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The Cumberland Islander Sep 3, 1921

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Array 9
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CUMBERLAND ISLAND
With which is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 36
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1921.
"•"..'I'f'.-V*'
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Light and Water Companies
Take Action to Supply Price
Cumberland Team
Outplay Ladysmith
Easter's Brilliant Work on Sunday Mainly Responsible for
Win Over Northerners.
Ladysmlth's championship aggregation of balltossers visited Cumberland
last Sunday and were treated to a
Blight defeat to the tune ot C runs to
3. Easter's slants and twists had tlie
visitors from the south completely
puzzled and hits were few and far between.
Cumberland's field artists gave their
slabster good support outside of the
usual two or three boners.
A feature of the game was Tappy
Davis for Ladysmith, at second base.
Some of liis pick-ups were on the
verge of marvellous, and the ground
he covers playing second leaves no
holes in the territory.
Easter struck out fourteen men and
Rice struck out four. Ladysmith had
7 errors and Cumberland 4. Brown
gave. a two-base hit, nnd Davis was
hit by pitched ball. Rice walked 2.
Cumberland had 4 men left on bases
and Ladysmith 5. Double play, Russell to Davis to Lapsansky. Time of
game, 1 hour 48 minutes.
Frank Dallos Seeks One Months'
Rebate on Licence for the
Waverley Hotel.
NOTES ON GAME
The boys' averages are looking up
when the season is over. Easter looks
to be the best sticker in the bunch.
He lays his balls where the fielders
alnt.
Bannerman and Plump garner four
bingles between them; Conti nicked
one. Tucker had hard luck, Davis
gathering two of his good ones.
His Unips Charlie Graham played a
good game. No soda-water bottles.
His first assistant, Farmer, was right
on the job.
Sandy Kerr, manager of the southern
plllet throwers, can't make out why
his boys couldn't hit the pill. Fourteen Btruck outs, we'll tell him.
Plump was like a rock on first.
Lauderbach in left field for Lady-
smith pulled down a couple of sure
ones headed for his garden.
Harrison's willow wand deposited a
good one ln the sixth frame.
The bread king waB there with
bells. If he was quicker in action
the Big Leaguers would be after him.
Old Pete Morrison was travelling
with the Ladysmith boys.
The Score.
Cumberland—    A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E.
Plump, lb  4
Bannerman, I.f  4
Marocchi, 3b.
Easter, p	
Tucker, 2b. ..
Harrison, cf.
Conti, r.f	
Hunden, s.s.
Kerr, c	
Total.
,6    6  27  10    4
Ladysmith
Weston, 3b  4
Davis, 2b  4
Lapsansky, lb 4
Zboyoosky, r.f  4
Brown, c     4
Simpson, cf  4
A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E
Russell, s.s	
Lauderbach, l.t.
Rice, p	
36    5    3  24  16    7
TIGERS PLAY GOOD
GAME AND WIN 7 TO 4
Local Team Played an Inferior
Game in Which There Were
Numerous Errors
A strong team of Vancouver Japanese baseball players, known as the
Tigers aud runners-up in the Terminal
League, played a game on the local
grounds Saturday afternoon against
the Cumberland Seniors. Tbe visitors
are a sturdy, heavy bunch and put up
a rattling good game. They are well
organized and put all kinds of pep
Into the game.
Cumberland put a somewhat weakened team ln the field and went down
to defeat before the Sons of Nippon by
the score ot 7 runs to 4.
The visitors are a much superior
team to the Ashais who were here recently, and whom the local boys had
little difficulty tn disposing of.
Fifteen errors on thc part of Cumberland players was the chief cause
of the defeat
Moose Lodge
Opens Saturday
At 7.30 o'clock Saturday night, in
the Fraternity Hall, will begin the institution of the new Moose Lodge being formed by Organizer Thompson.
The new lodge opens up under very
ausplcisous conditions as it will have
nearly one hundred members to begin
with.
A team from the Ladysmith Lodge
ls coming up to assist Mr. Thompson
in the opening ceremonies.
WILL RESUME EVENING SERVICE
AT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Commencing Sunday, September 4,
the evening services at St. George's
.Presbyterian Church will be resumed,
commencing at 7 o'clock
The regular fortnightly meeting of
the City Council was held Monday
evening ln the City Hall, Mayor D. R.
MacDonald ocupying the chair, with
Aldermen J. C. Brown, Thos. Bunner-
innn, P, U. Pickard, C. J. Parnham and
D. Thomson in attendance.
Considerable time was spent discussing Hie summary presented by Mr.
W. A. Owen on the soldiers' houses,
etc. This is reported in another
column.
Wants licbule of Licence.
Mr. Frank Dallos of the Waverley
Hotel wrote the council as follows
asking for a rebate of part of his
licence fee paid In January, for the
sale of near-beer, and which sale was
stopped on June 15 by the operation of
the Moderation Act:
"Mayor and Council,
"City of Cumberland.
"Gentlemen—
"I herewith beg to put In my application for return of balance due me of
one trade licence for Waverley Hotel.
On January 15th, 1921, I paid the sum
of ?100 for licence to sell near beer
until July 15th, 1921. On June 15th,
1921, I was ordered to cease the sale
of beer, which I accordingly did, and
have not opened up for business since
that date. Therefore I apply for return of licence fee pro rata for the
month I had to close.
"Yours truly,
"FRANK DALLOS."
After some discussion a motion,
moved by Aid. Brown and seconded by
Aid. Bannerman, "That the communication be received and laid on the
table for future consideration," was
carried, tlie idea being to see what
other cities are doing under like circumstances. It was generally agreed
that the matter was up to the Provincial Government.
Tbe application ot Mr. A. E. Jeffery
to be allowed to couple a septic tank
up to the city sewerage pipe was
granted.
Light nnd Water Companies Taking
Action on Sale Proposals.
Communications from the Cumberland Electric Lighting Co. Ltd. and
the Cumberland and Union Waterworks Co. Ltd. were received. These
letters show that the 'wo companie3
are taking action towards giving the
city a reply in the near future as to
the selling price, as nsked, aud not
waiting until the annual meeting in
February. The communications read
as follows:
Cumberland Electric Lighting Co. Ltd.
"August 29th, 1921.
"To the Mayor and Aldermen,
"Cumberland, B. C.
"Gentlemen— v
"Yours of 17th Inst, received in
reference to purchase of Cumberland
Electric Lighting Co., Ltd., and the
same will come before tbe directors
at tlieir next meeting and your board
will be communicated with at once.
"Will you kindly furnish our board
(Continued on Page Five)
Dan Bannerman
Not Treated Fairly
Compelled to Run Second Race
In Few Minutes Against
Fresh Competitor.
That splendid Cumberland athlete,
Dan Bannerman, of the Cumberland
Athletic Club, put up a fine performance at the B. C. track and field
championships held in Vancouver on
Saturday last. Dan's performance Is
all the more remarkable because he
goes iu for such a variety of sports.
Were he to confine his training to running for a few weeks be would make
people sit up and take notice.
ln the 100 yards he ran third, L.
Cowan winning In 10 1-5 seconds.
In the 220 yards Dan had to contend against a very unfair disadvantage. This race, like the others, waB
run in heats. In tbe first heat Bannerman came first, doing the 220 yards
in 23 1-5 seconds. Five minutes later
Bannerman had to run another race
against L. Cowan, who had a bye in
the first heat and was consequently
fresh. Bannerman, Stewart of Victoria and Cowan ran ln the final, the
latter just getting over the line ahead
of Bannerman; tbe time iu this heat
was 24 2-5 seconds. If Bannerman
had had time to fully recover from the
effects of the flrst race instead of being called on to run So soon, there is
little doubt he would have won the
race. Anyway, he did tbe first heat In
over a second less time than Cowan's |
performance. People who were present from Cumberland say tbat If
Cowan had ran in the first heat be
would not have had a place!
Award Contract
For New Houses
City   Engineer   Supplies   Summary of Costs and Estimates
On Plumbing Work.
Football Season
Opens Sept. 17th
Jas. L. Brown Elected President
Of League—Good Outlook
For Coming Season.
Jtnnnie Brown, the popular sport,
has been elected president ot the
I'pper Island Football League. While
congratulating him on his election we
think the honor was coming to him
for lie has worked hard In the interest
of clean sport and is always willing
to devote time and energy to its
cause. The league should benefit by
his experience In the field.
The annual meeting was held in the
Hoard of Trade rooms at Nanaimo on
Monday night, when delegates were
present representing Nanaimo, South
Wellington, Granby, Ladysmith antl
Cumberland.
Cumberliiiid Plays nt Nannlmo.
It was decided that entries to tlie
league will close on September 10, and
tlie season open ou September 17, thc
following being the draw:
Nanaimo City vs. Cumberland.
Ladysmith United vs.- Granby.
South Wellington vs. First Entry.
The following officers were elected
for the coming season:
Hon. President, Hon. Wm. Sloan.
Hon Vice-Presidents, Mr. Charles
Graham, Cumberland, and Mr. T.
Spruston, Ladysmith.
President, Mr. J. L. Brown, Cumberland.
Vice-President, Mr. J. C. McGregor,
South Wellington.
Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. W. McDonald, Nanaimo.
The meeting passed a hearty vote
of thanks to the retiring president
and decided to present Mr. W. McDonald, the secretary-treasurer, with a
gold watch for his untiring efforts
during the past season.
Six-Team League  Expected.
Efforts are being made to have a
six-team league. The league Ms at
present constituted is composed of
live clubs, but It is hoped that another
team will be entered from Nanaimo.
The Cumberland boys are getting
down to practice and are out to repeat their brilliant performance of thc
past year.
"The Law Is
Very Peculiar"
Cumberland Man Forced to Defend Himself at Esquimalt
On Trivial False Charge
A Lord Chief Justice of England
once remarked that "the law is just,
but very peculiar." While everyone
will agree with the latter part of the
above dictum, many take exception to
the first part. Certain cases which
have occurred in our Immediate neighborhood give grounds for the exception. For instance, when some otherwise law-abiding citizens are convicted on a technical Infringement of the
game laws they were sentenced to
three months' imprisonment with hard
labor; while a man, whose record It,
Canada was anything but good, who
was convicted on three counts with
housebreaking and robbery, gets off
with two mouths. ' ln another instance a lad of 16 gets two years for
the theft of ten dollars.
A more recent case Is that of Mr.
John Murdoch, a respected resident
of this city. Mr. Murdock was served
with a summons under the Traffic
Regulation Act, charging him with
being in Esquimalt on a certain date
In August and not having his motor
car tail light burning one-half hour
after sundown. Having been working
in Cumberland all day on the date in
question, aud having many most reliable witnesses to prove that fact, he
obtained an affidavit from the Mayor
and Chief of Police testifying to tbe
circumstances. This affidavit tbe
chief forwarded to Chief of Police
Dawley ot Esquimalt (late of Courtenay) and a covering letter giving
full details. Dawley phoned that the
defendant wonld have to appear. Mr.
Murdock states that he got into telephonic communication with the Reeve
of Esquimalt, whom, he states, said
he would appear for him and present
tlie affidavit.
Later on the chief of Cumberland
was somewhat surprised to get a letter from the prosecuting attorney for
Esquimau saying that the case had
been tried, and abundantly proved, ln
the absence of the defendant, no one
having appeared for him, but that the
court bad adjourned the case for one
week for the defedant to put in an appearance.
In reply to a further letter from
Chief Bunbury he was somewhat sarcastically told that he apparently did
not know the use of an affidavit and
its admlssabillty as evidence. The
chief claims that in his many years of
police service he has had many police
cases where affidavits put In by responsible parties have been admitted
by tlie trial magistrate and concurred
In by himself and prosecutor. Police
courts do uot always stand on the
strict letter of legal evidence, but
where it has been shown by reliable
statements that a mistake might have
occurred and that the defendant would
be put to great expense to answer a
trivial charge the case has been withdrawn. Chief Bunbury states that had
the case been reversed, and he bad
Issued the summons to a citizen of
Esquimalt, he would have cheerfully
accepted an affidavit from the reeve
alone and withdrawn the charge.
A veiled presumption has been stated
to the effect that both the mayor of
this city and its chief of police have
sworn to a false statement.
Mr. John Murdock has had to go to
Esquimalt, taking some of his witnesses with him to answer to the
harge, and even If acquitted will be
put to heavy expeuse. If the prosecution, backed by Chief Dawley, objected to the admlssabillty of the affidavit in question as legal evidence the
trial magistrate would no doubt have
to sustain the objection, and thus we
once more come back to the old adage
that "the law Is just but very peculiar."
Case Thrown Out.
Since the above was written information comes to band that the case
At a special meeting of the City
Council on Friday night the tenders
for labor on construction of tbe soldiers' houses received further consideration. City Engineer Owen submitted a report on the list of material accompanying each tender, finding that
oue tender was out ot order aud an
other showed a shortage of several
thousand feet ot lumber.
