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The Cumberland Islander Jan 22, 1921

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Array VICTORIA
Provincial Library
pjo-ic^
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER °
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland Kens.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 4.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
OFFICIAL OPENING
OF ATHLETIC CLUB
Splendid New Club Building Erected by Management of Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. for Use of Their Employees Is
Formally Turned Over to Men—One of the Finest Buildings
of its Kind on the Pacific Coast.
On Thursday afternoon the magnificent Athletic Club building, which
has been built by the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., was formally
opened by Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent, and handed over
to the men entirely free of cost. A
large number of the employees availed
themselves of the opportunity of taking part in the opening ceremonies,
the rooms being crowded. The formal
opening took place in the Lecture Hall,
which was packed with employees.
Mr. Bob Walker occupied the ehalr.
His Worship Mnyor MacDonald and
several Aldermen were also present.
Mr. Walker, in opening the gathering, said that the meeting was called
for the purpose ot cnrrylng out the
agreement entered into some time ago
between the company and the men.
The company had agreed to build tlie
hall and furnish it aud hand it over to
tlie men as a gift. The company supplied both light and heat, and there
was no rent.
There was a great need of the hall,
said Mr. Walker. Working men were
nowadays looking for much higher
things, for physical and mental development and all that goes to improve
living.   He then called on Mr. Graham.
Mr. Charles Graham said It gave him
great pleasure, on behalf of the
Canadian Collieries, to welcome those
present to their first meeting In the
building. He regretted Mr. Thos.
Graham was unable to be present, but
•he had to go to Victoria.
The company had done their best to
give the men a building of which they
'would be proud, nnd in which they
would feel at home. The hall had been
completely furnished and equipped
with the exception of the books for
tho library and apparatus for the gymnasium, which tliey had thought best
to leave to the Board of Management.
To Form Library Assoc V.I inn,
He agreed with the chairman in regard to his remarks re physical and
mental development, and especially
appealed to the young men to take advantage of the facilities at their disposal. In regard to the library, the intention was to form a Library Association in connection with the Victoria Public Library, whereby, for a
nominal sum they could secure from
the library, say, 500 books at a time.
The club would purchase standard and
scientilic works. In this way the
citizens of Cumberland would have ail
tho advantages of much larger centres.
The library would be of great benefit to all. Ten pages read every day,
on any subject, said the speaker, would
result iu an enormous amount of
knowledge In a few years. He strongly
appealed to the boys to devote time to
mental and physical improvement. We
can only get out of life what we put
in It, said Mr. Graham, and they would
find It was time very well spent. The
world is looking for men of ability for
big positions. To (111 these positions,
young men must devote a good deal of
their time to study in order to attain
their purposes.
The meeting was to elect a Board of
Management composed of 12 members,
of which three would be appointed by
the Canadian Collieries. Thc sole object was to^see lhat the club was run
in a proper manner, and he heartily
hoped the employees would make full
use of lt.
Mr. Graham said It gave him much
pleasure to declare the club open to
the employees of the Canadian Collieries, and he trusted they would find
as much pleasure In using it as tlle
company had ln building it. (Loud applause.)
Officers Elected.
Nominations were then received for
the position of president, when there
were three nominations, vis., Chas.
O'Brien, F. J. Dalby and Bob Walker.
The ballot resulted in a big majority
for Mr. O'Brien. On being called to
take Ihe chair, Mr. O'Brien said he was
taken entirely by surprise. He came
there with the Intention of taking part
in tbe opening with the rest of tlie boys
and found himself placed in a position
of lienor. He said he was not without experience in that kind of work
and would do his best on their behalf.
He thanked tlle meeting for placing
him in the position.
Otber olllcers elected were: Vice-
president, Mr. Robt. Brown; secretary
pro teiu., Mr. T. Scott; committee
members: A. Thompson, Dan Stewart,
ljob Walker, Nat Bevis, Bobbie Brown,
A. J. Taylor.
A motion was passed by the meeting
conveying to the Canadian Collieries
the thanks of the men for the magnificent building.
The hours at which the club will be
open have been fixed at from 10 a.m.
to 11 p.m.
Description of Building.
The following ls a brief description
of tlio building, which represents an
institution that of its class is unsurpassed in the Province and probably
on the coast, the design and furnishings equalling many private clubs of a
moro pretentious nature.
The building ls a two-storey frame
structure with a concrete basement,
and the exterior has an Old Elizabethan domestic front with a Tudor tower,
which contains the circulating library.
The balance of the exterior has been
made to conform similarly in appearance.
The interior on the main floor contains an entrance hall 11 feet by 12;
circulating library 18 feet in diameter,
having accommi'tetlon for 2,000 vols,;
a panelled reading room, 17 feet by 22,
with a five-foot open fireplace, and
large archway to a corridor which
leads to a panelled lecture hall, 28 by
31 feet, containing 117 chairs and a
raised platform at one end.
Opposite the reading room is a writing room, 12 by IS feet, with writing
desk and attendant equipment; a
spacious cloak-room and lavatory
complete the main floor space. The
reading room furnishings, such as
tables, chairs, etc., are all massive and
such as private clubs boast of.
Downstairs on a half-landing is a
second lavatory containing amongst
otlier equipment, three shower baths
with tiled floors and sides.
Big Billiard Room.
The greater part of the lower floor
is taken up by a billiard room containing two English billiard tables and a
pool table. The English tables are
heavy and mnsslvc, with large mission
light fixtures. The room is panelled
with a mission finish and no expense
has been spared to make it an attracting room.
Beyond the billiard room is a gymnasium, 26 by 31 feet, and 15 feet high,
where the usual standard equipment
will be Installed.
The basement contains a hot water
boiler which looks after the hot water
heating system throughout the premises, also a 170-gallou tank whlcb
supplies hot water for the showers, etc.
The lighting system ls the BraBcollte
Indirect ceiling lights, with brass mission wall bracket lights used in con-
Junction therewith.
The genoral contractors for the
building were the Phoenix Contracting
Company of Vancouver.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer for the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited, was the architect and superintended the work.
MORE LIVES WILL BE LOST IN SIX
MONTHS THAN BY THE WORLD WAR
Famine in China will claim more lives in the next six
months than were lost in all the armies during the World
War, unless other nations come to the rescue on a tremendous scale, predicts the Rev. Dr. W. A. Mather, Presbyterian
Missionary, on his return from Paotingfu.
"More than 15,000,000 persons face the immediate prospect of starvation," he said, "and 45,000,000 others are
affected in the famine zone of 100,000 square miles."
First Meeting Of
New City Council
The new council of the city got down
to business Monday night and made a
good start on the year's work.
City Clerk Mordy, as Returning
Officer, administered the oath of ollice
to the Mayor and Aldermen. The full
council was present, comprising His
Worship D. R. MacDonald, Aid. Thos.
Bannerman, J. C. Brown, Louis Fran-
cesclni, Chas. J. Parnham, F. D.
Pickard and Duncan Thomson.
On opening the meeting tlie Mayor
welcomed tlie Councillors, saying he
was pleased to see so many of the
Aldermen of last year"s Council back,
and also the new faces, Aid. 1). Thomson and L. Frauceseini. He hoped
Cumberland would make this the banner year, financially and In other ways.
There was no doubt Cumberland was
going to prosper, he said. The Colliery
Company thoroughly believed ln It;
they had just erected the Athletic, Club
Hall at a cost of $30,000, and were
going ahead In other directions.
It was up to the city fathers to do
their best, and he felt confident they
would all work together harmoniously
for the city's welfare. He hoped to see
improvements on the avenue continued
to fifth Street this year, as well as
other necessary work.
In reply Aid. Parnham said he would
do his best for tho interests of the city
while holding office. He also welcomed the new aldermen to the council, an hoped with their co-operation
the new council would do as well as
last year.
Aid. Brown said lie was glad to be
back amongst old friends, also welcoming the new mon, aud was sure
they would prove good aldermen. He
was sure the council would support the
Mayor iu all things reasonable.
Aid. Bannerman was pleased to be
assolcated with such good company,
and it gave him pleasure to welcome
Aid. Thomson and Aid. Francescini to
the council table. They were just the
men the council wanted.
Aid. Pickard said he was pleased to
be back again, and also welcomed the
new aldermen. Speaking of work for
the year he hoped to see the avenue
completed to the city boundary.
Aid. Francescini thanked the Mayor
and Aldermen for their kind reception.
He hoped they would all work together
harmoniously, and he would serve the
council to the best ot his ability.
Aid. Thomson claimed not to be an
orator, but€ would try to be a worker,
and would do his best for the city.
City Clerk Mordy congratulated the
Mayor and Aldermen on being returned
to the council. There was a good many
things to be attended to this year, and
the council would have plenty to do.
He would serve them to the best of his
ability.
Committees for 1921.
The following committees were appointed by the mayor for the year:
FINANCE COMMITTEE—Aid. C. J.
Parnham (chairman), J. C. Brown and
F. D. Pickard.
BOARD OF WORKS—Thos Banner-
man (chairman), J. C...Brown and D.
Thomson.
LIGHT COMMITTEE—Aid. Pickard
(chairman), Francescini and Thomson.
HEALTH COMMITTEE—Aid. Francescini (chairman), Parnham and Bannerman.
WATER COMMITTEE—Aid. Thomson (chairman), Parnham and Pickard.
FIRE WARDENS — Aid. Brown
(chairman), Bannerman and Thomson.
The council concurred ln the recommendation of the Board of Police Commissioners for the council to pay $20
monthly to the night watchman, to
supplement the amount he receives
from tlie business houses.
A communication received from the
Provincial Government, enclosing the
regulations under which relief ls
granted by the government, was ordered filed for reference.
Bills and Accounts.
Thc following bills and accounts
were received and ordered to take the
usual course:
C. H. Tarbell  $11.25
Kierstead    15.25
Canadian Collieries   74.2!)
B. C. Telephone  7.35
R. E. Frost  5.30
Gasoline    3.00
Mordy, Returning Officer  25.00
MacDonald, visit to Victoria  25.00
Rubber boots for teamster  15.00
Islander  37.50
Appointment of City Clerk.
On motion of Aid. Bannerman,
seconded by Aid. Pickard, Mr. Thos.
Mordy waB re-appointed city clerk, the
remuneration to be $60 in the meantime.
The question of the renewal ot the
Championship
Decided Sunday
Cumberland United Football ..team
journeys to Nanaimo tomorrow to play
the South Wellington team for the
championship of tlie Upper Island
League. According to lutest reports
the ground at Nanaimo is in good condition, hence the decision of the league
management to play iho gamo Sunday.
The Cumberland team confidently
pects to win. and Manager Dave Wilson is instilling into ilio mon the
necessity of absolute coufldouce,
The following will represoul the
locals: Coal, Walker; backs, Strang
and Campbell; half-backs, Irvine.
Conti, Home; forwards, Bannerman,
Nicol, Boothman and Harrison. Reserves, Carle, Brown and Clarke.
Hume Willi Mots. Postponed.
Owing to the amount of snow on the
field, tlie Vancouver Island Football
League fixture with Victoria Mets. has
been postponed,
SAFETY DEVICES FOR
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
A Short Paper on Safety Devices for Accident Prevention in and
Around the Mines of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.
Head at a Meeting of the St. John's First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association by Mr. George O'Brien, Safety Engineer.
CHINESE FAMINE HIND
Chinese Residents Actively Engaged in Collecting Money
For Stricken China.
In connection with the Chinese
Famine Fund, several meetings lntve
been held in Chinatown, und resident!
of that locality are actively engaged in
making personal canvass of the district, meeting with very gratifying results.
Vory Liberal Response.
At u meeting of the Presbyterian
Mission nine men gave $122. One man
whose last pay cheek was $39, gave
$30. Another who had heen ill and
whose pay cheque was $28, gave $20,
In ftbout a weeks' time a canvass
will he made of the Cumberland district on behalf of this urgent need,
when it is hoped everyone will give
liberally.
ANOTHER OLD-TIMER
GOES TO HIS REST
Alexander Somerville Had Been
A Resident of Cumberland
Twenty-Eight Years.
Another long-time resident of this
district has heen called to his rest in
the person of Alexander Somerville.
who died on Sunday last. Mr. Somerville, who was 60 years of age, and a
native of Scotland, had been a resilient of Cumberland for nearly 28 years
and previous to coming here was in
Montana for some yenrs.
Deceased leaves six sons and twn
daughters, Mrs. Jas. Walker, Mra.
John Williams, James D., Robert.
George, Alexander, Walter and David
Somerville. Mrs. Somerville, his wife,
died in 1916.
The funeral took place on Wednesday from the residence of Mrs. Jas.
Walker, West Cumberland, when tlie
remains were taken to tlie Cumberland
Cemetery for interment^a large number of friends attending, Rev. Jas,
Hood officiated.
The pall-bearers, who were old
friends of the deceased, comprised
Messrs. Alex. Waine, Tom Pierce,
Sandy Grey, II. G. BateB, Robson and
David Walker.
bond of the city clerk wus laid over.
The application of ihe city teamster
for an Increase in salary resulted in
$10 monthly being added to bis pay
cheque.
The Mayor and City Clerk were
authorized to sign checks.
Loan From Hank ok' $«,nil0.
