BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Cumberland Islander Jun 4, 1921

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342510.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342510.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342510-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342510-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342510-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342510-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342510-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342510-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342510-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342510.ris

Full Text

Array ■pp
I**--*-*-*
Provincial Library
f?
^
A>
i
tf
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which li consolidated the Cumberland Sews.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 23.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Big Gathering
ofB.C.P.F.A.
Many Important Matters Dealt
With at Representative Gathering in Vancouver.
Tho general meeting of the British
Columbia Provincial Football Association took place Inst Saturday, May 2S,
in the Sportsmen Koom of the Hotel
Vancouver, nearly fifty delegates being present, representing over one
hundred football teams which are
affiliated with the association.
The gentlemen representing Cum-
lierlnnd were Mr. Charles Graham,
Cumberland United Football Club;
Mr. Jas. L. Brown, Cumberland and
District Junior League, and Mr. N.
Bevis. second vice-president of the
B.C.P.RA.
Mr. Jack Russell, president of the
association, occupied the chair.
Ol'liclnls Refuse to Apologize.
Preceding the general meeting the
council held a session to complete
arrangements for the coming visit of
the Scottish team to the province,
also to consider an appeal from the
St. Andrew's football club against the
sentences handed out to three of their
ollicials for endeavoring to hold up the
St. Andrews-Cumberland game final
of the McHMdo Shield at Vancouver
on May 7. The suspended officials
were given another opportunity to re-
great their action, but declared they
would not, therefore the suspension
of sine die still stands as passed at
the previous council meeting.    *
I'cnrriil Heeling.
President Russell then called tbe
general meeting to order. After the
minutes of tlie previous general meeting were read, the secretary submitted
his report and financial statement for
(Continued on Page Two)
SPELLING CONTEST FOR
SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT
Tlie Comox District Teachers' Association is conducting a spelling competition for all schools in the district.
Preliminary contests were held at the
schools on Thursday, and three pupils
from each school will represent their
second, third and fourth readers respectively on June 10 at the final contest in Cumberland.
Eighty per cent, of the words will
be from the respective renders and 20
per cent, from words In common use
not in the readers. The final test list
will be the same as used in Vancouver.
All entries for tlie final should be sent
to Mr. C. E. Burbridge, Box 586, Cumberland.
Entries have been received from
Courtenay, Union Bay, Bevan, Headquarters, Mervllle and Grantham.
NO AUTOS ALLOWED ON
BASEBALL GROUNDS
Notice is given In our advertising
columns Unit during tlie progress of
baseball games no automobiles will
he allowed on the Recreation Grounds.
CHILDREN'S SERVICE
AT HOLY TRINITY
The nnnnnl Children's Evensong
was held Sunday last in Holy Trinity
Church. Tlie children assembled In
the parish hall and marched In procession to their seats. The hymns
were appropriate for the occasion aird
wero sung with much spirit by the
children, The Rev. Leversedge con
ducted the service and gave a very
helpful address from Christ the Good
Shepherd. If the remarks of the vicar
wero felt by the adult members of tho
congregation tliey will have far-
reaching affects.
Nanaimo Play
At Cumberland
First Game of Connaught Cup
Series Likely Be Played on
Local Grounds June 11.
VANCOUVER.—At a meeting of the
B. C. P. F. A. held on Tuesday night,
the qualifying knock-out competition
lo determine the team for the Connaught Cup series was arranged. The
draw was as follows:
Cumberland vs. Nanaimo.
Ladysmith vs. Wallace's.
First named clubs to have choice of
grounds and games to be played on
Saturday, June 11.
Thc final was set for June 25 on a
ground to be arranged after the above
matches are decided, and all games to
be played to a finish should a draw
occur after ninety minutes. The Island local executives are to appoint
referees.
BOWLING GREEN MOOTED
There has been some talk the last
ton days of the advisability of erecting a bowling green in Cumberland.
The project has our hearty commendation and would be a decided asset
to the city, ln the writer's opinion
the City Park would be a most excellent place to have one erected.
Perhaps some of our readers who
are Interested will express their views
through the columns of The Islander.
Some good results might be obtained.
BASEBALL GAME SUNDAY
The same team that played against
Courtenay last Sunday will line up
again on Sunday next at the Recreation Grounds at 2.30, when the team
from Union Bay will be their opponents.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
May 26—Chemaihus, coastwise.
May 27—Charmer, coastwise; Melanope, Vancouver; P. W„ Honeymoon, Kildala, Wireless, coastwise.
May 28—Gleeful, coastwise; Clayburn and scow, Bellingham.
May 29—Eastern Prince, Colon,
("anal Zone.
May 30—Spray, Chemalnus; Bell-
flower, Japan; Glenboro, coastwise.
May 31—Alcedo, coastwise.
June 1—Olive M„ coastwise.
Collections For
Salvation Army
In acknowledging the receipt of
$308.50 collected for the Salvation
Army, Adjutant R. E. Clark, of Vancouver, has forwarded the following
letter Ao Mr. Thomas Graham, General
Superintendent:
"May 30th, 1921.
"Thomas Graham, Esq.,
"Canadian Collieries, Ltd.,
"Cumberland, B. C.
"Dear Sir,—Attached please find receipt for $308.50, result of drive held
In our Interest at Cumberland. We
thank you sincerely for your personal
oversight In this matter and think you
have done well considering the number of appeals you have.
"I presume Ensign Nelson will be
writing you on her return to the city.
"Sincerely yours,
"R. E. CLARK, Adjutant."
A very enjoyable evening was spent
nt tho home of Mr. and Mra. F. J.
Dalby on Tuesday evening last, when
a number of young folks gathered together to make merry. During the
evening many musical items were
rendered. Dancing and cards were
nlso part  of the evening's  pleasure.
SUMMER SCHEDULE
AT ILO-ILO THEATRE
Daily Shows Will Be From
7 to 10 o'Clock, With a
Continuous Show.
Patrons of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
are notified that the Summer
Schedule will go Into effect on
Monday evening next, when
there will be a continuous show
from 7 to 10 o'clock each night.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW?
Who had the nice plump Italian baby
left on their back-door step early this
week?
What did the lady tennis player say
when she missed an easy ball? Sound
ed something like "Ham!!" spelt with
a D!
Who wore the couple that got
marooned up the Lake on Wednesday
night? Was It really 2.45 a.m. when
they reached home?
When is that young lady with the
dual personality coming back?
Why so many young bloods were
heading for the Lake on Saturday afternoon, nnd did quite a number of
them get no further than Chinatown?
If there is any more of that stuff
left with which they were filling the
Bevan cup on Saturday night?
Where the road eventually led the
couple who struck the wrong trail after leaving the dance at Bevan a few
nights ago?
If the Bevau Challenger bas still
got his five hundred bucks bandy?
What is the attraction on the Courtenay Road that draws the same Cumberland people every night between
8 and 10.30? Is the oriental cemetery
so pretty to look at?
If all the youngsters, In giving the
same opinion Saturday night, managed
to convince the big guy that Bevan
bas the best Junior team on the Island?
Constable Agassiz
Goes To Sidney
Provincial Constable C. F. Lucian
Agassiz, who has been tn charge of
the local office and district since the
end of January, left Thursday morning to take charge of the Sidney district, accompanied by Mrs. Agassiz.
This Ib the station Mr. Agassiz has
most desired since he entered the service of the Provincial Police, and the
department has now compiled with
his request.
The general public regret losing the
genial constable and his wife, both of
whom have become very popular during their short stay In the district.
For over twelve years Mr. Agassiz
filled the position of British Vice-
Consul at Tacoma and in recognition
ot the valuable services he rendered
during the war he recently received a
commendatory letter from the Foreign
Office in London, enclosing a cheque
for two hundred pounds, and has been
informed tbat lt ls the Intention of
the Foreign Office to present him with
an engraved teetimonial of the appreciation of his services.
Constable Dunbar arrived Wednesday evening to take charge ot the local
Provincial Police district. He has
been transferred from Sidney.
CONSTABLE BELL SUCCEEDS
DAWLEY AT COUBTENAY
Constable Bell, who has been transferred from Mllepost 50 on the old
Cariboo Road, is to succeed Constable
R. Dawley, of Courtenay, who leaves
tbe service of the Provincial Police
this week.
CHANGE AT CAMPBELL RIVER.
Another change which takes place
ln the Provincial Police force on the
Upper Island Ib at Campbell River,
where Constable Williams haa been
transferred to a. position on tbe Mainland.
RED CROSS MEMBERSHIP
CAMPAIGN NEXT WEEK
Throughout British Columbia next
week the general public—which means
everyone—are asked by the Canadian
Red Cross Society to enrol as members at the very modest fee of one
dollar for men and women and twenty-
five cents for juniors.
Rev. W. Leversedge will receive applications for membership. It was
intended to call a public meeting In
this connection, but after consultation with Mayor MacDonald lt was
decided to inform the secretary of tbe
Red Cross Society that the time was
thought inopportune for a drive in
this district, and suggesting September as the best time.
However, all who desire to enlist
now and help in extending the splendid work being done by the famous
society, are asked to give their applications to Rev. W. Leversedge.
GARDEN PARTY ON
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15
The Women's Auxiliary of Holy
Trinity Church will hold a garden
party on Wednesday, June 15, on the
lawn of the vicarage. Afternoon tea,
Ice cream and strawberries will be
served.
SALE OF WORK
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
In the Union Hall, opening at 3.30
on Saturday afternoon and continuing
until 9.30 at night, the Women's Benefit Association of the Maccabees will
hold a sale of work. Home-made
candy, aprons, children's dresses,
rompers, etc., will be on Bale, and tea
and ice creams will be served.
Taking of Census
In Full Swing
On Wednesday morning enumerators all over Canada staried out on the
gigantic task of gathering the information for tlie compilation of tin
sixth declnnial census since Confed
eratlon. Every mini, woman ami child
living within the Dbmlnlon will be
registered if possible, inn] every farm
animal will have lis place within the
records. Tlie Dominion hns been divided Into districts as nearly ns possible approaching electoral districts,
There are 247 commissioners and 13,-
ooo enumerators, The cost of the
census lo the country will lie nboul
two million dollnrs.
Mr. E. H. Hicks-Beach is Ibe olllcial
commissioner, and he has 2S enumerators to assist him. Mr. N. I). Dowdall
ls taking tlie local Information,
On Wednesday morning. .Messrs. J.
Walton and Win. Merrifield, with a
launch and crew, left to take tlle census in Powell River, Lnsquottl and
Texadn islands. They have a big district and many nooks nnd corners lo
visit, and will probably be gone some
four or five weeks.
MILLIGAN LEFT FOB REGINA.
Mr. W. Milligan, a star member of
the forward line of tlie Cumberland
football team, left on Thursday morning for Regina. where he has accepted
a position at the printing business, Mr,
Milligan being a printer by trade. His
departure will be keenly felt by the
local team, as he was a brilliant player
and his combination play with Ills
team-mates on the forward lino, especially with Bannerman, was a feature of the local team's gumes. The
playing of Bannerman and Milligan
has been likened to the working of a
well regulated machine.
