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The Cumberland Islander May 21, 1921

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Array Provincial LibraryN
mum
il
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
With which Is consolidated the Cumberland News.
FORTIETH YEAR—No. 21.
CUMBERLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, SATURDAY, MAY 21, 1921.
SUBSCRIPTION TRICK: TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM.
Masonic Royal Arch Chapters of
Island Have Brilliant Re-Union
Large Number of Visitors Entertained by the Local Lodges
—Greatly Impressed.
A notable event in the annals pf
Cumberland Masonic Lodges took
place on Tuesday, May 17, when Cyrus
Royal Anli Chapter No. 10 were the
hosts ut a Re-Union of the Island
Chapters, nearly 100 members of Victoria and Nanatmo Chapters, accompanied by many ladies, arriving by
car at 6 p.m.
The streets were decorated by a
"Welcome to Cumberland" arch, and
an illuminated Masonic emblem and
crimson streamer with "Welcome to
the Island Chapters" daintily lettered
thereon.
Man^of the stores were also tastefully decorated iu Royal Arch colors—
crimson and purple.
Visitors Met, ut Royston.
The visitors were met at "Royston
by the First Principal of the Chapter,
Ex. Comp. T. Mordy; Ex. Comp. T. H.
Carey, Director of Committees; Ex.
Comp. C. J. Parnham, Grand Supt. of
District Xo. 1; Comp. D. R. MacDonald, Mayor of the City; Comp. Chas.
Graham, Supt. of Canadian Collieries,
and many others, and after some time
spent in exchange of greetings and
arrangements of details of accommodation, etc., the visitors were escorted
into Cumberland and assigned to their
respective places of rest and refreshment.
Over 130 Attend lodge Meeting.
At about 7.30 p.m. well over 130
Royal Arch .Masons were assembled
in the Cumberland Masonic Hall,
among them being Most Ex. Comp. E.
B. Paul. First Grand Principal of the
Grand Chapter of British Columbia;
Rt. Ex. Comp. C. J. Parnham, Grand
Supt. of District No. 1; Ex. Comp. P.
J. Hall, First Principal of Columbia
Chapter No. 1 (Victoria); Very Ex.
Comp. V. Stewart, Grand Scribe N.,
Past Principal of Camosun Chapter
No. 14 (Victoria); Ex. Comp. Middle-
ton, Third Principal of Keystone
Chapter No. 8 (Nanaimo), and many
other Grand Chapter members.
The principals, officers and members of the three visiting chapters,
and the officers and members of the
Grand Chapter, were ably marshalled
by Ex. Comp. T. H. Cnrey, Director
of Ceremonies, and were officially received and cordially welcomed by
First Principal Ex. Comp. Mordy, after which the business of the evening
was continued under the direction of
Ex. Comp. P. J. Hall, First Principal
of Columbia Chapter No. 1.
A profitable and instructive evening in chapter was followed by an adjournment to the Ilo-Ilo Dance Hall,
(Continued on Page Five)
SCOTTISB TEAM WILL
PLAY MIXED TEAM
May Queen To Be
Crowned On Tuesday
Game Will Probably Take Place
at Nanaimo on June 20.
CHAS. GRAHAM WILL
DELIVER ADDRESS
At the next monthly meeting of the
St. John's First Aid and Mine Rescue
Association, on June 5, Mr. Charles
Oraham, District Superintendent of
the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Ltd., will read an address in connection with the work of the organization.
EMPIRE DAY DANCE
IN G. W. V. A. HALL
Tlie Women's Auxiliary of the G.
*W. V. A. are holding a holiday dance
ln the Memorial Hall on Tuesday
niglit, commencing at It o'clock. Admission 50 cents. Ice cream, cake and
soft drinks will he sold.
FAREWELL PRESENTATION
The Ladies' Aid and the Woman's
Missionary Society of St. George's
Presbyterian Church mot in tho
Mnnso on Wednesday evening in honor
of Mrs. David Hunden, who with Mr.
Hunden Is leaving next week on a
holiday trip to Scranton, Pennsylvania.
U.S.A., to see her mother, whom she
has not seen for over thirty years.
A very huppy nnd jolly evening was
spent by the ladles, a very Interesting
part of the evening's proceedings being the gift to Mrs. Hunden of a beautiful handbag, presented by Mrs. John
Fraser In a vory neat speech. As
Mrs. Hunden has for many years been
a very valuable and active member of
both the Ladles' Aid aud Missionary
Society, the gift was a slight token
of appreciation of the services rendered to the church. Although taken
by surprise, .Mrs. Hundon suitably replied. After the serving of refresh
ments and the singing of "Auld Lang
Syne," a very pleasant and enjoyable
evening was brought to a close.
