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The Cumberland Islander Jun 26, 1920

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THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which ls consolidated tke Cumberland News.
4o
TWENTY-NINTH YEAR—No. 26.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1920.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE; TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
URGE DELEGATION
WAITS ON
CONCERNING LICENCE BYLAW
Many Hotel, Restaurant and Confectionery Men Attend Council
fo Give Their Views on "Near Beer" and Soft Drink Bylaw-
Council Will Probably Modify Proposed Legislation at the
Meeting on Monday Evening Next.
Much more than usual interest was aroused at the regular
Council meeting on Monday last by the presence in the City Hall
of a full representation of persons directly affected by the new
Beverage Licence Bylaw now being put through its various stages.
Mayor McDonald was in the chair, the full number of aldermen as
well as City Solicitor Harrison being in attendance.
After the first regular business had been attended to, His
Worship the Mayor said he was pleased to see people attending
the meeting and taking an interest in the doings of .the Council,
and invited those present to address the meeting and lay before
it their views.
Considers $200 Licence Fee Unreasonable.
Mr. Merrifield, of the Cumberland Hotel, said they were present
to protest against the licence fee of $200, as they thought it unreasonable to tax the hotelmen the maximum amount allowed bylaw. He said they did not mind the regulations regarding the
hours of closing and orderly conduct. The $200 fee might be all
right in the larger cities, but here it was unreasonable; he also
mentioned the fact of the Union Hotel being outside the city limits
and exempt.
Tho Mayor:  "Under the old Liquor Act you paid $300."
'    Mr. Merrifield (with emphasis):  "We hod something to sell them then!"
(Laughter.)
The Mayor admitted there wos an injustice hut said the provincial government should set the rote themselves. He said the Council' did not want to
do anything that was unfair.
Mr. Merrifield said they did not mind closing up at the hours designated, but
the fee would put some of them out of business. They had hod a long series
of trouble—the strike, no work, the war, and then prohibition.
Unless Bylaw is Altered, Soft Drink Places Must- Close.
Mr. K. A. Scott, of the "Kelly" Cafe, asked if the licence applied to houses
selling soft drinks.
At this stage lt soon became apparent that some misunderstanding existed
owing to the two separate amendments to the Prohibition Act by the provincial government, one regarding drinks made from malt-or hops, under which
"near beer" comes, and tho other regarding soft drinks. Two aldermen considered the editorial in The Islander of last week Incorrect. City Solicitor
Harrison, who drafted the bylaw, gave a full explanation of both amendments, showing The Islander to be correct, and stated that places selling soft
drinks would have to close the same time as the hotels, Including.Sunday?.,
as the bylaw now stands.
Alderman Parnham said he was not in favor ot closing the places selling
soft drinks, there evidently being some misunderstanding at the previous
meeting.
One of the delegates sold he could uot olford to pay the licence fee. As it
was he had to go out to work to make a living.
Is "Near Beer" a Luxury?
Mr. J. Damonte, of the Vendome Hotel, considered the men were not getting
a square deal, contending that the big stores doing a big turnover could much
better afford to pay a large licence.
Aid. Brown: "These cannot he compared—one sells necessities, the other
luxuries."
Aid. Wier could not see how such a harmless drink as near beer, which was
strictly a temperance drink, could be called n luxury.
Mr. Henderson said he did not want lo sell near beer, but only soft drinks.
He did a very 'small business in that, and only kept it as a convenience.
The manager of the Royal Candy Store said he did not handle "near beer"
at all, but wanted to know if his store would have to close if he handled soda
water.
Mr. Scott contended that by fixing the licence fee at $200 It would cut out
all the small men. Anyway he only handled a very small amount of "near
beer," but objected to.closing because he sold soft drinks.
Another of the hotel mon present snid the small stores did not affect their
business, but tlie licence fee should he cut down—it was altogether too much.
Bylaw to Be Reconsidered at Next Meeting.
His Worship Mayor .McDonald said they did not want to do anything unfair.
The bylaw would come up for reconsideration next Monday night, as under
tho law lt had to lay on the table two weeks before being finally adopted.
The delegation then withdrew and llie Council look up Its regular business.
Council Will Finish Dunsmuir Avenue
Upon resuming the regular order of business Aid. Thomson, reporting for
the Board of Works, sold he could only report slow progress on Dunsuiiiir
Avenue. II hod been left in a muddle, the government men hnvlng been
withdrawn before the amount of work promised was anything like completed,
The Boord of Works wanted more men nnd more learns but could not gel them.
The Mayor sold it was hard to get men. Some of the men working on tho
street hud quit as they wonted more money—»5.un a day instead of $1.50. They
were available If the Council would pay $5.00 a day.
Considerable discussion followed ns lo what wos best to be done, some
aldermen being afrnid the work would not be satisfactory when completed
owing to an excess of sand iu the gravel. .
Alderman Brown sold the work hud cot to be done. The committee interviewed the government and they hod promised to put on 150 londs of gravel
—considerably less than this had been done, ond the city team had done most
of the work at that. He thought the Council should pay $5.00 a day if
necessary.
Eventually it was decided to proceed with the work, it boing understood
that Engineer Owen had given assurances the road would be satisfactory
when completed according to liis Instructions.
Ou motion of Alderman Parnham, seconded by Alderman Brown, the Board
of Works was empowered to hire the men necessary (o complete the work
at $5.00 a day.
Concerning the Fire Hose.
For the Fire Wardens, Alderman Brown reported that Aldermen Parnham,
Pickard and himself had canvassed Chinatown for the fire hose fund and had
secured $148.75, which together with the $117 previously collected amounted to
$265.75. They had not quite completed their work there yet. He recommended that the Council purchase the lire hose right,away.
After some further discussion, on motion of Alderman Parnham, seconded
by Alderman Bannerman, the City Clerk was empowered to order 500 feet of
2%-inch fire hose.
Laud Sale Bylaw No. 2 was put through another stage and the lots concerned will be advertised for sale.
JAMES HALLIDAY AND
FAMILY LEAVING FOR
VISIT TO SCOTLAND
Leaving Cumberland Today and
Do Not Expect to Return
Until October.
After seven 'years' strenuous business activity In Cumberland, Mr.
James Halliday, the well known baker
of this city, is taking his family to
Scotland for a three months' vacation.
They are leaving today, goiug to Vancouver, from where tliey lake the C.
P. R. train to Montreal, catching the
Donaldson liner Cassandra there next
Saturdays sailing for Glasgow.
They figure on having about ten
weeks In Scotland, during which timo
they will visit Mrs. Halliday's parents
and their many friends tn different
parts of Scotland, lt will probably be
the middle'of October before they get
back to Cumberland.. Their many
friends and patrons wish them a pleasant journey, happy re-union and sate
return.
Mr. John Halliday, a brother, will
have charge of the business during
Mr. Halliday's absence,.while Mr. McDonald, a well known Scotch baker of
Vancouver, js comiug to take charge
of the bakery, so the many patrons ol
this firm may rest assured of the same
satisfaction and service as in the past.
FORMAL WELCOME
TO NEW PASTOR
Many Citizens Meet to Welcome
Rev. and Mrs. Kinney to
Cumberland.
The members and friends' of Grace
Methodist Church held a social even-
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
HOLDS FINAL MEETING
OF SUMMER SESSION
The ladies of the Hospital Auxiliary
held their regular monthly meeting in
the Parish Hall on Friday afternoon.
This was the last meeting of the season, the next session being opened on
September 24th, when the women will
begin the Fall work by a "Tag Day."
The auxiliary has raised the sum of
three hundred and eighty dollars since
they started their meetings tn March,
which lias been expended on necessities for the hospital. A linen shower
was also held aud the hospital enriched by a generous offering from the
citizens.
STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL
VERY SUCCESSFUL
If any person had doubts about the
success of the Strawberry Festival
and Sale of Work held by tbe Ladies'
Aid ot St. George's Presbyterian
Church yesterday afternoon, such
doubts would quickly dissipate on
coming Inlo contact with the genial
pastor, Rev. Mr. Hood. He made the
fact of the day boing his birthday to
have a corker of a time.
Among the ladies assisting to make
the affair a success were Mrs. Hood,
.Mrs. Rickson, Mrs. McKinnon, ,Mrs. J.
Pattie, Mrs. Wm. Pattie, Mrs. Colin
Campbell, iMrs. Fraser, Mrs. White,
Mrs. Sutherland, Mrs. Baird, .Mrs. iMar-
pole, Miss McDonald, MIsb Agnes
Baird, Miss Mildred Halscrow and
Miss Grace Watson.
GREAT WAR VETERANS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
Cumberland, B. C,
June 23rd, 1920.
Edward W. Bickle,
Cumberland, B. C.
Dear  Sir.—I   have  been   Instructed
by the Comrades   of   the  Great War
Veterans'    Association     ICumberland
Local) to convey to you their sincere
ilianks and appreciation of your good
will toward them In contributing so
graciously to the success of the Benefit
Concert and Dance In aid of the War
Memorial to be erected in this city.
I have thc honor to be, Sir,
Yours faithfully,
0, J. BUNBURY,
Secretary.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Following Is a statement of receipts
of the Groat War Veterans' concert
and dance held in the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
on June 9th, in aid of the Memorial
Hall:
Box office receipts, concert  $59.75
Box office receipts, dance    80.05
Cash received from tickets sold
by John Walton     30.00
Cash received from tickets sold
by Mrs. C.A Bunbury    25.00
Cash received from tickets sold
Mrs. W. G. Hasfoll       3.00
Cash received from tickets sold
W. G.  Hassell      3.00
Total   receipts     $200.80
GOOD PROGRESS ON AVKNTK.
Good progress is being made wilh
Dunsmuir Avenue work this week und
it Is giving promise of turning out
very satisfactory.
and Mrs. Kinney to Cumberland.
About one hundred persous were present and spent a very pleasant evening. An address of welcome was given
by Mr. Ramsell, who also acted as
chairman for the Arst part of thc
programme. Mr. Bank was called
upon to officiate for the latter part,
after which refreshments were served
by the Ladies' Aid. Several songs
and recitations were given during the
evening.
The following persons contributed^
the evening's enjoyment: Mesdames
Jones. Piket, Henderson, Ramsell,
Waddlngton, Richardson and Mr. Edwards and Mr. Hassell. Speeches were
made by Rev, Hood, Rev. Kinney, Mr.
Ramsell and Mr. Banks.
WAKE UP! WOULD-BE VOTERS
Than One Thousand Names Have Been Received by Registrar
Baird for the Comox Electoral District Out of Five Thousand
Persons Entitled to Vote—Unless the Other Four-Fifths
Wake Up to Their Responsibilities They Will Have No Vote.
The great majority of electors apparently fail to realize that
there is only a little more than two weeks before the registrations
ing last Wednesday to welcome Rev. [on the new Voters' List will come to an end.   As only those who
register can possibly vote, the situation is serious.
If present indications are anything to go by, when an election
comes around—and it may come very soon—the great majority
of electors in this district will have no vote. It will be entirely
their own fault, as it is a very simple matter to step into some
place authorized to receive registrations and sign the necessary
"form.
ALL PREVIOUS LISTS CANCELLED
Many persons seem to be under the impression that because
they voted at the last election their names will automatically be on
the new list as was the practice heretofore. THEY WILL NOT.
^All old voters' lists in the province of British Columbia have
been* cancelled, and today there is not a voters' list in the province
—but a new one is in the making, and its entirely up to the electors whether -they are on it or not.
The Prohibition Referendum will be voted on shortly. If you
are at all interested-in this matter, register at once—and don't
forget women have a vote as well as men.
Wake up to the seridflgnes's of the situation and register—at
once. If you do not, you cannot vote—but the other fellow will,
and what he says will go, if you neglect your duty.
Under the Elections Act as passed at the last session of the
Legislature persons entitled to receive applications for enrollment
include a Justice of the Peace, Mayor, Reeve, Alderman, Councillor,
Commissioner for taking Affidavits, Registrar-General or District
Registrar of Titles, Notary Public, Registrar of Voters, Deputy
Registrar of Voters, Provincial Constable, Special Provincial Constable, Government Agent, Government Assessor, Mining Recorder, Deputy Mining Recorder, Judge of any Court, Stipendary
Magistrate, Municipal Clerk, Municipal Assessor, Postmaster,
Postmistress, Indian Agent or Provincial Elections Commissioner.
New Commissioners Appointed.
In addition to the list of Commissioners previously published,
the following have been appointed by the government, and will
receive applications for enrollment:
CUMBERLAND SOCCER
TEAM LEFT FRIDAY
FOR VANCOUVER
During Their Absence of Eight
Days They Will Play
Three Matches.
The Cumberland United Football
team left town, on Friday afternoon
at 5 o'clock by automobile. They are
in tor a most strenuous time, as three
gomes are to be played within eight
days. The players left with the full
Intention of winning all three matches.
Unfortunately Sullivan, the sterling
half-back, was unable to make the
journey, his place being taken by
Stubbart. The following players
represent Cumberland: Clark, goal;
Leigh, Wilkinson, full backs; Brown,
Jackson, Stubbart, half-backs; Wiley,
Crtrni, James, Boothman and Harrison,
forwards; Bannerman goes as reserve.
Manager Walker went in charge of
the team.
Their first match Is at Vancouver today, when they meet the Rangers.
BASEBALL MATCH
TOMORROW MORNING
Port Alberni Team and Cumberland Players Stage a Match
Commencing at 10.30
Commencing at 10.30 a.m. tomorrow
a baseball match will be played on the
Y" Grounds between the Port Alberni team and tlie Cumberland boys.