The amount of the loan from tbe
hank was fixed at $6,000, and a special
meeting is to he held this evening al
6.30 to put through the bylaw in order
thut the city will have funds wherewith to pay the school teachers' salaries and other expenses af the end of
the month.
Mr. F. A. McCarthy, manager of Ine
Royal Rank or Canada attended the
meeting in connection with the loan.
He said the corporation's financial rating stood very high with llie hanks.
Regarding the loan, be remined the
council that tliey would have to borrow all the money needed in tbe first
instance, as the provincial government
would uot permit a second loan.
The council decided to meet on alternate Mondays at 7 o'clock.
The council passed a resolution asking Dr. Hicks to accept the position of
Medical Health Oflicer for this year.
Aid. Brown reported that the matter of getting the memorial plate for
the fallen heroes was ready lo go on
with. This will probably be taken up
at the next meeting.
The question Of safety devices for
the purposes of preventing accidents is
getting greater attention year after
yoar, and tlie majority of the larger
Industrial organizations are equipping
their machinery and plants with safety
levices for the purpose of preventing
iccidents. While this is being don
by the operating companies, lei us
glance for a moment al another side of
the question.
The human factor which should be
the greatest safety device is in a large
number of cases the greater cause of
accidents. How often huve we seen
men wilfully dsiobeylng the very rule
made for their protection? A coal
mine or any other plant is only as safe
as tlie employees themselves make it,
and until such time as there is greatr
•o-operntlon and ducat ion along the
lines of self preservation, whicb Is the
first law of nature and which is very
often violated, we will not be successful In our campaign In the prevention
of accidents.
One of the mistakes that in my op
Inlon is being made is placing too
much responsibility on officials in see
ing that simple precautionary'methods
of prevention of accidents are being
carried out. We will take for example
a coal mine where a certain district is
more or less widely scattered, and
which is under the direct charge of a
fireboss who makes from two to three
visits of inspection to each place during his shift. He will possibly, and I
might say invariably, see some person violating some simple rule of the
mine, made for the protection of the
employees. The fireboss, if. he Is attentive to his duties, will comment
upon this to the miner, or whoever he
may he, and Issue instructions to
rectify the violation, and then pass
along ou his tour of Inspection.
In some cases he will not have gone
very far when a messenger Is sent
after him lo tell him that Jack Jones
or Tom Smith lias been injured or perhaps killed. He returns to the place
aud finds that a serious accident has
occurred and on investigating the
cause of the accident he learns that his
instructions were not immediately
carried out, wilh (lie foregoing results.
This is one side of tlie question, hut
there is another, aud that is the lire-
boss who makes himself a "good fellow" by not criticizing tlie men under
bis charge for simple violations, and
passes tbem up rather than have himself termed a busybody by Ihe men.
This usually leads up to further violations, and be suddenly finds himself
to be tbe leading witness at a coroner's
Inquest. Hs is questioned by the coroner and jury as to his methods of
supervision with regard to safety, etc..
und very often finds himself in a very
embarrassing position.
There is no reason why this should
be Ibe ease as tbe most simple violation should he criticized, and by doing
this Hie daily propaganda should have
some results. A chain is ouly as
strong as its weakest link, ond a mine
is only as safe as it is made by the
employees, which is very often its
weakest link.
How often do men sleal a ride on
mine cars and motors, knowing full
well that it is a violation of Ihe rules?
Then ngain, liow often do men jump
off moving trips and trains nnd lake a
chance of being mangled when a few
seconds more would permit Ihem to
leave Ihe trip or train in safety after it
came to a dead stop? There nre dozens
of apparently simple violations lhat
are constantly going on thut I could
mon tion, which sooner or later will
result in an accident.
bNo violation of the Coal Mines Regulation Act or Special Rules should be
tolerated if we expect to reduce our
accident rate to a minimum, aud this
applies lo the mine officials as well as
to the employees. So tar as the management of the Canadian Collieries Is
concerned they do not want to see any
official or employee violate the simplest
rule lhat is in force for their protection, and always dlscourge violations
of the Coal Mines Regulation Acl and
Special Rules.
one of the most prolific sources of
accidents in the coal mines is the
haulage.^ This is chiefly due to the
fad that (he younger element usually
follow this class of occupation. I will
quote a few of the things lhat very often occur and very often result in accident. A driver will walk up to a
mule which is displaying one of his
(Contiuutd on Page Five)
"THE SEA BEACH
AT EBB TIDE"
Illustrated Lecture To Be Given
By Dr. McLean Fraser of the
B. C. University.
Under the auspices of the [J. C.
University Extension Committee, and
of the Comox Teachers' Association,
Dr. McLean Fraser of the University
staff, will give his lecture ou "Tho
Sea Reach al Ebb Tide," at Cumber-
hind on Friday, February JS, and at
Union Hay on tlie Saturday following.
The lecture is illustrated and will
he a revelation to those whose walks
on the beach have heen unobservant.
Further particulars will he given
later.
NIMMOJ3LECTED AS
MAYOR OF LADYSMITH
The officials of the Municipality of
Ladysmith for the year 1921 are as
follows:
Council.
Mayor-M. Ninimo.
Aldermen—T. Bryant, l>. Davidson,
I). GoLirlay, J. A. Knight, D. Matheson,
G. Ross and H. Wrlglrt.
School TrusU'oi.
Jas. Glen, II. Gourlay, J. I.owery, w.
W. Walkem and R. Wright.
Police Commissioners.
The Mayor,   D.   Davidson   and   11.
Wright.
INCOME TAX REGULATIONS
Itringent regulations are to bo enforced iu tlie collection of income
taxes for tbe present year, full responsibility for making llie returns being placed ou the taxpayer, The form
of returns must be asked for, not
waited for, and at least a fourth of
the amount due is payable along with
the statement April 30th. Tiie tax is
reckoned on Income of calendar year,
January 1st to December 31st.
The normal lax ia 4 per cent, on net
taxable income up to $0,000, and S per
cent, beyond thai. Exemptions from
normal tux are $2,000 of married or
with dependents of certain categories;
$1,000 if unmarried ami with no dependents; $200 each tor children under 18 years.
WOMEN'S HOSPITAL
AUXILIARY   MEETING
Annual Meeting Will Be Held on
Friday Afternoon Next.
Tho Annual Meeting of the Women's
Hospital Auxiliary will he held ou Friday next, January 28th, iu the Anglican Church Hall, at 8 p.m. All
members are urgently requested to be
present'and to bring as many of their
friends as possible. \ hearty Invitation is extended to any other bodies
in the district who desire to associate
themselves with hospital work.
AMY B. CLINTON, Hon Sec.
Super Specials Coming to the Ilo-Ilo
TONIGHT,   JANUARY   22 —JOHN   BARRYMORE   IN
"DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE," by R. L. Stevenson.
"THE SEA WOLF" By JACK LONDON
"THE TEETH OF THE TIGER" ...An Arsene Lupin Story
"ON WITH THE DANCE"  With MAE MURRAY
"THE PRINCE CHAP" With THOMAS MEIGHEN
"THE RESTLESS SEX" By ROBT. W. CHAMBERS
"THE FIGHTING CHANCE"    By ROBT. W. CHAMBERS Twd
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 22, 1921.
COMFORT
==| is what the whole world wants.   There's some people
Hf who won't take it when offered, they're so skeptical.
i Heaters Which  Bring  Comfort  jl
A We have them with duplex grates.   This is the most
§= modern type of grate for coal.
§| The firepot is heavy and corrugated, to give addi-
H| tional strength.
U m^^P    THERE'S A HEATER HERE
m lOS?             TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS
T. E. BATE
m    P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
CUMBERLAND
il
TASTE is the TEST
of ihe DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer  The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
CaSCade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
Full line of Pure
Fruit Flavors.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
BREEZES
By X-RAYS,
When asked wliat he anticipated doing with the fishing rod he won at the
Cumlierland Football Club draw the
other day, Andy informed his friend
Uub that he intended to fish. "But,"
said his friend, "why waste your time
when you get plenty at the hotel?"
"Yes," said Andy, "the last lot we gol
at the hotel were not caught. They
gave themselves up."
The Irish League Ls due at Glasgow
on Burns' Day to try conclusions with
a picked team from tlie Scottish
Leugue. We wonder if they will cele-
hrate or if they will ask the same
question as of yore, "Pwhat the 'ell
did Burns Iver do fur Oireland?"
A story is told of a W. A. A. 0. mechanical transport who was detailed to
drive Gen. Pershing, of the great
American Army, around London during his visit to that city. Amongst the
numerous things said of the General
was that punctuality was his middle
name. Everything went well until one
day his lady chauffeur arrived a little
late at the American Embassy. And
the General said sternly: "You have
kept me waiting three minutes, miss,
and I do not like it." "Oh, jump in,"
retorted the W.A.A.C., "you kept us
waiting three years and we had to
like it." /
The price of good footballers has
evidently soared in comparison to the
general cost of living in the Old Country. Meechan (Manchester United)
was transferred to Chelsea and $16,500
was the price paid.
Two young lady visitors from Vancouver partnered by two well-known
athletes of this city, gave a very creditable display of dances, Including the
"shimmy" at the llo-llo dance hall the
otlier Saturday.
According to present arrangements
Cumberland is to play South Welling-
tou at Xanainio Saturday.
Old soldier (writing home): "Dear
.Mary, we have lost a trench this morning and the General says we must get
il back at any cost. Your loving Bill."
Reply—"Dear Bill, sorry to hear you
lost a trench. But I'm broke, too. Hoping this candle will help you out some,
Mary."
The following Scottish professionals
have promised to hold themselves in
readiness for the forthcoming tour
th rough Canada and the States:
Brown He (Third Lanark), McNair
(Celtic), Dave Taylor (Burnley), Gordon (Dunfermline), Cringan (Celtic),
McAndrew (Third Lanark), Alex. Bennett, Alan Morton, Andy Wilson.
"Vou miserable thief. Do you know
that bottle you stole cost me seven
dollars!" "Ish da so! Well It was's
worth e'very s'cent."
Paderewski has decided never again
to touch the piano. This ought to 15e a
hint for a certain young footballer in
Cumberland.
Jimmy Quinn has promised to act as
trainer to the Old Country football
tourists, and states he may take part
in one or two games.
Songs of the times: "Ireland must be
Heaven," aud "A Little Bit of Heaven
Fell Out of the Sky One Day." People
are thinking the opposite.
Last season Cumberland used thirty-
live footballs. With retail price of
512.50 each It would be expensive,
were they not fortunate enough to he
able to purchase wholesale.
The Old Country Showman
Says:
"What you lose on the round-abouts you make up on
the swings."
We have no "swings." In other words, we do not
sell an article at cost and make up the loss on other
lines.   We believe in a square deal for all.
Do not be misled by comparisons on a few lines.
Take a month's grocery account, compare the price,
QUALITY and service, and you will stay with THE
GROCER.
A Btranger appeared ot the enquiry
wicket and asked for a three-cent
stamp. "Next wicket!" was the angry
retoi l from within. The stranger felt
rather sore at this rebuff. So after
purchasing liis stamp he returned to
__ ihe lirst wicket, determined to get
'5sIquits, and asked the ruffled occupant:
a "If I post this letter tonight will it
reach Cumberland tomorrow night?"
"'Wily, certainly," was the quick reply.
"Oh, is that so," suid the stranger.
"Well, you're fooled. It's addressed to
Xanainio."
Tin; "Shower Datli Quartette" is the
latest out in Cumberland. Home, Milligan & Co. will shortly be looking for
engagements as a side line.
Jam Market has Declined
STRAWBERRY
RASPBERRY
BLACK CURRANT
4-lb. tins
$1.40
APRICOT
GREENGAGE
PLUM
GOOSEBERRY
4-lb. tins
m
j$1.30
STRAWBERRY, in 4-lb. glass jars   $1.75
Mumford & Walton
IIIUI
SPLENDID SHOWING
MADE BY COLLIERIES
Coal Mines of Province Produced
Nearly Half Million Tons More
Coal in 1920 Than Previous
Year—Good Prospects.
British Columbia's mineral production for 1920 totalled }20,680,626, which
Is an increase of $2,2S4,312, or 7 per
cent, over the 1019 total, according to
the preliminary review and estimate
for 1919 of the Deparement of Mines,
made public by the Hon. William Sloan,
Minister of Mines.
Estimates show that it is doubtful
whether there is any other mineral-
producing area on tlie continent that
can report a 7 per cent, increase over
last year.
Hon. Mr. Sloan is enthusiastic reganl-
ig the splendid showing made by the
collieries of the province. In coal
there has been an increase of 444,467
tons in 1920 over 11119—2.712,228 tons
against 2,2(17,541. Reduced to monetary terms this means an Improvement
of $2,223,435. The output of coke was
down somewhat, the production being
68,190 tons, compared with 91.13S tons
in 1919, a decrease in value of $160,636,
That the collieries at present in a
position to turn out this fuel should
be prepared to take advantage of the
enlargement of both the domestic and
foreign markets, is his opinion. Tliey
should make preparations to develop
their coal areas to the utmost. It is
apparent that the immense coal resources of British Columbia are not
going to lie practically dormant tor
much longer.
