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The Cumberland Islander Apr 9, 1921

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Array VICTORIA
Provincial Library
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which ls consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 16.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Special Train For
Game At Bevan
Cumberland and Bevan Juniors
To Play League Game—
Train Leaves at 1.30
The Cumberland nnd Bevan Juniors
will engage In a league game at
Bevan on Sunday next. The kick-off
ls limed fur 2.15. This should prove
to be a game worth seeing as on the
last occasion when these two teams
met, on tho grounds at Cumberland,
they put up a good exhibition of football anil seemed tn be evenly matched,
tho Cumberland boys managing to
win in llie lust few minutes by a 3-2
score.
Both teams will lie seen nt full
strength ou Sunday, and ns the local
boys are leaders iu the league so far,
the Bevan team Intends to lower their
lead a little, therefore a good game is
looked for.
The executive of the Cumberland
Juniors ' havo made arrangements
with tiie Canadian Collieries tDuns-
mulr) Ltd. to run a special train for
this game. All football fans should
take advantage of this cheap trip and
at the same time see a real soccer
game and encourage the Juniors. The
train leaves Cumberland station at
1.30 p.m. prompt, returning Immediately after tlie game.
Canadian Vimy
Memorial Church
$2,000,000 Income
Taxes From B.C.
Assessed Must Figure Out Own
Federal Obligations Under
thc New System
With a request for publication, the
following letter has been received
from Rev. Canon Shatford and Rev.
Prof. Chas. Bieler, chairman and secretary respectively of the Canadian
Vimy Memorial Church campaign,
who intend that the church "be erected In Lens, France, to the glory of
God and in loving memory of the
Canadian soldiers who fell in Northern France. A gift from Canada to
France."
We have pleasure in giving publicity to the matter, and trust that
some action will be taken whereby
Cumberland, which has a name for
generous giving, will be honored by
having its name inscribed on the list
of cities giving this church to France.
The communication is as follows:
.Montreal, March 29, 1921.
To tho Editor.—Your readers have
certainly hoard of the plan to build
at Lens, France, a Vimy Memorial
Church, as a sacred memorial to the
00,000 Canadian fallen in Northern
France during tlie great war, and a
gift to the Protestants ot that country
who have lost one hundred and fifty
of their church buildings in the Invaded area, and are in the direst
straits to rebuild them.
We feel that we cannot rest until
we have, put tlie question squarely to
the people of your city and asked
them if they are satisfied that their
city Should remain outside of this
national movement.
We would suggest that a returned
oflicer take the lead and arrange a
meeting to discuss the question ,hand,
if possible, an offering should he
taken in all the churches on the 10th
of April, which corresponds to the
fourth anniversary of the Vimy Ridge
victory, or on one of the following
Sundays, or that a house-to-house
visitation lie organized hy a local
committee. Offering envelopes may
be sent on application, from the Headquarters ot* tlio Vimy Memorial Church
campaign, 710 University St., Montreal.
If no local committee can be constituted, private subscriptions might
be sent to tlie Honorary Treasurer,
Brig. General J. a. Ross, C.M.G.', 142
Notre Dame Street West, Montreal.
Your city will certainly join in this
pntrotie and Christian enterprise and
earn the honor of having its name inscribed on the list of Canadian cities
and towns which have contributed to
the erection of tlie Canadian Vimy
Memorial Church.
Yours sincerely,
ALLAN P. SHATFORD,
Chairman,
CHARLES BIELER,
Secretary.
In previous years tlie tax, to the
average single man, was a mere Incident. Today, however, tt Is a real
liability. Four per cent, on all earnings above $1,000 is to be paid by the
bachelor. The benedict is allowed an
additional ?1000; he pays four per
cent, on all earnings above $2000.
Each taxpayer is to figure out the
amount he is to pay, himself.
No Opportunity of Escaping.
There will be practically no opportunity of escaping. All employers
were required to send ln names of
employees and the amounts earned by
them, by the end of March. Those
who have failed to do so are liable to
a penalty ot $10 a day. In addition
companies were required to furnish
lists of stockholders and the dividends disbursed.
With all these lists, returns submitted by Individuals will be checked
and ascertained If correct. If there
ls a discrepancy between the figures
on the returns and those submitted by
the employers and the companies, no
questions will be asked, but an additional tax, or penalty, will be Imposed.
No Excuses Taken.
No excuses will be taken from those
who fail to Bend in returns. Forms
have been made available to everyone
in the province, an adequate supply
having been sent to each postmaster
In British Columbia. And besides
this a circular letter explaining the
tax is being sent to each person
whose name was on the income tax
list last year. ,
British Columbia's income tax
quota for 1919 was $1,600,000. This
year it ls expected that $2,000,000 will
be collected as taxes for 1920. Previously all returns were handled in
Ottawa, bnt each province now
handles its own.
tlOO a Day Penalty.
Hundreds of persons were penalized
for fallisig to make returns, for making false returns, or for other causes
last year. This year, those who fail
to make returns by April 30 are liable
to a penalty of $100 a day. This year
lt is necessary to pay one-quarter of
the tax when filling the return. If the
taxpayer pays less than one-quarter
of the amount due he Is liable to a
penalty of $5 or one-quarter of the
amount unpaid, whichever ls the
greater. Six per cent, interest is
charged on the unpaid balance, too.
Payments are to be made ln quarterly
instalments at April 30, June 30, Aug.
31 and Oct. 31.
Unmarried persons are exempt to
$1000, and married persons $2000. On
excess amounts four per cent, is to
be paid. On incomes up to $6000, four
per cent. Is charged, and on incomes
above $6000, eight per cent. Is charged,
In addition there ls a surtax on Incomes in excess of $5000. This surtax
is one per cent, on incomes from
$5000 to $6000; two per cent, on $6000
to $8000, and so on to 65 per cent, on
$1,000,000 and more.
If one underestimates his income in
filling his return, if the amount exceeds one per cent., but is less than
20 per cent, of the total tax, one-half
of the deficiency will be charged. If
the deficit ls equal to more than 20 per
cent, of the total tax, a penalty equal
to the deficit will be imposed.
Dance At Bevan
A dance will be held this Snturday
evening in the new hall at Bevan,
commencing at 9 o'clock, when it is
hoped a good number will be present
from Cumberland.
First Aid Smoker
Very Successful
Very Enjoyable Time Spent at
Meeting of Association on
Saturday Night.
The St. John's First Aid Central
Association held a very successful
smoker In the First Aid hall on Saturday last. Business was combined
with pleasure on this occasion, as
it was decided to hold the regular
meeting on this date. The business
started at 7 o'clock, President L.
Francescini occupying tho chair.
After the business of the meeting
had been transacted, the president
called on Mr. J. Thomson, past president, to take the chair for tlie entertainment. On taking the chair Mr.
Thomson expressed his pleasure at
seeing such a large number present,
and also explained the absolute
necessity for First Aid men iu our
community. After the chairman's remarks refreshments  were served.
Following the refreshments the
fun began. Mr. Bates was called on
for a song, and by special request
sang "The Old Oaken Bedstead," fur
which he was encored, and responded
with a song and dance, which wus
much enjoyed.
The chairman then called on Mr.
Brown, of Washington, U.S.A., for a
few remarks. Mr. Brown said that bo
was pleased to be present at a gathering of that kind, he boing a First
Aid man himself and belonged to a
team in Washington. He explained to
the boys how they worked over there.
Mr. Robert Reid was then called on
for a song and rendered "My Alu
Folk" ln great style.
The chairman then called od Mr.
Geo. Richardson, who showed quite an
ability as a humorist.
After an Interval the chairman
entertained the boys, proving himself
to be elocutionist.
Mr. Jonathan Taylor was called
upon for a song. Mr. Taylor said he
would do his best, but he really was
not ln condition for singing as he had
just recently fell down a stairway!
Anyway, he sang "Oh, Where ls My
Nora" in a very artistic manner.
Mr. Derbyshire followed with "After the Ball," which he delivered ln
a pleasing style.
"Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot?" brought the proceedings to a
close, everyone voting it a most enjoyable affair.
South Wellington
Team Blanked
Cumberland Effectually Eliminated Southern Team From
McBride Shield Series.
"THE CHURCH AND LABOR"
MR. GOURLAY TAKES
CHARGE AT BEVAN
Watch out for the official opening
of the new Athletic Association Hall
at Bevan to he held shortly. It Is intended to have a big celebration ou
this occasion.
BOOKS FOR LIBRARY
EXPECTED TODAY
The 600 hooks coming from Victoria
for the Cumberland Public Library
are due here today and will be put In
order for distribution as soon as possible. It is expected tliey will be
available to the puhlic some time next
week.
Mr. Gourlay, who has been with
Simon Leiser & Co. Ltd., Victoria, for
some considerable time in charge of
tiielr Fruit Department, hns gone to
Bevan to assume charge of the Island
Supply Company at that point. Those
who have come ln touch with Mr.
Gourlay feel assured that he will be
quite an acquisition to the community
and will take an interest in local
affairs.
Rev. Principal W. H. Vance gavo a
very interesting well thought out address on "The Church and Labor" at
the meeting of Holy Trinity Men's
Club on Monday, when there was a
good attendance.    -
,Rev. Vance has made a very deep
study of the labor question in all its
phases and greatly impressed his
hearers by his clear-cut and fearless
opinions on this vital question. He
treated the subject from all angles,
as affecting-employer and employee.
showing the causes of the unrest under present conditions. The solution
of the deep problem lay, he averred.
in a better understanding by botli
sides. When, disputes urose, the
speaker said, both sides should meet
in a round-table conference and lay
their cards on thc table, and not meei
in different rooms, crystallize their
Ideas before getting together, and
then expect an amicable settleiiion
Only a change of heart on the part of
all concerned could do away with tlio
unrest now so prevalent.
Principal Vance was listened to
with keen attention by all present. At
the conclusion of his address questions were asked and a discussion
fully Indulged in.
Ou request of the meeting, Principal
Vance promised to visit Cumberland
again in the near future, If he can
make arrangements, and give an address ou another subject.
MEMORIAL ARCH FUND
It Is intended to have the official
dedication service of the Memorial
Arch take place on Empire Day, May
24. The total amount raised is now
about $900. The following subscrip
tions are acknowledged:
Cumberland Water Works Co $10.00
Cumberland Electric Light Co... 10.00
Paolo Monte     3."00
M. M. Brown, Bevan    1.00
Peter Myers    2.00
T. H. Carey     1.00
Badminton Finals
Played Saturday
Competitions Getting Down
Finals—Some Very Exciting Games Expected.
to
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Cumberland United turned out last
Saturday afternoon with a very different team than that of tho previous
week, and hail llo difficulty ill disposing of tlie .so-called intermediates,
proving easy winners by a score of
I-" II might easily have been 10-0
if Ihe local boys had exerted thom-
selses.
Tlio South Wellington aggregation
was composed of a number of tlie old
Xanainio United players, and judging
from the size of the team altogether
there was very little Intermediate
about thom. South Wellington won
tlie toss and took advantage of the
slight breeze. Owing lo tlie late
arrival of tlie referee it was nearly
five o'clock hefore Pilling kicked off.
The visitors at once made tracks for
tho Cumberland goal, forcing a, goal
kick in tlie lirst minute; incidentally
il was almost their last one, as Walker
was practically a spectator from start
to finish. The Cumberland forwards
took up tlie running, "Milligan passing
out to Bobby Brown perfectly, but the
big man was too slow and lost a good
opportunity, a goal kick resulting.
Tho local forwards immediately came
back on the left, Andy Home passing
nicely to Milligan, who tricked a
couple of opponents and lobbed the
hall towards the goal. Pilling pounced
on the ball and walked through, scoring the first count after ten minutes'
play.
rrsM locals continued to have the
bestflfc-the play, but as far as good
football went—there was none. A
combined run by the Cumberland for
wards resulted In a corner kick. Harrison placed the ball well into the
goal mouth, Pilling scoring, getting
his head to the sphere and making
the score 2-0.
Immediately after, Andy Home
scored a magnificent goal—one of
the best seen on the local grounds for
a long time. Half-time arrived shortly
after, with Cumberland leading by 3
goals to 0. **
The second half opened in a very
tame sort of way, neither team exerting themselves, the ball hoverlnjrf
around the centre of tlie field for some
considerable time. Hitcliens finally
cleared, and transferred the play to
the South Wellington end; after several attempts on the part of thc Cumlierland forwards lo get through the
hall was transferred to the Cumberland end. Hltchens, afler manoeuvring around for position, punted the
hall right across the left wing, where
both players were lying well down.