As the local team has uot had a game
here for some time, owing to unfavorable circumstances, keen interest Is
being manifested In the match, as the
seball fans are anxious to see what
the Cumberland teem really can do.
BIG  CELEBRATION
AT POWELL RIVER
Dominion  Day Attractions Include $1000 in Prizes—Boat
Leaves Union Bay 8 A.M.
A big celebration for Dominion Poy
has been arranged to take place at
Powell River. The S. S. Charmer has
been chartered to make the trip, and
will leave Union Bay at S* a.m.. arriving at  Powell   River  nt  10  o'clock.
The programme arranged Is very
comprehensive and should afford
amusement for old and youi). $1000
Is offered lu prizes, nnd among the
special features arc boot races and
water sports, field sports, a baseball
match between the Courtenay team
and Powell River boys, a championship wrestling match between H. McDonald and Al. Hatch, and last hut by
no means least, to wind up the day
a big dance will be held In the evening. The return boat leaves Powell
River at 1 a.m.
THE BLACK SECRET
The Serial of a Thousand Sensations, Commences at Ilo-
Ilo on Wednesday
Pearl White, a motion picture star
of great dramatic ability, ls starring
in the new Patlie serial of a thousand
sensations. "The Black Secret," This
is adapted from the novel "In Secret,
by Robert w. Chambers. Episode I
"The Great Secret," will commence
ou Wednesday next ol tlie Ilo-Ilo.
FRANK DALBY. Cumberland.
EDWARD W. BICKLE, Cumberland.
THOMAS MORDY, Cumberland.
JOHN C. BU.VBURY, Cumberland.
JOHN C. BROWN, Cumberland.
REV. JAMES HOOD, Cumberland.
COLIN CAMPBELL, Cumberland.
JOHN THOMSON, Cumbcrlond.
W.M. BEVERIDGE, Sr., Cumberland.
A. McKINNON, Cumberland.
T. E. BATE, Cumberland.
FRANK PARKS, Bevan.
DAVID ROY, Royston.
ABRAHAM  PICKLES.  Denman  Is
HERBERT GLOVER, Union Bay.
E. T. SEARLE, Union Bay.
MRS. JESSIE BRUCE, Chun-house.
CHARLES WILLIM McIVER, Head
quarters.
CHAS. ED. HIGGINS, Nahwittl.
HENRY ALEX MACDONALD, Duncan Island.
WILLIAM BEIKIE, JR., Denman
Island.
FRANK GAGNE, Quathlaskl Cove.
ANDREW  ROBERT JOHNSTON,
Scintilla.
TOBIAS SORENSON, Coal Harbor,
Quatsiuo.
JAMES WELSH, Alert Buy.
ROBERT J. COLE, Powell River.
Deputy Registrars Appointed.
The following Deputy Registrars
have heon appointed and will travel
In various parts of thc Comox Electoral District:
THOMAS MENZ1ES.
W. J. FRASER.
JAS. STEWART.
JOS. DICK.
J. D. HOWSE.
Register At The Islander Office
Applications to register will he received at the office of The
Islander between the hours of 11 and 12 a.m. and <1 and 5 p.m.
If you are entitled to vote, step in and sign the necessary form.
JU
Katherine  7? *
MacDonald "fgh
'oinp'g
Katherine Macdonald More Gorgeous nnd Enchanting Than Ever
In Role of Regal Beauty Fighting Love and Poverty in Big
Chambers' Story. "Thc Turning Point"—She is Said (o Be
the Most Beautiful Woman on the Picture Stage.
As a special holiday show thc management of the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
has booked "The Turning Point" for Dominion Day, Thursday
next. Katherine Macdonald, thc famous film .star, and saitl to be
the most beautiful woman on the screen stage, takes the part of
Diana Tcnnant, a society girl who is thrown on her own resources
without any money. "The Turning Point" is a throbbing story of
struggle made by a financially ruined society beauty to gain a living for herself and her nistcr and against moral ruin threatened
by a society man who desirtis her for her unusual charm and
attractions. Diana Tennant wins against all these odds and tlie
great American beauty enhances tho writer's famous novel.
Big Dance on Dominion Day, July 1st
Following the picture show in the evening, the Ilo-Ilo management is putting on a special holiday dance. Good music and a
jolly lime assured to all who tako this opportunity "f finishing
up the holiday in this manner. Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 26, 1920.
For June Brides
Useful Articles that
give the recipients
REAL PLEASURE
$37,50
97-PIECE DINNER SETS—
Regular $45.00.   Special	
CHOCOLATE SETS AND TEA SETS.
FANCY PIECES OF CHINA.
OAK   CHAIRS   AND    ROCKERS,   upholstered   in
Tapestry and Leather.   These are a particularly
good line.
DRESSERS, with large plate mirror, bevelled edge, in
Fumed Oak, Walnut and Mahogany, at $60.00 and
$55.00 each.
FAWCETT'S SUPERB $80.00
MAPLE LEAF PRIZE $77.00
»
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
ft. McKinnon
THE  FURNITURE- STORE
Cumberland, B.C.
A DANCE
Given by the Management
of  the Ilo-Ilo  Theatre on
Dominion Day
July 1st
GOOD MUSIC
Gents, $1.00     Ladies, 25c.
****************!**
'
FILMS
AND
AMATEUR DEVELOPING
AT
Frost's
The Rexall Store
CUMBERLAND.
\\USt\+t*t>0**l>^^
Symmer Camp
At Page's Point
"A boy In the process of growing
needs the outdoor. He needs room
and range. He needs the tonic of the
hills, the woods and streams. He
needs to walk under the great sky and
commune with the stars. He needs to
place himself where nature can speak
in him. He ought to get close to
Mother Earth. He ought to lie toughened by sun and wind, rain and cold.
Nothing can take the place, for the
boy of stout physique, robust health,
nooil blood, - firm muscles, sound
nerves, for these are the conditions of
character efficiency. His early teens
ure the most important years for the
hoy physically. Through the ages of
thirteen and fifteen the more he can
be in the open, free from social engagements and from continuous labor
and study the better. He should fish,
swim, row and sail, roam the woods
and the waters, get plenty of vigorous
action, have interesting, healthful
things to think about and do."—C. W.
Votaw.
This is the week foi» parents with
teen age boys to decide as to whether
they are going to send them to the
Boys' Camp held at Page's Point from
July 2nd to 16th. Applications and
letters expressing, the intention of
hoys from other points in the district
to attend the camp are coming in. To
give the purchasing committee a
chance to know how full to stock the
pantry, applications should be made at
once. Application forms may be obtained from Secretary C. B. McKinnon,
343 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo, phone
574Y, or from members of the Y. M. C.
A. committee in Cumberland. Mr. J.
C. Brown is. president of the local
branch, Dr. E. R. Hicks is vice-president and Rev. J. Hood secretary.
Where these camps for boys have
heen held the results have been so
splendid that they are regarded as being almost indispensible. At any rate
they have been sufficiently satisfactory that many of the biggest and best
men and women are giving of their
time and thought to promote them.
The Boys' Summer Camps have come
to Canada to stay.
This camp wil^be so organized that
the best interest of the boys' physical
and moral welfare will he looked after. Already a number of splendid
ohler boys bave responded to tlie call
to become tent leaders. The cost is
not any more than it will cost you to
keep your boy at home. Let us meet
your boy at Page's Point July 2nd.
The real purpose of camping is
"something to do, something to think
about, something to enjoy in the
woods, with a view always to character building."—Ernest Thompson-
Seton.
The summer time is a period of
moral determination with most boys.
Free from restrain of school and many
times of home, hoys wander during
the vacation time into paths of wrongdoing, largely because of lack of
directed play life and natural outlet
for the expenditure of their surplus
energy. The vacation problem therefore becomes a serious one for both
the boy and his parents, Camping
offers a solution. Page's Point is an
ideal camping place.
The America's Cup
The most prized of sporting trophies
is by no means the most valuable, for
tbe intrinsic, worth of the. America's
Cup which Sir Thomas Lipton will attempt to life next month is only £100.
The prize was offered lirst by the
Royal Yacht Squadron in 1851 and
won by tbe America owned by Commodore J. C. Stevens, of the New York
Yacht Club, in tbe race held round
the Isle of Wight. The trophy was
taken to tlie United States nnd there
It bas remained ever since. In 1857 it
was deeded to the New York Club as
a perpetual challenge trophy for international races between vessels of
not less than 30 and not more thnn
lirni tons. The first" challenge was
forthcoming from Mr. James Ashbury
in I860, and he wished to sail his
yacht, tbe Cambria, against any yacht
the New York club might designate as
defender. The club declined to imme
a boat and insisted that tlie Cambria
sail against the whole yacht club
fleet. To this Mr. Ashbury consented
and an American yacht, the Magic,
was successful. In'1871 he returned
to the attack and on this occasion it
was agreed there should be a single
defender, the boat nominated being
the Columbia. The Columbia defended the cup until she lost through still
accident, after which the club substituted the Sappho. The cup remained in the United States, but the
race ended in a protest.
In 1876 the Countess of Dufferin
challenged but lost, and In 1881 the
Canadian sloop Atlanta challenged
but was defeated by "Mischief. Subsequently the Galatea and' the Genesta
were defeated by American defenders.
Then followed the defeat of the Thistle.
In 1889 Lord Dunraven commenced his'
! series of challenges in the course of
which he suffered defeat twice. Sir
Thomas Lipton's attempts begain in
18S9, but his three yachts, named respectively Shamrock I„ II. and II.,
were* defeated in turn. He is now
about to make hTs fourth attempt. The
great British tea merchant Is and has
been deeply absorbed In the desire to
win tbe blue ribbon of the seas. T4ie
real and fundamental reason for his
ambition lias been stated by himself
to be to take back that cup in an Irish
boat, with an Irish name, and to do
something for Old Ireland. Sir
Thomas ls nothing If not superstitious,
and no doubt during the race he will
wear a four-leafed shamrock. This
is the thirteenth time the New York
Yacht Club has been challenged for
the trophy—a fact upon which Sir
Thomas Lipton Is accustomed to dwell
with a certain amount of relish. His
courage, his cheeriness, his tact and
above all, in the present and previous
experiences, the game sportsmanship
which he has displayed, will make
next month's races for the America's
Cup easily the outstanding single
event of the sporting world during the
current year. Every Britisher will
wish him the success which he deserves because of the pertinacity with
which he has held to the hope of winning back the trophy from the United
States.—Colonist.
KELLEY'S CAFE
AND CONFECTIONERY
Everything  to  Eat  and Drink
City Food
City Service
Moderate Charges
FULL AND COMPLETE LINES OF CANDIES,
SOFT DRINKS, FRESH FRUIT AND TOBACCO.
SPECIAL  ELECTRIC  MIXER
FOR FOUNTAIN DRINKS
McKENZIES   ICE   CREAM   AT   ALL   TIMES
Catering to Banquets a Specialty
We have rooms where Private Banquets may be held.
KELLEY'S CAFE
OPPOSITE THE BIG STORE
CUMBERLAND
ARE THERE POOR
SPORTS IN THIS TOWN?
(By a Contributor)
'
*
******•*•
•
*
YOU WILL LOSE YOUR
•
*
VOTE
•
*
unless you register on or be
ss
*
fore   July   15.    All   Provincial
,
•
Voters'  Lists   have  been   con-
*
*
celled.
•
HE km:w
'What's the matter with you and
your girl?"
We had a tiff. I told her I was going away forever, and she told me to
go."
Well, If you're any man at all you'll
stay away two evenings."
During tbe progress of the game on
Saturday last between Cumberland
and Nanaimo, feeling ran pretty high
at times, but for all that both teams
played a good clean game. It was a
different thing wltb some ot tbe spectators. A few of Cumberland's (?)
supporters were rooting for Nanaimo
ror all they were worth. On making
Inquiries, iiowever, I found out the
cause of It all. Here it ls: It appears
lhat .the selection committee had been.
looking around with a view to getting
one or Iwo new players to try and
strengthen the team, which tbey, or
nny other selection committee, are
perfectly entitled to do. Fortunately
they were able to secure a couple of
players, and from present appearances
the team has heen considerably
strengthened, Consequently with two
new players on tlie line up some of
the old lineup had to be dropped for
tlie time being. That is where tlie
rub conies in. Because someone is
left off a team to make room for a better player, is no excuse for certain individuals to boost for our opponents.
We want the best team in British
Columbia riglit here iu Cumberland.
The footluill club relies on your support, morally, financially and any
otber wny. We have no room In Cumberland for poor sports. Good sportsmen make good citizens, and we want
only the best. Bury any disappointment you may have because this
player or that player Is not on tlie
team. Boost along the game and give
the players and committee all the
assistance you can.
Big game Is almost extinct in the
Transvaal.
DEAD TREE FALLS
ON LOGGING CABIN
KILLING MAN IN BED
WHITE FISHERMEN
BEING CROWDED OFF
COAST FISHERIES
Japanese Supremacy on West
Coast of Vancouver Island
Becomes Unbearable for the
White British Subjects.
If It can be Imagined that some
person, with a. general knowledge of
the peoples of the world, dropped
from the sky onto the water, off the
west coast of this Island, without any
idea of his geographical location, that
person can easily be seen making the
mistake of believing that he had landed somewhere off the coast of Japan.
The landscape of the Island might
not present to him a Japanese color,
but the animated surroundings would
be suflicient to give him the wrong
Impression.
For miles around him, In and out,
up and down, as far as his eyes could
see, he wo'uld behold an expanse of
water dotted with small fishing boats
and an occasional animated harbor.