NEW STORE FOR
HALLIDAY'S BAKERY
Work will be commenced on the remodelling of tho New Home Bakery,
operated by Mr. Jas. Halliday, within
a few days. It is the intention of Mr.
Halliday to have a first-class store,
with a much improved frontage. A
ttfo-sturey building will be erected
and a first-class tea-room will he added
on the second storey, witli accommodation for about 40 people. Tbere will
also be a special room for ladies only.
There Is not a place In (own operating such service, and Mr. Halliday Is
to be complimented on Ibis innovation. In addition to the improvements
to tlie store, the bakehouse at the rear
of the premises will also be enlarged
and a garage built to liouso the two
cars. It is hoped lo have the new
buildings completed as soon as possible, and the work will be undertaken
by Mr. T. Banks.
BEVAN JUNIORS WIN
CHALLENGE CUI
In the re-play on Saturday lust of
the drawn game between Cumberland
Juniors and Bevan Juniors, played on
Empire Day for the Challenge Cup,
the Bevan team were fortunate in
winning tiie game witli the long end of
a 4 to 1 Bcore.
The game was well contested and
some good football was shown by both
teams, but the Cumlierland.team appeared to become discouraged In llie
second half owing to some unsatisfactory decision by tbe referee, and
which were probably mainly responsible for the big score by Bevan. II
cau be fairly said that (he score does
not represent the play.
Keenan and Thompson scored one
goal each and Aitken two. for Bevan,
while Mitchell registered llie Cumber
land goal.
BIG DANCE AT BEVAN
IN HONOR OF WINNEKS
Band Contests
Held Next Month
Cumberland Band Practising in
Earnest for Coming Event
At Ladysmith July 2.
The Cumberland City Band has
seitleil down to regular practlco, tu
ihey have entered tor tho Band Con
lest for the Island bands whlcb is ti
lu- held ni Ladyamlth on Saturday
July 2. The band is now practising
three hours on live night a week, in
oi-iier to gel Into ai form,
In nil thore me lour contorts, ns
follows:
Firsl Selection, open to nil sinn
lent- bands he Island.
Second Overture, open to nil mini
lem- bauds ou the Island.
Third—Overture, confined to col
llory hands on the Island.
Fourth- -March, open to all amateur
bands on the Island.
Tho players in the local band nre
taking n great interest iu the forthcoming contest, and if they continue
with iheir practices and under such
u capable leader ns Mr. Alverstone,
thero Is no doubt that tbo band from
our town will givo Ihe others n hard
run in I ho contests.
GASOLINE CAPACITY
GREATLY INCREASED
Tlie Cumberland Motor Works have
just finished Installing another 500-
giillon gasoline lank, thus doubling
Ihe former capacity. Tills lank has
been set in tlie road opposite the old
one and is connected to the original
pump. The addeil storage will he of
great benefit lo motorists during the
summer season, when (ravel Is heavy
and (he demand  on   gasoline  great.
Church Parade Of
Masons June 12
TIiu annual church parade of olllcers
and members of Cumberland Lodge
No. 2G, A. F. & A. M., will Im held ul
Holy Trinity Church on the evening
of Sunday, June 12, This is a week
earlier lhan usual, but is occasioned
hy the fact that the Grand Lodge of
British Columbia will hu in session
during tlio week of June 20, and many
members of (he local lodges will he
in attendance at Victoria.
GKAPTD .TiOnGIi UKIITIMJ HIM- UK
NOTAHLK EVENT.
Masons of British Columbia are
looking forward with keen anticipation
to tlie jubilee celebration of Iho Grand
Lodge of li. C. The 60th annual communication of the Grand Lodge will be
held ut Victoria in the Masonic Temple
on Wednesday. June 'i'l. Special ceremonies, including the conferring of
honors on certain distinguished members for llieir services to the order
will mark the occasion.
Tbe communication will lasl three
days, June 22, 'S,. ami 24, Arrangements for tbe entertainment of more
than 2.r>D delegates are being made by
tbe bulges nf Victoria, ll is expected
that every lodge In Ibe province will
be represented al this notable mini
versa ry celebration.
Immediately preceding the Grand
Lodge will he held the (bird annual
convocation of the Grand Chapter of
Royal Arch Masons of H. C, al tin
same place, on June 21. About 101
delegates will attend ibis meeting,
CITY BAND HOLDING
BIG DANCE THURSDAY
Newly - Organized Seven Piece
Orchestra Will Supply Music
LOST—VANITY CASE, STERLING
silver, initials O.L.B., between new
tenuis court and Ilo-Ilo Theatre, on
evening of June 1. Please return to
Islander ollice.
On Thursday next, June 9, the Cumberland City Band will hold a dance
in the Ilo-Ilo Hall, (or the purpose of
raising money (or the general fund.
The band intends to take part ln the
contest of Vancouver Island bands to
be held at Ladysmith on Saturday,
July 2.
It is hoped the dancing folk will
give this dance good support. Dancing will be (rom 9.30 to 2 a.m., and
admission has been fixed at 75 cents
(or gents and 25 cents (or ladies.
Latest up-to-date music will be sup
plied by the recently organized seven-
piece orchestra, comprising piano
two violins, clarinet, cornet, trombone and trap drums.
Jl8do-ln.B.C. Week, Juno 20-25.
250 People Attend Compliimn-
tary Dance tu ld>van Juniors.
On Saturday night Inst, nt short
notice, the people ot llevan held a IiIk
dance lu honor of the ilevnn Junior
soccer team, who won Hie Empire liny
Challenge Cup when tliey defeated
Cumberland Juniors lu Hie pliiy-oll' on
Saturday afternoon by 'I goals lo I.
Some 250 people attended Hie dance,
many going from Cumberland; officers
and members of the United Football
Club were well represented.
Splendid music was supplied hy nn
orchestra consisting of Miss Harris,
pianist; R. Walker, Sr.. violinist: It.
Walker, Jr., drums, and Mr. Duuslre,
violinist.
WHIST KIIIVK AM) DANCE
A whist drive nnil dance will he held
tonight (Friday) in Hie Memorial Hall
under auspices of Women's Auxiliary
of the G.W.V.A. Admission 50 cents,
including refreshments.
Mr. Wm. Mordy spent llie week end
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos.
Mordy, afterwards going to Headquarters on business, He is expected
to return on Saturday.
Scottish Team
Plays at Nanaimo
Special Trains for Came on June
20 Against Upper Island
Representatives.
BASEBALL GAME
ENDED IN DRAW
(Mi Sunday afternoon bed Cumber
land seniors engaged tbe Courtenay
baseball team on the local ground
Courtenay got away with a good lead
in tin' first inning, when they scored
four runs, afler which the gamo settled down; in the sixth and seventh
Cumberland came through wltb seven
runs, Courtenay evening up in tin'
eighth and ninth, The game ended in
a draw, wilh -S runs each
Johnnie Robinson did good work
ou tlio mound tor the local team.
The number of autos on thu grounds
were a source of interruption, when
the ball got under Ihem, and notice
is now given lhat earn will not. he
permitted iu the grounds during baseball games.
The line-up of (he teams were:
Courtenay—Downey, c; J. Robin-
sun. |i; MoKarlnno, lb; Dixon, 2b;
Prlngle, 3b; McLean, ss; H. Little, If;
A. Robinson, cf; \i. Roblnsiu, rf.
Cumberland— Kerr, e; Itoyd, p;
pantiot'inan, lb; Conti, 2b; Marocchl,
3b; n. Hunden, ss; Weetflold, lb; Harrison, cf; Robinson, rf.
Umpires   Aitken and Dallas.
A mooting or tin. upper i: land
Football AmocIuUoii executive took
place ;n tin- Windsor Hotol, Nanaimo,
on  Friday  hist, thr   following   being
present:   Mr. Thorn) i.  pri sldenl;
Mr. James I.. Hrown. vice-president;
Mr. \v. Macdonald, secretar) treasurer, and Messrs, Bovfs and Mlchle,
members of ine executive,
Olllj One (.'ante On Upper Island.
Tho moBl Imporinnt business taken
np was the coming visit tf. the Upper
Island of the famous Scottish football
team, at prdsoill inuring Canada. The
association was notified by Iho soere-
tary of the Provincial Association
thai the game would be played al Na-
niPimo, tbo most central place for the
benefit uf tin- football fans, as the
Scottish foam could only play ono
gam.- on Hie I'pper Island district;
also lhal a top in bo selected from the
teams in Ibis district In meet the
visitors on Monday. Juno 20. Tho following aggregation was selected:
Tcjiiii lo Play Scottish*
Goal   shepherd   (Ladysmith).
Backs—Strang and Campbell (Cumberland).   Strang will lie captain.
Half-backs T. Dickinson (Xanainio i, Roberts (Cumberland), Stobbart (Nanaimo).
Forwards - O'Brien (Nanaimo),
Robertson (Nanaimo), Davjes (Lady-
mith), Hltchens and Home (Cumberland).
Tho following wero chosen as reserves to till in ihe positions to,which
they are selected;
Reserve goalkeeper—Walker (Cumberland),
Reserve back—Hell  (Nanaimo).
Reserve half-back—Conti (Cumber*
laud).
Reserve forward—McGregor (Nanaimo).
Manager- Walson (Nanaimo).
Trainer-Rowan  (Cumberland).
Tlie appointing of tlie roferee and
linesmen was loft iu the bands of the
Referees' Association.
Burns Club f» Help Entertain.
The association has asked tbo Nanaimo Burns Club io help entertain
the visitors while in Nanaimo. Everything will be done for the comfort of
tbe Scotchmen, and i( is hoped to givo
them ii good impression of the sportsmen of tho Upper Island district.
Team in Cumborlund Colors-
It was decided to ploy iii the Cumberland colors, namely, royal bluo
jerseys, Tbo team is to he called tbo
Upper Island Solecl Team, and tbo
executive have every confidence that
Ihe nbove aggregation will give the
Scotchmen tho gome of tbelr tour. Of
course this can only bo dime by the
players getting Into hard training
from the jump and giving Iheir best
display nu ihe dav of the greal game.
A great deal depends on Iho manager
nml trainer and we know that those
positions aro also well filled.
-Nilim* Plnycd SlondnVj Juno -".
The game is to be played on tho
Cricket Grouuds, Nanaimo, on Monday, .1  20    The ki< I*, "ii  i    | lai. d
at i; o'clock prompt.
The executive < ommitleo arc making arrangen is to bundle Um larg-
oal crowd that ever witnessed a foot
ball ga  iu Ibis ill; trict. No automobile, will be allowed on the grouuds
mi thai day, in onablo tlio exei utlvo to
provide accommodation for all and at
the same timo taking ovi ry proven
tion ngalnal ;>< cldenls Tie' prim of
udml   mn  i. -ci ;ii  • i mi pei   pi, on
The secretary of tbe a n oi [ation wa t
instructed to write to Hie K, \ \, RJy,
Company asking tor Bpecial trains
both north ami south oi Nanaimo,
li is hoped bis efforts will lie successful as several hundred will go front
this district if suitable train arrange'
ments are provided. A largo number
will also go by automobile.
