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The Cumberland Islander Nov 19, 1921

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Array Provincial Library
A i»v vfjf \
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,r\ ) J 1921     I' {
THE C
ERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR-No. 47
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Wing Chong, Prominent
Chinaman, Fatally Wounded
Assailant Fired Three Shots at Him at Close Range Out of a Big
Germany Army Revolver—Wing Chong Was Secretary of the
Chinese Free Masons, While the Accused is Said to Have
.Been a Member of the Chinese Nationalist Association.
Another shooting affray disturbed the usual tranquility of the
town on Sunday last, when Wing Chong, a well known and probably the most highly respected Chinaman of the district, was
mortally wounded by a revolver shot fired at him by Wong 0 Sang.
He was rushed to the General Hospital and operated upon, and
though appearing to have a fighting chance for recovery, he took
a turn for the worse Wednesday morning and died Wednesday
night.
Wong 0 Sang, his assailant, is in jail at Okalla, awaiting trial
for attempted murder.   His case was remanded before Wing
Chong died.   Now he will have to face a more serious charge.
Wing Chong, among his other con'
nectlons, was agent for shipping trading to the Orient, and also secretary
of the Chinese Free Masons. It appears that Wing 0 Sang was at the
store about 12.30 on Sunday, but the
Btore of Wing Chong was filled with
his compatriots; Sang spoke about a
passage to China and said he would
return later, which he did, shortly after 1 o'clock, when most of the men
had gone to dinner. There were three
other Chinamen in the store besides
Wing Chong wheu Sang is said to
have entered and asked for a ticket to
the Orient, which Wing Chong proceeded to fill out, the visitor in the
meantime going around behind the
small counter, alongside Wing
Chong, ostensibly for the purpose of
spelling his name. Just as the ticket
was about completed, the visitor is
said to have turned around, saying
■something about getting the money
out of his pocket. Instead he pulled
a big German army revolver, ot the
Leuger make, and fired at Wing
Chong, hitting bim in the stomach.
The wounded man grabbed the assailant, as also did the other men ln the
store, and in the scuffle the assailant
fired two more shots.
The reports of the shots brought
Chinese from all directions, who
bound the accused hand and toot and
sent in a call for the police. Provincial Constable Dunbar, accompanied
by members of the R. C. M. P., proceeded to the locality and placed the
accused under arrest, ordering Wing
Chong taken to the hospital, where
he was operated on.
Accused Kemanded tor Eight Days.
On Monday morning Wong 0 Sang
appeared before Magistrate J. Baird
to answer to a charge of attempted
murder. Ou the application of the
prosecution he was remanded for 8
days, and was later taken to Okalla
and placed in the jail there.
Two other Chinamen are said to
have accompanied Wong 0 Sang to
the store of Wing Chong, but waited
outside and made good their escape
after the shooting.
As ls usual in cases ot this sort,
there are many rumors to account for
the shooting, the one generally accepted being ot bad feeling between
the different associations. Another
one says there is a reward ot a thousand dollars each for the death of
three prominent Chinese Free Masons,
one of whom was Wing Chong.
On the police searching the room occupied by Wong 0 Sang, the accused,
tliey found a holster to fit the gun
curried by accused and a bag of cartridges, as well as a sheath knife. The
revolver produced is a deadly looking
weapon, about a foot long, and has
capacity for ten cartridges. It Ib said
to be one of those disposed of somo
time ago by a well known man who
later left the district.
Coroner's Jury Adjourns to Monday.
Thursday afternoon, owing to Mr. J
Baird, district coroner, being engaged
on other cases, Coroner Dr. Thomas
Butters of Courtenay came up and
took charge of the preliminary enquiry. A Jury consisting of Messrs.
T. B. Bate (foreman), J. Walton, J.
Damonte, SI. Brown, F. Dallos and D.
D. McCrae, was sworn in. After viewing the body and hearing the remarks
of the coroner, the inquset was adjourned until 7 o'clock Monday in the
Court House. The body was identified
as that of Wing Cheng by his cousin,
from Vancouver.
Wing Chung's wife and family are
at present in China, but one son, about
11 years of age, lives in Chinatown,
Wing Chong has a brother In Cumberland.
BASKETBALL LEAGUE
NOW ORGANIZED
Expected That About Ten Teams
From District Will Enter-
Hall Nearly Completed
PRESBYTERIAN  QHURCH NOTES.
Rev. James Hood, Pastor of St.
George's Presbyterian Church, and
also Moderator of the Presbyterian
Synod, went to Vancouver over the
week-end, preaching at both Sunday
services of Westminster Presbyterian
Church.
Mr. A. C. Colman, Chinese mlssioner
in Cumberland, occupied the pulpit in
the morning at St. George's. The gentleman who was to take the evening
service failed to appear, and Mr. John
Sutherland occupied the pulpit.
Recognizing the great need for a
ball in which basketball could be
indulged in, the management of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
with their usual generosity where
sports are concerned, has had the old
band ball on tbe hill made suitable
for the purpose. Extensive repairs
and alterations have been made to the
building aud good seating accommodation provided. * The place will be
well lighted and made comfortable.
On Thursday evening a meeting was
held in the Athletic Hall for the purpose ot organizing a Basketball
League. It was formally agreed that
a Basketball League be formed, to be
known as the Comox District Basketball League. The following officers
were elected:
Mr. Thos. Oraham, Hon. President.
Mr. Chas. Graham, Hon. Vice-Pres.
Mr. A. Auchlnvole, Hon. Vice-Pres.
Mr. T. Piket, Hon. Vice-Pres.
Mr. F. J. Dalby, President.
Mr. Jas. L. Brown, Vice-President.
Mr. J. W. Pringle, Secretary-Treas.
It Ib requested that all teams have
their entries in the hands of the
President or Secretary, at Box 323,
not later than Thursday, November
24, aud to designate each team as
senior or intermediate.
About ten teams are expected to
enter the league, one each from Union
Bay, Denman Island, Courtenay, Comox, and six or seven from the city.
The executive ask the public to give
the new organization their moral support.
Register! Do It Now!
The Revised Voters' List of the Provincial Government
is being used in the Federal December Elections, and now
is the time to register, if you desire to vote.
If you voted at the last Provincial Election your name is
most probably on the list, bi t if you did not it is probably
struck off.
New names can be added io the list for the Cumberland
Polling Division, No, 10, which includes Cumberland, Bevan
and Minto, and all residents ihis side of the Trent River and
all who reside South of the Wellington Colliery Railway.
The office of the Registrai is at the corner of Dunsmuir
Avenue and Fourth Street vill be open during the coming
week to receive applications from 9 to 12 noon, and from 1
to 5 p.m.
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Registrar.
Clements Addressed Crowded
House Thursday in Courtenay
Spoke for Two Hours on the Vital Issues Before the Electors—
Showed Rank Folly of Lowering Tariff When Other Nations
Were Raising It—Was Accorded Splendid Reception and is
Assured of Big Vote in Courtenay.
COURTENAY, Nov. 18.—H. S. Clements, Federal candidate for
Comox-Alberni constituency, hald a meeting in the Majestic
Theatre last night, the hall being filled to capacity. Mr. Clements
was in splendid fighting form and dealt with the issues before the
electorate in a masterly manner. He showed very clearly by
numerous illustrations how a protective tariff policy had built up
the United States, and what protection had done to build up the
fruit industry of the Okanagan, and the pulp and paper industry
of British Columbia and Quebec.
DEATH OF ANOTHER
OLD-TIME RESIDENT
Mr. Andrew Aitken, who lived at
Bevan, aud was an old and respected
resident of the district, died suddenly
Sunday night following an attack of
hemorrhage of the brain.
Deceased, who was a native ot
Scotland and 60 years of age, came to
the Island many years ago, and had
resided in this district for over 20
years, following the occupation of
miner.
He leaves to mourn his loss, his
wife, four sons, Robert, David and
Colin of tbls district, and Andrew who
lives ln Vancouver, and a sister, Mrs.
John Miller.
The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon from the residence of
the family at Bevan, the remains being taken to the Cumberland Cemetery
for interment. Messrs. Jas. Potter,
John Logan, Geo. McLean, Andrew
Clarke, Jobn Aitken and Robt. McAllister acted as pall-bearers. Rev.
James Hood conducted the burial service.
A large number ot floral tributes
were sent by friends and relatives, including the family, Mr. and Mrs. V.
Marinelli and family, Bevan Burns
Club, Athletic Club, Mr. and Mrs. F.
Slmlster and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
Herd and family, Mr. and Mrs. Robt.
Yates, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Malpass,
Miss D. Harris, Mr, Jay and classes of
the school, Mr. and Mrs. J. Aitken,
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Weir and family,
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. McAllister, Mr.
and Mrs. D. Bannerman and family,
Mr. and Mrs'. Thos. Monks aud family, Mr. and Mrs. A. Robertson and
family, Mr. and Mrs. J. Irvine and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Miller, Mr.
and Mrs. T. Grieves.
ST. JOHN'S FIRST AID
MEETING CHANGED TO
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
The monthly meetings of the St.
John's First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association has been changed from
Sunday to Wednesday, and the next
meeting will be held on November 30,
at 8 o'clock in the Athletic Hall.
Mr. Peter Myers will read a paper
on "Mine Explosives." AU fire-bosses
are asked to attend this meeting as
this paper will'be of particular interest to them.
Free Trade Would Be Rank Folly.
He also showed very conclusively
that free trade In many articles which
are now on the tree list in Canada bad
not had the desired effect of reducing
the cost to the consumer, but that the
price had very materially increased
under free trade, while Canada had
lost tbe business, compelling employees to emigrate to the United
States to secure employment in the
factories there.
He also showed where the farmers
ot Australia and New Zealand were
demanding protection for manufaetur
ers so lhat machinery and supplies
could be made within their borders,
thus creating a home market for the
farm produce raised by the farmer,
and employment for the mechanic and
laborers.
How England, the Mother of Free
Trade, had recently adopted a protective tariff of 33% per cent, on no
less than 6000 articles imported into
the Empire.
In view of these facts, to talk ot
Free Trade, or even a reduction ot the
tariff, was rank folly.
The financial situation and railroad
problems of the Dominion were fully
discussed, showing the running expenses of the Federal Government,
apart from expenses connected with
the war, had been reduced fifty million
dollars last year.
Made Licences Available to White
Fishermen.
The Japanese fishing question was
fully discussed and it was conclusively
shown that Mr. Clements bad broken
up the cannery system formerly in
operation, where all fishing licences
were issued to tlie canneries, showing
that the Independent white fishermen
did now and could obtain licences
which they could not do when be was
first elected to represent the district.
He appealed to the electors for their
support on the record of the government and his own record as mentioned
for the last ten years.
At the close of a two-hour address
several questions wore asked and
frankly answered hy the speaker, and
judging by the applause the answers
were invariably satisfactory. From
the reception accorded Clements lt is
evident that he has nothing to fear
from the Courtenay section of the
district.
Sensational Climax To
Local Bootlegging Charges
Two "Stool Pigeons," Chief Witnesses for Dry Squad — After
Greulling Cross-Examination One Breaks Down and Admits
He and His Mate Were Deliberately Lying and Notes Were!
Faked—Entire Evidence Discredited—Prosecuting Attorney-
Asked for Adjournment Without Bail—"Stool Pigeon" Later
Arrested on Charge of Perjury.
The cases arising out of the somewhat spectacular raid by
the Dry Squad of the Liquor Control Board which took place in
Union Bay and Cumberland last Thursday, came up before Magistrate Baird on Thursday, and the concluding stages of the
day's work provided one of the most dramatic and sensational
climaxes said to ever have been witnessed in a British Columbia
court of law, when one of the "special constables" (or "stool
pigeons") absolutely broke down under the gruelling cross-examination of Mr. J. Edward Bird of Vancouver, and admitted he and
his mate were liars, their notes were faked, and that he and his
pal in the course of their "official" visits entered the room of one
of their victims for immoral purposes. Right there the charges
went to pieces.
CHAMPIONS WILL GO TO
SOUTH WELLINGTON
To Play League Fixture Against
Strong Opponents on Sunday Afternoon.
Cumberland United, the B. C. soccer
champions, Journey to South Welling
ton on Sunday to play their return
league fixture with the strong South
Wellington team. This game is about
the most important of the series, as a
win for Cumberland will about ciiuii
the league champlonsbip once again.
The following will do duty for Cumberland: Boyd, goal; Campbell and
Stewart, full backs; Irvine, Conti and
O'Donnell, half-backs; Hltchens, Milligan, Sutherland, Plump and Hani-
son, forwards.
MEETING OF AUXILIARY
OF GENERAL HOSPITAL
The regular monthly meeting of tlio
Women's Auxiliary of the Cumberland
General Hospital will be held In the
Anglican Church Hall on Friday nest,
November 25, at 3 in the afternoon.
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
BY WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
The Women's Auxiliary of the G.
W. V. A. will hold another of their
popular whist drives and dances on
Friday night next, November 25, In
the Memorial Hall. Whist commences
at 8 sharp, dancing 10 to 12, with ilrst-
class music. Admission 50 cents. Refreshments served.
"THE MONKEY'S PAW"
Courtenay Entertainment to be
Repeated Here on December
1st Under G. W. V. A.
The Courtenay Amateur Dramatic
Club will make its bow to Cumberland
people ou Thursday, December 1, under tho auspices of tbe Cumberland
G. W. V. A. and Women's Auxiliary.
"The Monkey's Paw," a delightful
drama in three acts, by W, W. Jacobs,
will be the offering.
