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The Cumberland Islander Sep 10, 1921

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Array •Provincial:
>■ >
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
it
/
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 37
CUA1BERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE; TWO DOLLARS PER ANNU.M.
Cumberland Secured Big Honors In The
Mine Rescue and First Aid Competitions
Loctl Men Display High State of Efficiency and Won Mine Rescue
i     Shield and Three First and One Second Prizes in First Aid
Work—Coulson Cup Goes to Nanaimo.
Cumberland teams entered in the Mine Rescue and First Aid
pontests held on Monday scored the majority of wins, taking no
less than four firsts and one second prizes. The only first prize
they failed to secure was the Coulson Cup, which went to Nanaimo.
These events formed the programme for the sixth annual field
day of the Vancouver Island Mine Safety Association, and were
held on the Athletic Grounds, Cumberland. The day was dull and
overcast, with occasional showers, but a large number turned out
to witness the competitions.
The notable success of the Cumberland men is highly gratifying to members of the teams, the management of the Canadian
'Collieries and all who had to do with the local teams.
Cumberland Secures Coveted Shield.
The coveted shield donated by the Vancouver Island Mining
Safety Association was won by the Cumberland team and is now
in the proud possession of Mr. Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd. The work
of this team was remarkable, it getting the full 500 points—not
a point being deducted from beginning to end of their test piece,
which shows that their work was perfect from the standpoint of
the different judges. The manner in which they carried out their
work, from the assembling of the apparatus to the conclusion of
the problem, was evidence of persistent and careful training.
Six teams entered in the Mine Rescue contests, Laird's team of
Nanaimo getting second place, with 498 points, and the Nanaimo
Reserve Mine team third with 496—all highly creditable performances. The other teams entered were Nanaimo No. 1, the
Cassidy and Extension teams.
Three First and One Second in First Aid Work.
In the First Aid events Cumberland men won three firsts and a
second, securing both first and second prizes in the B. C. Department of Mines Cup, first in the three-man and first in the two-man
contests—a very remarkable performance.
The Coulson Cup was won by Simpson's team of Nanaimo, in a
decidedly close contest, Hoggan's team of Granby getting second
place, closely followed by No. 4 Underground of Cumberland.
The ladies' and juvenile contests were won by teanis from the
south.   There were no local entries in these events.
Many men prominent in mining and public life of the province
were present, among them being Rev. Thos. Menzies M.P.P.;
James McGregor, Chief Inspector of Mines; James M. Savage,
General Manager of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd.;
Thomas Graham, General Superintendent; Inspector J. Biggs of
Nicola Valley; Inspector H. Devlin of Nanaimo, and Inspector
Thos. R. Jackson; Thomas A. Spruston of Ladysmith; Charles
Graham, District Superintendent, Cumberland; John Hunt, General Manager Western Fuel Corporation, Nanaimo; R. Henderson,
Manager Reserve Mine, Nanaimo; H. H. Sanderson of Seattle; A.
Auchinvole of Union Bay; Wm, Kttlton, Secretary St. John's Ambulance Association, Nanaimo; Fire Chief V. W. Stewart of
Victoria.
MINE RESCUE CONTEST
SI* teams entered hi this event.
uhlch proved of great interest to the
spectators, the work of the various
teams being watched very closely. In
this connection a very good suggestion has been made by Mr. Thos.
Oraham, which is that the test piece
should be displayed where the public
could read lt, and so follow more Intelligently the work undertaken.
Very good work was done by all the
teams, especially the three leading
ones. As the Cumberland men got* a
perfect score It is readily seen they
did excellent work. The clean, business-like methods won popular approval, and the general opinion loug hefore the judges' decision was given
■was that Cumberland would secure
lirst place.
The test for the Cumberland team
was: "A Are has occurred In tbe firsl
left entry and has spread through X
cut to right entry, where workmen
should be working. Team will enter
mine and perform the necessary work
required for the safety of workmen
and property."
Their tactics wero superior to those
ot their opponents, for they made tlieir
main effort the recovery of the injured
man, whereas other teams lost valuable time In preliminary work.
Mr.   Dudley   Michell   of   Edmonton
was the chief judge in this competition, assisted by Inspector   Biggs   of
Nicola  Valley.    Their decisions  met
with general satisfaction.
FIRST PRIZE, V. I. AI. S. A. Shield
and six Elgin Gold Watches-Won
by No. Four Aline Rescue team, of
Cumberland,  with   a   perfect  score
of 600 points.   This team comprises
Wm. Gillies  (captain), L. Francescini, Jonathan Taylor, Wm. Evans
and A. Watson.
SECOND PRIZE, six Gold Watches—
*Won by Nanaimo No. 2 team, with
■498 points;  R. Laird  (captain), T.
Parkinson, J. Sutherland, F. John,
A. W. Courtenay, J. Hodgson. -
THIRD—Newberry's  team  of. Nanaimo, 496 points,
FOURTH—Broderick's   team,   Nanaimo, 486 points.
FIFTH—Hoggan's team, Granby, 480
points.
SIXTH—Capt.    Hayes'   team,   Ladysmith, 474 points.
The Cumberland team was equipped
with the "Paul" Aline Rescue Breathing Apparatus, while the Nanaimo
team getitng second place had the
"Gibbs." The name "Draeger" is generally but erroneously applied to the3e
machines, but the "Draeger" machine
has been generally discarded in favor
of the modern one, the "Paul" being
considered the best ln the "world today. The Cumberland Aline Reserve
Station has ten of these and is the
best equipped station in thc province.
"Safety First" is thc outstanding
slogan of the Canadian Collieries, and
the management never hesitate to
go to any expense of adopt the latest
and best apparatus when convinced
of Its superiority. Last year the company secured four of the "Paul" machines, with which exhaustive tests
were made and which showed their
superiority. The result of the tests
were forwarded to Hon. Wm. Sloan,
Minister of Alines, who shortly afterwards ordered six of the machines to
be sent to Cumberland.
PRIZES PRESENTED
AT SOCIAL AND DANCE
llo-llo Dance Hall Crowded at
At Very Enjoyable Function
In the Evening.
The llo-llo Hall was crowded to
dancing capacity on .Monday night,
when n social and dance held under
the auspices of the St. John's First
Aid and Aline Rescue Association was
held.
This was one of the most enjoyable
affairs held here for a long time. The
tvldefelt pleasure at Cumberland's
success in tho day's events was no
doubt responsible in a large measure
for the joy of the evening.
Excellent music was supplied by
Liddell's Cumberland Orchestra. This
new organization is a very welcome
addition to tlio city orchestras.
The prizes won during the day were
presented by Rev. Thos. Menzies. member for Comox In the Provincial
House, who officiated In the absence
of Hon. Wm. Sloan, who was unable
to attend owing to illness.
Previous to commencing the dancing tin- gathering was called to order
ami Mr. Thomas Graham made a few
complimentary remarks. Ho said
that it gave hlm vory much pleasure
to he there Hint evening, on thc occasion of the sixtli annual Held day of
the Vancouver Island Aline Safety
Association. This was the second
time Cumberland had had the honor
of having these contests take place on
local grounds, and after several years
(Continued on Page Two)
SCHOOL IS GREATLY
IMPROVED BY PAINTING
Tlie contractors who have been
renovating and painting the public
school finished their work this week,
and the building now presents a very
fine appearance.
Messrs. McLellan & Son had the contract and have given every satisfaction, the work being done in a flrst-
clas manner and the best of materials
used. A particularly good job has
been made of the roof, 160 gallons of
oil and ochre being used to paint the
roof, cover up all crevices and cracks
in the shingles, etc.
The school rooms were kalsomlned
and the fire escape improved, as well
as other general repairs.
The plumbing work in connection
with tbe installation of the new sanitary system ls nearly completed, but
the work is held up waiting for equipment coming from England.
FIRST AID COMPETITIONS
Dr. Miller of Vancouver (referee of
the Workmen's Compensation Board)
was the chief Judge in all the First
Aid events. Dr. Brydone-Jack not being able to officiate. Other doctors
judging in these events were Dr.
Sutherland of Blaine, Dr. D. AlcLellan
of Vancouver, Dr. Emerson of South
Wellington, Dr. Ingham of Nanaimo,
Dr. Geo. K. MacNaughton and Dr. E.
R. Hicks of Cumberland, and Dr.
Millard of Courtenay.
The First Aid events were watched
attentively by a large number ot spectators, in some instances by very
critical ones. All the events were
very closely contested, the doctors
having no little difficulty In giving the
decision in some instances.
B. 0. DEPT. OF MINES CtP.
This was a keenly contested event.
No. 4 Underground team and No. 4
Surface team made a dead heat for
first place, the work of both tetms being practically perfect, the judges not
being able to find even a point difference.
Judges Tuke Half an Hour to Decide.
In the meantime they visited each
team uo less than six times before
finally awarding the cup to No. 4 Underground team.
There were eight entries tn this, the
first event of the day. The test piece
given each team was as follows:
"There is a mangling of the right
foot and ankle with crushing of the
bones and severe hemorrhage.    The
left femur Is broken.   Treat and convey stretcher ten yards.   Tourniquet
used must be improvised."
FIRST PRIZE, Department of Mines
Cup and Gold Aledals—Won by No.
4 Underground team of Cumberland
—Wm.   Beveridge   (captain),  Jonathan Taylor, R. Reid, L. Francescini
and John Williams.
SECOND  PRIZE, Gold Aledals—Won
by No. 4 Surface team of Cumberland—A. J. Taylor (captain), J. A.
Quinn, H. Boffy, J. Lockhart and C.
Nash. „.
Other teams competing were Granby
No. 1, Granby No. 2, Nanaimo No. 1,
Nanaimo No. 2, Simpson's ot Nanaimo,
and Extension.
COULSON CUP.
The above  eight teams  also competed in this event, the result being:
FIRST PRIZE, Coulson Cup and six
Gold   Aledals—Won   by   Simpson's
team   of   Nanaimo—D. H. Simpson
(capt.), W. H. Thorpe, L. Samann,
W. Neaves and S. Norris.
SECOND  PRIZE, Gold  Aledals—Won
by Granby No. 2 team—Geo. Hoggau
(capt.), W. Tuohey, A. Alawhinuey,
It. Houston, T. Irvine.
THHEE..VAN EVENT.
Eight entries. ,
FIRST PRIZE, Gold Rings—Won by
No. *4 Surface team, Cumberland—
LADIES' COMPETITION.
Three teams from Nanaimo entered
for this contest, very creditable work
Indeed being done by all the contestants. The third team did exceptionally good work but made one fatal
mistake, which lost them a1 prize.
FIRST   PRIZE,    $25—Airs.   Nlcholls
(captain), Airs. Tait, Airs. J. Scott,
Airs. Carnelly  and   Mrs.   J.   Swan
(patient).
SECOND   PRIZE,   $15—Airs.   Douglas
(captain), Aliss I. McCarrigle, Aliss
S. James, Airs. S. Davis, Airs. Dlls-
worth (patient).
JUVENILE CUP
Three teams faced the judges for
this contest, two being from Nanaimo
and one from Ladysmith. The boys
were keen and did very creditable
work.
FIRST PRIZE. Watch Fobs—Won by
Nanaimo team. Geo. Cottle leapt.),
Snm English, It, Jones, W. Muir, J.
Flynn nnd A. Shields.
SECOND PRIZE, Gold Buttons—Won
by Ladysmith team. D. Gourlay
(captain), .lames Andrews, W. WU-
boii, A. Zboysky und B. Foster
(patient).
The other Nannlmo team comprised
Fred Gard (captain), C. Wharton. T.
Itottery, J. Neilson, D: Kenmulr and G.
Wallace.
Football Game
Saturday at Four
Ladysmith's Famous Connaught
Cup Contenders Play Here
Saturday Afternoon
The management of the Cumberland Football Club have completed
arrangements for an exhibition game
if soccer to be played on the local
jrounds on Saturday, commencing at
I o'clock. The famous Ladysmith
:.eum. which did so well in the Connaught Cup games, will be the visitors.
As the visitors are bringing up the
best players they have, a good game
Is assured.
The local team will be a totally different one to last season, as several
■tt last season's players bave left for
pastures new. Harold Roberts has
gone to .Nanaimo, Andy Home to Brule
Lake district, Alia., and Milligan. tbe
star performer amongst tlio forwards,
is now in Winnipeg. The new players
obtained by the United are Plump of
Victoria, an inside right of the very
best type, and who should be a worthy
successor to Milligan.
Brewster, also of Victoria, plays any
inside position or In the half-back
line, and according to critics ls a
polished player.
Hunter, who comes with a great
reputation as an all-round player, recently out from Scotland. Jack Sutherland, who played for Cumberland a
few seasons ago; he is reputed to be
able to make 'em all step up.
The defense will be also well represented, as Alortlmer, one of Alberta's
best fulllbacks, will be Campbell's
partner. He played with the fanjpus
Hillhurst team of Calgary, and also
acted as manager when they went on
their big tour. Boyd, who was here
last season but not able to play on account of sickness, will be goal tender.
He is in the best of condition at present, and the old Heart of Midlothian
player will be watched with great interest.
In addition to these new men the
following are also available and are
requested to hold themselves In readiness for Saturday's game, as two or
three men may be Introduced Into the
game at half-time.
game at half-time: Walker, goal;
Gough, Carle, Conti, Irving, Banner-
man, Pilling, James, Hltchens, Hunden, Harrison.