Returns for the month of December,
as far as available, Indicate that the
rate of production is being well maintained. For November the output
totalled 261,608 tons, while, with the
production of tlie Crow's Nest Paso
collieries for December estimated,
that for the past month will reach at
least 240,000 tons.
Island Production for December.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., Comox   12,701
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., South Wellington    7,.M2
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., Extension   17,051
Canadian   Western   Fuel    Co.,
Nanaimo   52,790
Pacific Coast Coal Mines    3,20i
Nanoose Wellington Coal .Mines 3,28*
Granby    Consolidated    Mining,
Smelting & P. Co., Cassidy  1S.27I
The Rexall Store
J  ^.
THE "FLU"
Dare Not Return
The "nt" will certainly get a
warm reception this winter if it dares
show its ugly head in our peaceful
midst, for the peoplo are confident
now that thoy ean deal it such a
smashing blow it will nevor survive.
In every village, town and city iu
Canada, families are fortifying themselves with the greatest "Flu" ammunition known to science—Duck-
ley's Bronchitis Mixture. Colds,
coughs, eto.—the advance guards of
Flu—are met with withering lire, and
relief from these troubles is sure
every time. One hundred thousand
Canadians are only too willing to testily to the great healing power thia
remedy contains. It has conquered
soughs of 85 years' standing. It cannot fall to do for you what it has
done for others. Ton have everything
to gain and nothing to lose, as it is
•old under a money-back guarantee
to banish eonghs, colds, bronchitis,
bronchial asthma and prevent you
from getting the "Flu." It is not a
syrup, but a scientific mixture, 20
times stronger than any other cough
euro. One dose gives instant relief.
Price, 75 cents. Take no substitute.
None genuine without my signature.
Ask your druggist i7
SOLD IN CUMBERLAND BY
It. B. FROST.
Cumberland Public and High School
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
For the Year Ending December 31st, 1920.
RECEIPTS
Government Quarterly Grants   $ 8,905.00
Hall-Yearly Grants, outside pupils      3,095.81
Sundry amounts          22.00
City of Cumberland      6,326.89
Tot.il $18,919.70
EXPENDITURES
Salaries    $14,001.50
Janitors       1,650.00
Repairs         380.95
Sundries         202.20
Supplies          596.58
Fuel          518.90
Ollice          269.17
Heating, new furnaces, etc      1,132.40
Insurance         120.00
Light and Water         78.00
Total $18,949.70
They work
naturally
and form'
no habit
They™**."
naturally
and form
no habit
naturally
and form
no habit
H-
tttf
Don't Neglect that Irritating Cough
REXALLCHERRY BARK
Will Stop It
It soothes the bronchial and throat mucous membranes,
stimulates expectoration, lessens the cough, enables the
tissues to reject disease germs, thus ridding the body
or influences productive of the flu and fevers.
Frost's Pharmacy
The Rexall Store
CUMBERLAND
Boots     Shoes    Findings
It is not economy to buy old
shop worn shoes no matter
how cheap they are
DON'T BE FOOLED BY CATCH PRICES
We have the largest stock of shoes in town to choose
from, and our stock is new and up to date.
Our prices are marked in plain figures and are the
same to everyone.
flK^^p TRY US FOR YOUR NEXT PAIR
*i£sA WE WILL DO OUR BEST
TO GIVE YOU EVERY SATISFACTION
Special for Saturday d*£ AA
Hipress Rubber Boots «P«»vy
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
RUBBERS
SLIPPERS
GAITERS
Estimates for 1920, $19,315.00
Examined and found correct, January 10th, 1921.
C. B. WOOD, Auditor.
A. MacKINNON, Secretary School Board.
South Wellington's New War Cry
Cumberland came down to town,
South Wellington to play,
They brought a bunch of rough-necks
Just to cart the cup away.
\nd   tliey   banged   and   kicked   and
punched and yelled,
And tried to score all day;
But I'm hanged if they could shoot
A son-of-a-gun-of-a-oue.
Chorus.
And they couldn't score a gol-demed
Son-of-a-gun-of-a-one.
South Wellington are still undefeated in the Upper Island League, pl-
tliougli they have not won it.
TO EXCHANGE POSITIONS
LONDON.—-The York education committee ls offering all teachers ln their
employ an opportunity ot exchanging
positions for a year with Canadian
teachers.
"The doctor is telling everybody
how he give ye nothln' hut sweetened
water 'stead of reg'lar medicine, Jed."
"The danged ol' hypocrite! But Jest
wait till he tries to cash that cheque I
paid him with!" January 22,1921.
THB  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
ri
Thre«
Household Helps
MAYTAG ELECTRIC WASHER,      AM OP  tA
with Wringer attached; special tpL£tJ»0\)
WATER-POWER MACHINE—Regular flJOT CA
$32.00.   Special t&& t ,D\J
HAND-POWER WASHER—Regular      dJOO TK
$27.50.   Special $4.0. 4 O
1 ONLY KITCHEN CABINET— <£9K KA
Regular $40.00.   Special  tPOO.OU
1 ONLY KITCHEN CABINET— <|»07 QC
Regular $33.00.  Special $4 I .OO
A Full Line of Furniture and
Furnishings in Stock
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector delightful visions of affluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
AT ALL  THE  LEADING  HOTELS.
EVERY time you telephone you have at your ready
command property worth millions of dollars.
Thousands are actually used for the long distance call, and for your simplest message you have the
use of hundreds of dollars worth of property.
This vast telephone plant must be not only constructed and installed, but must be kept electrically alive to
respond instantly to your convenience or emergency.
It is manned by a multitude of telephone workers day
and night to maintain perfect pathways for that delicate telephone current started by your nearest branch.
The service must always be kept up to maximum usefulness.
The telephone system is a vast, vitalized plant, but
is accepted in such a matter of fact way that ita immensity and efficiency is rarely realized.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Canada Buys a Billion Dollars Worth
Of Goods From The U.S. Yearly
$90,000,000 of This Sum Went as Exchange on American Money
During the Past Year—Time for Canadians to Wake up and
Remedy the Situation—Must Buy Less United States Goods
and Produce More in Canada, Helping Employment.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Bay and Night.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C.
DR.R.P.CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
It the people of Canada would only
realize the extent to which they are
paying toll to the Americans—on account of the depreciation ot our dollar
In the United States market, due to our
buying more goods from them than we
sell to them—they would be entirely
convinced that It is the greatest problem with which the country is faced,
and that beside it all other political
questions shrink into insignificance. It
Is the all-important question which we
must grapple with, and towards the
solution of which the best minds of the
country, irrespective of politics, should
be directed.
Consider it calmly aud dispassionately for a minute or two. Understand
well, the actual fact is that our perfectly sound and good Canadian dollar
is worth only 85 cents in tlie United
Slates today. A few mouths ago lt was
down as low as 80 cents.
For What tke American Pays HIM), We
Pay 41.15, Plus Duty and Freight.
What does this mean? It means that
you have to pay at least 15 cents on
the dollar more for United States
goods than the Americans themselves
pay.
For the year from 1st October 1919
to September 30th 1920 we imported
from the United States goods to the
total value of (918,668,949, for which
w» paid ln Canadian money, on the
basis of our dollar being worth only
90 cents—One Billion Dollars!
You will see,, therefore, that there
was a drain upon the people of Canada
using these Imported goods of no less
a sum than 91 million dollars. It was
really a greater drain that that because
the discount on our dollar tor months
during that year was as high as 20
cents.
Why is our dollar at a discount in
the United States? Because we buy
more from that country than we sell
to lt—and are not ln a position to
settle the balance in gold.
What ls the Remedy!
One ls to sell more goods to the
United States. Right there let lt be
stated that there are limitations.
Built up by high protection in the
United States, manufacturers are ln a
strongly entrenched position, and, well
protected from outside competition by
their tariff, they are easily able to defy
any attempts of Canadian manufac
turers to get a foothold ln their market, except in a tew lines such as pulp
and paper which the Americans must
have.
The goods we are permitted to sell
them largely consist of food stuffs and
raw materials for manufacturing.
Would lt not be far better for us to
work up our own raw materials and
derive the profit therefrom which the
American now gets?
Buy Less From the United States,
The second remedy, and the best, is
to buy lesB from the United States.
We can do this by making more goods
at home. A double object would
thereby be accomplished. We would
help to restore the value of our dollar
and provide increased employment for
our own people—the effect of which
would be beneficial to every class iu
the community. By adopting that
course we would also be building up
a self-contained and self-dependent
nation, and we would keep our young
people within their own borders.
Is lt not humiliating to think that
we buy $900,000,000 worth of goods in
a year from the United States? At
least half of these goods could be made
right here in Canada and would give
employment to hundreds of thousands
of workmen.
It is still more humiliating to know
that we have to pay a toll of 15 cents
on the dollar on all tbe goods we buy
from them. Isn't lt time Canadians
woke up and did soma straight, clear
thinking?
We cannot continue to pay a toll of
90 to 100 millions a year to the Amerl
cans and carry on. That huge sum
in addition to the $360,000,000 required
to pay pensions, interest on war debt
and the expenses of administering thc
laws and affairs of the country is too
great a burden for a young nation to
bear.
Time We Faced Conditions.
Look at it ln another light. Ab individuals we pay ln the aggregate a
toll of 90 to 100 millions a year to
the Americans. If instead of paying it
as individuals our government were to
pay that amount to the American government by a vote ot Parliament—as
indemnity for the privilege of buying
goods from them: what would happen?
Wouldn't every red-blooded man In
Canada get up on his hind legs and
howl ferociously? We would get some
action then to remedy the situation
But because we pay the toll as individ
uals in drips we fatuously forget
about it. The trouble with most of us
is that we have lost all sense of proportion of numbers and of values. We
are still in a war-shocked condition.
It is time we braced ourselves to
understand our real conditions. It is
silly to talk about being a nation when
we are dependent upon the United
Slates - for $900,000,000 of supplies
every year.
Doesn't it seem ridiculous that we do
not make a real effort to overcome lhat
situation, especially when by doing so
we would save $100,000,000 a year, provide employment for hundreds and
thousands of workmen and keep our
young people at home with us?
TRACTOR PLOW CLEARS
SNOW IN SHORT TIME
"Two men witli a tractor and snow
plow cleaned the snow from 12 miles
of Highland Park sidewalks in four
hours," says a Detroit paper, whicb
also published a photograph of the
Fordson at work.
The Superintendent of Public Service declares: "At this rate two tractors could clean all of llie 126 miles of
walks under municipal control in Detroit in seven hours. Formerly this
work has required 10 teams and 10
men and If the snowfall was continuous, they were not able to'ropeat at
once because the horses needed rest."
"THE ARTIFICIAL SUN"
A German optical company is said
to have constructed a monster searchlight, the lens of which is more than
five feet in diameter, and throws a
beam of 2,000,000,000 candlepower.
The largest German searchlight used
during the war possessed 350,000,00(1
candlepower. Thia new light has heen
called "the artificial sun."
Don't have cold feet—get a guaranteed seamless hot water bottle at
Frost's,
As the Ancient Myth runs,
Atlas held up the world, and as
Atlas held up the world, the business of Electric Light and Power
Companies sustain almost every
other business.
Each day we pass to and fro surrounded by the
Modernization of the World; we go to bed, we read,
by the glow of an ELECTRIC light, rise to a room
heated by the pleasant warmth of an ELECTRIC
heater, breakfast on toast made on an ELECTRIC toaster, wash it down with coffee from an ELECTRIC percolator, listen to the grind of an ELECTRIC:
washing machine or the hum of an ELECTRIC vacuum
cleaner, and if we live in a large city we ride to business
on an ELECTRIC car—with never a thought of the
great power, the great expense that is put forward to
maintain us in the Elysium of comfort.
It has become part of us, a thing beyond our contemplation, our due; and the fact that this business must
be fed to keep it running, like anything else, is beyond
the probability of even our consideration.
But give it a little thought—
Just imagine yourself working at your desk, in your
home, or your store by the light of a candle, your
ELECTRIC lamps useless (it occurred for a few short
minutes the other day and it surely was nol pleasant,
was it?)
Imagine going home to a darkened house, to the
smoky oil lamp; your lights, your appliances—toaster,
washer, cleaner, iron, telephone—JUNK, just junk,
and this is what would come to you without the
ELECTRIC LIGHTING COMPANY.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons havo
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent of the law.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. 0. 314
llllllllllllllllllllllll
111
Ford Service that is
Satisfactory
Ford repairs in our shop are made at contract rates
on labor. You know before the job is started how much
it will cost you.
The excellence of our shop equipment and the mechanical skill of our men enables us to guarantee our work
fully. If your repair work proves unsatisfactory, return
it to us within five days and we will do it all over again
to your satisfaction, free of charge. Genuine Ford parts
used.
The average man can easily afford a Ford car. It is the most inexpensive car to drive.
Twenty to twenty-five miles on a gallon of gasoline is an every-day
occurrence; u.'i miles is frequently reported by Ford owners. Yearly repair
expenses of less than one dollar are not unusual. The car is light in
weight, and tires give more mileage on a Ford than on any other car.
You can always sell a "used" Ford at a good price'. You have to accept
a big reduction for a "used" larger car.
Come and take a ride in the 1920 model. Sec how comfortable it is.