I'p to date the Scottish tenm are
registering huge scores against all
their opponents en route on Iheir tour,
but it is to be hoped their record will
he held \\i* when thoy appear at Nanaimo, Everybody go to ihe Huh City
 1 boost for the Upper t laud team!
Mrs. Tarbell entertained Borne 40
ladies to tea ou Thursday afternoon.
The rooms were gaily bedocked With
leasonubld flowers nnd pre.-0111011 a
very gny appearance, Mi..- Molly Tarbell assisted at Uie i«-;t. and also receiving the guests along wilh Mrs.
Tarbell. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 4, 1921.
t. m.
Phone 31
P. 0. Box 279
McLaughlin
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus tlie Master Six is better known and more widely-
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for the
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK, WILLEMAR & WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. 0. Box 153
1 NewCarsfor Old
U      Mai\e that Car loot\ lii\e a new one |§
| Phone 135Courtenay |_
§§j AND WE WILL GIVE YOU AN ESTIMATE H
I K. P. Auto Painting Co. !
I    ISLAND HIGHWAY COURTENAY    m
m ALL WORK GUARANTEED
AAA:
Union Lodge  No.  11
I. 0. 0. F.
WILL HOLD THEIR
Second Annual Picnic
AT ROYSTON, B. C, ON
Saturday, June the 18th
Visiting Brethren alid Sister Rebekahs will meet at the
Fratenity Hall at 9 a.m.
An immense deposit of calcium carbonate between Merritt and Aspen
Grove is to be developed by a Kroup
of Merritt business men. They intend
to manufacture kalaomine, razor bono
paste, silver polish and otlier commodities.
MOTORCYCLE RECORD
PORTLAND.—Fred. Ludlow rode to
a new Pacific Coast record for the five-
mile dirt track record wl^>n he pushed
his motorcycle through the quintette
in 3 min. 59 sec, on the Rose City
motorcycle speedway sunday.
Big Gathering
ofB.C.P.F.A.
(Continued from Page One)
the past season.   The financial statement is as follows:
Statement foi Year Eliding May, 1821.
INCOME.
Balance from last year  $   46.00
Afllliation fees     127.50
\ds. iu Constitution booklet...     40.UO
Repayment of loan to Lower
Mainland Dlst, Ex      12.00
Refund   of  money   ordor   tor
referee's charts        4.80
Receipts—
McBride Sheild series games 3140,26
Total
.   $2370.05
EXPENSES.
Travelling   expenses.   Council
members  $ 125.SI
li. F, A. affiliation fee      50.00
Printing Constitutions      no.lio
Loan to Mainland District Executive       12.00
li. K. A. Constitutions      10.00
Printing, stationery, postages,
etc      il.l
Rental account, council meetings           S.OO
Telegrams     8.
Disbursements—McBride
Shield series games  1750.00
Balance—In bank  $324.01
Cash    45   324.48
Total    $2370.05
Election nf Olllcers.
The election of officers then took
place, three of the members of last
year's council declining nomination.
The election resulted as follows:
Mr, Russell, president.
Mr. Leith, first vice-president.
Mr. N. Bevis, second vice-president.
Olllcers and council for tlie season
1921-22 were:
Honorary president, Mr. Thomas
Oraham, Cumberland, re-elected.
Honorary vice-president, Mr. John
Hunt, Nanaimo, re-elected.
President, Mr, D. Nelson, Vancouver.
First vice-president, Mr. J. Adam,
Victoria.
Second vice-president, Mr. Grieves,
Vancouver
Secretary. Mr. G. K. Morton, reelected.
Upper Island Council Members.
Members elected to the council for
the Upper Island district:
Mr.   Charles   Graham,  Cumberland
Mr. Wm. Macdonald. Nanaimo.
Loner Island District.
Mr. A. Baker, Victoria.
Mr. J. Sullivan, Victoria.
Vancouver Districts
Mr. A. Robertson, Mr. J. Mute. Mr.
A. Milne, Mr. A. McLean, nil of Van
couver.
It was agreed that the late council
lie asked to act in conjunction with
the new council to complete arrange
ments for the tour in British Columbia of the Scottish team.
Scoltish Team Games.
The games to be played by the Scottish team lu Britisli Columbia are as
follows:
At Vancouver, June IS, against ;
team selected from Vancouver dis
trict.
At Nanaimo, June 20, against a tean
selected from Upper Island district.
At Victoria, June 22, ngainst a tean
selected from Victoria district.
The association Is endeavoring to
secure a fourth game, to be played at
Vancouver on June 23, but this ls
doubtful as the visitors are scheduled
to leave Vancouver on the evening of
that date by boat for Prince Rupert
Junior Provincial  Championship.
In view of the fact that so many
junior clubs have affiliated with tlie
association, n Inrge committee was
appointed lo draw up rules nnd suggestions ro a provincial championship
among juniors, as in llie senior class,
nlso a uniform age limit for juniors.
Secretary Presented with Gold IValeli
At the close of the meeting .Mr.
Russell, president, presented Mr. G. K,
.Morton, the energetic secretary, with
a gold watch in appreciation of his
services during the past season.
Something Good
to Eat
Something made of good Hour,
of good milk, of good, nourishing compressed yeast, of good
shortening!
A PURE FOOD PRODUCT
A product with a fine, natural
flavor, with a satisfying slice,
with a crisp crust.
What could it be but Bread—
the perfect food.
Bread'is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
GOOD   BREAD
is Bread at its Best—insist on it.
A Good Bakery
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue     •     Cumberland
PRIVATE NURSING
MISS M. BOND. R.N>, Is prepared to
undertake private nursing. Address
P.O. Box 353. Residence, New Town-
site. 4-25
British Columbia business is solid;
at heart British Columbia men nnd
womon are sound. We must show the
world, each other, ourselves, what the
B. C. spirit means.   If we boost for 13.
C, work for B C, and give our support to everything that Is identified
with B. C, we can make up our minds
to go ahead.
ROBIN EATS 165 CUT WORMS
An experiment in Toronto with the
robin as a cutworm destroyer is reported. One young robin, kept in confinement, ate 165 cutsvorms in a day.
Had be been compelled to find his own
food he would probably hnve varied
It somewhat, as he would not find so
many cutworms, what he could do
when he had the opportunity was
clearly demonstrated.
WANTED
GIRL FOR LIGHT HOUSE WORK.
Apply .Mrs. James Dick; Cumberland, II. C. 2-24
CAPABLE GIRL; PLAIN COOKLN'G;
fond of children; sleep in; good
home.   Apply P.O. Box 30.        3-23
FOR SALE
CHEVROLET CAR, 1918, IN Al CON-
dition; thoroughly overhauled; new
battery, spare tire. Price $575. Box
313, Cumberland.
FORD TOURING, 1918; SPARE-TIRE
and tubes; . At-t'lindition. Price
$150. Apply P.O. Box 343, Cum
berland.
l!)2ll  .MODEL CHEVROLET CAR—In
first-class    condition;     cheap    for
cash.   Apply Box 5S9, Cumberland.
2-23
FORD GAR, 1919, GOOD CONDITION.
Demountable rims, shock absorbers.
Call und see at Chas. McMillan's,
53, Camp. 3-20
CHEVROLET CAR FOR SALE—1920
model; run only 1500 miles; is ln
splendid condition. Will sell cheap
for quick sale. Apply A. R. Wesley
R. R. No. 1, Cumberland, B.C.   4-22
CHEVROLET 5-PASSENCs£R CAR,
1919 model, In first-class condition;
fully equipped, five new tires, five
spare tubes. Open for inspection to
any mechanic. Price $050 cash,
Apply Ben Evans, Camp, Cumberland. 4-17
LOST
SPIRIT LEVEL, ABOUT 10 INCHES
long; valued as keepsake. $2.00 ro
ward on returning to Islander.  1-22
FOUND
FOUND—A HONORABLE SERVICE
BADGE, No. 23590. Owner can
have same by applying to Islander
Ollice.
NOTICE
No cars will be allowed on the
Recreation Grounds while Base,
ball Gaines are in progress.
NOTICE
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited Medical Fund.
All parties laying claims to Reserve
Plots In the Cumberland Cemetery,
and who ean not produce receipts
that they bnve paid for the same,
are requested to call on the Secretary
of the above Fund at the office of the
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.,
who, upon sufficient proof, will issue
ttie necessary receipt.
By order.
THE MEDICAL BOARD.
4-26.
TENDERS FOR PAINTING
Tenders are Invited for Painting the
City Council Chambers. Particulars
may be had from the City Clerk.
Tenders to be in hands of City Clerk
,y 7 o'clock Monday, June 0. Lowest
or any tender not necessarily accepted.
T. MORDY, City Clerk.
If the Way Is Long
the Time Short
Your banking can be done by mail if it is inconvenient for you to come to our office.
Deposits will be acknowledged or remittances
made to you promptly.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
Why
"Auto-Shoes" ?
We figure that any automobile casing has
a right to be called a "tire"—whether
it's good, bad or indifferent. And we agree
with the opinion that an exceptionally
good casing deserves a distinctive name.
AmesHolden"Auto-Shoes"aremilesbetter
in performance than ordinary tires. That
has been proved to our satisfaction. So
we think it's a good idea to identify such
unusual mileage givers by an easy-to-
remember name—"Auto-Shoes."
The main purpose of the name is to help you to
get cheaper mileage. The guarantee behind Ames
Holden "Auto-Shoes" insures that you get it. If
necessity for adjustment should ever arise you
will find that you will get satisfaction without
trouble or red tape.
They are the principal advantages that go with
the name AmesHolden" Auto-Shoes." Drop in and
let us show you the tires themselves.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Sizes
f\m\     S
Cm
IB
•7
Cumberland
Motor Works
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver top Soda Water ™> j™or°f p»re
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Ready To Help a Man With
His Bur mess
With trade reviving, every reliance may be placed on the
telephone, which Is such a principal factor in industrial development. British Columbia Is particularly fortunate ln that telephone lines radiate from the principal cities to all points, so
that lnitant means ot communication are always available.
The duplicate submarine between Point Grey and Nannlmo
was laid this month, doubling the facilities for telephoning
between the Mainland and Vancouver Island. New long distance'
lines have been built on Vancouver Island and throughout the
lower Fraser Valley, both north and south of the river. Very
few applications are unfilled because of lack of facilities, so
that the telephone, always taken for granted, will not fall you.
British Columbia Telephone Co. 4°
June 4, Id2i.
TBS CmtSERLANt) ISLANDER
Three
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the office at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at once.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd,, may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
It Is Just As Easy
to own a genuine
" Ye Olde Firme"
Heintzman & Co. Piano
as it is to own one of inferior quality.
Our revised  prices  bring the  Heintzman  Piano
within the reach of all.
Terms can be arranged to suit your convenience.
Write for catalogue and prices.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Nanaimo VICTORIA Cumberland
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,673,215.00
Life Funds    58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON,
Special Agent,
Cumberland.
EDWARD W. BICKLE,
District Agent,
Cumberland.