Will Stand Half
Remodeling Cost
Fire Chief Banks to Attend Convention at Victoria at End
Of This Month.
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
TO RESUME MEETINGS
The G. W. V. A. Women's Auxiliary
will resume regular meetings next
week, when the first will be held In
the Alemorial Hall at 7.30 on Thursday evening. All ladies related to
war veterans are Invited to attend.
Don't Insist on having your own way
unless you know where the road ends.
At a meeting of the Fire Department
held on Wednesday evening there was
a good attendance and some Important
business transacted.
The men voted to pay half of the
cost rf remodelling the rear of the fire
hall so as to give accommodation for
living quarters. Plans for this purpose were prepared by Air. W. A.
Owen some time ago and endorsed by
the City Council, but have been held
up pending action by the Fire Department. The plans call tor a living
room 12x15 feet, kitcheft 15x9.6, bedroom of the same dimensions, a hall,
porch, pantry, bathroom, etc. The alterations are expected to cost $600.
The firemen will soon be throwing
out their manly chests a little more
than usual, for two dozen nice bright
silver badges have been ordered to
adorn them.
Will Not Adopt Siren.
By a unanimous vote the men decided against the adoption of thf electric siren which has been on trial for
a few days. They reckon the reliable
old bell gives better service.
Fire Chief to Attend Convention.
The   following   communication   was
received by Mr. T. E. Banks from Fire
Chief V. W. Stewart of Victoria:
'The 28th annual convention of the
Pacific Coast Association or Fire Chiefs
will be held at the City of Victoria during September 27, 28, 29 and 30. and
you are tendered a most cordinl personal invitation to bo present.        *
"Important subjects are to come liefore the convention, dealing principally with fire-lighting, (Ire-prevention, electrical hazards, etc.. and these*
subjects will be taken In hand by experts In their particular line, and
which should be Instructive and use-
I ful to the head of every lire department. There also will be a display
I of flre-fightliiK appliances, notably a
Leyland gasoline pumper Imported
I from England.
"The Pacific Coast Association of
Fire Chiefs need your support, your
opinion and advice, and especially desire your counsel from knowledge
gained ln the service, and you are
urged to embrace the opportunity to
take part in these matters, which are
of most vital import to every tire chief
and every tiro, prevention officer."
The members of the Fire Department urged Mr. Banks to go, and voted money for expenses.
Benefit Dance on Tuesday
The Great War Veterans' Association of Cumberland is
holding a big Benefit Dance in the Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall on
Tuesday evening next, commencing at 9.30. The proceeds are
in aid of Mrs. J. Sutherland, widow of the War Veteran who
lost his life by drowning in the Courtenay River recently.
The committee in charge is anxious to have a full house in
order that a good sum may be realized. First-class music will
be provided. Admission has been fixed at one dollar for gents
and twenty-five cents for ladies.
Baseballers Trip
Across the Gulf
Landlubbers   Get   Surprises  of
Their Lives in Adventures
On the Ocean.
B> Captain KhlU II.
The Cumberland Baseball team, after their victories over the Ladysmith
and Nanaimo teams on Sunday, returned the Bame-bight to Cumberland.
The following morning they left Roy-
Bton at It o'clock, en route for Powell
River, on the S.S. Oasullne Launch
owned hy the Powell River Merchant
Marine Co. The crew was composed
of two, a man aud a boy, tbt* tirst acting as Chief Engineer, while the latter acted as Hoy Scout. The Captain
of the boat was indisposed at Powell
River and was left sitting in Ihe Club
House there playing poker with a
stack of chips in front of him.
When leaving Royston tbe weather
was line and the sea like glass; so a
very enjoyable trip was looked forward to, and which actually ended in
that fashion, but not quite as expected.
Speeding Along nt Six .11 lies!
We had not proceeded very far when
it was found that the engine was running on one cylinder, whatever that
is In au eight-horse power motor.
Suddenly that difficulty was overcome,
so we travelled at a fast clip for the
next two hours across the Gulf and
on the inside of Texada Island, the
speedometer showing six miles an
hour—in places. The engine then began to hit on one cylinder again, and
the Enginer started to find out what
was wrong, when suddenly the piston
rod from the pump broke riglit in two.
So to prevent tbe engine from becoming overheated the engine was stopped
and the boat and the gang allowed to
drift wherever the sea would take us
until picked up. This was 11.30 a.m.
and we were then about ten miles
from Powell River, two miles from
Texada Island and about live miles
from Rebecca Island. There was land
three sides of us that could be
seen but not touched just at tbat time.
From Royston to where we broke
down many funny stunts were pulled
off, which caused lots of laughter and
made the trip an enjoyable one, Billy
Kerr being the'chief mirth maker.
Boy St'uiit Takes Hon bout In Search
of Help.
Although we were stranded, the
boys were having a good time until
about 12.30. The tide changed about
that time and began taking us back to
the Gulf, which was like a pond when
we passed it, but was now like a lion
with Its jaws open to swallow us at
any minute. The further we drifted
the rougher and wilder ft got, consequently the Enginer told the Boy Scout
to take the rowboat (the only life-saving apparatus on board) to Texada
Island affd telephone to Powell Uiver
for help.
Two or three of the passengers went
with him to row the boat. We expected them to return very soon with the
small boat, for we could see that It
was almost useles owing to the rough
state of the sea. However, many nice
things were said about them, which
compelled several to laugh, when
prayers should have been said asking
that the sea might calm down.
Larsen   Nearlj   Capsized   Bout
At this juncture the Engineer go(
sick; it was never thought that be
would have been the first to feed the
fishes, being a seafaring man. His bad
example had its effect upon Marocchi
and some of the bread he had baked
that morning was given to the denizens of the ocean. The next was Larsen, who got out of his bunk to proceed lo tbe side of the boat, but while
banging to the side of the boat be
nearly turned it turtle, scaring everybody on board, more especially those
who were on the lookout from the top
of the cabin.
Kerr again came In handy with his
jokes, saying that lie bad better fasten bis shoes so that when he went to
the bottom the barnacles would not
cut his feet while walking ashore.
Wales  Vppn'iirlilnt.' Hunt Add Terror.
The sea still got rougher, with uo
chance of the Engineer getting the
boat to go forward instead of backward. The wind began blowing about
100 miles au hour, accordong to the
weather glass which was broken some
weeks ago at Powell River. Thingi-
became more alarming, as wales
could now be seen coming towards us.
having been told by the smaller fishes-
how generous we were. The hoys began to take it more seriously. They
had almost resigned themselves to
llieir fate—Which was supposedly
Davy Jones' locker-when one of the
miners said be wished he was God so
that he might part the waves and walk
to Powell River. This little prayer
had a good effect, aud hy this time—
2 o'clock—the Hoy Scout bad secured
u boat at Blubber Bay to come out
and tow us to tbat city.
It wan a great relief when some one
shouted "Here Is a boat coining for
us!" Everybody got anxious and
wanted to get a good view, and again
nearly capsized the launch in their
anxiety. It. was miles away and just
like a liny speck, but all eyes were
centred on that boat until she arrived
and took us in tow to Blubber Bay,
landing there at 3.30.
Fciist on Sardines and Crnl-kern.
We wero allowed ten minutes on
shore, which wus taken up looking
for a store, as the boys were all
hungry. Tbey discovered the Post
Offlre and store combined, and bought
crackers and sardines galore, which
they devoured on their trip a^ro« to
Powell River, landing there at 4.30.
After playing baseball we got sup-
(Coutiuued on Page Eight)
Moose Lodge
Duly Instituted
Ladysmith Delegation Comes Up
To Put on Work—Baby Lodge
Opened With 99 Members
After several weeks' energetic work
on the part o( Mr. W. P. H. Thompson,
ilistriet organizer, the Cumberland
Lodge N'o. ltiC2. Loyal Order of
Moose, was Instituted on Saturday last
witli titling ceremonies.
The young lodge started on its
fraternity voyage with a list of 99
members, a very creditable showing
Indeed.
Officers Installed.
The olllcers installed were:
Past Dictator—John Thomson.
Dictator—John 0. Quinn.
Vive-Dictator—Robt,  11.  Robertson.
Prelate—J. E. Spicer.
Sergeant-at-Arms—Joseph Salmon.
Orator—William R. Newman.
Inner llttnrd -J. J. Herd.
Outer Guard—Sidney Hunt.
Secretary—Francis YV. Hobson.
Treasurer- Robert Thomson.
Trustees—J. n. Sommerville, R. O.
Davidson and William Wier.
Instituted  by  Officers ot  L>nl< smith
I.edge.
Thc olllcers of Ladysmith Lodge No.
1459 took charge of the ceremony of
Instituting-and installing the officers.
The work was put on in a most creditable manner, and tho baby loilgo of
Ladysmith deserves great credit for'
the efficient manner in which tbey
did lt. The Cumberland Lodge accorded them a hearty vote of thanks
for coming up in such large numbers,
over thirty making the trip. Tiie work
>f tbe newly equipped and uniformed
drill team, led by Captain Moore, wns
splendid, and all were delighted at
the beautiful musical drill performed
hy the team of 18 members.
The Fraternity Hall was crowded to
capacity, in fact it was much too
small, the drill team being hampered
ti their movements.
Mr. Thompson, the organizer, will
remain in charge for a short time, tho
charter remaining open so that new
members can still join at the charter
rate.
Cumberland Lodge now becomes the
baby lodge of the L. O. O. 51. ln B. C,
aud if they become as ambitious as
Ladysmith Lodge has done under the
able leadership of Bro. T. A. Spruston,
Past Dictator, with the better territory in Cumberland and district, they
should be able to forge ahead of their
rival.
The first regular meeting of the
new lodge will be held on Saturday,
September 17, when it Is hoped to
make a substantial addition to the
membership.
Baseball Game
[Sunday Afternoon
Nanaimo Team Coming Up in
Endeavor to Get Revenge for
Defeat on Sunday Last
The Nanaimo team, uot satisfied
with their defeat last Sunday at tho
hands of the Cumberland boys, havo
been talking over the wire with Cumberland's Manager, Insisting that they
he given another chance to show their
baseball abilities against tbe champions of the North. So McAllister,
General Superintendent, Director,
Manager, Secretary. Collector, etc., of
the Cumberland Baseball team, readily
agreed that they be given that chance
on Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock, on
the Athletic Grounds, Cuinhertand.
The visitors will bring the same
team that played at Nanaimo last Sunday. A great deal has ben said regarding Delcourt's pitching, which ia
good, but many fans lu Cumberland
have not seen bim In action. However,
they will have an opportunity of gratifying (hat desire on Sunday,
This probably will he the last gamo
of Importance on the local grounds
this season. So be sure and see It—
a good game Is assured. You will
never regret II. lie on lime as thn
game will start promptly at 1 o'clock.
SCHOOLS OI'EN FOR
THE WINTER TERM
Ceremony   on   Tuesday   Aflcriyinii   111
Keeping wltll Uie Peace Arch
Senile al Maine.
The Cumberland High and Public
Schools opened on Tuesday morning
for the Winter term, and teachers and
scholars have now settled down to
work in earnest, lion scholars are in
attendance, the receiving (lass having
a large number this term, nnd for tho
lirst time iu many years lias moro
scholars than the entrance class.
Ceremony in Afternoon.
The Peace Celebration between
Canada and the United States was tho
feature of the school re-openlng.   Tho
hlldren were assembled In front of
the school under the entwined Hags of
the greatest republic and the greatest
Dominion. Mrs. T. K. Banks, School
Trustee, was In the chair. Mr. G. W.
Clinton. American Consul, spoke of the
hundred years of peace since the
Treaty of Ghent, and Mrs. Banks and
Messrs. C. 11. Wood ntnl A. MacKinnon
referred to the great achievements of
thousands of miles of frontier without
a fort.   The children sang "O Canada,"
'Tlie Maple Leaf." the National Anthem and the "Star Spangled Banner"
and gave three cheers for the United
States and for Canada.
Commencing on Monday next, there
will he two shows at thc Hollo every
night except Friday. •      s
Tw6
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 16, 1921.
EXTRAORDINARY LOW PRICE ON HIGH-GRADE
Kitchen Ranges
We are showing a high-grade Kitchen Range, with
polished steel top, six holes, enamel back, enamel oven
door with thermometer, warming closet with nickel-
plated door, niekelplated base and legs, large fire-box
with duplex grates for coal or wood.
This is a high-grade, well made range, of first-class
materials—one that will be a credit to any kitchen.
The price of this range a short time ago was $105, but
we are now selling it ar
$80.00
CASH—TERMS IF DESIRED
The Best Fry Pan Made
Come in and see the very newest thing in Fry Pans
—highly niekelplated English cast steel. Will not tarnish antl is easily cleaned. Will last a lifetime—a Fry
Pan you will be proud to own.
The Bate
Hardware   Co.
Housefurnishings
TAPESTRIES, in a good assortment of colorings, suitable for every room in the home. Newest prices,
ranging at $1.10, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.75.
TABLE COVERS IN TAPESTRY—A nice line to
select from; 8|4 size. Prices ranging from $4.00,
$4.75, $5.00, $5.50 to $7.50 each.
CURTAIN NETS AND SCRIMS—In White and Ecru.
LACE AND NOVELTY CURTAINS.
Floor Coverings
CALL AND LOOK OVER OUR CARPET SQUARES
—You will find our values right.
AXMINSTER HEARTH RUGS—Reduced from $8.50
to $6.50 each.