The bewildered stranger, if he had
the appearance of an ordinary white
man, would, as he moved about, soon
become conscious that he was an object of curiosity. He would find himself being scrutinized by little men of
dark brown faces who were industriously engaged on the boats, the
wharves and the floats, and ln the
facial expressions he could clearly
see a question of the right of his
presence without regard to the manner of his arrival.
The editor of this newspaper, says
tlie Alberni News, haa just returned
from another trip up the west coast.
Among the few white men who could
be seen In the   fishing   Industry   he
found an anxiety to know if there wos
any sign of intention on the part of
the Dominion government to rescue
the district from the Japanese. Some
of these white men have become hopelessly discouraged and are planning to
.move.
WOMEN MARRIED
TO AMERICANS
Among the numerous inquiries in
regard to registration, is the case of
British subjects who have married
aliens.
The Naturalization Act of Canada,
enacted last year, says ln Section II.:
"The wife of a British subject shall be
deemed to be a British subject, and the ■
wife of an alien shall be deemed to be
an alien."
This prevents British women wbo
have married Americans registering
unless they are naturalized under the
succeeding sub-clause ot the same section.
VERY LIGHT METAL .
BUT STRONG AS STEEL
A metal lighter than any yet known
and as strong or stronger than steel,
has for years been the dreams of many,
and every now and then rumors are
circulated to the effect that at last lt
has been discovered. The latest report
to be circulated relates to a new magnesium alio, said to have been discovered by a metal company ln Montreal.
The new alloy, it is stated, is only two-
thirds the weight of aluminum, and ls
"as strong as steel." It Is said to be
especially suitable for pistons and
connecting rods of aero and other
motor car engines, where strength and
lightness combined are desirable.
DUNCAN.—One of those rare fatalities which are inseparable from'the
forest occurred just after midnight
on Wednesday of last week, when Mr. i
Diivld Cunningham met his death at
the Charter Lumber Company's camp,
some fourteen miles from Duncan.
There was no wind "at the time, but
a dead fir tree, over four feet In diameter, fell across two cabins, smashing
tbem into kindling wood. In one of
these Messrs. Cunningham, F. Robinson, Louis Bergman and John Scott
were sleeping.
It appears that the tree fell on the
foot of Cunningham's Iron cot, and
threw his head with such force against
nn Iron angle that his skull was fractured. It was two hours hefore he
could he released, the log having to be
sawn In two places and jacked up. He
was then rushed to Duncan hospital,
where lie died shortly afterwards.
The other three occupants of the
cabin sustained slight Injuries. In the
otber cabin two men were Bleeping. They escaped witli but slight
Scratches.
At the Inquiry held at thc camp it
was found that the tree fell the whole
of its length, uprooting itself, it
broke the telephone line in its descent.
Looking over the ruined cabins one
wonders how any person could have
escaped alive. There were about 30
men in the camp but the other'buildings were not touched.    i
It is a pcullar fact that, about a mile
away, on the Cowichan Lake road, is
the spot where the late Mr. Cloutier
met his death through a similar occurrence when driving the stage.
"They say the cause of their quarrel
was a letter his wife found in his
pocket." I
"One that he had forgotten to mall?" J
"No; one he had forgotten to bum."'
DOMINION    DAY
CELEBRATION
AT   POWELL   RIVER
$1000 IN PRIZES
Boat Racing  and Water Sports
Field Sports, etc.
BASEBALL: Courtenay v. Powell River
CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING MATCH
H. MCDONALD AND AL. HATCH
BIG DANCE
S.S. Charmer leaves Union Bay at 8 a.m., arrives at
Powell River to a.m.   Returning leaves Powell'River
at 1 a.m.   Fare for Round Trip, $2.00. June 26, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
Music and Photoplays
mi
JACK DEMPSEY IN
"DAREDEVIL JACK"
TONIGHT AT ILO-ILO
The initial episode or tlle Patlle
Serial "Darevil Jack," featuring Jack
Dempsey, the American champion, met
with a splendid reception at the Ilo-
Ilo Theatre last Saturday. It proved
to bo, a most thrilling plctire, filled
Jack Dempsey, who appears In the
thrilling serial, "Daredevil Jack," at
the Ilo-Ilo Theatre tonight.
with moments of action anil suspense.
Il is a story of adventure and romance, crammed with sensational
thrills, red-blooded action and breathtaking suspense plus a story of hearts.
1-Jpisoile Two ls shown at the llo-lio
tonight.
* ss     ss
The influence of music upon the individual is known to all time. When
an evil spirit came upon King Saul,
David was brought before him to play
until the evil spirit had departed from
him. Here Is a remedy at our very
doors. Why not, then, when possessed
of this evil spirit, call in comehdy to
play for you or having a musical instrument at hand start going some
sweet melody of the masters? Would
not many people benefit by this melodious and simple "application."
* •   *
"THE  FIREBRAND"
A POWERFUL STORY
Shows Bitter Fight Between
Royalists and Revolutionists
in RuSsia—Miss Pearson Has
Dramatic Role.
Virginia Pearson has a particularly
strong and compelling story in "The
Firebrand." which will he shown at
the llo-llo Theatre this evening,
lt is a tale of the Russian revolution
and shows the intense and hitter battle between thc revolutionists and the
royalists for control of that vast but
badly governed country.
In tlie play she is tho Princess Na-
talya, tlie niece of Prince Andrei ftost-
off, who wants her to marry bis son,
Doris. But the princess reads the
stories of Julian Hoss, an American
writer, of Russian family. Ross is one
of the leaders of the revolution. He
is captured and placed in prison. The
princess visits (lie prison camp. A
rock falls and places her in danger.
Ross saves ber.   She promises to help
NORMA TALMADGE IN
"THE FORBIDDEN CITY"
A Chinese Mandarin Offered San
San to the Emperor, But
When They Found Her Half
American Baby Girl the Emperor Ordered San San to the
Hall of Flashing Spears.
One of the prettiest Chinese stories
ever produced for the screen Is "The
Forbidden City," in which Norma
Tahnadge is presented in llie dual role
of "Sun San" and "Toy" by Joseph M.
Sclienck, "The Forbidden City" comes
to the lio-llo Theatre on .Monday next
'or one niglit only.
In old China the currying of the
1'iuperor's faxor by the Mandarins was
eiiuai to the state of petty politics
thai existed In the court of Louis XIV
ol' France. Wong Ll was the father
of the beautiful San San. The two
had been banished aud were living iu
a remote seetion ol* the country, while
Wong Ll eked out a bare existence
giving lessons In Chinese to foreign
students. Thus it came about thai
San Sau made tlie acquaintance of
John Worden, a young American attached to. the II, S. Consular depot.
The old mandarin grew fond of the
brilliant young American until he discovered Hint his daughter and Worden
had been secretly married. When
Worden returned from a short trip lie
found that Wong Li and San San had
disappeared. Worden was broken
hearted, but ensuing orders look him
to a distant port and he gave San San
up us dead.
In the meantime, Wong Li, in an attempt to regain tlie emperor's favor,
offered San Sau as a member of his
court. The emperor consented to reinstate Wong Ll in favor, but when he
sent his soldiers to bring San Sau to
him it was discovered that she had
given birth to a baby girl. The emperor wus furious and ordered Wong
I.i to his deatli. San San was also
killed, bul the baby was saved.
Years later. Toy, San's daughter,
her escape to Manila, where she meets
and falls in love with Lletrt. Philip
Halhert. Toy has become a Red Cross
nurse, but when the governor, John
Worden, learns that Halhert is about
to marry a Chinese girl, lie sends Him
to command troops on a distant expedition. During his absence the governor falls 111 and is nursed buck to
health hy Toy. When the governor
has. partly regained his strength he
learns that his little Red Cross nurse
is uo other than his own daughter.
Toy tells him of her mother's deatli,
and liow she was raised in the emperor's court, and later of her escape
to Manila, where she met Halhert.
The events of his own sad life come
back lo Worden, and upon the return
of Halhert to his station tiie governor
gives liis permission for tlle wedding,
which is consummated at his bedside.
ss     ss     ss
Pntbe titles run iu sequence. In "His
Chinese Wife" Madeline Delmar enacts a role called "Tea Flower." There
will he "Tea for Throe" companies and
ti new producer announces a play under tlie title of "Tea Flower." while
one oi the popular burlesque comedians is preparing something which be
says will be described us "Tec Hoc."
ss      •      *
Qeraldlne Farrar, who Is some
Oriental impersonator herself, pays a
high  tribute  to Madeline Delmar as
him.   She gives him a passport made j |>ri„cess Tea Flower in "His Chinese
nut in Hie inline of a servant of her
uncle's household.   He goes to Petrograd and continues his work for tho
revolution.
Treachery on the part of Ihe Royalists who arc in league wilh Ihe kaiser
cause the slaughter of a regiment of
Russlon troops. Among these Is the
princess' brother. Ross learns thnt
Prince Andrei is (he arch traitor.
Using die servant's passport he goes
hack ami kills Ihe prince. This makes
the princess not only hate him but
plan to kill him. She shoots hlm,
causing a slight wound. He shows
her proof thai the prince, her uncle,
had brought about her brother's death.
She forgives him and tbey both slip
nway to Petrograd and both give aid
to tlie revolutionists,
S523H! This is the munificent sum
an American composer of opera gets
as a reward for his labor when one of
his works is lirought out at the great
.Metropolitan Opera House. New York.
$2601 ll Is any wonder that American
composers are not keen to write
opera for tlie 'Metropolitan production" Why, such a sum would scarcely
buy a decent present for one's best
friend, yet be It said the production
oi a work at ibis famous-, opera house
gives (be composer a certain distinction, his name Is heralded throughout
Hie length and breadth of the country
Wife."   This play and ".Madame Butterfly" are slightly Blmllar.
*   *   .
"THE BRAND" IS
GREATEST OF ALL
REX BEACH PLAYS
Famous Author's Powerful Story
of Alaska Brilliantly Ph'tur-
ized for His Newest Goldwyn
Production, at Ilo-Ilo Tuesday
The genius of Rex Beach was never
more compelllngly demonstrated than
In the newest of his famous books t'o
find piclurization ou the screen. II
f is "The Brand." widely known because
of the thrilling nature of the story, its
superb character drawing nnd the
popularity of the locale, Alaska—always fertile ground for Ilex Beach.
Produced for Goldwyn and following closely on the success of "Laughing Bill Hyde" nnd "Too Fat to Fight,"
"The Brand" collies when Interest ln
rhe Rex Beach productions is at its
height.
The .story is one of great power and
appeal. It is drama from Hie first
scene. 11 grips and thrills as the
four princlpual characters begin lo
weave their net of love, bale, passion,
and,rebellion, and does not end until
thc  very last  scene,  when  occurs a
nud   he   is   numbered    amongst    tho I climax of such terrific power that tlie
"nlBQt," I spectator can only wonder how Rex' theatre envious
Beach conceived anything so extraordinary.
Magnificent Alaska, scenes arc
shown, with raging blizzards, chasms
of Ice and frozen rivers. Again Rex
Beach does not star a player, preferring to use the lient talent obtainable
for a brilliant, perfectly balanced cast.
He asks us to imagine a little Xew
Vork vaudeville actress in Alaska. She
ls superlicial, sellish and pines for tlle
comforts ol' her Conner life. The girl
is there wilh her stage partner, a man
who Is lured to the Far .N'ortli by the
discovery of the Klondike. Ills lack
of success in finding gold, coupled
with his brutality, make Alice Andrews long for affection aud al least
Ihe bare comforts of life. Bin not yoi
has tho quietness of the long whiter
come to her. for It Is late summer.
Then comes another man, nn outwardly rough "sour dough," tin old
timer who knows Matiku better (ban
iie knows women. Alice's purtuer has
left her because she will nol ):■> with
him up the rivor Info Hie hear! of Iho
country and it is to ihe second man
that the girl (urns. He consoles her.
lu her misery and awkwardly miilccs
known tiiat be thinks hor the most
wonderful being li" has ever seen.
Clumsily In- touches upon marriage
and is Btunncd when Alice says thai
she- wouhl wed hlm it he would ask
her. Of course he does, nnd the
Strang-  union is consummated.
He takes her to his lonely cabin
and for a timo the girl busies herself
lu making It homelike. Te novelty of
the association nnd Hie tenderness other husband blind her temporarily.
Sbe tines even imagine lhal she is in
possession of everything to make her
happy and keep her so.
Only when the long winter sets in
and the trackless wastes of snow
stretch far away from their cabin does
she feel the first pangs of her loneliness. Then does she know that with
all her selfishness her vaudeville
partner could give her more happiness.
He spoke hor own language and knew
the people she knew hack home.
Out of this complication and clash
of souls Rex Beach lias evolved a'
striking story, which in its motion picture form will lie presented at Ihe Hollo on Tuesday llight next.
ss     .     ss
Langdon Mccormick, who manages
to introduce in his plays effects which
seem even more natural than nature
itself, has a new device which is being
used in his melodrama, "Tlie Storm."
which gives the Impression of actual
sparks (lying over the audience in his
great fire scene.
ss     ss     ss
"OUIt BETTER SELVES"
A PLAY WITH A PUNCH
Wednesday's Offering at ihe Hollo is a Five-Act Drama nf denunciation and Self-Sacrifice
—Fannie Ward is the Star in
This Thrilling Photoplay.