JUNIOR RED CR0.3S WORK
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
The peace-time programme ot the
Red Cross League ot Nations, to
which the Canadian Red Cross is signatory, embraces and embodies the
very important platform of Red Cross
Instruction to children. This branch
is known as the Junior Red Cross, and
In Canada this Is the medium through
which the Canadian Red Cross ls endeavoring to induce among the children and young people Red Cross instructions and activities ot an educational and social value. In this situation the Red Cross alms to enlist the
services ol the children and young
people on behalf of suffering childhood, to minister to the needs of
those children less fortunately situated than themselves, and more especially, until the post-war work of
the society ls completed, to the children of soldiers or those Buffering
directly as a result ot the Great War.
In this respect It will furnish to
children and young people a useful
and healthy outlet for their energies
and present to them a definite purpose for which their talents may be
employed.
Dealing with the programme of the
Junior Red Cross work in tbe British
Columbia Division, It Is conceded that
the extension of the Junior Red Cross
Organization ln this Province is really
one of the most Important duties
which devolves upon the society. Upon the children in the schools depends
much of the Red Cross support of the
future. With the warm approval of
tbe Provincial Department of Education and the various boards of school
trustees, the society proposes establishing Junior Red Cross branches
throughout the province, with separately organized units ln all the larger
schools. This being done, It is proposed to create a "Junior Red Cross
Sick Children's Fund," whlcb will be
devoted to providing hospital treatment and care for sick children who
are not ln a position to receive proper
treatment. In tbe extension of this
branch it is proposed to provide country vacations for delicate or convalescent city children who are otherwise
unable to secure such a holiday. The
ultimate purpose of the Junior Fund,
however, will be to assist ln the establishment of a Children's Hospital or
Ward in this province, so that our
sick children may be assured, at all
times, of the very best care and attention from nurses and doctors, specializing in children's work.
From tbls Junior Branch of the Red
Cross great results are expected.
Children, properly enthused ln any
good enterprise, are oblivious to obstacles and difficulties. Few persons
can refuse the plea of a child. None
will refuse the children's plea for
children.
EXPERIMENTAL WORK
IN AGRICULTURE
Statements Made That Work of
Experimental Farms Is
Not Appreciated.
Suggestions have been made ln
parliament that the splendid work being performed by the Experimental
Farm system of the Dominion Is not
ns widely understood and appreciated
ns It should be. Perusal of the report
for the year ending March 31, prepared by the director, Mr. E. S. Archl
bald, will reveal far reaching results
and a remarkably wide range of activities. In this report details and
particulars are given of the operations
carried on by all the divisions, sub
stations, branches and illustration
stations, scattered from one end of the
Dominion to the other. In fact from
this report can be formed an excel
lent Idea of the prospects and proba
bilities ln agriculture of practically
every district in Canada. Nor Is it
only in this direction that the valuable results that are being established
are being revealed. Since the war,
expansion has been possible ln nearly
every branch, the number of lllustra-
tratlon stations has been Increased,
and progress owing to increased facilities has been most marked.
An especially Interesting feature of
the report Is the attention given to
weather conditions. By these It would
appear that Canada revels ln sunshine.
At Vancouver, for Instance, In the year
under mention, there were 2106 hours
of sunshine; at Fort Vermilion in the
Peace River district, there were 1930
at Charlottetown, P.E.I., 1658; at
Nappan, N.S., 1654; at Fredericton,
N.B., 1733; at Brandon, Man., 2000; at
Indian Head, Sask., 1942; at Rosthern,
Sask., 2365; at Lethbridge, Alia., 2333
VACATIONS SHOULD BE
SPENT IN CANADA
Planning vacation trips is one of
the pleasures in the average Canadian home. The approaching holiday
season tempts the mind to wander to
shady nooks, to the seaside, to the
fishing ground and the camp.
Canada offers to her people all the
attractions it ls possible to desire,
either for recreation or change. We
have all conditions of temperature
and altitude from the sea level to the
mountain heights.
Why should we look beyond our
borders for summer resorts? Tbere
ls an old saying that "the fishing is
always better on the other side of tbe
creek"; can it be that this is the reason why so many Canadians cross to
the United States each year to spend
their vacations, regardless of the
superior attractions at home?
Canada wants us to see our own
country. By spending their money at
home, Canadians will realize more
fully what a wonderful heritage we
possess, snd will help to overcome Hie
discount to which our money Is subjected on the otber side of the line.
V?
"On With the Dance"
What belter fun can be imagined than the impromptu dance
when a few friends drop in for the evening ?
Even those who have never acquired the nimble step enjoy tlie
gladsome activity—and the Music.
That's the thing which helps so wonderfully to make home life
happy—Music.
Choose Do you have plenty of music in your home ?   Do you take full
Musical advantage of Music's subtle power to make  the  long  winter
0jfls evenings pass by like Magic ?
The Player-Piano and the Phonograph need no skill to play.
Have you got them in your home ?
Now's the time to get them if you haven't—NOW when the long,
cold evenings make it more comfortable to stay at home.
Come in and let us show you how easy it is to own any of the
instruments of modern melody.
HEINTZMAN & CO.
VICTORIA
GIDEON HICKS, Manager
NANAIMO
CHINA A LAND OF
SMILES AND SURPRISES
Frazier Hunt, In a searching study
of the Chinese, says: "Before I went
to the Orient I held the vague and uncertain idea that all Chinese were
either waiters in chop suey restaurants or laundrymen, and that they all
answered to the name ot John.
"In this land of smiles and surprises I learned that China is not the
beaten, broken, helpless country that
she Is popularly supposed to be, but
a great, sure, superior Institution,,
certain as death, solid as the hills—
and smiling.
'To me lt was a tremendous discovery. If I had rounded a corner In one
of Peking's magic streets and suddenly come upon the North Pole sticking up like an old-fashioned barber
sign I could not have been more surprised. For I had discovered greatness and majesty and humaneness lu a
people I had thought backward, decadent and inferior.
"Four hundred million of tbem there
are.' That's four times as many people
as In America—and a good deal more
than the total population of all
Europe—and within 150,OOD,OUO of tlio
total white population of the entire
world.
"Theirs is the oldest civilization;
they are the greatest propagandists;
they are the most successful colonizers; they are the most industrious;
they are the master egotists; they
have the greatest power of resistance
—and they are thc champion smllers."
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The above Association will meet at 10.30 a.m. on
SUNDAY, JUNE 5th, IN THE FIRST AID HALL
Mr. Charles Graham will read a most important
paper at this meeting.
IMPORTANT ROAD FOR
NORTH END OF ISLAND
Tenders Being Called for Highway to Connect Hardy Bay
With (Juatsino Sound.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Letters of Administration to the Estate of David Rogers, late ot Cumber-
laud, who died on the 28th day of
March, 1921, Intestate, have been
granted out of tho Supreme Court lo
David Rogers and Bessie Ross, both of
anaimo.
All persons having claims agalnsl
the said estate arc required to forward
particulars of same duly verified to
the Administrators or to the undersigned on or before the 5th day of
June, 1921, alter which date the Administrators will proceed to administer llie Estate according to law, having regard lo such claims of which
they shall then havo received notice.
Dated at Nanaimo, B. C, this 6th
day of May, 1921.
C. H. BEBVOR-POTTS,
Commercial St., Nanaimo.
Solicitor for David Rogers and Mrs.
Bessie Ross, tho Administrators,
4-23
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
wrllo fnr price's to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Oflico 262(1 Bridge Slreel, Victoria, B.C,
Good Excuse.
Dolly (coldly): "The next time I
speak to you in a street car I'll bet
you'll raise your hard-boiled hat."
Dick: "Bet I won't—if I'm on my
way to work."
Dolly: "Why, what's on your mind
then?"
Dick: "Two sandwiches and a cut
of pie!"
Rheumatism
Neuiitis, Sciatica, Neuralgia
'*' *■■*.   ■<
Templeton's
Rheumatic
Capsules
Have brought good
health to half-a-million
sufferers.
s A healthful, money-saving remedy,
well known for fifteen years, prescribed by doctors, sold by druggists, 11.00 a box. Ask our agents
or write for a free trial package.
Templetons, 142 King W., Toronto.
Sold by
R. E. FROST    ■    Cumberland
The Provincial Public Works Department Is calling for tenders for the
construction of a road between Hardy
Bay and Coal Harbor, on the north
end of the Island. The completion or
this project will mean a great denl tn
the development of the natural resources, mineral and otherwise
around Uuatslno Sound, West Coast
Hardy Bay Is on the East Coast aud
Coal Harbor is on the Sound, and the
artery will affect road communication
between the East and West Coasts.
The total distance ls about seven or
eight miles. There is a trail between
the two points at present, but it only
allows for travel on foot or horseback.
Port Alice, where the Whalen Pulp
& Paper Company maintain one of
their plants, is situated on the Sound,
and the construction of the highway
will greatly facilitate tralllc for them.
It Is understood lhat the paper com
pany propose to run a fast launch lie
tween Port Alice and Coal Harbor
when tbe road Is built.
Get a Kodak and keep a picture
story. Frost's for Kodaks.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
riiono ui!
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and. juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal I.oaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our I'lckled I'ork
and Corned Heel I It Is delicious.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required,
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley I'hone !)2R
Thos. H. Carey
Hilt: AMI 1,111! INSI'liAMK
I'niiilicrlnnd, II, ('.
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE JMILWAV STATION.
First class Accommodation,    Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE Pour
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 4, mi
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE .
BEN H. GOWEN	
 Manager and Publisher.
 Editor.
SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 1921.
JOIN  THE   RED  CROSS
Red Cross today is tlie vision of a wonderful ideal.
Faith and effort can carry it to a glorious reality. Its
peace-time mission is to save lives and to help the suffering, exactly as it was on the battlefield. It can ward off
disease from your child and mino und the child that is yet
unborn and muke the world a better place for him to live
In. It can ward off pestilence and contagion from your
own community and so protect us all. J* can help weld
all the people of our country and of all the other countries
into the common brotherhood of sympathy that is bo
necessary now if humanity is to keep to the path of
progress.
Red Cross has not forgotten the crippled, the blinded,
the helpless, or the dimply unsettled remnants of war, in
our hospitals and throughout our land.
She remembers them, and has the resources and devotion to care for them, but she also has a new aud a broad
■work to do for which your endorsement is now asked.
The membership enrolment is a nation-wide reminder
to everyone who has ever helped the Red Cross, or been
helped hy it—and who, lias not?—to renew their allegiance
to its sacred emblem, identify themselves by their membership with its effort to belter the condition of humanity
at home, throughout our Dominion, all over the world.
When you could see with your own eyes that your son
was ln danger and could be helped, you did not hesitate.
You can still see the dangers that surround him everywhere, if you will but look with the eyes of understanding.
Learn all about llie Hod Cross Mission for health. Join
the Red Cross nud enlist In its crusade.
CHINESE  IMMIGRATION
ed for maintaining this effort, day by day, week by week.
St. Dunstans' has always been a cheery place, but those
who have still to complete their training certainly must be
stimulated by the knowledge that the men who have made
their fresh start are going on unfalteringly. Such is the
good news that I am able to give in this sixth rfhnual
report. The blinded soldiers are not ouly busily al work,
not only making some remarkable successes in an extraordinary wide variety of occupations, but are carrying on
with the same resolution with which thoy set out.