Andy Home, meeting the hall, drove
it across wilh great speed, the visiting fight full-back not being nblo to
get to it properly, breasied it through
liis own goal, making No. 4 for Cumberland.
Afler this fourth reverse the visitors went all to pieces, ami Ihe local
team could easily have put up a big
score had they exerted themselves.
The end came shortly after, Cumberland thus entering another stage In
the  McBride  Shield  competition.
Taking tlie game as a whole it was
a rather poor exhibition of football,
and it would he futile to choose any
Individual player as the star. Pilling,
the new centre forward, made a good
impression, and we look forward witli
pleasure In seeing thi.i crack centre
forward staying here for some considerable time.
The following did duly for Cumberland: Goal, Walker; backs, Kitcheus
and Gough j halt-backs, Irvine, Roberta and Jackson; forwards. Bobby
Drown, Milligan. Pilling, Home and
Harrison. Mr. Locke of victoria
refereed (lie game and gave great
satisfaction   to all.
X-RAYS.
SPECIAL MEETING OF
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
Some keenly contested matches
were played iu the badminton tournament games played on Saturday and
Wednesday nights In the Anglican
Church hall.
The only finals played so far are
tlie ladies' single, in which sMrs. J. E.
Splcor was winner, and the men's
doubles, iu which W. Rodger and A.
Nunns defented F. Dalby and V. Dalby.
winning two out of three games.
There should ho some ding-dong
games Saturday night In tiie final
events. What promises to be the star
game will he tlie mutch botweeu A.
Nunns and W. Rodger in tlie men's
singles. The ladies' doubles and
mixed doubles also should furnish
some exciting games.
The following aro tlie results of Ihe
games played Saturday and Wednesday (the figures iu parenthesis are the
handicaps):
LADIES' DOUBLES
Seeks Prevention
Rather Than Cure
Salvation   Army   Appeals   for
Assistance to Carry on Its
Good Work in B. C.
A .Van Muy Ile Down, Hut He's
Jicvpr (hit."  S. A. slogan.
,1 Krlenil of the Friendless.
A llniiie tn tlie Homeless.
A ( biiniplini uf the Weak nud
Fallon.
Thai's  Ills. Salvation  Armj!
Hill Yuu Hack II Ip I
Charles Wilson, of Nanaimo. Deputy
Grand Chancellor of the Knights ol*
Pythias, will visit Cumlierland Lodge
No. 14 on Monday evening next, at
7.30 p.m.
JOSEPH HORBURY, K.R.&S.
JOHN BENNIE, C. C.
OILING DUNSMUIR AVE.
The Board of Works, taking art-
vantage of the spell of line weather
is having a much-needed coat of
"tarvia" put on Dunsmuir Avenue,
This should put it in good condition
| for the summer. ^
'First Hound.
Mrs. Owen and Mrs. Leversedge (-2)
15. beat Mrs. Stacey and iMiss Weldon
(0), 12.
Mrs. Scott and Miss Campbell (-2)
15, beat Mrs. Clinton and Mrs. Cameron (0) 4.
Mrs. Spicer and Mrs. Nunns (-31 15,
beat Miss Gegeogchan and sMiss Dando (0) 7.
MIXED DOIBLES
First Round.
Mrs. Stacey and T. Mumford (-2)
15, beat Mrs. Scott and T. W. Scott
(0)   7.
■Mrs. Spicer and B. H. Gowen (0)
15, beat Mrs. Clinton and J. Vernon-
Jones (-1) 3.
Mrs. Leversedge and J. Walton (-1)
15, beat Mrs. NunnB and F. Dalby (0)
10.
Miss Daudo and G. Hassell (0) 15,
beat .Mrs. Owen and W. Rodger (-8)
14.
Miss Campbell and W. Leversedge
t-5) 15, beat Mrs. Scott and G. Tarbell
(0) 8.
Miss Gegeogehan and J. F. Hough,
a bye.
* tContinued on Page Four)
McBride Shield
Game Saturday
South Wellington Seniors Coming Up to Try Conclusions
With United Team.
South Wellington soccer team will
visit the local grounds on Saturday
afternoon to meet tlie Cumberland
United in the second round of the McBride Shield competition. There has
been a lot of talk during the pas!
week re tlie composition of the team.
We are of the same opinion of one of
our renders, that to move Pilling to
the inside left position would be a
bad move. Sack! Contt ls Just the
man needed for the inside left position, with Home outside left, and keep
Roberts in his accustomed place at
centre half, with Irvine and Gough
for the wing halves.
It is a mistake to put a centre-half
in the wing half division, especially
when the centre-half lu question is
reputed to he one of tlie best men in
thc province in that position.
However, the selection committee
think differently and have ehospu th
following to ropresent Cumberland in
the Saturday game: Goal, Walker;
backs, Hitcliens and Campbell; halfbacks, Hrown, Cnnti and Roberta; forwards. Hannerman, Milligan. Pilling.
Home and Jackson.    All other play-
re
erve.
The kick-off Is limed for 4.110, with
.Mr. Locke of Victoria a:; referee. Admission will be 50 cents for gent*
und J") cents for ladles.
GIRLS' CLUB SOCIAL
On Monday next the gentlemen appointed by the City Council recently,
Mr. John Sutherland und Mr. 10. W.
Bickle, to canvass for subscriptions to
the appeal on behalf of tlie Salvation
Army "Red Shield Home Service Campaign." will commence their work.
This is part of a province-wide
effort by the Salvation Army for funds
wherewith to continue the splendid
work conducted by this organization.
Tlie Canadian Collieries is taking
up a collection among .its workers for
this cause, nnd the business men and
others of the city will be called ou
to contribute lo this fund.
The Salvation Army undertakes to
maintain and, where advisable and
necessary, increase its service to tho
community.
Examination of tho Army's forty-
year record, since its war activltlea
have made it a target of Intensllled
public interest, shows this organization has made astonishing progress!
toward solving our problem of that
public disorder whlcb is the out-
growth of private distress. In consequence renewed calls for aid havo
come to the Salvation Army from
throughout the country, evidencing a
situation the public necessity ot
which must be fully mot.
In the face of a popular demand of
such extent there is no choice but to
extend its functions as to fully meet
the demand. On llie one hand the
statistical record shows practical relief extended to many In the past year.
This work will never be abandoned by
the Salvation Army, they claim. On
the other bund the demand is ouo
which invites the intenso interest of
every element of every community. It
cannot be met iu halfway fashion. It
must be fully met.
Preu'iiUuirRather Hum lure.
The Salvation Army hns ever waged
Ita battle In the very front line, or
more correctly speaking, the lust lino
of defences. Us trenches have been
dug in the streets of poverty uud tho
fight of humanity has been made when
the enemy was reinforced by want,
vice, disease and despair. Efforts have
necessarily been devoted in n large
miiusure to ministering to those who
have already been dangerously, if not
mortally wounded in life's encounter.
The function of the Army has been
and will continue to be one of alleviating distress nnd sorrow. "A .Man May
Be Down Hut He is Never Out'' will
remain their slogan. It is the hope of
the officers everywhere that thc
efforts they are making will tend to
prevent rather than cure, and that tho
uiiin, boy or girl may nol always come
to them down.
G. W. V. A. Smoker
A special meeting of tlie Women's
Auxiliary of the General Hospital will
he held on Tuesday next, at 7.30 p.m.
at the residence of Mrs. Chas. Graham,
All Interested in the Children's
Fancy Dress Bull in aid of the hospital are especially invited to lie
present.
MENS CLUB DANCE
On Tuesday evening next a dance
will be held in the Anglican hall under tho auspices of the Men's Club.
Dancing from 0 to 12; admission 50
cents each.
The Girls' Club of Holy Trinity
Church hold a most enjoyable social
evening In the Church Hull on Friday,
April I, when they entertained their-
parents und other friends. Games of
all sorts wero Indulged In, and the
aeroplane ride seemed to be a favorite. Of courso there were refreshments, und th girls greatly enjoyed
the pleasure of the evening.
SALE OF WORK
A sale of work and afternoon tea
under the auspices of the Women's
Auxiliary of Grace Methodist Church,
will be held in the Anglican Church
Hall on Wednesday, April 27. Articles
of varied and useful description, also
home cooking, Ice cream, etc,
Boys, don't forge) the G. W. v. A.
Smoker to bn held iu tin' Memorial
Hall on Saturday, April flth, al 7 p.m.
All are welcome. Como and bring a
friend. A aploudld programme has
been arranged. Dry ami wet refreshments.  Admission one dollar,
G. W. VA7 NOTES
There will be u Church Parade on
Sunday next, April LQUl, All eoiu-
rudes Inking part nre asked lo meet
at the Memorial Hull not Inter than
6.30 p.m. Service to he held iu the
Grace Methodist Church,
Comrades please note thut tho G. W.
V. A. Library is now open for the use
of ull members, com. J. A. Emily,
librarian, will be in attendance eveity
Saturday at 7 p.m. to givo out books
required, There is a splendid assortment to suit ull readers.
Meetings are now held every Tuesday at 7 p.m. in tho Memorial Hall.
Comrudes will be sorry to hear thut
at the time of writing our genial
president ls tu the hospital suffering
from a slight accident. We trust that
he will soon be Al again, Two
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April 9, 1921.
T. E. BATE
P. 0. Box 279 Phone 31
CUMBERLAND
WE SPECIALISE
IN BULK TEAS
and recommend the following blends:
AVONDALE, per lb.
60c
OLD DRURY, per lb  75
SUPREME, per lb.
80c
These Teas are specially blended for us to suit the
waters of this district.
PROCURABLE ONLY AT
MUMFORD'S  GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a large
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
bills.
Send us your specifications
and we will give you a close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
Discipline And Its Relationship To
Safety In And Around The Mines
Paper Road by Mr. Thomas Cunliffe, Coal Inspector of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., at the Meeting of the St.
John's First Aid and Mine Rescue Association on Sunday.
Of! all the mottoes which ever existed in the industrial world, "Safety
First" Is by far the most popular. In
an extremely short period of four
years from its flrst being inaugurated,
it has spread from one ond of the continent to the other.
Unfortunately, however, regardless
of how well this slogan may wound,
or how well it may look printed on
paper, or on a large board, il is not
a fetish aud of itself possesses no
value.
We often say "Safety First" without meaning it in ttie least. Of that
there can he no doubt If we wore to
make safety the end and aim ot our
existence, we would not mine very
much coal, neither would we raise
very much fruit and vegetables, wheat
or corn.
What we actually do mean is probably maximum safety, or llie greatest
possible security in our daily work
for subsistence. As a lirst step towards "Safety First" wo must have
organization, and then discipline.
Discipline and safely go hand in hand,
or in other words nro mutually interdependent. Ii is Impossible to have
one without the other. Wo cannot
have security and chaos, neither ean
we have safety without discipline.
Some people have gone so far as to
correct "Safety First" and substitute
'Discipline First," although Ihis may
seem an extreme version. I think you
will agree with me when 1 say that
without discipline, "Safety First" as
our motto will get us nowhere.
Definition of Discipline.
Now lot us analyze for a moment
this word discipline, and what it
means. Webster gives us "discipline"
as meaning training generally, according lo rule or drill, or training subjecl to rules, and again a course of
instruction in a special form
branch of knowledge or art. He also
says that it is meant as punishment
intended to correct crimes and errors.
He also gives us tlie meaning of
"disciplinable" as being capable of
being trained or taught; again, a
"discipllner" as one who disciplines,
and a "disciplinarian" as an expert in
tho art of teaching discipline.
Now you will probably wonder why
i have taken so many detinitions of
this word discipline. Most people
whon thinking of discipline, think of
the harsh military methods that were
generally adopted by somo of the
great military powers previous to the
great war, but if wo look at it in that
light, we look at it wrong. History
has taught us that mosl, if not all, of
our greatest leaders in both army and
navy have been vory strict on discipline, and yet have shown the greatest
consideration for the care and welfare of their men, aud have had their
well-being at heart, and so it behoves
us to really understand what is meant
by discipline.
The organization of a mine, particularly it it is a large oue, is appar-
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
WM.MERKIF1ELD,    Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cumberland, B.C.