A FULL LINE OF FURNITURE
ALWAYS SHOWING
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
PRIZES  PRESENTED
AT SOCIAL AND DANCE
(Continued from Page One)
Hi
FOR  SALE
Acreage   on  Royston-
Cumberland   Road
Price $30.00 a
Acre      m
APPLY—
P. Leo Anderton |
NOTARY PUBLIC g
PHONE 22 COURTENAY, B. C. I
FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE AGENT H
Ilillilllllll
of effort our teams had heon successful.
Barton's Team Dues Well.
ITe was also pleased that In the absence of Mr. Barton's team of Nanaimo. Cumberland had won the Mine
Rescue Shield. -Burton's team had
carried Ihe fame of Vancouver Island
to the United States, where in the
great international contests held at St.
Louis they had secured fourth place
out of 01 entries (applause).
It pleased Mr. Graham to learn that
the team had been so successful—at
the same time lie was sorry that we
did not have the honor of competing
against them that any. for he was sure
Cumberland would have beaten them
(laughter,).
.Mr. Graham said he regrolted the
absence of the Hon. Wm. Sloan, Minister of Mines, who hail heen under the
weather of hue and could not attend,
lie then callod on Mr. Menzies to
present the prizes.
First   Aid nml   Mine Rescue Work a
Revolution*
Mr. Menzies said Cumberland ought
as a city to feel proud on account of
the honor that had come to it through
the success of the teams that day. He
said he came to the competitions just
to get first-hand information in regard
to First Aid and Mine Kescue work,
and it had been a revelation to him to
see the care that was taken by the
different companies for the safety of
the employees while underground.
He complimented all who had taken
part to make that a red letter day not
only for Cumberland but also for
Vancouver Island.
The judges had had very difficult
tasks, for all teams exhibited great
merit, showing the results of much
time and energy in preparation. He
hoped that in the future the men who
underwent considerable hardship and
hard training to gain the state of proficiency tliey had reached, would receive compensation for their labor.
They underwent this hard training all
for the purpose of providing for the
possible contingencies that might
happen in the mines.
The mining industry, said Mr. Men-.
7,ies, was one of the most important
in our province, and carried with lt
more danger than any other, causing
parties to devise way and means of j
overcoming tlie danger. Those who I
had contributed to making life reason-
'» ^!:m: TSHiiJI Hlllllli lllliliiltlimilllltlliltiUlllthililllttlUILS^
|   The Studebaker
I        Light-Six
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THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was de-
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for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
m
Weeks   Motors
We Like to
Give Service
Or, to put it differently, has it
ever struck you that it isn't the
ease of the job, but your liking
for it that makes it attractive?
We're in the battery business
because we like it.
If we can give you service that
you didn't know we had, we are
particularly pleased. We don't
stop with merely filling, charging and testing your battery, and
selling you a new one when you
need it. We're here to do everything we can to see to it that
your battery gives most miles of
uninterrupted service per dollar,
and more satisfaction all around.
We like to be bothered. Como
tn anytime.
SPARKS CO.
COURTENAY
NANAnKI   nml   IIINCAN
LIMITED
B     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.
ably safe underground hnd cause to
feel proud of that which had been accomplished.
Vancouver Island Stands First In Mine
Kescue Work.
Mr. Menzies complimented those
who were responsible for the training
of the successful teams. Both pupils
and teachers had reached a high degree of efficiency.
Vancouver Island stands first and
foremost in her rescue work, he said.
Tliis was clearly shown that day and
In the United States contests held at
St. Louis, where Barton's team of Nanaimo had got fourth place out of 64
teams competing. Different locations
had slightly different ways of doing
things and he believed the Vancouver
Island team had been handicapped ln
lhat respect, otherwise he felt sure
they would have secured first place.
Ever)thing Cuming to Cumberland.
The speaker congratulated Cumberland.    It  seems   that   everything   is
I Cumberland now—in football, baseball and everything tliey go In for tliey
win. It showed the high degree of
efficiency to which tlie men had attained.
Not only are you noted for your
coal, but also for your athletes, said
the member. Cumberland is rapidly
climbing up the ladder of fame in the
athletic world. There is always llie
incentive to reach tlie top, but tlie difficulty was to remain there. There
are others who will endeavor to surpass you and will strain every nerve
and every endeavor to attain the pinnacle which you have attained.
The speaker thought the public
ought to lie better acquainted with the
life-saving devices in the mines. It
would do good to demonstrate what
had been accomplished in that connection. (Applause.)
Mr. Menzies then called on the ilit'-
I ferent teams and presented each with
j the cups, medals and other prizes won
i during thc day.
ROD AND GUN
Rod and Gun lu Canada, the popular
Canadian sportsman's monthly magazine, appears in n new and improved
size with its September Issue. The
many improvements include a larger
size of page, together with a coated
paper that adds considerably -to the
appearance of the stories and illustrations. This number is rich with
stories, articles and anecdotes deal-
Ing wilh wild life in the various parts
of tlio Dominion.
Thc Great Mackenzie Basin is tho
title of the leading article, which is
written by F. H. Kitto, and tells of his
12,oou mile trip from Edmonton, north
along the Mackenzie through to the
Pacific coast and then east to Edmonton. In addition to this article this
number Includes thirteen stories and
articles, which together with the usual
departments makes an Interesting
issue of Canada's   outdoor   monthly.
Thli trademark; atamped in red
on the case. Identifiei the Willaisl
Threaded  Rubber  Batters/.
Willard
Batteries
Guaranteed
Beer	
Cascade Beer is full strength beer. It is truaranteed
not less than 8 per cent, proof spirit. You will find
every bottle of it the same—uniform strength. There
is more Cascade sold than any other beer in Canada,
Because it is the Best Beer
Cascade Beer
Vancouver  Breweries  Limited
i /
September 16, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
I
Thr«6
iL
many men of
muscle
MANY men toilers—and women toilers too
—suffer from   a  "gone-feeling" during
the last hour of a day's work.
Why should you suffer so, when a liberal diet of
home-made bread will supply more heat and
muscle-power than an equal weight of other
food? Pound for pound ROYAL STANDARD
FLOUR contains far more nourishment than
meat,
'Tis so easy to bake a larger, more nourishing
loaf—one of exceedingly fine flavor—when using ROYAL STANDARD. This Made-in-B. C.
flour gives you the loaf that sustains.
VANCOUVER MILLING AND
GRAIN CO., LIMITED
Campbell Highet
Local Manager
Courtenay, B. C.
Telephone S3
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While IT Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS,DCZ
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sneclaltj.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
BACK EAST
FOR YOUR HOLIDAYS
TRAVEL
Canadian National
Railways
AU Rail or
Lake and Rail
TO
Edmonton, Saskatoon
Winnipeg, Toronto
Ottawa, Montreal
Quebec, Halifax
aud other Eastern I'unadu and
United States points.
CHOICE OF ROUTES
EXCELLENT SERVICE
E. W. BICKLE, Agent,
CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
will assist yon In arranging details, quote lowest fares, make
reservations, etc.
YOUR TEETH
OCCULSION
By REA PKOCTOH McOEE, Editor ot
"Oral Hygiene."
Occulslon means the fitting together
of the upper and lower teeth when the
mouth Is closed,
extend slightly over the lower teeth
Iu the normal mouth the upper teeth
all around. Each upper tooth strikeB
two lower teeth and each lower tooth
strikes two upper teeth
This ai-raugemeut acts ' upon the
principle ot a shock-absorber. Every
tooth has a slight motion independent
of the otlier teeth. When the jaws
come together the teeth move a little
and escape the jar.
All bodily movements are due to
muscles pulling upon the bones according to the well-known mechanical principles of the different forms of
levers.
It' the muscles of your arm worked
upon the same lever plan that the
muscles of your Jaw work upon, you
could throw a horse over a six-foot
fence without much trouble.
This means that there Is an immense pressure upon your teeth when
you chew.
A soldier completely equipped for
Held service makes a pressure of
eleven pounds to the square inch upon
the ground wheu he walks.
The human jaws in a normal man
can exert a pressure of" two hundred
and fifty pounds to the square Inch.
The lower jaw moves up aud down,
from side to side, back and forth, and
it also has a rotary movement. If any
tooth Is out ot its proper position ln
the arch, it is very liable to receive
the whole pressure of the jaws In some
of these movements, and the constant
jailing that it receives will start au
inllaiumutlou iu tbe pericementum—
the membrane thnt covers the root of
the toolli and attaches It to the bone
The sume tiling happens when a tilling ls too high, and sometimes when
u tooth has been extracted the teeth
ou either side will move a little Into
the vacant space and cause one or
mora teeth to strike too hard.
This Is culled traumatic occlusion
and Is the cause of many cases ol
death of the nerve, alveolar abscesses,
pulp stones, enlargement of the end
Of the root, called exostosis, and pyorrhea.
II* a tooth Is slightly tender of seems
to be In the way, a visit to the dentist
Will save a great deal of trouble.
One thing Is certain, a tooth never
hurts or even feels queer unless there
Ib something the matter. There may
bo sham pains In other parts of the
body, but whenever anyone tells you
that his teeth hurt, they do.
RESULTS OF CHILDREN'S
SPORTS ON LABOR DAY
"Every Runner a Prize" Results
In Big Entries in the Young
Folks Races.
When the workmen own the workshops
And the railroad men the rails;
And the grocery clerk the groceries;
And the mail clerks own the mails—
When the preachers own the pulpits,
And the pressmen own tlie shops,
And the drillers own the oil wells,
And the jails are owned by cops—
When the conductors own tbe street
cars
And each driver owns his bus,
Will you tell us common people—
Whatlnell become of us?
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Offlc*   WILLARD BLOCK
Fhoue 116 Cumberland, B. C.
TWENTY-TWO POUND TROUT
Thomas M. Wilford, leader of the
Liberal party in the New Zealand parliament, ruined the day for Hollywood
fishermen when he dropped in at Universal City and told about twenty-two
pound trout which infest the rivers of
New Zealand,
The mule It has two legs behind
And two we tind before.
We stand behind before we find
What the two behind be for.
The children's Bports held in conjunction with the Sixth Annual Fleld
Day of the Vretaoinetaoluoinliiiaaata
Day Mine Rescue and First Aid contests in Monday attracted a large attendance and big entries, good prizes
being provided In all of the 30 events,
lu addiiton the nun-successful competitors each received a dime, which
no doubt helped to swell the number
of entries in the junior events.
There sports were held under the
auspices of the Employees' Picnic
Committee ot the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., who also provided
the prizes.
The winners In the various events
were as follows:
Boys' race, 6 years and under, 50
yards—1, Willie Waugh; 2, E. Walker;
3, J. N. Dykes.
Girls' race, 6 years and under, 50
yards—1, Marjory Beatty; 2, Thelma
Waterfield; 3, E. Allara.
Boys' race, 8 years and under, 50
yards—1, Walter Waugh; 2, John
Davis; 3, F. Bolettini.
Girls' race, 8 years and under, 50
yards—1, M. McNally; 2, B. Caval-
lero; 3. E. Waterfield.
Boys' race, 10 years and under, 50
yards—1, Sam Stanaway; 2, J. Stana-
way; 3, C. Tobacco.
Girls' race, 10 years and under, 50
yardB—1, P. Cloutier; 2, R. Manincoe;«[
3, M. Taylor.
Boys' race, 12 years and under, 76
yards—1, H. GibBon; 2, W. Pearce; 3,
S. Stanaway.
Girls' race, 12 years and under, 75
yards—1, Josephine Bono; 2. E.
Waugh; 3, V. Pickettl.
Boys' race, 15 years and under, 75
yards—1, W. Marshall; 2, D. Partridge; 3, H. Gibson.
Girls' race, 15 years and under, 75
yards—1, Martha Boyd; 2, P. Cloutier;
3, K. Bono.
Boys' obstacle race, 15 years and
under—1, D. Partridge; 2, T. Abe; 3,
J. Picketti.
Girls' egg and spoon race, 16 years
and under—1, Martha Boyd; 2, E. Cun-
liflo; 3, E. Ducca.
Boys' sack race, 12 years and under
—1, J. Picketti; 2, A. McDonald; 3, 0.
Freloni.
Girls' shoe scramble, 12 years and
under—1, Josephine Bono; 2, M. Taylor; 3, Jean Smith.
Boys' three-legged race, 14 years
and under—1, W. Marshall and D.
Partridge; 2, W. Stanaway and Chas,
Bobba; 3, V. Bono and F. Bolettino.
Girls' relay race, 14 years and under—1, Martha Boyd, K. Bono and J.
Bono; 2, L. Allara, M. Taylor and H,
Gomm; 3, P. Cloutier, M. Jones and M.
Eurlcci.
Boys' pillow fight, 15 years and under—1, Orestl Freloni; 2, C. Frens-
clole.
Girls' potato race, 15 years and under—1, P. Cloutier; 2, Martha Boyd;
3, Em. Waugh.
Boys' cracker-eating contest, 10
years and under—1, Joe Freloni; 2, H.
Pearce; 3, S. Stanaway.
Girls' skipping contest, 10 years and
under—1, Em. Waugh; 2, P. Cloutier;
3, Lena Bogo.
Junior 100 yards race, 18 years and
under—1, Jack Fouracre; 2, Tom
Glaholm.
Boys' race, 8 years and under, 60
yards—1, Gordon Horwood; 2, W.
Waugh; 3, J. Freloni.