Car tn inly   no   unprejudiced   party
ould accuse Miss Fannie Ward nf
nny diminution of her emotional pow-
ors as expressed on tlie screen in tli"
exlra selected star photoplay. "Our
Better Selves," which show* al the
Ilo-Ilo on Wednesday next
The atmosphere of this play is entirely French throughout, as it follows
the fortunes of .Mdllc. Loyetto Merval,
a wealthy member of ihe imutej
noblesse, and iter admirer, one WM-;
laid Standish, an Impecunious member of the American aristocracy. The
entire action of the, play centres I
around these two, tlieir mooting at
l.oyetlo's beautiful country estate,
their mutual attraction, om; for the
otlier, their inarrlago, and tlieir awakening to the realization thai it Is Impossible io lind one's bettor self until
frivolity and vanity have been banished and the stern realities of life
recognized.
Tiie lirst part of llie piny is occupied wilh many beautiful scoiios and
a goodly amount of comedy, bul from
the moment thai Stamlisb decides to
play a real man's part in thc world,
the play consists of a series of dramatic situations, dosing wild a tableau showing the souls of tlie hero
and heroine crossing tlie River Slyx
iu Charon's Furry.
This latest vehicle for exploiting
Fannie Ward's versatility makes an
intensely interesting play, considerably above the average of present-day
photodramas, for it subtly convey.; a
great message, and one which will be
remembered long after thp play itself
has been forgotten.
Throughout the play Fannie Ward
very carefully sustains tlie idea of a
French woman of tho hfgltest class
society, ller gowns are gorgeous, nr..!
thr ere is one particularly dollcioua
'bathing costume which will assuredly
I make tlie lady patrons of tli" llo-llo
IL04L0 THEATRE
Continuous Show, 7 to 10
Saturday, June 26th
VIRGINIA PEARSON
— IN —
"THE  FIREBRAND"
ALSO  SECOND   EPISODE  OF '
Jack Dempsey
— IN —    .
"DAREDEVIL JACK"
Monday, June 28th
NORMA   TALMADGE
— IN —
"THE FORBIDDEN CITY"
a
Tuesday, June 29th
THE BRAND"
From the Story by
REX   BEACH
Wednesday, June 30th
-?(
FANNK  WARD
— IX —
"OUR BETTER SELVES"
Thursday, Dominion Day
SPECIAL HOLIDAY ATTRACTION
Katharine  McDonald
— IN -
"THE TURNING POINT"
NIGHT
During the Month of June Four
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 26,1920.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATURDAY, JUNE 26, 1920.
war to the utmost of her own limit' and assumed
obligations for her Allies in replenishing the store
from the United States. She sees more clearly
than any other nation the necessity of restoring
Europe to normal conditions. Her vision is backed
by deeds. Friend and erstwhile foe 'alike look to
Britain for aid and leading, and do not look in
in.—Toronto Globe.
BEVERAGE LICENCE BYLAW
After the full discussion of the Beverage
Licence Bylaw at the Council meeting on Monday
last, everyone concerned should have a clearer
conception of the proposed regulations formulated
by the City Council. The arguments adduced by
the hotel and restaurant men enables the Council
to see the matter from their viewpoint, and it
should now be in a position to amend the bylaw
more to the satisfaction of all concerned.
While the bylaw was not taken up at this meeting for amendment or ratification, still the impression prevails that the Council will eliminate
entirely the provisions relating to »soft drink
places and regulate and licence only those selling
by retail "drinks made from malt or hops containing not more than two and one-half per cent.
proof spirits," under which designation "near
beer" comes.
The City Council would be dealing justly with
the purveyors of "near beer" to considerably reduce the proposed licence fee. t
There is no question that the amendments to
that wierd piece of legislation called the Prohibition Act are very faulty; in fact, they have been
very aptly termed "half-baked legislation." The
government passed legislation empowering municipalities to govern places selling "soft drinks or
drinkable liquids containing less than two and
one-half per cent proof spirits," and then failed to
state what is meant by those terms.
From the wording of the Act as passed by the
Oliver government we are convinced that to sell
or give a cup of tea or a glass of water during
prohibited hours is a contravention of the letter
of the law if not the spirit. Truly wonderful
legislation!
To close a restaurant on Sunday because it sells
a bottle of lemonade—and the Council is empowered to do this under the Prohibition Act—is going from the extreme to the ridiculous. If this
sort of thing is what the Prohibition party-wants
it is taking the quickest possible steps for a return
of the old-time practices. The wave of fanatical
prohibition sentiment that swept over the continent is on the wane, and the people want and
will insist on sane government. Temperance in
its strict meaning is what is needed. Hon. Martin
Bun-ill, speaking in the House of Commons at
Ottawa a few days ago said the distilleries of
Canada last year made no less than 2,636,000
gallons of liquor, and had in store over six and a
half million gallons. Whereas in the yea* previous thirteen private stills were discovered, last
year the number had increased to the appalling
number of nearly one thousand!
THE  PUBLIC  PAYS
Many people object to the monarchistic form of
government on the ground that the money spent
in maintaining royal families and their dependents
is an extravagance yhich should be done away
with in these modern days of efficiency. The
republican form of government is usually advocated by such people as one by which public money
is not "wasted" on "useless frills." In answer to
such arguments it might be asked, whence come
the millions upon millions of dollars that are spent
by United States political organizers in the quadrennial presidential elections of that country and
in the numerous booms of contenders for the
nomination by each of the two great parties? The
answer is that it is the people's money and if they
do not pay directly, under the republican system
as it operates across the border, everybody knows
that they pay indirectly.
In this connection it is interesting to note that
a writer in as conservative a newspaper as the
New York Times estimates that the cost of this
year's election in all its phases will be at least
twenty million dollars and perhaps twenty-five or
thirty millions.—Vancouver Sun.
WELL, IT'S A BEGINNING
Hurrah, and hurrah, and hurrah, and a tiger!
Standard flour in Minneapolis has had the second
reduction of 50c a barrel in its wholesale price
within the space of seven days. Flour is now qnly
$15.25 wholesale. That is to say, it is only a
meagre $2.00 a barrel higher than it was three
months ago. Who says deflation and price reductions have not begun ?—Worcester Telegram.
Some residents in Los Angeles who consider it
the best town in the world in which to live
had their opinion considerably shaken by the
earthquake which started at 6.47 on Tuesday
evening and continued intermittently until 5 a.m.
next morning.
Down in the towns across the international border they ha#e taken the beaver off the Canadian
Arms and have replaced it with a blind pig, says
the Penticton Herald. This is a sad commentary
upon the- amounj of illicit international trade in
whisky which is now going on along the border,
south of here.
MORE ABOUT SUGAR
If tiie Board of Commerce did nothing else, it
serves the public to bring out the information on
matters which effect the cost of living. The information placed before the public as a result of
the inquiry into transactions on two car loads of
sugar sold in Ottawa is such as the public should
have. Briefly, it was disclosed that the sugar was
sold by the refiners to a Montreal broker at $19.98
a hundredweight. The latter sold it to dealers in
Magog, Quebec, who, in turn, disposed of it to
another dealer. By the last Montreal man it was
sold to wholesalers in Ottawa and by them to retailers at 27 cents a pound. Consumers bought it
from the retailers at 30 cents a pound. Thus, on
those two carloads of sugar five dealers took profit
of over 10 cents a pound before the food reached
the consumer.
Even if this costly process of getting the sugar
from the manufacturer to the consumer is not
remedied, the public at least has the satisfaction
of knowing where the money goes.
According to figures just published by the
French Minister of War, the total number of
French soldiers killed during the great conflict is
placed at 1,362,872, and of this number the details
of the fate of 361,854 are unknown. Such an
appalling toll is eloquent of the sacrifice made in
behalf of civilization by the people of France. It
is small wonder that she should chafe under the
diplomatic delays which postpone the demand that
Germany should abide by the terms of the Treaty
of Versailes.
NO MORE, THANK YOU
The departure from this country of Mr. John-
' son (familiarly known by what seems to be a
tribal or perhaps a totem, name) for thq United
States has coincided with the arrival of a body of
his disciples, says the London Morning Post. We
cannot, with any regard for truth, affirm that in
their missionary capacity we are glad to see Mr.,
Johnson's friends and colleagues. As descendants
of the Pilgrim Fathers they are, of course, welcome, but as a matter of fact we have missionaries
enough and to spare of our own. The kindest
consideration our visitors could manifest is to
take the next convenient liner westbound. We
only wish they could persuade our own temperance party (as it is inaccurately called) to go with
them. They should be happier in a dry climate.
Our British Prohibitionists might even learn in
the United States, what they cannot achieve* in
this country, to distinguish between drink and
drunkenness, between good liquor and bad, between use and abuse, between liberty and licence.
Denouncing drink, they increase drunkenness,
Degrading the public-house, they brutalize the
conception of social enjoyment. By blindly condemning all fermented liquor they offend the very
_people who, if the condemnation were applied to
""drunkenness instead of drink, would do their best
to encourage true temperance. For no one but a
fool or a fanatic would class beer with spirits or
wine with either.
BRITAIN THE DOER
Fifteen thousand tons of wheat intended for
Britain have been diverted to Germany. Large
stocks of frozen mutton are also being sent to the
same country from storage warehouses in Britain.
These actions, taken to avert serious shortages of
food supplies in a country with which she has recently been at war, are striking illustrations of
the methods of Britain, the doer of things. The
Motherland might have been rich beyond the
dreams of avarice had she contented herself with
•strict neutrality in the war. She entered it for the
sake of neutrality.   She furnished the sinews of
NOT UNDERSTOOD!
Not understood!  We move along asunder,
Our paths grow wider as the seasons creep
Along the years.   We marvel and we wonder,
Why life Is life, and then we fall asleep—
Not understood!
Not understood!   *We gather false Impressions,
And hug them closer as the years go by,
Till virtues often seem to us transgressions,
And thus men rise and live and fall and die-
Not understood!
Not understood!   How trifles often change us!
The thoughtless sentence oatfhe fancied slight,
Destroy long years of friendship and estrange us,
And on our souls there fallB a freezing blight-
Not understood!
Not understood!   The secret springs of action
Which He beneath the .surface and the show
Are disregarded; with-self satisfaction
We Judge our neighbors and they often go— •
- Not understood!
Not understood!    Poor fools with .stinted vision,
Oft measure giants by their narrow gauge,
And the poisoned shafts of falsehood and derision
Are oft Impelled 'gainst those who mould the age—
Not understood!
Not understood!   How many breasts are aching
For lack of sympahy; ah, day by day,
How many cheerless hearts are breaking!
How many noble spirits' pass away—
Not understood!
Not understood!  Oh, Ood! that man could see a Utile clearer,
Or Judge less harshly where they cannot see!
Oh, God! that man would draw nearer to one another!
They would he then nearer Thee—
And understood.
—THOMAS BRACKEN.
THE RIGHT USE OF SUNDAY
In most localities the industrial output on Monday is below that of any other day in the week.
For many people Sunday is a day, not of recreation, but of dissipation. One test of a people is
their use of leisure, and this is the test that Sun
day brings. Sunday should be an escape from the
things that irritate, annoy and sap out the
strength, it should be a day with a purpose that
brings release from the week's routine. The man
or woman who permits Sunday to be starVed or
crowded out loses the best part of the week. Sunday brings its own peculiar gifts to the spirit—
rest, worship, recreation, leisure, renewal of
friendship and meditation. Never were these
values more needed than today, and it is indeed a
pity if they are wasted or unrealized because of
misuse or lethargy.
"These are the things I prize, and hold of clearest worth, light of the sapphire skies, peace of the
silent hills, shelter of forests, comfort of the
grass, music of the birds, murmur of little rills,
shadows of cloud that swiftly pass, and, after
showers, the smell of flowers and of the good
brown earth—and, best of all, along the way,
friendship and mirth."—Van Dyke.
Specials Shown this  Week
A
MISSES* AND CHILDREN'S PLAY
SUITS AND ONE-PIECE COVER-
ALLS, in light and dark blue cham-
brays, striped galateas and khaki
drills.
LADIES' HAND - EMBROIDERED
VOILE WAISTS, from $4.75 to $9
each.
LADIES' WASH SKIRTSAND
MIDDIES.
■"■ — " -J
SPECIALS IN . LADIES' SUMMER
UNDERVESTS at 35c each.
SPECIAL VALUES IN MISSES' AND
CHILDREN'S PINAFORES AND
DRESSES, in pink and blue cham-
brays, pique trimmed.
The Balance of our stock of Ladies' Trimmed
Hats at a discount of 20 cents on the Dollar
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
WEEKS   MOTOR   COMPANY
NANAIMO, B.C.
Chevrolet
Enjoyment ceases to be complete when you feel it
is extravagant.
The certainty that a car conserves your money—that.
its every feature renders you the utmost service, is the
most gratifying feeling about it.
That is why more people buy Chevrolets In preference to heavier types that are a burden on the pocket-
book.
The experience of veteran moorists has proven that
the Chevrolet affords you all the feelings essential to
complete enjoyment.
Pride in its appearance and absolute confidence in its
dependability alone guarantee your peace of mind.
Yet in addition the Chevrolet offers every riding and
driving comfort and equipment convenience.
These things are to be enjoyed equally in a Chevrolet
as in other cars. But in the Chevrolet alone can you
enjoy them at such low cost.
That is the peculiar attraction of the Chevrolet—all
essential features other cars afford, but at lower cost.
Do not entertain any doubts on this score. Give us
an opportunity to show you how and why this is true.
Weeks Motors Limited
NANAIMO, or
THOMAS HUDSON, Union Bay
Y
& June 26, 1920.
"THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Five
m\
m
READ
THIS--
ADD WEIGHT OP
CAR TO ITS VALUE
This is New Basis on Which
Autos of Province Will Be
Licensed— Minimum $15
The warm weather is here again and with it
has alsp arrived a consignment of Bestov Electric
Cookers.
These little stoves are the latest thing on the
market, and will save you much discomfort this
summer by allowing you to prepare your meals
without the necessity of lighting your coal stove.
Before purchasing these stoves we considered
the question of price very carefully, and finding
the usual grill stoves way up in price and beyond
the means of the average housekeeper, we looked
around for something that was serviceable and at
the same time reasonable in price.
We found what we were looking for in the
BESTOV, and are pleased to offer these useful
little appliances to you at the following prices:
Plain finish   $5.25 each.
Semi-nickle $7.25 each.
Full nickle $8.25 each.
These different finishes are all equally serviceable, the only difference being in the finish.
SEE THEM IN OUR WINDOW.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. 0. 314
Bill
■■111
When Custom
Interferes
The constant use of a word often makes it
standard, but custom should not be allowed to interfere
with efficiency. We say "Hello" when we answer the
telephone, not realizing that it is not the proper way.
You help your own telephone service when you give
the. name of your firm and department when answering
a call.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Limited.
TASTE is the TEST '
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that pre the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water
Cascade Beer
Full line cf Pure
Fruit Flavors.
The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Specialty.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
License No. 8-25489
The new basis for arriving at the
value of motor cars in ordor to fix the
amount of licence fees to be paid annually by owners, Is set forth In the
regulations just promulgated by the
lleutenant-governor-in-council.
These regulations are Issued under
the new Motor Act passed at the recent session of thc Legislature, and
the provisions of which will become
effective oti July 1 next. Under the
act the fees called for are a registration fee of $15 at the time of Urst
registration only, and thereafter uu
annual licence fee based upon tlte
"taxation units" computed by adding
the weight of the motor in pounds to
the value ln dollars. On each motor
representing 25')0 taxation units or
less, an annual foe of $15 will be
charged; on those over 2600 taxation
units a fee of $15 plus 60c for each
100 taxation units in excess of 2500.
Computing Values.
The regulations now promulgated
provide that in computing the value of
any motor vehicle or trailer, other
than a motorcycle. It "shall be determined on the basis of thc dealers' selling price, f.o.b. point of delivery in
British Columbia, of trailers and motor vehicles ot tlie yejr, make and
style of thc trailer or motor vehicle
in question, allowing In all cases
where the trailer or motor vehicle has
been used a deduction from the selling
price according to the following table
of depreciation:
"Value up to $1500, selling price:
For one year's use a deduction of 25
per cent.; for two years' use, 35 per
cent.; for three years' use, 45 per
cent.; for four years' use, 50 per cent.,
and ten per cent, additional for each
year of use after the fourth year.
"Value $1500 ami over, selling price:
For one year's use a reduction of 30
per cent.*; for two years' use, 40 per
cent.; for three years' use, 55 per
cent.; for four years' use, 60 per cent,
and 10 per cent, adltlonal for each
year of use after the fourth year.
"In computing depreciation for any
number of months less than twelve, an
allowance of a proportionate number
of twelfths of the deduction prescribed
for the corresponding year mav be
made."
The licence fee payable for a chauffeur's licence Is fixed at $5.
The regulations also cover the question of number plates, lamps, head*
lights, spot lights, tall lights, brakes,
mufflers, etc., and also the transfer of
licences.
KENNELNOTES
TO MAKE GOOD WATCH DOG
VERY LARGE INCREASE
IN ILLICIT STILLS
Enormous Increase During Year
In One of the Evils Following Prohibition.
OTTAWA.—In auswering Hon. C.
Marcil, Hon. Martin -Burrell said in
the House that the ten distilleries In
Canada made 2,636,000 gallons of
liquor last year, and there was In
stock at the end of the year 6,503.000
gallons. He could not say what- the
consumption was.
Stills Increase from IS lu 085.
The clause Increasing the penally
for illicit stills from $100 to $200
brought forth thc information that
government agents discovered 985
stills last year. In 11)17-18 only 13
were found In the Dominion, but they
had increased enormously since.
NEW PRESIDENT CROWS
NEST PASS COAL CO.
The dea,th of Mr. Ellas Rogers rendered vacant the post of president of
the Crows' Nest Pass Coal Co. Mr.
W, K. Wilson, who has been general
manager since 1910, Is uow president
and general manager. Tho company's
head ollice has been removed to Fernie
from Toronto.
PUBLICATIONS OF
AGRICULTURAL DEPT.
•    ISSUED FOR FARMERS
The new list of publications of tlie
Department of Agriculture at Ottawa
contains titles of nearly three hundred nnd fifty bulletins, circulars and
other pamphlets that deal wilh agricultural practices. These cover the
whole range of agricultural and horticultural pursuits, Including dairying,
field crops, live stock, orchard and
garden crops, poultry, Insects and
plant diseases, farm building construction, farm machinery and many
other topics. The subjects are arranged alphabetically under general
titles. Not only are the lists themselves available from the Publications
Branch of the Department but any of
the publications therein contained.
Perhaps some day a genius will
rise to the occasion and Invent a
noiseless phonograph.
To leach a dog to make a good
police dog, to guard and track house
or office for criminals—teach the dog
to lead properly, to use his nose by
hiding and allowing hlm to find you.
To speak when told. To sll and remain where placed until called. To
lie down on sign of your hand being
raised. To retrieve; to find an object
and bring lt; to go hack a distance and
fetch object and take messages; to
guard something; to refuse from
others than owner. To track friend
for miles by scent; on finding him,
tench hlm to stand by and guard him.
To climb or jump goodWielghts, in
shurt to do all things expected him,
hut bu patient and let him know that
hy obeying he gets patted aud kind
words spoken to him.
Send us notes of your good dogs
and kennels, litters born and puppies
sold. We will do all we can to help
you with publicity. Write Bert Finch,
305 Sylvia Court, Beach Avenue, Vancouver, for any Information.
-Nauaimo can feel proud of its doggie men, such as R. Watson and his
good hull dogs; Mercer and his wire
Fox Terriers; Reece Jones, English
Setters; Percy Hickling, Pomeranians; Harold Knecn, Airedales and
Fox Terriers; Cottle, Irish Setters;
Turner, Pointers.
You can teach a dog more by kindness than otherwise. Teach your dog
to obey, and don't shout at him;
speak quietly—he will soon learn to
understand. If you ill-treat him you
make a coward of hints
When attending a dog show always
take aloitg a brush and comb and give
the desired final touches to dog and
provide yourself with a piece of
boiled liver. Keep dog on the hungry
side before being Judged—he will then
smell liver and be eager to consume
same. After letting him smell same,
hold it up in your hand, letting him
plainly see it. It will help to shorten
his back by holding his head high up
and this will give him a smart appearance In tho ring. Learn your-dag to
get accustomed to the big crowd of
dogs aud people. Walk him around a
few times, carefully holding the lead
short so as to prevent him being attacked unawares by another dog. If
dog Is not in good health and off his
food, by all means keep him at home.
Buy your kiddie a pup instead ot a
doll and he or she will never forget
the joy that pup brought Into his or
her life.
Let's hopo that the Vancouver Exhibition Association decides upon a
judge that will be a drawing card and
popular and satisfactory to all. If a
good man such as Charlie Mason, Del-
mont or Ben Lewis should be selected,
I'll bet my hat that lt would be a 5-
polnt show.
A business man in Boston keeps
Ills Boston Terrier upon his desk and
the dog puts out its tongue tor Its
owner to place stamps upon—and
takes the place of a good sponge.
Don't hit your dog every time he
makes some little mistake.
Don't treat your dogs as HonB in a
cage.
Never lose your temper and kick a
dog.
Don't feed your dogs on sloppy
foods.
Don't feed your dogs the same food
duy after day.
Write 305 Sylvia Court, Beach Avenue, Vancouver, for nny Information
pertaining to man's best friend.
HEARST STARTING THIRD
PARTY WITH JOHNSON
CHICAGO.—Announcement of the
formation of a third party sponsored
by William Randolph Hearst Is made
here by the Hearst papers. Hiram
Johnson Is to he boomed as an independent candidate for the presidency.
HAVE  YOU  REGISTERED?
Until July 15 you have a chance to
set yourself right by seeing that your
name Is on the new voters' list, which
closes on that date. If you want to
vote on the prohibition plebiscite, or
to vote M the next election, you must
personally sec that your application
is in for registration. The old list is
in the discard and a new one Is In the
making. Make sure that you are not
In the discard when lt comes timo to
deposit your vote. If you are a British subject, of the age of 21 years, or
have become a naturalized citizen of
Canada, have lived six months in the
province and one month In the electoral district, register, and register,
now.
PRESERVING
STRAWBERRIES
NOW is the time to place your order
for Preserving Strawberries as the
price next week will likely be the
LOWEST OF THE SEASON
Mumford and Walton
Grocers, Cumberland.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61 Cumberland, B.C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
Mrs. P. Anderson
UNION BAY
CANDIES TOBACCO
SOFT DRINKS
McKenzie's Pure Ice Cream
(Nanaimo)
Sandy Chapman
UNION BAY
Car for Hire
Night and  Day
Prompt Service and Careful Delivery.
Charges Moderate.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
Service, Material
aad
Workmanship
Guaranteed
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Young Steer Beef,
tender and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
—SPECIJU.S —
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf '
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork *
and Corned Beef ?    It is delicious.
Each Thursday morning (rom now
on a full line of Fresh Fish will be
on hand.
License No. 9-3902
llahher Heels
Fixed While V Walt
S. DAVIS  -   Dunsmuir Avenue
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cake* a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,      Cumberland.
License No. 6-1172
YOUR  GUEST  ROOM
should be attractively and comfortably furnished, and
it's really surprising how well you can furnish it at
small expense, if you come here to select the
FURNITURE
We have elaborate, as well as simple designs in
furniture, suitable for every room.
Come and see our furniture.
P. O. Box 279
T. E. BATE
CUMBERLAND
Phone 31 six
THE   CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
June 26, 1920.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MKR1UFIELD,   Proprietor,
GOOD ACCOMODATION
EXCELLENT CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.       Cumberland, !>.(
Canada Food Board License  No. 10-4986
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY. STATION.
First Class Accommodation.    Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM   JOKES
Cumberland, B. C.
License No. io-igog
PALMISTRY AND
PHRENOLOGY
MRS.   YOUNG
683 Hastlni. St., W., Corner of
Granville.     VANCOUVER, B.C.
OYSTERS
VENDOME CAFE
The   liouso  ol  Quality.
Our motto:  To please.
Oysters, Steaks ,iik1 Chops
Also Oysters, Oyster Loaves and
French Fried Potatoes to take
home.
Boxes for Ladies.
Open Dny nnil Night
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
A barbel' has four times
the shaving on Saturdays.
If people would get their
hair cut during week days
it would relieve the Saturday waiting.
CUMBERLAND BAR13EK
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Charlie Sing Chong
Groceries, Dry.Goods, Boots and
Shoes, Crockeryware and
General  Merchandise.
CHARLIE SING C1IONC, Cr ''erland
HONG CHONG & CO.. BevLd
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Hay, Grain and
Mill Feed
Also Baby Chick Feed and All
Kinds of Poultry Supplies.
FOR
Fire, Life and
Accident Insurance
THOS. II. CAREY
Cumberland, B.C.
D R . R . 1'. C II R I S T IE
DENTIST
Phone 116
Office: WILLARD BLOCK
( I-.slllKULAXD. B.C.
Begin Your
Trip Right
by selecting the shells that
hunters from coastto coast
Imve proved dependable
under ;i!i conditions.
Regal
Shotgun Shells
nre a doiible assurance oi
■ u ■ ■■ I .' thc man Who
; '■ ■' . ■; ballistite powder.
, I   ■■■• B f'llt hue of
Cam cl   nd I iven in Shot*
(Vni  Sheila   qi '1   Dominion
Metallic  Cartridges — <■ ich
Iby thobig"D"tra(*e.
murk
r. ii. Tiiinr.ix
TOO MUCH HEARST
FOR HIRAM JOHNSON
Hearst's Scurrilous Papers to Be
Permitted Circulation in
Canada Again.
When Charles S. Wheeler of California nominated Hiram Johnson at
the Republican convention in Chicago
he foolishly mentioned the inadequate
campaign fund of his candidate and
was greeted with loud cries of "'What
about Hearst?" The backing of Hearst
was too much for the popularity of
Johnson to overcome and he went
down to inglorious defeat. Apparently the name of Hearst is no more
popular in tlie States than In Canada.
The Toronto Globe recently published
the following regarding Hearst:
Nobody wants the Job of dealing
with the muck nml the filth nnd the
poison of a foul sewer. It Is a dirty
and dangerous job, but the time comes
when, iii the public interest, it has to
be done.
Canada learns with chagrin that
the newspaper publications of William Randolph Hearst are again to be
permitted to pollute her newsstands
and be sold upon her streets. This
exponent of disloyalty to his own
country, of hatred towards Britain, of
distortion of facts, of dishonest treatment of news, of faked cables, of pro-
German propaganda, of salacious sensationalism, seeks once more to dump
Its offal in this Dominion. Tlle wartime action of the Federal government
in placing the ban upon his papers
mot with universal commendation. Relaxation of that restriction will be as
generally and as emphatically deplored.
The Globe believes in the freedom
of the press. It believes, too, in individual freedom. But it recognizes tlie
right of tlie citizen to be protected
from the criminal. Antl it recognizes
the right of the nation to refuse its
hospitality to the avowed and unscrupulous alien enemy.