The Courtenay Amateurs presented
"The Monkey's Paw" recently to a
Courtenay audience, and from nil accounts it was a decided success. The
local G. W. V. A. are lo be congratulated ou securing the services of the
Courtenay society, and judging by the
way tickets arc selling a bumper
house ls uutlclpaled.
Prices huve been placed within the
reach of all—general admission 50
cents, box seats 75 cents. Tickets
may be obtained from any member of
the local G. W. V. A.
BOOKED SUPER SPECIAL
PICTURES FOR ILO-ILO
Mr. James Haworth, manager of the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre went to Vancouver
over the week-end, where lie arranged
for some high-grade pictures for the
theatre. Among the big feature pictures coming in the near future are
"The Great Impersonation," "The Affairs of Anatol," "The U. P. Trull,"
"The Man of the Forest," etc.
Clements To Speak At
Ilo-Ilo Theatre Tonight
Mr. H. S. Clements, men ber for Comox-Alberni in the
Federal House, will addres? the electors of Cumberland tonight (Friday), in the Ilo-Mo Theatre. The meeting will
open at 8.30. Mr. Clemen' i will speak on the most important issues of the day.
The chair will be taken by Mayor D. R. MacDonald.
"Stool Pigeons" Star Witnesses.
"Special Constables" L. H. Wheeler
and Geo. Mars of the Liquor Control
Board were the star witnesses for
the prosecution. These men are what
better known as "stool pigeons"
aud their highly discreditable evidence
was a splendid example of the un-
worthiuess of this kiud of witness,
probably one of the lowest and most
despicable of occupations known to
mankind.
Mars provided the sensation late in
the afternoon, near the close of a
very interesting and at times exciting
day's c,ourt proceedings. Mr. J. Edward Bird, the well known lawyer of
Vancouver, who assisted Mr. P. P.
Harrison for the defence, subjected
both Mars and Wheeler to severe examination. Both men were witnesses
against George Neill of Union Bay and
Mrs. Hilda Johnson of Royston Road,
and Bwore that they had purchased
liquor from these persons in October
last.
.liars Admitted Giving False Evidence.
The case against Neill had been
concluded, judgment being reserved
until later in the session, The charge
against Mrs. Johnson was under way
when the climax came, Mars being under cross-examination. After getting
answers to bis questions, Mr. Bird
told witness in no uncertain tone that
he would bave the truth, even if he
had to bring all the officials from Victoria to get lt. Witness then and there
began to weaken and finally broke
down, admitting he was lying and
that Wheeler had tied, and that he
had entered the bedroom of the ac
cused tor immoral purposes, as nlso
did Wheeler.
fuses Adjourned Wltbont Ball.
These damning admissions sent a
thrill of sensation through the court
room, which was crowded, snd brought
the day's proceedings to a speedy end.
Mr. Arthur Leighton of Nanaimo, counsel for the prosecution, feeling the
gravity of the situation, arose and
asked for an adjournment until Friday morning, without any bail being
required. Previously the accused had
put up $2000 bail.
A warrant was later sworn out by
James Engllah for the arrest of the
witness Mars, charging him with perjury. iMars was arrested shortly afterwards and spent the ulght ln jail.
Magistrate Baird fixed the bail al
.■?4000. bul accused was unable to provide it.
"Padded" Accounts.
Mr. Bird proved from the evidence
of these men and their expense accounts, that they were "padding" the
latter, from charging up the Liquet
Board With 51) cents for a twenty-five
cent jitney ride to $8 for a bottle ol
whlBkey which they admitted they did
not buy. They kept note books, supposed lo contain details of occurrences
US they happened, but Mr. Bird proved
they had been made up later and were
exact copies of u report submitted to
the Liquor Control Board, despite tlie
positive assertions of thc witnesses to
the contrary. Mars went so far in one
instance lo state in his book that Us
had bought a bottle of whiskey from
George Neill for $8 In company with
t'onstable Mars (himself!). He
copied verbatim the other man's report, swearing it was original.
Swore 'Dhey Consumed U Drinks In
1,'s 11 (null'* and Kemnlned Seller.
Wheeler swore be bought $5 worth
of drinks at Neill's place, whiskey and
beer, at 25 cents each, and Mars said
lie spent $6 for the same purpose—
which would make 44 drinks beside:
what .\eill "set up" and what they
bad out of the bottle produced In
court. As they admitted being In
Neill's house only about 45 minutes
Ihey wore going some, nnd declared
t the end of thiB time Ihey were "all
light" (sober).
The cases were henrd before Magistrate J. Baird, and the officers and
counsel attending the court were:
Major Chas. B. Bailey, Deputy In-
pector of Liquor; who had charge of
Ihe prosecution and who alno conduit
cd the recent raid.
Mr. Arthur Leighton, of Nanaimo,
conducted thc cases for the prosecution.
Mr. P. P. Harrison and Mr. J. Edward Bird of Vancouver acted for the
defence.
Miss Florence Callow, court stenographer of Nanaimo.
Chief Constable Stephenson and
Constable MuBtart of Nanaimo.
The first case called was that of
Geo. Liddell and George Hirst, who
were charged originally with "keeping liquor for sale," but this was
amended to "selling beer." They
pleaded guilty and Magistrate Baird
fined them $75 and costs.
R. D. Webster's charge was altered
to the same effect and he also pleaded
guilty, being fined the same amount.
The case against George Neall of
Union Bay followed, be being charged
"with unlawfully on November 1 selling liquor."
FRIDAY'S CASES
On the court resuming sitting this
(Friday) morning the caso against
Mrs. Hilda Johnson of Royston Road
was called. Tho original charge, on
which the "stool pigeon" Mars broke
down and confessed to lying and other
unlawful acts, was withdrawn aud a
new charge laid of selling beer. She
pleaded guilty to this and was fined
$75 and costs.
The charge against Wm. Merrifield
of the Cumlierland Hotel was also
amended to selling beer, to which be
pleaded guilty, and was assessed $75
and costs.
Jas. English's case followed tho
amc course, he pleading guilty nnd
being fined $75 and coBts.
Case Against Neill Dismissed.
The case of George Neill came up
for judgment, and Magistrate Baird
iismiBsed it. This was Ihe other case
In which the "stool pigeons" gave
conflicting evidence.
Fecliuer Pleaded Not Guilty.
The case against O. II. Fechncr aud
Lucille McCormack of the Wilson
Hotel. Union Bay, followed. They
were charged jointly with selling
liquor. Mr. Bird objected to tho
charge being laid jointly, and it was
amended against Mrs. McCormack to
selling beer. She pleaded guilty to
this and was assessed $75 and costs.
Feekner was charged with selling
liquor, and pleaded nol guilty. Evidence was given by Provincial Confutable Mustart uf Nanaimo, Provin-
ial Constable Russell of Courtenay,
leo. Broder of Union Buy, and Major
Bailey, who laid the charge::.
Jiechncr's (use lilMMissed.
The prosecution failed to prove their
case and Magistrate Baird dismissed
it.
I "STOOL PIGEONS"
DISMISSED FROM
BOARD'S EMPLOY
Following the sensational
climax and confession of G.
Mars, one of the "special"
constables" employed by the
Liquor Control Board to get
evidence of unlawful selling
of liquor, that ho and his
partner had deliberately lied
in their evidence and produced faked notes.they wero
summarily dismissed from
the service of the Board and
their badges taken from
! them.
Wheeler Remanded.
Wheler was later arrested
1 on a charge of perjury, laid
I by James English, and put
| in   jail.    Magistrate  Baird
| sot bail at $-1000, which ac- \
1 cused was unable to put up.
f He came before Magistrate
Baird this afternoon for a
preliminary hearing and was
remanded,
I II^KMMHMmmhii
Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 19, 1921.
WOMAN'S INFLUENCE ON
MAN SHOWN IN DRAMA
Slater's Strider
—the best good Shoes for Men
"That settles the shoe question!" is what you will
say after you buy a pair of shoes from us.
We solicit your patronage and we strive to deserve it
by selling supreme quality slippers and shoes.
SPECIAL   FOR   SATURDAY
il, Louis or
$4.50
75c Z $3.00
LADIES' SHOES—Vici Kid or Gunmetal, Louis or
Cuban heels.  Just the shoe for everyday wear.   See our window.   Special...
MEN'S WORK GLOVES—
New priced, per pair	
BUY "AHERNS" SCHOOL SHOES, OR "CHUMS"
and you will not make a mistake.   We will guarantee
these shoes to give you satisfaction .
Full Line of Lamb-Wool Soles for Your Xmas Slippers
Cavin's ShoeStore
FOOTWEAR ONLY
Spats— Shoe Findings — Rubbers — Slippers — Boots
and Shoes and Foot Comfort Appliances
Moil's
High Grade
Chocolates
FRESH'STOCK ALWAYS
ON HAND
New shipments of these high-
grade confections arrive every
two weeks, ensuring fresh goods
all the time.
Henderson's
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE BAH,WAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland. B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEKRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.        Cumberland, B.C.
Little cats and rabbits,
Captured with much zeal,
Soon are on the market
Labeled "Seal."
■III!
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
lillllllllilUg
"Man - Woman - Marriage"   Pictures Feminine Rise and Fall
—Showing Tonight
Those who doubt tlie world has
progressed (luring tlie last two thousand years should witness the showing of Allen Holubar's famous Associated First National production of
the eternal-drama, "Man-Woman-Mar-
rluge," starring the talented actress,
Dorothy Phillips. The picture is
showing at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre Friday
and Saturday of this week. On Friday
night there will be one show, owing to tlie theatre being engaged for
the meeting of Mr. H. S. Clemens'
supporters, following the first show.
"Man-Woman-Marriage" Is a condensed history of the world's progress
—a screen epic and proof positive of
woman's sutble and benign Influence
ovor tlie destiny of mankind.
In the retrospective Roman scenes
of this stirring modern story, beautiful
Dorothy Phillips Is seen as a Christian
slave girl at the court of the Emperor
Constnntlne. In thc mighty Bplendor
of this potentate's magnificence Ib
pictured tlie decadence of civilization
—the period whon man lived for
pleasure. It Is the period whose unrestrained orgies were notable even in
tlie reign of an Augustus Caesar. In
striking contrast Is Dorothy Phillips
in the role of a despised and tortured
slave steadfastly refusing to forswear
tlie tenets of Christianity.
Down through the ages, as depicted
in "Man-Woman-sMarriage," the talented Miss Pliillips Indelibly Impresses
the spectator with tlie influence for
good woman lias wielded over man.
In the modern story of this magnificent film, Miss Phillips is no less impressive in her role as a womaij of
our times.
The story is strong and convincing,
and the work ot the star stamps her
as an artist of rare talent and ability.
Comedy reels will be screened with
this picture.
m
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.      p.o. 3u
Phone 75
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains ot this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of wuter to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper with such
valves, and should the offending parties he apprehended they will
he prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Correspondence
WHAT IS AN INDEPENDENT!
Sir,—"Why "is an independent?" It
Is a question many ot us would like
discussed. The writer finds lt hard
to answer, the records are silent, but
the question Just now is insistent; the
noble army of martyrs themselves are
not agreed. But if you corner one he
will tell you he finds the old parties
so evil and corrupt that he cannot
associate with them, and that he proposes to purify politics (withholding
his support).   At the same time the
evil and corrupt," unaware of their
depravity, would simply put it down
to vanity, vanity mixed with prudence,
which shuns the collective counsel of
men, while appealing for their united
support.
The motive for supporting an Independent must be essentially selfishness—to benefit the few at the expense
of the many. But every worthy government has for its motto. "The Greatest Good tor the Greatest Number."
Under our system of government,
which is a true democracy, where all
the people are ruled by a majority of
themselves, there can be only two
parties: the majority, or government,
and the minority, or opposition. The
opposition may be composed of widely
differing elements, but the members
of the political opposition belong to
one of the historic parties. The majority party is always homogeneous
and harmonious. This ls the phlloso-
plhc view. Group government, such
as they have In Europe, ts constitutionally obnoxious to all people who
speak the English language. If there
Is a tendency just now in this direction, have no fear, it will not last.
Independents have been appearing
in parliament since the last election
under such aliases ns Liberal-Labor,
Liberal-Progressive, Liberal-Farmer,
but never Conservatlve-anything, for
they are out to demolish, not to conserve. They have as many fancy
names as breakfast foods, and equivalent origin and nourishment.
Comox-Alberni offers a good example of distorted opposition to the
Meighen Government, where an Independent candidate has shoved the
Liberal nominee to one side, and after
he had received Mackenzie King's
blessing. The chagrin of the Liberals
ls only equalled by the annoyance of
the old-time Conservatives at being
invited to support the Independent,
"just for once," because he Is a "local
resident." They admit its sinfulness
who plead "just for once," but for the
sake of a third-rate sentiment they
propose to commit this wrong, which
ls just nothing else but the betrayal
of the government they profess to admire. Because he ls a local man, and
because they esteem his record as a
citizen, a few men, who call themselves "Conservatives," intend, so we
are told, to vote for the Independent
candidate. This is contemptible casuistry; they would sacrifice their country and their convictions for what?—
a "local resident," who ls local to only
ten per cent, of the electorate.
H. H. BROWNE.
Alberni, B. C, November 10,1921.
ILO-ILO  THEATRE   |
FRIDAY and SATURDAY, Nov. 18 & 19 §
you'll see—
—the newest screen marvel.
—a wonderful romance of Mother-Right.
—the love of a woman endures through
the ages, while the love of a man is
reckoned only in hours.
You'll see thousands of women ride bareback into battle, clad only as the Amazons of old.
You'll see the barbaric beauties of pagan
courts, and tho life of the men and
women who rule today.