Girls' race, 8 years and under, 50
yards—1, Annie Brown; 2, Muriel
Partridge; 3, E. Allara.
Boys' human wheelbarrow race, 10
years and under—1, V. Bono and F.
Bolettini; 2, Walter Waugh and Willie
Waugh.
Girls' potato race, 10 years and under—1, Em. Waugh; 2, J. Eccleston;
i, Ethel Hunt.
Boys' 100 yards dash, 15 years and
under—1, W. Marshall; 2, D. Partridge; 3, H. Gibson.
Girls' 100 yards dash, 15 years and
under—1, sMartha Boyd; 2, L. Allara;
i, Mabel Jones.
Boys' centipede race, 15 years and
under—1, W. Jones' team; 2, J. Stan-
away's team.
Junior half-mile race, 18 years and
under—1, Jack Fouracre; 2, T. Glaholm.        	
BIG CONFERENCE
ON. B.C FORESTRY
The forests of British Columbia are
in the main tbe property of the whole
people. Although au Incalculably
great asset to towns, the greutcst
.ontrlbutur of freight to the railways
and steamship lines, nevertheless forest wealth ls the most easily destructible of all the natural assets, and
Its maintenance as a raw material
jails for a definite programme of conservation.
Keeping in view the vital problems
associated with British Columbia's
timber and timber industries, a Provincial Forestry Convention has been
organized for Vancouver, September
19 and 20, and Victoria the following
dny, which In addition to a programme
of constructive subjects has drawn its
speakers from the flrst rank of industrial leaders and professional foresters.
Such subjects as "The Trend of the
Timber Situation in Eastern Canada,
the Middle West and the Pacific Coast"
will be handled by three thoroughly
qualified sueakers. Mr. G. C. Plche,
chief foresters of Quebec, who has
just returned from Sweden, will at-
| tract much public interest by a popular talk on "A Canadian Observer in
Scandinavia." Mr. J. O. Cameron of
Victoria will speak on "Manufacturing for Export," Mr. H. R. McMillan,
of Vancouver, on "Lumber Exports ln
Relation to Forest Products," Mr. F. S.
Buck on "The Motor Truck In Logging," Mr. E. W. Hamber, Mr. Archie
Martin, Mr. P. Z. Caverhill, provincial forester, Major SlacLaurln, Mr. H.
R. Christie, are a few of the other
speakers who will handle Important
subjects.
What a lot ot people there are who
have no use for their heads beyond
that of a hatrack.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - - B. C.
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
Now   Open
for Business
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Phone 66
Cumlierland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Fork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef! It Is delicious.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF  LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LIFE and MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assots $156,673,215.00
Life Funds     58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,000
It. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON,
Special Agent,
Cumberland.
EDWARD \V. BICKLE,
District Agent,
Cumberland.
il
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C
WHY YOU SHOULD SAVE
To insure yourself against aa unknown
future.
To insure happiness and comfort in your
old age.
To insure provision for your family In
the event of your death.
Commence Saving to-day with
THE ROYAL BANK
,   OF CANADA
F. A. MCCARTHY, Malinger Cumberland Branch.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERRIFIELD,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, II. C
Thos. H. Carey
F1BE ANO LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland. H. C
C. R. Mulholland
late  of  Cameron's  Oarage, Cumberland, has bought
Central Garage
Haliburton Street,   NANAIMO
and   will   b«   pleased   to   have   the
patronage of his old frionds and acquaintance!} when in Nanaimo.
Repairs (s'unranleed.
GAS, OILS AND SUPPLIES
Prices Reasonable.
I
Victoria's   Famous   Beer
NOW ON SALE AT
The Local Government
Vendor's Office
SILVER SPRING
BEER
AND
XXX STOUT
Even belter than in pre-war days, and brewed on
Vancouver Island.   Made from malt and hops only.
Demand Silver Spring
ABSOLUTELY PUKE
The most wholesome Beer brewed in B. C.   Try it and
'   you will use no other.
WM. DOUGLAS, DISTRIBUTING AGENT
Cumberland and Courtenay, B. C. Phone 60L
SILVER SPRING
BREWERY, Ltd.
~£
l£= Pour
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 16, mi.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN ..„ Editor.
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 10, 1321.
THE VALUE OF "SAFETY FIRST" MOTTO
One of the best exemplifications of .Mine Rescue and
First Aid work ever given in this province was staged on
Monday on the Athletic Grounds, which were specially
arranged to represent llie difficulties eiicoumeiod ln real
mining work. Kor the .Mine Rescue competition there were
six teams entered, and each Iiiui to draw for thu test as
well as for the placo, so that all would have a fair opportunity, Nanaimo and Ladysmith had good tennis, but we
me proud to say the winning team came from Cumlierland.
The motto of tlie Canadian Collieries for some years
past has been "Safety First" In large letters and all over
tlie mines, even on the sports Meld, this motto is held aloft
as of paramount importance, so that the thought Is ham
nuied Into every one that prevention la hotter than cure
—hence "Safely First." Every Improvement in the vnrious
apparatus lias boon taken hold of. When there were no
hotter than the Drager, 11 had to do, but when a bettor one
was discovered it wns to bo found In the Cumberland Mine
Rescue Station, where the Canadian Collieries Installed
four of those at their own expense, the Minos Department
recently supplementing these with six more. So that today
ten of the very best appliances for mine rescue work are
to be found here, ready for work at a moment's notice.
As tlie practices for theso special devices for Mine Rescue
work demands men of nerve as well as constant training,
the Canadian Collieries I Dunsmuir) Limited makes a good
monthly allowance to the employees who participate in
the practices In order to bring tlio men to tlle highest state
of proficiency.
Both Mr. James M. Savage. Ceneral Manager, and Mr.
Thomas Graham, General Superintendent, have taken
special interest in the motto of "Safety First," and encourage everything which will give tlie best protection and
safety to tlie men who work below ami above ground in
the hazardous work of coal milling.
The great credit our Cumberland men deserve for their
achievement will be given by all, but we venture to express
the opinion that Mr. Savage and Mr. Thos. and Mr. Charles
Graham are prouder than most of us for tlie signal honor
the men have brought to the Canadian Collieries as the
results of Monday's competitions.
First Aid competitions added fresh laurels to our Cumberland boys, and we venture to give vent to an opinion
which we think was a great stimulus to the local First
Aid teams, and that is tlie splendid rivalry existing between the two teams captained by Mr. A. J. Taylor and Mr.
Wm. Beveridge, Jr., both of whom wero out to win, and
the exhibition of First Aid given by both was worthy of
special commendation.
In the First Aid work there was a feeling of regret that
the winning loam of last year from Xanalmo was not
able to be present owing lo its presence at St. Louis in the
International competition. As tlie judges practically declared thc work of the Cumberland First Aid teams perfect
it gave tlie spectators a realization that on their merits
they would have upheld tlieir position against all comers.
The achievement of Monday was the results of the
splendid co-operation and harmonious working together
of employer and employee, in llie general welfare of all,
and we lake groat pleasure in congratulating both for tlie
splendid success.
TOURIST TRAFFIC NOT APPRECIATED
People who hnvo not hnd first-hand contact with tourist
trade do not appreciate wliat it means to a community,
They look upon it as something which, when developed
might bring many people into iho country whose numbers
and requirements would so popularize our resorts as to
take from thom their native charm as camping resorts.
Not linving experienced the bonefits of tourist trade, they
con see lu their coining only the disturbance of tlieir own
established custom without anything to compensate,
11 Is not mors' than 3ii yoars ngo whon certain sections
In Southern California held similar views In regard to the
coining of tourists. They did nol like to have their
serenity disturbed; ihey held the tourists off; did not
encourage liis coining. Hut others longer sighted, opened
the way and provided the moans by which certain localities
could be visited anil enjoyed. Llllle hy little the "tourist
crop" of California developed until today it brings to tbat
state an Income of anywhere between $lf,0,000,000 nnd
$200,000,000 a year. Uritish Columbia can hardly look for
anything like lhat, but llie province should attract a very
lucrative tourist trade."—Okanogan Commoner,
HAS A SMALL SOUL
"In my experience every returned mnn Imagines ho has
a mortgage on the soul of every man unable to go to the
front."
Thus spoke one U. X. navies, described as "a judge's
secretary," to the Public Service Commission at Osgoode
Hall. We have not the "pleasure" of Davies' acquaintance,
and frankly don't want to have, for tlio good and suflicient
reason that a creature who would thus express himself
regarding the men who gave up their all to fight for Freedom must be a mosL undesirable sort of chap to meet
under any circumstances. He cannot have much of a
"soul" to utter such a vile insult to the men who fought,
while he skulked at home; but even admitting for a
moment that^iis words are true and that every returned
man has a mortgage on the soul of R. N. Davies, he must
have mighty poor security. Even the Devil wouldn't give
much for such a soul! Incidentally we wonder what position R. N. Davies would be in today had it not been for
the men who went to the front. He would certainly not
now be a judge's secretary at Osgoode Hall, unless he
turned German, because the benches in that historic pile
would now have been filled hy jurists delivering the law
as it was in Germany instead of the law as it is in a
British Dominion.—Jack Canuck.
First  Showing of  Fall
Coats and Dresses
EXCLUSIVE STYLES—DIRECT FROM EASTERN MANUFACTURERS
VELOURS, POLO CLOTHS AND TWEEDS—ALSO SALT'S PLUSHES
With and without Fur Collars
New Fall Dress Goods
GABARDINES. SERGES, SATIN CLOTHS, VELOURS AND TWEEDS
In All the Wanted Shades
Showing Next Week the Newest
Styles in Ladies' Fall Skirts
PLEATED PLAIDS, TRICOTINES. SILKS AND SERGES
Blankets
Comforters
Pillows
-SEE OUR EXHIBIT-
CHOOSE YOUR INSTRUMENT TODAY
FALL
OUTFITS
SPECIAL TERMS FOR THE EXHIBITION, SEPT. 27 OR 28.    RESERVE YOUR INSTRUMENT
Outfit No. 1
I,RICE $37.50
On Convenient Terms:
$4.50Cash $35
er
Month
Outfit No. 2
The beautiful Grafonola shown above,
equipped with powerful double-spring
motor.    In Fumed Oak or .Mahogany.
PRICE
$60.00
Terms as Low as
*\\\ Cash &r Pi
er
Month
Outfit No. 3
With three-spring mote
™" $75.00
$7'"'
Terms:
ish i]*rj Per
Month
%jy' We have also a few Slightly Used
Phonographs. Special Prices and Terms
Outfit No. 4
Exactly as shown above.
Full Cabinet size; will hold 75
Records.     Three-spring   motor.
PRICE
$95.00
$8Ca
Terms:
Cash.    &n rf\ Per
$ I ttflf Month
Outfit No. 5
Full Cabinet-Size Phonograph.
PR,CE $115.00
Terms:
Cash      (Um Per
Month
$10"   $10 K
$12
Outfit No. 6
As shown above,
PRICE $135.00
Terms:
Cash       (JIO Per
$14 Month
PIANOS
This Beautiful Full-Tone
CANADA  PIANO
DIRECT PROM THE FACTORY
In either Fumed Oak or Mahogany Finish, only*
$450.00
On Terms to Suit Every Pocket.
Exactlv as shown above. Just
the kind of a Piano YOU would
like in Your Home.
Suit' Agents for the
GERHARD HEINTZMAN
PIANOS
SECOND-HAND PIANOS T
| frort.$100 up.  Easy Terms
S _#
:    '  AI!  These  Instruments  Can  Be
Seen and Hoard in Our Show Rooms.
THE
G.A.
FLETCHER   MU
CUMBERLAND   AND   COURTENAY,   B.C.
J
1
!
H
.■'
. T
September 16, 19^1.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
[fj
Piv6
Victorious in all Ball Games
Cumberland Boys Vanquish the
Ladysmith, Nanaimo and
Powell River Teams
Three more wins to their credit was
the proud achievement of the Cumberland baseball team over the weekend. On Suindty they went down to
Ladysmith and in an exciting game
won by 13 runs to 11. Later in the
day they disposed of Nanaimo by 9 to
3, and on Monday, after a weird aud
wonderful sea trip in a small launch,
they licked the papermakers^ by 5-0,
LADYSMITH GAME
The Cumberland bull team (Comox
District League winners) proceeded
to Ladysmith on Sunday to lock horns
again with the Mid-Island League
winners lo demonstrate which was
the superior team on Vancouver Island. Things looked black for the
Cumberland team in the lirst four Innings, due mainly lo the shortness of
the fleld nnd partly to the umpire,
who seemed determined that Cumberland should not win.
Ladysmith brought S runs over the
plate ln the first three innings, while
Cumberland was held scoreless. Larsen, who pitched for Cumberland,
was unmercifully batted, and while he
pitched good ball, the fielders were
not allowed to gather In any of the
hits, as nearly all were put over the
fence. But Cumberland, with their
never-say-die spirit, decided to show
the Ladysmith supporters that they
were going to play a part in the game
as well as the home team.
In the fourth innings Conti started
the scoring for Cumberland, clouting
Ihe hall over the left field fence, which
Is an home run according to their
ground rules. Unfortunately no one
was on bases, and while that was Cumberland's only tally, Ludysmlth scored
two mure, making 10 to 1 at the end
of the fourth.