In its issue of last Saturday, Hearst
prints upon the editorial page of his
New York American, a picture of the
new British dreadnought, H. M. S.
Hood. And here is the text of his
leading editorial:
Hearst Speaks,
"Such  battleships as  this one pictured on this page are therefore built
*o menace U. S.
"They must be.
"There is no other nation against
whom England would need such ships.
"England is not only strengthening
her huge navy.
"She is enlarging her army.    She
has appropriated $300,000,000 to build
up an air fleet.
"And we PAY THE BILL.
"That is just what we are doing.
"The money to build these battleships and these alrsliips and to enlarge the British navy is money DUE
TO US—interest due on the gigantic
loans England obtained to use in her
war.
"Our Congress says we can spare
only $30,000,000 for an air fleet—one-
tenth what England has appropriated.
"Our Congress says we haven't anymore money to spare for air ships.
And then rt promises to excuse
England from paying the interest for
three years of her debt to us—because
England wants the money TO BUILD
SEA FLEETS AND AIR FLEETS!
'In all thc history of nations was
one government ever made such a fool
of by another?
"And on top of that, the British
press fills its pages with revilings—
with ugly and sneering statements
that we went Into the war to make
money.
"That we waited for two years to
see wliat side would -win, so that we
could go in on the winning side!
That we pretented neutrality so
that we could profiteer!
That's no reward for saving those
people from the licking that wus coming   to   them—and   which  a   lot  of
Americans   think   would   have   done
them good.
"First they borrow our money.
"Then they beg our food.
"Then they cry for our soldiers.        j
"Then they shake their lists iu our j
races, because they can't get any more
from us.
"We wonder what these Anglophiles
who were filling the press with 'our
dear mother, country,- and 'blood
thicker than water' antl 'hands across
the sea.' and all that sort of sickening
sentimental nonsense a few months
ago have to soy now—wheu tliey say
anything where they can be heard.
"There are too many of these serfs
of England in private life yet, and too
many In pubic life.
"It is high time we Americans spoke
out nnd rebuked this sort. It is high
time that certain hybrids In the Congress and in the administration heard
that this is still an American nation.
"Tho patriotic American in tho Congress should act.
"Let England pay us the money
Ihey borrowed.
".Millions of Americans were persuaded, antl many were coerced, into
helping fi make these loans to Eng-
AFTER-
fflt'DAY'S WORK
ORDER BY MAIL
GET YOUR
NAME
ON OUR
MAILING
LIST
FROM
EATON'S
MID-SUMMER
THIS BARGAIN
BOOK WILL
BE MAILED
EARLY IN
JUNE. SEND
YOUR NAME
I NAT ONCE
SALE CATALOGUE
<T. EATON C<2.™
WINNIPEG CANADA
land.
"Our government raised the money
by borrowing it from the American
people on the security of Liberty
bonds and then loaned It to England,
and now it is proposed that* WE be
taxed again to pay the interest due to
US—in order to let British borrowers
build battleships and airfleets to Intimidate us in the future!
"Have we an American government
in Washington or have we a British
government annex?
"This picture looks as If we had the
Annex.
"This most powerful battleship in
the world was built with the money
that we are lending England.
"If wo keep on lending money to
England to build these ships, she will
be able to come over here and blow
New York off the earth any time she
wunts."
Should Not Admit Hearst Papers.
There Is a time when the liar becomes more than a nuisance—when
he becomes a menace. When that
time comes It is tlie duty of the States
to deal witli him. William Randolph
Hearst is the most contemptible of
creatures, a traitor to his native land.
He is one of those who "shall go down
to the vile dust from which he sprung,
unwept, unhonored aud unsung." He
will be remembered as the man who
prodded anarchy into the assassination of William McKlnley; who plotted
with von Bernstorff after the murder
of hundreds of bis l'ellow-cltlzons, Including women and children, on the
Lusitania, who even after thc United
States formally entered tlie roll of the
Allied nntions in tlie Great War, diligently played Ihe enemy's game during the lifc-and-death struggle in
which his own country was Involved.
It is-to be expected that this sort of
creature will continue his miserable
efforts to Injure his native land and to
mislead his people by all the untruthful and dishonest arts at his command.
But there Is no reason why Canada
should permit the Hearst sewers to
dump their pestilence into this country. This country Is no garbage can.
There Is no place here for the avowed
and unscrupulous alien enemy. The
doors should remain barred. And, at
a time when patriotic Canadian newspapers have had to suspend publication temporarily, owing to the shortage of newsprint, the Dominion government might well consider the advisability of stopping the enormous
supply of Canadian paper consumed
by the Hearst papers in publishing
these lying and dishonest attacks on
the Motherland and endeavoring to
sow distrust and discord between
Canadians and their cousins south of
the international boundary line. Too
long has Canada permitted the Hearst
creature to bite the hand that fed it.
Has the time not come to bar the
Hearst news service forever ln this
country and to stop their supply of
paper from this country? This is not
a matter of fiscal policy. It is merely
muzzling the frothing mouth ot a dangerous dog.
CHINA MAKING GREAT
PROGRESS TOWARDS
MODERN CIVILIZATION
One Ambition of Youth of That
Country is to Learn the
English Language.
ARE YOU A VOTER?
Only a Short Time in Which to
Get on the New List.
Those who wish to vote at the forthcoming plebiscite on thc prohibition
Issue, or Indeed to be registered as
voters In readiness for any provincial
emergency, will do well to remember
that July 16th has been officially announced as the closing date for registration.
Dr. Greil has heen studying nearly a
year ln China nnd studying the Five
Holy Peaks, mountains which for over
three thousand yenrs have been visited
by numberless pilgrims. He has returned most Impressed with progress
made by the Chinese people towards
modern civilization during the last few
years. The one ambition of the youth,
of China Is to learn English. As for
their own intricate writing, a method
has been devised which reduces the
period of study from severnls years to
a few weeks. Radical changes are taking place, some of which oven affect
the outward appearance of tlie people's
homes In some of the provinces an
order directs every family to plant n
number of trees every year. This Is
being carried out with such energy
that groups of young trees nre found
even in streets and market places. In
his peregrinations Dr. Greil found the
natives becoming more and more
kindly toward English-speaking visitors. Western thought is a subject of
much speculation and interest.
distribution will be to men with 30
months' service in the face of the
enemy, that is. on the high seas.
The commander in chief of the
Grand Fleet gets $7,500; a commander
ln command $450, and n commander
not in command $150. Special forms
are provided for application, but so far
as is known none have yet reached the
coast. Those eligible will have to
write to Whitehall.
GERMAN TAXATION
TAKES BULK OF LEGACY
NAVAL MEN WILL GET
SHARE IN PRIZE MONEY
Several hundrod ex-naval men on
the British Columbia coast will "come
ln for" a share of the special award
of naval prize money being distributed.
It is expected to amount to about $62
per man and Is the proceeds *of war
prizes taken on the high seas.    The
Financier Bequeathed £1,000,000
And Beneficiaries Only
Get £117,000
A German financier died recently
and bequeathed £1,000,000 at the prewar rate of exchange. Of this amount
£260,000 had been made during the
war, and was taxed to the extent of
£210,000. Further war taxation
amounted to £501.000. tho Inheritance
tax was £7000, and the death duty
£34,000.
Each of the three children will now
receive £49,000 gross, not allowing
for the depreciation of the mark.
BIG DAM AT HEAD
OF BURRARD INLET
Vancouver.—Plans and estimates of
cost are being prepared by the Harbor
Commissioners for a dam across the
Second Narrows of Ilurrard Inlet. The
proposition is to construct a dam to
be"opened for navigation by means of
locks, and the construction would
create a great fresh-water harbor off
tho east end and north arm of Burrard
Inlet, suitable for the largest deep-sea
ships.
rfte
—- . - June 26, 1920.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Seven
V
THE ISLANDER SPORT PAGE
KEEN INTEREST TAKEN
IN WRESTLING MATCH
Weeks and Brown Go to the Mat
in Nanaimo Tonight for a
Purse of $250.
NANAIMO.—The wrestling match
on Saturday night between Tom Weeks
and Dave Brown is the one. topic of
conversation. There is a side bet of
$250 for the best two out of three falls.
Three good preliminaries are on the
programme. The entire gate proceeds
go to the new hospital building fund.
Everybody,concedes the true sports
manshlp of both men when they volun
tarlly undertake a month's gruelling
training to settle a sporting difference
and arrange for all the proceeds of the
meeting to go to a local Institution.
Both men are past masters of the
game, and both are sure they can
win and determined to do so. Neither
of them has slacked a minute In his
training. Weeks started right in with
Pete Morrison to look after him. His
trainer and his Immediate supporters
are all satisfied that he ls right back
to his old form. His wind Is good and
he moves on the mat as fast as ever.
Brown has had with him during his
training the local veteran, Swanson.
He says his man Is ln the best of
shape. Brown can go at top speed for
a couple of hours, and finish fresher
than the half-dozen men he takes on.
FAST GAME AT THE "Y"
LOST BY HOME TEAM
BASEBALL GAME AT
COURTENAY TOMORROW
Courtenay ball team will entertain
the boys from Alberni on Sunday.
Given fine weather a good game is
assured.   The (un starts at 1:30.
CUMBERLAND BASEBALL
.TEAM VISITS ALBERNI
The Teams Score 34 Runs Be-
- tween Them—Pleasant
Trip for Local Boys
The local baseball team paid a visit
to Alberni on Sunday last to play a
match against the canal boys. The
match was a somewhat loose affair, as
may be guessed from the score, Cumberland scoring 18 runs and the home
team getting 16. However, the local
boys had a good outing and thoroughly
enjoyed themselves. The following
playera represented Cumberland: Conti,! Beattle, Marrochl, Bannerman, Tobacco, James, Harrison, Westfield,
Hanclen, with Stant as reserve.'
OLD COUNTRY CRICKET
LONDON.—Fine bowling was seen
In the Kent-Gloucester cricket match
at Gravcsend this week, the match being over In two days and Kent winning by 10 wickets. In Gloucester's
flrst Innings, Falr-Vescher had Ave
wickets for 26 and Freeman four for
20 ln the second. Scores: Kent 154
and 8 for no wickets; Gloucester, 96
and 62.
Northampton beat Derbyshire at
Chesterfield by 114, thy scores being:
Northampton, 196 and 89; Derbyshire,
71 and 100.
At Taunton, Somerset, for whom
Lyon- scored 116, easily defeated Worcester by an Inning and 155, the
scores being: Somerset, 357, and Worcester, 68 and 114.
Nearly Two Thousand Five Hundred People Gather to Witness
Struggle for Supremacy Between Two Crack Soccer Team of
Vancouver Island, the Nanaimo Boys Winning Out by Two
Goals to One in Very Evenly Contested Game.
The soccer football game last Saturday between Cumberland
United and Nanaimo United, turned out to be a battle royal, with
Cumberland"having a slight edge on the crack Nanaimo team.
The special train from Nanaimo brought fully three hundred
enthusiasts from that burg, all intent on cheering their men on to
victory, and this number was considerably augmented at various
places on the way up, so that when the train finally pulled into the
Cumberland depot there was scarcely standing room to be found.
Probably two hundred more came up from Nanaimo by auto,
hundreds of others coming from the surrounding districts to witness this match,   Close on to 2500 people witnessed the struggle.
And those who came to see the game were well rewarded for their trouble,
for lt was worth going n lpng distance to see/betng fa*.*-t and clean from the
first to last, while the weather was all thut could be desired.
. CiiiiiIhtIiiuiI Scores llight nt Start of 1'imio. •>
Promptly at the hour named for starting. Referee Craig of Vancouver blew
his whistle and a game which ls destined to live long iu the football history
of the Island had begun. Following their usual, practice. Cumberland went
off with a rare burst of speed, and before the visitors had found their feet,
had forced a corner, which, however, was fruitless. They were back again
Immediately, though, and within the first, three minutes of the game had
scored the first, and as it happened, the only goal which they were destined to
get throughout the match. t
Cumberland had all the best of the argument throughout the rest of the
first half, but they were never allowed to score again, both the Nanaimo backs;
and as usual Routledge in goal, playing a sterling game.
Conti missed a glorious chance ln the first half, when being well placed and
having no one but Routledge to beat, he shot yards wide. Half time ajrived
with Cumberliyid leading, 1-0. •"
LIPTON'S CHALLENGER
WINS ANOTHER TRIAL
SANDY HOOK, N. J.—The ten-mile
race between the challenger Shamrock IV. and the 23-metre yacht this
week began ln a ten-mile breeze. The
challenger started at 2:10:42, and the
trial yacht at 2:12:35.
Shamrock IV. doused her club' topsails and set working topsails when
the breeze became fresher.
Cleverer sail handling on the 23-
metre boat ln a fairly heavy ground
swell enabled her to overhaul the
challenger, but Shamrock IV. rounded
the first mark at 3:29:38 and the trial
boat went around at 3:30:00, the 23-
metre yacht making one minute 24
seconds better actual time on the run.
Shamrock IV. crossed the finish line
eight minutes 10 seconds actual time
ahead of the 23-metre trial yacht.
Nanaimo  Scores  Quickly.
Nanaimo followed Cumberland's lead
by going off from the start of the
second half at a great pace, and within
the flrst Ave minutes they bad equalized, the goal coming as the result of
a fine centre from Hines playing on
the left wing, which O'Brien got to,
and from which he sent lu a shot
which had the backs and the goalkeeper all beaten. It was a beauty
and there was no chance of stopping
it.
Naiiiilino Funs Take Heart.