The tender of Hugh G. Russell and
George R. Brown at {2325 was accepted.
Summary of Costs.
At the regular meeting of the City
Council on Monday night, Mr. Owen
submitted a detailed summary of costs
under different schemes of plumbing
for the houses. This report was fully
gone Into by the council, but as the
money tor the extra plumbing work
will be in addition to the amount of
the money loaned under the Better
Housing Scheme, the council took no
definite action. A motion was put
through to the effect that the matter
be left In the hands of the building
committee to make terms with the
men for extra expenditure for plumbing.
Scheme No. 1.
>,000 ft. B.M. ® average $22
per M $1958.00
Russell's contract price   2,325.00
Plumbing, sink and toilet,
with complete -toughing in
and also 30-gallon tank
with pressure regulator for
6 houses   1,250.00
Water connections, including
cost of tappings, etc., complete for 6 houses     162.00
Lighting, 8 outlets at 4.15 per
outlet per bouse      199.20
Bricks, 3000 @ $20 per M       60.00
Sewerage      270.00
Supervision and contingencies    300.00
First Aid and Mine Rescue
Competitions Monday Next
Total  $6524.20
Scheme No. 2.
All figures except plumbing,
as in Scheme No. 1 $5,274.20
Less cost of toilet and kitchen
tank installation, also regulator pressure or installing
sink only with cold water
tap        243.50
Total  $5,517.70
Scheme No. 3.
All   figures   except  plumbing
as in Scheme No. 1 $5,274.20
Sink   and   toilet   Installation
with cold water connection..    895.00
Total  $5,169.20
In discussing the different schemes
the aldermen were unanimous in saying that the best value would be obtained by having the complete pluming installation done during the,construction of the houses. The cost
would be far less and better work
doue.
Tenders for Plumbing.
Two tenders were opened for the
plumbing work as follows:
T. E. Bate Hardware Co.—for all
plumbing, finished complete as per
specifications, with steel baths enameled inside, $1737; with 5 ft. porcelain
baths, $1899; without baths, $1443.
Rushton Plumbing Co., Courtenay-
At $268 for each house, making a total
of $1608; this did not include pressure
regulator.
Morton Bros., Ltd., Nanaimo.—Quotations submitted through Mr. Owen,
and embracing three schemes, as follows:
1. Furnishing and Installations of 1
18x30 In. cast enamel sink, and 1 Vitro
oak L.D.W.D. closet in 5 houses at
$149, and 1 house at $150; total, $895.
2. Furnishing and installation of
above fixtures and 1 30-gallon range
boiler, Installed ready for connecting
to range, including % in. pressure
regulator; also the roughing In for the
bath; the waste and hot and cold
water pipes to come above the floor
ready for connecting tlie bath, in 5
houses at $209 each, and ! house at
$205; total, $1250.
3. Complete Installation as per plan,
with pressure regulator Included, In r>
houses at $289, and 1 house ut $285;
total $1730.
In all these Installations the sewer
waste and water pipes extend to 1 ft.
beyond the foundation wall.
The tender of Morton Bros. Ltd. a:is
accepted for whatever plumbing was
needed.
The houses will be built 20 feet
from front propery line and In centre
of the lot, allowing 16 feet on each
side.
NANAIMO CITY WINS
SUMMER SOCCER TITLE
Nanaimo City captured the championship of the Pacific Coast Soccer
League on Saturday by defeating South
Wellington In a closely contested game
by a score of 2-1, the winning goal
being registered by Bobby Robertson
about a minute from full time. The
game was played before the biggest
crowd to attend a Pociflc Coast Soccer
League game this season, and is said
to have been one of the best exhlji-
tions of soccer in the h(fb city for
some time.
has been thrown out of court. The
magistrate, after hearing evidence for
the prosecution and but two witnesses
for the defendant, decided against the
prosecution and dismissed the case.
Good Programme of Sports for
The Children to Be Run
In Conjunction.
Flue weather is uow the prime
requisite for tbe big events ou Monday next, Labor Dav. Tlie Sixth Annual Field Day of the Vancouver island .Mine Safety Association will take
place ou the Cumberland Athletic
Grounds, commencing at 10 o'clock in
the morning,
Tiie Cumberland City Band will be
in attendance all duy to enliven the
proceedings.
This is uu international affair, and
teams ure expected from ull coal-mining points lu tlie province and tbe
.-state of Washington.
.Many mine ollicials aud government
olllcers will be in attendance, the Mine
Kescue and First Aid competitions being looked upon as highly important
and of great interest to all concerned
in work in and around the mines.
Mr. Jas. McGregor, Chief Inspector
of Mines, will arrive Saturday afternoon in connection with the competition.
Mine Rescue Competitions.
The first event on the day's programme is tlie Mino Rescue competitions, which start ut In o'clock, and
itr which a good number of teams ure
expected to compete. Entries iu both
this and the First Aid events close
tonight (Friday) at Nanaimo.
Tlie big prize in this event is the
Vancouver Island Mine Satety Association shield, which is for interuat-
lioual   competition.
Mr. Dudley Michell of Edmonton
will be the chief judge of the Mine
Rescue events und will be assisted by
two judges at the assembling table
and two in tbe tunnel.
One team will ebter from Cumberland, No. 4 Mine Rescue, which will
be composed of Win. Gillies (captain),
L. Francescini, Wm. G. Evans, Jonathan Taylor, Arthur Watson aud Wm.
Devoy  (linesman).
A visit to the grounds today shows
tbat the test table, smoke room and
tunnel have been erected and ready
for the contestants. Tbe teams, on
beginning their test, assemble their
apparatus on the stand erected on tbe
far side of the Athletic Grounds; there
the table judges inspect for errors,
leaks, etc. Tbls concluded, the men
proceed 117 yards across the fleld to
the "smoke" room; this distance haB
to be covered iu two minutes, when
their pulse Is taken; tbey then enter
the smoke room, which represents a
miue with a bad atmosphere. Here
the men and machines undergo a
severe test to make sure all Is right
before eutering the long tunnel to perform the schedule of work laid out.
Of course the various teams will not
kuow what work they have-to perform
until just before tbe test begins. Once
in the improvised tunnel the teams
meet with various obstacles on their
way to rescue men who supposedly
have met with an acident.
First Aid Events.
Under this heading there are several
events, as follows:
Department of Mines Cup, team
event, won by No. 4 Surface team of
Cumberland last year.
Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association Cup, team event.
Juvenile Cup, team event.
Two-man event.
One-man event.
Exhibition ladies' event.
About a dozen teams are expected
to enter for the main events.
Two teams will enter from Cumber
land, No. 4 Surface and No. 4 Underground, and the teams or members
of each will take part In the various
First Aid Events. The teams comprise
No. 4 Surface—A. J. Taylor (captain)
Jas. A. Quinn, H. Boffy, J. Lockhart,
C. Nash, and F. Bond '.Instructor).
No. 4 Underground—Wm. Beveridge
(captain), Jonathan Taylor, R. Held.
L. Francescini and John Williams.
Dr. Brydone-Juck of Vancouver
Will be the chief Judge of the First Aid
events, and will he assisted by Dr. G.
K. MacNaughton, Dr. E, It. Hicks and
visiting doctors.
A meeting of the Vancouver Island
Mine Safety Association will be held
In the Wilting Hooni of the Athletic
Hall on Sunday evening.
Sports for the Children.
In another part of this Issue Is
printed thc full programme of the
children's sports to be run in conjunction with the competitions. There
will be races und other events dear
to the hearts of the young folk, and
good prizes have been provided for
the winners. The losers will also be
In the swim, for each unsuccessful
competitor will receive a dime as consolation.
The sports are conducted by the
committee who so successfully managed the employees' picnic of tho Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. at
Royston ln July. Mr. Chas. O'Brien
ls secretory, and the different committees Include:
SPORTS.—Jas. A. Quinn Bobbie
Brown. Preston Bruie, A. H. Ksy, Dun
Stewart, Jonathan Taylor and W. C.
Colling.
TRANSPORTATION.—H. L. Bates
(chairman), Harry Buchanan, G.
Simlster, A. It. Westley, A. Matheson,
L. Francescini, A. Hughes and A.
Derbyshire.
JUDGES.—C. J. Parnham, J. Sutherland, A. Hughes, A. Auchlnvole, Tom
Cunliffe und George Shearer.
STARTERS- t'lins.  Grohain  and  J.
D. Quinn.
GROUNDS—Andrew Pollock, A. C.
Big Social and
Dance at Night
Function Expected to Be One of
The Biggest Ever Held in
This District.
In the evening a big social and
dance will be held In the llo-llo Hall,
under the auspices of the Canadian
Collieries First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association, Preparations ure being
made for a very large attendance to
wind up the holiday. It will start at
9 o'clock.
The committee expects a large attendance from Victoria, Ladysmitli,
South Wellington, Nanaimo and Nanoose. Those intending to be present
are asked to be on hand early—the
fun begins at 9 o'clock. Refreshments
will be provided.
The prizes in the various Mine
Kescue and First Aid events will be
presented by the Hon. Wm. Sloan,
Minister of Mines, during thc evening.
All the visiting ollicials and contestants will he guests of the local
association  that  evening.
The committees handling this affair
are:
ENTERTAINMENT. — C. J. Parnham. J. Thomson and fl. L. Bates.
REFRESHMENT. — L. Fransescinl,
11. Reid, S. Hunt, E. Hughes, W. Devoy
ind W. Beveridge.
PUBLICITY.—A. J. Taylor and
lonnthau Taylor.
FEMALE COUR^OF
FORESTERS PLANNED
 r~
Preliminary arrangements aro un-
Icr way looking to tbe formation of a
Female Court In connection with
Court Bevan, Ancient Order of Foresters, Cumberland.
Only a few more names are needed
to warrant a new court being opened.
Those who are thinking of joining the
new lodge and participating in tbe
benefits are asked to communicate
with Secretary F. G Eaton, General
Delivery, Cumberland.
THREE BASEBALL
GAMES  SCHEDULED
Cumberland Team to Play Ladysmith, Nanaimo and Powell
River Over Week-End
The local bnseballers havo plenty
of engagements over the week-end.
On Sunday at 1 o'clock they are due
to play a game at Ladysmith. Following this they proceed to Nanaimo
for a game there at 4 o'clock. On
Monday tliey go to Powell River for
i game against the papermakers.
LIQUOR  STORK  CLOSES  MONDAY
Monday being a statutory holiday,
all the liquor stores operated by the
Liquor Control Bourd throughout the
Province will be closed all day.
Schools Open
Tuesday Next
The Cumberland High School and
Public School will re-open on Tuesday morning next, after a ten weeks'
vacation.
There have heen several changes
in the staff, no less than six teachers
levering their connection with the
public school since the last term.
The schools will reopen with the
following staff:
High School.
Mr. C. B. Wood, principal.
Miss C. B. Dalton.
Public School.
Mr. Chas. K. Burbrldgo, principal.
Mr. G. B. Apps.
Miss .Margaret Beckwith.
Miss Dorothy E, Hastie.
Miss Mary K. Column.
Miss Alice J. Column.
Miss Margaret C. Bannerman.
Miss Carrie Richardson.
Miss Ida McFadyen.
MA^ Hannah Harrison.
Miss Nettie Robertson.
.Mrs  Drader,
Notice Is given in nnother column
Unit all intending pupils are requested to enter nt the beginning nf tho
term. Pupils pnterlng the receiving
lass must be six years or over on or
jefore October 1. and must produce a
birth certliicate. No pupils will be
admitted to tbe receiving class for
this term after October 1.
IMPROVEMENTS TO
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
The work of grading one block of
Dunsmuir Aventre, between Fourth and
Fifth Streets, is nearly completed, and
already one coat of tarvia has been
applied. This is a great improvement
tnd gives yie street a much nicer appearance. When the ulher block is
finished the citizens will have a main
treet to be proud of.
The next move will be up to some
d the business men and property
holders to Improve their business
premises, if only by tho application of
a coat of paint.
Lymn, Ed. Nancy, S. Fraser, John
Smith. M. Williamson. A. Lockhart, R.
TurnbtlU, P. Harris, W. Wilson, W.
Mossey, Arch. Boyd and T. Robertson. Two
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September JJ, mt
\V
EXTRAORDINARY LOW PRICE ON HIGH-GRADE
Kitchen Ranges
We are showing a high-grade Kitchen Range, with
polished steel top, six holes, enamel back, enamel oven
door with thermometer, warming closet with nickel-
plated door, niekelplated base and legs, large fire-box
with duplex grates for coal or wood.
This is a high-grade, well made range, of first-class
materials—one that will be a credit to any kitchen.