You'll see thousands of players in riots of
splendor, beauty, love, life, hate, trampling but never crushing the love-power
of Mother-Right.
nrrsp something too great for comparison c:A5^n
1113?      WITH ANYTHING THAT HAS GONE BEFORE      13CJU
ALBERT A. KAUFMAN PRESENTS
ALLEN   HOLUBAR'S   DRAMA ETERNAL
STARRING
DOROTHY PHILLIPS
— IN —
Man-Woman-Itas abe
A MIGHTY MILESTONE IN MOTION PICTURES
THRILLING* INSPIRING!  AMAZING!
9   AMAZING   REELS
m Extra Special Comedy Reels * jf
| Children, 25c. Adults, 50c. |
5jj= a^—p^^M^M^'^'^^^gii^^g^s^^gs^s^S'    "     ',,, '^ „i.,!i  i ;'■"■"■■ 5BS5S5 •*-■?
|    MATINEE   SATURDAY   AT   2.30 §
|      Children, 15c. Adults, 35c. ■
I Usual Saturday Night Dance, 9.30 p.m. |
m
A\
VFRICAN JUNGLE BUILT
FOR PHOTOPLAY, "THE
GREAT IMPERSONATION"
A portion of the jungles ot German
F.ast Africa were duplicated in nn exterior setting built on the Lasky ranch
near Hollywood, California, for scenes
In George Mcltord's production, "The
(Ireat impersonation," featuring Jas.
Klrkwood, which will be shown at the
llo-llo Theatre on Tuesday next.    .
Inasmuch as a trip to a tropical
iungle would have cost a tremendous
sum it was decided to build a Jungle
lo order. A site was selected and trees
:md tropical foliage were transported
to the spot.   Several days were con-
umed in the preparation of the set-
:lng,  which  was set up   under   the
upervlsion of Rudolph Bylek, techni-
i al expert for George Melford productions. The jungle was so realistic that
Melford was badly scratched in trying to penetrate it, and he ordered
ome of the briars removed.
The story, written by E. Phillips
Oppenhelm,  deals   with   two  men, a
erman and an Englishman who re-
omble each other greatly and ln its
'evclopment, one ls carried from Eng-
and to Africa, thence to Germany
ind again to England. The situations
■re thrilling and there isn't a dull
i.oment in the picture. Ann Forest
ms the leading woman's role and in
he cast are Winter Hall, Truly Shat-
uck, Fontaine La Rue, Alan Hale and
nany other noted screen players.
THE MAIN QUESTION
The main question is, should we
idopt a policy that means Canada for
"anadians or should we open our
■jates wide to the products of other
lands, thereby destroying our own
markets by paying our good Canadian
dollars to producers and artlsants of
arelgn countries?
The Issue is clear-cut and definite.
Mr. Meighen stands for Canada, for
ihe sane and reasonable protection of
ail our industries, those ot the farm,
forest, mine, sea and factory. He believes in Canada and her destiny. He
is steadfastly opposed to the destruction of our home markets and our
home industries.
The Inventor of a motor truck wheel
built up of layers of wood glued together under heavy pressure, claims
it will withstand twice as much Bide
strain as a spoked wheel.
Something Good
To Eat
INCONSIDERATE.
"Now look here, Johnson, this man
is doing double the work you do."
'That's what I've been telling him,
sir, but he won't stop."
Customer: "What have you in the
shape of oranges?"
Shopkeeper: "Well, ma'am, we have
golf balls!"
The bamboo sometimes grows two
feet in 24 hours. There are 30 varieties of this tree. The smallest is only
six inches in height and the largest
150 feet.
Something made of good flour,
jf good milk, of good, nourishing compressed yeast, of good
shortening!
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a fine, natural
flavor, with a satisfying slice
,vith a crisp crust.
What could it be but Bre.td—
ihe perfect food.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
GOOD BREAD
13 Bread at its Best—insist on it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H; HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue     •     Cumbcrluuii
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
Tbo meetings of the Great War
vVtorans Association arc hold every
Tuesday al 7 o'clock In tho Memorial
Hall.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - •  B. C.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings arc held on the second
and fourth Wednesdays of ouch month,
in thc Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brothren cordially invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, O. Ranger;
F. Eaton. Secretary; F. Slaughter,
I'reasni'er.
BROWN'S
TOBACCO, CIGAR AND
CONFECTIONERY  STORE
Good Selection ol Pipes, Cigar and
Cignrcllc Holders.
*	
Football Results Every
Saturday Night
James Brown
Cumberland
Liddell's Orchestra
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions
of all kinds. Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave.
i !#
November id, 1921.
tHE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
tfhree
Rheumatism?
Or Neuralgia, Sciatica, Lumbago!
Thc remedy ia aimple, inexpen-
live, easily taken and harmless.
Tcmpleton's
Rheumatic Capsules
Your druggist will supply you.
Write lor tree trial to Temple-
ton's, 56 Colborne St., Torontt*.
Sold by R. E. FROST.
Jim & Sacki's
POOLROOM
Headquarters for
Footballers, Baseballer*
and other Sportsmen
Watch our
BULLETIN  BOARD
for the Latest Sport News
Jim English     Sacki Conti
Proprietors.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and Goods ot Any Kind
Delivered to All Farts of Dislrlot.
Rubbish and Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE  PO TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Vendome Hotel.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While II Walt
PHILLIPS'  MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dummuir
S. DAVIS, TS
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
The Dangers of Deer Hunting
By C. N. A. IRESON in "Rod and Gun in Canada"
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) $4.50
"What  is   the  height  oi  fashion,
papa?" «
"About one inch above the knee, my
To say that deer hunting is a sport
beset by dangers at first sounds ridiculous to anyone knowing the habits
ot the Odocoileus family, but although
deer are timid and very wary creatures,
there are probably more hunters killed
annually when bunting these animals
in America than there are big game
hunters killed stalking dangerous
game In Africa.
The source of the danger, however,
lies not In being gored by a buck's
antlers or devoured by roving packs
of timber wolves or hugged to death
by some overly affectionate black bear,
as some Nlmrods would like us to believe, but as a matter of fact about
tho only danger outside of getting lost
comes not from fang, horn or claw,
but from the soft nose bullets of numerous fools armed with high-power
rilles who are licensed to roam tbe
woods during tbe open season for big
game.
These fools fire at a bush rustling in
the wind, u patch of white or brown
moving ln n thicket or the sound of
breaking twigs, and Judging from the
number of people killed or wounded
annually In Canada aud the United
States, theso chaps are unfortunately
pretty good shots.
It is generally presumed that the
tenderfoot hunter is alone to blame In
these cases of accidental shooting, and
that In the throes of a violent attack
of "buck fever," with eyes bleared
with excitement, he fires at a patch of
brown and kills another hunter Instead of what he presumed was tbe
first deer he had ever seen running
will. This may be so, but as a matter if fact the shots ot a man In this
state of mind as a rule ily high, wide
and handsome of their mark. Therefore, taking into consideration the
number of deer fired at aud missed
under such conditions, lt only seems
reasonable to suppose that'a man under fire from a gun in the same hands
would be about as immune from danger as the average deer. True It Is
that the tenderfoot ls an annoyance
and frequently a source ot danger in
camp or on the trail. He will do his
best to upset tbe canoe or if that fails
will acldentally blow a hole in the
bottom. He will invariably carry his
gun at full cock with the safety catch
off, and when resting will lean on tbe
muzzle; sometimes it goes off and kills
his partner or probably himself.
He can, therefore, be classed as a
dangerous man to be near ln the tall
timbers but he ls not usually a good
enough marksman to hit a flash of
white In the tag-ulders or a spot of
brown moving through the shadows
of a spruce swamp. The men who can
do this and sometimes do what we
might call the intentional killing, are
as reports show, backwoodsmen and
hunters of some experience who have
come to be a bit too quick with the
rifle.
It Is not an uncommon thing to hear
some of these chaps telling of how
when out hunting they saw a flash of
white in the underbrush which at the
time tbey did not know was a deer, but
taking the long chance on it being a
ling (deer's white tail) let go, and on
going up to where they fired found a
line eight-point buck "dead as a maggot."
Then again another hunter will relate with an air ot boasttulness equal
to that ot a half-breed, ot how he
heard a twig crack In the stillness of
the forest and on seeing a patch of
brown, fired a shot and on going up to
the thicket found that his trusty rifle
had downed what turned out to be the
biggest buck killed by any of his
party that year. Either of these men
when they fired took the chance of
killing a man instead ot a deer, for
the autumn woods are full of hunters
We will grant that Mr. Tenderfoot
without a level headed experienced
companion or guide to chaperone him
Is a source of danger to others, but he
Is by no means alone, for the deadlier
shots from the more experienced class
who Ore at aud hit flashes ln the
brush, are au even greater danger to
ull mankind tramping the November
woods. The tenderfoot is more easily
schooled than the latter kind for "it
is hard to teach an old dog new
tricks," especially if the old dog Is a
bit bull-headed and over conflldent.
The acldental shooting of a fellow
hunter is about all that will teach
some to be careful and at all times
to be sure of what they see in the
woods before they Are.
To show how careful a person who
hunts in brushy country must be I will
repeat an incident that happened to a
hunting companion of mine some years
ago. One morning he shot a small
deer in a dense hardwood bush and
was carrying it out on his shoulder to
a tote road about half a mile distant.
To get to this tote road he had to pass
through clumps of underbrush that
grew shoulder high. When making
his way through one of these clumps
someone fired two shots in quick succession at the deer on his shoulder, the
only object visible above the brush.
The two bullets found their billets ln
a maple just over his head and in a
flash he ducked and dropped the deer.
An excited hunter came crashing
through the brush towards him, shouting, "I got hlni!" Imagine the hunter's
surprise when he came up to my companion sitting down by the dead deer,
who calmly said, "No you didn't, but
you came close enough to suit me."
Apologies In such a case are useless,
but I'll wager this chap who was on
his first hunting trip has developed
into an extra careful hunter and has
probably   since  passed  up shots at
game which he might have killed if
he had been a little quicker with a rifle.
And if be has sometimes come home
without his deer he is more of a true
sportsman than the successful flash
shooter, who to give the devil his due
is a good shot and gets a lot of game
by shooting at Indistinct objects
through the bush, but let us uot forget
to score against bim the number he
wounds that he never gets; these poor
brutes escape to die a lingering death
or fall an easy prey to timber wolves
too old to hunt with the pack.
The following" conversation which
was overheard in a hunters' special
will give au Idea of how careless some
good marksmen are. The narrator
was a weather-beaten man of about
fifty, clad iu macklnaw and tbe centre
of interest of ills group of nimrods ln
a crowded C. N. R. coach. Tbe following ls the gist of his story:
'I had a young dude up hunting oue
fall who used white handkerchiefs
when roughing it in the bush. One
day we had separated to hunt alone
on my suggestion because I wanted to
get rid of him tor a while. He made
so much noise that I concluded that if
1 didn't get out alone I stood a poor
chance of getting my deer. Well, he
went one way and I went the other.
After a long walk I stopped to rest on
a hogback overlooking an alder
swamp, and saw what I took to be a
deer whisking its tail through the
branches, so 1 hauled up and fired.
Well, sir! you should have heard the
yell in that swamp, for It wasn't a
deer al all but the dude who had got
lost and was circling back to me. He
bad Just taken out his white handkerchief from his pocket and waB shaking
It out when I plugged lt cleau as a
whistle. Now that is what I call a
good shot, boys,"
Yes, it was a good close but very
careless shot ln the opinion of any
rational being. Let us hope this crack
shot has gone to Wisconsin, a state in
which a great number of hunters are
acidentally shot every fall.
Some years ago I was out hunting
with a fellow who always wore a
brown sweater In the bush. One day
we were hunting a strip of burnt country containing a number of pot holes,
the bottoms of which were covered
with water-soaked reindeer moss and
timbered with small but dense spruce,
interwoven into an almost Impassable
tangle, affording excellent cover for
deer. It was almost impossible for
one man to get a shot hunting these
swamps alone; he might often hear
tbe kerplunk! kerplunk! of a startled
deer but seldom saw one in such a
jungle. To overcome this difficulty we
had heen taking it turn about to act as
beater, one "of us watching tbe far end
of the swamp whilst the other struggled through on the chance ot driving
out before him any skulking deer
which might be lurking In the thickets. These deer would have to break
cover for the surrounding burning,
where open shooting could be had by
the one on the watch.
After many unsuccessful trials we
came  to  a  swamp  of  considerable
acreage.   My friend left me to do his
turn at beating whilst I went to the
head of this swamp and sat down by
a scrubby pine on the leeward side
and kept a sharp lookout.   It was not
long  before a doe and  fawn  broke
cover and  went bounding over the
opposite ridge with tbelr white flags
waving good-bye.   Not wanting them
I let them go and continued my vigil.
After quite a wait my companion appeared and I asked  him  the  usual
question, "D|d you see anything!" to
which he replied, "No, but   I   came
nearly getting a bullet.   I was picking
my way through the edge of the swamp
over there when I heard the click of
some one cocking his gun.   Pushing
my way through the tangle I stepped
out into an open space of  labrador
tea fringing a small pond and found
myself covered with a hallbreed's rifle.
He was about as surprised as I waB.
I asked him what the Idea was and he
explained   that  on  coming  to   this
swamp be heard me splashing through
the water, so stopped and on seeing ii
portion ot my brown sweater movlne
through the trees mistook me for a
deer and cocked his gun, but ae I wa:
coming straight towards hlm he "decided to wait until I stepped out into
the tea, when fortunately he saw his
error and lowered his rifle.   If I had
turned be said he had Intended risking a shot as he was most anxious tn
get some more deer for a party tc
whom be had already sold five for $31
each.   This party was  hunting wltl
John Barleycorn, a mighty poor guide
who kept them in their cabin day and
night.     Now,   although   that   Breed
would bave been absolutely wrong in
risking  that   shot,   I   have   resolved
never to wear a brown sweater again.