And stylish, too—stream line effect, tapered hood, crown fenders, beautiful finish. You need one for business. Your wife and children need one
for pleasure and health.
SEE US FOR FORD PARTS, REPAIRS AND ACCESSORIES
E. C. EMDE, Ford Vealer
COURTENAY, B.C.
II
lliilll
III
il font
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 22, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1921,
THE ATHLETIC CLUB BUILDING
The splendid Athletic Club Building, which was formally
opened on Thursday afternoon by Mr. Cbarles Graham,
District Superintendent, is a magnificent contribution of
the Canadian Collieries to (lie men in its employ. The
company spared no expense in making this one of the
tine.st and beBt-equipped insitutiona of its kind, tbe coat
being in tbe neighborhood of $30,000. With the exception
of the books for the library and apparatus for the gum-
nasium, the building is completely equipped with furniture
of a massive and expensive nature. Heading and writing
rooms. lecture hull, a large billiard room equipped with
two full-size billiard tables aud a pool table, In themselves
should bo strong inducements for the men to make [ull use
of these commodious quarters.
The company handed tbe hall over to its employees absolutely free of cost, free of rent, and with light and heut
supplied, hoping that the men will make full use of It.
The employees of tlie Canadian Collieries are to be
congratulated on having employers who take such a keen
interest in their welfare. Cumberland as a district cannot
fail to greatly benefit by the company's munificence.
STARVING  CHINA
"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of one of these
my brethren, ye have done it unto Me."
Heartrending appeals for help—help at once—have been
sent out to the world from China, both by the government
of tbat country and also by the leading missionaries of the
alllicted area, comprising as it does no less than five
provinces of North China and containing 100 million souls.
SO.oOO.OuO of these people are suffering the terrible agonies
of slow starvation, and some statements say that half of
these are doomed to die. Think of it! Fifteen million
human beings! Dying hy thousands daily—because they
have no bread, or anything else eatable.
While these appeals are sent out lo the whole world,
they should especially find ready response in America, both
north and south of the forty-ninth parallel, for of all countries in the world they are probably best able to render
assistance In a large way.
True, Canada has several thousand unemployed and considerable suffering from want, but generally speaking we
are a prosperous nation, and almost every one cau afford
to subscribe liberally to save the lives of fellow human
beings.
Of recent years we have become so used to talk of
millions that we have lost our sense of proportion in this
regard. But the number now starving from this terrible
famine—the worst in half a century—is equal to four times
tbe population of all Canada. And these poor people bave
absolutely no means of helping themselves.
The government of China is doing its best. Other parts
of China are raising large sums for relief. Japan is raising
many millions. Right here In Cumberland the Chinese
residents are holding meetings and making big efforts to
raise money. And we venture to say tbat the white population of this district will be surprised when they learn the
sum the Chinese are striving to raise to help their suffering
brethren.
In a few days the people of this district will be canvassed to give—and give liberally—to the Famine Relief
Fund. The people responded nobly to the appeal for
suffering Europe. We feel sure they will do the same in
this case—but on a larger scale, for tbe magnitude of
the distress is almost beyond calculation.
One dollar a month, we are informed, will keep a child
from starving!
New and radical measures are being advanced every day.
Some revolutionary national economist now suggests solving the government's financial troubles by reducing expenses instead of increasing taxes.
WHERE  IS THE  "LEAK"?
Tlie gentle art of playing both'ends against the middle
depends for its ultimate success upon the ability of the
operator to keep the middle ignorant of his activities at the
ends.
This political axiom is commended to Messrs. Oliver and
Farris, who are attempting tbe trick without sufficient
dexterity to conceal it.
A fow days ago the Attorney-General summoned a reporter from a hospitable newspaper, and forecasted some
startling provisions ho proposed incorporating in tbe forth-
oining liquor law. Tbere is good reason to believe thai
his action was hurried by Ihe liquor trade, to whom he bad
given definite assurances during the recent campaign, a:-
a result of whicb tbey saved bim from defeat in Vancouver.
They wore doubtless anxious that tbere be no delay in
formally committing tiie government to Mr. Farris' undertakings.
I * ti i ttie announcemenl proved inopportune for tbe government, and tho Premier immediately hoisted signs of
distress, This is the way ho talked when questioned on
tlie details divulged by bis colleague:
"The papers nre lull of slorb-w of what Is going to be ln
fhe act," said the Premier. "I don't know where all these
tories are coming from. Thero has been no official announcemenl of what is going to ho iu the act. Beyond
tatements at the time of the election, there is no authority
for anythone to make statements about what will be iu
the act.   I dou't know where the leak is."
Now the Premier knows exactly where the "stories come
from," llo culls the Attorney-General "a leak." He knows
that bis colleague is no more leak. When thut minister
begins to exude interviews lie is not even a defective spigot.
He is an open bung-hole. He Imposes on himself no space
limit. He weighs, contrasts, considers, moralizes and
deduces in full view of tho public. And although his mind
was made up lor him rather summarily during the last few-
days of tbo light in Vancouver, the Attorney-General permits tho public to survey hlm repeating the process. The
trouble is thn! Mr. Farris in liis gratitude to Vancouver
forgot Delta. Here his leader bas another fight on his
hands. The Premier will have troubles enough there with-
ut boing compelled to explain why bis Attorney-General
purposes to widely vary the mandatefOf both Moderationists
and Prohibitionists, The "e-lectors of Delta are an honest
slower than townspeople to overlook
Ighbor, especially if he is a politician,
iba massing to iho loader of the gov-
deny the offending forecast. He dare
So he takes refuge in assumed
|    Grand
1 Clearance
SALE
10 days
only
-^sfcH^-fetr^
at
Campbells, Cumberland
of
HIGH  CLASS  DRY   GOODS,
GENTS'   FURNISHINGS  AND
BOOTS AND SHOES
m
|     There will be a distribution of Fall and Winter     m
1 Merchandise at from g
|    35 to 50 per cent, below today's prices    |
ind
farmer folli
sharp practice i'
Tho situation
rnmt.nt.   Ho c;i
not repudiate hi
olio
Ignorance and in bland dismay at a "leak."   The good yeomen of Delta  will  find  thoir old neighbor has long ago
sed to be candid.   Although painfully endeavoring to do
so. he bas not yot learned to be cute.—Wprld.
On pain of sudden death, tbe Pilgrims, visiting America
for the tercentenary celebration of the landing of the Pilgrim Falhers, wore warned by Chauncey M. Depew not to
question tiie authenticity of Mayflower furniture. Depew
said ono will find in 14,000,000 homes in the United States
enough .Mayflower furniture to fill tbe Aquitaniu, tbe Maure-
lauia and several others of thoir size several times, but,
he asserted, the fathers "undoubtedly had a way of compressing furniture for storage that is now a lost art."
Difference between a profiteer and a gunman seems to be
that the latter uses a gun.—Brooklyn Eagle.
Ireland acts as if she though Lloyd Georgo had mistaken
poison-ivy for an olive-branch.
A falling star is liko prices. It makes a great show of
falling, hut never lands anywhere.
Uncle Sam's latest contribution to peace is a battle-
cruiser S">4 feet long and with twelve 10-inch guns.—N. Y.
Evening Mail.
About twenty years from now the immigrants now coming in will be worrying about the flood of aliens coming to
our shores,
It may be, as a scientist says, that 'from a physical
standpoint, we aro much inferior to prehistoric man; still,
most of us would rather be inferior than prehistoric.
Those enthusiastic Greeks who kissed the harness of
King Constantino's carriage-horses showed their appreciation of a stable gjvernment.
Now On
and will continue for
One More Week
irnl^iii;;iil!;ii!^ii:!!;!,*!:!...'::m::: '',.M11!,;:-:m:: i...;:./,::;:,'!;',;-!!!,
POLICEMAN'S POCKET
PICKED IN COURT
SEATTLE. — "It's getting tough
when a policeman isn't safe from
thieves even in court," complained Pat
Kenyon when he applied to his precinct caputain for a new street car
pass. Kenyon reported that ho bad bis
pocket picked while attending the daily
session of police court and lost his
wallet containing $")0 and street car
and theatre passes.
The SUssIng Blush.
He told llie shy maid of his love,
Tho color left her cheeks;
But on tbe shoulder of his coat
It showed lor several weeks.
"Thore seems to be a great feeling
of unrest throughout the country."
"Ves, I've noticed that. Most of my
clerics yawn so frequently through tbe
day that I'm dead sure they're not getting sleep enough."
WINNIPEG CALLS IT OLD-
FASHIONED AT 32 BELOW
WINNIPEG—For the first time this
season a touch of the real old-fashioned winter weather prevailed here
over the week-end. During Sunday
niglit the mercury dropped to 32 degrees below zero, with a twenty-mile
northwester blowing, the lowest record this winter.
Extra Special Attraction—Coming Saturday, January 29th
Marshall Neilan has created a master work of live, sizzling entertainment in
"DON'T EVER MARRY"
A Geysher of Giggles guaranteed to goad any Grouch into Gracious Grimmace.   Gee!
"DON'T EVEK MARRY"—A Comedy Cocktail in Five Swigs
There are three things in life.   You are born, yon get married and
you die.   So, after you are married, there is nothing left for vou
to do but die.   "Don't Ever Marry."   Neptune married and he is
a Fish.   Sea for yourself.
Woman's hair is her crowning glory.   She's man Crowning Glory,
too.   Uncle Sam allows $2,000 for a wife. Well, Brigham Young
had SOME foresight, we'll say.
Birth statistics shows more girls than boys.   Keep this in mind
when you do any betting.
SI
An electrician sparks his way into a secret marriage by short circuiting it non-conductor whose 'olm venture inspires her warning
"Don't Ever Marry." Contact with an unsuspecting father-in-law
brings batteries of mirthquaking complications while the Girl
Pessimist turns the confidence into weapon to compel the Bridegroom to pose as her Husband to lower the amperage of her own
family's ambitions for her. Trouble shooters have six thousand
feet of real excitement untangling the predicament of a man whose
first and only "I DO" GIVES HIM THREE WIVES!
m
m
m
ILO-ILO THEATRE,  SATURDAY,  JANUARY  29th (<
January 22,1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
SAFETY DEVICES FOR
ACCIDENT PREVENTION
'(Continued from Page One)
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
; NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP    /(H;j
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While C Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS, DA™
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General Merchandise.
CHARLIE SINO CHONG, Cumberland
HONG CHONG & CO., Bevan.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.C.
IF YOU REQUIRE
Windows, Doors
Frames
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Offiee 2«20 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C,
peculiar characteristics ot stubborn
ness aud cut him with a whip or perhaps hit him with a stick. The mule
resents this treatment and his objection to it is usually demonstrated by
kicking back like a flash ot lightning.
If the driver is quick enough to get out
of the way he escapes, if not, he very
often has to nurse broken ribs or other
injuries. Then again one will see
drivers attempting to couple cars
while they are in motion. Sometimes
they do not succeed und the result Is a
broken collarbone, shoulderblude or
ribs. Cars should be at a dead stop
before an attempt is made to couple
them, more especially if there ls not
good clearance, as Is sometimes the
case in coal mines. This disregard for
safety is not confined to drivers by any
means; there are a great many rope-
riders who are afflicted the same way.
aud 1 might add that hoisting engineers are uot altogether immune.
Time after time I have seen rope-riders
riding on their trips between the cars
going down the slopes and on the rear
end going up Slopes. It Is very obvious what would happeu should the
trip become derailed or the rope or a
coupling break.
Hoisting engineers very often lose
their tempers and forget that there is
a human being practically at his mercy
while riding the trip. The dangers
surrounding the haulage are great
enough without adding to them by
carelessness, and a great many other
forms of carelessness could be quoted.
I have already stated that lt is chiefly
due to the younger element following
this class of occupation, and would like
to point out to them that it only takes
a fraction of a minute to cause sufficient injuries to cripple them for life,
or perhaps cause their death. Prevention is better than cure, so join hands
and help In the prevention of unavoidable accidents.
Occasionally there are surface accidents occurring in places where one
would igamigne it was almost Impossible for an accident to occur. Let us
go into the machine shops for a moment, aud what do we sometimes see?
A mechanic ls sharpening a tool on
the emery wheel. Goggles are provided for his use while doing this work
to prevent flying sparks aud bits of
steel from entering his eyes. It takes
about three seconds to put the goggles
on, but the mechanic very often fails
to put them ou, and suddenly he has
an agonizing pain in the eyes. A hot
spark or a piece of flying steel has entered his eyes and he is lucky if he
does not lose or impair the sight of
one or both eyes.
Then again, one will see mechanics
working around belt drives ln the most
careless manner. Instead of having
close-fitting clothing, their coats aud
other portions of their clothing are
flapping around and sometimes It is
caught by a belt or other moving parts
of the machinery, and an accident has
to be recorded. Most dangerous moving parts of the machinery are feuced
or guarded, by how often are the
fences removed by the workmen for
the purpose of a little more convenience in doing a certain piece of work?
And how often are these same fences
and guards replaced as soon as the job
is done? Iu some cases not until another accident has been recorded, and
very often the victim was uot the person who removed the fence or guard.
To go back to the safety devices for
the preveutiou of accidents.