From then on Larsen tightened up.
allowing Ladysmith no more runs In
eight, making tbem 11 to Cumberland's
in. The game at this stage was get-
tlug deoldedly interesting, especially
for the Ladysmith fans, who could by
now that Cumberland bad some real
baseballet'B in the, field, and a team
Lamentations Of An Old Tinier
NO more whlBkey, no more beer, things are looking punk round here;
no more fun at Gartley's Point, my, this is a rotten joint; no more
brandy, no more wine, go to bed at half-past nine. No more kegs in
the City Park, up to roost before it's dark. No more cocktails, no more
rum—say, this country's on the bum. No more sleeping on the floor-
bully gee, It makes me sore. No more porter, no more gin—how the heck
did this begin? No more rides to No. 2, gee, what is a guy to do? No
more lager, no more bock, got to join the Prohibition flock. No more
fighting in the bar; well, it's gone a bit too far. No more paper, uo more
Ink, so this poem's on the blink. Publish this before I croak, yours
sincerely,
OLD TIME SOAK.
Empress
Tea, Coffee and
Baking Powder
contain Coupons which entitle the purchaser to a
chance in the following:
ROGERS* SILVERWARE
TEA SPOONS
TABLE SPOONS
DESSERT SPOONS
KNIVES AND FORKS
Ask us for Particulars
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
Your Insurance Premium!
HOW WILL YOU FINANCE IT?
Payment of an insurance premium often means going short on other needs for the month in which it
comes due.
Deposit as much as you can in our Savings Department each pay-day and establish a credit balange to
escape worry.   Your money earns you interest.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH*
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Mannger.
Plant Home
Grown FruitTrees
Shrubs, Roses
and place your order with the
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
who have a large lot of s]>lendid fruit trees and other
nursery stock coming on for Fall delivery.
OUR ROSES are specially good this year, and are
sure to bloom with you first year.
WRITE US FOR ADVICE on what you want to
plant. All our trees and plants are the finest in the
land, and are sure to please you.
PRICES REDUCED.   WRITE US TODAY.
ADDRESS—
British Columbia Nurseries Co.
LIMITED
Department C.
SARDIS, B. C.
Mention tills paper when writing.
that was hard to stop once they got
their batting eye. This was proven
conclusively to their dismay when
Larsen, the first man over in the 9th
was brought over the plate by one of
Tucker's long drives to the outfield,
quallzlng the score, Harrison, Conti
und Kerr putting the game on ice
with two more home runs. Ladysmith
was lust at bat but failed to equalize,
Larsen winning thc game by shutting
them out, which had a serious effect
on the expressions of not only the
fans of Ladysmith but also on the expressions of the Mid-Island League
winners, who were going to clean up
on Cumberland whenever they would
play a game at Ladysmith.
The Score.
Cumberland—    A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E.
Plump, lb.
Bannerman, s.s. .. 6
Marocchi, 3b  5
Easter, I.f  6
Larsen, p  5
James, 2b  5
Harrison, cf 6
Conti, r.f  5
Kerr, c  5
0 0
4 1
2 3
0
0
0
1
3    3
0    0
3    2    0    0
10    10
47 10  13  19  11 8
Ladysmith—      A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E.
Weston, 3b  5 0    0    2    2 0
Davies, 2b  B 0    1    1    2 3
Russell, s.s  5 0    12    4 3
Brown,  c  6 12    0    2 0
Rice, p  6 12    13 0
Lapsansky, lb  6 1    2  11    0 0
Zboyvosky, r.f. .... 6 0    10    0 0
MeKinley, cf  4 110    0 0
Lauderbach, r.f  4 112    0 0
43 6 11 19 13 6
Summary.
Two-base hits—Rice, Lauderbach,
Brown, Larsen, James (2); three-base
hits—Easter, Lapsansky; home runs,
Conti 2; left on bases, Cumberland 4;
Ladysmith 4; base on ball oil Larsen,
2; struck out by Larsen 8, by Rice 8;
double plays, Bannerman to James to
Plump.
Score by Innings.
Cumberland   .... 00011621 3—13
Ladysmith  0 3 5 2 0 0 10 0—11
NANAIMO GAME
The Score.
Cumberland—   A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E.
Plump, lb  6    1    0  13    0    0
Bannerman, ss. .. 5    2    2    0    2    1
Marocchi, 3b  5    2    10    2    0
Easter, p  6    10    2    4    0
Larsen, i.f.   6    0    12    0    0
James, 2b  6    2    0    16    0
Harrison, cf  5    0    3    0    0    0
Conti, r.f  5    0    10    0    1
Kerr, c  6-01001
The Wet
Weather Will
Soon Be Here
BUY GOOD SOLID BOOTS
FOR THE CHILDREN
46    8    9  18  14    3
A.B. H. R. P.O. A. E.
Nanaimo— A.B. H. R. P.O. A.
Piper, c  4    1112
W.   Beattie,  cf  4    0    110
Kllecn, 2b  4    0    0    2    1
Flanagan, 3b  4    0    0    0    0
Ferguson, s.s  4
Wood, lb  3
Beattie, I.f  3
Bowen,  r.f  3
Delcourt, p  3
32 2 3 16 8 7
Nummary.
Two-base hits—Marocchi; left on
bases—Cumberland 6, Nanaimo 2;
struck out—By Easter 9, by Delcourt
7; base on ball off Easter 1, Delcourt
3; double play, Easter to James to
Plump.
Score by Innings.
Cumberland     00032300 1—9
Nanaimo     00000200 1—3
POWELL RIVER GAME
The Score.
Cumberland—    A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E.
Plump, lb  5    0    16    10
Ilannerman, s.s. .. 4
Marocchi, 3b  4
Easter, p./.  4
Larsen, I.f.   4
Harrison, cf  4
James, 2b  4
0    0    0    11
0 0
1 3
0 0
2 2
1 1
Conti, r.f.
4    1    1
Kerr, c  4    0
0 1 0
1 4 0
1 1 0
1 0 0
6 i 0
;s i n
ii
l
37    5  10  17  10    1
Powell River— A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E.
Hansen, 2b  4    0    0
Pickett, s.s  4    0    1
McLean, 3b  4 ' 0    0
Gribble, c. ...
Tait, cf	
Millard, lb. .
Mundegel, I.f.
Heavey, r.f 3    0    10
Orcutt, p  3    0    0    0
4
4
3    0    0 10
3    0    0    1
0 0
1 0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0    0
6    0
32    0    3  17  16    4
Summary.
Two-base   hits—James;   three-base
hits—Easter; left on bases—Cumberland 6, Powell River 6; struck out by
Easter 10, by Orcutt 10; base on ball
off Easter 2, Orcutt 1; sacrifice hit—
Bannerman;    double    play— Banner-
man to James, James to Plump; Orcutt
to Millard, Millard to Pickett.
Score by Innings.
Cumberland     03000000 2—5
Powell River .... 00000000 0—0
"Everybody should learn to swim."
"I should say so," replied the other.
"The more some of these folks submerge the better the ocean looks."
"You look worried, Tom."
"I am. My wife went out without an
umbrella and it's pouring rain."
"Oh, pshaw! She'll take refuge In a
store somewhere."
"I know. That's what worrying me,"
Bring your children to us—we
will measure their feet and be
sure that they get the proper fit.
FOR THE BIG BOYS
who take over size 5% we have a
number of broken lines of men's
solid welt which we wil sell for less
than cost.
IN BOYS' SHOES
Sizes from 1 to 514, wo have in
stock a number of good lines, ranging from UM to H6.76.
FOR THE GIRL WHO
TAKES A LADY SIZE
we have a number of good buys. It
will pay you to look these over.
FOR THE SMALLER
BOYS AND GIRLS
we advise "CHUMS," ranging in
price from Rlitl to $7.00.
CHILDREN'S SHOES $2.25 UP
We have also other good solid
leather shoes for children from
$23 up.
We Have the Largest Stock in
Town to Choose From.
Cavin's Shoe Store
HALL NOTES
Cumberland Literary and Athletic
Association.
The membership of the Library now
consists of 210 club members, 17 public members (residents of the city who
are not members of the club), and two
visitors.
We would like to see more members
from the residents of Cumberland.
Seventeen public members hardly
shows the Interest tbat should he
given in an Investment of this kind.
The material for the gymnasium is
starting to arrive In good order, and
is of a quality to be proud of for a
gymnasium of this size.
Visitors to the ball over the weekend Included: John G. Ulggs. Merrill;
Mr. and Mrs. Laverick, Nanaimo; Jan.
Touhey, Cassidy; Thos. R. Jackson.
Nanaimo; C. M. Campbell. Cnssidy!
T. A. Spruston, Ladysmith; Mathew
Meek, Ladysmith; David Morris, Lady-
smith; William Grundy, (Iraiib.v; II.
Howorlh, Granby; Win It. Touhey,
Qranby; A. Mnwhlnuey, Qranby; 11.
f'hirkaon,    Nanaimo;    A.   McLuchluu.
asstdy; Matthew Gunnls, Nanaimo;
James Hodgson, Nanaimo; Robert
Laird, Nanaimo; Harry Weeks. Nanaimo; John White, Nannlmo.
OUR DOUBLE SERVICE
GLASSES
will enable you to read with comfort
"»r to see objects at a distance without
strain. These glasses have no lines
!a blur or Interfere with the vision
They look like any ordinary glasses
but they do double service. Better
have a pair. Their cost Is not to be
compared with their convenience.
Louis R. Stevens
Optometrist and Jeweler
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
Get them at Frost's
FOR THE HIGH SCHOOL
Elementary Botany (Groom & Penhallow).
Outlines of European History (Robinson & Breasted).
Elementary Algebra (Hall and Knight).
Select Poems.
French Grammar (Fraser & Squairs).
La Mere Michel et Son Chat.
Julius Caesar (Shakespeare).
The Merchant of Venice (Shakespeare).
Laboratory Manual in Chemistry (Cornish & Smith).
Canadian Civics. \
Poems of the Romantic Revival (Cunliffe & Cameron).
High School Physics.
Dominion High School Arithmetic.
Chemistry (Cornish).
High School Composition.
Seipmann's Primary French Course, Part 2.
School Geometry (Hall & Stevens).
Kidnapped (R. L. Stevenson).
FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
Phonic Primer. Second Reader.
Beginners' Reader. Third Reader.
First Reader. English History.
Lady of the Lake (Sir Walter Scott).
Dictionaries
1
Inks, all colors
Blotters
Paint Brushes
Rulers
Set Squares
Penholders
School Bags
Pastes and Glue
Pen Nibs
-
Notebooks
Crayons
Map Pens
Ever-Ready Pencils,
35c.
School Paint Refills
Pencil and Pen Clips
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
A Pleased Long-Distance
Customer
That the long distance service between Vancouver
Island and the Mainland i.i better than ever is indicated by the following excerpt from a letter of a user:
"Perinil nie to compliment you upon the excellence
of your lung distance service. I have occasional calls,
one so recent as last evening, ami I invariably find the
voices of my friends so extraordinarily clear anil distinct and the line so tree from any annoying Interruptions or noises as to make the telephoning not nnly a
quick convenience bul a real pleasure."
British Columbia Telephone Co.
DAMONTE &
MARCHETTI
GENERAL  DELIVERY
Coal, Wood and I'oods of Any Kind
Delivered to All Parts of District.
Ilublilsh nnd Ashes Cleared Away.
MODERATE CHARGES
TELEPHONE   PO  TELEPHONE
nr Leave Orders ut Vendome Hotel,
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by electricity.
WILLIAM JONES. Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00 uum
."■
Six
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
September 10, mi.
MARVELLOUS CAVES j
OF NEW ZEALAND
BREAD!
The little boy of the family
never finds it a burden to go for
a loaf of bread.
The promise of a slice with
jelly or jam turns the trick—
Children have natural longings for substantial foods.
Give them brea dat meals and
between meals.
Bread is your Best Food—Bat
more of it.
Eat
HALLIDAY'S BREAD
"The bread that builds"
THE NEW HOME
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Avenue     •     Cumberland
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2620 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
DC THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF JOHN GEORGE REID, Deceased
Intestate.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
debts due to the estate of John George
Reid, deceased, who died on or about
the 2nd day of July, 1921, at the City
of Cumberland, B. C, must be paid
forthwith to the undersigned.
And all accounts, debts and claims
against the said estate must be filed
with the undersigned, duly verified,
on or about the 25th day of September, 1921, after which date the undersigned will proceed to distribute the
estate, having regard only to such
claims as have been tiled with her.
August 18, 1921.
ANNIE MARIA POTTINGER,
413 Vancouver Street, Victoria, B. C.
Administratrix of the personal estate
and effects of J. G. Reid, deceased.
4-37
White Laundry
Leave orders at
LIDDELL'S  BARBER  SHOP
Dunsmuir Avenue
or Phone 47-F
when   your   requirements   will
receive immediate attention.
THE COURTENAY LAUNDRY
Ancient Order of Foresters
Meetings are held on the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month, In
tbe Fraternity Hull, Hunsmulr Ave.,
commencing at 7 o'clock. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Hugh McLean Davidson, C, Hanger;
F. Eaton, Secretary; F, Slaughter,
Treasurer.
FEMALE COURT
A few names arc still needed to
open the Female Court of tbe Ancient
Order of Foresters In this city. This
lodge will be a real benefit to you In
case of sickness, and the dues and
tees are very low. Think this matter
over carefully, then write to F. G.
Eaton, Secretary A. 0. F., General
Delivery, Cumberland.
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
Tbt meetings of tb* Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 1 o'clock tn tho Memorial
Hell.