Quite a number of hunters are wearing red caps or coats, and although
It must be more difficult to get lu
range of a deer garbed tn scarlet tban
in brown, I have concluded that it will
be wise for me to change to red with
so many careless companions about.'
I quite agreed with my pompanion'r
point ot view and ln spite of its brilliant hue have  seen  as  many  dee'
when wearing it as In the days when
I wore khaki clothes.   This success If
due no doubt to.a deer's comparatively
poor eyesight, for contrary to the general opinion, deer are warned of their
enemies more by nose and ears than
by the eyes.
Whilst a great many deer hunters
wear red caps or coats there are still
a number who still persist in wearing
brown, and in so doing take their lives
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE  INSURANCE
Cnmherlaud, B, C.
Wood for Sale
$1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Loud.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley I'hone 92R
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 86
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have yon tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef I It Is delicious.
What Matters It
if the break in the plate or metal
part looks serious? The delay
will not be cosily when our
welders get to work on it. We
will have it back in your hands
within a few hours, all ready to
go ahead with.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED
CUMBERLAND  GARAGE
A. R. Kierstead, Prop.
Third Street Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Ofllce 2«2(l Bridge Streil, Vltilorln, IU ,
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
• prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Plumes I and (il
Cumberland, B. C.
-Jl
Have yon the mom y with which to do it ?
Start to save while fiey are young—let them
commence life knowing you are at the back
of them.
Savings Accounts are a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
in their hands. Because tbey themselves may be careful antl cannot understand how anyone enn possibly
mistake a deer for a man, It does not
necessarily follow that everyone Is as
careful as themselves. Let them rcuil
the death notices in tbe papers and
remember that no man Is shot for
deer ln the open but In the dense underbrush which would conceal n deer's
form equally as well.
Saskatchewan has realized this
trouble and has so framed her game
laws that every big game hunter must
wear a complete suit of white, which
is a very good fool proof color when
the game is moose, elk and cariboo,
hut red would be more appropriate for
where the white-tali deer abounds,
and if our game laws required each
hunter to wear a red cap or coat a
number of serious acldents no doubt
could be obliterated.
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even better than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt aud hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PURE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
^E
i>I8(.iia('i:i» Tin: imjiii.v
The girls wore skirts exceeding short;
their knees were often bans;
Their bathing suits were statuesque;
but mother didn't care;
Dear father, who had criticized what
he called want of taste,
One day forgot his necktie—and the
family felt disgraced.
1850—Ye Olde Firme—1921
MADAME MELBA!
MADAME TETRAZZINI
These two great artists have purchased HEINTZMAN & CO. Grands,'Mine. Mclba for her homo in
Australia and Mme. T.trazzini for her castle in
Rome.
HEINTZMAN & CO. PIANOS ARE .SOLD ON EASY
TERMS
Heintzman & Co.
(IlllEON HICKS, Manager—BOX 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDEtt
November 19, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager ar.d Publisher.
BEN II. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1921.
WHAT PREMIER MEIGHEN STANDS FOR
"1 stand for unity in Canada, for solidarity of conditions
and freedom of onterprise within our own borders. The
lesson lor Camilla and the tree peoples of the British Em'
pire Is to avoid tho pitfalls of all the nations which have
preceded it and sunk into oblivion, uud of those as well
that are writhing in chaos and Buffering. I shall strive
with all my powor foi national unity, embracing all races,
languages and creeds. I shall fight with all my energy
for national solidarity, [or moderation of thought and
action, for orderly progress, for maintenance of law and
order, and for policies which liavo brought us whore wc
stand,"
"My aim and object will bo to bold the balance fairly and
firmly among all classes, and lo see, as far as that is possible, that tlie maximum of proiltablo labor may be given
to all our peoplo, and that they may be encouraged in the
idea which I consider the foundation stone of national
Buccess, that intolllgont effort shall always be suitably
rewarded, that tho mon and women ot this country may
rise In stature ami improve tlieir mind and their material
condition acording to tho measure ot their endeavors.
These 1 conceive lo be the highest aims of statesmanship."
THE CURSE OF  EUROPE
Survey Europe from the Shannon In the west to the
Vistula and the Danube in the cast, and you will find
everywhere the traces of the embittering and desolating
Influence of nationalism. It was the cause of the Great
War. Thc German statesmen and soldiers who prepared
and began the war wore devoted patriots, animated by
patriotic zeal and, as anyone can see who reads the
memoirs of Count Ludendorff or Admiral von Tlrpitz, unselfishly given up to the service of their country. It was
nationalism that not only made the war, but denied It with
the shameful crimes that have so deeply impressed our
minds. And if Ihe Gorman militarists were patriots, so
also nre the Sinn Fein murderers. The abominable crimes
in Ireland from which we turn with horror were the fruit
of nationalist sentiment. Again, if wo look at Central and
Eastern Europe today, what ls the cause of all the bitter
antagonisms, the violence, the lawlessness, the filibustering wc see there, except tiie same spirit of nationalism?
if one can imagine some beneficent magician who could
weave a spell by which all the peoples of Europe should
cease to hate alien nationalities, even if it cost them the
love of their own, how enormous would be the benefit to
human happiness. We need not deny that nationalism
under due discipline is a beneficent force like other passions. Hut when we see all the mischief it has done and
the desolation it has wrought during the past few years,
we have a right to ask that it should Justify Its deeds
before the tribunal of conscience according to the principles of the moral law.—Lord Hugh Cecil.
Just as sui'ely as tho sun rises and sets, this Canada of
ours will get a severe set back in its industrial development If Crerar or King, or both working together with
their revolutionary trade policies, get control of Parliament.
Every business man in Canada should be on his tip toes
fighting in tills campaign to prevent the destruction of his
business. Free Trade in Canada with protection in the
United States and in every other country in the world,
would wipe Canada off tlie industrial map.
OUTDOOR LIFE
Editorial in Rod and Gun in Canada
The system of training men in the army did more to
raise the health standard of the nation than is generally
realized. Broken down, middle-aged men and sickly
youths, with complaints of long standing, were rapidly
developed Into red-bloodod human beings through a system
of regular exercise in tlie open. Witli the passing ot the
war, national physical training ceased and today wc fiud
the conditions becoming as in 1914, thc round shouldered,
anaemic youth being in tlie majority in any crowd.
We can talk of tbe benefits ot* physical training and the
various health exercises, but when there is no incentive
such as a drill sergeant and army law there is no general
rush to Join physical classes. The remedy lies in the
development of the Canadian youth into becoming a sportsman. Not evory youth can afford the time or money to
become a big game hunter, but there is no reason why tho
majority of Canadians should not become belter acquainted
With life in the open.
Let the sickly member of the family crawl tout of the
blankets at 4 a.m., eat a man-sized meal of porridge, bacon
uud eggs and steaming coffee and push a "clinker" out to
the duck blind In the cold white mist of the morning; or
let him follow the woods trail with die hoar 1'rosl lying
svblte on tiie ground. N'o, it won't kill him, it will make a
man out of him; and although he might murmur, "Never
again," the lirst time; wait until he gets another opportunity and watch him throw aside the enervating social engagement. Instead of sending the weakling to tbe popular
summer resort, send him to the woods and let Nature work
her cure.
For the man who cannot get Uito the fields or tbe bush,
there is the gun club where he can learn to shoot the
flying clay birds. And do not let anyone think that the
trapshootcr is n silk-shtrtod sportsman who .is afraid to
go out after the hard work in the bush country. The
reverse is tlie case and the trupsliooter wbo can stand up
to thc traps and shoot at two hundred birds daily for Iwo
and three days at a time has more trained nerve and
stamina than many a brother shooter who tramps through
the woods. Tho co-ordination of mind and muscle to a
wonderful degree of development is seen daily at the traps.
Man's truest friend—the dog—can be taken on a trip in
the country by, the city dweller who cannot get Into a
game country. What hotter healthy exercise can he found
than tramping through fields and climbing ovor fences.
and as a diversion watching the antics of a little four-
footed friend. The kind of canine matters not; "plain pup"
will have just as much fun in tlie country as a "100 per
cent, dog." If you are a resident of tlie city try one afternoon with a dog somewhere in the country and experience
the wonderful feeling of a wholesome day spent with
Nature.
The various organizations that deal Willi the development of the young people of the country are to lie commended for the splendid work they are accomplishing, bul
too soon the youth breaks away from these associations
and drifts Into the narrow chested, pasty faced class.
Canadians have a wonderful opportunity for a healthy,
natural development through a proper relationship with
Nature. Let us seize the opportunity and not wait for
another war to find our disabilities.
The sensational ending of the Dry Squad cases on
Thursday when their "stool pigeon" witnesses, employees of
the Liquor Control Board, were proved to be absolute liars
and using faked evidence, should be n lesson to the Hoard
and Government to cease using .such low, despicable
methods to procure evidence. It would bo interesting to
know how many people hove been convicted on the fak
evidence of these self-admitted liars, whom counsel for the
defence called "dirty swine."
Dry Goods Department
First Showing this Week of Holiday Goods
SPECIAL VALUES IN CUT GLASS.
FRENCH IVORY.
TOILET' CASES.
MANICURE SETS.
ELECTRIC READING LAMPS
BRUSH AND COMB SETS.
A battleship lasts but a few years befort lt is Junk, even
in times of peace. But a good road runs straight to the
sunrise, endures for a lifetime and brings happiness and
convenience to millions.
There is a good deal of righteous Indignation' In Cumberland this week over tlie report that the man who shot
and killed Alderman Francescini in tlie woods tlie Sunday
previous, was out last Sunday shooting deer—and got one.
It this is true it indicates an attitude ot cold-blooded cnl-
lousnesB on the part of the young man, and the Attorney-
General should take steps to cancel his licence.
Small Attendance Hear Independent
Candidate and His Supporters
Candidate Neil, Major Burde and eaged in mild-curing fish, and the <jniy
Rev. Thos. Menzies ,M.L.A.,
Spoke to Meagre Gathering
In Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Friday.
Either through lack of interest, insufficient advertising or clashing with
another gathering the same night,
the meeting held in tho llo-llo Theatre
mi Friday last was small, only one
hundred persons being In the big hall.
The speakers wore Jlajur H. J. Burde,
M.Ij.A.i A. W. Neill, Independent candidate in llie C'dtnox-Alliernl riding,
and Hev. Thos. Menzies, member In
the provincial house. The speakers
wero given a good bearings though the
meeting was too long drawn out and
lacked enthusiasm,
Mr. A. MacKinnon was chairman of
the meeting and Introduced the different speakers. Major Burde was lirst
of the trio, and entertained the audience wilh bis dry humor and mild
sarcasm. Taking a drink of water before speaking, lie said he was partial
to water as it was the only thing the
government had not placed a tax upon.
Ilo said he and Mr. Menzies bad left
the Legislature to struggle along by
Itself for a day or so while they came
up here to speak on behalf of Mr, Neil,
ln supporting the Independent candidate, Major Burde said he had only
ono. string on him—that if elected he
Uid vote against the Meighen gov-
nent gaining power again.
The speaker dwelt at length on the,
fisheries and the Japanese, particularly as affecting the West Coast. He
said llie big problem Is that the white
man, anil even the Indian, arc being
i) 'ivon from the fishing grounds by the the fishery question. He said the
Japanese, Not only are tlio Japanese j West Coast Is absolutely swamped
getting control of the fisheries, but with Japanese, and It was a very serl-
" ■- '"" "° ous situation indeed. They arc threatening the very existence of the white
men In that locality. Every strategic
point In the waters of the West Coast
is held by Japanese—men who are
well educated. He believed these
people knew the West Coast as well
other persons in the cannery are 'the
Japanese. He blamed the Meighen
government for this state of affairs,
and expected Neill if elected to help
put the government out ot business.
Major Burde took Issue with the
contention thnt the balance of trade
wus responsible for the big discount
in the Canadian dollar In the United
States, which Is worth about 88 cents
there. He said a $5 Canadian gold
piece was worth 500 cents in U. S,, but
the Dominion government would not
allow the banks to Issue gold; the
winks Issued bills and only deposited
with the Dominion government live
cents on each dollar I
Tho member dealt with several other
questions before leaving to attend the
meeting at Courtenay the Bami evening.
Mr. Neill was the next speaker. He
mid lie hnd the support of men of ail
parties. He wos nominated hy a Conservative, seconded by a Socialist, and
tlie first man to congratulate him was
a Liberal!
Thc speaker said the first plank in
the platform adopted by the Independent convention at Courtenay was
opposition to thc Meighen government.
Tlie feeling of that meeting was that
we do know about the past, but do not
know about the future. The speaker
said he would vote against the government in a want of confidence motion,
but If the government was returned to
power he would support any sane
legislation.
The Fishcrj' Question.
Mr. Neill also dwelt at length on
are getting the canneries also. lie
said there was a prospect of conflict
between white man and Japanese If
something was not done. The Japanese even insisted on Indians being
discharged from the canneries, succeeding In their efforts. In one cannery a uumber of Scotch girls are eu-
He contended that the remedy was
very easy—do not issue any moro
licences to Japanese.
Another platform plank was the
absolute exclusion of Asiatics. There
was a gentleman's agreement restricting the number entering Canada each
year to 400, but tne speaker said the
census would show it was nearer
4000!
Mr. Neill said ono section of the
Election Act gave certain Japanese
the right to vote in tlle election—those
who have discharges from the Army
and Navy. The speaker contended
this to be a very dangerous precedent.