"There are various ways," says a
contemporary, "In which unemployment can be coped with. The method
adopted in Chicago, where, according
to a recent report, another five hundred men have been absorbed into tlie
potted meat industry, sounds perhaps
a little too drastic."
INCUBATORS
BROODERS
We have the largest antl most
complete stock of Poultry Supplies in B. C.
Wire Fencing and Netting for
poultry farm and berries.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUES
A. I. JOHNSON & CO.
811 Cambie St. Vancouver
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE IUIMYAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by ElectrlcHy.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, B. C.
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
ently complicated. It perhaps lias its
nearest parallel in military organizations where the privates report to the
corporal, the corporals to the sergeant, llie sergeants to the lieutenants,
the lieutenants to the captain, the
captain to the major, and so on.
In tiie army there are also subsistence olllcers, ordnance officers, fleld
officers, etc; so it is in mining. Although tlie chain ol' organization may
appear at flrsl sight to be apparently
nunc complicated, yet upon better ac
qualntance it becomes more simple
Tho miners or privates, so to speak,
repci I to llie fireboss! he 111 turn re-
ports to the shiftboss, who reports to
the overman; Hie overman or plthoss
reports to tlie manager, who reports
to the district superintendent, and he
reports io tlie general superintendent,
and so on.
Mosl Danger nl Working Pace.
We have also wliat might be termed
side line ollicials, such as driver-
bosses, stablebosses, payroll clerks,
timekeepers, etc. Tlie organization ot
a colliery can readily be compared
with Ihe organization of an army. Tlie
mine organization may vary widely
with tlie conditions encountered in
mining, and tlle duties and details of
the various ollicials may be varied to
a large extent even iu the same lield
nl' mining. Whatever may he the organization of the colliery ln general,
il is generally conceded that it is at
tlie working face, or where the miner
actually produces the coal, that most
accidents occur, and it is therefore
at Ihe face, or shall I say the frontline trench, that the greatest care in
organization should be taken, and
where the greatest discipline should
exist; but let me nol be here misun
derstood-I do not mean discipline as
most of us undersood in comparison
to German methods of the year 1914,
but rather as Webster gives us when
lie says that discipline means a course
ot* training, or instruction, in a special
branch or form of knowledge or art.
Experiments in different coal fields
have proved almost conclusively that
the greatest safety has been attained
when the fireboss has a district of not
more than 35 to 40 men under his
charge, the numbers varying, of
course, with the natural dangers of
Ihe coal measures being worked, and
the manner in which the working
places are grouped or scattered:
which proves that tlie more often a
man's place is visited by an official
the safer that miner appears to be.
Why is this? It Is because the miners
are being disciplined by the fireboss
by a course of instruction according
tii the rules laid down by the higher
official,
Some of you may not agree with
llils, and probably think that though
we can lead a horse to the stream,
we can not make him drink; but I
beg to amend that by saying that he
certainly would drink if able to, provided you keep him there long enough,
which I say would be discipline by
learning him to do what Is necessary
and good for himself.
So it is with thc miner and other
workmen; teach him by constant discipline to do what is safe and right,
and he will soon realize that your constant drill according to certain rules
laid down, is good for him and he will
continue to do them with additional
safety to himself and the other workmen around him.
You may again disagree with me
and say, that no matter how some men
in tlie army arc drilled and disciplined, there are still defaulters; but
let me here quote, that the way to a
man's heart ls through his stomach;
and also permit me to amend this a
little, by adding, that the way to his
stomach Is through the dollar bill in
his pocket. In other words, if a work-
man wilfully or deliberately does
something which he knows is dangerous to his or other men's safety, then
teach him by a system of fines to
realize Hint what Is shown and taught
him is for his own safety and benefit,
ond lie will be disciplined by way ot
the dollar bill or thc way to his heart
through his stomach.
You have all probably heard or read
that familiar quotation, "He that
would conquer must first conquer
himself." So it is with the fireboss,
ing thnt discipline let him not for one
overmen and oilier officials. In exerting that discipline let hlm not for
one moment forget that "Safety First"
applies just as much or more so to
himself ns It does to the miner or
other workmen under his charge; so
lirst let us see that we individually
apply this "Safety First" slogan, and
in deling so we are helping others to
apply It also. ___
Caution in this world's affairs, and
in business relations, play a very Important part, and though many criticize and sny that caution on part of
man Is often cowardice, we know that
self-preservation is the first law of
nature, and so If tempted to do something that would endanger our own
as well as otlier men's safety, let us
stop and think of "Safety First"—and
let me say right here that when you
find a man who does stop to think,
then show by a word of praise and
encouragement that you appreciate
his efforts and forethought towards
"Safetay First."
A pat on tho back and a word of
praise is often"more effective than all
the whips ever made to make a mule
go, and so it is with mon. I repeat,
give that pat on the back as often as
you find a man doing right, just as
you would make a "kick" if you found
hlm doing wrong and taking a chance.
Tills I say is Included in discipline
according to the dictionary definition
as meaning a course of drill and instruction.
(Continued on Page Three)
The Rexall Store
A Wondrous Beauty
Cream
YOU will love the fragrance first. Thm the
velvet smoothness, the delicate creaminess,
of this marvelous beauty cream. It fairly melts
into the skin-without a trace of grease, or the
clogging of a single pore. Anemic tissues
speedily drink it in, becoming smooth and softly
pliable under Combination Cream Jonteel. A
perfect base for powder.    Take home a jar
today.
REPAIR IT
Save money by mending your broken furniture, rubber
goods, enamelled ware, aluminum ware, glass, leather
goods, books, etc. The following will make fixing easy.
Lepage's   Liquid    Glne — For
repairing   furniture,   leather
goods, books, etc. Tubes, -."ie
Prj'stoln—A transparent glass
cement.   Tubes   85c
Volpeek—For repairing enamelled ware, tinware, etc.
Package   15c
Kix-A-Tenr—An invaluable repair outfit for mending
holes in rainproofs, rubbers,
hot water bottles, etc. Per
package   fiOc
Taylor's Waterproof Cement-
Repairs china, crockery, etc.
Will stand washing ln hot
water.   Package   Sue
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX. MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
THE EDUCATION OF YOUR CHILDREN
Have you the money wilh which to do it ?
Start to save while they are young—let them
commence life knowing you are at the back
of them.
Savings Accounts are a specialty with
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. McCarthy, Manager Cumberland Branch tf
April ft, 1921.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Three
Men's Shoes
MEN!   K you want a happy combination of ityle, fit;
comfort and service in your next pair of shoe*,
come to this store. We are mighty particular about
getting just the kind of shoes men like to wear.
Our shoes have won their way into the hearts of discriminating men, through sheer force of merit
Find out about these unequalled values we are featuring right now. Take a look at our window display of tha
"snappy" new styles.
Do Your Feet Ever Bother You?
Tired, aching feet make you inefficient and cause you
much suffering. Come in and let our Foot Expert demon*
strate to you
DrSchoIIs
JfotCbiqfortAppliances
—he knows exactly what each foot trouble case needs.'
Dr. Scholl's scientific appliances are fitted and adjusted to
your individual foot,   They will correct and relieve you.
Know what it is to have constant foot comfort Come
in today.
Examination and Advice Free
Cavins Cash Shoe Store
RAMSAY'S
PRINCESS
CHOCOLATES
ALWAYS IN STOCK
FANCY BOXES OF HIGH-
GRADE CHOCOLATES
WM.
HENDERSON
CONFECTIONERY AND
ICE CREAM PARLORS
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. GATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Slioo Repairing a Sueclultj.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
New Home Bakery
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
J. HALLIDAY!
Dunsmuir Ave.,"    Cumberland.
Wrong Sign.
A farmer hitched his team to a telephone-pole.
"Here," exclaimed a policeman, "you
can't hitch there!"
"Can't hitch!" shouted the irate
farmer. "Well, why does the sign Bay,
"Fine for Hitchin'?"
"What is your notion of the Ideal
man, Miss Sharpe? Suppose- you define hlm for me."
"Impossible! The terms are contradictory." (
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers suid
Bakers
Cumberland and Courtenay, B.C.
Thos. H. Carey
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2630 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
G.W.V.A. MEMORIAL HALL
OPEN DAILY
The ball ls now open dally from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sundays from 2
to 5 p.m.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 9830 meets on tbe
second and fourth Wednesdays ln the
Fraternity Hall, Davis Block, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland. Visiting
brethren cordially Invited.
Frank Bond, Chief Ranger; A. 0.
Jones, Secretary; Frank Slaughter,
Treasurer.
Famous Players
Here Three Days
Athon Company Opens Three-
Day Engagement on Monday, April 18th.
Cumberland will Imve a special
theatrical engagement beginning .Monday night, April IS. when the Athon
Company of players will appear at
the Ilo-Ilo Theatre. The advance
notice for the attraction states that
this company has played Ki weeks at
the Orphcum Theatre in Seattle, Tl
weeks at the Strand and Lyric
Theatres in Portland, Oregon, li.'i
weeks at the Princess and Hippodrome Theatres, San Francisco, 21
weeks at the Columbia Theatre iu
Vancouver, and nine weeks at the
Hippodrome Theatre in Spokane.
The Attion Company claims to be
the only show of its kind in the world,
inasmuch as ihey ure presenting cou
densed versions of the very best big
plays—some of them being tlie foremost English comedies — something
never before attempted by auy organization. Iu other words instead of
paying two or three dollars to witness
a well known play, and sitting through
three long hours to see it, the Athon
Company gives you tlie same play in
a condensed form, with all tlie plot,
scenes and situations, and does each
play in forty minutes, giving two
different styles of plays, a big vaudeville act, and the latest feature pictures on each programme, and
changes the programme completely
every night.
Miss EUie Johnson, known from
coast to coast as the "Girl with the
Million Dollar Personality," and as
one of the cleverest actresses the stage
has produced, heads this versatile
company. The company also numbers amongst its members such well
known people as Clifford Lancaster,
for years connected with some of the
best stock companies in the country;
Neill McKinnon, who was featured in;
Rex Beach's big play, "The Spoilers";,
Robt. Athon, who appeared with
Blanche Bates in Belasco's New York
production of "The Darling of tlie
Gods"; Dorothy Randall, a clever actress whose wonderful singing voice
has earned her the name of the "Western Nightingale," is also with the
company.
Doors will open at 6.30 and the performance will start at 7 p.m. Prices
have been placed within the reach of
all. Adults, 75 cents, and children
60 cents; box seats, $1, including
government tax.
HALF-MILLION DOLLARS
RECEIVED FOR NORTH
CHINA FAMINE FUND
More Help Needed — Suffering
Will Continue Until Crops
Are Harvested.
Church Notices
HOLT TRINITY CHUBCH
Rev. W. Leversedge.
April 10, Second Sunday After Easter.
11 a.m., Matins and Holy Communion.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School.
7 p.m., Evensong.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHUKCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
PRESBYTERIAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. G. B. Kinney, B.A, F.H.G.9.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m.
. Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
,, 	
Miss Perte: "It was a peach of a
show. One of the feminine performers wore absolutely nothing but a
single catskin."
Aunt Lucy: "Shocking! What kind
of a creature could she have been?"
Miss Perte: "She was a trained cat."
A DRINKING SONG
Germany, lift  up  the  chalice—drink
the bitter potion down!
And,  while   drinking   it,   remember
that Its brewing was your own!
Blood and iron—so you brewed it —
flavored it with blood and sweat-
Though  you  brewed  it  for another,
your own lips slialUdrnin it yet!
Quaff the cup of reparation to its
dregs, aye! do uot shrink!
Drink your years of preparation—to
your dream of empire drink!
Drink the flower of earth's young manhood, lying low within tlie grave.
While above them blow tiie blossoms
of the land they died to save!
Drink the ruined towns and cities,
tortured'towers, shattered shrines.
Silent bells of old cathedrals, wasted
forests, flooded mines!
Drink the martyred babes and mothers, prisoned priests and ravished
nuns,
Whose one crime was to he living in
the pathway of the Huns!
Toast the little maiden mothers—
drink the dead beneath the sea!
And the stately ships that hore them,
sunk tn shameless perfidy!
"Ah!" you say, "It Is too bitter"—
and you turn your hend away!
Bitter?—Aye! hut so you brewed it.
wheu 'twas lifted to "Tlie Day!"
Drink your cun of reparation—drink.
now, to another day!
Night has passed with all thi' horrin a
that you dreamed—come, wake and
pay!