The price of this range a short time ago was $105, but
we are now selling it at
$80.00
CASH—TERMS IP DESIRED
The Best Fry Pan Made
Come in.and see the very.newest thing in Fry Pans
—highly niekelplated English east steel. Will not tarnish and is easily cleaned, Will last a lifetime—a Fry
Pan you will be proud to own,
The Bate
Hardware   Co.
Housefurnishings
TAPESTRIES, in a good assortment of colorings, suitable for every room in the home. Newest prices,
ranging at $1.10, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.75.
TABLE COVERS IN TAPESTRY—A nice line to
select from; 8[4 size. Prices ranging from $4.00,
$4.75, $5.00, $5.50 to $7.50 each.
•CURTAIN NETS AND SCRIMS—In White and Ecru.
LACE AND NOVELTY CURTAINS.
Floor Coverings
CALL AND LOOK OVER OUR CARPET SQUARES
—You will find our values right.
AXMINSTER HEARTH RUGS—Reduced from $8.50
to $6.50 each.
A FULL LINE OF FURNITURE
ALWAYS SHOWING
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Hay - Fever
SUMMED COLDS, ASTHMA,
■poll many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively atop* these trouble* ■
Sneezing, weezing, coughing,
weeping eye* aren't necessary—
unlets you like being that ways
J1.00 at your druggist's, or writ*
Teinplctons, Toronto, for a free trial
Sold by R. E. FROST
Sports Programme
To Be Run on Labor Day on the
Athletic Grounds.
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on  Royston-
Cumberland   Road
Tlie following Is the full progrntume
of eporta to be held in conjunction
with the Field liny events of the Van
couver Island Mine Safety Association
on .Monday next. Labor Day.
The starters will ho Mr. Charles
Oraham and Mr. Jack Quinn, and the
i Judges .Messrs. C. J. I'nrnhara, J.
'Hughes, ,1. Sutherland, A. Auchlnvole,
Tom Cunlilfe and George Shearer.
Unsuccessful competitors will receive 10 cents. There will he no 2nd
prize unless there are three or more
entries, and no Srd prize unless there
are four or more entries.
11.00 a.m.—1. lioys' race, 6 years
and under, 50 yards; 1st prize, value
SI; 2nd, 75c; 3rd, 50c.
ll.lio.—2. Girls' race, 6 years and
under. 50 yards; 1st prize value $1;
2nd, 75c; Srd, SOc.
11.05.—3. lioys' race, 8 years and
under, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1.50;
2nd, $1; 3rd, 50c.
11.05.—4. Girls' race, 8 years and
under. 50 vards; 1st prize, value $1.50;
2nd. $1; 3rd, SOc.
11.10.—5. Hoys' race, 10 years and
under, 50 vards; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd. $1.60; Srd, $1.
11.10.—6. Girls' race, 10 years and
under, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd. $1.50; 3rd, $1.
11.15.—7. Boys' race. 12 years and
under, 75 yards; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd. $1.50; 3rd, $1.
11.15.—8. Girls' race, 12 years and
under, 75 yards; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd, $1.50; 3rd, ?1.
11.20.—(I. Boys' rnce. 15 years and
under, 75 vards; 1st prize, value $3;
2nd, $2; Srd, $1.
11.20.—10. Girls' race, 15 years nnd
under, 75 vards; 1st prize, value $3;
2nd. $2; Srd, $1.
11.25.—11. Boys' obstacle race, 15
years and under; 1st prize, value $4;
2nd. $2.50; Srd, $1.50.
11.25.—12. Girls' egg and spoon
race, 15 years and under; 1st prize,
value $4.50; 2nd, $2.50; Srd, $1.50.
11.35.—13. Boys' sack race, 12 years
and under; 1st prize, value $2.50; 2nd,
$2; 3rd, $1.
11.35.—14. Girls' shoe scramble, 12
vears and under; 1st prize, value
$2.50; 2nd, $2; 3rd. $1.
11.45.—15.   Boys' throe-legged race,
14 vears and under;  1st prize, value
$4; 2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
11.45.—Girls' relay race, three girls
to team, 14 years and under; 1st prize,
value $4.50; 2nd. $3; 3rd. $1.50.
1.30.—17. Boys' pillow fight, 15
years and under; 1st prize, value $3;
2nd, value $1.50.
1.30.—18. Girls' potato race, 15
vears and under; 1st prize, value $3;
2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
1.40.—19. Hoys' cracker-eating competition, 10 years and under; 1st prize,
value $2; 2nd. $1.50; 3rd, $1.
1.40.—20. Girls' skipping race, 10
years and under; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd, value $1.50; 3rd, $1.
2.00.—21.   Juniors'  100 yards  race,
15 vears and under; 1st prize, value
$5; 2nd, $2.50
2.10.—22. Boys' race. 8 years and
nnder, 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1.50;
2nd, $1; 3rd, 50c.
2.10.—23. Girls' race, 8 years and
under. 50 yards; 1st prize, value $1.50;
2nd. $1; 3rd, 50c.
2.15.—24. Boys' human wheelbarrow race, 10 years and under; 1st
prize, value $2; 2nd, $1.
2.15.—25. Girls' potato race, 10
vears and under; 1st prize, value $2;
2nd, $1.50; Srd, $1.
2.25.—20. Boys' 100 yards dash. 15
vears and under; 1st prize, vnlue $3;
2nd. $2; Srd. $1.
3.35.—27. Girls' 100 yards dash, 15
vears and under; 1st prize, value $3;
2nd, $2; Srd, $1.
2.45.-28.' Boys' centipede race, 15
vears and under; six boys to team;
1st prize, value $6; 2nd, $3.
S.oo.— 211. Juniors' half-mile rnce,
18 years and under; 1st prize, value
$5; 2nd, value $2.50.
A new industry has been established In Vancouver. It Is the manufacture of a delicious non-intoxicating-
wine from loganberries.
British Columbia's opportunities for
increased trade with Switzerland were
emphasized by Dr. Carl P. Huebacher,
consul-general in Canada for the
Swiss government, in an address before the Foreign Trade Bureau of the
Vancouver Board of Trade. The visitor was obviously impressed with the
vast possibilities for Increased development In British Columbia, and
urged that exporters here insist on
direct shipments to his country.
"Canada's records in the war lias
placed her in tlie forefront of nations
In the eyes ot Switzerland, and there
was no limit to tlle business that
might be done between the two countries," he said.
For the guidance of retailors, enabling them to become familiar with the
names and products ot British Columbia manufacturers, the Made In-B.c
Campaign has compiled a booklet for
distribution among the retail trade.
Tlie list of commodities lias been compiled in alphabetical order. ,\ more
complete booklet for distribution
among householders will follow
shortly.
Excellent cloth is now being manufactured In I). C. from the wool of the
sheep of this province. A wide range
of suitings is being produced, and In
addition blankets of fine quality. It
takes the wool from 21,000 sheep to
keep the mills operating.
Thc canning industry in British Columbia has received a decided impetus
this year with thc establishment of a
large new plant at Kamloops. It Is
expected that the season's pack of
"Kamloops Tomatoes" will be between
ten and twelve thousand cases.
The now shipping line to South
America, announced by the Universal
Shipping and Tradinf Company, will
be valuable to B. C. from the point of
view of trade. The boats will ply between Vancouver and the Southern
country.
Opening of new liquor stores have
taken place at Qucsnel, Pouce Coupe,
Williams Lake, Lillooet, Ashcroft and
Grand Forks. With those in operation
the Liquor Control Board within two
months of commencing business has
under its control about nn even fifty-
stores scattered all over the province.
Tlie population of the world is about
1,050.000,000. It has been estimated
that the earth can mafntnin a population of 0.000,000.000, a total which will
be reached In the year 2100 at the
present rate of Increase.
YOUR CHILD'S BRAIN
ACTIVITY
KEEP YOUR children fit—retain the health
and vigor they gained during the-holidays.
Start their school term right by giving them
plenty of home-made bread made from
ROYAL STANDARD
FLOUR
It supplies the food elements necessary for
tissue building and in the most easily digestible
form,
Bread made from Royal Standard Flour has
helped children through many a school term.
Your children will enjoy it and be benefitted
by it—and so will you.
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Highet
Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C.
Telephone 33
A preparation made from the scales
of shad aud herring caught in the
Chesapeake Bay has been found to
make the best imitation pearls manufactured in the United States.
They were talking about friends.
"And what do you think of Brown?"
"I'd trust him with my life."
"Yes, I know.  But would you trust
him with $5 in cash?"
Price:
$30.00 I
er
ere
APPLY-
P. Leo Anderton
NOTARY PUBLIC
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C.
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT
NEWS IN BRIEF
A Canadian canning Iirm has offered to take a consignment of fifty
thousand cases of tinned fruit from
the irrigation areas of New South
Wales on condition that It is permitted to nflix its own labels.
France Is smoking nenrly Oftoo tons
of tobacco a year more than before
the war. The biggest increase Is In
pipe tobacco, though the increase in
the number of cigarettes consumed is
about two million kilogrummes.
What ls said to he the oldest harp
In the world Is preserved at the Louvre
museum in Paris. It was found in nn
Egyptian tomb, and ls nearly four
ihousund years old. Others dating
back three thousand years have been
discovered. The harp was held In
such high regard by the ancient Celtic
races that harpers were treated with
veneration and distinction, their lands
being free and their persons sacred.
Statistics from sixteen countries, Including the United States, which
normally produce about 50 per cent,
of the total wheat crop of the world,
indicate a production this year of approximately 1.053,000,000 bushels, or
about seven million bushels more thnn
last year, the Department ot Agriculture announced recently.
West Australian prospectors claim
to hove struck oil near Bremer Bay.
A laboratory expert declares it will be
one of the biggest oil-fields in the
world.
A great plague of grasshoppers, billions of them darkening the sky, is
destroying the last vestige of crops
needed for starving Russia in thc Samara and SaratolT districts, according
to reports reaching thc Red Cross nt
Paris.
Hazellne: "I despise men! All men
have their price!"
Hazeldine: "I adore women—every
woman has her figure!"
AUCTION
COURTENAY, VANCOUVER ISLAND
(Ity direction of Captain II. 1'. I.. Vigors, lt.8.0.)
September 14th and 15th
Sale Commences Each Day at 12 Noon
FARM STOCK, including a FLOCK of carefully selected PURE BRED OXFORD DOWN SHEEP, a TEAM
OF HORSES and various FARM IMPLEMENTS
VALUABLE ANTIQUE and other ENGLISH FURNITURE.
Illustrated and descriptive Catalogues can he obtained FREE
on application to the Auctioneer,
G. J. HARDY, Courtenay, B. C.
Guaranteed
Beer	
Cascade Beer is full strength beer. It is guaranteed
not less than 8 per cent, proof spirit. You will find
every bottle of it the same—uniform strength. There
is more Cascade sold than any other beer in Canada,
Because it is the Best Beer
Cascade Beer
Vancouver  Breweries  Limited
J i4
U\
September 3, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND isLANDER
Three
YOUR TEETH
DENTURES
The Battery
Question Is
Have you a Willard
Threaded Rubber Battery
in your car?
Then your battery judgment is backed by the best
brains in the automobile
business.
Car builders who are particular about battery quality specify the Willard
Threaded Rubber Battery.
Cw buyers who are particular about battery performance look for the red
Thread-Rubber Trade-
Mark.
Ask about Willard
Threaded Rubber Insulation whether you are in
the market for a new battery or not. We give
authorized Willard Service.
New batteries — repairs —
recharging.
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
TUNAIJIO  and  DUHCAK
Willard
Batteries
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
(JlIARANTEEK k-V
RUBBER HEEL!
Fixed While II Wait    'fiHM.
/" /Cs>"-
Uy REA PROCTOR McGEE, Editor of
"Oral Hygiene."
A denture is an artificial set of teeth
dther for the upper or the lower jaw.
One person is capable of wearing
two dentures—one above and one be-
iow. When the natural teeth are
gone, or even partly gone, the plate
looms up as a posibility.
Let us consider just the full plate
—meaning by "full plate" a plate that
replaces all of the teeth In one Jaw
or the other.
After the gums have healed sufficiently from the extraction of the
teeth, an impression is made of tlie
gums and u model in plaster of Paris
made from the Impression. This
model has certain changes made in It,
so that tlie atmospheric pressure will
cause the plate to remain In pluce.
The skill iu making these changes
usually what determines whether
not a plate will stick lu pluce.
The teeth that are used upon these
plates are all made of porcelain. The
very finest porcelain In the world ls
used In their construction. The colors
end shupes of the natural teeth are
very closely watched. In making artificial teeth the greatest artistic effort
used to restore expression and appearance and a very high degree of
mechanical skill Is used to restore the
function.
Tills work upon the part of the dentist is the nearest approach to perfection thut lia.s ever been made in
the restoration of a lost pnrt and a
lost function.