He said he waa in favor of the eight-
hour law, old age pensions, extension
of time for payments on stock of soldiers settlers, consolidation of income
lax.
Fuel Oil 'I'm.
Mr. Neill said be was not In favor
of a tariff for tlie manufacturers' protection. It elected he would join wilh
every B. C. member in getting such a
tariff on the muin products of the province, such as lumber, llsh, eggs, fuel
Oil, etc., as would protect them. The
tax on fuel oil should he retained or
increased. He was thoroughly aware
of the necessity for a tariff on fuel
oil.
The speaker said he bad always
voted Independent, and would continue
to do so. If elected he would do his
best for the constituency.
Rev. Thos. Menzies arrived shortly
after 10 o'clock and spoke at length
In support of Mr. Neill, touching on
similar matters dealt with by the previous speakers.
SPECIAL SHOWING OF FANCY HANDKERCHIEFS AND CHRISTMAS HANDKERCHIEFS, for Ladies, Misses and Children.
NEWEST CREATIONS IN LADIES' GEORGETTE CREPE BLOUSES, TRICOLETTE
MIDDIES, CAMISOLES AND BOUDOIR CAPS.
EXPECTED TO ARRIVE NEXT WEEK—THE NEWEST STYLES IN LADIES'
SILK AND CREPE EVENING GOWNS AT POPULAR PRICES
OUR STOCK OF LADIES', MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S FELT SLIPPERS WITH
LEATHER SOLES, AND BOUDOIR SLIPPERS IN ALL SHADES, IS NOW COMPLETE AT LOWEST PRICES.
Men's Department
JUST RECEIVED, ANOTHER LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF
MEN'S "PROGRESS BRAND" SUITS AND OVERCOATS
ALL-WOOL WORSTEDS SUITS—
Special values at  .■	
$35.00
NEWEST NOVELTIES IN MEN'S NECKWEAR—Now to hand, a large and varied
assortment, in the best quality Swiss Silks, from 75c to $2.00.  Each Tie in fancy box.
NOVELTY STYLES IN MEN'S BELTS AND SILK MUFFLERS, SILK SO£KS, FANCY
-    SUSPENDERS AND ARMBANDS.
Grocery Department
WEEK END   SPECIALS
Bulk Currants, per lb 25c
Bulk Seedless Raisins, per lb SOc
Sunmaid Seedless Raisins, 15-oz. pkg. 30c
Bulk Dates, per lb  15c
I
Rolled Oats, 6-lb. sacks, each  40c
Sesqui Matches, pkg 50c
Assorted Jams, 1-lb. glass jars, each... 40c
Sunlight Soap, per carton 30c
Church Notices
Holy Trinity Church
Itcv. YV. Leversedge.
Sunday  Next  Hefore  Advent.
Holy Communion, 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
Roman Catholic Church
Key. Father ltciilon.
Sunday Next liefore Advent.
Mass, il a.m.
St. George's Presbyterian
Key. Jus. Hoods
Morning Service, 11 a.m. •
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Choir practice, 7.30 Friday evening.
Grace Methodist Church
Itcv. G. 11. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Junior Football
MACCABEES WILL HOLD
SALE OF WORK NOV. 23
as the officials at Victoria.
The Women's Benefit Association
of the Maccabees will hold a sale of
work in the O. W, V. A. Hall on Wednesday afternoon next. Afternoon
tea will he served.
Whist Drive nnd Dance,
In the evening a whist drive and
dance will be held, commencing at S i
o'clock.   Admission 50 cents, refreshments served. I
The Cumberland High School foot
all team were defeated by Union Bay
unlors on Saturday last by two goals
i one, The game was well contested
hroughout, the High School having
'ic best of play In the flrst half, with
nion Bay having the best of ex-
hanges In the second.
This v.ln now places Union Bay at
he top of the league, with one game
i play, which is with the Bevan
t unlors. These two teams have to
ueet at Bevan for the final game, and
.' Bovan should win, both teams will
ie for first place and will necessitate
i playoff. If Union Bay should tie the
■core on that occasion they will be
'oague winners.
It should be a good game when
hose two teams meet, as both are
attllng hard for the honors.
The Cumberland juniors went down
o defeat at the hands of the Bevan
uniors on Sunday at Bevan by two
.:oals to one.   Mitchell mised a penalty
Idck for Cumberland, which would
ave equalized the score, he kicking
ide.   This now finishes the schedule
for the Cumberland Juniors, with six
points.
DINNER WARE
sHH H       Bs^HHBBS
39-Piece Set, White and Gold, English  d»i f\ r A
ware, good quality    «PX.fai»t)U
97-Piece Set, White and Gold, C97 K(\
price   *P& • -OX)
97-Piece Set, pink decorated, $9^ 00
Blue Willow Pattern, English Ware, with gold lines,
semi-china, in tea sets or'separate pieces.
/
Christmas Goods Now Arriving
We are showing a very large ran^e of
BRASS AND STEEL BEDS, COIL SPRINGS AND
MATTRESSES
CALL AND EXAMINE THESE GOODS
The
Furniture Store
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
A man I know kicked up a row
That stirred the neighbors' wrath,
lie walked up to a lady cow
And slyly pinched its calf.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
Tlie Itegulur Monthly Meeting will be held in the Lecture Room
of the Athletic Hall on
Wednesday, Nov, 30th, at 8 p.m.
Mr. Peter Myers will rend a wiper on u*Hlne Explosives,   Fire-
llosses. particularly ure requested to attend this meeting. (A
November 19, 1921.
TttE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
The Cold Winter Nights
and Chilly Days Will
Soon Be Here
To offset them we are now stocked with a full line of
WINTER  CLOTHING
at the Lowest Prices going.
BELOW ARE PRICES WHICH CLAIM YOUR
ATTENTION
BOYS' SWEATERS, British manufacture, in all sizes,
in Navy, Brown and Maroon. (J*i   PA
Prices as low as   •p J »sj\/
Old price $2.50.
BOYS' V-NECK SWEATERS, with fancy
trimming in different colors, at
20 DOZ. BOYS' HEAVY RIBBED ALL-WOOL HOSE,
Winter weight; priced as low as,
ALL-WOOL GREY UNDERWEAR	
BOYS' UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS,
Winter weight, per garment 	
SPECIALS IN
MEN'S SOX
HEAVY    WORKING
SOX
Prs.
for
MEN'S HEATHER
MIXTURE SOX
20 dozen; all-wool.
Regular price $1.25 a
pair.   Now re-1
^^^^^^^^^ duced to
20 DOZ. MEN'S HEATHER MIXED SOX, union mixture; splendid wearing quality; regular       KOn
$1.00 a pair; on sale for OUC
STANFIELD'S MEN'S HEAVY RIBBED d»« AA
ALL-WOOL UNDERWEAR, garment.. <[>.•£.UU
PENMAN'S MEN'S UNDERWEAR, line
95.   Per garment	
ANOTHER   SHIPMENT   OF   MEN'S
SUITS, in All-Wool Tweed, Dark
Brown effects.   Priced at	
$2.90
a HOSE,
50c
95c
3 5 $1.00
75c
IN NAVY SERGE, ALL-WOOL.
Old price $45.00.   Now selling^at
$2.25
AND   BOYS'
$24.95
$32.50
Masquerade Ball
Highly Successful
160 Persons in Costume — Hall
Was Packed to. the Doors
With Spectators.
WE INVITE INSPECTION AND
DEFY COMPETITION
The Model Clothing and
Shoe Store
F. PARTRIDGE
'hone 152
P. O. Box 343
TRY THIS CALCULATION
Charles L, Dodgson, professor of
higher mathematics at Christ Church,
Oxford, known to most people as
"Lewis Carroll," and the author of
"Alice in Wonderland," is responsible
for the following peculiar calculation:
Write down the number of your
brothers that are living. Multiply this
by iwo.   Add three.   Multiply the re-
isult by live.   To tills add the number
of your  living sisters,    multiply  the
result by ten.
Add  to  this  result the number of
J your dead brothers and sisters. Prom
! the total BUbstract 150.
The right hand figure gives the number of deaths, the middle flguro the
number of living sisters, and the left-
, hand figure gives tlie number of living
I brothers.
THE
PIKET - ELECTRIC
We handle everything in the Electrical line.
EXPERT  HOUSE   WIRING
Don't throw your broken irons away,
repaired.
Have them
WHITE CAP ELECTRIC WASHERS, $135
LEN D. PIKET
Phone 131R
P. O. Box 21
Courtenay, B. C.
The Great War Veterans' Association lias every reason to bo satisfied
with tbe results of their third annual
masquerade ball held in the Ilo-Ilo
Hall on Friday last. It was a great
success In every way. The big hall
was filled with spectators, while no
less than Hill persons in costume took
pari in the grand march. There were
costumes of all kinds, comics largely
predominating; some very pretty
creations were worn by ladies, and to
add dignity to the ceremony, one gentleman appeared garbed ln a curate's
outfit, bat, collar 'neverythng; he
looked the part to perfection, and but
for' the fact that be was flirting with
n "chorus lady" of uncertain age,
might have pased for the genuine
article. The said 'chorus lady" proved
to be a well known grocery merchant!
Africa was represente'd by a Zulu ln
full war paint, wbo looked fierce aud
startling with bis big spear and shield.
A group of Chinese characters were
splendid imitations uf the real Chink,
iu fact one appeared to be a high
degree highbinder.
One hobo had bis canary cage with
lim. enclosed In which was an ancient
en of doubtful pedigree.
Three black cats  were very effective ami their antics most amusing.
Several   clownR   provided   the   entertainment usually asociated with them.
Judges Had DIMnilt Task.
With such a large number on thc
lloor the judges had a very difficult
nsk In declaring winners tu the different classes. In the prize waltz,
Mr. and Mrs. Pearce won the first
place, with Mrs. F. A. McCurthy and
Mr. Frank Slaughter next in order.
Mrs. Haworth and Mr. Lee were judges
lor this event.
Judges for the other events were
Mrs .Cooke of Courtenay, Mr. W. T.
McLean ani) Mr. Thus R. Jackson.
There were 1110 persons In the grand
march, those chosen as winners being:
Best dressed lady, Mrs. Fraser, Union
Bay.
Best dressed gent, J. Purvis, Union
Bay.
Best national lady, Miss Norah Peacock, tn Highland costume.
Best national gent, Mr. Dixon, as
'Uncle Sam."
Best sustained lady, Mrs. Wm. Marshall of Union Bay.
Best sustained gent, Dave Kenny, as
wounded Roldler.
Group representing Allies, Rdna
Bennie, C. Pearce, J. Dixon, K. Fyfie
and Airs. Kobt. Walker.
Besl comic group, Matt Stewart, Bob
Robertson and Dave Richards.
Best comic lady, Mrs. P. F.TslcNally
Union Bay.
Best comic gent, Sidney Hunt, as
imitation Scotchman with bagpipes.
Best Red Cross nurse, Mrs. F. A.
McCarthy.
Best hobo, C. Lewis ("Toots"), and
lie sure looked it.
Best clown, O. H. Feckner, Union
Bay.
Best local advertising character,
Mrs. M. Liddle, representing Comox
Creamery, Courtenay.
Best flower girl, Mrs. James Bond.
Special prize, Mrs. RI P. Christie,
ns "Poppy." Tills costume was very
artistic and won popular approval.
Special prize, best flower girl, Miss
Annie Dando.
Special prize. Bill Newman, a Zulu
Special prize. Mol. J. Hardy.
Mr."Geo. O'Brien ucted as master ol*
ceremonies and carried out his duiles
in liis usual genial manner.
Miss Emily won the grand raffle,
with ticket no. 447, winning the handsome reading lamp. Tho tombolu
drawing resulted as follows:
1st. Alius E, Horwood, No. Btl.
2nd, Mr. Donald Watson, No. 263.
3rd, Mrs. Potter, No. 62.
4th, Allan Nunns, No. 211.
6th, No. 193.
6th. J. Rosslter, No. 383.
7th. J. C. Colling, No. 257.
8lh. Win. Walker, No. (10.
Dancing was kept up to a vory luti
hour, tbe lloor being crowded to capnc
Ity With dancers, who hud a very en
Joyiible, If bumpy, time. Music w
supplied by Monle's orchestra
Small Bank Accounts
Many people put oft" opening a Savings Bank Account
until they feel they have a large enough sum to make
it worth while. This is why they never learn the habit
of thrift.
Open an account with us by depositing $1, and add
$1 weekly or monthly until you can increase the
amount of your periodical deposit.
WE WELCOME SMALL ACCOUNTS
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
IV Hi
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
CANDIDATE ARMISHAW
ADDRESSED SAYWOOD
VOTERS ON SUNDAY
SAYWOOD, Nov. 14—Mr. J. E. Arml
sliaw, Farmer-Labor candidate for the
Federal constitutency of Comox-
Alberni. paid a political visit ti
Saywood, liis home district, and held
a meeting at the schoolhouse on Suu
day last.
The nieellng was well attended des
pile the fact that quite a number ol
the residents had a very long distance
to walk under very crude conditions
but they were well paid for theii
efforts, as Mr. Armishaw spoke at
considerable length on the question o!
development and progress of the rid
Ing, and went deeply into the gov
ernnient's past record. The speaker':
remarks were much appreciated am!
drow  1  uodplpsuaae ptl.Wyedot
drew loud applause from the audience,
as be drove home his points on the'
various questions at issue dealt with
by bim.