—Roselle Mercler Montgomery.
One of our readers in Portland,
Ore., has sent to the local treasurer
of tlie China Famine Fund the sum of
$12, which together with the local
subscriptions has been forwarded to
the head office.
in response to the appeal of China's
starving millions, $509,000 has been
received at the head ollice in Toronto
from the various treasurers. While
expressing its grateful appreciation
of tlle splendid response, the committee desires to call attention to the
present condition of tlie famine-
stricken multitudes iu North China
and Uie Inadequacy of the relief thus
tar sent and to voice the cry of their
continued distress.
All Unprecedented [feed.
Of the fifty millions affected, many
thousands have perished. To thc
horrors of starvation have been added
the Bufferings from extreme cold and
those diseases, such as ty/hus, which
inevitably accompany famine. Thc
terrible distress will continue with
increasing severity until the harvest
In June. Evory Christian and humanitarian instinct demands that relief
must he continued till then.
Culls Thut Must Ile Met.
Lieut-Col, Gray, of the British
Legation at Pekin, cables on March 8:
"Help still urgently needed. Relief,
so far, inadequate for tlie huge number of starving sufferers."
Rev. Dr. Donald MacGlllivray, of
Shanghai, in a strong appeal Just
issued, says: "Notwithstanding all
that can be done many will die. The
distress will last until midsummer
antl perhaps after. There is prospect
of a good wheat harvest iu June. We
all know something of the aftermath
of tho war, but the aftermath of a
famine,* involving so many millions,
will leave lingering distress."
A letter from Rev. A. W, Lochead,
of tlie Canadian Presbyterion Mission
in Honan, states: "The pinch of
famine is becoming more and more
severe as the days go by. There have
been a great many people frozen to
death during tlie IaBt month. Preparations are being made all over tbe
north to light the inevitable typhus
that will soon be upon us."
Bishop White, who is Director of
transport and supplies in Honan.
writes: "Of the three million most
destitute in Honan, the amount received will enable us to save tho lives
of approximately one million. This
means that two million will die unless additional  funds arc available."
Need for Further Help.
The relief which we have sent
strengthens thc call for further help.
Having saved so many thus fur, shall
wc now let them perish? Tliey must
unless additional funds are forthcoming.
Royal Insurance Company
Limited
OF LIVERPOOL,  ENGLAND
FIRE, LlFE^d MARINE
LIFE DEPARTMENT
Total Assets $156,673,21.5.00
Life Funds      58,667,860.00
Profits Distributed to Policyholders    27,622,286.00
The Additional Reserves maintained by the Company, over and above a full provision for the liabilities
in all departments and exclusive of the capital and
stock, amount to over
$30,000,00
R. V. WINCH & CO., LTD.
H. G. McKINNON, EDWARD W. BICKLE,
Special Agent, District Agent,
Cumberland. Cumberland.
Discipline And Its Relationship To
Safety In And Around The Mines
(Continued from Page Two)
tJrfyal
DENTACL0R
TOOTH PASTE
WHITENS    A ^
CLEANSES  \  I
k        PRESERVES ^
RELIEVES PYORRHEA
,<*r,iir.r~Ar
c/tfual
<DnuqSlo/
For Sale by
R. E. FROST    -     Cumberland
BABIES $1.50 EACH
If yoti want to buy a baby you must
go to China. You oan purchase one
tor $1,50, or maybe two for $2.50.
("Miiua is, in fact, tbe greatest slave
country in tbe world. Of a population
of 400,000,000 there are slaves to the
number of 10,000,000.
Every family of means keeps its
girl slaves, aud a man's position is
usually gauged by the number he
keeps. At any age from three to fifteen girls are sold, seven or eight being tbe age at which most change
hands. The girls are purchased to
do housework, it being cheaper to buy
tban to hire.
To the credit of the authorities, it
may be statod that tbe regulations
governing the sales are pretty stringent, and ensure decent treatment for
llie girls. Women slaves are frequently given hy oue man to another
as presents, and it is quite a common
liiing to give slaves as wedding presents. Occasionally a man will sell u
wife; hut such treatment stamps hlm
as a vagabond. Practices of this kind
are mainly resorted to by opium
maniacs, who have been known to
sell their wives and children to sup
ply their crazy appetites.
Shaves vary lu price; $10 is about
tbe average; but much depends on the
girl's appearance. A good-looking
girl will fetch $25, or even (50. In
buying slaves a man takes tbem on
trial, just as If he were buying horses,
lo make sure they are sound and
heal t by.
Line of Least Keslstence.
It is oue of tbe natural laws of thi:
universe that all matter seeks the He
uf least insistence, and so It is with
workmen iu and around mines. We
too often take tbe line of least reslst-
ence, when it would he beneficial to
take the other course.
To make this plain, too often a mun
to make his work pay, or as stated
above, working along the lines of
least insistence, takes a chance on his
personal safety, with the result that
the mineral be is winning from the
earth also takes the lino of least re-
sistence, and because of neglect, or
shall I say ease on tbe part of the
workman, iu not putting up a post or
prop, tbat mineral falls down when
the workman is least expecting it,
with tbe result that the poor fellow
Is taken to the hospital, and in some
cases to the cemetery, simply through
not auplyiug "Safety First" which
he should have been disciplined to do.'
We know tbat accidents will happen in the beat of regulated families,
and they will also happen iu the best
of regulated coal mines, but this does
not alter the fact that far less accidents would occur if every man waB
disciplined to the fact that he must
take no chances but must apply
"Safety First."
In our homes we teach a child not
to go near a hot stove or fire; it it
wilfully does so after being taught,
then the child is generally reprimanded by a severe scolding, or in some
cases whipping, to show that It is
wrong to do such a thing, and it is
being taught discipline. It is also applied in our schools from the time a
child starts until ho leaves und enters
into the highest stages of life, when
he starts to work in or around a mine.
It is well known that the school
teacher wbo is a strict discipliner
teacher invariably turns out the best
scholars, and they become tbe best
of skilled workmen. Of course there
are exceptions, but that only proves
the rule. I think ynu will agree that
discipline is from the lirst start in
life to entering tbe great unknown,
one of the greatest assets tbat a mau
cau carry through bis life. It he-
conies a second nature and he applies
it to himself as often as lie applies it
to others.
We all known that familiarity
breeds contempt in everything, and po
it Is with dangerous things In und
around mines, and so as to offset this
familiarity let us discipline ourselves
to a greater safety first and take no
chances, In so dulng we alsu apply
it in its fullest sense to others.
Surface Danger.*;.
So far as I have gono with this
paper it has beeu chiefly on underground discipline. Let us for a shorl.
time dwell on the surface.
Here the principal dangers encountered are from electrical conductors,
moving machinery, or tbe possibility
of falls from buildings; moving machinery, not only locomotives but tipple and shop machinery, require careful and efficient guarding, Not one
of you need to be told that a train of
gears, or revolving set screws, or a
key upon a shaft, is a source of danger. In such places oue frequently
finds placarda printed, generally in
red type, bearing the mottor "Safety
First." yet how often have we known
of workmen doing some action that
endangers their own and in some
caseB other men's safety, and the placard bearing the motto staring them iu
the face.
This would never be done if proper
discipline was enforced at that particular plant or colliery. As long as
human nature remains as it is we will
doubtless have accidents in and
around mines, even though we use all
possible physical precautions. The
real safety of the worker comes from
within and not from without We
should all realize that it is better to
be sure than sorry, yet we ..till tako
a chance, and why? The answer can
only be one way—because wo lack
discipline.
Tbe safety of the miners and other
workmen depends entirely upon the
ability to think and act along sufo
lines. Wben through long discipline
he hus acquired the habit of being
safe, then and only then will mining
probably no longer be classed as a
particularly dangerous occupation.
Let us always think of "Safety
First." It is a maxim I would teach.
Let your watchword bo "Discipline,"
and practice wliat you preach; do not
take any dangerous chances but safety
rectify, for you never miss the water
until the well runs dry.
.Mistress: Xorah, I rang for you four
times and you didn't come. I'm getting
tired of it.
Mistress; So am I; that's why I've
conic.
.Mrs. Gaggs; "So you don't believe in
clubs for women—eh?"
.Mr. Gaggs: "A club Is too gentle for
women.   I prefer an axe,"
The Corner Store
WE   SELL   FOR   LESS
A TRIAL ORDER WILL CONVINCE YOU
STRAWBERRY ,1AM, 4-lb. tins   $1.(10
POST TOASTIES 3 pkts. 25c
SUNLIGHT SOAP 3 cartons $1.00
VAN CAMP'S PORK AND BEANS, 15s, tin  15c
HEINZ SOUR MIXED PICKLES, quart jars        title
EXTRA SPECIAL
RIPE STRAWBERRIES, per basket   40c
RIPE TOMATOE.S, per lb  45c
CUCUMBERS, each    35c
DRY GOODS
LADIES' SILKOLINE HO.SE, per pair  75c
LADIES' PURE SILK HO.SE, per pair  $2.25
These are extra good value.
MEN'S UNDERWEAR, grey; regular $1.75 per garment.   To clear  $1.40
MEN'S WHITE WOOL UNDERWEAR, regular $2.50
per garment. To clear  $2.40
BOOTS AND SHOES
MEN'S SOLID LEATHER WORK SHOES, all sizes;
regular $8.00 per pair. To clear  $0.75
MEN'S HIGH-TOP ELK HIDE BOOTS, regular $18.00
per pair for $15.00
BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES, per pair $3.25, $3.50, $3.75
We have a full range of Kor-Ker Shoes for Children.
A money-back guarantee with every pair.
WM. GORDON
Phone 133 rw
CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April d, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
.Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BIGKLE Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN Editor.
SATTK1UY. APRIL 9,  1921.
WHAT'S IN  A NAME
The contention of some legal luminaries that beer ean be
sold over the bar provided ii is not sold as such, but under
some designation remote in name though akin In taste
opens up interesting possibilities. And this loophole wat
discovered in the Legislative Assembly before the Huust
had concluded its session. We wonder if the new Moderation Act is going to develop as many leaks and loopholes
aa tbe famous—or infamous—Prohibition Act!
British Columbia voted for a Moderation Act. aud It now
haa it, coming into force ou the lirst of May. Some people
who heretofore have uot taken a keen interest in .May Day
probably will do so on this occasion. It is up to the people
of tbe Province to give tin* Act a fair trial-six months
should be ample time in which to gauge the workings of
the measure, and nece-isary amendments could be made
at the Fall session of the House.
Not the leatf difficulty in enforcing the provisions of the
Act will be met wltb in the people who come from without
the borders of the province, seeking an oasis in a supposedly arid continent. As far as possible they should be
made to obey the law and not be allowed to bring this
fair province into disrepute by excessive indulgence in
hard liquor.
Probably tbe greatest dissatisfaction with the present
Act is the elimination of the sale of beer by the glass. In
the light of fuller discussion on the matter it would seem
that the best solution of the matter would be local option
as regards beer sold by the glass. There are some towns,
such as Cumberland, a coal-mining centre, where the sale
of this refreshment over the bar should be allowed, under
strict supervision. If anyone ls entitled to a glass of beer
surely it is a miner after doing a shift away down in the
mines.
However, it is hoped the people will give it a fair trial,
otherwise British Columbia is doomed to total prohibition,
with all its evils and humbug.
OLIVER'S FAVORITE PASS
"PasBiug the buck" ls a game that politicians play.
Every politician plays it some, but all are not successful
i nthe same measure. Premier Oliver has oue favorite pass
which has enabled him to get away with a fair amount of
It, but if we mistake not the rumblings, this pass will not
see him through any more rough places, and it will be
up to him to give a better account of himself when he is
again approached.
For some months now, says the Enderby Commoner, the
one reply of the Premier to any and all delegations appearing before him in connection with the expenditure of public moneys has been, ln effect, that the people of B. C. ask
for more than tbey are prepareed to pay for. and that
they expect the government to do more than they are prepared to provide tbe money for.
The same reply is given by the Premier with regard to
road work, for schools, for hospitals—anything and everything that a delegation may approach him on. And taxes
are going up all the time, and the service is getting poorer.
The people are tired of hearing this plaint of the Premier.
Thy look upon it as a half truth tbat is as good as a full
lie. The people of British Columbia do not ask more than
they are willing to pay for. But they do expect something
for the taxes tbey are called upon to pay. and will not
be long satisfied with this raven's cry of Honest John.