No replacement in any other part of
the body will give so nearly a natural
ippenrance and so nearly a normal
function as will (be construction of
artificial teeth. Those who have lost
tlieir natural teeth are particularly
fortunate to he able to place them
wltb a good substitute. But, regardless of how good (be substitute is,
nothing artificial cau ever_ compare
with the real.
So if you wish to go through life
without wearing artificial teeth, you
will have to begin to take proper care
of your natural teeth right now, because if you don't the artificial teeth
will "get you" by and by.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 111! Cumberland, B. C.
UNITED STATES MOST
ILLITERATE OF GREAT
NATIONS OF WORLD
S. DAVIS, D,,ns,m,ir
"The United States stands a« the
only one among the great nations of
the earth iu which there is uot- a high
degree of literacy. It Is tbe world's
greatest disgrace that iu the richest
country on the globe, there ls not
money available to pay red-blooded
men nnd women to teach our children. Unless we are willing to pay
teachers more than janitors or scavengers, the temple ot freedom will be
destroyed." declared Dr. J. J. Tigert.
United States Minister ot Education.
One Quarter of American Army Could
Neither Itcud Nor Write.
"It has been declared that the United States, like Rome, will be destroyed
by vandals from within and not from
without, through the forces of illlter-
acv," he continued. "One man out of
every four in the United States army
could neither read nor write, but
there was only one illiterate in five
thousand in the Germany army. Nn
one can realize without seeing the
seemingly impeueuetrable terrain of
the Argonne Forest what we owe to
our soldiers. But It was- a crime to
send (hem In as (hey were against
men in such high literacy.
"1 hope there will never be another
war. but If there ls it will be a disgrace to the nation if our men arc not
better prepared, and it Is the task of
the schools to prepare them.
"The country Is facing a great crisis.
politically, socially, economically and
educationally. Wc have emerged Inlo uu 'aftermath for more pitiful than
war itself," declared Dr. Tigert.
"It is (rue that before the war the
United Slates spent more than any
oilier mil lon nn education and that
every state in Ilio Union has laws re-
tiuiriug al least elementary school
education. But the laws are not enforced aud only half of thc children
required by law to be In the schools
are actually there. As a result the
average American Is very poorly odu-
caled."
GOOD  EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR  QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Daj aud Night.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. OATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sueciuitj.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
C. R. Mulholland
late  of Cameron's  Garage, Cumberland, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton ^Street,   NANAIMO
and   will   he   pleased   to   have   tho
patronage ot his old friends and acquaintances when In Nanaimo.
Hcpairs Guaranteed.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Trices ltcusoiiable.
WESTERN NIGHTFALL
How sweet the scent of twilight!
No clouds the blue skies hold;
While one hy one   the stars   prick
through
In arubusques of gold.
The mists o'er distant mountains,
Like altar incense play;
The baby winds amid the trees
Lisp "Bencdiclte."
Uirds end their soft complaining
In drowsy sleep; and soon
Daintily over the hill-tups,
Steps lovely Lady Moon.
And all is peace—so deep—profound—•
On earth, in air. In sky;
Angelic wings seem brooding o'er,
Safeguarding from on high.
We put our fretting cares aside,
Like garments worn and bare,
We lay us down to quiet rest,
Sure of our Father's care.
And soon the gentle breeze Is still,
The moon to bed doth creep,
And watched o'orhead by starry eyes,
Both man and nature sleep.
—Marian D. .Merry.
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 66 Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Hare tou tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned llccft It Is delicious.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland. B. C
Absence will strengthen friendship
if the lust recollections were kindly.
Thos. H. Carey
URE AND LIKE  INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
ANNUAL CLEAN-UP
IN THE POULTRY YARD
Experimental Farms Note.
As soon as the breeding season is
over the fowls that are not intended
to be retained for future breeders
should be disposed of. Tlie birds
should be either put Into a yard or
confined to part of the yard, the rest
being limed, ploughed or spaded, and
seeded to green crop such as rape or
rye.
All litter should be removed from
the house ami tlie ceiling, walls and
floor thoroughly swept. Movable fixtures should be taken   out   and   the
ole Interior given a thorough washing. The best way to do this is to
use the hose if you have one; after
the hose give the building a good
flooding and scrub it down with a still*
brush. If there is no hose, be eveu
more careful about tiie scrubbing.
After tlie house bus been thoroughly
cleaned give it u soaking with a good
Stiff disinfectant. One ot the coal tar
preparations will be found satisfactory for this purpose; this should be
applied with u spray pump so that it
will be forced into ull the cracks and
crevices of tlie building. It there Is
uo spray pump, use a brush, but be
sure to get lulu these cracks uud
crevices.
The house should be left standing
for a couple of days to dry out, leaving it wide open to allow the sun und
to enter freely. It should then be
given a good application of while-
wash. The fixtures, nest boxes, roosts
and dropping boards which have been
removed should be treated In a similar manner.
At the time of this annual house-
cleaning it is a good plan to note wiiat
repairs to tlie houses, fixtures and
fences are needed, aud have thorn
made as soou us possible. Also clean
up and burn any accumulation of rubbish, leaving nothing under which
vermin may hide. A clean house free
from lice and mites is easy tu keep
clean. Then see that the pullets are
healthy and free from lice, when tliey
are put In, and the yroblem of winter
eggs is more than half solved.
STRANGE FATE FOR A
PACIFIC COAST FIR LOG
With what amazement must a
Douglas Ilr log which has spent its
tree life along the Pacific coast or on
some tributary river find itself uprooted and caught hy ocean currents
far-flowing and strange of direction,
borne along for some six thousand
miles, and hurled to rest at last on
one or another of the Gilbert Islands
in the South Seas. Here, still more
surprisingly, lt finds a hearty welcome
awaiting it after tbe long voyage. Says
Francis Dickie in American Forestry:
In recent years, since the white man
began logging operations on the Pacific coast, the number of logs to make
the wonderful journey has been much
greater, due to log booms ou their
way to the mills being broken up by
storms at sea. Truly, never was
stranger story told than the Odyssey
of these mauy logs crossing so vast a
stretch of water, for they came to
places where they were most needed.
The Gilberts are low-lying coral
atolls upon which grows no timber
suitable for making canoes. Thus,
since time immemorial the islanders
have gazed seaward daily with anxious
eye for tbe coming of Hr logs. When
a log or logs was sighted great excitement reigued. The news spread
quickly and all the people from inland
came to share in the good fortune.
Never was nature more unkind to a
people than these Islanders, for they
have no stone to make tools. They
overcame this difficulty, however, by
taking the shell of a gigantic clam
(Trldacua gigas), tbe most remarkable of its species, which In somo
caseB weighs a ton, and from it made
adzes, knives and chisels. With these
the fir logs were cup up in thin strips.
These were then shaped to the form
of canoes some twelve to fifteen feet
long. This wood was sewn together
by thread taken from husk of cocoa-
nut called coir, pandanus leaves being used for calking. Tlio canoes have
only a two-foot beam and are very
sharp. They would not be practical
save for the added outrigger, which
makes them very seaworthy.
FINED FOR SELLING GUN
TO AMERICAN SUBJECT
R. A. Thorpe, of Duncan, was siini-
money the other day for selling a .28
rifle to an American citizen without
the necessary penult. Mr. Thorfi
pleaded guilty and slated (hat he did
not know thai (he permit wus necessary. Mr. C, F. Davie, police magistrate, pointed out lhat ll was (be duly
of merchants lo acquire a knowledge
of (ho law affecting the sale of goods
Ihey hnd for disposal, lie held dial
It was n more serious offence on (be
part of the seller than of (be buyer.
As this wns (ho first offence he Imposed a line of $15.
The previous week F. S. Hyatt, II"'
buyer of the rifle, wrs fined $1" for
being in possession of a rifle without
the necessary permit.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF   LIVERPOOL,   ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE~and MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets ?15G.G73,2I5.00
Life Funds     ,r)8,(i07,8(i0.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,280.00
Tho Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
slock, amount tb ovor
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON,
Special Agent,
Cumberland.
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
District Agont,
Cumberland.
trtee^imertmst^^mmjLHAUsK.l—»-VJ f x. J - ^- i c'      s.ii ll
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Mauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if dewrad.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
THE EDUCATION OF YOUR CHILDREN
Have you the money with which to do it?
Start lo save while they ure young—let them
commence life knowing you ate at thc back
of thnn.
Savings Accounts arc a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Mauagor Cumberland Branch.
Who Has the Burglar(
"Well, my dear," Bald he as he waa
dressing, "I guess you were right when
you told me last night that there were
hurglnrs in the house."
"Why," asked his wite. "What has
changed your mind?"
"Because all the money I had In my
pockets when I went to bed Is gone."
"Well, If you had been brave," retorted the wife," and had got U|i and
shot the wretch you might have saved
your money."
"Possibly." was the reply, "but
then 1 should have been a widower."
She gave him back hall hia money.
GOLD IN COAL
In describing the Cambria coalfield
of Wyoming, an expert mentions tbe
Interesting fact that gold and silver
are present In small quantities in the
coal. From the occurrence of Iron
pyrite, which is distributed throughout the coal seam, it is suspected tlia(
this mineral carries (he precious
melails. The coke made from the coal
is used In (he smelling works, and
averages from one to two pennyweights of gold per ton, which Is slllll-
cleitt to compensate for a high ash
content.
Thero has been a similar occurrence
In South Africa. The coal occurred
In small seams running through the
quurtzite ore, and in place was quite
rich in gold, the ash being colored a
bright purple by the finely divided
particles of metal.
Love Is like a photographic plate-
it takes a dark room to develop it.
1
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendors Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even  heller  than  in pre-war days, ami brewed on
Vancouver  Island.   Made from  mall and  hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY  PUKE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in li. C.   Try it and
you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRD3UTING AGEKT
Cumlierland and Courtenay, B. C. I'hone (Ull.
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
•~%~ Pou*
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September S, 1921.
T
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. OOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY,  SEPTEMBER 3, 1921.
THE PEACE ARCH AT BLAINE
There is something fitting in tlie form hy which one
hundred years of peace between Great Britain and tlie
United States Is commemorated at Blaine, Washington
State, says the Kamloops Standard-Sentinel, The arch
represents lhat open door which has symbolized the
peaceful comings and goings between the two countries
and the fact that never a gun has been placed between
the two in that century, never a frontier marked by signs
of possible hostilities.
One hundred years have passed since the signing of the
Treaty of Ghent. September 0, the date of dedication, will
be an historic day for the people ot the state and province,
living side by side. It ls an historic day in the annals of
the people ot freedom-loving democracies. On September
6 Marshal Joffre fought thc Battle of the Marne; on September 6, General Lafayette, friend of the American colonies, wns bom, and It was hoped to have the grandson
of the gallant soldier of Revolutionary Days, Marquis de
Chambrun, ptesent nt the dedicatory ceremonies, as well
as Marshal Joffre. On September C, the Mayflower sailed
from Plymouth, England, with 100 passengers for North
America, and a small party of these Pilgrims, including
*WUllam Bradford, landed at what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 11th day of December, 1620. On the May-
fl.ower was signed the compact which is the basis of the
present form of government in the United States of
America.
The memorandum on the Peace Arch and Peace Memorial Park, prepared by the Peace Memorial Association of
British Columbia, concludes with this reference to the
timely nature of this dedicatory celebration in view of the
approaching conference at Washington, D.C, on the limitations or armaments: "A World's Peace coincrence is
shortly to assemble. It will meet in America. The men
and women and the boys and the girls of America can rise
to such a height of enthusiasm in their demand that war
and all Its paraphernalia shall be abolished, that the conference will so resolve, and the chorus which the shepherds heard upon the Plains of Bethlehem will be carried
around the earth."
Let the news go forth broadcast to the world, mtghtly
suggestive as it is to war-worn peoples that they live In
harmony under diverse organizations, that disputes can
be settled without recourse to arms, the desolation of men
and ravage of children.
mention merely a few of ttie names that will live as long
us humanity and memory. Every act that man has done
since the dawn of reason humanity gauges and evaluates
according to the measure of its service to others. Who
lias heen of the greater worth to the world, the men who
have ordered things done or the men who have done
them? How much easier is it to say "Do this" or "Do
that" than it is to do this or do that? How much more
ot dignity in the carrying out of an order than in the
giving of it'.' Which is in fact the greater, thc general who
commands or the soldiers who carry out the command?
We approach freedom when we voluntarily and cheerfully
serve at the behest of others; but we come into the fullest
realization of freedom when we serve gladly and abundantly at the prompting of our own hearts and under the
banner of tlie Golden Rule.—Telephone Talk.
IF CHINA AND RUSSIA SHOULD BECOME
THE WORLD'S WORKSHOP
"If China and Rpssia could be drawn upon for their man
power in manufacturing we would have not an eight-hour
hut an eight-cent working day," declared a New York
banker. "Before the war, Americans, Englishmen, Germans and Scandinavians owned factories tn Russia. A
good German automobile was built In Russia by Russian
labor. An American sewing machine, an American airbrake, and American harvesting machinery were built ln
Petrograd and Moscow factories, A great rubber factory
was operated by Englishmen. The Russian factory hand
was able and industrious and Russian skilled labor was
not to be sneezed at. Wages are very low.