The Progressive Association feel
that they have nominated the right
man iu the person of J. E. Armishaw.
as he bus always fought for progress
aud development during his long real-
GREAT PRIZE CONTEST
At the
Corner
Store
FIRST PRIZE—1921 MODEL FORD TOURING CAR. value  $77.1.00
SECOND PRIZE—AMHERST IMANO, MAHOGANY CASE, value  $550.00
THIRD PRIZE—CABINET   PHONOGRAPH, value  $167.00
SEE  WINDOW  DISPLAY
Estimate how many SUNSHINE TOFFEE TABLETS are in the Sealed Pickle Bottle.
There is no limit to tlie number of estimates you may put in; each five-cent package
entitles you to one estimate.
Everybody will take a chance in this—don't wait, I have only one week's supply of
these
SUNSHINE   TOFFEE   TABLETS
Price Five Cents Per Package.
In Bulk, 50 Cents Per Pound
RAINBOW   PICKLES,   50c.  PER   BOTTLE
THESE GOODS ARE MANUFACTURED IN VANCOUVER
-   BOOST B. C.
Wm.   Gordon   -   The Corner Store
rj
In Memory of
Aid. Francescini
Twas on a Sunday morning,
• Cumberland was fast asleep,
That Louis left the llllle homo .
He loved so true and deep.
With a happy, smiling faco,
He kissed his loving mate,
Stepping in tlio car he called,
"I won't be very late."
When Cumberland awoke,
Tbe news went far and wide
That our splendid team-mate
Had crossed the Great Divide.
'Twas dark and late when Louis came,
Slain by a careless hand;
N'o more will that smiling face
Breathe in this troubled laud.
He was a clever fellow,
A man both straight and true,
A man that everybody liked,
White, clean, through and through.
When the team was out of humor
And harsh words ubout to say,
If you chane'd to look nl Louis
You'd find him laughing and gay.
His face again we'll never see,
And though forgotten hy many,
Forever in our minds will live
The momory of Francescini.
Uut when the last great call ia sounded,
When myriad angels swarm,
We'll meet again, face to face,
No pain, no grief or barm.
—One of His Team-Mates.
SECOND DIVISION TEAM      \l
TO PLAY NORTHF1ELD
LIFE OV ,300 YEARS
POSSIBLE  FOR  MAN
Insurance Actuary Says Man in
Switzerland Lived to Be
335 Years Old.
George Bernard Shaw was nol all
wrong when in his book, "Buck lo
Methuselah," bo prophesied a life of
too years for man, according to .lohn
W. Barth, Mr. Barth, noted insurance
actuary, addressed the convention of
tbe National Association of Underwriters recently iu Chicago,
"Never laugh at prophecies," bo
snid.   "The human race has added 10
years to the length of the average man
in the last lifty years. When I was a
boy we laughed at the thought of a
niaiuUiing; it is now a fact. Let's not
laugh al Ibe idea of a man living to be
'100 years old.
'.'Records show that a man in Switzerland lived to be 335 years old," Mr.
Garth said. "Wc have a record of a
man in Massachusetts who died just a
few years ago at the age of 165," ho
said. "Back to Methltsaleh: why not?"
Some iron ore deposits in the northwestern peninsula nf Iceland, which a
Danish company proposes lo develop,
are said lo contain from 20,000,000 to
.'10,000,000 tons of ore.
THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A
Rattling Good Car
CUT OUT THE  RATTLE—
Or rattier lut us do It.   Wo know how lo make your ear beliavu,
aud will give you a lot of free ail.ice on the subject il" you ask us.
Marling & Ledingham
Telephone S Cumbei land P.O. Box 349
The Cumberland City football team
vill go to Nortblleld on Sunday lo
day tlie team of that town in uu Upper Island Second Division League
,-iintc. The executive of the club has
elected the strongest possible team
tnd the boys Intend to bring back the
aeon.
The following players have been
^elected to do the trick: Foster, Cough.
\. McWhirter, Brown leapt.), Cour-
enay, Jackson, Rosier, Westwood, J.
•IcWhlrter, Slaughter and Scott.
Reserves:  Gibson and Bennie.
All players and reserves meet at the
Waverley Hotel at 8 a.m. Sunday
'iiorning, the motor bus leaving sharp
tt that time.
lence in this valley. The hearty good
"islies of the Progressives of Sayward
ml his many admirers go with bim
dining the balance of bis campaign,
and they feel sure ot liis success.
THE value to the public of telephone service is based
on thc reliability, prompt ness and accuracy of lhat
service. Quality of service depends on the economic
operation of all telephone activities, From the time
raw material is produced until the Eurnished equipment is complete, ii is a matter nf continuous exhaustive testa to get ihe best. After installation, ceaseless
vigilance Is maintained to get tho best character of
service. . All efforts are directed toward tho highest
standard. .
British Columbia Telephone Co.
■
d THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 19, 1921.
1oAicA?
Crerar
King
Meigh
The head of a great trading organization which unites its
trading with its politics—a political theorist—has lost control of
the political movement he started and is being driven into impossible positions by class rule extremists. He is under thp
domination of Wood, the political boss of Alberta. He would
give effect to Free Trade, thus destroying Canada's industrial
and economic structure.
A Vote for Crerar is a Vote for Chaos
sSo evasive that nobody knows where he actually stands on the
freat issues of the day. Fits his policy to suit his audiences,
alks Free Trade to the West and Protection to the East
Specializes in high-sounding phraseology. His party is pledged
to ai large measure of Free Trade, but fails to suggest new
methods of obtaining necessary National Revenues.
A Vote for King is a Plunge in the Dark
Easily the outstanding figure in Canadian public life to-day, and
tgjl the only real Leader in sight. Able, forceful, courageous, and
upright in character. A statesman of demonstrated ability with
broad National and Imperial vision and an unassailable record.
Stands firm for the maintenance of a reasonable Protective
Tariff, and aims to provide the maximum amount of profitable
labour for all.
A VOTE FOR MEIGHEN IS A VOTE FOR A SPEEDY
RETURN TO MORE PROSPEROUS TIMES
Platform of the National, Liberal
and Conservative Party
Constitutional
Firm adherence to British connection in full
confidence that Canada will find its amplest scope
for development, usefulness and influence as a
member of the Britannic commonwealth with the
status of a self-governing nation equal to that of
the other members. The maintenance of the
autonomy of Canada and its existing rights and
powers of self-government; the approval of the
principle that no treaty, understanding or corn-
it. In devising methods of taxation and in fixing
rates consideration must be given to the revenue
necessities of Provinces and Municipalities, and
care must be exercised to avoid the creation of
conditions that will not discourage immigration or
the investment in Canada of capital essential to
our economic development.
National Expenditures.
Owing to the heavy financial burdens entailed
initment which may involve the Empire ought to'by the war and resulting from railway policies,
Canjaxta TlwU
The National Liberal and Conservative Party
Publicity CommittM
DIFFEBENT METHODS
Elsie: "My mamma got a nice present yesterday an' she frew her arms
around papa's neck. What does your
mamma do when she gets a nice present?
Eddie: "She tells daddy she'll forgive him, but he mustn't stay out late
again.
PBOVIDEsNTIAL.
He was more religious than educated and so not to be greatly censured
for this "testimony" at prayer meeting: "1 thank the Lord that 1 have
three wives ln heaven."
Patently n Pacifist
Quiet mnn, middle-aged, wants quiet
room with quiet family in quiet neighborhood.— Advt. in New York Times.
Bachelor: "Well, old man, one thing
I notice about you since you've been
married, you always bave buttons on
your clothes."
Benedict: "Yes, Dolly taught me
how to sew 'cm on before we'd been
married a week."
Do undertaken except after consultation and by
common consent in the common interest
Approval of Canada's membership in the
League of Nations and a firm determination to
maintain our recognized status as a member of
the League.
The upholding by every means within the fed'
cifll power of constituted authority throughout
the Dominion; the maintenance of parliamentary
control over all legislation; respect for the rights
and powers of the Provinces,
Citizenship.
The adoption of such measures as are neces'
i ary to maintain and protect the ideals of Canadian citizenship, and co-operation with the Pro.
vinces in their efforts to Canadianize alien immigrants; the fostering of a Canadian as opposed
lo any other class of sectional spirit, and the
elimination of all prejudices that tend to retard or
destroy national unity and development.
Strawberries are said to contain the
fragrance of the falriest flowers, the
spirit of the bluest skies and the songs
of the happiest birds.
PETITION TO STOP LASH
VANCOUVER—A petition-ls being
circulated, asking the provincial officials to end the lash in prison. The
petition claims lt is a relic of savagery
and claims that educational methods
might accomplish more along humanitarian lines of effort." Reports say
the petition is not receiving much
support.
Gold to the value of 18,194,129, representing 396,391 fine ounces, was
produced in Canada during the flrst
six months of this year. This amount
represents 52 per cent, of the amount
mined In 1920.
BEERS
CASCADE and
U.B.C.
BRILLIANTLY clear and sparkling, with a flavor that
CASCADE BEER is just what you want. There is no purer beer
made. Ji is brewed with all the care and experience of a
great plant, the culmination of thirty years' progress in brewing British
Columbia's favorite beer.
Union Brewing Co., Ltd.
Distributors
Nanaimo, - - B. C.
National Policies.
Practical application of the principle that
Parliament and government exist to make and
administer laws for all the people and not for
any particular class or section to the detriment of
the nation as a whole; the carrying out of policies
that are nation-wide in their application or effect
and that look toward the growth and development
of the whole of Canada and the prosperity and
happiness of all of its people.
The Tariff.
A thorough revision of the tariff with a view
to the adoption of such reasonable measures as
are necessary—(A) To assist in providing adequate revenues; (B) to stabilize legitimate industries; (C) to encourage the establishment of
new industries essential to the economic development of the nation; (D) to develop to the fullest
extent our natural resources; (E) to prevent the
abuse of the tariff for the exploitation of the
consumer, and (F) to safeguard the interests of
the Canadian people in the existing world struggle for commercial and industrial supremacy.
As a means of raising revenue the tariff should
be adjusted as to place the chief burden upon
those best able to bear it. Articles of luxury
should be heavily taxed through the imposition
of customs and excise duties. Food commodities
and other necessaries of life, not produced or
manufactured in Canada, should, if taxed at all, be
taxed only as may be necessary for revenue purposes. Those produced in Canada should be subjected to such customs duties only as may be
necessary in the general national interest to be
determined after strict investigation from time
to time.
Apart from the question of revenue, the tariff
should have regard to maintenance, stability and
prosperity of Canadian enterprise in the development of all our natural resources in lands, forests,
mines and fisheries—as well as our agricultural
and manufacturing industries. Consideration
must also be given to the importance of creating
and maintaining conditions that will afford to
Canadian industrial workers opportunities for
steady and remunerative employment, and maintain proper and decent standards of living among
our laboring people. It is undoubtedly not in the
true interests of Canada as a whole that Canadian
workers should be forced to seek in foreign coun
tries employment and opportunities denied them
at home by reason of the export of the natural
resources with which the Dominion is so amply
endowed.
Fullest Development of Natural Resources.
For the purpose of encouraging the fullest
development of our natural resources the tariff
should be so adjusted as to permit machinery and
the implements of production to be purchased at
prices that will compare equitably with prices in
other countries for similar articles. The revised
tariff law should be so framed and administered
as to effectively prevent any customs duty being
used to facilitate the formation or maintenance
of any combine, trust, association or agreement
among manufacturers, dealers, or producers for
the purpose, at the expense of the general public,
of restraining trade, preventing competition or
unduly enhancing the selling price of any article
of commerce.        ' *  Ae
The principle of trajfftreference between the
different members ol^fe Bdwinic commonwealth should be maintained .-jy extended from
time to time to such degree air may be found
practicable and consistent with Canadian interests.
While a general revision of the Canadian Tariff
based upon the foregoing consideration is due,'it
must be recognized that, owing to the war, economic and commercial conditions the world round,
have been profoundly disturbed, and that as a
consequence it is neither practicable nor possible
in the national or public interest to undertake
such revision until a thorough enquiry is made
to ascertain the essential facts upon which tariff
revisions must necessarily be based.
To Apply Principle of Direct Taxation.
The maintenance and continued application of
the principle of direct taxation with a view to
increasing the national revenue derived from this
source should be so adjusted that the burden
may be borne by those most capable of sustaining
adopted in pre-war days, the general national interest demands the utmost economy in every
department of Government and effectual provision
for the gradual reduction of the war deal. All
expenditure, including even those of a productive
character, should be strictly limited to essentials.
More comprehensive and effective methods providing for the control of expenditure by Parliament must be devised and adopted.
National Railways.
Recognition of the necessity under existing
conditions of amalgamating and unifying the
various railway lines owned by the Dominion,
with a view to eliminating duplication and effecting economies in construction and administration.
Efficient, expert management and operation of
the entire national railway system, unfettered by
partisan political interference.
The fixing of a proper capitalization for the
national railway system.
Air Service and National Defence.
The reorganization upon a moderate scale of the
Canadian Militia system, and the restriction of
the permanent forces to such establishment as
will constitute a nucleus for defence, maintain
respect for constituted authority and ensure the
public safety.
The establishment and maintenance of an efficient nucleus of a Canadian Air Service so constituted and administered as to be available for
either military or civil duties.
Aid to Returned Soldiers.
Continuation of the policy of aiding ex-members of the force.i to become satisfactorily established in the civil life of the communitly.
Should experience show the necessity, further
special consideration of claims made upon behalf
of the disabled, or the dependents of those who
have fallen, in order that the nation may discharge its full obligations to those who have thus
suffered.
Labor.
The enactment of such laws as will carry into
effect the ideas and principles embodied in the
Treaty of Peace, regard being had, as contemplated by the Treaty, to the time and character of
similar legislation enacted by other nations. The
encouragement of confidence and co-operation
between employers and employed.
Agriculture.