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers .and
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
More  Wonders  Added  to  the
Marvellous Sights of Our
Sister Dominion.
A lady traveller, Jessie Mackay,
who bas been visiting the marvellous
caves of Waitomo, the woodland of
New Zealand, tells of what she saw ln
the following manner:
Well and long did the hills and bush
of Auckland keep the secret of these
winding caves of old Waitomo, But
now the while man has Ihem listed on
his tourist trail, and the while man
knows what the .Maori was too frightened ever to know—the marvels of
these grots and galleries where the
old gods carved In the morning of
time by lambent lights that never will
shine on heavenly mallet and celestial
chisel again.
Tliey are only throo. these wonder-
caves. A short two-mile drive from
the Government Hostel brines us to
tlie narrow mouth of Aranul, the newest of these ancient chambers of the
heavenly chlsellers. Day nnd the
sequence of the rolling years lie behind us now; times and hemispheres
are quulntlly twined into one continuous maze of astonishment,
We pick our narrow footway in the
clogging miry greyness, Aisle alter
aisle opens hefore us, bannered with
the folds of stone that mock tlie eye
witli mimic weft and woof. Here are
niches of fairy fretwork; there are
bays of pillared marble; yonder are
little Louvres filled with the art-drift
of all the ages, natural bas-reliefs,
curiously wrought statuettes of godlike kings and beast-headed gods.
Unnamed for the letterless Philistine, for the elect beholder the mystic
catalogue spells itself in this glorious
wreck or artistry. Here is the head
of a Pharoah with the nimbus of
dreadful calm; there is a llat-headed
divinity of old Peru, and yet again we
plunge forward into the gracious company of the late-born sons of Apollo,
Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and the
rest. This is a .Madonna dimly fair
and eternally young, cast away between the sun-baked mystery of tlie
Pyramids and tlie red reek of the teo-
callis. Here was architecture born,
full-grown as Minerva, where the
Cathedral of the Aranul stands. Jabul,
too, was of this eclectic company, for
here the guide lightly stringes one
stalactite with another, aud a delicate,
votive harmony, frozen down the ages,
wakes again among tlie aisles.
Petrified Dutch Auctions.
Out of these broken shrines and
pantheons we are tumbled into petri-
iied Dutch auctions, oddments of nature's jumble sales. We pass fat stone
sponges, curtains of blatant modernity, vegetables tossed out of some
heavenly burrow, blankets and bowls,
delf and knick-knacks, tucked away
under the velvet and vair of the old
.Maori forest overhead. But beauty
took us lirst and beauty liolds us last,
as we stumble out of Aranui's shadows
into the blazing sunshine.
A short sylvan stroll takes us to
Kuakuri, oldest and longest of the
triad. Legend dimly invests this cave
with dread. Once, it is said, an intoxicated Maori broke the "tapu" of
silence and told of tbe Loathly Hounds
who kennelled here and stole children
to devour in their dark lairs, till some
wise old priest trapped and destroyed
them with his magic.
We ramble through the narrow corridors. Here is rude grandeur, grey,
formless majesty, but little of actual
ueauty till near the end. Kuakuri is
royalty's home. Behold the courtly
throng in King George's Throne.Room
and admire the softened traceries of
Queen Alexandra's Grotto. Ageless
romance remain lily-carven in the
Bridal Chamber.
But the soul of Kuakuri is not In
these. The creeping eerlness of it Is
alive In tlie Kuakuri Kiver, n beck, a
brook to span with a step could wo
out see it, but a roaring primeval
Niagara in the rayless prison of rock-
.iininil night.
For Waitomo Itself, subllmlst and
last, we lake our way lu solemn star-
sight. Steeply down, and the mum h
of Waitomo closes upon us, locks us
Into chining Fairyland. A whimsical
Faerie Indeed! First we must Inspect
the Larders of the Good Folk. Behold
.1 profusion of profane nierchanlry.
Who ever dreamed of Oberon eating
levllled drumsticks, or Tltuiiia picking chicken bones? Yet here are turkeys, quail, ducks, and, oh, pathos of
ill, a Hitch of bacon!
liver ('rowing Nearer.
Hack frnm this carnivorous debacle
to the True Romance - here are tho
disappointed Lovers, u stalactite
knight stretching out arms of stone
to a lovely stalagmite lady for eons
mil ages. Every BO years he wins un
inch nearer; in 500 years they will
meet, no "frustrate gliosis," nt last.
Grottoes with sort little snowy pillars
and baby frettory charm us next, till
llie coster challenge of n cauliflower
■itall breaks the spell ngain. We nre
proudly shown the Waitomo Blanket,
hanging perfect lu petrified Illusion of
thread and tint and fringe.
Again wc are among the Jumbled
godsblps of Aranui, only more of
them.
The corridors expand Into halls,
great doming roofs above us are rough
with needles of crystal and Ivory. We
ascend and descend abruptly on balustrades hung out in air.
Wc walk ln utter stillness, but not
In darkness; a moony, sheeny radiance flows about us, and reveals the
tideless flowing of a soft, black river.
We do not breathe as we take our
seats In this moored boat of mystery
a Charon's boat that moves silently
of Itself when Its crew is gathered In.
We look above. Oh, galaxy of all
wonder! The sheeny radiance drops
from a million blue, untwlnkllng, diamond points. The rough knobbed roof
is a living glory with them. Yet If a
foot stirred, or an oar slipped, the
majesty would be gone. We nre In the
Gloworm Cavern of Waitomo.
All that ever waB or will be ls melted Into the spell of this soundless
Canoe of Destiny, afloat on the snow-
IN A CITY OF WAGE EARNERS
Everybody, Merchants as well as the
Working People, always look forward to
PAY-DAY
When this day comes, like it does again this Saturday, you people who
receive pay should look around and make this "Pay" go as far as you
can. If you come down to our little store and see the things we have
ON SALE you will soon realize that you can make your pay go a lot
farther.     Think this over, come and see our Wonderful Offerings.
SALE CLOSES WED., SEPT. 14th
A fine lot of
New Blankets
Full Size 72 x
88 inches. On
Sale at
$3-25
Per Pair
A brand new
lot of
PENMAN'S
UNDERWEAR
On Sale at
$1.00
Per Garment
A nice new lot
of All-Wool
SWEATERS
and SWEATER COATS
On Sale at
$5,50
Each
FRANK PARTRIDGE
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
jotl darliiiess of Ibe liiver of Time. Oo
Where we will, and live where we
must, the Bpell of Wnitomo abides
with us hereafter.
CHILI) WELFARE CLINICS
Interest of Mothers Increases in
This I'hase of Health Work.
DUNCAN.—Interest bus Increased
n eonnoctlon with tho Child Welfare
Hull's that nre held every month in
.he Cowichan Women's Institute
rooms, Duncan. Al tho lust one held
tlioro were sixteen Imbles nnd live
children botwon tho nges o( two and
six yenrs old brought by Iheir inoth-
arB io be exuinlnod.
Two doctors nnd llie district nurse
oxnmtno the children.   History cards
ure lllllile out [or encll Child. These
curds nre now mado to show the prenatal health of the mother nnd anything in the history of tbe parents'
health thai might affect tho child.
This knowledge should prove of
much benefit for future reference In
connection with the health of the
child, and If health statistics should
lie .required ut nny time.
Tennis balls for shipment overseas
are sealed in cans to prevent tbem
from going dead.
Hay - Fever
SUMMED COLDS, ASTHMA,
spoil many a holiday.
RAZ - MAH
Positively atop* these trouble* I
Sneezing, wealing, coughing,
weeping eye* aren't neceasary—
unless you like being that way.
|1.00 at your druggist's, or writ*
Templcton*, Toronto, for a free trial
Sold by II. E. FKOST
HAWAIIAN ISLANDERS
FLEW CENTURIES AGO
Thrills ol* [lying were enjoyed by
Knwailans centuries before aviation
was invented, according to stories told
hy natives of today. Their ancestors
not their aerial excitement by jumping off olIUs Into the ocean In homemade "planes."
They mads' n regular game of It,
known us "leie pall" or "jumping from
llie cliff." II was played up to a hundred years or sn ago hy natives who
lived near groves of loulu palms near
high cliffs overlooking the ocean.
Delnlls of the game bnve been ob-
lalned hy Wllllutn J. Coelho, a former
newspaper editor, now an ollicer of
the Hale o uu Alii Hawaii (House of
Chiefs). This ls how he describes the
vanished sport:
The game wus played with a huge
contrivance built of light but stout
sticks and overwoven with loulu palm
leaves. Several of these affairs were
made ready, the Hawaiian "aviators"
look tlieir seats and were pushed over
towering cliffs at the same time. The
adventurer who remained longest In
tlie air was the winner.
Often through carelessness or excitement a "plane" would execute a
nose dive similar to those of twentieth
century airplanes. The only damage
was the loss of the game.
Old Hnwallans say that their flying
men were exceptionally skilful. The
only means they had of guiding their
crude appliances was to shift their
weight to maintain balance ns they
zigzagged down towards the sea.
A fleet of outrigger canoes anchored
offshore to pick up the sportsmen and
retrieve tho "planes."
Exceptionally during Hawniians often hopped off thousand-foot cliffs on
the mainland, it is said.
'Hasn't Miss Oldham got searching
eves ?"
"Well, I don't wonder at It. She's
been looking for n husband for twenty
years." .._  .._»
"Your honor," said the prosecuting
attorney, "your hull pup has went and
chawed up tho court Bible,"
"Well." grumbled tho court, "make
the witness kiss the pup; we can't
adjourn courl to gel n new Bible,"
"Did you really call this gentleman
an old fool last night'.'" asked the
magistrate.
The prisoner tried hard lo collect
his thoughts.
"Well, the more I look at hlm. the
more likely it seems thai I did," he
replied.
"I never was rebuffed In so pleasant
a way ns on my lust journey," said
Joblots, the commercial traveler, "I
was just about to enter an office when
I saw a staircase with a sign, 'This
way for commercial travelers.'
"I supposed the stairs led to tlle
counting-house, so I went up and
found myself in a long hall, with walls
on which were painted hoards directing the wny.
•1 passed through the ball, and came
to a staircase leading down as another
board pointed. I descended, and,
opening tlie door nt the lower step,
I found 1 was—*in the street ngaiu."
AUCTION
COURTENAY. VANCOUVER ISLAND
(Ily direction uf Cnplaln It. I'. L. Vigors, D.S.O.)
September 14th and 15th
Sale Commences Each Day at 12 Noon
FARM STOCK, including a FLOCK of carefully selected PURE BRED OXFORD DOWN SHEEP, a TEAM
OF HORSES and various FARM IMPLEMENTS
VALUABLE ANTIQUE and other ENGLISH FURNITURE.
Illustrated und descriptive Catalogues can bo obtained FREE
on application to the Auctioneer,
G. J. HARDY, Courtenay, B. C. September 16, 1921.
(ft
r
-THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Seveii
"FATTY" ARBUCKLE
IN "THE ROUND-UP"
The World-Famous Play That
Has Thrilled More Crowds
Than Any Other Drama
Of the West.
Probably the most famous melodrama ever written about the golden
West Is "The Round Up," which has
been played on the road by numerous companies for several years and
has caused thrills to tingle the spines
of theatregoers in practically every
town in the country.
Now the great old-timer has reached
the screen as a Paramount picture.
produced by George Melford and with
every character portrayed hy a prominent fllm player. Roscoe Arbuckle
appears as "Slim" Hoover. Thc picture will be shown at the llo-llo
Theatre on Saturday night.
The story is western and every
scene has its thrill. Mr. Arbuckle is
said to vest the pari of the Sheriff
with Individual realism, blending
humor and pathos most happily. The
leading woman is .Mabel Julienne
Scott.
New Serial Starts on Wednesday
June Caprice and George B. Seitz in An Original and Amazing
Fifteen-Episode Serial—More Speed Than a Shooting Star—
More Action Than a Machine-Gun—More Suspense Than a
Detective Story.
HI
DAINTY JUNE CAPRICE
lleautj, bruins und magnetism bine
made June Caprice u fascinating anil
atlrurtlve personality t» picture funs.
She is the ideal serial heroine. She is
charming, she is popular, she Is unafraid.
ATHLETIC GEORGE B. SEITZ
Fans cull hlni 'The Prince of Thrill-
dim.'' Die lias imiguilicd the thrill;
given the thrill vivid climax; and lift-
mi tlie thrill to dramatic suspense. Ills
fearless foals will aninze- -Ills daring
devils will astound—his heroic valor
will electrify.
SWIFT AIRPLANE CIRCLES WORLD AND
POWERFUL LIGHT COMMUNICATES WITL
MARS
"The Sky Ranger" Foretells Marvelous Inventions When Science
Has Completely Mastered the Elements of the Air.
SHOWS EVERY WEEK
NIGHT COMMENCING
MONDAY, SEPT. 12
The management of the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre announces
that, commencing Monday, September 12, there
will be shows every week
night, excepting Friday.
The first show will commence at 6.30.
To wed or not to wed,
That Is the question.
Whether 'tis better
To remain single
And disappoint a number of women
For a time,
Or marry
And disappoint one woman for life.
At one time tlie world scoffed at inventions thnt we uow take as a matter
of course, hardly realizing tlie genius
that created them, or the helplessness
of modern man without them. Steamboats, locomotives, the telephone, telegraph and wireless, and the automobile are now familiar to the point ol*
contempt. The airplane and the submarine we still have a deep respect
for.