"sN'one of the tilings manufactured by the foreigners was
sold outside Russia because great Russia consumed them
all. But the day may come when foreigners will draw
upon the man power of Russia for factory production for
a large part of Europe. And it that day ever does comes,
the Russian workman, with his low standard of living,
will turn his country into the workshop of Europe.
"The same possibility exists in regard to China. If the
Chinaman can ever he coaxed to the workbench and If he
remains satisfied with his present standard of living, he
will give even the Russian a race for ills money."—International Magazine.
PENALIZES FAKE PROMOTERS
Over ln Switzerland the Supreme Court has delivered a
Judgment with a lot of sense to It. It is to the effect that
company directors who make unduly optimistic or false
statetsynts in prospectuses Intended to induce the public
to subscribe capital to their business, shall be liable for
damages in case the said business shall fail. The case
hefore the Supreme Court was that of a Swiss hotel, the
directors of which issued a prospectus In which the profits
were for the year's operation estimated at 150,000 francs;
whereas at the time of Issuing the prospectus the directors
knew that the profits for the flrst four months of operation were only 9,000 francs. The Judgment of the court
was that the directors of the enterprise pay to the shareholders 25,000 francs damage.
Under like circumstances one ls given to wondering
how many oil companies of tbe Fort Norman variety
(those that are promising profits without even a well in
sight) would be operating in Canada if our Supreme Court
took a notion to follow the Swiss precedent.
TO SERVE IS SOVEREIGN
Throughout all history we may find that where a man
or a woman has reached the highest point in mental and
spiritual development and has lived fresh in the hearts of
others through the passing centuries, that point has been
reached through service. Long after the petty kings and
emperors and conquerors of earth have been forgotten,
or are known only as accidents of history, deep in the
hearts of humanity will live the memory and the Influence
and the Inspiration of those who served, of those who
'•mnd their chief delight in giving, not«tu taking; In heal-
i - net in wounding; in helping, not in hindering; in
blessing, not lu cursing; in loving, not in hating; In smiling, not In frowning; in the suppression ot self, not In
selfishness—ln a word, ln the doing of good to others.
Even where a titled accident of politics or the truit ot
Bolfish force has wished to give a touch of real worthiness
to the pomp and circumstances of his high place, he has
tried to express it ill the language of service, ls it not
the eout-of-arnis of tlie Prince of Wales that bears the
words "Ich Dieu"—I Serve? The most sovereign thing
man can do is to Berve.
Service is not servitude. There Is nothing menial in it.
The Creator served when Ho created this earth for
humanity, or for whatever else His purpose embraced.
Christ served so completely thut the world's dominant
civilization today Is gased on Ills lite and teaching. Confucius served, and the teeming millions of China have
deified his memory.   Buddha served; Bruhnia served.. We
There will always exist a struggle hetwen "practical"
men and idealists, and probably this struggle is essential
to the progress of the human race. There are millions ot
things in this world which want doing, and the practical
men are the ones to perform them; but there are several
matters concerning which the idealist, and especially the
churches, must take thought, even though they have to
combat the routine practices of the practical. Among
these latter matters are such things as honesty, fair dealing, sympnthy and brotherly love, which are, to say tlle
least, not yet universally respected hy this workaday world.
—Baltimore Sun.
Though living so close to the wonderful north country
we are always learning something new about it. One of
the surprises is a statement contained In a statement by a
writer In the "Century" about its geographical position.
He says: "Alaska is as large as Norway, Sweden, Finland,
Denmark, Holland, Belgium, England, Ireland, Scotland,
and two-thirds ot the former German Empire. It covers
exactly the same parallels of latitude that these countries
cover, possesses the same climate and much the same
wealth in forests and tillable soil, with a vastly greater
wealth in animal life and minerals."
The last Arctic "sea cow" was seen in 1S54—about a
century after the first discovery by white men. When
full grown the creature weighed as much as 8000 pounds.
These animals frequented shallows at the mouths of rivers
in herds, and while feeding they drove before them their
young, to protect them from danger. So tame were they
that one could stroke their backs without objection on
their part. Unfortunately their flesh was good to eat, re
semhling beef. Whalers got in the way of depending on
them for stores of fresh meat, and so in the natural course
of events, they were wiped out.
A wife was awarded a divorce the other   day   in   the
United States hecuuse her husband wouldn't dance with
her.   Has the day come when tlie husband must promts
not only to love, honor and cherish, but also to fox-trot
as well?
There is a fire running on the Indian reserve hack over
the hill from the west bench. The other day one of the
Indians was asked why his tribe did not get out and fight
the fire.. "Let the white men put it out," he replied. "They
are going to take our lands, unywny."—Penticton Herald.
THOUGHT STRANDS
Sometimes when my thoughts go straying, like waves on a
wind-swept sea,
I mind, perchance like the waters, again they'll come back
to me,
Bearing the tidings of gladness out from a dim, far past,
Of treasures that slipped, one hy one, away, out of my
eager grasp;
Echoes of happy voices, forgotten, never to be.
Smites that lightened, as hours passed by, lips that pressed
those of nie;
\s the morning brings back the sunshine;  us the birds
come again with song,
So must It sometime, somewhere, be without any aught of
wrong.
Thus are my fnncies weaving closer the strands that reach
My heart from tho Isle of Somewhere, so shall each new
-A. O.
day teach.
BE
HALL JOTTINGS
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association.
The Board of Management has been
investing several hundred dollars In
gymnasium and other athletic equipment, books for tbe library, etc.
A big batch of gymnasium apparatus
],»<• been ordered, which when re-
cclved and fitted up will make this a
.'.i !!-e<ru!ppcd gym.
irMsts have also been looked
• v set of balls for snooker
ards have been secured.
A Bet of quoits and vaulting poles
Tor outdoor use are part of the equipment. These will be for use on the
grounds over the railway track at
rear of Mine Rescue Station.
For the Library a set of the International Encyclopedia and a practically complete set of the Library of
Technology have been bought.
The committee is figuring on n series
of social events for the fall and winter. Keep your eye» open for some-
thlD( good ln this Hue.
CONSTABLE AGASSIZ
RECEIVES GIFT FROM
IMPERIAL GOVERNMENT
RELIGION OF PRESIDENTS
OF THE UNITED STATES
Mr. C. E. L. Agassiz, who was formerly provincial constable at Cumberland and who Is now stationed at
Sidney, B.C., has received a band-
some present from the British Government In recognition of his services as vice-consul at Tacoma.
Mr. Agassiz was last week the recipient from thc British Government
of a very handsome solid silver Inkstand, engraved with the British Coat
of Arms und underneath the words,
"Presented to C. E. L. Agassiz, Esq.,
by His Britannic Majesty's Government in recognition of his long and
faithful service as H. B. M. Vice-Consul at Tacoma, 1907-1919."
Mr. Agassiz suffered a complete
breakdown in 1918 and was obliged
to resign from the consular service,
coming to the Island with his. family
to reside. His health ls now improving, hut be is still unable to take up
an active business career. Mr. Agassiz
received special recognition from the
Canadian Government on three different occasions during the war for
services rendered the navul und military authorities,
Following Is u list showing the religion of each president of the United
States:
George Washington, Episcopalian.
John Adams, Unitarian.
Thomas Jefferson, Liberal.
James Madison, Episcopalian.
James Monroe, Episcopalian.
John Quincy Adams, Unitarian.
Andrew Jackson, Presbyterian.
Martin Van Buren. Reformed Dutch.
William II. Harrison, Episcopalian.
John Tyler, Episcopalian.
James K. Polk, Presbyterian,
Zachary Taylor, Episcopalian.
Millard Fillmore, Unitarian .
Franklin Pierce, Episcopalian.
James Buchanan, Presbyterian.
Abraham Lincoln, Presbyterian.
Andrew Johnson, Methodist.
Ulysses S. Grant, Methodist.
Rutherford B. Hayes, Methodist.
James A. Garfield, Disciples.
Chester A. Arthur, Episcopalian.
Grover Cleveland, PreBhyterian.
Benjamin Harrison, Presbyterian.
William McKinley, Methodist.
Theodore Roosevelt, Reformed Dutch
Willlum H. Tuft, Unitarian.
Woodrow Wilson, Presbyterian.
First  Showing  of  Fall
Coats and Dresses
EXCLUSIVE .STYLES—DIRECT FROM EASTERN MANUFACTURERS
VELOURS, POLO CLOTHS AND TWEEDS—ALSO SALT'S PLUSHES
With and without Fur Collars
New Fall Dress Goods
GABARDINES, SERGES, SATIN CLOTHS. VELOURS AND TWEEDS
In All the Wanted Shades
1
Showing Next Week the Newest
Styles in Ladies' Fall Skirts
PLEATED PLAIDS, TRICOTINES, SILKS AND SERGES '
Blankets
Comforters
Pillows
'iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!
The Studebaker
Light-Six
1   The World's  Greatest  Light-Weight  Automobile
\
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the worldwide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
• from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks   Motors
LIMITED
M     WALLACE STREET
■111
NANAIMO, B. C. T
?!
September S, id21.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
I' ■
Empress
Tea, Coffee and
Baking Powder
contain Coupons which entitle thc purchaser to a
chance in the following:
ROGERS' SILVERWARE
TEA SPOONS
TABLE SPOONS
DESSERT SPOONS
KNIVES AND FORKS
Ask us for Particulars
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
Your Insurance Premium!
HOW WILL YOU FINANCE IT?
Payment of an insurance premium often means going short on other needs for the month in which it
comes due.
Deposit as much as you can in our Savings Department each pay-day and establish a credit balance to
escape worry.   Your money earns you interest.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. ORA1NGER, Manager.
Plant Home
Grown FruitTrees
Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with the
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
who have a large lot of splendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coming on for Fall delivery.
OUR ROSES are specially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the finest in the
land, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WRITE US TODAY.     ,
ADDRESS—
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
Department ('.
LIMITED
SARDIS, B. C.
Mention tills paper when writing.
REMARKABLE FIGURES OF PROFIT AND LOSS ON FARMS
New Cars for Old |
Make that Car look ukQ a neW one B
PnOne 135 Courtenay |
AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE M
zissS **5E
I K. P. Auto Painting Co. |
( ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY I
M ALL WORK GUARANTEED W
Labor Loss of $300 on Farm Can Be Turned Into Profit of $12001
By Raising) Good Crops and Using Pure-Bred Stock.
By tbe Iniversltj of British Columbia.
In order to determine the factors that make for profit or for loss on B. C.
dairy farms, the University of British Columbia conducted an extensive investigation last year. The work was doue by Mr. H. R. Hare, Extension Assistant,
of the Animal Husbandry Department. Definite figures of all business transacted on fifty-four farms, Including a complete inventory of land, buildings
and equipment, was collected iu the farming areas. These districts included
Chilliwack, Ladner and Courtenay. Tho results are for the year ending April
30, 1920. The work Is under way for another year to prove results of the
year's business concluded.
It was found that farmers having poor crops and poor livestock received a
minus labor of $313.43. Those with good crops and poor livestock had a
labor income of $230.87, or a gain of over $500 by simply improving the crops.
Those who had poor crops and good livestock had a labor income of $333.06,
or a gain by having good livestock of over $600. This shows that on dairy
farms good live stock is more Important than good crops. The men who had
good crops and good livestock made a labor income of $1207.65, or a gain by
having good crops and good livestock of over $1500! A farmer, then, cannot
afford to raise poor crops to feed poor live stock.
The pure-bred aire waB found to have a great influence nn the labor Income,
us is shown below:
Kind of Sire and number of years
In use ou the farm.
Cost of 1 Ib. of
Butter Fat.
Labor
Income.
Pure-bred Sire, 1 to 5 years      1.03       216.04
Pure-bred Sire, 6 to 10 years U3       ■195.85
Pure-bred Sire, 10 years and over 77       550.36
Grade Sire     $1.19 ....Minus $41.95
This table shows conclusively why the grade aire is a losing animal to
keep. These figures expresB In dollars why the dairy farmer cannot afford
to keep a grade bull.
Among the many factors that affect the cost of productiug milk the following were outstanding: (1) Breeding of the herd; (2) milk yield of the cows;
(3) yield of crops per acre; (4) efficiency of the use of labor; (5) capital per
acre of land.
The report of tills investigation ls now in the press and may be had by
applying to the Animal Husbandry Department of the Universitly of Vancouver, or to the Department of Agriculture at Victoria.
LIGHT AND WATER COMPANIES TAKE ACTION
TO SUPPLY PRICE
(Continued from Page One)
with a, certified copy   of   agreement
held by your city.  „
"Yours very truly,
CUMBERLAND ELECTRIC  LIGHTING COMPANY, LTD.