The Inauguration of policies conceived with a view of
increasing the agricultural production of Canada, and of
improving marketing methods and facilities In order to
obtain the best net return to producers.
With this object In view, und for the purpose of eliminating duplication of services and expenditure, the reaching of an agreement wllb the Provinces respecting the
future activities of the Federal anil Provincial Departments ot Agriculture.
Co-operation with the provinces In the direction of providing better rural credits and improved social conditions
in rural communities.
Regulation aud control of cold storage and refrigerating
facilities so as to provide for tlio satisfactory marketing
of perishable products in the interests of both producer
and consumer.
Co-operation wltb the Provincial Departments of Agriculture in a united effort having for its object the improvement of the livestock and dairy industries to the end that
production mny be increased and quality Improved.
To further facilitate and encourage all phases of agricultural production by Investigation and experimentation.
Foreign Trade.
Continued thorough study by competent experts of
foreign markets and Ibe opportunities therein for the
development and extension of Canadian trade, and tho
collection nnd distribution of pertinent and up-to-date Information to tho business men of Canada. Efficient publicity agencies for making known abroad the commercial
resources and products of Canada, Tbo maintenance of
continuous communication and personal visits between our
agencies abroad and our producers at home. A system of
accurate and comprehensive statistical representation of
our commercial and productive output and distribution.
Immigration.
A firm adherence lo the principle that Canada as a self-
governing nation, has the absolute riglit to determine its
own immigration policy.
The energetic promotion of immigration of desirable
classes of persons who wish to establish homes In Canada
and become loyal Canadian citizens. As In the past
encouragement will bo confined to prospective Innd seek-
 -SJ—"Y- — - ...... — ^ SWSS-SSSSsSAItWSM tw |M,F,IJ"     (Mil
era, agricultural labor and household workers
The continuation and extension of the policy adopted to
prevent the landing in Canada of mental or physical
defectives or all such persons as are likely to become
public charges, and of those whose ideals, customs and
modes ot living are such as to render them incapable of
assimilation within a reasonable time.
Conservation and Natural Resources.
The transfer, under fair terms and conditions, of the
remainder of the public domain held by tbe Dominion to
any Province of Canada, in which such domain Is situated,
subject to such reservos as may be deemed advisable in the
public interest.
As regards tlie public domain and all other natural resources outside the provinces, and owned bv the Dominion,
the adoption of such policies as will result in their use
and development to the advantage of Canada as a whole
Such further development of the existing canal system
A Washington weekly paper has this to say: "The country newspaper is In proces of evolution. Thousands bave
suspended publicat!on in the past few years. The country
paper does more than nny other institution for its community. It giver, its space, which is its stock in trade,
lavishly and without cost to the upbuilding of the community. The town without a newspaper is dead, and every
town realizes this when lack of adequate rapport forces the
publisher to givo up tlio struggle." Tlie change which is
evolving, it sayt', is making the country paper a business
enterprise instead of a charitable institution. (&.
November 19, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Sevell
For Quality
and Service
Try
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF THE FINEST
QUALITY GROCERIES
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN
SEASON
SPECIAL AGENCIES:
GREAT WEST TEA PERRIN'S BISCUITS
CRYSTAL WHITE SOAP
MOOSE AND GEESE
SMUGGLE LIQUOR OVER
INTERNATIONAL LINE
FORD
SEDAN
(A Family Necessity)
Price
$1130.50
Closed Car
Week
21st to 26th November
Corfield
Motors   Ltd.
Ford Dealers
Courtenay
Get Double Wear
out of your
OLD RUBBERS AND GUM
BOOTS
I Repair them yourself with
Reliable Rubber Repair Kit
Easy to apply.        Tried and proved.
Price 85 cents postpaid.
Westminster Novelty Company
P.O. Box 1117, New Westminster, B. C.
Thos. E. Bate
REAL ESTATE, INSURANCE
COLLECTIONS
GENERAL AGENCY
Persons having property for sale are
asked to list same with us. Our clients'
Interests will have our best attention.
FOB SALE—Large house on full size
lot.   A great bargain at $900; small
cash payment and very eaBy termB.
This will sell quickly.
Insurance at Low Rates
The good sound, non-board English
Insurance companies which we represent recognize that the rates charged
ln Cumberland have been far' in excess of what they should be, taking
into consideration the splendid fire
protection which the city has, and
have consequently cut the rates very
materially. In some instances tbey
are over a third less than prevailing
rates.
Thos. E. Bate
iNOTAlti PUBLIC
Maxwell's Office    Dunsmuir Avenue
Beds,   Springs,   Mattresses
Kitchen Cabinets
NOW ON DISPLAY, A BIG SHIPMENT OF
Crockery Ware and
Sybil Pattern China
In stock patterns, We can supply one piece or a full
Dinner Set. The Sybil pattern is a very captivating
one and is having tremendous sales in the cities.
ALSO A NICE DISPLAY OF
Hand-Painted Nippon Ware
These comprise some beautiful specimens of Japanese
high-class painting, and are very suitable for presents.
Come in and view these goods at your leisure.
Kitchen Chair Special
 $2.25
Good strong, solid chaira,
at a special price, each	
Ingenious Methods Employed to
Frustrate Watchfulnes of
Prohibition Agents
WINNIPEG. — "Liquor running"
across the Canadian border Isn't an
adequate term. It files, swims, dives,
floats, trickles and walks across the
line. If Webster recognizes any other
tenable means of navigation, they probably are used, too.
Liquor Hun-nays.
Minnesota and North Dakota are
run-ways for thousands of gallons of
liquor going to all parts of the country.
It Is being taken Into the United States'
by train, motor boat, automobile and
airplane. These standard conveyances
bring In the greatest quantity, but the
traffic is flourishing in a smaller way
right under the noses ot agents, under
disguises that put fairy tales to shame.
A youth ot 19 who had escorted
hundreds of quarts and pints across
the border, told some of the means
used to transport liquor, within gun
shot of agents, and without their
knowledge.
Much ot the traffic Is confined to
the area around Fort Frances and International Falls, across the Rainy
River. Darkened autos, speeding at
night, rowboats and motor boats are
commonplace.
Ingenious Smugglers.
It Is the uncommon that shows the
ingenlousness of the smugglers.
One French Canadian, living ln International Falls, but working on the
other side of the river, had a flock of
tame geese. Every morning as be
crossed in his boat the geese followed.
He fed them on the other side and
they returned with him at night.
Curiosity led to investigation and it
was found about halt the flock had
carried a half-pint flask of whiskey
under one or both wings, tied with
string, on the return Journey.
Tourists around International Falls
have heard ot the yearling tame moose
kept by a trapper at his cabin near
International Falls. Few of them
knew that the tame moose used to
swim the river occasionally, dragging
a case of whiskey behind it.
Fooling the Agents.
Boats with false bottoms, hip boots
with false linings, hunting coats containing rubber compartments, and
various other means of getting across
a personal supply, are frequent.
Agents detected a flourishing business when tbey found that fish being
shipped across the border each contained one or two quarts.
B. C. REPRESENTATION
IN DOMINION HOUSE
We have on display some nice Cut Glass Water Sets.
FURNITURE — RANGES — HEATERS
CROCKERY AND HARDWARE  OF ALL KINDS
CALL IN AND INSPECT OUR GOODS
Hargreaves & Smith
Successors to T. E. Bate Hardware Co.
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland
"Why do you
use
such a long cigar-
"The doctor
rom tobacco."
told
me
to keep away
CITY MEAT
MARKET
For Best Quality
BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON AND
PORK
Fresh and Cured Fish
HOTELS AND CAMPS
SPECIALLY CATERED TO
 i
Our Motto:
"QUALITY AND SERVICE"
W. P. Symons
Proprietoi
Representatives Nearly Always
Have Been Conservatives
British Columbia representation in
the House of Commons dates back to
1872, the lirst general election following the entrance of the province into
confederation being held in that year.
During Ihe fourth session of the first
parliament of Canada, British Columbia was given six members, the province having entered confederation
July 20, 1871. Tbe representation remained at six for seven parliaments,
tn the parliament elected in 1900 the
representation was increased by one,
aud continued at seven until 1914. In
that year a redistribution bill was
passed increasing the province's representation to thirteen members, and
at this number tt stands today.
Inclined to Conwrvutlsui.
For the lirst six parliaments British
Columbia's members were Conservatives, and not until the election of 189C
did the Liberals send a representative
to Ottawa. In this year they elected
tour members tb the Conservatives'
two. Tho province continued lo endorse Liberal candidates in the three
succeeding parliaments but the Liberals failed to elect a member ln 1911
and 1917.
The following tables will indicate
the political complexion ot members
of parliament since 1872:
Year
1872
1874
1878
1882
1887
1891
1896
1900
1904
1908
1911
1917
In the forty-seven years dating from
1872 to the last general election ln
1917, British Columbia bas been represented at Ottawa by sixty-five Conservatives and sixteen Liberals. British
Columbia has contributed its quota to
the 1911 of men who in greater or less
degree have made their mark in parliament, although its representation
has been small. In 1872 Sir Francis
Hincks was elected ln Victoria. The
Hon. Edgar Dewdney, for many years
a minister ot the crown, represented
Yale; Lieut-Col. E. G. Prior, minister
ot militia in 1896, was the member tor
Victoria. Hon. William Templeman,
a cabinet minister, was elected in Victoria in 1896 and at a by-election ln
1909 he was returned for Comox-Alberni. Hon. S. F. Tolmie, Canada's
present minister of agriculture, also
represented Victoria until tbe dissolution ot parliament a tew weeks ago.
Hon. Martin Barrel, Yale, also obtained cabinet rank.
"Relations Have Been Happy.
British Columbia's relations with
the central government at Ottawa
has seen differences ot opinion at
various times over financial matters
and the fisheries. While there has
been considerable political turmoil ln
the province this has been confined almost entirely to the provincial arena.
In the earf£ political history ot the
province there waB considerable bitterness displayed over the delay in
the building of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, the chief condition ou which
the province entered confederation.
Cons.
    6
Lib
n
    6
n
    6
n
    6
n
    6
o
    6
n
    2
4
    2
4
    0
7
    6
?,
    7
ft
  13
ft
The Chinese and Japanese in their
fables regard tbe milky way as a
stream containing silvery fishes. African bushmen and American Indians
associate it with lights guiding the
paths of wandering spirits.
The rate of growth of mahogany is
shown In southern Nigeria, where the
site of a town destroyed sixty years
ago has been covered with a forest
containing mahogany trees, some of
which are more than 10 feet in diameter.
5 Weeks to
Christmas
Mai\e your
Selections  early
Pick  Out  Your Holiday  Gifts
m
tp   WE WILL   RESERVE
ANY! HING
PERFUMES  DIRECT  FROM  PARIS
STATIONERY OF THE FINEST
BOOKS  UP-TO-DATE
CONFECTIONERY  UNEXCELLED
FRENCH IVORY (KANTELL'S)
FOUNTAIN  PENS  (WATERMAN'S)
CHILDREN'S PICTURE  BOOKS
EVERSHARP PENCILS (in Silver and Gold)     |
10,000 Christmas Cards
*   to choose from
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
J
OLD   COUNTRY
A WORD
TO
THE  WISE
FALL AND CHRISTMAS
SAILINGS FOR ALL
STEAMSHIP LINES
ARE AVAILABLE —IF
YOU   ARE   PLANNING
MAKE
Reservations
EARLY
A TRIP TO THE OLD COUNTRY THIS WINTER SEE OR
WRITE
E. W. BICKLE
Agent Cumberland, B. C.
Passports Arranged
BOOKINGS
Canadian National Railiuaqs
Planning   Ahead
For Christmas
None too soon to be thinking ot tha'.
Christmas Gift. This is a particularly
appropriate suggestion to those who
will be sending gifts a great distance
away. Then again when the stocks
are fresh and new, shoppers bave a
better opportunity to make wise, wel!
thought out selections, than later In
the mad whirl of Christmas shopping.
By paying a small deposit we will be
pleased to bv * away any article or
articles you may choose.
"BUY GIFTS THAT LAST"
14-Karat Wrist Watches and Diamond
Lavellleres
Louis R. Stevens
Quality  Jeweler,  Optician, Engraver
Cumberland, B. C.
Style   -   Quality
Fit
These are the three essentials in a food Suit of
clothes. We can Rive you these combined with good
workmanship and comfort.
Prices range from $25.00
GIVE US A TRIAL—WE AIM TO PLEASE.
CLEANING, PRESSING, REPAIRING and DYEING
at City Prices
NOTE.—Will Club membei 8 please pay at the store
in future.
J. M. GARDNER
ILO-ILO BLOCK
CUMBERLAND
EE
iMa -sflsBsMBwHEBOHMHsfl
Eight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
November 19, 19?1.
We are now showing
Whip
The Arrow
Form-Fit
Collar
for Fall
THESE HAVE JUST ARRIVED
ALL ARROW COLLARS, 2,r»c EACH
Ladies' New
Velour Coats
Just arrived. We offer a very special line in Velour,
nil shades, at our special price §19.50
PLUSHETTE COAT, good quality, lined throughout.
Price   $39.00
EXTRA HEAVY VELOUR COATS, beautifully lined
and strictly tailored; guaranteed to give satisfaction.