There are now 1,772 names on the books of St. Dunstan's, 106 new-comers were admitted during 1920, and ih
ihe course of the year 305 blinded soldiers completed tlieir
training and were set up in occupations they had mast-
tered. Thus more than 1200 men are already established
at work.
llllllllllll
FOREST FIRES
While so far as they go most of the new elauses to be
incorporated In the hill now before Parliament amending
the Chinese Immigration Act nre satisfactory*, more cspeci
ally that designed to prevent the fraudulent entry of
Chinese laborers under tbe guise of merchants, the proposal that Chinese returning to China within two years
shall have the head tax refunded, unless it Is to apply only
In a limited class of cases, may simply open the door wider
to the Chinese coolie.
It Is easy to see that on a money-returned arrangement
a system might speedily be inaugurated by which large
numbers of Chinese would be brought across the Pacific
for periods rather less than two years, virtually in a state
of peonage, to be sent back to China with what would seem
to tbem vast wealth when the term of their servitude
expired. Tiie only limit on the flood of Mongolians would f
ba the ability of tiie promoters of this kind of immigration
to remain out of pocket to the extent of $51)0 a head while
the laborers remained in Canada
It is to be hoped very serious consideration will be given
to this clause before it is made part of tlie statute.
THE EMPIRE'S BLINDED SOLDIERS
A report on the welfare of the soldiers blinded in the
war is no longer merely a record of progress in our classrooms nnd workshops, says Sir Arthur Pearson in the Sixth
Annual Report of St. Dunstan's, England. Large as is the
number of men in training, a much larger number has-1
passed through this stage and are established in their own
homes at their newly-mastered work. A survey of their
lives carries us to the most distant parts of the Empire—
beyond the Rocky Mountains in Canada, out Into the Australian and New Zealand bush and on to the South African
veldt. 1 have said a good deal in the past about the
courageous way in which the blinded soldiers faced the
facts and set to work to equip themselves for a renewal of
everyday life, hut perhaps even liner qualities are demand-
Wit h the opening of another fire season, the question of
forest fire losses becomes of direct personal interest to
very Canadian. Forest protective organizations, Dominion,
provincial and private, are increasing in strength nnd
efficiency, but still tlie provision made is far from adequate
in every forest province' of the Dominion. Our average
annual losses from forest fires still run Into the millions
of dollars.   Most of these forest fires are preventable.
To check this enormous drain upon our resources, it is
necessary that the individual citizen should interest himself and make his interest felt in the matters of Improved
administration, and increased appropriations for the belter
protection of our forests. Governments and legislative
bodies are, for the most part, alive to llie situation, but
they are keenly suceptible to enlightened public opinion,
and, in fact, require its support when measures are under
consideration involving large expenditures or material
changes in policy.
Expenditures on forest protection must be regarded as
au Investment not only for the future but for the present
as well. If existing merchantable timher is to be kept
from destruction, for immediate use, and if the vast
areas of young forest growth are to be preserved, to comprise the forests of the future, very substantial expenditures must be incurred for this purpose and to sn administer them that non-agricultural lands will he kept in a
permanently productive condition.
The forest is h crop, which may be perpetuated by wise,
but which will inevnttbly he destroyed by unwise use. Irrefutable evidence of this may he seen over thousands of
square miles in both Canada and the United Slates.
In all of our forest provinces, other than the Prairie
Provinces, adequate protection will involve the expenditure of only a reasonable fraction of the Crown timber
revenue. There has in the past heen too strong a tendency
to divert an unduly large proportion of tho forest revenue
to purposes of general governmental administration, leaving tlie forest to he regarded as a mine to be exploited,
rather than as a crop to be reproduced.
Educational propaganda t'or greater care hy tho general
public in preventing aud extinguishing forest fires is of inestimable value, and can scarcely be overdone.
It Is of the greatest importance to Canada to perpetuate
the source of the raw material upon which are dependent
the great timber Industries of the Dominion. These industries provide employment for some 80,000 men and an
avenue for the investment of probably more than $400,-
000,000 of capital. Forest products comprise one of the
largest items in our export trade and nre a vital factor iu
the exchange situation.
With adequate protection, and scientific yet practical administration, these great, industries may be still further
developed and maintained for all lime to come. Without,
they must inevitably diminish, ns are already tho great
timber industries of the eastern and southern States, for
lack of these vital elements.
Really adequate protection from destruction by fire Is
the keystone of the forest arch.
Corsets
Distinctive Poise
is attained by the tfoman who wears
dia'£z6c&
Corset*
because she has the assurance of being
perfectly fitted.
There is a Model for everj) type of flgure—
so have our Saleslady help you select pour
particular style.
C/C k la Gr&ce Corsets give untold comfort
and wear, and are very economically priced.
Campbell's   -    Cumberland
iiiiiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiii
hi
A duck, very young and very wild, which was chased
into the Hudson's Ray Company's store by   a   dog, then
Chased by a lot ot girls, died.   Any young duck that has to
be chased by Hudson's Ray girls ought to die.—Kamloops i
Sentinel.
I
I    F. AIKAWA
| Boat Builder and General
| Carpenter
1  Boats built to order.    All sizes
1 of Boats for Sale
1  F. AIKAWA    -    Royston Rd. 1
m
SAVE BEFORE YOU SPEND
Let your Bank Account be your
first concern.
It will more than repay you in
later years.
A Savings Department
at every branch of
THE ROYAL BANK
OFOANADA
F. A. McCarthy, Manager Cumberland Branch
ill CANADIAN TREES
FOR BRITISH FORESTS
The demand for timber during the
war aroused interest in Great Britain
In the subject of forestry. It was seen
tbat even in the thickly populated
Motherland there were very considerable areas which would give a greater
return in growing trees than if
handled in any otlier way. In fact,
as foresters have been pointing oul
for years, many areas cannot he made
to product anything hut trees. The
British Forestry Commission have undertaken a programme of planting and
seeding these. It has heen found Hint
certain Canadian trees do well in the
British Isles, and through the Forestry
Branch of the Department of tho Interior, a quantity of tree seeds has
been collected and forwarded for sowing on certain nreas. These shipments have been sent for several
years in succession and have amounted to as much as half a tou iu n year.
The trees most favored in this connection arc Douglas fir and Sitka spruce
and a recent visitor to England reports the plantations of these species
as doing remarkably well. Some consignments of Canadian tree seeds have
also been sent to Belgium to help re
store the devastated forests of that
country.
The Studebaker
Light-Six
WILL SLAUGHTER
SURPLUS BUFFALOES
The increase in the number of buffaloes in Buffalo Park, Wainwright,
Alberta, has reached sucli proportions
that it in proposed to slaughter 1000
of the animals this year. It is expected that a considerable sum will be
realized from tlio sale of the meat,
hides and heads.
Penchstones have about SO per cent,
of the heating value of coal and are
being sold In New York at $1 a ton as
fuel.
m   The World's Greatest  Light-Weight  Automobile
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
Weeks Motors
LIMITED
m
=    'WALLACE STREET
illinium
NANAIMO, B. C
Illlllllllllllli June 4, 1921.
fittfe   CtlMSERLAND  ISLaNMH
ki
Five
FRESH  LOCAL
DAIRY BUTTER
Churned   Twice Weekly
45c. lb.
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
FOLLOW THE
MARKETS
Our policy is to "follow the markets," which are on
the downward grade, believing it is better business to
drop our prices accordingly, thereby getting the confidence of our patrons.
Help support a good, clean opposition that will not
fall in line and fix prices.
Wc don't sell cheaper goods—but we do sell the same
brands of goods for less money.
20-LB SACKS SUGAR   $2.60
40-Ut. SACKS PURITY FLOUR   *2.90
COMOX OR SPRINGBANK CREAMERY       A p»
BUTTER, per pound r4«JC
BURNS' AND SWIFTS' MEATS
*BOIU3D HAM, por pound   7<5c
ROAST PORK, per lb  SOc
SIDE BACON, per lb  Mc
PELS' NAPTHA SOAP, per carton  $1.00
P. & G. NAPTHA SOAP   10 cakes for 90c
PALMOL1VE SOAP   12 cakes for $1.00
SNOWFLAKE PASTRY FLOUR, per sack   65c
B. & K. ROLLED OATS   7 lbs. for 85c
RIPE STRAWBERRIES, per box 35c
RII'E HOTHOUSE TOMATOES, pound.... 50c
Tomatoes, Peas and Corn, per tin 20c
Inspect our stock of Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes.
WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY.
We Want Your Business and Will Appreciate It.
The Corner Store
WM. GORDON Phone 133
PANTHERS AND WOLVES
VALUABLE WHEN DEAD
An increased bounty on wild animals and birds that are considered to
be a menace in British Columbia has
been authorized by a Provincial order-
in-councfl.
For any panther, killed at the age
of one week or over, the sum of $40
will be paid.
Timber wolves (black or grey), at
the same stage of existence, will be
paid for at the rate of $25 each.
Noxious birds are rated as follows:
Big-horned or snowy owls, $1 each.
Magpies, 20 cents each.
Crows, 20 cents each.
Eagles, bald-headed or golden, $1
each.
YOUR TEETH
FILLINGS
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
IS SAID TO COLLECT
WOMEN'S UNDERWEAR
NORTH VANCOUVER. — Suspected
of being insane, George Holburt was
put under restraint late Sunday evening, when he was taken from a shack
in the bush near Williams avenue,
where he had been living alone for
aome time. Holburt came here from
Alberta, and has a brother who Is a
doctor tn Edmonton. He Is 42 years
old.
According to the police tbe man's
peculiar form of mania Is collecting
women's underwear, a large assortment of these articles of apparel having been found in the busb behind his
shack. He was taken to New Westminster for further investigation.
Church Notices[J
HOLT TRINITY CHUBCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
Sunday, Jane fi, II. After Trinity.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
Evensong, 7 o'clock.
ROHAN CATHOLIC CHUBCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Third Sunday Alter Pentecost.
Mass, 9 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11,
Evening Service at 7,
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. 0. B. Kinney, B.A„ F.R.G.S,
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30,
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker •
Shoe Repairing a Soeclaltr.
CUMff&RLAND. B.O.
A former judge, who had become a
cashier in a western bank, once declined to honor a cheque that a
stranger had presented. "The cheque
Is all right," he said, "but the evidence
you offer In identifying yourself as the
person to whose order lt Is drawn Is
scarcely sufficient."
"I have known you to hang a man
on less evidence, Judge," was tho
stranger's response.
"Quite likely," replied the ex-Judge;
"but when we're giving up cold cash
we have to be careful."
We sell Genuine
Ford Parts at
prices set by the
Company.   Our
labor charges
also are set.
You know the
cost before you
buy Ford Service
E. C. EMDE
Ford Dealer
COURTENAY, B.C.
1,
A filling is a repair in a tooth. There
are many kinds of filling materials.
Rack one lias some special quality
that causes it to be selected for a certain cavity.
A cavity Is a hole in a tooth usually
caused by caries, which is decay of
the teeth. To prepare a cavity for
filling, the dentist must remove all
decay and all of the tooth structure
that lias been Invaded by decay. If a
tooth could bo successfully tilled by
simply removing the actual decayed
portion and then placing the tilling,
the Job would be a very easy one, botli
lor the patient and the dentist.