MUSIC AND MANKIND
Shakespeare tells us the man who is not moved by
sweet sounds is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils.
Another philosopher had rather write the songs of a nation
than make its laws. And we are all familiar with the old
saying that a person who does not love music, flowers and
little children is not to be trusted as a friend.
Testimony of this kind in behalf of the good qualities of
music could be lengthened to a point of tedium. Music is
the one universal language of the heart. One nation's
tongue may conceive a piece of music, but when it is put
iu instrumental form, it becomes the property of ' the
nations of the world. In its general appeal music captivates both mau and beast. It soothes man in bis sorrow
and thrills bim in his joyous moments. The happiest
homes are tbose where tbere is music or a sincere love of
music.
A city must have its music or it will languish on the
purlieus ot moral indifference.
PREACH OPTIMISM—KEEP SMILING
A Western Ontario business concern says: ' Whether
piices go up or down, whether labor conditions grow
better or worse, whether interest rates work higher or
lower, business will go on. Aud those who are worthy
are the ones who will do it. There are 8,000,000 people
In Canada who must be fed and clothed and sheltered, and =
there will always be something to exchange for entertain-' -aS
ment and luxuries. And through it all, the bu-dncss that
Is worthy, tbat serves legitimate requirements persistently
and consistently, will continue. There will always be men
to do the world's work. There will be business men of
cleur vision, who not only talk service but give it—give
it every day—and who never lose faith for a minute. Such
men are responsible for the world's prosperity. They will
continue in their success as surely as modern civilization
endures. Therefore, don't cry hard times, but preach
optimism.    Keep smiling."
Illi
New Showing of Corsets
Just Received.   Look out for our Window Display
SOMETHING MORE THAN EARTH
Probably ot* all tbe beautiful and eloquent passages ever
written by the Inimitable George D. Prentice, the following is the finest:
lt cannot be that earth is man's only abiding place. It
cannot be that our life is a bubble cast by eternity to float
a moment upon its waves and sink into nothingness. Else
why ls it that the high and glorious aspirations which leap
like angels from the temple of our hearts are forever wandering unsatisfied? Why is it that the rainbow und clouds
como over us with a beauty that is not of earth, and then
pass oil* aud leave us to muse on tlieir loveliness? Why
is It that the stars which hold their festival around the
midnight throne are set above the grasp of our limited
facilities, forever mocking us witli their unapproachable
glory? And finally, why Is it that bright forms of human
beauty are presheted to our view and taken from us;
leaving the thousand streams of our affection to flow back
In an Alpine torren upon our hearts? There Is a realm
where the rainbow never fades, where the stars will be
prad out before us like the Islands that slumber in the
ocan, and where the beautiful being which pass before us
like shadows will stap forever in our presence?
Germany thinks she can't pay the Indemnity.   For that
matter she thought she couldn't be licked.—Dayton News.
Premier Oliver has played a little shell game on Mrs.
Ralph Smith. That lady is a member of the cabinet, but
the position of President of the Council Is still held by
Honest John himself, so that all .Mary Ellen has received
Is the empty shell.—Kamloops Standard-Sentinel.
will particularly appreciate our very smart
showing of:
DRESSES
BLOUSES
LINGERI!
HOSIERY
GLOVES
MILLINERY
tnd
CORSETS
Early inspection is
desirable.
t/aygacAg
Corsets
It we would dig our happiness out of What we Have,
Instead of trying to dig it out of What we Want, we would
get more of it.
Badminton Finals
Played Saturday
(Continued from Page One)
Second Round.
Miss Weldon and A. Nunns (-6) 15,
beat Mrs. Stacev and T. Mumford (0)
lu.
Mrs. Spicer and D. H. Gowen (0) lfs,
heat Miss Campbell and W. Leversedge (-3) 14.
.Mrs. Leversedge and J. Walton (-4)
15, beat Miss Gegeogehan and J.
Hough (0) 5.
Miss Dando and G. Hassel, bye.
MEVN SINGLES
Tarbell
Bryan
(-3)
Stacey
Hough
First ltiMiinl.
F.  Dalby  (-1)   15,  beat
(-4) 3.
J.  Walton   (-3)   15, beat
(-2) 2.
A. Nunns (-) 15, beat V. Dalby
0.
T. Mumford  (-3)  15, beat T. Scott
(-2) 12.
W.   Leversedge    (-41    15.    beat    J.
Vernon-Jones  (-8)   11.
J. Cameron (-1) 15, beat It.
(-1) 5.
W. Rodger (-4) 15, beat J. F
(0) 7.
U. Hassell, bye..
Second Hound.
J.  Walton   (-li   15,  beat
(-4) 7.
A. Nunns (-4) 15, beat T
t-3) 3.
W.   Leversedge    (-1)    15,
Cameron (-1) it.
W. Rodger (-4) 15, beat G. Hassell
(-2) 1.
Third Itiiiinil.
A. Nunns  (-4)   15, bent J.
(-3) 8.
W. Rodger (-4) 15, beat W
sedge (-4) 8.
Finals.
(Rest two out of three games.)
W.  Rodger and A. iN'unns   (-4)   15,
11, 15, beat F. Dalby and V. Dalbv (It)
3, 15, 5.
The following players to compete in
the Ladles' Doubles. Mixed Doubles
and Men's Singles, are requested to
be at the hall as early after 7 o'clock
Saturday evening as possible, as it is
hoped to finish the competitions that
night.
Ladies' Doubles.
Mrs. Owen, Mrs. Leversedge, Mrs.
Scott, Miss Campbell, Mrs. Spicer and
Mrs. Nunns.
Mixed Doubles.
Miss Weldon and A. Nunns, Mrs.
Spicer aud B. II. Gowen, Mrs. Leversedge and J. Walton, Miss Dando and
G. Hassell.
.Men's Singles (Finals).
W. Rodger v. A. Nunns.
INSPIRING SERMON BY
REV. PRINCIPAL VANCE
F
Dalby
Mumford
beat   J
Walton
. Lever
MBN'S DOUBLES.
First Itniind.
W. Rodger and A. Nunns (-8) 15,
boat T. W. Scott and R. Stacey (0) 10.
W. Leversedge and J. Walton (-4)
15, beat J. Cameron and J. Vernon
Jones (0) 3.
F. Dalby and V. Dalby (-2), beat T.
Mumford and G. Hassell (0) 8.
G. Tarbell and J. F. Hough, bye.
Second Hound.
W. Rodger and A. Nunns (-C) 15,
beat G. Tarbell and J. F. Hough (0) 7.
F. Dalby and V. Dalby (-2) 15, beat
*W. Leversedge aud J. Walton (-4) 10.
At Holy Trinity Church on Sunday
evening Rev. Principal Vance, of the
Anglican Theological College of B.C.,
delivered a powerful sermon. Starting with the experience of Saint Paul,
whose religious progress was composed of three stages of revelation,
when he saw (lod face to face, revolution from being an opponent of the
gospel to being nn exponent of It. and
resolution to make known lo the
world what had transformed his
ideals. Principal Vance applied the
three stages to the church. He said
the church was presumably composed
of those who had met God face to face
nnd that Its members were presumed
to have made the revolution that
Saint Paul had experienced. The third
stage, however, which was the resolution to sprend the gospel through the
world, had not been fully achieved.
One of thc agents of the Anglican
Church In the province for coping
with the needs of mankind was the
Anglican College for training clergy,
this Institution being democratically
governed nnd being in line for
eventual affiliation with the provincial University. Ono of the main features in having the college on the
university grounds was that it would
give the impact of Christianity to
students at a critical period in their
lives.
The war record of the college was
an enviable one, its enlistments during the war equaling the number of
its enrolment, and many of these men
had returned with honors.
The needs of tlie college were for
Information, prayer, money and men.
Principal Vance pointed out thnt the
secular part of higher education wns
paid for by the state, but that a theological college did not enjoy that
source of revenue. Teaching, nursing
aud the ministry, the three sacrificial
occupations, that persons entered nol
for gain hut to benefit their fellows,
were woefully undermanned, said the
speaker. God worked his plan
through individuals, ho said, and it
was necessarily that men, the right
men, should answer the divine call.
God had an Only Son, nnd He gave
Him to tlie world. Christ the Onl,
Son, gave Himself lo the world.
BREEZES
By X-RAYS.
Who killed Cock Robin?
"We," aaid the wolves,
"With our little hawser;
We pulled the ftup
"From the trjp of the saucer."
And the birds of tlie air
Went a-sighi}lg and a-sobbing.
If the studs and nails in players'
boots are not examined more frequently some of us will be walking
about the field wearing littlo more
than a smile.
"Yon make I laugh!" was the sentence uttered by a tmvnie of mine
when a certain gink told us in the
pool room that his father was suffering from "Eucalyptis."
Pilling, it is rumored, has been
placed on a "bean" diet, on the recommendation   of  his   lengthy  chum.
They say there is money in the English Cup. One would think so, to read
of a "Bank" scoring one goal, while
Cash-more scored two.
Andy Home scored one of his
specials again, you know—whou ft—
at. llfteen yards, and tlie goalie
blushed.
How about a public subscription to
buy "milkshakes" for the team?
And Cumberland ain't no worse-
cause Stan Fazackerley of Everton
has played ten games since New Year
and not scored a single goal.
Rheumatism
Neuritis, Sciatica, Neuralgia
Templeton's
Rheumatic
Capsules
Have brought good
health to hulf-a-niillion
sufferers.
A healthful, money-saving remedy.
well known for fifteen years, prescribed by doctors, sold by druggists, $1.00 a box. Ask our agents
or write for a free trial package.
Templetons, 142 King \\„ Toronto.
Sold by
R. E. FROST
Teddy Jackson more than held his
own nt left-half last' week. For that
we thank the Band.
Chelsea played eight games in the
English Cup competition and did not
meet a single First Division team.
With Pilling leading the attack, the
United consider they aro very much
strengthened.
I wonder if the gent who communicated with the "Herald" down below
saw the game last week. -If bo, I
guess he will have some sweeter music
to play ln his next write-up,
"Attn Bhoy" Trainer. Bevan
slammed a win on Sunday at Union
Bay, by defeating the leaders on their
own "middin."
WHAT  "DUCAT" SAVS
Weir and Aitken scored the tallies
Perhaps Bo van's luck has changed.
Desperate Dick, the reserve trainer
for United, was all in after the game
—long nfter.
Willie   is getting   more
support every week.
and   more
Strange, Cardiff City has come
through with a 1-0 victory ln each
round of the E. F. A. Cup.
From a report in the English papers
there are eighteen maiden internationalists. One would think the
ladies ure making wonderful strides.
Manchester City's defence was altered last week, for tlle first time this
season.
it's like old-times playing on Saturday ufternoon. The weather prevent
eel the crowd from coming, but ut that
we had a good gate.
Seven of Liverpool F. C. players
are capped, viz., Scott, Longworth,
Lacey, Bamber, Bromllow, .Matthews
and Chambers.
TENDERS
Tenders arc rnvited for the building
of a Septic Tank and installing four
flush toilets In the Fraternity Hall Co.
Block at Cumberland.
Tenders to bo In by April 16, 1021.
Lowest or any tender' not necessarily
accepted.
For further particulars apply to
JOS. HORBURY, Secretary.
Cumberland, B. C.
Hltchens and Gough did not have a
great deal of work to do, but what
came their way was accomplished in
a most able manner, with complete
under standing.
Jock Clarke went out to gather
scalps last week-end. His latest—so
he claims—ls his Singing Championship.
There will be a regular .line-up of
football songsters at the G.W.V.A.
Smoker Saturday night. They are
wondering if there will be another
check up of "dead marines."
One good shake deserves another—
but don't shake   too   many different
Favorite  Stings  ou  Training Nights,
"Smile a 'Wile.' "
"The Moonshine on Vour Smile."
"Jolly Good Pals."
"Friend o' .Mine."
"Tjie Scoop That Failed."
"You say he's mean. Well, why?1
"Why? If you givo him a cigar he
would shure smoke it to the lust half
inch, chew the end, and use tlie ash
for snuff—nnd even then he gave up
smoking, because lie could not find
any use for the smoke."
Jack: "Do you like apples?"
Sammy:   "Apples!    Naw!    I   'ates
'em.   I wouldn't eat a napple fer the
world, 'cause me old mother died of
Apple-plexy."
'Can you crack nuts?"