Price   $39.00
LADIES' NAVY SERGE SKIRTS, Allwool Serge, well
made and all sizes up to 3G waist.  Prices from $6.75
RED MIDDIES FOR GIRLS AND LADIES —Just
what is required for these cold days.... $4.50 and $5.75
DRYGOODS
& GENT'S FURNISHINGS
SCOTCH MINERS' WAGE CUT
LONDON.—Tho Scottish miners will
suiter a sereve decrease In wages this
month. At a meeting of thc executive
of the Scottish National Union Mine
Workers of Glasgow, it was reported
that tlie wages for November throughout the Scottish coalfields would be
reduced by four shillings per day,
making the daily wage nine shillings
elghtpence, compared with twenty-one
shillings sixpence last February,
while tbe  wages of surface  workers
would be reduced to six shillings per
day, compared with llfteen shillings a
day in February last. Showing tbe
criticalness of the position of the Scottish miners, the members of the executive stated that only four days' work
per week was being obtained.
Reinterring J. Barleycorn.—An undertaker's wagon when searched ln
Montreal the other day was found to
contain 800 bottles of whiskey.—St.
Thomas Times-Journal.
We Carry a Full
Line of
CARPENTERS' TOOLS
CROSS-CUT SAWS
SLEDGE HAMMERS
WEDGES, Etc.
KITCHEN UTENSILS in
Enameled and Aluminum Ware
THINGS YOU WANT, WE HAVE
A Fresh Consignment of
Brand's
Hyacinth   Bulbs
Just Received
C. H. TARBELL & .SON
Hardware and Sporting
Goods Cumberland
Phone 30
G.W.VA Notes
The G. W. V. A. wish to publicly
thank Frincpai C. B. Wood of the High
School, tbe High School girls, Frin
cipal Burbridge and teachers ol the
ruolic School tor their help in the
"I'oppy Day" campaign.
The local also thanks Mr. Tremlett,
secretary of the Athletic Hall, for his
kind assistance in the campaign.
Friends interested lu the welfare ot
the widows und orphans of ex-service
men will be pleased to kuow that the
uut sum realized was $120.50, which
has been forwarded to the funds tor
distribution as allotted.
our Comrades who paid the "great
price" for their patriotism were not
lorgotton on Armistice Day, the Mae-
oabees and Women's Auxiliary placing
wreaths on the urch at the Memorial
Hall.
Comrade George O'Brien was given
u very hearty welcome "home" by the
Comrades at the last regular meeting.
The third aunual masquerade ball
was a great success—the bes.t yet
Particulars are printed in another
column,
Special thanks are due the following comrades for their efforts in arranging details, etc., for the ball: F.
Slaughter, W, A. Clark, W. Hutchinson, Fraser Watson, Tom Scott, Geo.
O'Brien and other members ot the
dance committee.
Will all those who so kindly donated cash and goods to the prize list
accept the besl thanks of the association.
Look out for something good on
December 1st, to be given unslor the
auspices of tlie G. W. V. A. in the Hollo Thertre.
WEDDING
Gibson—Stevens.
A very pretty wedding was solemnized on Wednesday morning at 8
o'clock in St. George's Presbyterian
Church, when Mr. Henry Gibson of
Cumberland and Miss Agnes Flnlay
Stevens of Bevan were united in marriage. The bride was beautifully
dressed in a brocaded purple and grey
shot silk with grey velvet hat trimmed
with purple, and carried a handsome
shower bouquet of cream chrysanthemums and ferns.
The maid of honor, Miss Malpass,
cousin of the bride, was dressed ln
yellow silk embroidered ln white, with
bat to match, and carried pink carnations. Miss Creighton, bridesmaid,
was dressed in white silk and black
velvet bat, and also carried white carnations. The groom was supported by
his brother, Mr. Robert Gibson.
The bride was given away by her
uncle, Mr. Robert Yates of Bevan.
The Wedding March was played- by
Miss Harris, also of Bevan. The Rev.
James Hood, pastor of the church,
performed the ceremony.
After the wedding breakfast at
Bevan the happy couple drove to their
new home in Cumberland.
Personal Mention
Mr. W. H. Macklin, Joint manager ot
Simon Leiser, Ltd., ot Victoria, was in
town during the week.
Mr. J. Edward Bird of Vancouver
arrived on Tuesday to attend court
sittings here.
Mr. H. L. Bates left for Vancouver
Wednesday on business.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir)   Ltd.,   left   tor   Victoria
hursday morning.
Mr. W. A. Owen left tor Nanaimo
.hursday morning and returned on
Friday.
Mrs. James Tremlett returned from
.union on Saturday last.
Mr.   N.   McFadyen   returned   from
visit to Seattle on Monday.
Mr.   Frank   Reynolds
.■as iu town this week.
ot  Nanaimo
Mr. II. H. Ryall, ot the Canadian
ilank of Commerce, left for his home
,n Nanaimo Friday on a short leave
of absence.
Mr. W. S. Wilson left tor Vancouver
on Saturday after spending a few
Jays in town.
A tew friends gathered at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomson Thursday
veniug and had an enjoyable time
playing cards, etc.
FINAL GAME OF JUNIOR
LEAGUE ON SUNDAY
On Sunday next the final game ot
the Cumberland District and Junior
League will be played, when the Union
Day team will go to Bevan and engage
he Juniors there for supremacy. The
Kick-off is timed for 2 o'clock.
Special Train Service.
A special train will leave the tank
ut 1.30 for Bevan, returning after the
MASQUERADE BALL AT
BEVAN SATURDAY NIGHT
A masquerade ball will be held at
the Bevan Hall on Saturday night under auspices ot the Burns' Club. $100
in prizes has been allotted to the different classes, and lt hi expected that
a record crowd will be present. Doors
open at 7.30 and the grand march
starts at 10,30. Good music and refreshments will be provided.
CLUB NOTES
SMOKER UNDER AUSPICES
OF MINING INSTITUTE
A smoker to be held under auspices
of the local branch of the Canadian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy,
will be held in the Athletic Hall on
Saturday, November 26, at 8 p.m.
Several prominent speakers from
Vancouver will be present, who will
give short addresses on mining subjects. A programme ot songs is also
being arranged.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
Chemalnus, Progressive, Chieftain,
Joyful, Celtic, Cheerful, Annacis, Peerless, Dauntless, Esdud, Malaspina and
Norvan, coastwise; Tyndareus, Orient;
Superior and Scow, Vancouver; Mor-
ristown, New York.
LOST
LADY'S FINGER RING, SET WITH
Black Onyx and Pearls. Finder
kindly return to Islander office.
RIGHT SHOE, ABOUT TWO WEEKS
ago. If found, leave at Islander
Office.    Reward. 2-48
FOR SALE
LARGE TWO-STOREY BUILDING,
situated corner of Dunsmuir Avenue
and Fifth Street; every accommodation; also the necessary outbuildings and garage. For further particulars apply to Charles Mussatto.
4-50
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association.
A very Interesting debate was held
last Sunday evening at the Debating
Society. The subject under debate
was "Would lt be Better tor a City
to Have a Civic Manager than a Mayor
and Council." Arguments tor both
sides were very ably put. The next
debate will take place on Sunday, November 27, when the subject will be:
'Is the Economic Factor the Most
Important ln Social Progress." This
jubject will be bandied by two well
jiuown members ot the club. A hearty
invitation is extended to members and
their wives and lady friends to be
present
The SUCCESS af YOUR
Christmas Cake
or Pudding
depends largely on the quality of ingredients used.
In our Grocery you will And the choicest of imported
raisins, currants, peels, dates, extracts, spices, etc.
Your Christmas cake or pudding will have a wonderful richness of flavor if the ingredients come from the
B. & B. Grocery. Our new season's stock is now due,
and includes:
Glace Cherries
Crystallized Cherries
Glace Fruits, assorted
Preserved Ginger, in jars
Crystallized Ginger
Caraway Seed
Candied Caraway Seed
Cleaned Currants
Dromedary Dates
Hallowai Dates, bulk
Layer Figs
Seeded Raisins
Seedless Raisins
Thompson's Blanched
Seedless Raisins
Cluster Raisins
Wagstaffe's Orange, Lemon and Citron Peel
Mixed Cut Peel, 1-lb. packages
Extracts, all flavors Spices, all flavors
Shelled Walnuts, Shelled Almonds, Vi. ¥>, 1-lb. pkgs.
Almond Paste and Ground Almonds
Cake Decorations, assorted
Cowan's Icings, assorted flavors
We Carry a Full Line of
Christmas Pudding Bowls
Mixing Bowls, Etc.
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
Until further notice, billiards will
be ten cents a halt hour, Instead of
20 cents as previously. Pool rates regain the same.
Arrangements are being made for a
teries of lectures by Major R. W.
Brock of the U. B. C.
The president of the club has a
icheme in his sleeve which will be ot
merest to the membership. More
particulars of this anon.
rALKING MACHINE MAY
REVOLUTIONIZE MOVIES
A picture that talks without the aid
ot a phonographic device has been Invented and successfully demonstrated
>y Grlndell Mathews, ot London, Eng.
At the demonstration a picture was
.ihown of a man seated at a piano. Ab
he struck the keys the sound ot mi" 'c
in the correct tone was heard from tue
instrument, which has the appearance
at a sugar spoon. The Inventor says
his Instrument will revolutionize the
motion picture business.
TEN-ACRE FARM, HAPPY VALLEY,
2 miles from Cumberland; 6 acrei
pasture land, 3 acres good timber;
pasture laud, 4 acres good timber;
4-room house and barn; ten tons o
cheap; half cash, balance arranged
Chlu Yeuk, Happy Valley, or c|o Bo>
322, Post Office, Cumberland.     3-41-
1900 MOTOR WASHER;   ALSO FIRE
Screen.   Apply Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
FRESH VEGETABLES DELIVEREI
to your door every Tuesday and
Saturday. Ripe Tomatoes, Potatoes
Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Turnipf
Cabbage, etc. E. C. Eddington, Cal
hound Ranch, Sandwick P.O.      2-4
PIGS AND POULTRY
REBUILD BRITANNIA
ON A SAFER LOCATION
AND ABANDON OLD SITE
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR PIGts
and Poultry. Kwong Ylck, China
town, Cumberland. Telephone B-F
P.O. Box 282. 13-52
.BRITANNIA BEACH.—To avoid any
possibility ot a recurrence of the terrible disaster recently, when 36 lives
were lost ln the flood which wrecked
iearly 80 houses of employees of the
Burrard Mining ft Smelting Co., the
townsite ls to be rebuilt on a new and
iafer location above the north bank of
Britannia creek
Announcement that this bas been
practically decided on has been made
by E. J. Donahue, local manager, after
communicating with President E.
Schley and Managing Director Quikley
In Texas, who are coming up soon to
inspect the village and mine workings.
While the remaining undamaged
houses may not be removed tor a considerable time, lt ls practically certain that the new houses which will
replace the wrecked ones will be rebuilt In a new location to be cleared
and graded on higher land on the
north bank ot the creek. The present
channel will be filled in and provision
made for confining the creek to a sate
channel In tuture,
CUMBERLAND CITY
TEAM BEAT NANAIMO
DAVENPORTS BY 4 TO 2
The Cumberland City soccer team
Jefea'ted Nanaimo Davenports by 4
goals to 2 in an Upper Island Second
Division League game on Sunday last.
Only one goal was scored ln the first
halt of the game, all the other five
oelng scored in a period of about 20
minutes in the second half, which
jrought tbe spectators to a high pitch
if excitement. Good goal-keeping by
lackson of the Davenport team kept
.he scoring down for his side; he
irought off some nice saves.
The following were the teams to
lineup at 2.45:
NANAIMO DAVENPORTS—Jackson,
Davis, Edmunds, Bowen, Purse, Stiles,
Old, Corbett, Perry, Pryde, Kelly.
CUMBERLAND CITY. — Jackson,
Gough, McWhlrter, Brown, Courtenay,
Jackson, Gibson, Kerr, McWhlrter,
Slaughter, Scott
Referee—James L, Brown of Bevan.
Nanaimo won the toss and decided
to defend the west goal. McWhlrter
ticked off for Cumberland and the
'.ocal boys pressed the Nanaimo de-
'ence for the flrst ten minutes, and on
leveral occasions looked dangerous.
After fifteen minutes' play Edmunds
■jave away a penalty for handling tbe
ball in front of the goal; McWhlrter
took the kick and made no mistake,
icorlng with a hard drive.
Nanaimo spurred up after this and
broke through on several occasions,
but were never dangerous. Cumberland's forwards missed some splendid
ipportunitles ot adding to their score.
There was no further score in the first
period.
On the resumption ot play the Cumberland boys again took things into
their own hands and added three .more
to the score sheet, the scorers being
Scott, Slaughter and Jackson.
Nanaimo, who were four goals to
the bad, now commenced to take a
hand In the game, and through a misunderstanding by Cumberland's defence, Corbett scored tor Nanaimo; a
ninute later Purse added the second
goal to Nanalmo's score. Cumberland
pressed until tbe end of the game but
there was no further scoring.
Cumberland City, 4 goals; Nanaimo
Davenports, 2.
CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Aitken and family wish to
convey their sincere thanks for
the many expressions of sympathy,
also for the many iloral tributes,
during their sad bereavement.
Used Cars
One Chevrolet Five-Passenger Touring Car... A real
snap for
$275
Ford Five-Passenger Touring 1919 model, just been
overhauled and repainted. New top, good tires,
etc.   Price
$425
TERMS GIVEN
CORFIELD
MOTORS
Limited
FORD DEALERS
Courtenay
PARENT-TEACHER ASSN.
MEETS MONDAY NIGHT
Not Many Quality.—Wanted, a man
who can run a car and wlte.r-Advt. In
Auerlcan Medical Journal.
In the Blind Pig Zone—We asked
Reggie Holmes what the fair waB like
at Harrow, and he said he wasn't able
to see much.—Amherstburg Echo.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Parent-Teacher Association will he
held in the High School on Monday
night next, nt 8 o'clock.
After the routine business has been
disposed of a paper will be read by
Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton.

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