The human being should be the best
safety device, and 1 am optimistic
enough to believe that he will be, providing he Is taught sufficiently and accepts the teaching In the spirit ln
which it is given. Mechanical safety
devices are only safe so long as the
human factor will allow them to be
safe, and all that has been written and
all the rules aud regulations that huve
beeu printed with the object of securing safety will tail in their object unless the workmen can be brought to
realize that they must protect themselves and co-operate with their fellow
workers ln eliminating avoidable accidents.
I believe I am conservative In stating
that eighty per cent, of the accidents
in and around the coal mines could be
avoided and that if It were possible to
get full details of the other twenty per
cent, we would find that a large number of them could have been avoided.
Witli this end in view the management ot the Canadian Collieries has,
during the year 1920, placed a number
uf safety devices at their different
mines and plants, chief among which
are as follows: Safety cars on man
trip at .No. 4 Mine, Cumberland. This
mino is entered by two slopes, which
are sunk a distance of 9,000 feet. The
main haulage extends for a distance of
7,000 feet, and It Is on this portion the
safety cars are used, as the men are
permitted to ride on a special man
trip up the slopes at the end of the
shift.
Formerly all the protection the men
had from the breaking of a coupling
was a drag behind the trip and a safety
rope that extended from the haulage
rope coupling to the rear end of the
trip. There was very little protection
(or the men should the haulage rope
break. Tests were made with the
safety car by using the maximum load,
which is much greater than the load
caused by the man trip, and in every
instance the load was stopped ln from
18 to 36 inches.
These tests were mode In sight of
the majority of the employees in No. 4
Mine for the purpose of getting suggestions with regard to further improvements, but all appeared to be
highly satisfied with the results. The
Inventor of the car is Mr. Kohl. Turn-
bull, blacksmith. Union Hay Shops,
and the operation of the car is very
simple but absolutely effective. It wus
built and completed by Mr. Turnbull
lu the Canadian Collieries plant at
Union Bay.
Another safety device was an automatic alarm bell placed at the niouth
of No. 4 "Mine for the purpose of warning persons of the approach of a trip
to the surface. Tills bell commences
to rnig loudly wheu the trip readies a
certain point some distance from the
surface, and continues to ring until
the trip is nearly landed on the tipple.
The bell is operated by the contact
made between the mine car wheels and
the rail and through certain magnets
and springs to the 110-volt lighting
circuit, so that there are no storage
batteries to depend on, there being a
constant supply of electrical energy
available. ThiB alarm signal was invented by Mr. W. G. Hassell, one of the
colliery electricians.
At No. 7 Mine a similar device was
arranged, but instead of lt being operated by contact with the rail the contact is made on the haulage engine Indicator and Is operated by storage
batteries. This Is also a very Ingenious device and was invented by Mr.
Arthur Lee, who is one of the hoisting
engineers at No. 7 Mine.
At No. 5 Mine an electrical heating
device for heating mine car oil was
Invented nud put Into operation by
Mr. A. R. Stacey, the chief electrician.
This device did away with the coal Are
in a stove that was used for this purpose formerly on the pithead, which is
built entirely of wood. The menace
from a coal Are on the pithead of a
downcast shaft was considerable and
the electric heating apparatus has lessened the menace considerably, if not
entirely.
Sheet iron guards were placed on all
moving gearwheels where there was a
possibility of persons coming in contact with them, and I am pleased to
state that not one accident was reported from this source during the year.
In addition to the above safety devices, Are extinguishers of the "Reliable" and "Pyrene" type were placed
in all mine buildings, offices and other
places of importance, and men were
trained in their use by demonstrations
and practice. A fire caught in Its incipient stage is easily extinguished If
the proper means are available.
In adidtion to the lire extinguishers
there are a number of Are hydrants and
a suflicient supply of hose and nozzles
for lire lighting purposes placed in
important places around the surface
at the various mines.
Danger notices, ln four languages,
are placed in a conspicuous place at
each of the mines In Cumberland,
where they can be seen by day or
night, an electric light being used for
illuminating purposes at niglit, so that
there Is absolutely no excuse for anyone who ls able to read. The several
notices warn the employees of different dangers, such as dangers
from high-tension electric cables, taking matches In the mine, travelling ou
slopes while trips are running, lllegul
riding on cars and motors, and several
other dangers which, if the warnings-
are strictly adhered to will eliminate
number of accidents that can be
classed as avoidable.
In conclusion, let me Impress upon
each and every one tlie absolute necessity of complete co-operation between
employer and employee in the prevention of accidents, and let each one remember that he Is "his brother's keeper" so far as the prevention of accidents
are concerned. No excuse should be
accepted or any leniency given to any
official or workman who has wilfully
taken a chance and risked injuring
himself or others. It ls not the desire
of the management to be compelled to
use the courts to see that the mine
rgulations for safety are carried out,
but rather secure the co-operation ol
all concerned voluntarily. It this can
be done it will, without a doubt, reduce the percentage of accidents to a
minimum. It is absolutely Impossible
to have complete supervision over
every mine employee in his dally actions, and if he can be made to see tlie
necessity of himself becoming a safety
device much will have beeu accomplished. So once again let us all join
hands and do our utmost to make the
year 1921 a banner year In the prevention of avoidable accidents.
January Sale
Your Big Opportunity to Save Money
I Specialize in Shoes, Men's and Boys' Clothing, Underwear and Gents' Furnishings.
Having been buying and selling these lines of merchandise for over 20 yoars, I should
and do know, when, where and how to buy. Having bought just at the right moment,
I am able to solicit your patronage for our mutual benefit, as I know 1 am able to give
you better values than you can get elsewhere.
Below are a Few of the January Sale Bargains
12.50
60 PAIRS 1I0VS' TWEED BLOOMER PANTS, lined, i
and Governor fasteners; sizes 24 to 34. January Sale '
2 DOZ. PAIRS HOYS' DARK BROWN CORDUROI BLOOMERS
Just the thing for hard wear and       flJQ OK        CO 7H1
service.   Sizes 24 to 34.   On sale al   wOtst&O and WU. I U
SO BOIS' SPITS—Sizes 26 to 34, with bloomer pants; in allwool
tweed effects; brown, grey, slate aud dark green mixtures;
out in latest styles, with and with- (PI A CA"i> tfl C Ki\
out belts. Keg. $17.00 to $23.60 for wJ.Tr.uUhi wlU.OU
MSN'S NATS lll.l'K SERGE SUITS—Medium weight, allwpol;
sizes 35 to 40 breast measure. Good value at ilvQ**! IZi\
$45.00.   January Sale Price   >!)QaU.O\I
YOUNG MEN'S TWEED SUMS—In snappy styles and the latesl
colorings. Brown, green and bins' effects. Sizes CQO KA
34. 35, and 36. Selling regular at $4n and $15, for wOu.OV
50 PAIRS MEN'S ODD PANTS—In blue serge, brown, navy and
otlier colorings, at reduced prices for (J? A ft A up (t'T ft A
January selling, from    ©Tt.tlUto Wl.UU
HOBBERLIN  SUITS
Tailored to your Individual measure, al ONE-THIRD OFF 111:1*1-
I.AR PRICES I Tor January only). This gives vou the chance
of Inlying a nice suit at a much lower price than will be
offered for Spring selling.   100 samples to select your suit from.
HE HAVE A FEW PAIRS LEFT OF MEN'S AM,WOO!, RIBBED
SOX—In black, heather and slate colorings.   Usual  d>-|   f\f\
price $1.50 pair.   On sale at    u)JL.UU
MEN'S HEAVY RIBBED WINTER UNDERWEAR.     <Pj   (TO
Per garment  fDJ-.tlV
MEN'S WORKING LEATHER GLOVES
Specially priced at 	
A MCE RANGE OF BOYS'SWEATERS AND SWEATER ('DATS.
in dark grev, brown, cardinal (PI or (p-| r»J» (prt nr
navy; 24 to 32 chest measure tD±.£U> «D1. I O* tait. I O
90c
THE MODEL CLOTHING AND
SHOE STORE
Note the Address—Opposite the Post Office
P. PARTRIDGE
MOTOR BANDITS PLUNGE
CAR OVER CLIFFS INTO
SEA 125 FEET BELOW
Organized Gang Ship Machines
of Movable Paris Then Try
To Destroy Evidence.
VICTORIA.—The police are at work
trying to break up automobile thieving
in Victoria, which, they arc convinced,
lias grown into an organized business
with an underground system of disposing of the spoils.
Late Friday night a young girl and
her brother, who were on Douglas
Ireet, near where Niagara ends at tlio
park, saw four young men busy around
a car. After a few minutes tho car
started to move down the hill towards
Dallas Road, and us it gained momentum the four, who were hanging on.
jumped and ran off into Uie park.
By the time the car reached tbe
Dallas Road it was travelling at a terrific speed. When it came to the sharp
corner guarded by the white fence, it
kept straight up, leaped over tlie cliff
out into the Straits.
Leaped ll* Foot Cliff.
Less than two hours   later,   at the
end of the hockey game. Albert Ry-
Iands was hunting all tho side streets
around the Arena for his Studebaki r
car, and wondering how he happened
to forget where Im parked it.    ft
he thought that perhaps the owni r
a similar car bad taken his by m
take.
Next morning tlie police Investigated
reports of whal had gum- on al lbs
end of Douglas Street, and found Mr.
Itylatuls' car nu the beach, aboul 12S
feet below. It was standing on lis lour
wheels, hut the trout two woro
smashed.  The frame appeared slightl>
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone Wi
Ciiiuherlnuil
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge I'ork Sausages.
Cambridge i'ork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our I'lckled I'ork
and Corned Beef.' If Is delicious.
twisted, but there was not a crack in
tlie windshield.
Tlie car struck a ledge half way
down the cliff and this diverted its
course so that It landed on the shore.
It* it had not been for this the car
would likely have plunged right into
tlie deep waters off some of the rocks
and might never have been found.
Examination of the car showed that
it had heen stripped of everything of
value, thc men taking tools, spotlight,
spare tire and speedometer. They tried
to take the batteries, but they smashed
them lu getting them out.
G.W.V.A. HEAD GOING
TO EMPIRE CONFERENCE
OTTAWA.—President It. 11. Maxwell
nf the Dominion command of the O. W.
V. A., will go to the Empire conference of the war veterans in South
Africa at his own expense, it is announced. Mr. .Maxwell will sail from
Canada on tbe Minnedosa on Jan. 21.
"What do ou think of a man who
constantly deceives liis wife?"
"Think of him! I think he's a wonder!" •
The Corner Store
GROCERIES
Best Creamery Butter, per lb., only 65c
Empress Pure Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Empress Climax Jams, 4-lb. tins SLID
Sugar, 20-lb. sacks for $2.i)0
Side Bacon, streaky, per lb (i.r>e
Best Japan Rice, No. 1    5 lbs. 50c
Tomatoes, large size tins 5 for SI.no
Oranges, sweet and juicy, dozen 25c and 65c
Anything you want in Campbell's Soups.   I have
just received a nice fresh stock.   Order today.
DRY GOODS
85c
JIE.VS PURE WOOl, SOX   Only four dozen pairs left.
'I In- regular selling pi-Ice of these is ?l.r,il pair.   Special '
ill.VS  HEAVI   RIBBED   UNDERWEAR   Real  honesl   value.
See it before buying elsewhere. (pi   ri\
"   Per garment          91.0XJ
BOOTS AND SHOES
MEN'S SOLID LEATHER I, WtltH.WS, In ull sizes; th,, very
thing for tiiis weather. Absolutely waterproof. If you don't
believe nie ask the long Short man- he's wearing fl**| A AA
a pair right now.   .Non-combine price   UJIU.UU
As every otlier store in town knows.
Vou might buy Huy ut a Shoe Store, but yuu can't buy Ihis shoe
fur less money hums lure.
MEM'S AMERICAN RUBBERS) with the Red Band around tho
top.   See my window for price. —Enough Said.
An opposition that will not fall in line and (ix prices
with other stores is your best friend.
W. GORDON
THE CORNER STORE
Phone 13,3 Six
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
January 22,1921.
I
Quality Grocers
WE HANDLE THE BEST
GREAT WEST TEA
Haines Marmalade
PERRINS' BISCUITS
Old City Pure Jams
IN GLASS JARS ONLY
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
THE ROYAL BANK
OF CANADA
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
begs to advise that it has for rental at
moderate prices
SAFETY   DEPOSIT
BOXES
They are recommended for the protection from fire or
burglary of valuable business or private documents,
Victory Bonds, jewelry, etc.
THE MANAGER WILL BE GLAD TO FURNISH
PARTICULARS UPON APPLICATION
NOTICE
The First Sitting of the Court
of Revision of the Assessment
Roll will be held on February 8th
in the Council Chambers.
T. MORDY,
City Clerk.
Cumberland, B. C.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEKRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Dunsmuir Avo. Cumberland. B. C.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
Flrat Clans Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumlierland, B. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double!load)...$5.00
The old parishioner had been absent
from church for some weeks. Questioned by the minister he explained
that he had to watch the crops.
"Can you not leave them to Divine
protection?" demanded tho minister.
"Man, tbey boys be sich devils that
lt takes us both to do it," was the reply.
"Have you many close friends here?"
"Can't say.  I've never tried to borrow anything yet."