'No—got'no teef,"
'Well, 'old on to these while I
for some more."
Tliey say certain fish can open oyster shells. Another kind of fish delights to guess under which shell the
little pea is hidden.
4-101 kinds together.   They don't agree.
'What sort of a woman is Mrs.
Guff?" asked Mrs. Muff.
Well," replied .Mrs. Duff, "she's
one of those women who could wear
a $10,000 necklace and make it look
like it came from the 10-cent store."
A story 1 heard the other day will
amuse referees as much as it amused
me. A spectator, dissatisfied with the
manner in which tlie referee was
failing to keep pace with the game,
yelled: "Git a move in\. Hut. Ast yer
mower ter bring yer a barf-chalr!"
"Garn! 'E don't want a barf-chalr,"
Bill retorted to his pall; "'ET1 send a
postcard when 'e wants ter whistle."
Rather an unjust reflection on the
hardest worked man on the field. And
it is because lie is overworked that he
gives decisions which exasperate
spectators and Irritate players. Then
why not two referees? To keep close
to tlie ball and keep ln touch witli
every infringement during the whole
ninety minutes of tlle game is an impossibility.
For instance, the ball is banged up
tho fleld—say 50 yards—slammed
across from one wing to another, and
back to down the Held—snapped up
by a forward who makes a quick rush
for goal. However speedy the referee
may be lie cannot get probably within
2o yards of a player who is being
robbed of the leather in an unfair
manner by the opposing buck before
the official has time lo see what ls
happening, And with a hefty kick
the back sends the ball down the field
and oil* goes the referee again.
Suppose a referee was chosen for
each half of tlie field— then it would
fend to euse tlie task and also ensure
a stricter control und supervision of
llie game. Each referee would cou-
line Ills attention solely to the one
half which he controls, and as soon
us the bull had crossed the half-way
line his colleague would take up the
olllclal capacity of chief referee. At
the same time tlie flrst referee would
keep a strict look-out and be consulted on matters uncertain.
WHEN NEW YORK COST $24.
The Island of Manhattan, the site of
New- York, was bought from the
Indians on May 6, 1626, for $24 by
Peter Minult. Today the assessed
of New York is more than $0,000,000,-
000, the bulk of which is in Manhattan, The Island of Manhattan is 12%
miles long and bas an average breadth
of oue and three-fifth miles. In this
small portion of the earth live 2,284,-
103 people.
"What's your Idea of clean sport?"
"Swimming." <?
April 0, 192l.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Five
«£$\  Music and Photoplays |fp-
"MORE DEADLY THAN
THE MALE" HAS A
STARTLING FINALE
New Ethel Clayton Picture Is
Packed With Thrills aud
Adventure.
Ethel Clayton's new picture, "More
Deadly Than the Male," is said t(
have all the earmarks of a grim melodrama until just before the tlnale,
when a few revelations turn it
abruptly Into a delightrul comedy
drama, The centra) figure is u capable hi&h-splritcd girl in love with a
wealth; clubman who is used to
searching hi queer corners of the
globe f " excitement and adventure,
When Bhe urjes him to aettlo down to
useful occupation, lie retorts thai
there a: i no (Ini'ls iu modern civilization. Whereupon sin.- Bets oui to prove
him mistaken
All sorts of hair-raising incidents
in a mountain camp follow. The conservatory has been transformed into
au African jungle, he lights a fatal
duel .with the girl's supposed husband, n dam hursts with nearly disastrous results, and finally thero is a
rip-snorting set to with the harbor
police, at the end of which the har-
rassed hero is brought to, informed of
the real state of affairs, and agrees to
stay close to the family fireside thereafter.
The story was adapted from a
novelette appearing in a popular Action magazine recently. This Para-
mount-Artcraft picture will appear at
the Ilo-Ilo on Monday night next.
Miss Kflie Johnson
Leading lady of the Athon Co., which
will appear at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre for
3 days, commencing .Monday, April IS.
"You look sleepy, Jones. You must
have been up with the sun this morning."
"Yes, I was up with him all niglit."
.Magistrate: "Describe the man
whom you saw assaulting the complainant."   '
Policeman:'"He was a little insig-
nilicant looking mau—about your
sine, your honor."
"Why not marry," said the benedict
to the woman hater, "and have a wife
to share your lot for better or for
worse?"
And the disgruntled one growled:
"It sounds all right; but some of
those shareholders blossom iuto
directors."
Coming With The
Athon Companv
TWO WOMEN, A ROGUE,
A REVOLUTION AND AN
AMERICAN HERO
Mr. Iliilirrt  A tli on
who brings Uie Athon Co. to the Hollo Theatre for a  three-day engagement, starting Monday, April 18.
REGULAR OLD BLOCKHOUSE FIGHT SHOWN
IN SERIAL EPISODE
The old blockhouse fights between
the Indians and the whites in other
days, as described in history and
story and even those during the Spanish-American war were always thrilling to read or hear about. To see
such a tight, with rifles spitting fire
between cracks in the wall, loop-holes
aud through the windows as an actual
scene would be a thrilling sight worth
while.
The Vitagraph serial, "The Invisible
Hand," starring Antonio Moreno,
offers such a privilege in the fifth
episode which will be presented at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Monday and Tuesday nights, Moreno playing the role
of the great Secret Service detective,
together with a border patrol of soldiers, is trapped in a deserted cabin
by the baud of organized outlaws they
are trying to round up. Surrounded
on all sides, the detective and the soldiers put up a great battle until the
bandits dropped a can of TNT upon
the roof of thc cabin,
Lawyer: "What did you marry him
for?"
Client: "His money."
Lawyer: "What do you want a
divorce for?"
Client: "I've got It."
Wife (pleading): "I'm afraid, Jack,
you do not love me* auy more—anyway, not as well as you used to."
Husband: "Why?"
Wife: "Because you always let me
get up to light the fire now."
Husband: "Nonsense, my love!
Vour getting up to light the fire makes
tue lovo you all tho more."
"The way to run this country." said
Knowltall, "is to put thoroughly wise,
capable, alert and honest men in control of affairs."
"Yes," answered Miss Keen, "but
what are we to do—there's only one
of you."
We all make mistakes, but thank
goodness the other fellow's look
■worse to us than our own.
"Which do you prefer, the monlains
I'br the seashore?"
"1 prefer the seashore when I'm at
the mountains and the mountains
wheu I'm at the seashore."
1   DORIS KEANE
^ROMANCE        w_
FM.iuuiuuuiiiiuirimTTmTiinMiMiiniiiiiiMiim^yjai
Spain, the blossom land of passion!
Spain, the fiery flower land of romance! Spain, the fascinating, blazing, beautiful, exotic! To that sunny
land ef scarlet and gold Reggie Harding followed his wilful American
Beauty,   But she spurned liis love!
A bold and reckless rogue had
strummed his guitar and she had
fallen hard for bis songs and his
Spanish moustache. She thought she
had found real romance at last, and
when a Spanish siren, with flying
heels and flashing eyes, drew a stil-
letto in jealous rage, she was thrilled.
And because two women loved one
rogue, a revolutionary plot did not go
according to schedule. True, the city
plaza was a riot of mad, lighting, hard
riding, straight shooting soldiers,
civilians and revolutionists, but the
revolutionists were forced to flee
without their prize   the governor.
After that fracas, Reggie pulled oil
one by himself, in which single-handed he rescued the girl from the rogues
who were holding her for ransom.
George U. Seitz is Reggie. June
Caprice the American girl, Marguerite
Courtot the Spanish dancing girl and
Harry Semets the rogue In "Hogues
and Romance," the big Pathe spectacle
coming to the Ilo-Ilo on Thursday of
next week.
•   *   *
SETTINGS OP ti HEAT
BEAUTY DISTINGUISH
NEW DE MILLE FILM
Expense Not Considered in the
Production of "Something
To Think About"
Stage settings of unusual beauty
are assured in any photoplay bearing
Cecil B. Do Mine's name, and "Something to Think About," the Paramount
picture which will be shown at the
Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Saturday, April 16,
easily reaches the high standard set
by previous De Mille productions.
But "Something to Think About"
lias, in addition to several stage settings of remarkable beauty, some of
tbe most realistic backgrounds of a
humbler sort ever seen in a motion
picture production.
The story offers a great opportunity
for contrast, and due advantage lias
been taken of every opportunity. In I
this production has been supplied a
humble blacksmith's liome. bis work
shop and the poverty-stricken apartment wherein some of the most important action of the story transpires,
Against this background De Mille
placed a home of exquisite- beauty.
By thus contrasting the two surroundings, they have emphasized the realism of one and tbe artistic perfection
of the other.
•   *   *
"ROMANCE" A PLAY OF
DELIGHTFUL QUALITIES
No screen production that lias yet
been produced possesses such delightful qualities as does "Romance," the
alluring and fascinating love story
from the pen of Edward Slieldbu.
America's foremost dramatist, in
which Miss Doris Keane, who played'
the leading role on the stage for six
continuous years In New York, Chicago, Boston and London, will play
the chief part, when it is shown at
the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Wednesday
week, April 20th.
As Mine. Cavallinl, tlie fascinating
prima donna heroine, Miss Keane bas
won for herself many triumphs on llie
International stage and is ranked today as America's greatest emotional
actress. Her Impersonation of the
difficult role Is one of the most brilliant acting achievements the screen
has known. ,
The production is said • to lie remarkable In Its every detail and Is beyond compare in artistry of detail
witli any motion picture production
ot the lust decade. Tlle most minute
care has been taken to faithfully represent the environments of New York
In which the production is laid, anil
the picture will go down In motion
picture history as one of the epoch-
making productions of the nge.
Brown: "Don't you find it hard these
times to meet expenses?"
Blnn: "Hard? Mun alive! I meet
expenses at every turn."
Coming to the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on Monday week, April 18.
Tom: "Does your wife wait for tlie
least thing on your part to make
trouble?"
John: "Dear me, no; she's not so
slow as that.   She's a self-starter!"
"Did you se that movie called 'Oliver
Twist?'"
"Yes; and say, wouldn't It mako a
peach of a book?"
The Eskimos require that a doctor
return Ills fee If the patient dies while
under treatment.
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, April 9th
William Farnum
IN
IF I WERE KING
Monday, April 11th
Ethel   Clayton
— IN
MORE   DEADLY  THAN
THE  MALE
A. PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT   PICTURE
CAUGHT!—in fair arms that clung—drew him in—trapped him like a fly in the
web of a spider! And he had thought that women were weak; had planned adventure, hunting tigers in the wilds. But the eternal tigress, woman, sprang into his
life at home; crammed his days with more adventure than he ever dreamed; in the
end, made him glad of her powr. A picture of rare beauty, stirring events, and a
subtle appeal that is irresistible.
Wednesday, April 13th
The Woman That God Sent
Thursday, April 14th
JUNE   CAPRICE   AND
GEORGE   B.   SEITZ
— IN-
Rogues & Romance
HOT-BLOODED ROGUES AND RED-BLOODED ROMANCE—That's what Reggie
bumped into in Sunny Spain. Rogues adtled thrills, passion and punch In his adventures. Romance was already in his soul, but the Spanish lips of red, coal black eyes,
clicking castanets, thrumming guitars, fiery fandangos, and a piping hot revolution
gave his American heart some galloping throbs.
Saturday, April 16th
11'
Cecil B.DeMille's Production |
A   PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT   PICTURE ||
SOMETHING TO THINK 1
ABOUT |
(I   Coming for 3 Days commencing Monday, April 18th   1
1 THE ATHON COMPANY |
| Presenting condensed versions of the
I WORLD'S BEST  PLAYS I
mil
1 §b
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April a, mi.
DINING TABLES
ROUND GOLDEN OAK, 6-ft. extension $32.50
ROUND FUMED MAPLE, 6-ft. extension $28.35
SQUARE GOLDEN FIR  $18.75
NEW SEASON'S WALLPAPERS
We are now showing the new season's wallpapers
in artistic patterns, newest shades and colorings.
A Full Line of Furniture and
Furnishings in Stock
A. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B. C
re
1
K
WHEN YOU WANT A SATISFYING, HEALTHY
DRINK, ORDER
SILVER
SPRING
BEER
AT ALL THE LEADING HOTELS AND BARS
WILLIAM DOUGLAS,  Distributing Agent.
Silver Spring Brewing Company
P.O. Box 03
Established 1907
Does Your   House
Need Repairs?