"G. W. Clinton, Managing Director.."
Cumberland & Union Waterworks Co.
"August 29th, 1921.
"To the Mayor and Aldermen,
"Cumberland, B. C.
"Gentlemen—
"In reply to yours, of 17th Inst., we
beg to inform your board that the
Managing Director Is communicating
with the shareholders ot the Cumberland and Union Waterworks Co., Ltd.,
and requesting of them authority to
sell this company to the municipality
as a going concern.
"When their answer is received lt
will be communicated to your board
at once.
"Yours respectfully,
"CUMBERLAND  & UNION  WATERWORKS CO., LTD.
"G. W. Clinton, Managing Director."
The letters were ordered received
and filed.
Fire Underwriters .Unking Inspection.
A letter was received from Mr.
Douglas A. S. McGregor, district manager ror Vancouver Island of the B. C.
Fire Underwriters' Association, Informing the council that a representative would be in Cumberland in the
course of a few days for the purpose
uf making a report on the waterworks
system and fire department. AIbo that
a new fire map was being prepared.
The test of the Water pressure held
on Monday developed the tact that a
nozzle supplied with the new hose by
an Eastern firm was useless at lt
would not fit. This will be shipped
back at once.
Bills nnd Accounts.
The following   bills   and   accounts
were read and referred to the finance
committee for approval before being
paid:
England   &    Cowan,   clearing
street  $250.00
City Clerk    60.00
Chief of Police   110.00
Barrett & Co., Tarvia  607.00
Evans, Coleman & Evans—
Cement      55.94
Wellington Colliery Ry. Co.—
Freight on Tarvia     15.00
Freight on Cement    24.35
B. C. Telephone Co      9.15
Royston Lumber Co., lumber....   26.14
Electric   Light   Co.,   light   and
water     32.85
Repairs     48.28
In connection with the bill for labor
nn the Isolation Hospital, a motion
was passed that the Bourd of Works
make an Inspection and report at the
next meeting.
Tenders for Insurance.
Threo tenders were received for In
surauce on the houses to be built for
the soldiers, as follows:
Mr. W. Willard, at $18 per $1000;
board company.
.Mr. T. H. Carey, $18 per $1000; board
company.
Mr. A. MacKinnon, $12 per $1000;
In the Northwestern National Insurance Company, a non-board concern.
The tender of Mr. MacKinnon was
accepted, the sum Hieing placed at
$6000.
Xew Sewerage Main.
Aid. Bannerman, reporting for the
Board of Works, said the present pipeline leading from the main sewer outlet on Dunsmuir Avenue was too small
and serious consequences would result unless additional sewerage accommodation was provided. He suggested a new 12-inch pipe be laid
down, which would require about 400
feet and coat In the neighborhood of
$500. The council decided to go ahead
with the work.
YOUR MONEY
RETURNED
Cavin's Shoe Store
will make this contract with you
Walk into the store and
buy a pair of shoes. Should
they not give you satisfaction we will hand you back
your money or give you a
new pair.
IT WILL  PAY  YO  TO  BUY
SHOES AT CAVIN'S
because it is the only store in
town that carries such a complete line of shoes at the right
price.
"Vassar" and  "London  Lady"
for the women.
Derby, Slater's, Beresford and
Leckie's for men.
"Chums" for the children.
i
It will pay you to buy
"CHUMS"   when   school
starts.    Don't  let  anyone  tell  you
different
BARGAINS
We always have broken lines
which we sell for cost. Don't be
fooled by catch prices.
Cavin's Shoe Store
UNFAVORABLE WEATHER
DELAYS TENNIS GAMES
One of the big difficulties about the
present styles, observing women coming down the street, you can't tell
whether it's your little sister or your
grandmother.
Owing to Ihe unfavorable weather
but few matches have heen played In
the tennis tournament conducted by
the Cumberland Tennis Club during
the past week. The following are the
results up to the time of going lo
press:
SECOND ROUND RESULTS
If you want to go far on the river
of lite, paddle your own canoe. The
other fellow's may sink.
Men's Doubles..
Spicer and Bryan beat Tarbell and
3*ott, 6-5.
MacNaughton and Christie beat
Cameron and Walton, ii-3.
.Ven's Singles.
Walton beat Leversedge. 6-5.
Tarbell beat V. Dalby, 6-3.
Christie beat Cameron. 6-1.
Ryall beat Stacey. 6-2.
Mixed Doubles.
Tarbell and Mrs. Clinton beat Bryan
and Mrs. Christie, 6-4.
Christie and Mrs. Scott beat Horwood and Mrs. Cooke, 8-1.
Ryall and Miss Bickle beat Hassell
and Miss Geoghegan, 6-3.
Ladles' Singles.
Miss Geoghegan beat Miss Weldon,
6-2.
Ladles' Doubles.
Mrs. Spicer and Miss Geoghegan
beat Mrs. Cooke and Mrs. Cameron.
6-1
School
Supplies
Get them at Frost's
FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL
Elementary Botany (Groom & Penhallow).
Outlines of European History (Robinson & Breasted).
Elementary Algebra (Hall and Knight).
Select Poems.
French Grammar (Fraser & Squairs).
La Mere Michel et Son Chat.
Julius Caesar (Shakespeare).
The Merchant of Venice (Shakespeare).
Laboratory Manual in Chemistry (Cornish & Smith).
Canadian Civics.
Poems of the Romantic Revival (Cutiliffe & Cameron).
High School Physics.
Dominion High School Arithmetic.
Chemistry (Cornish).
High School Composition.
Seipmann's Primary French Course, Part 2.
School Geometry (Hall & Stevens).
Kidnapped (R. L. Stevenson).
FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
Phonic Primer. Second Reader.
Beginners' Reader. Third Reader.
First Reader. English History.
Lady of the Lake (Sir Walter Scott).
Dictionaries
Inks, all colors
Blotters
Paint Brushes
Rulers
School Bags
Set Squares
Penholders
Pastes and Glue
Pen Nibs
Notebooks
Crayons
Map Pens
Ever-Ready Pencils
, 35c.
School Paint Refills
Pencil and Pen Clips
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
Four Minutes to Complete
Calls to the Mainland
Have you tried thc long-distance telephone service
between Vancouver Island and the Mainland lately?
The additional submarine cable gives ample facilities,
and the average call is completed in four minutes.
That's pretty good going, when it is remembered that
Central hunts up the party wanted and gets him on
the line.   Try it and see.
Between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. you get three times the
day period at the same price.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood nnd Goods of Any Kind
Delivered le All furls of District.
Ituhblsh nud Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE  CHARGES
TELEPHONE  CO  TELEPHONE
or Leave Orders at Yenilnnie Hotel,
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
UNION HOTEL
OITOMTK RAILWAY STATION.
I'irsl Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, li. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00 &
Si*
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 3, 1621
- f:
LADIES
wishing their
SPORTS SUITS, DRESSES
EVENING FROCKS
MADE TO ORDER
should meet
Madame   Mordant
of Vancouver
Present address:
Courtenay Hotel   -   Courtenay
A tew  choice  Organdie and other
Frocks, ready-to-wear.
MOTHER'S LITTLE MAN
goes for a loaf of bread every
morning.
And he eats slice after slice
of it at and between meals.
That's why he's hardy and
healthy.
There  is  no  food  equal  to
Bread.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
is flour and compressed yeast
and milk and shortening, just
the pure-food products that
growing children need.
Send sonny for a loaf today.
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Arenas     •     Cumberland
POR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write tor prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2820 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
IS THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF JOHN GEORGE REIi), Deceased
Intestates
NOTICE Is hereby given that all
debts due to the estate of John Oeorge
Reid, deceased, who died on or about
the 2nd day of July, 1921, at the City
ot Cumberland, B. C, must be paid
forthwith to the undersigned.
And all accounts, debts and claims
against the said estate must be filed
with the undersigned, duly verified,
on or about the 2uth day of September, 1921, after which date tlle undersigned will proceed to distribute the
estate, having regard only to such
claims as have been filed witli her,
August 18, 1921.
ANNIE MARIA POTTINOER,
413 Vancouver Street, Victoria, H. C.
Administratrix of the personal estate
and effects of J. tl. Held, deceased.
4-37
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second and
fourth Wednesdays uf each month, In
the Fraternity Hall, Dunsmuir Ave.
Visiting brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C. Hunger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F, Slaughter,
Treasurer.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings ot the Oreat War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock In ths< Memorial
Ball.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Customer; "You say thia hair restorer ls good, do you?"
Druggist: "Yos, sir; I know a man
who took the cork out of a bottle of
this stuff with his teeth, and he had a
moustache next day."
Authoritative.
"Bill ls going to retire from bust
ness for Ave years."
"Oh, I've heard him Bay that before.
"Jes, but this time the Judge Bald'
Labor Sunday
American Federation of Labor
Endorses Religious Observances on September -1th
Sunday nest. September 1, the day
before Labor Day, will he observed
by churches throughout Canada and
the United States, particularly in the
big cities, as tlie church's special day
ior the observance of Labor.
The executive of the American Federation of Labor iu annual session recently recommended that the Sunday
Immediately preceding Labor Day be
appropriately observed with religious
ceremonies. This recommendation
was officially adopted by the convention.
This year the observance or Labor
Sunday Is being kept more widely
than In many others years. Many
labor unions have adopted the idea,
•and in several centres, both large and
small, the unions and labor groups
are arranging themselves or are cooperating wilh the churches and religious groups of their communities In
special arrangements for observance
cf thc day.
This is the day on which the church
worships. In a peculiarly beautiful
comprehension, the Incarnation and
Human Labor of its Great Creator.
Who by the life of toil dignified all
toll. And It Is also the day on which
all who labor by nund or brain may
come together wilh a deepened sense
of conscious relationship with Him
who strove in a commonalty of effort,
not only in His days on earth, hut
Who is today constantly with us by
His Presence and Power in nur effort.
And with realization of this comes
a new-found sense of sympathy and
common brotherhood among all. who
In tlieir little day are toiling eac'.i In
tlieir separate calling or choice towards the fulfilment of tlieir individual ideal, as It has offered itself to
their vision.
Labor Sunday, therefore, In its proper conception, and lived In the spirit
in which Its observance was conceived, should be a time for renewing in the community and In the
church the bonds of brotherhood, and
common interest tlie one with the
other.
What Is the Church's Message]
"Canon C. W. Vernon, General Secretary, Council for Social Service,
writing ln the current Issue of Social
Welfare under the heading of "A
Message for Labor Day, 1921," says:
"No self-regarding purpose will
suffice; a self-centred individual security or a church-centred corporate
selfishness is equally insufficient; the
individual and the church find themselves when they lose themselves in
their ultimate aim, Seek ye lirst the
Kingdom of God and His righteousness. Any definition of the Kingdom
of God must assuredly contain the
Ideal of human life according to God's
Intention. It must Include the extension everywhere of God's sovereignity
of love, and the claim that His sovereign sway shall govern every part
of life; the former is tlie missionary
work of the church, the latter Is the
witness of the church concerning
social and industrial righteousness."
So when in July of last year the
Bishops of the Anglican Communion
from all parts of the world were
gathered together in conference at
Lambeth, declared the committee appointed "to consider tlie opportunity
and duty of the church In regard to
social and industrial problems."
Accepting the greal principle thus
eloquently stated, the church would
he recant alike to the high character
and thc catholicity of her mission if
she failed to set forth as her ideal for
capital and for labor, for producer and
consumer, for buyer aud for seller,
the fraukeBt and fullest acceptance
of the principles of tier Lord as applicable to every realm and department
of human lite and interest; and if she
failed to plead with organized and unorganized capital, with organized and
unorganized labor, witli the community and the Individual alike, for an Industrial and economic life based upon
His principles and the value of every
human being, of thc reality of human
irotlierhood, and of service for tlie
ommuuity as the divinely intended
purpose alike of life and labor.
Part of the social message entrusted
to tlie church Is the ministry of exor-
■ism. Just as far and no further, as
he church, by Instilling the teaching
of her Master, can succeed in driving
mt the devils of selfishness and unbelief, will industrial pence be assured,
national prosperity built up, nnd our
Dominion made.
"The Dominion of our Lord and his
Christ."
Capital, when it thinks only In terms
of dividends anil not of human life
and needs; and labor, when it thinks
inly In terms of rlghs and nol duty
and of service, are both alike unchristian. To adapt ihe Lambeth
statement, a self-centred capitalist, or |
u self-centred laborer; and a company-centred or a labor union-centred
solllshness will not do. There must
be a brotherly coming together to confer for the common good and for the
development ot a passion for service
fr thc commonwealth.
The demon of selfishness must be
cast out. And with selfishness there
must go forth Into "the outer darkness" the devil of unbelief, of lack of
faith and trust in brother men. Lack
of trust ls one another, and the temper and the outlook that develop this
attitude In ourselves and in others,
are based vory largely, In the last
analysis, upon lack of faith In God.