M
"ivy
INCUBATORS
BROODERS
We have the largest and most
complete stock of Poultry Supplies in B. C.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUES
A. I. JOHNSON & GO.
844 Cambie St.
Vancouver
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 0830 meets on the
second and fourth Wednesdays iu the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; Chas.
O'Brien, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer,
Primate Appeals
For Help for China
Heartrending Conditions Prevailing in Honan and Other
Provinces Call for Liberal Response From Everyone.
The following appeal has been sent
through Canada by the Primate of the
.Anglican Church, on behalf of the
Famine Holier Fund for China:
Appalling famine conditions exist in
.North China In the live Provinces of
Houan, Chihll, Shantung, Shensl and
Slinnsl. Thirty million lives nre in
danger. The lust two harvests have
boon totnl failures, hardly any ruin
having fallen for twelve months. Grout
distress prevails. The situation is desperate. Many are seeking to live on
leaves uml hark. Hundreds are dying.
Parents arc killing their children
rather than see them starve. Letters
Trom the missionaries In the famine
area give heart-rending descriptions
of conditions and appeal for help.
Chinese Government Appeals (or Help.
The Government of Chint has sent
tlie following message to tho Chinese
Consul-Genora) at Ottawa:
"Over one hundred thousand localities ure niTecled:  millions of
people ure destitute nnd dying of
famine.   This Is the biggest famine seen for forty yours.   Relief
fund is urgently needed."
Our own Bishop White sends this
word as lie hastens to the famine area:
"I have passed through the dread experiences of two famines in Honan,
and if, us our missionaries report, this
is worse than those which preceded it,
the situation must he horrible in the
extreme.
"To see these famine refugees
huddled   together,   niounlng  nnd
crying for bread, rolling on tlio
ground In (heir agony,  Is  moro
limn mortal man enn bear.   Hark
nnd leaves ef (rees, grass nnd roots
uml even clay are onion In their
distress,  with  awful  results.    I
have travelled for days through
llie famine regions, seeing sights
never to he forgotten, for often-
limes the dead were unhurieil by
(he roadside or In (he iields, tainting Ihe air for miles.
"Tlio most severe suffering will be
experienced  during this  winter,  but
the time of greatest mortality will undoubtedly be next spring.   As usual,
typhus will no doubt appear then, and
hundreds of thousands of starved and
enfeebled refugees will be snuilcd out
hy this deadly disease."
The present distress, keen as it is, is
hut a suggestion of the awful agony
through which North China must pass
boforo the winter is over.   Even should
rains fall they would bring no relief to
tlie starving millions until the harvest
in the late spring of the year.    The
disaster is of such magnitude that the
Chinese authorities, ready as they are,
cannot cope with it alone.   In Honan
a joint relief committee of Chinese and
foreigners has been formed, of which
Rev. Coo. E. Simmons of the Canadian
Anglican Mission is Foreign Treasurer.
The Japanese have organized a National Relief Fund.
The Rev, Geo. E. Simmons writes:
"I am working dny nfter dny as
u member of the Famine Committee for the Province and our hearts
uro nil soured with pity for tlie
numberless lives thnt must be lost
despite our best endeavors to save
life."
Every contributor may rest assured
that all monies received will he used
exclusively fo.1 famine relief, and will
be wisely administered.
Two motives, among others, should
specially move us to help with all our
power.
In the lirst placo, part of the sorely
afflicted area is comprised within the
Province of Honan, where our Canadian Church Mission is operating.
Sympathy shown by us to our converts
there will greatly commend our work
by indicating that we at the home base
have a care and lovo for our fellow
Christians nnd others In that far off
laud.
In tlio second place, quite apart from
any Christian or missionary sentiment,
more love for humanity ought to move
us to come to the Immediate relief of
suffering follow being who nro facing
terrible deaths from want and starvation.
I therefore appeal most earnestly to
our people to respond liberally to the
appeal.
I am, very truly yours,
S. I'. RUPERT'S LAND', Primate.
Corporation of the City of Cumberland
Financial Statement for the Year ending December 31,1920
RECEIPTS
TAXES—
City, General—
611.G0
Interest 	
School-
Current  	
25.18
8,421.20
605.07
47.00
Road Tax 	
Dog Tax 	
230.00
42.00
Trades Licences 	
2.112.50
.    1.002.00
592.23
770.00
School Government Grant....
20.04
109.40
20.48
Freight Refund 	
11.80
260.40
720.00
15.00
Night School	
98.00
Stable Account 	
42.00
552.00
Interest and Discount	
6.02
$5,263.09
9,163.45
EXPENIDTURES
Advertising     $    80.44
Printing     135.80
City Buildings  136.70
Election   76.31
Fire Protection     1,191,78
Insurance    132.75
Interest and Discount  126.25
2.384.50
$16,811.04
2,425.13
2,425
12,607
1,154.72
1.154.
3,000.
713.02
713.02
Total
1,880.03
Light and Water-
Current   $ 526.51
Supplies   142.37
Water   6.00
Supplies   4.80
Ollice— 	
Salaries    1,076.00
Stamps   20.00
Supplies   245.08
Sundries     84.20
Audit   20.00
Police— 	
Salaries    1,315.95
Supplies   138.10
Light and Water  '    51.40
Night Watchman  720.00
Streets nnd Sewers— 	
Labor    2,888.78
Material   1,772.00
Health Department— 	
Medical Officer  102.13
Scavenging   1,104.25
Telephone 	
Stable Account-
Feed   	
Repairs	
Loan  	
Legal	
Road Tax Refund .
Stock   	
Hauling  	
692.74
101.62
150.00
16.00
173.75
3.50
679.68
1,445.28
2,225.45
4,660.78
1,206.39
49.25
694.36
3,000.00
343.25
14,304.47
CITY TOTAL	
SCHOOLS—
Salaries   15,901.36
Supplies and Repairs    3,048.35
16,184.47
Night School .
18,949.70
98.00
19,047.70
$36,711.72 Total Expenditures for 1920  $35,232.20
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ACCOUNT
GENERAL TAXES—
Arrears (1920 rates plus interest).... $493.74
Delinquent (1919, plus interest)   163.60
SCHOOL TAXES, INSIDE—
Arrears (1920 rates plus Interest).... 468.93
Delinquent (1919, plus Interest)  143.30
SCHOOL TAXES, OUTSIDE—
Arrears  (1920, plus Interest)  94.21
Delinquent (1919, plus Interest)   28.47
$1,392.25
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE—
Scavenger Buckets	
REAL ESTATE—
Land owned by the City	
City Buildings 	
STOCK AND EQUIPMENT—
Wagons, Sleighs, etc       300.00
Horses .*.       300.00
Fire Hall Apparatus     1,800.00
Fire Motor Truck     2,700.00
Tiled Piping        120.00
Plough   34.11
Feed           65.00
Tarvia          220.00
25.50
4,000.00
3,438.50
Cash in hand
6,539.11
2,247.85
15,250.96
Total Assets   $16,643.31
LIABILITIES
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE—
Outstanding Cheques         802.34
Bank Overdraft         193.95
996.29
BALANCE STATEMENT
Outstanding Cheques $ 966.14   Cash ln hand  $2,247.85
Bank  Overdraft   193.95
1,160.09
Balance on hand  1,087.76
Dr. Elmo .Marshall, chiropractor and
drugloss healer, who was sentenced in
Vancouver to servo a month at Okalla
for practising the healing art contrary to the provisions of the Medical
Aet of the province was released Friday morning, and was met by a big
number of his fellow-workers and
friends.
'What makes your nose so red nnd
blistered—too   much   sunshine?"
'Nope!   Moonshine!"
Total   $2,247.S5   Total .
. $2,247.85
Cumberland, B. C, Jan. 6, 1921.
To the Mayor and Alderman of the City of Cumberland,
Cumberland, B. C.
Gentlemen—
I beg to submit herewith my report as Auditor for the
Corporation of the City of Cumberland for the year ending
December 31, 1920.
BALANCE.—The business of tho year shows a credit balance of $1,087.76, as opposed to a deficit of $392.29 for the
year 1919.
COLLECTIONS—An outstanding feature Is the amount
of money collected during the year both by the tax rates
and by voluntary subscriptions for various purposes. Taxes
outstanding at present are $1,392.25, as compared with
$1,970.79 in 1919 and $5,494.77 ln 1918. This le due to the
general prosperity of tbe city and to the beneficial effect
of the tax Bales.
During the year $1,062.90 was collected for paving Duns-
mulr Avenue. While this is a credit to those who contributed and to the Council for financing the balance of the
work, lt is evidence of the inadequacy of the present basis
of taxation that the work was not financed by the ordinary
methods. Although the city has no bonded debt, the rates
are practically at the maximum and lt will be Increasingly
difilcult iu future to raise the money required for ordinary
business. The question of changing the system of taxation
to meet the increased requirements ought to be given urgent
consldration by both the ratepayers and the Council.
SCHOOLS.—The cost of Schools has increased to
$18,949.70, being an Increase of $4,222.08 over last year.
This ls accounted for mainly by the Installation of new
furnaces and increase of salaries over those paid ln 1919.
The Government grant shows a corresponding Increase ot
$1,800.60.
TRADE LICENCES.—This source of revenue shows an
Increase of $642.50, due mainly to the Imposition of "near-
beer" licences iu the hotels.
In conclusion permit me to express my appreciation ot
the courtesy Bhown me by the City Clerk and his assistance in conducting the audit.
I havo the honor to be, gentlemen,
Your obedient servant,
C. W. WOOD, Auditor.
CONFIDENCE IN EMPIRE;
BUT CANADA HAS "RIGHT"
Doherty Explains the Independence of Canadian Representatives in Differing from Downing Street.
NEW YORK—"Canada, nlthough a
part of the British Empire, is a nation
in itself, and its spokesmen represent
only the Canadian people," says C. J.
Doherty, K.C, Minister of Justice of
Canada, declared on his arrival after
attending the meeting of the Council
of the League of Nations, at Geneva.
"I have the utmost confidence the
Empire will hold," he said, "but the
Empire members must stand together
on the basis of agreement, and not on
the basis of control. To get the voice
of the Empire It Is necessary to get the
voice of all the nations that compose
It. There need be no apprehension as
to Canada, which Is a nation within
the Empire, but persons who are sent
out to represent Canada are respon
sible only in their expressions to the
Canadian people."
Citing thc failure of Canadian representatives at the League Council to
agree with the British representatives
concerning certain mandates, and the
admission of certain countries, Mr.
Doherty explained: "We reserve the
right to our expressions, Independent
of anything when we differ with those
sent from Downing Street."
CLAIMS "P. R." WAS A
COMPLETE SUCCESS
VICTORIA.—Proportional Representation proved a complete success at
last week's civic election here, according to a telegram sent to Hon. W. L.
MacKenzie King, Leader of the Liberal
Opposition at Ottawa, by Alderman-
elect E. S. Woodward, Secretary of tho
local "P. R." organization. Mr. Woodward's telegram follows: "Proportional election complete success. Returning officer and staff, without previous experience, completed alder-
manlc count in fourteen hours. Spoiled
ballots less than five per cent. Labor
secured two seats, flrst time in history
of the city."
"HIGHLY MORAL BUT
DEADLY DULL," SAYS SUN
VANCOUVER.—"Extremely fair and
highly moral but deadly dull," ls how
the Vancouver Sun describes the civic
elections under Proportional Representation which took place last week.
The Sun says: "A 'P.R.1 election ls an
election with the kick taken out, a
non-alcoholic beverage, a christening
In which the baby can not possibly refuse to accept the name bestowed upon
it. So long as an election Is more uncertain than a horse race, you can get
the electors worked up to a pitch of excitement, but take away the element of
uncertainty and you take away the
element of excitement."
Only 6,0000 voters out of a list of
40,000 turned out to cast their ballots.
Possibly the wisdom of a man may
surpass that of a woman but when it
comes to tact he simply isn't In it January 22,1921.
TBE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
j6
Seven
Music and Photoplays
JOHN BARRYMORE IN
Dr. Jekyll and
Mr.JIyde
The Most Amazing Change of
Character Ever Achieved—
Wondrous Scenic Effects.
The greatest drama of dual personality ever written will be shown at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre this evening, when
John Barrymore, one of the greatest
screen actors ot the time, will take the
leading role in that famous story by
Robert Louis Stevenson, "Dr. Jekyl
and Mr. Hyde."
Mr. Barrymore has tbe best part, or
pair of parts, of his course through
the silent drama. The director, John
S. Robertson, has likewise wrought
wonders in the street scenes ot London. But it is Mr. Barrymore who Ib
worth seeing. His miming of the contrasted parts ls far above any Bcreen
portrayal for many a day. His Hyde
1b more than a mere brutal ruffian; it
is a wonderful reincarnation of the
Hyde of Stevenson's story. Throughout no realism is spared and the
whole film moves with exceeding
swiftness.
DOROTHY DALTON IN
Black js^ White""
Emotional Star Plays Triple Role
in Highly Dramatic Paramount Picture.
Dorotby Dalton is coming to the Ilo-
Ilo Theatre on Monday In "Black ls
White," a photoplay produced by Thos.