The hard part of a tooth, you know.
Is composed of enamel and dentine.
The dentine is similar to bone and has
i great many little tubes called tubuli.
running from the pulp canal in the
centre of tlie tooth to tlie outer surface of the dentine just Inside of the
numel. Tlie bacteria of decay work
along these tubuli and go far ahead
of the actually destroyed portion of
llie tooth. To receive a lining that
will stay, this Infected dentine must be
cut away. Then the cavity must be
given shape that will give the filling
us much support as possible, that will
allow tho lining to protect the niar-
ginc of the enamel, and that will retain the filling iu the tooth.
Even a small cavity will have a
much larger area of infected dentine
than you would imagine. If you allow
your teeth to decay until you find the
cavities yourself, the chances aro that
the pulp, or nerve, as it is incorrectly
called, will become inflamed.
Then there is real trouble. Tlie best
filling is a small one, because if there
has been very little destruction of the
tooth there has been very little loss
of contour and of strength, and most
Important of all, whore the cavity is
small the pulp Is safe. Ho nof neglect
your teeth until large fillings are
necessary.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
OLD-TIME CLOTHING
By CHARLES E. HUNT.
What has become of thc old-time
derby hat wltb the low crown and the
brakeman with tbe spring-bottom
pants and tbe sack coat cut square in
front?
Do you recall Bert Osborne, the
youthful son of B, F. (nicknamed Big
Foot) Osborne, who conducted the
farm machinery store aud had lots of
money and could afford to buy the
latest clothes for his girl like son?
What a day it was when Bert first appeared in that hat, stiff brim, black-
ribbon band, and crown three inches
high? Aud lie wouldn't let go of it,
but held lt back gently ou his arm and
waved it In the air whenever he met a
girl he knew, although before that he
would ouly make a grab at his cap as
if to lift it, but didn't.
And how all the town fellers got
mad at him about something else, but
it waa reaily because he had the only
stiff hat In town? And he didn't care,
because he was wearing tlie hat aud
all the girls were nice lo him.
And Prank Paul!, tho brakeman,
home on a layoff, with the spring
bottom pants, so tight at tlie knee that
he could not get them on without a
shoo horn, and a great flare at thc
bottom with a slit and two buttons on
each side like a cuff? And the brass
buttons on the coat? He looked like
a regular city chap nnd the town
swains couldn't eveu get a look In until his layoff was ovor and he had
deadheaded back to take oul his run.
But ull Ihe line clothes weren't
enough for Frank, who was "keeping
compuny" witli Miss .McAllister, fhe
lady from the city who worked iu tlie
millinery emporium, lie peddled if
around (hat he was a conductor?
Don't you remember lieiirlng nboul 11?
And lie borrowed a straw cap from tlie
conductor thai hnd the letters "Conductor" embroidered iu bold gilt Idlers In front, und holding il so it would
show, had his picture taken nnd sent
to Miss McAllister and she showed ft
around.
And there was Lawyer Hussey who
went about town In thu summer In
linen trousers and an alpaca cask
coat and a canvas helmet, and Banker
Cameron, who wore black trousers
and a seersucker coat and a straw
hat with a wide band antl a silver
watch chain with a goose-neck hook
that fastened in a button-hole In his
vest that lie always had to leave unbuttoned.
And tlie Imsques of tlie women folks
and tlle banked hair uud the Florida
water perfume?   Do you remember?
Those were thc days of boyhood and
hope, and even to think about them
and to imagine tlie women ot tlie long
ago in short skirts and upholstered
laces and chromatic ilps Is no small
I part of the Job for the brain?
1
/ iff*
nffib±c  ]
0hteel
'T'HINK of 26 rare nnd delightful odorsl Im-
JL aginc them combined in one wondrous
fragrance! That is the way the Talc Jouteel
.melJs.   Try some of it today.
Bathing Caps
IN  GREAT VARIETY
Newest Colors and
Styles from
50c. to $4
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL .STOKE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
Wc have just installed <•
largt?
Dry Kiln and arc
now in .
t posi-
tion lo supply complete
liou.se
bills.
Send  us  your
spciilit
ations
and wc will give
you a
close
figure on il.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 0880 meets ou llie
second ami fourth Wednesdays in the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, at 7 p.m.
Visiting brethren cordially invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Hunger; P.
Myers, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
There is no need to worry about Ilio
extinction of tlie buffalo, There were
480 of them born lu 1010.
MIGRATORY BIRDS
An uineiidnii'iil to tbe Migratory
Birds Convention Act Increases the
penalty for violation of tho act from
$100 to $300. Section 18 now roads
us follows: "Evory person who violates any provision of tills art or any
regulation thereof slinll, for cue li offence, tie llulile upon summary conviction, to a line of nol more than
three hundred dollars and not less
than ten dollars, or to Imprisonment
for ti term not exceeding six monthss
or to both fine and Imprisonments" Six
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
June 4, 1921.
RANGES
REDUCED IN
PRICE
FAWCETT "MARVEL"
A new model, having all the advantages of a high-
priced Range. Large fire-box, polished steel top, white
enamel finish.   Priced now at
$100.00
OTHER STYLES FROM $45.00 UP.
PRICES ON ALL LINES ARE NOW CONSIDERABLY REDUCED.
CALL AND INSPECT OUR STOCK.
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND.B.C.
WHEN YOU WANT A SATISFYING, HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
AT  ALL  THE  LEADING   HOTELS  AND  BARS
WILLIAM DOUGLAS, Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day und Night.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:  WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • ■ B. C.
Through Service to Europe or Eastern Canada on
"The Continental Limited"
Leaving Vancouver Daily at 7.45 p.m.
Compartment Observation Cars, standard and Tourist Sleepers
Alternate Route via Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships
to Prince Rupert and Rail Line
BOOKINGS ON ALL ATLANTIC SAILINGS
L
For full Information apply to
E. W. BICKLE, Agent, Cumberland
Canadian National Railwaijs
SAVING A THOUSAND
MINERS' LIVES
The mau who goes into a burning
mine and brings out a half-suffocated
miner at the risk of his lire is rightly
rated as a hero. He is given a medal
and his name is telegraphed from
coast to coast. But a thousand miners' lives were saved last year, without any medaling or trumpeting, by
improved safety methods and appliances, due largely to the work of the
United States Bureau of Mines. In
19U7, 3243 miners were killed at their
work; in 1920, only 22G0, although
more were employed. The number
saved since tho Bureau was established
ten years ago must be very great.
This work has nothing sensational
about It, like that of the heroic life-
saver; but Its result!! are equally
worthy of praise, and Dr. Joseph A.
Holmes, the man who organized the
Bureau's safety work, is surely entitled to a very large medal. The
Holmes Safety Association, an active
body among miners, perpetuates his
name aud fame. Says the Mining
Congress Journal, Washington, D.C.
"Fatalities per million tons of coal
produced were fewer in 192U than at
any previous period in tlie world's
history. The death-rate was 3.50 per
million tons of coal produced, which
was little more than half that of 190*
and represented a drop of more thau
IS per cent, as compared with 1919.
And the 1919 record a few years previously would have been considered
very fine.
"The production record is consid
ered in many respects the most accurate gauge t'or mine accidents and
fatalities. Equating accidents to the
number of men employed is not considered the best system for making
comparisons, because many miners
work less than a year, some during
short and some during long periods
"Another equitable method of testing the results of efforts to make coal
mining safe for coal-miners is found
in comparing the number of tons pro
duced for each man killed during two
or more years. Last year 2S5.700 tons
of coal were produced for every man
killed. This was 50,000 tons more
than the production-pcr-dealh record
of 1919, and 23,000 tons more than
that of 1918, which at that time was
tlie best record which had ever been
hung up.
"Many factors have contributed to
the lessening of the dangers which be
set tlie daily work Of the coal-miner
Chief among them is the work of the
United States Bureau of Mines. But
back of this work was the humanity
of the American mine-operator, who
was first to decide that something
ought to be done to protect the life
and limb of mine-workers and that
he, the boss, was the one who ought
to do it. And he did it, paying the expense of installing new machinery
and educating his employees before
there were laws compelling him to do
so. To this day the most up-to-date
mining enterprises are several laps
ahead of the law in this respect.
"Tlie operators, working through
their organization, the American Mining Congress, succeeded iu bringing
about the establishment of the Bureau
of Mines in 1910. The Bureau operates ten mine-rescue cars which visit
mining communities, giving practical
demonstrations of first-aid work and
training men in both first aid aud
mine-safety operations. Those who
take the training generally form local
organizations. There are approximately four-score such organizations
in the country. Many mines and mining communities boast of first-aid and
rescue teams, trained, drilled and
equipped to a point not exceeded by
the best in the United States Army.
Once a year these teams from all parts
of the country hold contests which
attract international interest."
Laboratory work in behalf of the
prevention of mine accidents ia carried on at the Pittsburgh experiment
station of the Bureau. The three mosl
important phases of Us work aro the
establishment of permissible explosives for use in gaseous and dusty
mines, the development of safe electrical equipment for such mines, and
improvement of the safety of mechanical devices usod about any and ali
mines.  We read further:
'Explosives tested by the Bureau ol
Mines are the only explosives used by
the industries of the United State;-.
whose quality is first tested and then
certified by the United States government. All such explosives which win
the official designation of 'permissible
aro considerably less sensitive than
other high explosives and black blasting powder, but thoy 'do the work,'
nevertheless. The result of the use ol
permissible explosives in bituminous
coal-mines was to reduce the number
of fatalities at once. Between 1903
and 1910, fatalities caused by explosives were never fewer than .2 per
thousand men employed. After 1910.
the number of fatalities from the same
cause never exceeded .138 per thousand
men employed. In 1917, the fatality
rate   per   thousand   employees   was
Join the
RED CROSS
In
British Columbia
C The Coming Week of June 6 to 11 will
see the greatest Red Cross Membership
Enrollment Drive that Canada has ever
known. British Columbia must, and will,
top the list, else it will defeat its own
traditions, so splendidly upheld.
fr The Red Cross is today a living thing,
pulsating with energy. A child of war, it
will not be denied its right to manhood in
time of peace. Vast as was its work in
battle, vaster still are the labors which now
confront it—labors which it is pledged to
undertake.
C Join the Red Cross in British Columbia,
and by your example and effort help it to
achieve its work in the relief of sickness
and distress. Help it to inculcate its
principles and practice amongst the rising
generation — the mothers and fathers of
tomorrow.
C Join the Red Cross in British Columbia,
you men and women of our Province, and
help it in its greatest endeavor for the
improvement of health and the prevention
of disease.
C Join the Junior Red Cross in British
Columbia, you boys and girls. You will
be proud to wear its emblem—you will be
glad to serve under its banner. Many are
the children less fortunate than you whom
you can help and cheer.
Senior EnroIlmeBt Fee $1.00
Junior Enrollment Fee $0.25
Mall your Enrollment Fee to your Local Branch or the
CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY
BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION
626 Pender Street West Vancouver, B. C.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AM) WORKMANSHIP
(iUAKANTEEI)
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed Whilo V Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
S. DAVIS, tut
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings ot the Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Hall.
