonograph,
Beautifully finished in Fumed Oak or
Mahogany.   Another Real Snap.
MODELS UP TO $395.00 IN STOCK
OPPOSITE  ILO-ILO  THEATRE
THE MARSHALL MUSIC CO.
COURTENAY
OI'I'OSITE  THE  "DOUBLE  ARROW"  SIGN AND  PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH
##*#:
ALSO "TOP OF THE TOWN."
3E

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