H. Ince. It was adapted from an original story by George Barr McCutcheon.
Miss Dalton plays a triple role and is
said to have been afforded unusual opportunities to display her versatility
and talents as an emotional actress.
The plot centres around Margaret
Brood, deeply ln love with her husband, Jim, who Is domineering and
Jealous without reason, even of the
love ot Margaret for Fred, their son.
Matters reach a climax when he accuses his wife of infidelity and she
leaves him. Margaret finds a refuge
ln the home of her Invalid sister,
Theresa, whom she strongly resembles.
Theresa dies, just as news comes that
Demetrius Strakosch, a baronet, has
arranged to adopt her as his daughter
and establish her ln his Paris residence. Margaret takes her sister's
place and goes to Strakosch. There
Jim Brood meets her, tailing to recognize her as his wife. He falls in love
with her and marries her. She is willing, desperately eager to see their sou
again and to revenge herslt on Jim.
Back In New York, Jim's old Jealousy
returns when he sees the ripening love
between Fred and his supposed stepmother. But by an untorseen develop
ment matters are straightened out
happily.
BLANCHE SWEET IN
Help Wanted, Male
A Gay Romance of a Maid Who
Wanted a Man—A Piquant,
Fine-Flavored, Merry Comedy
With a trunk bulging with Ave hun-
dred dollars' worth of clothes, the
same amount of money In her purse
for expenses, and a spirit of adventure
aided and abetted by a more or less
unrelalble amount of nerve, Leona
Stafford went a hunting for a rich
husband.
"To attract men you must be a mysterious woman with a past," her friend
had told her, when lt was decided that
Leona's thousand dollar legacy could
best be Invested ln a plot to ensnare a
millionaire.
So Leona brushed the dust oil her
French, borrowed Toodles,   a   feroc
iously tame bull dog, went to a fashionable seaside resort, pretended to be
the French widow ot a Russian and
hinted at a dark and hidden past.
Leona had hoped such procedure
would start something, and it did, but
not exactly what Blanche Sweet expected in "Help Wanted: Male," the
romantic comedy showing at the Ilo-
Ilo on Wednesday and Thursday of
next week.
The Story.
Leona Stafford, a hotel telephone
operator, was poor. When a rich
uncle died she looked forward to Inheriting enough to be able to keep the
old home and live a life of ease and
luxury. But, he left her only a
thousand dollars!
Edith, her chum, said the best way
she could invest it was In a daring
plan to ensnare a rich husband. It
sounded so adventurous and romantic
that Leona decided to do it. Accordingly one day the monotony of life at
the most fashionable hotel at a famous beach resort was broken by the
arrival of a dashing young blonds
dressed in black of a daring style and
leading a bull dog who expressed his
dislike of people by chasing them
about the hotel lobby and taking a
vice-like grip on the seat ot their
trousers.
A peep at the register disclosed the
fact that the mysterious woman was
Mme. Olga Stepbanoff.
Trailed By un Amateur Sleuth.
The clerk, a correspondence school
detective, had his suspicions of the
widow with a Russian name and a
French accent (yea, Leona had acquired a French accent with her flue
raiment), and was ready to accuse her
of anything. His continual spying upon her was annoying to Leona, who
waa disappointed because she couldn't
get a thrill out of a single man at the
hotel.
Of course, the young British aviator
proposed, but he thought she was
rich, and when be found out they were
both playing the same game, it was all
off!
Leona's only solace was ln being
herself to "Tubbs," whom she ran
across one day on the beach. He was
shabbily dressed and heavily bearded,
worked only when he had to, and
thought there were better things ln
life than money. She went on many
happy Ashing trips with "Tubbs" and
wished that rich men were as nice as
he, or that nice men were as rich as
he.
Then, suddenly trouble descended
thick and fast upon the slender Mrs.
Stepbanoff. Billy Kerr, an old friend,
arrived on the scene and nearly gave
her disguise away. His "old man" had
struck oil and he would be her rich
husband, but he was fat and funny,
and Leona didn't seem to want that
kind ot a rich man.
An Aviator Missing.
The clerk, convinced that she had
kidnapped Capt. Cromwell, an aviator
about whose whereabouts the newspapers were worrying, met her at
every corner and demanded, "Where is
Capt. Cromwell?"
Leona was nearly at her wits end
when a flirty Mrs. Dale had her purse
stolen and Leona was accused of the
loss.   Then things began to happen!
See this snappy comedy at the Hollo on Wednesday and Thursday of
next week.
name of her latest jcreeu work is
"Help Wanted: Male," and this unusual title lead her to show her friends
a weird collection of humor from the
newspapers. Here they are:
HELP WANTED: MALE—An honest
lawyer to prosecute a crooked one.
HELP  WANTED:    MALE—Bartender
capable of mixing mince pies.
HELP WANTED:   MALE—Cook, with
some Scotch In him preferred.
HELP    WANTED:    MALE—Man   to
look after garden, milk a cow with a
good voice accustomed to sing in tbe
choir.
WANTED—Respectable salesgirls; no
flirts need apply; we will teach you.
FOR SALE—Second-hand bicycle by a
lady with bent bars.
FOR RENT—Room to gentleman looking both ways and well ventilated.
FOR RENT—A house of 8 rooms and
two baths on the trolley line.
LOST—Valuable walking stick  by a
gentleman with an Ivory head.
FOR SALE—A bulldog; will eat anything; very fond of children.
ROOM  WANTED—By gentleman,  including kitchen privileges, where he
could occasionally cook himself.
Love is Love
Young love never adorned a photoplay more delightfully than it aaorns
"Love is Love," the William Fox production which shows at the Ilo-Ilo on
Friday* next. Albert Ray and Elinor
Fair are the two leading stars. These
two stars are as clever young folks as
ever handled romance and pathos; and
give plentiful dashes of their light
comedy.
The story unfolds the rise of Gerry
Sands, a boy who has been made the
tool of a scheming and criminal old
uncle but who, through the inspiration
of a good girl, turns his back on the
wrong course and, after interesting
complications, finds himself—and also
finds that love Is the greatest force in
the world, overcoming obstacles that
appeared immovable.
Don't Ever Marry
A Corking Comedy in Which is
A Newly-Made Husband and
Three Wives Who Claim Him.
HELP WANTED—ANYTHING
"Why read books," a man once said,
"when there Is so much romance—so
much adventure—bo much mystery—
in the columns of the dally press?"
And it is quite true. You cannot pick
up a single paper today without find
ing some remarkable occurrence which
ls as good as any novel. Blanche Sweet
thinks so, too.
The Pnthe star does not read Joke
books for the peculiar style of humor
that delights her, but looks through
the columns of the dally press.   The
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.    Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
On Saturday next, January 29, there
comes to the Ilo-Ilo one of the finest
productions ever shown to a Cumberland audience, when the Marshall
Neilan production, "Don't Ever Marry,"
will be shown.
"Don't Ever Marry" is the production by the noted director, which is uproarious comedy from the opening
scene to the closing episode. The
production is a surprise coming directly after the dramatic sensation
from the same director, "The River's
End," but it is safe to Bay tbat the
director will lose none of his admirers
through his latest effort, but will gain
many more, for it depicts a wbole
series of as laughable scenes as bas
ever been filmed, and the story ls
dramatic.
Picture An Ideal Comedy.
It is not so surprising, at tbat, that
Mr. Neilan should have produced
"Don't Ever Marry." It is just such
a comedy as all producers are always
seeking but which are seldom found.
There ls not a laugh In it dependent
upon the grotesquenesB of any character, but all the humor and comedy,
with which the picture abounds, come
from situations ln which every day
people find themselves through a combination of circumstances.
Marriage Flan does Wrong.
Deep trouble for the people Involved, which was farcical humor for
spectators, developed in Elmfield, a
little country village, due to the plans
of a pretty maid to avoid a marriage
upon which her mother had insisted.
She enlisted tbe aid of the best friend
of the man she really loved. Her
plan was simple. She would announce
that she had married the friend.
Ergo, no other marriage was possible.
After the announcement she planned
to go to her own home for the night
to pack. He was to go to a hotel.
The next day she would accompany
him to New York where he had accepted a position. Tbere they would
separate, she going to tbe home of a
friend until her true lover could come
to claim her.
The plan is complicated at the start
because the young man whom she has
selected to play the role of husband,
has secretly married on the day he is
to assume the role. The announcement is made, however, and then thc
plans go all wrong. Her excuse to go
home to pack Is brushed aside as nonsense, and the couple are conducted
by an Impromptu wedding party to his
rooms in the hotel, and left there to
begin their honeymoon.
The secret bride had seen them
taken to the hotel. The girl ls pretty.
But why attempt to describe the complications that ensue when Marshall
Neilan has depicted them with all their
humor In a motion picture, "Don't Ever
Marry?"
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, January 22nd
JOHN BARRYMORE
— IN-
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
By the well known author Robert Louis Stevenson
THE GREATEST DRAMA OF DUAL IDENTITY
EVER  WRITTEN
Monday, January 24th
Dorothy   Dalton
— IN —
BLACK is WHITE
IF TODAY fate seized you, an ill-treated wife—flashed you away from the world you
had known—told family and friends you were dead. AND THEN—if smiling Fortune
came to you—bade you begin a new life, as new as on the day you were born—in luxury, gaiety—far from the old ways, the old burdens—WOULD YOU TAKE THE
CHANCE. See Jhis marvellous romance of a woman thought dead, who learend to
LIVE.   Wish dashing Dorothy Dalton in sensational scenes in New York and Paris.
Tuesday, January 25th
AN EXTRA SPECIAL FEATURE
Please Get Married
Also the side-splitting Comedy
Hearts and Diamonds
Wednesday and Thursday, Jan. 26th & 27th
Jesse D. Hampton presents
Blanche Sweet
— IN —
Help Wanted:
Male
A PIQUANT, SPICY, PINE-FLAVORED BUBBLING COMEDY
THE   ANSWER  TO  "A   MAIDEN'S   PRAYER"—
SHE WANTED A MAN. Not a tall man, or a short man, or a "good
looker" or a kingly title. Sho was frank. She wanted a man with money.
But SHE had no money.   How did sho win him'.'   It's some system,
A RIPPLING  ROMANCE—MERRY, MIRTHFUL AND MISCHIEVOUS
Friday, January 28th
LOVE IS LOVE
STARRING
Albert Ray with Elinor Fair
Don't forget the Country Store Drawing
takes place each Friday Night Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
January 22, 1921.
DOWNWARD   PRICES
Within the past few days we have been notified of a considerable reduction in several
lines, and extend our customers the benefit, believing as we do that the first loss is the
least,   ere are a few prices:
$2.50
BIG   HORN   BRAND   OVERALLS   arc
marked now for regular soiling at, per pair	
BIG HORN WORK SHIRTS, dependable
mrrchandise. (£<>} CA
Price, each   tp&*0\J
WHITE FLANNELETTE SHEETS, 12-1,
full size; in pink or blue bor- &A   PA
der.   Woro $5.50.  Down to ... tjj^t tj\)
WHITE HEAVY QUALITY SHEETING
—Certainly a good wearer. & -I IP
Was $1.50 yard.   Now  tj)l.ltl
FINE WHITE SHEETING—Nice oven
thread; 2'/]. yards wido. Q J? _
Downward prico, yard t/t)<L
WHITE FLANNELETTE, good
quality; wide width, per yard..
BOYS' ROCK RIB HOSE, no better cdtt<m
hose on the market. Worth 90c.
Downward price	
GINGHAM—About 200 yards of splendid
quality, mostly pink checks. Q£/»
Special price, yard   OtlV
LADIES' RAIN COATS-
Onlv a few left	
$9.95
$25.00
50c
75c
LADIES' COATS, made of allwool velour.
Only a fow to go,
Downward price	
CHILDREN'S VELOUR AND TWEED
COATS—Greatly reduced. Wore $18.50
to $22.00. djjrt  CO
Clearing al $9.95 and tPJ.U,0\J
CHILDREN'S RAIN CAPES, the kind we
gu*arantee to give satisfac- (PF7 (Jft
tion. Prico $ 1.95 and     «p I »tjU
MEN'S TWEED RUBBER LINED COATS
—Regular $35.00 valuos. (£9/? AA
Reduced to $25.00 and  tPiiiU.UU
SWEAT COATS at greatly reduced prices.
LADIES' FINE LISLE HOSE, in pale blue
and pink.   We bought them at a snap
and givo you tho benefit.     Q Prs- (fl*"!
Price ,15c pair or O for «P JL
SEE OUR SPECIAL BEDSPREADS at	
$3.95
WE  INVITE  COMPARISON
DRYGOODS
GENT'S FURNISHINGS
LOST
BLACK COCKER SPANIEL, WITH
little white on breast; (lnder please
return   to Mrs. M. J.  Waddlngton,
opposite Anglican Church.  Reward,
1-3
HUNCH KEYS AT OR NEAR POST
Office; nnder please return to the
Islander Ollice and get reward.   3-5
COLD WRIST WATCH IN FRATER-
nlty Hall on Friday, January 7. Reward on returning to Isohel Prydo.