And then the Nanaimo crowd, who
up to this moment had been content
to remain fairly quiet, broke loose,
and such a shout went up as might
have been heard miles away. Give
and take play followed for about a
quarter of an hour, with both sides
attacking iu tarn, though it was very
noticeable that the Cumberland custodian had twice as many shots to
deal with as had Routledge. for though
the local forwards were playing a
quick, snappy game, they seemed to
fall down badly when It came to taking a shot at goal, whereas the Nanaimo men shot whenever au opportunity offered. During this quarter of
an hour the home custodian certainly
saved a heavy score being piled up
against his team.
Wllie Misses Undefended Goal.
And then occurred one of those Inexplicable occurrences which so often
happen even with the most finished
players.
From a combined move downf the
field, Wllie, who had gone to play inside right, received wheu only a couple
of yards in front of tlie Nanaimo goal,
and with no one to beat, the goal being
absolutely at his mercy, he lifted the
ball over the crossbar, a feat he would
probably be hard put to repeat In
cooler moments. Nanaimo came right
back, and wheu well within striking
distance, Dickinson sent In a slow- one
from tffc left, whicli the Cumberland
back only pnrtlally cleared and Oiler-
ton rushing up. landed the ball in the
net for Nauaimo's second score, the
goalkeeper, wlio would have, saved,
being prevented by the fact that Jackson, ln trying to stop tlie ball, de-*
fleeted it sufficiently to send lt out of
his reach, but not enough to stop it
from passing between the posts.
Cumberland Tries Hard to Score.
Then iu the last five minutes of the
game Cumberland made n desperate
efl'ort to gut on even terms again.
They forced corner nfter corner, only
to have the ball cleared by either (lie
back or Routledge, and the final
whistle blew with Cumberland still
attacking. Nanaimo thus loft Ihe field
with a second victory to their credit
over the champions..
On the day's play the win must be
conceded even by Ibe Nanaimo players themselves to have been a sonie-
\vtiat lucky one. Taking everything
into account and the actual chances
of Scoring that the local forwards
missed, the home team should have
been winners by a score of 3 to 2.
Still, it is goals that count, and Nnnnl-
ino is to be congratulated on winning
tiie game.
For the visitors Chester, at riglit
back, and Dickinson and Hines, were
tlie pick of a well balanced team.
For the home team Clark In goal and
Wilkinson at "back were safe, Wilkinson being the best man on the Held.
Wiley, the new outside right, played a
real classy game In the flrst halt.
Why he changed over to Inside riglit
cannot be understood, aa lie himself
was out of position; also the change,
put Conti off his play; he had been
playing excellent football. Harrison
and Boothman also played a fine game.
Stubbart, Ihe new centre forward, was
good and bad in turns, being rather
Inclined to be selfish.
THE TRUE ANGLER
NOT NECESSARY
Mrs. Tompkins brought home a new
girl from the Intelligence office, and
was instructing her ln her duties.
"And do you have to be called in
the morning?" she asked.
"I don't have to be, mum," replied
the girl, hopefully, "unless you just
happen to need me."
A famous newspaper man says the
true angler does not measure his success by the size or the number of the
fish he catches, for his days are always full of profitable pleasures. "To
him, every minute In the woods or on
the waters offers something of interest, whether it be merely watching Ihe
wild people of the forest, the sunsets
and the sunrises, the starry map overhead at night, or llstinlng to Ihe call
of the birds, the w-iml tu the trees or
the musical lap'of the waters."
CAMPING IN COMFORT
Philosopher: "People who listen seldom hear anything good of themselves.'1
Cynic: "Yes; and people who talk
seldom say anything good about anybody."
"The Idea of camping out on long
distance,motor tours still fills many
people with thoughts of difficulties
and Inconveniences too arduous to
contemplate seriously," says A. L.
Westgard, In the June issue of Motor,
wherein he writes entertainly of
method and equipment that will make
the camping tour not only possible
but delightful and enjoyable.
"The growing expense of stopping
nt hotels," continues Mr. Westgard,
"has driven many motorists to ven
ture, even while dreading it In consul
erable degree, upon a camplng-out ex
pedilioii.   Aud once having made the
venture Ihey are converts for life and
become more enthusiastic every season. Nothing else on earth can compare with the restfulness, the relaxation from mental efforts and the blissful comfort which pervade one when
Idly sitting by a cheerful camp fire
and watching the smoke rlso."
RANGERS DEFEATED BY
CELTICS ON SATURDAY
Rangers Started Well But the
Celtics Came Through and
Won by 2 Goals to 1
VANCfoUVBR.—Although thc Rangers opened ns it tliey wouhl play
rings around the Celtic soccer team nt
Gamble Street grounds on Saturday
last, at the close ol* the fray they had
to admit defeat by a score of two goals
to one. One glorious chance came
for the Rangers to tie tlie score two
minutes beforo time, when Referee
Cowan awarded a penalty against the
Celtics for hands. Robertson banged
tiie shot straight al Tipper, who made
his debut between the posts for tlie
Celtics, and the new goalie pulled off
a neat save. A corner was conceded,
but nothing came of it.
Only twice in the first ten minutes
of play were the Celtics able to gel
the ball down to the Rangers' goalmouth, and tlie game was 20 minutes'
old before Tnpp was called upon to
handle tlie ball. He then stepped out
to an easy one, and cleared without
being pressed.
Brown, Campbell, Home and Craig
were as busy as bees around Tipper,
but weak shooting spoiled tlieir efforts.
Celtics Rally.
In the Inst ten minutes of the half
the Celtics ralllied; Grant and Adrian
worked well together, Grant's neat
footwork and Adrian's burst of speed
on tlie wing enabling them frequently
to carry the leather to the Rangers'
goal. Brace, however, was the only
man nn either side to put in a shot
that looked like scoring until a couple
of minutes before the whistle sounded
for half-time, when Adrian banged the
ball at Tapps, who stopped it, but was
unable to clear; and Grant got in and
put tlie finishing touch to the efl'ort.
and Celtics had scored.
Hitting up a lively clip in the second
half a corner nt each end was forced
in quick succession. Tlle Celtics gave
Tapps- a busy time. Bobby Grunt putting in several good shots. Brown,
playing thc right wing for the Rangers
lost a perfect chance to equalize tlie
score when he shot wide from a close
rhnge. Later ho> made up for It by
putting iu «n good centre. Robertson
banged it in, but Tipper was on the
job. although he was forced to concede a corner.
The Celtics got riglit away from Ihe
kick, and Kempton. with the goal at
his mercy, made lio mistake witli the
shot, and put the Celtics two ahead
minutes after the second half
opened.
.Hissed Opportunity.
Big Jim Wilson let another opportunity ,to score go by when he placed
a free kick over the bar.
Ten minutes after the Celtics'
second goal thc Rangers broke into
tlie scoring column. Tipper placed
too much confidence in liis backs, and
as a result was only able to partially
lear. Robertson got to the leather in
time to hang it into the net.
The Rangers' last chance to divide
the points slipped when Robertson
failed with the penalty award In the
last two minutes of tiie game.
SEATTLE SWIMMER
CLAIMS NEW RECORD
Miss  Audrey  Griffin,  Victoria,
.Wins the Women's Championship Title.   •
Hitrie KonowalofT, of the Crystal
Swimming Club of Seattle, established
what is claimed to be a world's record
in the Pacific Northwest Amateur A.
A. meet here this week. He niude thc
50-yard back-stroke ln 32 3-5 seconds,
which ia 1-5 faster than the record
made by Duke Kahanamoku in San
Francisco In 1913. Konowaloff is only
17 years of age.
Seattle swimmers carried off the
lion's share of the Northwest championships first during the meet. Miss
Audrey Griffin, Victoria, won tbe 50-
yard breast stroke and women's championship.
COURTENAY BASEBALL
TEAM PLAYS POWELL
RIVER DOMINION DAY
Included in a big programme of
.ports events on Dominion Day at
Powell Itiver is a baseball match between tho home team and Courtenay,
Al. Hatch is also slated to meet H.
McDonald in a championship wrestling match. Boat racing, water sports,
aud field sports are otlier events'on
Die programme, besides a big dance
in the evening. Boat leaves Union
Cay at 8 a.m.
TIIE FORD AGAIN
TO THE RESCUE
One hears of Ford parts being used
to repair baby buggies, sausage machines or mill machinery, etc., but it
is not often that one bears of Ford
parts being used to repair railway locomotives.
When a C. V. It. passenger Wain
brbke down recently outside of Choso,
B. C, the engineer was riglit ou to his
job. He Immediately sunt to tlie Ford
.service station, operated by Mr. Kimble Scatchard in Chase, for BU (Helen I
genuineFord part;, to make temporary
repairs.
With (lie loss of only a few minutes
spent in making tlie repairs, the train
was again speeding on the way to
Kamloops where it arrived on lime.
pillllllllllllllllllllllftllllllll^
Fred's and Joe's Place
CUMBERLAND
HEADQUARTERS FOR ALL
THE ATHLETIC AND SPORTING ORGANIZATIONS IN THE
CUMBERLAND     DISTRICT.
WAVERLEY   HOTEL
The lloyse of Quality.
Phone 69.
Cumberland, B.C.      §
Automobiles
That Stand the Test
WHEN considering the purchase of an automobile,
be sure you select a reliable car—one that will
stand the test. We are agents for THOS. WEEKS of
Nanaimo, and we carry the following reliable makes of
automobiles,:
Chevrolet, Dodge, Chalmers,
Hud.son Six, Cadillac.
We also specialize  in  REPUBLIC  TRUCKS  and
TRAILERS of 1 to 5 tons.
THOMAS HUDSON
UNION BAY, B.C.
"He* throws himself into every job
he undertakes." "I wtrm the bore
would go hunting for wells or craters
or something like Lhat."
SILVER
is becoming so valuable that it is fast approaching the point where it may be considered as a standard of value, and the discovery
of it will cause to
SPRING
up instantly in the mind of the prospector de^
lightful visions of affluance long deferred, but
the source of sure and real pleasure is a* drink
of good, refreshing Silver Spring
BEER
AT  ALL THE  LEADING   HOTELS.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
VICTORIA,   B. C
 =J
Please Take Notice
Owing lo the fact that all supplies must be paid for
cash on delivery, through credit operations being curtailed by (he wholesalers, it has become absolutely
essential that all business be transacted on a
STRICTLY   CASH BASIS
Cumberland Motor Works
J. H. CAMERON, Proprietor. Cumberland, B.C. Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
June 26, 1920.
NEW ARRIVALS FOR
LITTLE VISITORS
A shipment of Baby Clothes has just been opened out, and comprises
many of the requirements needed by Baby.
We intend giving this department special attention so that you can
depend on getting immediate delivery.
BABY'S FLANNEL BARRACOATES, made of a nice quality material
and well finished.
BABY'S LONG ROBES in very dainty designs, trimmed with ribbon and
lace; others embroidered in neat edging.   Prices $2.95 and $3.25.
BABY'S SHORT DRESSES in very fine mull; delightful little dresses for
we(j tots.
BABY'S FLANNEL SKIRTS with cotton bodice, suitable for 2  years.
Price $1.25.
UNDERSKIRTS FOR CHILDREN, with bodice attached.   Prices $1.00
and $1.50
BABY'S BOOTEES, all wool, in white only.
BABY'S WOOL GAITERS, full length, very fine quality.
BABY'S BIBS, in nicely embroidered cotton, also in silk, at prices from
25c to $1.00 each.
BABY'S BONNETS, in a choice variety at reasonable prices.
BABY'S SOCKS, in pink, blue, white and tan.   Price 35c pair.
NAINSOOKS in very fine make, just the desired goods to make baby's
clothes.  Prices 50c and 60c yard.
Should you require anything in this line which we do
not stock, it will be a great pleasure for us to procure
same if at all procurable.
PHONE  134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
NOTICE
Property holders are hereby notified
that interest at the rate ot Ten Per
Cent, will be charged on all Real
Estate Taxes remaining unpaid after
the 3uth day ot June, 1920, and an add!
tional Five Per Cent, after the 31st
-day of August, 1920. Tax receipts can
be obtained from the City Clerk or the
Chief ot Police.
T. MORDY,
City Clerk.
FOR SALE
FIVE-ROOM HOUSE FOR SALE, ON
Penrith Avenue.   A. J. Richards.
02-26
FORESHORE LEASE
Nelson District, Vancouver  Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Ihe Canadian
Collieries (DunBtniilr), Limited, of
Victoria, B. C, Colliery Owners, intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following lands:
Commencing at a post planted at
high water mark three feet (3 ft.)
East from the South-East corner posi
of Lot 11. Nelson District, thence East
sixteen hundred feet (1000 ft.) to the
approximate low water mark, thence
Southerly along tlie approximate low
water mark to a point due East from
the South-East corner of the North
Fractional half of thc South-Wesl
quarter of Section 32, thence West to
aforesaid corner* of said fractional
part of Section 82, being the original
high water mark, thonco Northerly
following original high water mark.
being the Easterly boundary of Section 32 nnd D. L. 28 In suid Nelson
District to point of commencement.
Containing In all ninety-six (90) acres
more or less.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES  (DUNSMUIR), LIMITED,
Charles Oraham, Agent.
Dated June 22nd, 11)20. 28-8
G.W.V.A.
A special meeting of all returned
soldiers will be held at Courtenay on
Wednesday. June 30th, nt 8 p.m., to
discuss matters of great Importance.
Returned men and their lady relatives are urgently requested to attend.
Free cars will be provided nnd will
leave the Post Ollice corner at 7 p.m.