"The Sky Ranger," the new Pathe
serial, starring June Caprice and Geo.
B. Seitz, and produced and directed by
Mr. Seitz, deals with inventions of the
future.
The plot of the story, written for
the screen by Frank Leon Smith, revolves about the most powerful search-
in the world. When lt is completed
its inventor can signal to Mars.
It ls the tusk of the villains to
destroy tho light and its plans, for the
chief villain is the inventor of the
largest und swiftest airplane. Its engine is noiseless, und its speed such
that it can circle the world In a few
hours. In warfare, such airplane
:ould be Invaluable, and could only be
fought hy the searchlight, the powerful rays of which would ignite the fly-
EVENTUALLY:
THEN WHY NOT NOW?
Eventually you will, like music lovers everywhere,
want to get
A Heintzman & Co. Piano
Why no't get the best now?  It is the cheapest and
best policy in the long run.
Besides, the price is little more, and we can
arrange terms to suit any customer.   Write us.
Heint
zman
& Co.
CIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Cumberland VICTORIA Nanaimo
Ing machine and burn it ln mid-air.
With these inventions for the main
theme, brightened by a charming romance, "The Sky Ranger" Is the most
thrilling and adventurous of any of
the Seitz serials. Miss Caprice makes
her lirst appearance ln a serial, and
therefore, when you see her hanging
from an airplane speeding through
space thousands of feet above the
earth, you get a tremendous thrill, because the petite June has never done
such stunts before.
George B. Seitu plays the hero role
with his customary punch and nerve.
He is given the assistance of Harry
Seniels as the airplane's inventor,
Frank Cuny as a rival scientist, Peggy
Shamir us a fair accomplice, and Chas.
Revcda, Spencer Bennet tand Thomas
Goodwin in other roles.
"Out of thc Clouds," the flrst episode of "The Sky Ranger," will be
shown at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday next, and there-
ater a new episode will be shown each
week for fifteen weeks.
Episode I.—"Out of the Clouds."
George Oliver Rockwell, in accordance with the prophesy of a gypsy
fortune teller, meets a beautiful girl,
falls In love with her at sight, and
follows her to her home. She ls June
Elliott, daughter of William Elliott,
inventor of a powerful searchlight
Hint will signal to Mars. Murdock, a
rival scientist, wants a share in the
invention.
Elliott's home is guarded day and
night by armed men. George is warn
niglit by armed men. George Is
warned to keep out, but the element
of danger adds zest to his predestined
courtship, and he perseveres until he
sees June at a window.
She throws him a piece of paper,
which he thinks ls a love letter, but It
is blank. He dips it in lemon juice
and brings out an algebraic formula
written ln invisible Ink. Murdock interrupts and demands the paper. Instead he gets a fight.
George returns the formula to
Elliott, who thanks the zealous lover
by imprisoning him. George is delighted over being forced to stay under the same roof with June.
Meanwhile, Murdock is visited by
Dr. Suntro, who has come from
Buenos Aires in three hours by an
airplane of his own invention. Suntro
is a scientist and a magician, and pur
poses to destroy Elliott's searchlight.
He and .Murdock agree to work together. Suntro appears before George
and June, a mysterious figure lu his
flowing magician's garb, and commands Ihem to follow. A compelling
force makes them obey. Then suddenly there is u blinding flash aud a
cloud of smoke.
i
NOTICE
On and after May 27th all services and meter loops
installed must be in conduit with externally operated
switch, all to be grounded and installed in accordance
with Underwriters' Regulations.
This applies to meter loops moved from one location
to another in the same building.
All wiring must be strictly in accordance with the
Rules and Regulations of the Inspector of Electrical
Energy for British Columbia, and also the National
Electric Code.
Any person moving meters belonging to this Company, altering, disconnecting or connecting service
wires will be immediately prosecuted, according to law.
Special attention is drawn to the fact that porcelain
sockets and switches are required in certain locations,
and new installations will not be connected without
them. Old installations in which brass or other metal
sockets are installed in prohibited locations after this
date will be disconnected. And further be warned that
the secondary circuits on the distribution system of
this Company are now grounded, and we strongly urge
all our customers to see that only porcelain sockets
and switches are used when same are within reach of
any grounded pipes, concrete floors, etc., and we will
not be responsible for any hazards incurred unless such
fittings are used.
Our authority for above regulations is written instructions from the Provincial Inspector of Electricity,
which instructions may be seen at our office by interested parties.
FEATS BY HOUDINI
ARE   BIG   FEATURES
OF "TERROR ISLAND"
Celebrated Escape Artist Performs a Series of Baffling
Underwater Exploits
Houdlni, the famous Illusionist and
self-liberator, in a thrilling screen
melodrama, "Terror Island," will he
llie attraction nt the Ilo-Ilo Theatre
on Saturday night. To save some
sunken treasures of ships thnt have
been sent to the bottom forms one
motive of the tale. But there Is, In
addition, a skull-shaped pearl upon
which a man's life depends; a lovely
girl, kidnapped by her villainous relatives; a submarine built on a startling
plan; South Sen Island adventures-
enough thrills, It Is declared, to make
thu ordinary adventure picture seem
tame In comparison.
Above all, Iloudini himself In underwater stunts that draw upon his exceptional powers to the last degree Ib
the outstanding feature of the picture. He escapes from a closely-
bound sufe while under water, lights
u smashing battle with a diver on Ihe
bed of the ocean, nnd performs otlier
I hulr-ralslng feats that are declared to
surpass anything he has ever done on
the stage.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
Whereas certain mischievously inclined persons have tampered
with the valves of the mains of this company, thereby allowing
a considerably amount of water to run to waste, we therefore
wish to point out that it Is a serious offence to tamper with such
valves, und should the offending parties be apprehended they will
be prosecuted to the very fullest extent of the law.
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATERWORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
A feminine voice called up the Times
office yesterday and asked for the
editor. We took the receiver. Tho
following conversation took place;
"Is this the editor?"
"Yup."
"Have you red hair?"
Scenting a mouse, we parried, "No,
what did Hare write?"
"Don't get fresh,"—she was reasonable, like any woman—"do you know
why your hair isn't red?"
"Nope."
"Cause ivory doesn't rust."
—Kitsilano Times.
Illllllli
"I should like to be excused, your
lordship," said a man who had been
summoned on a jury.
"What for?"
      "I owe a man five dollars   aud   I
==' want to hunt him up nnd pay It."
"Do you mean to tell this court you
would hunt up a man to pay a bill
instead of waiting for him to hunt you
up?"
"Yes, your lordship."
"You are excused; I won't want any
mnn   on   the  Jury who will   He   like
|fl that."
E
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, September 10th
ROSCOE (FATTY)
ARBUCKLE
— IN —
The Round Up
THE WORLD-FAMOUS PLAY THAT HAS THRILLED MORE CROWDS
THAN ANY OTHER DRAMA OF THE WEST
Rocking with Laughter, Loaded with Action—Filmed amid Beauty and
Grandeur of Scene that Dwarf Any Stage  Production  Ever  Presented.
See Fatty in "The Round Up," with its struggle of savage and white;
romance of gold; grit of the pioneer; loyalty; deviltry, daring, love.
In the world-famous role of the rotund Sheriff "Slim" Hoover, Fatly
Arbuckle comes to millions of friends in this big feature drama.
With hundreds of troopers, cowboys and Indians in seven smashing reels
of laughter, thrill and excitement.
Commencing next week there will be two
shows every night except Friday
Monday, September 12th
nENDSo/VENGEANCE
Tuesday, September 13th
HOUDINI
•a
IN
TERROR   ISLAND
The world's master wizard in a fascinating romance of sunken treasure,
puzzling plots, deadly encounters and miraculous escapes. Beginning in
the shop of a Yankee inventor; ending on the shore of a South Sea Isle.
See the battle and rescue beneath the waves. Strange rites on a barbarous isle. Submarine race to salvage sunken treasure. Love, villainy,
mystery, sensational feats of daring and escape—all in
Six Smashing Reels of Blood-Stirring Melodrama, Made Miraculous by
the genius of Iloudini.
Wednesday, September 14th
A   BIG   NEW   SERIAL
THE SKY RANGER
WITH JUNE CAPRICE AND GEORGE B. SEITZ
Full of that hang-by-the-teeth-BUspense. More surprises than a dream.
More speed than a shooting star. More action Hunt a machine-gun. It
will grip you! It will startle you!
FLY ON THE WINGS OF ADVENTURE
Speed on the airship Hint circles the globe in a few hours. Come with
June! Help save her, as she hangs by her lingers from this speeding
'plane.  It's the thriller of thrillers!
mge9i.it--
Wednesday and Thursday Next—Episode I., "OUT OF TIIE CLOUDS"
and thereafter for fifteen weeks.
Thursday, September 15th
The Flame of Youth
Featuring
SHIRLEY   MASON
Mil
uut Eight
THE CUMBERLAND tSL'ANDEft
September id, Mi.
L=
FALL MILLINERY
OUR first consignment of new Millinery for Fall has arrived and combines the latest
styles, together with the best values we have had the pleasure of showing for some
years.
In READY-TO-WEAR HATS we have quite a nice selection of the leading shades, at
prices from $4.50.   Vou will be surprised at the excellent values.
FALL COATS
The Fall season is here, and so is our advance shipment of Ladies' New Coats, in the
leading shades and styles.
Coats made in any size and style, to suit our customers.   Call and inspect our stock.
New Shipments of Gossard Corsets
Gossard Corsets have given unquestioned prestige, and it is our pride to guard zealousy
by making each and every Gossard Corset as perfect as time, artistry, fine workmanship
and the highest grade of materials can make it. This pride of leadership is your best
assurance that every Gossard Corset offers you the true economy of unequalled value.
"Venus" Silk Hose
"Venus" make of Ladies' Silk Hose will give you good value for your money. They
give every satisfaction, combined with appearance and style, all of which go to add to
the personal appearance of well dressed ladies.
Phone 134
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Cumberland Lodge, No. 1662
Loyal Order of Moose
Was Instituted on Saturday, September 3rd, with 99 Members.
The officers of the Ladysmith Lodge, L. 0. 0. M„ No. 1459, took charge of
the ceremony of instituting and installing the officers, the work being most
efficiently put on, over 3U Moose members from Ladysmith coming up for the
occasion. .
Mr. Thompson, the organizer, will remain In charge for a 'short time, the
charter remaining open so that new members will have the benefit of the
charter rate entrance fee of $10. Cumlierland Lodge ls now tlie Baby Lodge
of the L. 0. O. M. in B. C, and if the members become as ambitious ns Ladysmith Lodge has done under the able leadership of Bro. T. A. Spruston,
Post Dictator, with the better territory in Cumberland and district, we should
be able to forge ahead of them. So share in nn Invitation of the organizer
and give him your hearty and cordial cu-operntlon. Why should not Cumberland have a Lodge of 300 or over—and echo answers, Why?
Do you realize that the International social benellts ln this order are worth
all you pav in dues, and In addition to the benefits In your local lodge you
have the benefits of MOOSEHEART. Children without a father, children
without a mother—more than one thousand of tbem, nnd well as seventy
widows and 22 aged men—are now at Mooseheart. Every child is entitled to
a High School education and a trade ut Mooseheart.
Have you stopped to think that If you should die tonight what would become
of your wife nnd children? Be alive to your own Interests and join this big
order and big lodge of Moose while you can get In at the charter rate.
Members—get your friends In on the ground floor.
If some of the ladies of Moose will get interested in forming a Women's
Legion of Moose It can now be done, by getting a Pledge Card from Mooseheart, if some lady will undertake it.
If you members of the Cumberland Lodge will put your shoulders to the
wheel and with a long pull and a strong pull and a pull together, we will
put Cumberland Lodge over the top with, a membership of 300. It will then
constitute the strongest lodge on Vancouver Island.
The difference between joining hefore the charter rate closes and after, is
fifteen dollars.
The James J. Davis day celebration Is to take plaee on Friday, October 11,
but this lodge will celebrate it on Saturday, the loth, as we cannot get the
hall for the 14th. The Lodges are vieing with each other to see which can get
the biggest number of members initialed on that day. So let us make a
special effort for the 15th of October.
Cumberland Lodge will have its first regular meeting on Saturday, the 17th
day of September, when the candidates who were not at the last meeting can
be Initiated.
For full particulars apply to W. F. II. Thompson, organizer, at the Eagle
Hotel; If not In leave message with the proprietor.
BASEBALLERS TRIP
ACROSS THE GULF
(Continued from Page One)
per, and then proceeded to the launch
(another one) which was to take us
back. The weather was still bad, and
some were anxious to examine the
boat before risking their lives again
on tho Gulf. There was onliy one
man abord this launch, and he was
asked many questions regarding the
weather, etc. He finally admitted It
would be risky to leave In the dark,
as there were lots of drifting logs
floating around, which were dangerous to a small launch like his.
Deluy Return Trip t'nUI Daylight
He was also asked how the weather
glass was. He said he hnd none and
did not know. With this the boys decided to wait until morning, when
they would be able to see where they
were going—but even this was denied
them in the end.
lleds Thickly Inhubltcd.
We all  went back to  town,  many
going to tbe dance, while others sought
other places of amusement, and somo
went to bed ill the rooms they had
"hanged in after tlie game. The
dance broke up nbout half-past one.
and tliey commenced to collect the
boys together so as to be ready to
start as soon as daylight arrived. One
of the boys stayed around after waking up those who were in bed, and to
his surprise saw several bed-bugs
running back to their hiding places
after their first feed from a Cumberland baseballer!