ON SUNDAY LAST, NEW WEED TIRE
CHAIN, between Royston anil the
Anglican Church, Cumberland. Reward on returning to Rev. W. Leversedge. 1-3
WANTED
GOOD   SECOND-HAND   PIANO —Apply Box A. IS., Islander. 2-4
FOR SALE
WHITE ROTARY SEWING MACHINE
In first-class condition. Apply to
Mrs. Peter .Myers, i\ew Townsite,
Cumberland. 3-5
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
January 13—Swell and Scow, Victoria; Gleeful, coastwise; Tartar, J. C.
Potter, Ocean Falls.
January 14—Charmer, C. P. R. Hulk
No. 1UU, Vancouver.
January 16—Glvenchy, Vancouver;
Glenhoro, James Carruthers, coastwise.
January 16—Spray and Scow, Victoria.
January 17—Molanope,
Vancouver; Progressive,
coastwise.
January IS—Chieftain
Princess .Mary, Vancouver
and scows, Seattle.
January ID—Maagen and Scow, Vancouver; Active, coastwise; Joyful and
Scow, Courtenay.
Qualicum.
Thlepval,
coastwise;
;  Katahdin
Church Notices
HOLY TIUM'JT CHURCH
Rev. W. Leversedge,
Soptiingeslnin Sunday.
Holy Communion, 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHUKCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
PRESENTATION TO
MR. A. McKINNON
ANNOUNCEMENT
F. C. Frazee, Chiropractor, has opened an office at Mrs. Cairns', Victoria
Street, Courtenay.   Consultation Freo.
Tho Iirm of Simon Leiser k Co, was
accidentally omitted from Iho list published In last week's Issue ns sending
Chrislnias parcels to Ihe Hospital.
G.W.V.A. MEMORIAL HALL
OPEN DAILY
The hall ls now open dally from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sundays from 2
to 6 p.m.
A few evenings ago Mayor MacDonald, Dr. MacNaughton, Dr. Hicks and
Mr. Charles Nash, representing the
Hoard of Management of St. George's
Presbyterian Church, and Mrs. Hudson
and Mrs. Charles White, representing
the Ladles' Aid of the church, surprised Mr, Alexander McKinnon at his
home, when iu the name of the members and adherents of the Church they
presented him with a beautiful eight-
day (dock as a token of appreciation
for bis loving and faithful Bervices as
superintendent of the Sunday School.
which position he filled for fifteen consecutive years.
Mr, McKinnon, iu a neatly worded
address, accepted the handsome gift
ami thanked the givers.
CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Alexander
Somerville desire to thank all
friends for their expressions of
sympathy in their recent sad
bereavement.
CLASSES IN
PITMAN'S   SHORTHAND
MISS M. MILLAR (Court Reporter) is prepared to
receive students wishing to learn Shorthand. Day or
Evening Classes.
For further particulars apply P.O. Box 561 or Phone
93L.
PKESBTTEHIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Sunday School at 2.30.
Evening Service at 7.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday evening
at 7.30.
Choir practice Friday evening at
7.30.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Hot. (1. II. Kinney, B.A, F.R.G.8.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11a.m.
Sunday School aud Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Pfeachlng Service, 7 p.m.
Young People's Society, Monday at
*.CU p.m.
S. B. Club, Tuesday nt 7.30 p.m.
Basketball Clubs, Tuesday night.
Bible Class Study, Wednesday, 7.30.
Choir Practice, Thursday at 7.30.
W.H.O, Club, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
HORN
".McKINNON-January  1(1,  lo Mr
.Mrs. II. G. McKinnon. a son.
and
LOGGING CAMPS TO
OPEN MIDDLE OF APRIL
Al the Logging convention held In
Vancouver this week ii was authoritatively slated that llie logging camps
would open up for active operations
about the middle of April,
CRUCIFIXION TO BE
GIVEN BEFORE EASTER
The choir of Holy Trinity Church,
assisted by other singers, Intends giving Stainer's Crucifixion before Easter.
Mr. \V. ('. Edwards will he the conductor.
Persons willing to help in this
beautiful oratorio aro requested to give
their names to Mr. Edwards or .Mr.
Mumford.
Thos. H. Carey
Fllli; AMI LIFE  INSURANCE
I'limhcrluml, B. ('.
Personal Mention
Mrs. T. R. Jackson, who has boon
visiting Cumberland for a few days,
returned lo Nanaimo Wednesday.
Mr. T. H. McAbe, of tho Oak Bay
Branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce of Victoria, lias beon transferred
to Cumberland.
Mr. George O'Brien, Safety First
Engineer of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., left for Ladysmith
on Thursday morning.
.Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Graham left
for Victoria and Vancouver Tuesday
morning.
.Mrs, .1. Newton returned to Nanaimo
Tuesday evening afler spending a few
days with Mrs. Thomas Oraham,
Mr. L Marks, ut" ihe Canadian Explosives, Vancouver, arrived in town
Wednesday and lei'l Friday.
Mrs. A. C. Lymn left fur Victoria
Monday morning and returned Thursday evening.
Mr. IT. A. Robertson, representing
tbo Canadian Explosives, Vancouver,
was in town during tbe week.
Mr. Wm. Richards returned to Ladysmith Thursday morning, alter spending a few days in town with liis
parents.
W. H O. CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR TERM
The W. H. O. Club of the Grace
Methodist Church elected its otlleers
for the new term, the following girls
being elected:
President, Miss IT. King; vice-president,'Miss J. Hughes; secretary, .Miss
M. Fouracre; assistant-secretary, Miss
E. Horbury, and Miss H. Lockart was
elected treasurer.
JAMES BATEMAN IS
KILLED BY ROCK SLIDE
James Bateman, an eld-timer on the
Island, was killed in No. 5 mine at
South Wellington on Tuesday night
by a fall of rock. He leaves to mourn
bis loss bis wife and several children.
Mr. Bateman was well known to Mr.
residents in Cumberland, who will be
grieved to hear of his death. He was
.r)8 years of age. Formerly Mr, Hate-
man lived in Ladysmith and worked in
the Extension Mine.
Much sympathy will be felt for tbo
widow and family in tlieir loss. Only
last June, Frank, one of the sons, \yas
killed in the same mine in a similar
manner.
Mr. Bateman was a son of Mrs.
Mason, who was iu Cumberland at tlio
time of tbe accident, and went south
Wednesday morning, accompanied by
Mr. George Bateman and Mrs. George
Richardson.
ORGAN FUND BOOSTED
As a result of the dame held Thursday evening in the Anglican Church
hall in aid of a new organ, no less tban
$50 was added to the fund, bringing it
to over $100. $2r. was added in silver
and notes showered nn the floor when
Mr. Dftlby was explaining the object <»f
a large painted thermometer. Mauy
dancers were on the floor, a very enjoyable timo being spent.
HONEY FIND AT BEVAN
About the middle of last summer Mr.
Ralph Gibson of Bevau was strolling
through tlie woodlands of that camp,
when he noticed several bees (lining
in an out of a tree-trunk. Mr. Gibson
kept this in mind and awaited a favorable opportunity of making further
investigation. Tli is opportunity presented itself hist Monday,'when be
again visited the spot. After felling
the tree and ransacking the bees' larder, lie found that he was the richer by
approximately evolon quarts of rich
honey.
ACCIDENT AT No. 7 MINE
Friends of Mr, !>. Ferguson of Bevan
will be pleased to know tbat be is recovering as quickly as can lie expected
from an accident received whilst lol
lowing his employment al No. 7 .Min;.
Mr. Ferguson was crushed between a
cur aud a stringer, resulting iu severe
bruises to (he lower part of llie holy.
On admission to the Cumberland Hos"
pital it was discovered lhat he was not
seriously hurt and Ills complete recovery is expected shortly. Mr. Ferguson
partnered Campbell at lull back in a
trial game three weeks ago for the
Cumberland soccer team.
BEVAN BOBBY BURNS BOYS
A meeting was held at tbe Store's
Hall, Bevan to make linal arrangements for the "Burns" celebration to
be held tonight. Mr. Quinn occupied
thc chair. After several short discussions it was decided to leave the
tatering in Ihe hands of the ladles'
committee, specially formed for this
occasion. Tlie music will be provided
by Murdock's orchestra of Cumberland.
A very interesting vocal program has
been arranged by a special committee.
It Is expected that a number of Cumberland friends will be down to participate. Tho tickets, which cost $3,
Include refreshments, concert and
dunce.   The fun begins at S.30.
GROCERIES
SERVICE
QUALITY
In buying your Groceries here you are assured of
getting the best in QUALITY at MOST pASONABLE
PRICES. We do not advertise bogus comparisons
showing how much you can save or how much you
should put in the bank! Neither do we advertise goods
at low prices and not have them in stock.
Our motto is a fair deal to all.
EXTRA SPECIAL
10-lb. tin Rogers' Syrup  $1.85
1 pkt. Robbie Burns' Pancake Flour 30
Regular price ,$2.15.
Special 1'or	
$1.75
American Sodas, .'15c pkt 3 for $1.00
Crete of Wheat, pkg 30c
Lowney's Breakfast Cocoa, j^-lb. tin 35c; 1-lb. tin 65c
Bulk Tea. per 11) 45c
Fresh Ground Codec, No. 1, per lb. «0c; No. 2, lb. 50c
Clark's and Daviss' Soups, all flavors 2 for 25c
Quaker Pork and Beans, tin 10c
Delmonte Pork ami Beans, small 2 for 25c
I arge size tins, 20c   fi fnr $1.10
King's Quality Flour, the Best—49-lb. sack   $3.40
Whole Wheat Flour—49-lb. sack $3.25
Graham Flour—49-lb. sack   $3.25
Libby's Pickles, Picnic Size 25c
Sweet Mixed, Sour Mixed, Sweet Chow, Sour
Chow, Gherkins and Sweet Relish. Bottle 25c
Pacific Milk, baby size. 10c tin 12 for $1.00
16-oz. size, 15c tin 7 for $1.00
■Maple Leaf Milk, 16-oz. size, 15c tin 7 for $1.00
Oranges, dozen 35c 3 dozen for $1.00
Cooking Apples, per lb 10c
JAM PRICES REDUCED
Cherry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.25
Strawberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Raspberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Blackberry Jam, 4-lb. tins $1.40
Apricot Jam, 4-lb. tins  $1.40
Plum Jam, 4-lb. tins 95c
BUY POTATOES NOW—IT WILL PAY YOU
Yakima Netted Gems, guaranteed the best.   100-lb.
sack for $2.75
Simon Leiser &Co.
Phone 38. Limited
FOR SALE
CORNER KNOWN AS THE WILLARD BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, B. C.
Good paying proposition.   For full particulars apply
P. O. BOX 8fi, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
inspiring address
by miss McGregor
i
]
'
A splendidly attended meeting of the
Woman's Missionary Society and the
Young Woman's .Missionary Society,
and the Live Wire Club, was held in
ihe basement of St. George's Presbyterian Church on Thursday evening.
The meeting was presided over by Mrs.
Hood, president of the Woman's Missionary Society. Mrs. Colman led in
the devotional exercises, and gave a
very helpful address.
The chief speaker of the evening was
.Miss McGregor, Travelling Secretary
ni' the Woman's Missionary Society of
llie Presbyterian Church in Canada
(Western Division), who gave a mug-
nilicont address on tbo Religious
Problem of Canada from the viewpoint
of church work. In her survey of
Canada she gave her intensely interested audience, in u most graphic and
picturesque manner, a blrdseye view
of conditions as tbey am in the different provinces of Canada, and especially in the province of Quebec. All
present were delighted with the eloquent address.
Refreshments wero served at the
conclusion of an inspiring und helpful
meeting.
INDUSTRIAL AND
SOCIAL PROBLEMS
Tho report of the Lambeth Conference on Industrial and Social Problems
ls truly an International document.
Representatives from the West Indies,
Persia, New Zealand, Australia, Scotland, Canada, United States, India, as
well as Rishops of Kngland, were members of the committee.
It is a distinctively Christian pronouncement, marked by clarity of
Ihoughl aud breadth of outlook anil
sympathy, and  a   wholesome  sanity.
This document will be read and discussed ou .Monday next at the meeting
of Holy Trinity .Men's Club. A cordial
invitation is issued to all interested
to he present and tako part ln the discussion.
BOOK SHOWER FOR G.W.V.A.
Mrs. J. Walton is holding a "Book
Shower" to take place on February 2,
from 4 to C o'clock, ln aid of the O. W.
V. A. library. Hooks ot any description will be gladly received on behalf
of this worthy cause.
i-     sr. regm. <-1Y*\
$50 to $5,000
A YEAR FOR LIFE
A CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ANNUITY PROVIDES IT
* —No better life investment available
—No better security obtainable
—Cannot be seized or levied upon for any cause
—Will be replaced if lost, stolen or destroyed
■ —Not affected by trade depression
—Free from Dominion Income Tax
—No medical examination required
Anyone over the age of 5 years resident or domiciled in Canada
may purchase.
Any two persons may purchase jointly.
Employers may purchase for their employees—school boards for
their teachers—congregations for their ministers.
Apply to y.nir postmaster; or write, postage free, to S. T. Bastedo, Super-
. int tn. lent uf Annuities, Ottawa, for new booklet and other Information desired.
' '       State lex and age last birthday. ■
■ 4ttt»t'M^tt»'l'»'Ms»4'tt»*«^^^^***»»->»sM'*-l'***s>»»t

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