Acreage for Sale
6'/o acres of Land for sale,
2]/|, acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
J
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MEB1UF1KLD,   Proprietor,
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Avo.
Cumberland, D.C.
only .091. Tlio safety work of the
Bureau of Mines, notwithstanding its
accomplishments, is vaster and more
varied today than ever before.
"Investigations are now being carried on in regard to safety catches tor
mine cages, gates for safeguarding
mine shafts; standard platforms, railings and tow-boards; safe practices
for steam-engines, hollers and ladders
used about mines; haulage equipment, caging devices; safe construction of cages and skips; deterioration
of wire ropes; belts for power transmission, and proposed code for mechanical equipment for coal-mines."
—Literary Digest.
NOTICE
May 25, 1921.
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one locition
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also thu National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned th.it
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.      p. o. 314
Phone 75
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons hava
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it ls a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should tlie offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
very fullest extent ot the law.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00 ((I
-tfune 4, i92i.
ftta  CUMBERLAND   ISLANDED
Seven
-^   Music and Photoplays
"SUDS," GREATEST OF
PICKFORD SUCCESSES
Unusually Sweet and Charming,
Wholesome, Fresh and Refreshingly Natural.
Mary Pickford, who has delighted
so many millions as the glad girl in
"Pollynnna" will be seen at the Hollo Theatre in her United Artists Corporation production, "Suds," in a role
suid to bo entirely different from anything in which she has heretofore appeared.
The story was adapted from the
stage play, '"Op o' Me Thumb," in
Which Maude Adams appeared with
such great success.
Tho story has to do with tlie affairs
of Amanda Alilick, a pug-nosed
homely little slavey in a French laundry in the slums of tlie English city.
Amanda Is the most woebegone char-
ncler Imaginable and as the other
girls in the laundry have tlieir sweethearts, and no man has ever deigned
to notice tbe little slavey, she weaves
a wonderful romance for her own
benefit and tlie benelit of the girls in
the laundry, about the owner of a
shirt which had been loft to bo washed
some months before tlie story opens.
Amanda tells tlie girls that she Is
really of a very high station in life,
but her father, the Arch-Duke, has
sent her to work in the laundry to be
sure that she will be loved and courted for herself alone and not for her
vast fortune. She informs the eager
listeners that when 'Orace .Grcen-
sniitli, the man whose name is on the
laundry ticket accompanying the
shirt, appears for his wearing apparel
It will be a signal that all is well and
she can return to her rightful station
In lite.
Amanda is continually getting into
difficulties both in and out of the laundry and when Lavender, the horse
which pulls the battered delivery
wagon. Is about to be sold for glue
she rushes to Ills aid and takes the
horse to her own humble little room,
three Highls of stairs up in the tenement.
How she and the liorse are ejected
by the other exasperated tenants is
ono of Uie amusing scenes ot the
story.
HUMAN FRAILTY
THEME OF FILM
"The White Dove" With H. B.
Wat net- as Star Sounds Depths
Of Common Weakness
"Tho White Dove," a Robertson-
Cole special in which H. B. Warner
will be seen at the llo-llo Theatre on
Tuesday night next, sounds the depths
of human frailty and in most dramatic
fashion proves that the strongest is
weak at limes. "The White Dove" is
a Jesse D. Hampton production in
which Mr. Warner does thc best work
of his career.
Tlio picture is founded on the novel
of the samo name by William J.
Locke, tlio famous Englisli novelist,
who never penned a more powerful
story than this narrative of "the sins
of tlie father" which are visited upon
tlie son. Tlie central character,
played by Mr, Warner, Is Sylvester
Lanyon, a British physician, who remembers 'his wife, now dead, as the
finest woman who ever lived.
He docs not realize tlie secret
which is in the heart of his fine old
WATER NOTICE
USE AMI STORAGE.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Collieries (Dunsiuuir) Limited, whose
address is Belmont House, Victoria,
B.C., will apply for a licence to take
and use 30 cubic feet of water per
second out of Tsa-Abl Itiver, also
known as Baynes Sound Kiver, which
Hows in ail easterly direction nnd
drains Into Baynes Sound, about a
miles south of Union Bny. The storage dam will bo located at Langley
Lake, water being diverted thereto
from Tsa-Abl Itiver. The capacity of
the present reservoir, Langley Lako,
is about 500 acre feet, and will he increased to about 600 acre feet, and It
Will Hood about 1(1 additional acres of
land. The water will bo diverted from
tho stream at a point 1% miles more
or less, approximate bearing S. Gti degrees, 48 minutes W. (ast) from N.W.
corner of Lot 2A, Nelson District, and
will be used for Mining, Coal Washery
and Steam purposes upon the Mine and
Washery described as located in Block
33 or Block 34 or Lot 2A or E. & N.
Ry. Land, adjacent to Block 33, Nelson
District, and Lot 28, Nelson District,
Union Bay. This notice was posted on
the ground on the 2nd day of June,
1921. A copy of this and au application pursuant thereto and to the
"Water Act, 1914," will be filed In the
office of the Water Recorder at Nanaimo. Objections to the application
may be filed with the said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within 30 days after the
first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper. The date of the first
publication of this notice is June 4th,
1921.
CANADIAN  COLLIERIES   (DUNSMUIR)  LIMITED, Applicant.
CHARLES GRAHAM, Agent.
father, a country gentleman, who remembers vividly the day when the
daughter-in-law came to him and
confessed that momentarily she had
given way to the caresses of a former
lover. She was penitent, and the
father, lu his deep knowledge ot humanity, knew that she repented and
would sin no more.
He never suspects that this will
come to the ears of his Bon, from whom
lie has kept the secret. But the man
iu the case, a close friend of the son,
becomes the victim of a runaway accident, and dies in the home of the
doctor, not, however, before he has
gasped out, ln delirium, the secret ot
his love for the dead wife ot his
friend.
Dr. Lanyon is embittered. He leaves
Ills father aud his little girl and goes
to London. While there he sees acted
out a druma which teaches him toler
ance and reconciles him to what heretofore ho has considered a ruined lifV
fuses them. Tom is falling in love
with Jane, as he realizes when he
takes her in his arms after she has
been thrown from a bucking horse.
In order to win her, however, Tom
has to do many exciting and daring
things. These are what make the
picture a great one.
ILOILO THEATRE
Saturday, June 4th
'MECCA" MUST NOT BE
TITLE OF SUCCESSOR
TO "CHU CHIN CHOW"
'HER UNWILLING
HUSBAND" FULL OF
ZIP, PEP AND SPARKLE
Are you one of those generous, ten
der-heurted, hospitable souls who issue
standing invitations to all your
friends? Hospitality, loosely offered,
is a dangerous thing. Like a neglected gun—whang!—it goes off unexpectedly, aud most anything might happen.
The farcical plot of Blanche Sweet's
Jesse D. Hampton-Patho feature "Her
Unwilling Husband," coming to the
llo-llo on Wednesday next, hinges on
a standing Invitation. After a prolonged, absence, John Jordan, a glad-
of-it bachelor, decides to drop in on
his old friend, Gilbert Lennox, for a
visit.
Instead of his friend, he found in
the house ouly two Chinese servants
and a pretty girl. He thought the
girl was his friend's wife. When a
second man arrives, she introduced the
bachelor as her husband. It was a
decided shock! A shock to tbe bachelor because he didn't want to be anyone's husband, and a shock to tbe
the other man because he wanted to
be her husband, and until a month
previous had been her fiance.
The suspicions aroused by the predicament resulting from the girl's
hasty and mysterious action, make an
amusingly entertaining photoplay, and
one particularly suited to the versatility of beautiful Blanche Sweet,
"RUTH OF THE ROCKIES"
A THRILLING SERIAL
"Ruth of the Rockies," the new
Pathe serial starring Ruth Roland,
delighted the patrons at the Ilo-Ilo at
|ts first appearance on Wednesday
last. This episode drama is ln fifteen
instalments of two reels each and will
be shown each Wednesday from now
on until the completion of the exciting adventures of the charming heroine are brought to a close in the final
episode.
The story is a highly dramatic
blending of mystery and adventure,
lt deals with a young woman who unwittingly becomes the very centre of a
band of crooks to gain possession of
a collection of jewels smuggled into
the country. She is made the aid of a
secret service agent and receives
assistance from a mysterious character who bus a way of coming to the
rescue in the most spectacular fashion,
using an aeroplane to save her on occasions.
Miss Roland has lost none of her
skill in the dramatic moments and she
surpasses her previous performances
In point of being daring and energetic
ln the thrill stunts.
BUCK JONES PUTS
FORM INTO REFORMER
Buck Jones, the new Bcnsatlon of
the screen, and a Wm. Fox star, has
a strong role as Tom Beck in Harold
Titus' absorbing story of tho west,
"The Last Straw," which shows at the
Ilo-Ilo ou Thursday night.
Although a rough and ready cow-
puncher, Tom Beck, when he first
meets Jane Hunter, the heroine—who
comes from the East to assume control of the ranch she haB Inherited—
quickly tells her why she shouldn't
drink cocktails and smoke cigarettes.
Jane, being used to the high life of
New York, is surprised, but Tom nevertheless makes an impression on her.
However, when Bhe offers him the
chalice to draw for the position of
foreman of the ranch Tom surprlseB
her again by refusing to take part in
the lottery when he sees that he would
draw tho last straw. Then when Hepburn, whom Tom suspects as the
leader of cattle thieves, Is made fore
man, Tom at once decides to keep his
eyes open.
Tom's censuring of Jane evidently
takes effect, for when Dick Hilton, her
Eastern suitor, arrives and suggests,
some cocktails and cigarettes, ahe re-
LONDON—Viscount Sandhurst, who,
as lord chamberlain, is ox-ofllcio censor of all plays produced in England,
has finally decided, after a great deal
of controversy, to ban the word
"Mecca" as the title of Oscar Asche's
latest spectacle, which succeeds Chu
Chin Chow after the latter's unprecedented five-year run at His Majesty's Theatre here.
The reason for this peculiar action
is found in the lord chamberlain's
decision that use of the word would
be "offensive to His Majesty's Mohammedan subjects." Mr. Asche pleaded
In vain for retention of the title.
Extensive preparations are being
made by the United Artists Corporation for the marketing of "Carnival,"
the Harley^-Knowles production made
In England, which Hiram Abrams an
nounced the Big Four had purchased
for world distribution.
This Information was given out by
the president of the United Artists
just before he left Lob Angeles, where
he spent a week In conference with
Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks
and Charlie Chaplin.
"Carnival" is a seven-reel picture,
featuring Mathewson Lang, said to be
England's greatest actor. The nature
of this feature is expressed In the
title, and the story is laid in Venice,
where all of the exterior scenes were
made. This production takes the form
of a spectacle, lavish and picturesque
in costuming, and it is said that more
than a thousand players took part.
The cast is wholly English, and Includes all ot the best-known players
in the British Isles.
In order to get a more accurate conception of Alexander Dumas' famous
story, "The Three Musketeers," which
Ib being studied in the original tongue
by the French classes ln all Long
Beach schools, Miss Edna Blackwood,
head of the high school French departments, made an arrangement
with Douglas Fairbanks through
which French classes from all of tbe
beach city schools are to be allowed
to visit the Fairbanks studio and
watch tbe making of the film version
of this literary classic.