They—the boys, not the bugs—then
went to get the others out of the next
room, which was occupied by Tucker
nnd Peg, and it was found that this
room was even worse than the other.
The bugs were more numerous and
larger in size, almost as big as baseballs. The sheets were lifted and
here was more blood around than was
-pilled at the battle of Mons.
Slept (hit of Doors.
It was now two o'clock and the boys
decided they would wait until daylight. Being tired out some of them
huddled themselves together on tbe
doorsteps and slept until lt became
too cold fur them.
Tliey then went up Into the dance
hull, which was left open, where. Kerr
began to enliven tlie rest up by showing some new dances, such as the
Powell Kiver Glide and the Paper-
makers' Four-Step. Getting tired,
they slept In the hall until 4 o'clock,
when tliey went to the boat.
I,cine for Home.
Exactly at live o'clock they left
Powell itiver, and had travelled quite
a distance when it became foggy. After sailing about four and a half hours
Bannerman went on deck to tell the
Captain to take the boat to Royston
instead of to Comox, thinking they
were in the vicinity of Comox, as it
is only about four hours' sail. However, he could nut yet see land, so
Danny asked the Captain if he knew
where he was. Tlie Captain replied
by saying "N'o." Danny then asked
hlm it* lie knew which way he was go.
ing and the Captain replied In the
negative. Several big steamers bad
been seen passing previous to this,
hound for Prince Rupert or elsewhere,
and the boys got to thinking they were
on the wrong course. They asked tlie
Captain If be had a compass, and he
said "N'o." He then brought out his
chart and pointed to nn island off
Prince Rupert, saying "That must be
where we are!"
Threaten to Throw Cuptuln Overboard.
Some of the boys got mad then and
told the Captain some queer stories,
and promised that if he did not take
them to Royston they would throw
111 ill overboard.
Land loomed up shortly after and
tlie Captain was given instructions to'
get there as quick as possible, as they
began to realize that the gasoline sup-
lily would soon run out. However, he
wus beaded ill that direction, and after
speeding towards it for half au hour
the Captain shouted to the boys that
lie knew where he was at.
Arrive Safely ul Powell Kiver!
They thought they were about Cape
Lazo, but they got quite a surprise
when, in answer to their questions,
tliey were told it was Powell River!
After being out live and a half hours
on llie water they had arrived back
exactly from where they started!
That finished tlie baseballers trying
to make homo on any more launches,
and they decided to wait until Wednesday, when the Charmer called at
Powell River and brought the boys to
Comox.
Slept ill Bath to Escape Hugs,
Beds were got for tlie boys that
night, some tlie same as tliey had
previously slept in, and more on the
same Hat. But when the weary men
went to look nt them tliey found the
animals mentioned before running
races, mul doing the ion yards quicker
than Bannerman ever knew hows
To protect himself one of tlie boys
filled the hath witli warm water and
slept there, the rest leaving and procuring rooms for themselves ut the
hotel, where they spent a peaceful
night, which was lo them the eliding
of a perfect day.
Ford Cylinder Reboring
WE ARE NOW IN A POSITION TO REBORE FORD CYLINDERS. We are going to
specialize in this work and will gladly give you an estimate. No need to send out of
town to get your work done.
BUY YOUR  NEW  BATTERY  FROM  US
We handle the famous WILLARD THREADED RUBBER BATTERY.   Same price
in Cumberland as in other parts of B. C.
Phone 77
Cumberland Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Personal Mention
Mr. E. F. Stephenson, publisher ot
The Speaker, New Liskeard, Ontario,
was a visitor to Cumberland on Friday. He is spending a few weeks on
the Island, at present staying with his
brother In the Courtenay Valley.
Mrs. E. N'. Case and little son
"Dickie" who have been spending the
summer with Mrs. Case's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. R. P. Dowdall, at Royston
Bcarb. left Friday morning for their
borne in Vancouver.
Mr. Dudley Michell left Thursday
morning, going to Nanoose and Victoria before returning to Edmonton.
Dr. R. P. Christie motored to Victoria on Saturday, returning Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Hunden returned Saturday from a three months' visit to
Mrs. Hunden's mother In Nanticoke,
Pennsylvania. They also visited relatives in Scranton, New York and Jersey City. On their return journey
stops were made at Niagara Falls,
Toronto and Winnipeg. They report
a most enjoyable time.
Mrs. Earl Dowdall and baby daughter Georgina of Walla Walla. Wash.,
who have iTcen visiting Mr. and Mrs.
It. I1. Dowdall of Royston Beach for
several weeks, left last week for Victoria nnd other points before returning to her home.
Miss Lillian Hodgson of Vancouver
was a visitor to Cumberland during
the week.
Miss Edna McCoughlan of Toronto
arrived on Tuesday.
Mr. L. B. Toombs of Vancouver was
In town on business Thursday and
Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Westwood and
child arrived Tuesday on a few days'
visit.
Mayor MacDonald left Monday to
attend the Peace Arch dedication ceremony nt Blaine. He ls not expected
home until Monday, as he is undergoing a minor operation at the Vancouver General Hospital.
Mr. J. Walton motored to Victoria
on Friday last and returned Thursday,
aconipanled by -Mrs. Walton and
daughter Rhoda.
Miss Viola Campbell went to Victoria on Saturday for a week-end trip.
Mr. Jas. Hayworth of Ladysmith has
been visiting the city during the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Hayworth recently returned from an extended tour In the
Southern Stales. For some years Mr.
Hayworth ran a theatre ill Ladysmith
but disposed of his interest some time
ago.
Miss Dorothy G. Thompson, daughter of Mr. W. F. H. Thompson, visited
Cumberland last week before going
lo take up her duties on the teaching
stall' of the Telkwa school.
Mr. Chas. Graham, District Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied hy Cadets
Hawthorne and Thomas Graham and
Miss Violet Graham, left Ior Victoria
Tuesday morning. Mr. Graham returned Thursday.
Miss Eileen V. Seagrave, of the staff
of the Government Telephones, Acme,
Alia., is visiting her grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. J. Lewis.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Thatcher, of Port
Gamble, Wash., arrived Saturday on a
week's visit to Mr. and Mrs. Thos. J.
Lewis.
Mr. H. Devlin, Inspector of Mines,
and Mrs. Devlin, spent last week-end
in Cumberland, returning to Nanaimo
Tuesday morning.
Mrs. J. Newton, ncompanied by ber
daughter, returned by motor to Nanaimo on Monday.
Jim. Phillip Rowe nnd Miss Eunice
Howe returned to Nanaimo Tuesday,
after spending three weeks' vacation
with Mrs. E. W. Bickle.
Mr. W. A. Owen, Construction Engineer Canadian Collieries, left for
Nanaimo Friday morning.
Mr. Thomas Graham. General Superintendent, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., acompanied by Mrs.
Oraham, Cadets Morton, Thomas and
Pierce Graham, left for Victoria Tuesday morning. The boys will resume
their studies at the University School.
Mr. and Mrs. Graham returned Friday.
Miss Hannah Harrison returned
from Vanouver Monday evening.
Mrs. William Jones and Mr. A. B,
Jones left for Victoria and Vancouver
on Tuesday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Peacey, Miss Lois
and Master Jack Peacey arrived from
Victoria on Saturday, on a visit.
Mr. Robert Henderson, formerly of
Cumberland, was in town during the
week.
Miss Carrie Richardson returned
from Victoria Monday.
Mr. T. A. Spruston, District Superintendent, Canadian Collieries, Ladysmith, was In town over the holiday.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Richards of Lady,
smith enme up for the holiday.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Mordy returned
from Victoria by motor on Monday.
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
Who was the married man who offered his services as patient for the
ladies' first aid contest?
If the Marine Department contemplates putting gas "buoys" on some of
the lakes on Royston Road? Some of
the Lizzie passengers are liable to get
drowned during the rainy season if
something is not done.
Will the chauffeurs have to study
for marine captain's licence?
If some ladies cannot get enough
tennis six days a week?
W*hy the visiting Moose made such
a hellofanolse after the meeting Saturday? No one In the Cumberland got
any sleep until daylight.
What's the matter with the electrician these days?
Who has got a rattling good Hup?
When was the wedding, anyway?
Who won the log-sawing contest at
Royston on Wednesday, and which
lady sawed the largest block?
Was the big crate in the freight
shed for the brilliant-haired irishman?
Who won the tinsel ribbon? Some
baseballer, by heck!
TEAS
OUR SPECIAL  BLEND CEYLON CA/»
TEA, per lb UUC
B. & B. GROCERY CHOICE TEA— K(ft«
Per pound   J"v
COFFEE
OUR SPECIAL  BLEND FRESH 7ft/»
GROUND COFFEE—Per lb .... 4 UC
No. 1 FRESH GROUND COFFEE— (\(\(*
Per pound  U"C
No. 2 FRESH GROUND COFFEE— Ktrtp
Per pound  •J"C
"Lord Roberts" Currants, per package  25c
Green Ribbon Seeded Raisins, SOc pkp 2 for 55c
Blue Ribbon reeled Teaches, package   25c
Jelly Powders, all flavors', 2 pkgs. 25c  0 for $1.00
Log Cabin Pancake Flour, SOc pkg 2 for 55c
Soda Biscuits, package .35c 3 pkgs. $1.00
Kellogg's Corn Flakes  2 pkgs. 25c
Brooms, each   $1.10 and $1.25
Quaker and Clark's Pork and Beans  5 tins .50c
Brunswick Sardines   3 tins 25c
Sunflower Pink Salmon. K.-lb. tins  2 for 25c
1-lb. tins, each 25c
Sultan Pineapple, I's, 20c tins 3 for 50c
2's, 25c tin 4 for 90c
For complete satisfaction use
Cream of the
West Flour
21-pound Sacks— tfl»i   Of\
Price  J    «pl»OU
49-pound Sacks— d»Q AA
98-pound .Sacks—   (Pf? QA
Price :    «Dt)»t/U
Phone 38 for Service and Quality
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
Sept. 1—Achates, Massct, coastwise;
Princess Ena. Alaska.
Sept. 2—Chieftain, Charmer. Jessie
Mac, coastwise; Plunger and Scow,
Vancouver.
Sept. 3—Francis Cutting, Bermuda,
coastwise; Wailiemo, Seattle, Myrmidon, United Kingdom.
Sept. 4—Qualicum and Scow, Victoria; Talzan Maru, Japan.
Sept. 6—Active, Clayburn, Sknokuni,
coastwise; England Maru, Japan;
Charlton Hall, Seattle.
Sept. 7—Suwa Maru, Japan.
FOR SALE
MARROWS, CABBAGE, BEANS, Potatoes, etc., grown nt Courtenay,
delivered at your door every Tuesday and Saturday, E. C. Eddlng-
ton, Calhoun Ranch, Sandwick P.O.
3-37
LOST
Church Notices
St. George's Presbyterian
Hev. JttS. Hood.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening service at 7.
On Sunday, September 11, the Sunday School will re-open for the Fall
and Winter work. It is hoped that
parents will send their children, as
the classes will be reorganized.
At the evening service .Mr. Howard
Macauley will sing.
Holy Trinity Church
Hot. Wi Leversedge.
Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity.
11 a.m., Holy Communion,
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
Parents of Sunday School scholars
ire asked lo note the resumption uf
Sunday School.
Roman Catholic Church
Itcv. Father Beaton.
Seventeenth Sunday after l'ontecost.
Mass at 9 a.m.
A SMALL FLAT-BOTTOM BOAT,
from Royston Beach; painted grey
and trimmed with green; oars, oarlocks and sails aboard. Finder will
be suitably rewarded. Communicate with T. E. Bate, Cumberland.
PERSONAL MENTION
WE CLEAN OR DYE SOILED OR
Faded Garments, Housefurnlshlngs,
etc. Let us send you our price list
Waterproofs "reproofed." Permanent Dye Works Limited, 1641 Fourth
Avenue West, Vancouver, B. C.
Grace Methodist Church
Iter. 0. B. Kinney.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
Regular Evening Service, 7 p.m.
BIRTH
IHORTT—At the Cumberland General
Hospital, September 7, to Mr. and
Mrs. J. Shortt, a daughter.
Who woke the Chief of Police of
Powell River up at 3 a.m. iu order to
;et something to eat?
Who turned on the warm water and
slept in the hath—to get away from
iied bugs?
Who is the chief Chicken Chaser of
(he balltossers?
Who rode from Fanny Day to Parksvllle last Friday niglit with a young
lady on his knee? No wonder he had
crumps.
Liddell's Orchestra
— Is —
OPEN FOR ENGAGEMENT
for Dances and Social Functions
of all kinds. Any number of
pieces supplied.   Apply
G. LIDDELL
Barber Shop .. ..Dunsmuir Ave.
NOTICE
Parties having houses or camping
sites on Comox Lake are requested to
call and sign a lease at the Companies'
Office ou or before October 1st, 1921,
otherwise the Company will take
possession of the property.
CsUrADUM COLLIERIES (DUNS.
MOIK), LIMITED.
DAME AT BEVAN
Saturday night a dance will be held
in tlie Bevan Hall under the auspices
f tlie  Bevan  Burns  Club.    Dancing
commences at 0.30.  Admission, gents
one dollar, ladies, refreshments,

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