WHEN SUNSHINE APPEARS
IT MAKES US FEEL BRIGHT
Look around the house and see
if it needs repairs.
Now after the winter
Your house with dirt appears thick,
So don't you think you had better be
quick,
Call  in  the  Painter and  have your
house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter Cumberland, B. C.
SIGN WOItK A SPECIALTY.
ESTIMATES GIVEN.
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ROUGH AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load)...$5.00
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND • - B. C.
rz
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
Leaves Vancouver 7.1,1 p. ni. Dally.
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
PORT ARTHUR
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
Connections for all points In Canada and United States.
Compartment Observation Cars, Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
EDWARD W. BICKLE, District Agent.
Canadian National Railways
YOUR TEETH
LOCAL ANAESTEHICS
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
The local anaesthetic is a medicine
that temporarily takes away the sensation of feeling from one part of the
body, leaving the rest of the body
with its normal sensation. We use
the word "local" to differentiate this
type of anaesthetic from the "general"
anaesthetic, which takes away the
sensation from the entire body by
putting the patient to sleep.
The first local anaesthetic was cocaine. It was used with varying success, but with a great deal of danger,
for a number of years. The desirability of a local anaesthetic and the
danger of cocaine poisoning finally
resulted in a series of experiments to
find out the exact chemical contents
of cocaine. This, fortunately, was
discovered, and today we have a sub
stance called Xovocaine—or, to use
the proper government word, Pro
caine. This Procaine is what we call
a synthetic product. A synthetic is a
chemical imitation of a natural drug.
Procaine contains all of the element!
of cocaine, except the poison, and in
addition, it is much more uniform in
its strength. The results of its use
have been truly remarkable. By using Procaine, the dentist is able to
take away the sensation from any
part of the face or jaws that he may
desire.
Formerly the local anaesthetic was
injected with a hypodermic syringe
around the exact spot where the operation was to be performed. But nowadays the Injection is made any point
upon tlie main branch of the nerve
that supplies the area to be operated
upon, and the entire nerve branch Is
temporarily desensitized so that pain
is absent. The use of the local anaes
thetic in nerve blocking, as this
method Is called, was almost entirely
developed by investigators in America. Fortunately, we are now able to
manufacture in this country all of the
synthetic drugs that are necessary, so
that we never again will he caught
with a local anaesthetic famine, as
we were at the beginning of the war.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
SPRING
Spring comes hither dancing
All along the way,
Robin Redbreast chirping
On a dewy spray.
Hazel tassels tossing
Jn the morning breeze,
Silver plumes adorning
Slender willow trees.
Shoots their coats are changing.
Green for sombre brown,
So—the tiny bud-scales
Softly flutter down.
For the sun is shining
Over all the land,
Setting out the green things
Fresh on either hand.
Tripping 'neath the hedge-rows
And the trees, her feet
Press out all the flower-buds
Into blossoms sweet.
Spring comes hither dancing—
Trills a merry lay
Till the breath of roses
Bears her far away.
Bangor, Eng.        Mrs. W. F. Perry
■111
W
Genuine Ford Parts Only
SERVICE
E or the Ford Company cannot be held responsible for the
performance of your Ford if you use parts not made by
the Company.
The Ford warranty automatically becomes void the moment you
use spurious parts on your car.
You cannot afford to incur this penalty. Nor do you want your
car weakened by badly fitting parts made from poor material.
Spurious parts are manufactured with profit as the first consideration. Genuine Ford parts have the Ford reputation to
maintain.
It is to the interest of both the Company and ourselves that
your Ford shall give you continuous satisfaction. The interest of
those who make and sell spurious parts ends with the sale.
The only way to make sure of getting the genuine is to patronize
the dealer displaying the Ford Service sign. That sign shows that
the dealer has bound himself by contract to sell genuine Ford parts
only. Wherever you go, look for this sign, your guarantee of
satisfaction.
As Ford dealers in this community, we render Ford service. We
sell genuine Ford parts at a standard price which is set by the
Ford Motor Company. Our charges for repairs are also on the
"one-price" basis. You know the whole cost before we perform
the service.
E. C. EMDE, Ford "Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C.
R. G. LAYER, SALESMAN, CUMBERLAND.
PHONE 115.
FIREMEN STARTED FIRES
TO WIN ADMIRATION
The Columbia, Pa., (ire department
is under arrest charged with arson.
Reason: Eight young men desiring to
lie brave fire fighters in the eyes ol*
Columbia belles, confessed, it is said,
tliey had set at least ten fires in two
weeks. Damage in these different
blazes ranged from $100 to $50,000.
The "heroes" arrested were Qeorge
J. .Muir, 19; Chester L. Boutley, IS;
Georgo E. Grab, 10; Charles R,
Reamer, 10; William llasselliach, IS;
Clayton 11. Smith, 17; Albert Lowery.
22, and Harold G. Murr, 22.
Excitement of lire lighting meant
littlo ill the young lives of these
"smoke eaters." It was tlie clanging
of the gongs, the shrieking of tho
siren on the fire apparatus, the thrill
of hearing Emma or Susie or Edith
yell as the puffing monsters raced
madly down the street: "Oh, my!
There goes the fire engines."
"Look at George; see Charles. Oh,
dear me, I am afraid they will be
killed."
Members of the gang visited buildings picked for thc lire, started the
blaze going with oil and other combustibles, then hurried out to see that
an alarm was given.
As the fire hose was strung from
hydrant, ladders were erected and
youthful fire fighters swarmed up to
chop holes iu the roof or throw
streams of water on adjoining buildings. When the blaze \ as subdued
the "heroes" trotted back to headquarters, followed by admirers.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day and Night
D. Campbell's
Meat  Market
Phone 66
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Hare yon tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef J It Is delicious.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIA!
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
EXTENSION
OF REBATE
PERIOD
11 Commencing from February 15, the
gj rebate period on current Electric Light
H accounts will be extended to the end of
JH the month.
11 Thus the period in which discount will
•|j[ be allowed in future will be from the
1 15th to end of each month
PAY YOUR ACCOUNTS PROMPTLY AND SAVE
THE DISCOUNT
I
S. DAVIS, TES
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Whereas certain mischievously Inclined persons have
tampered with the valves on the mains of this company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out that it is a serious
offence to tamper with such valves, and should the offending parties be apprehended they will be prosecuted to the
Very fullest extent of the law.
Dunsmuir    js (*6
April 9, 1921.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Why
"Auto-Shoes" ?
We figure that any automobile casing has
a right to be called a "tire"—whether
it's good, bad or indifferent. And we agree
with the opinion that an exceptionally
good casing deserves a distinctive name.
AmesHolden"Auto-Shoes"aremilesbetter
in performance than ordinary tires. That
has been proved to our satisfaction. So
we think it's a good idea to identify such
unusual mileage givers by an easy-to-
remember name—"Auto-Shoes."
The main purpose of the name is to help you to
get cheaper mileage. The guarantee behind Ames
Holden "Auto-Shoes" insures that you get it. If
necessity for adjustment should ever arise you
will find th it you will get satisfaction without
trouble or red tape.
They arc the Drinnpal advantages that go with
the name Ames I ioldefi"Auto-Shoes." Drop in and
let us show yuu the tires themselves.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
BOOST THE PROVINCE
BY PURCHASING ONLY
GOODS MADE IN B. C.
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Sizes
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
TASTE is the TEST
of the DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,   LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer   The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water FFruu!»fc°f Pure
Cascade Beer   The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,  LTD.
NANAIMO. B.C.
Public  Service
The spirit of responsibility to the whole telephone
democracy, to the millions who form the telephone-
using public, is the foundation of service. It is the
appreciation of this responsibility by the many employees of the company which has as its result a comprehensive and adequate telephone system and an
alert and prompt handling of telephone calls.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Small Bank Accounts
MANY people put off opening a Savings Bank
Account until they feel they have a large enough
sum to make it worth while. This is why they never
learn the habit of thrift.
Open an account with us by depositing $1, and add
$1 weekly or monthly until you can increase the
amount of your periodical deposit.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBEKLAiVD URANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
April 15th is "Made in B. C. Day."
On this day the people of British
Columbia are being asked to buy the
goods that  tliey themselves  produce.
Citizens of Golden are petitioning
the provincial government to construct a road from 8-mile to 20-mile
An effort will also be made to induce
the Dominion government to construct
a highway from Golden to Leanchoil
completing a circut from Windermere
to Banff and Golden.
Building permits were taken out for
143 dwellings in Vancouver during
the month of March.
The provincial governmeut appropriated $200,000 for new buildings at
Prince Rupert.
A large order for railway ties has
been placed with British Columbia
mills from Egypt.
The Canadian National Railway's
station to be built at Prince George
will be large enough to take care of
the traffic for some year to come.
The Allies have demanded from
Germany, as indemnity, the sum ot"
55 billion gold marks. The German
Empire has a population of seventy
million persons. Tbey have forty
years in which to pay the indemnity.
This means that the per capita payment is $5 per annum.
The per capita payment of the people of this country to the United
States in exchange alone last year
was $17.50! The only way to reduce
our exchange is to buy at home.
British Columbia jams, jellies and
canned fruits are equal to any produced in the world—yet hundreds of
thousands of dollars' worth of these
commodities have been imported.
The manufacture of a unique toy
has been commenced. This toy is of
a constructional character, made entirely of wood. It will sell cheaper
and ls of a more substantial character
than any on the market. There are
many other wood products that could
be manufactured from British Columbia timber.
If all the cigars smoked each year
in British Columbia were placed in
one line, they would reach from Vancouver to Edison, Ontario. Those produced In British Columbln and smoked
In this province would not extend beyond Kamloops.
Recent mining reports received
by the government contain the information that ores found in the Grand
Forks district contain the precious
metals platinum, palladium, (radium,
osmium, radium and ruthelum.
Allowance for mine depletion in
taxing the properties of mine owners
in British Columbia Is to be made,
according to a recent speech of Hon.
J. Hart, Minister of Finance.
The price of copper in British Columbia has advanced from 11% to 12 Vi
cents per pound, according' to an announcement by Mr. Granby Quinn.
comptroller of the Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. The new
price comes as good news to the
Granby and other companies operating in copper, because, they .state
they have beeu losing money for some
time.
A revival of trade with Vladivostok, which was beginning to assume
important proportions at the outbreak
of the great war, is now looked for
hy British Columbia commercial and
shipping men. The decision of Britain to trade witli Lenine and Trotsky
is regarded as the lirst step in that
direction.
Face cream, hair restorer ami other
toilet articles are being manufactured
In British Columbia.
There appears to be a possibility ol
the gold-bearing sands of the Cariboo
again attracting the prospector. Reports from ABhcroft indicate that
rich strike has been made lu the
vicinity of that famous little city.
Commercial and shipping men iu
British Columbia have good reason to
be pleased with the announcement
that the 8 per cent, arbitrary increase
against Vancouver on transcontinental shipments from the East will be
withdrawn in a new tariff about io be
Issued. The province will be saved
thousands upon thousands of dollars
each year under the revised scale ol*
charges.
Thero is an increasing demand for
British Columbia timber in Eastern
Canada, in the manufacture of wood
products. These products could
easily be manufactured In this province.
g APRIL 18th, 19th and 20th
IIlo=Ilo Theatre
ITHRK BIG DAYS
ts=z
I Starting Monday, April 18th
|  The only Show of its kind in the World
I THE ATHON
| COMPANY
I    Presenting condensed versions of the
| World's Best Plays
J In  addition  to  the  Highest Class  of
I    VAUDEVILLE
|  Featuring the clever Actress with the
| wonderful personality
1 MISS EFFIE JOHNSON
|  Added to all this will be Seven Reels
| of the latest
| FEATURE PHOTO PLAYS
|  All   for   the   one   price   of   admission
THIS COMPANY ENJOYS THE DISTINCTION
OK   HAVING PLAYED   LONGER   ENGAGEMENTS IN CITIES THAN ANY SHOW EVEB
TOURING THK WESTERN COUNTRY.
Columbia Theatre, Vancouver, B. ('.   21 weeks.
Orpheum Theatre, Seattle       . .        t.". weeks,
strand and Lyric Theatres, Portland.. 72 weeks.
Princess Theatre, San Francisco i'l weeks.
Hippodrome Theatre, Spokane  !l weeks.
Weir and Bijou Theatres, Aberdeen 20 weeks.