Gems of Thought
The cure for all ills and wrongs,
the cares, the sorrows, and the crimes
of humanity, all lie in tbe one word
"love." It is the divine vitality that
everywhere produces and restores life
to each and* everyone of us, it giver)
the power of working miracles if we
will.—L. W. Child.
Integrity is the first step to true
greatness. Men love to praise, but,
are slow to practise it—to maintain it
In high places cost self-denial; in all
places tt Is liable to opposition, but its
end is glorious, and the universe will
yet do lt homage.—C. Simmons.
A holy life ls not an aescetic, gloomy
or solitary life, but a life regulated by
divine truth and faithful Christian
duty. It is living above the world
while we are still in it.—Tryon Edwards.
As no true work since the world began was ever wasted, so no true life
since the world began has ever failed.
—Emerson. '
Mind Is the great lever of all things;
human thought is the process by
which human ends are answered —
Daniel Webster.
Love is never lost. If not reciprocated it will flow back and soften
and purify the heart.—Washington
Irving.
GO AFTER IT
Most people get what they "go after." The reason for the failures is
that they don't go after everything.
In nearly every case the spirit back
of a man'B efforts is reflected in thc
results he obtains. And none of us
are able to Judge the success of our
fellow men. Possibly tbis one or that
one may not seem to us to have
achieved very great success, but his
humble station may be the station lie
went after. Perhaps he realizes that
there he can gain the greatest happiness for himself, and be of the greatest good to others.
"John," said the lady sadly, "I don't
believe you have smoked one of those
lovely cigars I gave you on your birthday."
"No, my dear, I haven't," replied
her husband. "As a matter of tact, 1
intend to keep them until our little
Willie grows up and wants to learn to
smoke."
i ?fary Pickford in the characterization of a little cockney laundry drudge in "Sud.s"
builds the loveliest dream castles out of soap suds. It is one of the rare productions
that goes straight to the heart and awakens all sorts of human sympathy—Strong and
moving—and with that measure of humor and pathos that is inseparable from ils
realism.   From the Charles Frohman production, '"Op O' Me Thumb."
Tuesday, June 7th
H. B. WARNER
— IN —
The White Dove
He loved but he trusted no woman. Because his wife had proven untrue he believed
all women were faithless. But another, unlike the othor women he had known,
brought him love and happiness. A soul-stirring drama of love and forgiveness—a
problem of the ages brought down to modern life.
Two persons he had loved above all else proved
untrue-but another brought new love and happiness
Wednesday, June 8th
Blanche   Sweet
IN —
HER   UNWILLING
HUSBAND
IT'S A WISE HUSBAND THAT KNOWS HIS OWN WIFE!
Particularly if she be beautiful, if he never saw her before, and if she
insists that he is her "hubby." A chance visit placed this bachelor in a
strange house, with a strange girl and a strange man. During the diiy he
pretended he was her husband. She was so loving and "wifely." But at
night—what embarrassments!
A PERT AND NAUGHTY COMEDY OK A FASCINATING MAID AND
TWO MEN, ONE WILLING AND THE OTHER UNWILLING.
A ROMANTIC COMEDY DRAMA OK CHARMING ORIGINALITY
Thursday, June 9th
BUCK  JONES
.
— IN —
The Last Straw
Buck Jones, the new sensation nf the screen, in the speediest of thrillers. All the
elements of life—love, laughter and lust—welded into a sensational western drama.
Thc soldier-cowboy-horseman-actor, Buck Jones, makes his first screen appearance in
"The Last Straw," a triumph of action, chock-full of dash and daring. A dynamic
picture of the cattle country, bristling with tense situations.
Summer   Schedule
ON MONDAY NEXT, JUNE 6, THE SUMMER SCHEDULE WILL GO
INTO EFFECT AT THE ILO-ILO THEATRE.    THE DAILY SHOW
WILL BE
Continuous Show from  7 p.m. tb 10 p.m.
!!!■■
liiiiin Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLAKDIR
June 4, 1921.
Ladies', Men's, Girls', Boys'
and Children's Hosiery
LADIES' SILK HOSE—Venus make, one of the choicest lines of Hose on the market; a
beautiful quality of silk. Price, $2.00 a pair. Colors of Black, White, Paddy, Navy,
Pink, Sand, Grey, Blue, Nigger Brown and Cordovan.
MONARCH KNIT OPEN-WORK SILK HOSE—In colors of Black, Navy, Cordovan and
Grey.   Price $2.50 a pair.   Just the name "Monarch" is suflicient guarantee of quality.
LADIES' SILK ART HOSE—In most of the wanted shades, at $1.25 pair.
LADIES' LISLE HOSE—A really good quality at 75c and 90c pair.
LADIES' WHITE LISLE HOSE—Mercerized; extra special quality; 9">c pair.
CHILD'S SOX—ln shades of Pink and Blue; sizes 4Mj to 7; .35c pair; .3 pairs for $1.00.
CHILD'S CUTIE SOX—Willi or without striped tops; sizes -V* to 7.   Price 45c pair?
CHILD'S VERY FINE MERCERIZED SOX—White with colored lops.   Price (i5c pair.
CHILDREN'S FINE MERCERIZED HOSE—Sizes 5 to*1.), in Black and Brown. Prices
05c lo 95c pair.   Guaranteed to give good wear.
BOYS' HOSE—Cotton rib, the kind that wear well; it pays to get quality. 50c to 75c pair.
BOYS' LARGE SIZE KNICKER HOSE—Splendid line for the boys who play football.
Sizes 8V*a to 10.   Price 60c pair.   Rare value.
MEN'S WORKING SOX—35c pair or 3 pairs for $1.00.
MEN'S FINE CASHMERE HOSE—English make; one of the finest lines we have seen,
and the price is only $1.00 a pair.   Try one.
MEN'S FINE LISLE HOSE—A really superior quality, in Black and Brown; .ill sizes.
Price 75c a pair.
MEN'S HOLEPROOF SILK HOSE—In Brown and Grey only.   Price $1.25 a pair.
THE STORE FOR QUALITY HOSIERY
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr. and Mrs. It. R. Frost motored to
Victoria on Sunday, returning Tuesday. They report a very pleasant
trip.
Mrs. George Kerr MacNaughton
will not ^receive on Monday and not
again this season.
Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (l)uiis-
iiuiir) Ltd.. left (or Nanaimo Thursday.
Mrs. C J. Bunbury and daughter
returned on Monday from Victoria,
pier spending a week's holiday witli
friends.
Mr. James Jl. Savage, General Malinger Canadian Colleiries (Dunsmuir)
Limited, accompanied by Mrs. Savage,
returned t" Victoria Thursday,
Mrs. A. It. Nunns returned from a
short visit to Victoria nn Sat unlay.
.Mr. I1'. A. McCarthy, manager ot the
Royal Manic of Canada, accompanied
by Mrs. McCarthy, returned on Saturday after a two weeks' vacation spent
at cinisl ellies.
.Mr. and .Mrs. McMillan hit tor Victoria mi Montiay to- sisit Mr. McMillan's mother.
Mrs. Joseph Aaposi, roprosotattvo ol
llie Cumlierland Itehekalt Lodge, will
go to Nanaimo Monday to attend tlie
Ucbi'knh Assembly t" lie hold in that
city on June 7. Mrs. Francescini and
Mrs. Balagno will accompany Mrs.
Aspesl.
Mr. T. Mordy, City Clerk, left for
Nanaimo Thursday morning and relumed Friday,   •
Mr. A. Winninghnm left for Victoria
Saturday morning ami returned Tuesday.
.Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer, Canadian Collieries lUuns-
muirl Limited, left for Nanaimo Friday morning.
.Miss Ida McFadyen, who hns been
attending Provincial Normal School,
Victoria, for tlio past year, returned
home on Wednesday.
Mr. 1'. Monte returned from Victoria
Thursday.
.Mr. Charles Graham. District Superintendent, left for Nanaimo Thursday
morning.
, Mr. George O'Brien, Safety First
Engineer, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. returned from Ladysmith
and Nanaimo on Friday.
.Mr. and Mrs. A. Wilkinson arrived
in Union Bay Thursday. Mr. Wilkinson has just returned from Portland,
where he has been attending college.
Miss A. Coleman, who lias been attending Normal School in Victoria, returned on Sunday last. •   .
Mr. C. R, Drader returned to Victoria Wednesday morning.
Mr. Philip ltowe arrived from Nanaimo Wednesday evening.
Just arrived at the
B. & B. GROCERY
a new line in
Glassware
AND
Crockery
SEE   OUR   WINDOWS"
Our Trices are Right
FRESH  FRUIT
Arriving Daily
CHERRIES       STRAWBERRIES       PINEAPPLES
BANANAS    ORANGES    LEMONS    APPLES
GRAPEFRUIT
FRESH VEGETABLES
LETTUCE   TOMATOES   CUCUMBERS   CABBAGE
ASPARAGUS   CARROTS   BEETS   TURNIPS
Our Motto: Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
I
For Ten Days Only SALE-You can't afford to miss these
SMASHING
REDUCTIONS
In PIANOS, PHONOGRAPHS and all DEPARTMENTS
PIANO SNAPS
This beautiful Player-Piano will play
all latest hits.   Was $850. flJC'TC
Special Sale Pricij   «P«J I O
Easy Terms.
NEW MORRIS PIANO
Was $550. C/Iqf;
Special Sale Price tP'±t7tl
Easy Terms.
CECILIAN PIANO
Reduced from $G25 CF\Fvft
Easy Terms.
SECOND-HAND PIANOS
At prices ranging fl»-| PA
from   tplDU
Easy Terms.
Phonograph
Needles
600
FOR ONE DOLLAR
Sheet Music
ALL  REDUCED
RECORD ALBUMS
Regular price $2.50.
Special Sale Price	
MOUTH ORGANS—
From	
MUSIC CASES—
From 	
$1.95
50c
75c
RECORDS
2 for $1.00
Cheap Phonographs
TABLE MODEL—      (£1 A A A
Special Price «Pllf.UU
PHONOGRAPHS—      dJOP AA
Special price  «p£it)«vl/
COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH
Regular price $82.50.   d»/IQ AA
Sale Price   «P4:I/.UU
EDISON PHONO-        d»r A AA
GRAPH—Sale Price tPUU.UU
COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH
Regular price $110.       <£CC AA
Sale Price   «J>tJU«VV
PATHEPHONE
Regular price
Special Sale Price
$250
Full Cabinet
ColumbiaPhonographs
Automatic  Stop;  Compartments to
hold 75 Records.   As shown above.
Ordinary price $135.
SPECIAL SALE PRICE
$95.00
LOWER THAN PRE-WAR PRICES
SPECIAL TERMS
d»0 DOWN     &n PA MONTH
These  SPECIAL PRICES  only  hold good during TEN  DAY  SALE
FLETCHER   MUSIC
CUMBERLAND   AND   COURTENAY,   B.C.
CO.
LTD.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342510/manifest

Comment

Related Items