C. J. BUNBURY,
Secretary.
COOK STOVE, old or new, converted
iuto a gas stove in a few minutes
with a Buckeye Vapor Gas Burner.
Prepaid for $22.50. Agents wanted.
Fawkes & Co., Summerland, B. C.
SHETLAND     PONY,
CART     AND
Harness;   price $00.
F.  II.  Janes,
Grantham.
C3-27
YOUNG HORSE, HARNESS, BUGGY,
also heavy express for sale.   Apply
Henry Thompson, Royston Road.
c2-27
HUDSON TOURING CAR, IN GOOD
running condition-, $450 cash. Apply
Wm. Douglas, Courtenay. c2-20
McCLARY   "KOOTENAY"    RANGE-
Apply Telephone Office. 1-25
FOR SALE -FOUR ACRES OF LAND
witli three-room dwelling, burn,
garage and other buildings; one ant!
a half miles from Cumberland.
Price reasonable. Apply A. R WeB-
loy, Cumberland, B. C.
SEVEN HOUSES TO SELECT FROM
at prices from $550 to $1200. T. E.
Bate. Phone 31.
FINE NEW CAMERA
INSTALLED IN LOCAL
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO
Vitax Lens on New Instrument
Said to Be Second to None
In All Canada
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A GOOD
home cheap? If so, see T. E. Bate.
Phone 31.
FOR SALE—3-ROOMED HOUSE,
Cash or terms.   Apply to B. Pearse,
r.itv
SEVEN HOUSES FOR SALE CHEAP
Easy terms. For parlit-uiars seo T,
10. Bate. I'hone 31.
LOST
A STRING OF PEARL BEADS BE-
tween Now Townsite and Wilcox's
Dutcher Shop. A reward given
upon return lo The Islander.   c2-27
A PEARL BROOCH ON DUNSMUIR
Avenue or Second Street. Suitable
reward upon returning fo The Islander Ollice.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
FOUND
FOUND—A bunch of keys at Comox
Lake. Owner can have same upon
applying io Tlie Islander Ollice,
June 15—Glenboro, Esduil, Olive M.,
Earl, coastwise; Klldonan anil Scow,
Vancouver.
June 10—Chieftain, Beatrice, coastwise; Pronative and Scow, Vancouver.
June 18—Clayburn and Scow, Prince
Rupert; Coqultlum, Brunette, coastwise; Ixion, Seattle.
June 19—Clievc,  B.C.P.,  coastwise.
June 20—Clan Monroe, Japan;
Daisy, coastwise.
June 21—Lucerlc, San Francisco;
Storm King, Gleeful, coastwise; Oregon and Scow No. 38, Seattle.
June 22 —Qualicum, Vancouver;
Stadicona, coastwise.
June 23—C. P. R. Hulk No. lf)0, Vancouver; Agron, Australia; Earl, coastwise.
Mr. Geo. Barton, the enterprising
photographer who opened up business
in Cumberland recently, has just In
stalled new equipment to enable him
(o cater more satisfactorily to Ills fast
increasing business. The chief part of
tlio new facilities ls a largo Century
Grand Camera with Centennial slnud
and fitted wllb a Vltnx Lens working
at F 3.8. Mr. Barlon says there is
only ono oilier lens like It on the Island, and not a heller one In Camilla.
This camera Is fitted with all the latest adjustments. The photographer
linds tlie high speed nt which this
camera may be manipulated very advantageous in taking pictures of
children.
An electric dryer enables this house
to turn out work expeditiously. In
cases of rush a photo can be taken
and finished tlie same day. He is'
equipped lo handle all branches of Ihe
trade, and invites the public to call
and look around.
Personal Mention
James M. Savage, of Victoria, General Manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., arrived on
Thursday.
ss    *    *
Henry S. Fleming, of New York,
President of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd., accompanied by
Mrs. Fleming and daughter, arrived
on Monday and are now occupying
Beaufort House, the official residence
of the Canadian Collieries.
* *     ♦
Mr. and Mrs. Con Jones and two
sons of Vancouver were visitors In
town over the week-end Mr. Jones
was an Interested spectator, at the big
game on Saturday. Leaving town they
motored to Alberni.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. and Mrs. Weber and two daughters of Vancouver were visiting at
Mrs. King's for a few days tills week.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. P. Jones, representative of the
International Correspondence Schools,
Is In town this week.
♦ *      ss
Miss Booth, District Traffic Manager
uf the B. C. Telephone, was in town
(his week.
ss      »     *
■ Mr. Forrest, lato Sergt. Major of the
Ctli D. C. O. R., Vancouver, visited
Cumberland on Wednesday.
.   .   .
Mr. Bert Creech is in town today in
connection with the Dominion Day
sports at Powell River.
ss     ss     ss        '
Miss Harriet Horbury left on Monday for Vancouver on a two weeks
vacation.
ss     ss     ss
T. 1t. Jackson, Inspector of M ines,
arrived ou Monday on his usual tour
of inspection of the local mines.
ss     *     ss
Mr. and Mrs. James Halliday and
family leave on Saturdny for Scotland,
on a three months' vacation. Mr.
John Halliday, a brother, will take
charge of the business during their
absence, and Mr. McDonald Is coming
lo tnkc charge of the bakery.
ss     ss     ss
Miss J. Graham, who has been the
guest of Miss Janet Graham for tho
past two weekB, left for her homo In
Victoria on Wednesday's train.
• '•    s>
.Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent nf the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Ltd., left for Vancouver
Tuesday morning.
ss     *     ss
Miss C. Tourlgny of the High School
teaching stnif left for her home in Victoria on Saturday morning.
t   .   .
Miss Margery Michell arrived from
Victoria on Sunday on a two weeks'
vacation to her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
T. Michell.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. and Mrs. C. Fouracre arrived
Irom England during the week and are
staying with Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Four-
acre.
ss     ss     ss
Mr. W. Fouracre. accompanied by
his bride, arrived In town tbls week,
and are guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. C,
Fouracre.
ss     ss     ss
Mrs. R. E. Frost returned on Wednesday from Vancouver, where she
has been spending the past week.
KELLY'S CAFE GOOD
PLACE TO EAT AT
SUBSCRIPTIONS TO
BASEBALL CLUB
Tin' committee of the Cumberland
Baseball Club desire to thank Hie following persons anil linns for dona-
lions towards Ihe club funds:
Thomas Csrtiliam    $25.on
 '10.00
       5.00
     2.00
     2.00
     2.50
     2.50
Waverley Hotel
Campbell Bros	
Thomas Rickson ..
Vendome Cafe 	
Simon Leiser & Co.
M.  Shosokl   	
K. Abe   1.00
V.   Benorn    2.00
R. E. Frost   2.00
Anu Kimurn   2.00
A. B. Gates   2.00
J. McDonald   1.00
Roval Candy Co  n.oo
Kelly's Cafe    5.00
F.   Wilcox     2.00
P.   Monte    2.00
Union Labor   1.00
E. McVell     1.00
W.   Gordon     2.00
Mumford & Walton   2.50
Geo. A. Fletcher .Music Co  2.00
W. Marshall   1.00
D. R. McDonald   5.00
Cumlierland Motor Works  3.75
Jos.  Aspeal    1.50
Albert Enven   1.00
John Sutherland   2.50
James H. Halliday  1.00
Stanfleld Garage   1.00
A. R. Kirstead  *.. 2.00
Geo. Barton   2.00
Union  Browery    10.00
Vendome Hotel   5.00
J. D. DAVIS, Sec.
Carries Big Lines of Confection'
ery, Fruit, Tobaccos, Etc.
Whether for a good "square" meal,
an Ico cream or *other light refreshment, "Kelly's" Cafe Is hard to bent—
and a plenslng feature Is good service.
Since opening up a short time ngo
"Kelly" has installed many lines of
confectionery, fruit, tobaccos, etc., not
the least of which Is a line assortment
of Victoria chocolates. An electrically-
driven machine enables him to serve
delicious milk drinks, which together
with McKenzle'B famous ice cream,
makes a big Inducement to visit this
place during the hot weather.
A specialty with "Kelly" is catering
to banquets. He can also supply rooms
for private parties, banquets, etc., on
short notice.
Judging by the brisk business enjoyed by cafe it is proving a welcome
addition to Cumberland's refreshment
parlors.
FATAL BURNING
NEAR   NANAIMO
A woman is often a danger to all I
men  when site  Isn't married, and  a
terror lo one when she is. 5
Catching lire In her home on Extension Road just above Chase River,
Mrs. Greenaway was so seriously
burned while her husband was away
at work end of last week that she died
In the Nanaimo hospital. Some people
in a motor car which was passing
about midnight noticed a person run
out of the house enveloped in flames,
and brought the sufferer to the hospital.  '
Don't miss the opportunity
of these Specials as they are
Money  Savers
Royal Household Flour
49-lb. sack   $4.00
24-lb. sack   $2.10
Pacific Milk
Lare tins, each 15c 7 for $1.00
Baby size, each 10c .-. 11 for $1.00
Maybloom Tea, 60c. per lb.
LEAVE YOUR ORDER FOR
No. 1 Preserving Strawberries
PICKED THE SAME DAY THEY ARRIVE
ALSO A FULL STOCK OF
Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
.   ARRIVING  DAILY
Simon Leiser & Co.
Limited
Phone 38.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
TO G. W. V. A. HOLDS
SPECIAL MEETING
A special moetlng of the Women's
Auxiliary to the Great War Veterans'
Association will be held in the City
Hall on Monday evening at 7 o'clock.
MRS. G. CONRAD, Sec.
BUILD MOTOR CAR BARGE
'  FOR ISLAND TRANSIT
In order to meet the demand for Increased transportation facilities for
automobiles between Vancouver and
Nanaimo the C. P. R. coast steamship
service Is remodelling a large scow
Into a car transfer barge. The work
Is being done at the Inner harbor
waterfront workshops of the company
In Victoria, and the new barge will be
In use very shortly. It will accommodate about 18 autos completely covered
In from the weather and spray and a
tug will lie provided to tow the barge
on Its trans-Gulf trip. This barge is
expected to considerably reduce the
crush of motor cars on the Gulf passenger steamers on which the available accommodation for more than
two or three cai'B was somewhat
limited.
SPORTS AT LADYSMITH
ON DOMINION DAY
The   pigmy   antelope   of   Africa   Is
onl eight Inches high.
LADYSMITH. — Arrangements arc
well In baud for the celebration to he
held In hndysmith on July 1st. At I)
a.m. the day's festivities will begin
with a grand parade led by Ihe Lady-
Biulth aud Extension Silver Hand and
tlie Mayor and Corporation. The
school children will follow, many of
whom will be in fancy dress. Following thc children will be the decorated
floats and automobiles, horse vehicles
and bicycles, lt is expected that thia
year's parade wjll eclipse all former
years. ..
Prom 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. will be spent
at the Agricultural Grounds, where a
splendid programme of sports will be
gone through. In thc afternoon the
sports will take the form of a water
gala and will be held at the Athletic
Club's bathing beach.. An extensive
list of races haB been prepared, Including swimming races, canoe races,
launch races, etc.
One of the features of the celebration will be the community singing,
which will take place immediately preceding the water gala. A few patriotic
songs will be sung and a speech on
Dominion Day delivered by a well-
known public speaker.
In the evening a dance will be held
In Gould's Hall and good music has
been procured for this occasion. With
good weather everything points to this
boing Ladysmlth'a most successful
celebration. I
COLONEL COLLISHAW
•VISITING NANAIMO
Distinguished Canadian Airman
Returns to England Shortly
To Report for Duty.
NANAIMO.—Squadron Leader Raymond Colllshaw, R.A.I''., returned to
his honjo town this week for a fortnight's visit, nnd is the guest of his
brother-in-law and sister, Dr. and Mrs.
T. J. McPhee, Wallace Street. Colonel
Colllshaw ls duo to report after three
months' leave of absence on July 25 In
England, whence he expects to leave
for service with the R.A.F. In India
He hns entirely recovered from a
severe attack of blacy typhus, during
the worst of which, being too ill to
reach the hospital at Constantinople,
he was nursed to strength in a one-
roomed hut by a Russian woman, who
took him from the train and, having
served herself as nurse in tlie Russo-
Japanese war, waB able to give him
proper attention. Ab in his public addresses, the distinguished ace describes the conditions In Russia as deplorable, but is hopeful of a bright
future for the Russian people.
Church Notices
HOLY TRINITY (III III 11
Rev. W. Levorsedge.
June 27, IV. Snndiij ntcr Trinity.
Holy Communion, 8.30 a.m.
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Royston, Service at 3.30 p.m.
Evening Prayer at 7 o'clock.
ROMAN  CATHOLIC CIII'IM 11.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
11 u.tn., mass at Cumberland.
0 a.m., mass at Comox.
GRACE METHODIST I Ill'IiCII
Rev. Geo. Kinney.
Morning Service, 11 a.m:
Sunday School, 2.30 p.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m. ■
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
James Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service, 11 a.m.
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Prayer   meeting,   Wednesday,   7.30
Choir practice, Friday evening, 7.30.
The Sacrament ot the Lord's Supper
wil be dispensed ln the Presbyterian
Church on Sunday morning, June 27,
at 11 o'clock. All members are earnestly requestly to attend.
A specially attractive service has
been arranged for the closing ot the
Sunday School on Sunday afternoon
at 2.30 in the Presbyterian ■ Church.
A good and inspiring programme has
come to hand, the central theme of
which is "A New Canada." The address at this gathering will be given
by Capt. J. C. Brown. Parents as well
as children are invited to be present.
M

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