Credit, trust In others, fulth in the
plighted word, these are among the
fruits of Christianity. The Christ-
centred life will also be community-
centred, Faith ln God breeds faithfulness to, and readiness to trust in
others.
Thus it is that problems of the Industrial order are, In their essence,
moral, and therefore religious. It Is
for the church to teach the principles
which are to lead to their solution;
to Indicate the spirit In which they are
to be solved, and to be the divinely-
appointed channel through which the
grace to work them out is given. It
Is (or her members to exemplify these
FIX UP THAT SCHOOL BOY NOW!
We have Boys' Suits from $5.50 to $12.50.
MEN'S AND YOUNG MEN'S SUITS
Values to $60.00 on Sale at $20.00 to $35.00.
A fine lut of new Salts coming in for next week.
At QUALITY
FINE HEAVY
WORK SHIRTS
WHEN
ISA
SALE
REAL S
When a merchant has a slock of merchandise that was bought over a year or more ago; merchandise that was
bought during the war when materials had to be cheapened and prices went sky high, and this merchant places this
merchandise on sale at prices which conform to the present-day market price, he may be putting on a sale.
BUT
When a merchant has a stock of merchandise made up after the war. out of better material,
bought on the low market and on which the retail price was RIGHT Irom the beginning, and he
places that merchandise nn sale at special reduced prices, then he is pulling on
A  REAL  SALE
ALL of our merchandise, with one or two exceptions, is absolutely new, bought right—and we are giving it to
the public at
REAL   SALE   PRICES
AVAIL YOURSELF OF THIS OPPORTUNITY TO BUY NOW FOR SCHOOL AND THE COMING WINTER—AND SAVE!!
FRANK PARTRI
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Opposite the Post Office
That Nice
SUIT CASE
GIVEN   AWAY
on Saturday
Night. Sept. 3.
WILL IT
BE   YOURS?
In a few days we will have in a brand new
stock  of  UNDERWEAR  for  the  coming
Winter, which will be sold at
REAL SALE PRICES
WE ARE PUTTING ON A REAL SALE!
GENUINE
LECKIE SCHOOL
SHOES
Sizes 1 to 5
$4.25
THK FOOLISH -MAN
Thore was a man In our town,
And he would never learn;
He went upon a fishiiiR trip
And let his camp-fire burn.
Oil, swiftly spread that, forest tire
And many homos it burned,
And from thnt Utile fishing trip
That man hns ne'er returned.
School
Opening
How aboul (he Children's Eyes?
Are they prepared to do their
work and help them to achieve
success and maintain health?
Much depends on good eyesight. Don't allow the children
to be handicapped by poor vision.
If their eyes are defective a pair
of correctly adjusted and good
fitting eyeglasses will overcome
the handicap.
Louis R. Stevens
Optometrist and Jeweler
principles In their own lives and to
develop the practical application of
them to the thought and operations of
the various organized groups und fellowships to which thoy may belong;
tlie workshop and the ollice; tlie labor
union and tho Incorporated company;
the manufacturers' association und the
consumers' league, the municipality,
the province und the nation.
B. C. UNIVERSITY IS
PREPARING WAR BOOK
Intends to Give War Records of
Students Who Enlisted.
The University of British Columbia
is preparing for publication a War
Book which will contain a brief summary of tlie war record of every member of the University, of McOIll University nnd of Vancouver College, who
enlisted for service in Canada or overseas.
Considerable difficulty Is being experienced in getting in touch with
many of the former students. The
University is therefore asking through
tlie press that all present and former
students of these institutions who have
received forms from the University,
to return them as soon as possible;
and all those who have had military
service, hut who have not received
forms, to write for them nt their
earliest possible convenience. The
information given by some of the
students two years ago bus heen found
to be Insufficient ln almost every case.
Former students who have not seen
service will assist the work of the
committee greatly It they will write
the University to that effect. This
will save the time and expense of
securing their present addresses and
circularizing them.
Communications should be addressed
to The Editor, Roll of Service, the
Unlversitly of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Making Malaria Unpopular.
"Never hear about malaria out this
way any more."
"No," answered Uncle Bill Bottle-
top. ".Malaria gets terrible unpopular
when there's nothing to cure It with
except quinine."
"I thought Alice figured on marrying Jack?"
"So Bhe did, but she was outflgured
by another girl with more money."
What's a
Guarantee ?
Our idea of a guarantee is that the
manufacturerwho gives one which hasn't
any tags and loopholes —believes in his
product.
So much so that he stands ready in make
good any loss sutlcrcd by the purchaser
through defective material or workmanship.
It's mainly because of the guarantee that
goes with them that we are selling and
recommending Ames Holden "Auto-
Shoes."
Of course, we know they givo the cheapest
age too—that they are dependable tires If
make of car, anywhere. But it's thc gun
that we talk about most. It's the Kir.ii.nl
clean-cut, without time or mileage limit
shifts our responsibility on to the mnnuffl
and he lives up to every li iter of it. Come
let us tell you about thc guarantee that goo
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES
Cord and Fabric Tires in all "tanilartl
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland
7
I September S, 1921.
■THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Five
(fl
EVENTUALLY:
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why not get the best now? It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Besides, the price is little more, and we can
arrange terms to suit any customer.   Write us.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
"THE_DEVIL"
George Arliss' Film Version is
More Human Than the Stage
Version—A Sensation
I
1111
■ill
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
wWch instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
m
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
with the valves ot the mains ot this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount ot water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it is a serious offence to tamper with such
valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will
he prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Ulllllllillllllllllllll
IIIIIIIIIII
BACK EAST
FOR YOUR H0LIDAY8
TRAVEL
Canadian National
Railways
AU Rail or
Lake and Rail
TO
Edmonton, Saskatoon
Winnipeg, Toronto
Ottawa, Montreal
Quebec, Halifax
ud other Eastern Canada and
United States points.
CHOICE OF ROUTES
EXCELLENT SERVICE
E. W. BICKLE, Agent,
CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
will assist yoa In arranging details, quote lowest tares, make
reservations, etc.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
REPORTS AVAILABLE
The Summary Report ot the Geological Survey for 1920, Part A, which
has Just been published, contains reports of Investigations carried on by
Qeological Survey parties on the west
coast of Vancouver Island, between
Barkley and Quatslno Sounds, ln the
Coquilhalla area, the Lardeau area,
and the Eutsuk Lake district.
It also contains reports by W. E.
Cockfleld on the stiver-lead deposits
of Mayo, by S. J. Schofield and George
Hanson on the Salmon Arm district,
and by J. D. Mackenzie on the
llmonlte deposits ot Taseko Valley.
Copies may be obtained by applying
to the Director, Geological Survey, Ottawa.
Suave, bantering, cynical, clever,
crafty, with subtle innuendoes, "The
Devil" ensnared an artist, a model, a
banker and his wife in e. diabolical
plot to overcome Truth with Evil.
"The Devil" was one of Mr. George
Arliss' greatest stage characterizations. As portrayed on the screen lt
is a character delineation to live and
roll down the years of photoplay history as au interpretation without par.
Those who have had the good fortune to see "The Devil" on the screen
say that the • photoplay Is Infinitely
more in keeping with human experience than the stage play.
It has necessarily been stripped of
much of its brilliant dialogue and,
happily, of much of its cynicism. It
was found possible to retain Mr. Arliss' fine characterization of evil, and
to make him the moving spirit of a
natural, logical story.
The scenarist has built around the
leading  character—"The  Devil"—two
beautiful, inspiring and powerful love
themes which run side by side throughout the drama. The devil is still a
bizarre, diabolical and strangely fascinating figure, but he ls robbed of
his victory in the end.
"It Is all very well to shock people
a little—to jolt them Into thinking—
to facing the truth ln themselves and
In the world," says Mr. Arliss, "but tt
ts not morally right to depress and
discourage them. Besides, evil ls not
stronger than good. If good contends
valiantly, good carries away the Victory. It this were not so, what would
be the use of all ot us—the use of
everything—of anything?"
For sheer artistry of production
"The Devil," which shows at the Hollo Theatre Saturday night, must be
listed among the best of the season's
photoplays.
For superb dramatic Interpretation,
George Arliss In the title role has
given to the silent stage a performance
as wonderful as his delineation of ths
same part on the speaking stage. We
venture to say that "The Devil" ln six
reels will prove an even greater success than "The Devil" In three acts.
SHOW EVERY WEEK
NIGHT COMMENCING
MONDAY, SEPT. 15
The management of the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre announces
that, commencing Monday, September 15, there
will be a show every week
night.
"THE SKY RANGER"
White Laundry
Leave orders at
LIDDELL'S  BARBER SHOP
Dunsmuir Avenue
or Phone 47-F
when  your  requirements   will
receive immediate attention.
. .„ .     The test of your worth is  if you
THE COURTENAY LAUNDRY would be missed from your place.
Some people have an Idea that they
have a right to keep anything they
find. They are wrong. Failure to advertise or report to the police the finding of anything is construed by the
law as a disposition to steal. A young
man travelling on a railway train
found a gold watch and put it in his
pocket without saying anything to
anyone about It. Unfortunately for
him he was seen to pick It up and it
was found in his possession. The
Judge sent him to jail.
Importance of Little Things.
She: "Just think ot It! A few words
mumbled by a minister and people
are married."
Him: "Yes, and, by George, a few
words mumbled by a sleeping husband
and people are divorced."
Aviator (on way to court): "But officer, I was only going 60 miles an
hour!  Do you call that speeding?
Aero Cop: "Who said anything
about speeding? You were delaying
the tralllc."
Say It With Flowers
The Lady: "Oh, there Is still some
dew on these wonderful flowers you
brought me."
Her Beau (absentmindedly): "Yes,
I know, but I'll settle up for them on
pay-day."
A Pathe Serial in Fifteen Thrilling Episodes—An Original
And Amazing Sensation
Commencing on Thursday, Septem
ber 15, and continuing for fifteen
weeks, there will be shown at the Ilo-
Ilo Theatre a serial that will hold
the audience enthralled. "The Sky
Ranger" Is a high-grade thriller.
Imagine a startling searchlight invention with enough power to signal
to Mars; an aeroplane speedier than
a whizz-bang shot from n gun; a beautiful girl; an adventurous millionaire
und a scheming villain.
Place these amid stirring action,
have a fifteen-chapter serial seething
and breath-holding suspense, and you
with sensations, throbbing with thrills
and glowing with romance.
That's "The Sky Ranger."
Two Nationally Famous Stars.
The heroine Is Dainty June Caprice!
Beauty, brains and magnetism have
made Juue Caprice a fascinating and
attractive personality to picture fans.
She ls the ideal serial heroine. She
is charming. She ls popular. She is
unafraid.
Athletic George B. Seitz Is the hero
who puts a thought back ot every
thrill. He is called "The Prince of
Thrllldom." His fearless acts will
amaze; his daring feats will astound,
and his heroic valor will electrify.
There are many locations in the
pictures—outdoors, on land and sky,
high society, beautiful estates, exotic
Asia and New York skyscrapers!
You'll like "The Sky Ranger"—the
kiddles will love lt.
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, September 3rd
Mr
(jEORGE
iAkjliss
221
Mr. Arliss' screen
P1 pispm np»i I -
debut in a mighty
drama — a magnificent production,
a triumph of the
photoplay art.
The
Devil
"All thc world his playground,
human hearts his toys"
He twists thc souls, brettks the faith,
and wounds the hearts of men,
women, wives, husbands and sweethearts.
Yet he wins you by his suavity,
charms you with: his brainy words,
and lures you by his plans.
He's a smooth society meddler. His
eyes, they burn like acid. His words,
they melt like fire.
He fascinates you. He captivates
you. He holds you in his spell.
Mr. George Arliss make3 "The Devil"
live in the mirror of your memory.
Acclaimed by everyone as the greatest achievement of the silent drama.
SPECIAL   ATTRACTION, LABOR DAY
Monday, September 5th
The^ost
Also a Special Mack Sennet Comedy
Astray from the Steerage
Thursday, September 8th
FINAL EPISODE of the Big Serial
Ruth of the Rockies
YOU  MUST SEE IT
Commencing Monday, Sept.  15th
Pictures will be shown every
Week Night
■ U
u     gs
iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiii v>
tight
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September ii, 1921.
School Day Requirements
Schooldays are near at hand once again and every mother will be busy getting the
necessary requirements.
Our Hosiery Department is complete
with good quality hose at reasonable
prices.
HOSIERY FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
For mothers who desire really good
stockings for their boys, we would recommend you to try a pair of our "Goderich
Knit" All-wool Stockings. They have
double knees and guaranteed to give satisfaction. ,
(iirls' All-wool Fine Rib Hose, "Goderich"
make; a really dependable hose.