Bijou Theatre, Honolulu  12 weeks.
P
R
I
C
E
S
Adults, 75c.    Children, 50c.
Rnv <N.o»tc   tl  f       INCLUDING      \
dox oeacs, «ju ^government tax; Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
April d, mi
5
Featuring New Skirts, Sport
Coats and Dresses
New Skirts
SERGE liKIRTS, in All-wool Navy Serge:
quality guaranteed; sizes to suit.
Price $7.50.
HEAVY NAVY SERGE SUITS, accordion
pleated.   Price $10.95.
FIXE NAVY BOTANY SERGE SUITS,
in newst styles and designs. Price
$13.75.
JERSEY CLOTH SKIRTS, in good shades
and warranted to give perfect satisfaction.   Price $9.50.
LARGE CHECK ALL-WOOL PLAID
SKIRT; very new and smart.
New Sport Coats
Shipments of these are arriving all the
time* as we aim to keep in touch with the
newest materials and styles. See the new
colorings just to hand.
New Dresses
NAVY SERGE DRESS—Pleated skirt;
waist and skirt beautifully beaded.
NAVY SATIN DRESS—Frilled skirt,
bodice trimmed with gold braid. This
is a really smart and up-to-date dress.
LADIES' SUITS, in Tweed, Serge nnd Tri-
cotinej no two alike
ALSO JERSEY SUITS.
THE NEWEST IN GEORGETTE
WAISTS
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
it
CICTB-.^jJ
SALE
Of Slightly Used  Phonographs
From time to time we take good Phonographs in
exchange for larger models or pianos; all these instruments are overhauled by our repair men and put in
perfect working order. Today you can get a snap in
slightly used Disc Phonographs at
$10 $15 $25
THE
G. A.
FLETCHER MUSIC
CUMBERLAND   AND
COURTENAY, B.C.
CO.
LTD.
 LOST
LOST — A    POST
OFFICE . KEY
Please return to Mrs. Peters. Cumlierland, B. C.
FOR SALE
FIVE-ROOMED FURNISHED HOUSE
in good locality; can give immediate
possession.   Apply F. S. Burrell.
THREE ACRES GOOD LAND, partly
cleared; house, liam and garage;
one cow, two dozen chickens; mile
and a half from town. For further
particulars apply Islander Ollice.
3-17
FORD CAR, mi), GOOD CONDITION.
Demountahle rims, shock absorbers.
Call and see at Chas. McMillan's,
E3 Camp. 3-17
POLICE COURT
K. A. Scott, of Kelly's Cafe, charged
by the chief of Police wiih having
liciunr in ills possession, appeared liefore Magistrate Baird on Thursday
and after bearing the evidence thc
case was adjourned until Friday,
when he was assessed $08.60 as line
aud costs.
The charge against the proprietor
of the Wilson Hotel, Union Hay, laid
hy Constable Agassiz of the Provincial
Police, of running a disorderly house,
was adjourned until Monday, and the
case against Neil of being In possession of liquor was adjourned until
Tuesday.
A business man advertised for an
office boy. The next morning there
were some fifty- boys in line. He was
about to begin examining the applicants when his stenographer hftnded
him a card on which was scribbled:
"Don't do anything until you see
me. I'm the last kid In line, but I'm
telling you I'm there with the goods!"
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
March 81—Esdud, coastwise; Ho-
ycisan Maru, Japan.
April 1 -Charmer, Vancouver; Che-
niaiiius, coastwise; Achates, coastwise; Storm King, coastwise.
April 2—Joyful, coastwise; Wireless, coastwise; Chieftain, coastwise;
Squid, coastwise.
April 4—Faultless, coastwise.
April 5—Alccdo, coastwise; Walka-
wa, Wellington, New Zealand; Plunger and Scow, Vancouver.
April 6— Canadian Prospector,
Genoa Bay; Tatsuna Maru, Japan.
A Hindu woman never cats with
her husband; if she were to touch
liis food It would be rendered unlit for
her lord''-; use.
HOUSE AND LOT FOR SALE—
House contains six rooms with a
concrete foundation; garage and
necessary outhouses.    Also a
GRAY-DORT SPECIAL AUTOMO-
bile, In first-class condition. For
further particulars apply to It.
Adamson, Cumberland.
FOR SALE—FORD TOURING CAR,
llilS, in Al condition; spare tire
and enrburetor. A good buy for
$500.    Apply Box 343, Cumberland.
CHEVROLET 5-PASSENGEH CAR,
1919 model, In llrst-elass condition;
fully equipped, live new tires, five
spnro tubes. A snap, $650 cash.
Apply Ben Evans, Camp, Cumberland. 1-17
FOR SALE—A FEW TONS OF GOOD
HAY. Apply Thomas Pearse, Minto,
or Plume Sti L.
PIANO FOR SALE—Price $150. Till
instrument is In good condition and
lias a good full tone. A bargain.
Apply to Box X Y Z, c-o Islander.
WANTED
PRIVATE   GARAGE.     APPLY   BOX
561, Cumberland. 2-10
A shaving brush of Japanese m'oko
is said to have been the cause of a
man iu Melboure getting anthrax.     s.
FOUND
TWO KEYS—OWNER CAN HAVE
same by paying for advertisement,
Apply Islander.
Grand Drawing
— for —
"C" MELODY SAXOPHONE.
TICKETS FIFTY CENTS.
Get your tickets from
Thos. J. Allen - Nanaimo, B.C.
Personal Mention
Rev. A. Bischlager, of Duncan, ac
companies by Mrs. Bischlager, are
visiting Cumberland for a few days
and are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. T.
il. Mumford. They leave Saturday
for Royston, returning South on Tuesday.
Mrs. Noel Macfarlane and daughter,
of Nanaimo, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilkinson of Union Bay. who were tlie guests
of Mrs. John Bruce of Belview Villa,
left for their homes on Saturday.
Mr. H. Macklin, of Victoria, manager of the Simon Leiser Co. Ltd., arrived Saturday and leit for Victoria
on Monday.
Mr. J. 11. Cameron, of the Cumberland .Motor Works, left t'or Victoria on
Monday and returned Wednesday.
Mr, and Mrs. T. U. Jackson returned
to .Nanaimo Thursday morning,
Mr. Qoggan, representative of Simon
Leiser & Co., Ltd., o! Victoria, arrived on Tuesday,
Mr. H. Creech, formerly of Cumlierland, arrived from Victoria Monday.
Mr. H. Stewart and Mr. Brown of
Victoria arrived iu town Monday.
Mrs. Philip Howe and daughter, of
.Nanaimo. who have been visiting Mrs.
EJ( W, Bickle for the past week, returned to iheir home on Tuesday.
Miss Agnus Totter returned from
Vancouver on Saturday last after
spending the Blaster vacation there.
Miss C. Dalton returned from Vancouver on Sunday.
Mr. F. S. Burrell returned from Vic
toria Wednesday.
Miss Hilda Watson returned from
Vancouver on Saturday last after
spending a week's vacation there.
Mrs. K. A. Scott returned from
Vancouver ou Saturday.
Mrs. W. A. Owen left for Nanaimo
Saturday and  returned Tm. day, ;
companied by her daughter Olga.
Mr. Charles Graham, District Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., returned irom Vancouver Sunday and left on Monday.
Mr. George Millard, who has been
spending the Easier vacation with his
parents in Courtenay, relumed to
Vancouver Sunday.
Mr. J. G. Quinn, manager No. 7
Mine, motored to Nanaimo last weekend.
Mr. Geo. O'Brien, Safety Engineer
of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
O'Brien, returned from Ladysmith on
Sunday.
.Major General Leckie of Vancouver
arrived in town Tuesday and left for
Vancouver Wednesday morning.
Mr. A. U. Stacey, Superintendent of
Electrical Operations, Canadian Collieries, left for Nanaimo Wednesday
ind returned Thursday.
Mr. Con Reifel of Nanaimo was in
town during thu week.
Mr, and Mrs. Charles Grant and
lamily returned from Victoria on
Saturday last.
Mr. A. J. Fouracre left for Vancouver Thursday in connection with S.C.
H. matters, and expects to return on
Tuesday.
Inspector May, of the Department
of Education, Victoria, arrived Tuesday on his annual tour of inspection.
Mr. Chas, E. Burbridge returned
Sunday alter attending the Teachers'
Federation conference  in  Vancouver.
Miss Hazel Frame has returned
from Fenticton, and is spending a
holiday with her parents, Mr. and
Airs. J. Frame.
Air. Geo. O'Briun motored to Nanaimo Wednesday.
Mv. W. Wall returned to Vancouver
Friday morning.
Miss -Maude Christie returned to
Victoria Sunday.
Births
VAUGHN—At the Cumberland General Hospital, April 5, to Mr. and
.Mrs. J. 11. Vauglin, a son.
RUTHERFORD—At the Cumberland
General Hospital, April 1, to .Mr. and
Mra L. Rutherford, a daughter.
JONES—sApril S, at the General Hospital, to .Mr. and Mrs; S. C. A. Jones,
a son. .
WHAT WE WANT TO KNOW
W. C
Happy Valley
Who took the milk out of Wee
Bobble's toffee ut the First Aid
smoker?
Who called his partner the endearing name of tlie "Old Lady" on Wednesday night?
Who boarded thc wrong steamer at
Vancouver Saturday and watched the
"Pat" go out? Iiowever, he reached
Cumberland at last—via Powell River
nnd otlier points. Beats the trip to
Vancouver via Victoria all to a
frazzle.
Who lt was that had the tube connected lo the Cascade bottle at the
Ambulance Smoker on Saturday?
Who wus the guy that loBt his teeth
at the smoker?
Who was the fellow that asked
which house he lived In after the
smoker?
Who was the critic that said what
excellent coffee those bottles contained?
If the local Band turned out last
Saturday at the fothall game to wel-
ome Bobby Brown back?
If our readers are aware that Ave
white men" (Lancashire lads) appeared in tlie Cumberland line-up last
Saturday?
Who calls this a "hick" town? Is
he of the samo opinion still?
If the management of the local football team Intend to play Pilling, who
is purely a centre forward, on the Inside left?  Be advised—don't do it,
Who beat it out the back door with
a bottle of whiskey—Into the arms of
WHITE " pollceman?
Why do so many men wriggle when
Phone 92R they go to church? Ask George.
Wood for Sale
$4.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
JUST ARRIVED:
KITCHEN   ENAMELWARE
Pearl
Enamelware
WASH BOARDS
COFFEE BOILERS
CONVEX KETTLES
PITCHERS
White
Enamelware
MIXING BOWLS »
SEAMLESS MUGS
WASH BASINS
DIPPERS
CHAMBERS
SOAP DISHES
LADLES
SKIMMERS
SPOONS
PUDDING PANS
CREAM PITCHERS
WATER PAILS
SINK STRAINERS
MILK PANS
Diamond
Enamelware
LONDON KETTLES
RICE BOILERS
SEAMLESS PAILS
PRESERVING KETTLES
SAUCEPANS
DISH PANS
COFFEE POTS
TEA POTS
CONVEX  KETTLES
CHAMBER PAILS
Japanned
Tinware
BATHS
BREAD BOXES
CAKE BOXES
FLOUR CANS
TRAYS
DUST PANS
WATER PANS
WE ALSO CARRY A FULL LINE OF
TIN KITCHENWARE
A Fresh Stock of Vegetables and
Fruit Always on Hand
SEE OUR WINDOWS.
WE  GUARANTEE  SATISFACTION
Burns  & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
SUCCESSORS TO SIMON LEISER & CO. LTD.
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the office at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at once.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
BUY HIGH-GRADE CAR
The Cumberland Motor Works, in
keeping with their policy of giving the
best service, have this week purchased
a splendid new McLaughlin cur with
which they will eater to high-class
trade.        >
Employer (to clerk): "If that hore,
Sniithcrs, conies In, tell him I'm out.
And don't he working or he'll know
you're lying."
Uncle Sam has the credit of winning tlie war—If you understand exactly what's meant by "credit."—
American Exchange.
LOST
Many of the pleasures of this life are lost by impaired vision. Poor or impaired sight means in many
cases poor health. Do you suffer from these disabilities? If so, why not attend to it now? Properly
fitted glasses will bring you relief and pleasure.
L. R. STEVENS
EYESIGHT SPECIALIST
Expert Watch Repairer, Jeweler and Engraver.
Dunsmuir Avenue Cumberland, B. C.

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