Boys' and  Girls' Cotton  Hose,  in many
qualities, at prices to suit most purses.
Boys' Suits, in nearly all sizes, at reasonable prices.
Boys' Underwear, in Penman's, Turnbull's
and various other makes.
Boys' Caps in a very complete range. See
our new patterns.
Girls' Cotton Dresses at Special Prices—
Newest styles.
New Flannelette Underwear just arrived
at greatly reduced prices.
Girls' White Flannelette Nighties, sizes 4,
6, 8, 10 and 12 years. Made of good
quality material.   Priced at 60c each.
See these.
Girls' White Flannelette Underskirts-
Fine quality; sizes 4 to 12 years. Price
B5c each.
Ladies' Flannelette Bloomers, in white; a
really good quality, and the price is
only 95c.
Ladies' Flannelette Gowns, down to prewar prices. See our leader at*$1.50.
Very hard to beat this line.
Ladies' Flannelette Nightgowns, very fine
make, full size. Price $1,95.
Large Size Flannelette Gowns, in white.
Special price, $2.25.
Bungalow  Aprons — Our assortment  of
-leading lines in aprons is very attractive.   See them.
Phone 134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
FIRE UNDERWRITERS
INSPECTING CITY
During the past week Cumberland
has been getting the "once over" by
o;!icials of the B. C. Fire Underwriters
Association. Mr. Dowllng made an Inspection of the fire department and
waterworks system on Monday, the
latter including a visit to the flrst
dam. He found the water pressure in
the city very good, but part of the
main lie is understood to have condemned and this will probably be re*
placed.
Messrs. T. H. Morcom and L. M.
Clement have been engaged In making
a new Insurance map of the city. This
map will be used later to set the fire
rate by.
It is hoped the Underwriters will
has ben getting the "once over" by
rates charged by the board companies
in this city. Cumberland has a good
water supply and n very efficient fire
brigade, and a very little fire loss for
a long time.
ST. JOHN'S AMBULANCE
ASSOCIATION MEETING
The annual meeting of the St. John's
Ambulance Association, Cumberland
Centre, will be held in the First Aid
Hall on Friday, September 16, at 7
p.m.
LIDDELL'S ORCHESTRA
MAKES GOOD IMPRESSION
Lidrtcll's Orchestra made a decided
hit at the dance given by Ibis organization on Monday evening. A large
number of dancers attended the Ilo-
Ilo Dance Hall, a very pleasant time
being enjoyed by all. Tbe dance
music was of the best.
ln another column the orchestra
announces that it is open for engagements for dances and social functions
of all kinds.
"That heiress is going to marry a
struggling young mnn."
"If she is a sure-enough heiress,
what's he struggling for?"
Ford Cylinder Reboring
WE ARE NOW IN A POSITION TO REBORE FORD CYLINDERS. We are going to
specialize in this work and will gladly give you an estimate. No need to send out of
town to get your work done.
BUY YOUR NEW BATTERY FROM US
We handle the famous WILLARD THREADED RUBBER BATTERY.   Same price
in Cumberland as in other parts of B. C.
Phone 77
Cumberland Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
NOTICE
Parties having houses or camping
sites on Comox Lake are requested to
call and sign a lease at the Companies'
Office on or before October 1st, 1921,
otherwise tbe Company will take
possession of the property.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUN'S-
JIllll), LIMITED.
"Yes, indeed," argues the Ford
salesman, "this little car is a great
Investment, You put a few dollars into a Ford and right uway it runs Into
thousands,"
Liddell's Orchestra
— is — !
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions j
of all kinds. Any number of;
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave
School Opening
The Public and High Schools will
open for tlie Fall Term on Tuesday,
September liih.
All pupils intending to enter arc
requested to do so at tlie beginning of
tlie term.
Pupils entering the Receiving Class
must lie 0 years or over on or before
October 1, and must produce a birth
certificate,
No pupil will be admitted to the Receiving Class for this term after Kep-
I ember 13.
A. MACKINNON,
Secretary School Board,
Fall Millinery
Maximum Styles at Minimum Trices
DUVETYNE — VELVETS — PLUSH— BEAVER — HATTERS' PLUSH
CELLOPHANE — FLOWERS — ORNAMENTS
are all used in this Fall's creations.
VELOURS IN ALL THE WANTED SHADES
LAYER'S - Cumberland
Phone 115
Personal Mention
Mr. James M. Savage, General Manager Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., accompanied by Mrs. Savage, arrived on Thursday.
Mayor D. R. MacDonald and Aid. J.
C. Brown left Tuesday morning to
attend the Goods Roads and Union of
B. C. Municipalities conventions at
Alberni. Mayor .MacDonald returned
I'hursday night.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Abrams have returned from Victoria.
Rev. James Hood left on Tuesday
morning for Victoria, and is due to
return Friday evening.
Miss Hilda Watson left Thursday
morning lor Peiiticton, at which place
slio has been appointed on tlie school
staff,
Mr, Dudley Michell of Edmonton,
accompanied by bis son. arrived Tuesday evening and is spending a few days
with bis parents, Mr. aud Mrs. T.
Michell.
Mrs. A. Evans nnd Mrs. .MacDonald
came up from Victoria on "Monday, accompanied hy tlie two children ot Aid.
J. 0. Brown,
Mrs. Abrams, Sr., an old-time resident of Cumberland, is in town visiting tier son and his wife, Mr. aud Mrs.
Robert Abrams.
Rev. aud Mrs. Comley, who have
beeu visiting iu the district, returned
to their home in Metchosin on Thursday.
Mr. T. Mordy left for Victoria Friday afternoon accompanied by his
daughter Marjorie, who will resume
lier studies at the Normal School In
that city. Mr. Mordy will return beginning of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Morcom and Miss
Morcom of Vancouver were in town
during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Patterson of
Kelowna arrived Thursday evening
and are registered at tlie Cumberland
Hotel.
Miss 10. Durant and Mr. E. H.
Durant of Victoria are visitors to tlie
city.
.Air. Y. Sato, of Vancouver, Japanese
vice-consul, is visiting Cumberland
and Comox district for a few days. He
is on a holiday trip but is also looking to tbe furtherance of business between Canada and Japan.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gardner returned
to Vancouver Thursday.
Mr. G. Spencer and Mr. A. Passie of
Vancouver arrived Thursday on a visit
to Mr, W. Robertson.
.Mr. and Mrs. Chas. E. Burbridge
and family returned to town Thursday
after two months holiday at Kye Bay.
They are all much benefitted by the
change,
.Mr. Con Reifel, of Nanaimo, was In
town Thursday on business.
Mr. George Barton returned Wednesday after two weeks' holiday spent
in Victoria and Vancouver.
Mr. W. A. Owen motored to Nanaimo
Sunday, accompanied by Mrs. Home,
mother of sMrs. Owen. He returned
on Monday ucompauied by .Miss Olgo
Owen.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Robertson and Miss
Laura Robertson returned from Victoria last week-end after spending a
week's holiday iu that city.
Airs. F. J. Dalby returned from Victoria Wednesday evening.
Air. A. R. Stacey motored to Nanaimo Wednesday.
Aliss AI. O'Neil returned to Vancouver Wednesday morning after spending a holiday with Aliss Lena Carey.
Mr. John Branslield returned to
town on Sunday last. He had traveled
as far as New York.
Air. Andy Home left for Alberni on
Thursday.
Alias Jlildred Halcrow left on Saturday last for Vancouver, where she
will enter training at the General
Hospital.
Miss Annie Pryde left for Victoria
Thursday morning whero she will attend the Provincial Normal School.
Air. Herbert Roy left for Vancouver
Thursday morning where he will attend King Edward High School.
Miss Edith Horbury left for Victoria
Thursday morning, where she will attend the .Normal School.
Airs. Charles Grunt was a passenger
on Thursday morning's train for JNa
uaimo.
SPECIAL
In Crockery
PLAIN WHITE CUI'S AND SAUCERS
Per dozen  :..
CLOVER LEAF DESIGN CUI'S AND
SAUCERS—Per dozen	
$2.75
$2.95
VEGETABLE DISHES
FRUIT DISHES
PLATTERS
SOUP PLATES
TEA PLATES
DINNER PLATES
BOWLS
BUTTER. CREAM AND
SUGAR SETS
FRUIT BOWLS
BERRY SETS
GLASSES
PLATES IN ODD SIZES WATER SETS
JUGS ETC., ETC.
Nice Juicy Oranges, 3 doz. for $1
Also 50c. and 90c. per doz.
LARGE  LEMONS, per dozen   65c
LARGE GRAPE-FRUIT 3 for 25c
■^mM i ———■**■**■*——^^^^^^^m^^^^w
LEAVE YOUR ORDER FOR
PRESERVING   FRUITS
ITALIAN PRUNES       PLUMS        GREENGAGES
DAMSONS        BARTLETT PEARS
Placo yoiu' order early or you may be disappointed
as there is a shortage ol' preserving fruit this season.
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
ARRIVING DAILY
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
REGULAR EVENING
SERVICES RESUMED
ON SUNDAY NEXT
St. George's Presbyterian
Jtev. Jus. Hood.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening service at 7.
Mystic .Mimics of the Mouth Sens.
Few of us know that by thoso who
live there Tahiti ls pronounced "Tlty"
tlong i) to rhyme quite perfectly with
nightie.
There was a young lady of Tahiti,
Whose   neighbors  declared   she   was
llahltl;
For they saw on her lino
(If the Monday was fine)
An extremely diaphanous nahiti!
"THE  DEVIL"
MRlGEORGEARLfSS
Appearing at the Ilo-Ilo Saturday.
Holy Trinity Church
Itcv. W. leversedge.
Fifteenth Sunday After Trinity.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
Sunday School will re-open on Sunday, September 11th, at 2.30 p.m. All
scholars arc asked to make an effort
to he present.
The Church Committee will meet on
Tuesday next, Sept. 6th, at 8 p.m., in
the parish hall.
Roman Catholic Church
Iter. Father Denton.
Sixteenth Sunday Alter Pentecost.
.Mass at 11 a.m.
FOR SALE
CHEVROLET CAR, late model, 1920,
for sale; cheap for cash. Apply E.
Bridge, Onion Hotel. 1-36
MARROWS, CABBAGE, BEANS, Potatoes, etc., grown at Courtenay,
delivered at your door every Tuesday and Saturday. E. C. Eddlng-
ton, Calhoun Hanch, Sandwick P.O.
3-37
SIX-ROOM HOUSE, EXCELLENT
condition, newly decorated. Half
cosh, balance over one year. Apply
P, O. Box 411, Cumberland.       2-35
LOST
Grace Methodist Church
Itcv. tl. II. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m
Itegulur Evening Service, 7 p.m.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
August 25—Seattle scows, Seattle;
Palter, coastwise; Hulk loo, Vnncou
ver.
Aug. 26—Charmer, Vancouver; Che-
mulnus, Coaster, Progressive, coastwise.
Aug. 27—Glenboro, coastwise.
Aug. 2S—Belle, Vancouver, Joyful,
Comox; Alliance, coastwise; Vancouver, coastwiso.
Aug. 29 — AlcCulloch, coastwise;
Chemainus, coastwise.
Aug. 31—Beatrice, Vancouver; Olive
AI„ coastwise.
Sept. 1—Qualicum, coastwise; Pee
Chee, coastwise.
OLD COUNTRY FOOTBALL
RESULTS DUE SATURDAY
Football In the Old Land is booming
greater than evor this season and
lovers of the game who are interested
will be pleased to hear that arrangements have been made for results to
reach Cumberland about 6 o'clock
every Saturday evening. They will be
posted at Jimmy Brown's Tobacco
Store on Dunsmuir Avenue.
A SMALL FLAT-BOTTOiM BOAT,
from Royston Beach; painted grey
and trimmed with green; oars, oarlocks and sails aboard. Finder will
be suitably rewarded. Communicate witli T. E. Bate, Cumberland.
GOLD    LOCKET    ON     THURSDAY
evening.   Apply Islander. 1-35
FOR RENT OR SALE
POR RENT OR SALE, ON AND AF-
tcr September 1st, tlio Wilson Hotel,
Furnished.   For further particulars
apply Wilson Hotel, Union Bay, B.C.
2-36
WANTED
LOCAL AGENTS TO SELL FIREX,
the now Fire Extinguisher for
Homes, Automobiles, Stores, etc.
Big Commissiou, details free. Write
Coast Agencies, 307 Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C. 2-35
PERSONAL MENTION
WE CLEAN OR DYE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housefurnlshlngs,
etc. Let us send you our price list
Waterproofs "reproofed." Permanent Dye Works Limited, 1641 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, B. C.
An efficiency expert is a man who
gets a fat salary for telling an ?S a
week clerk how to save money.
There Isn't any luck In hanging a
horseshoe point down, and It ls the
samo tiling with the corners of your
mouth,

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