A meeting of the Upper Island
Football Executive has been called for
Friday, May 27, at Nanaimo, for the
purpose of making all arrangements
for the game with the Scottish foot
ball team, which ls at present making
a tour of the Dominion. ,
It Is understood that only one game
will be played ln the Upper Island
district, and that will be at Nanaimo.
A team will be selected by the executive from the teams ln the district to
play the visitors. The game will
likely be played on Monday, June 20.
TENNIS CLUB MEETS
MONDAY NIGHT AT 8
An Important meeting of the members of Cumberland Lawn Tennis
Club will be held on Monday, May 23,
at 8 p.m. in the Anglican Church Hall.
As it is hoped to officially open the
new court on the 24th, a full attendance of members is requested. Only
members whose 1921 subscription has
been paid will be eligible to vote.
The secretary will be on hand with
a supply of membership cards in order
to accommodate all wishing to join.
COWICHAN CLUB VOTES
FOR SUNDAY TENNIS
DUNCAN.—Olorious weather greeted the opening day of the tennis
courts ot the South Cowichan and the
Duncan Lawn Tennis Clubs on Saturday last. At both clubs there was a
big turnout for the opening day.
At the South Cowichan Club courts
much Interest was evinced on the
question as to whether the courts
would be open for play on Sundays.
Previously the courts have been kept
strictly closed on tbat day. On Saturday afternoon a meeting was held at
the courts, and the question was settled by vote, 44 favored the courts being open for play on Sundays and IS
against.
EXHIBITION FOOTBALL
GAME ON SUNDAY
Combined Team from Cumberland and Bevan Will Try Conclusions With Bay Team
The executive of the Cumberland
and District Junior League bave completed arrangements to stage a junior
football exhibition between Union
Bay, the champion junior team of the
district, and a team to be selected
from tbe other two teams, Bevan and
Cumberland Juniors. As will be Been
below, a strong team bas been selected and no doubt will make the Bay
boys travel all the way. This should
prove to be the best exhibition ot
junior football ever seen ln the district, therefore a large crowd of fans
Is expected to witness tbe game, which
will be played on the Recreation
Grounds on Sunday. The kick-off will
take place at 3.30. Mr. Jas. L. Brown
of Bevan will probably have charge
of the game;
The team selected to represent
Cumberland and Bevan Is as follows:
Goal, J. Walker (Bevan); backs, Boyd
and W. Walker (Cumberland); halfbacks, Lockart (Cumberland), Wier,
(Bevan), Mitchell (Cumberland); forwards, Parks, Marshall, Keenan
(Bevan), R. Strachan (Cumberland),
Burns (Bevan). Reserves, Strachan
and Coe, ot Cumberland.
ENJOYABLE MUSICALE
TUESDAY AFTERNOON
Mrs. Goo. Hassell was the guest of
honor at a muslcale on Tuesday afternoon, when a number of ladles went
to her home and rendered the following enjoyable programme:
1. "Norwegian Bridal Procession,"
Mrs. Ralph Frost.
2. "Rose Bud," Miss Beckwith.
3. "Garden of Your Heart," Misses
Etta and Edith Hood.
4. "Thc Homeland," Miss Laura
Harllng.
5. "Absent," Misses Beckwith and
Potter.
0. "Hungarian Love Song," Mrs.
Colin Campbell.
7. "Tell Me That Beautiful Story,"
Miss Laura Harllng.
8. "Dusky Lullaby," Miss Beckwith.
9. "Bells of St, Mary's," Misses*. Etta
and Edith Wood.
10. "Love's Old Song," Miss Agnes
Potter and chorus.
Mrs. Ralph Frost was accompanist.
Fine Weather Only Big Factor Necessary to Make Crowning of
Miss Margaret Johnson, of Union Bay, as May Queen, and
Long List of Events a Successful Empire Day Programme—
Arrangements Almost Complete—Maypole Dances Will Be a
Special Feature—Big Sum Collected.
Memorial Arch To Be Dedicated
Parade Starts at 10 o'Clock—-Thirty-Two Sports Events and Football and Baseball Matches Will Keep Interest All Day-
Fireworks Display at Night—Special Train from Union Bay
One of the biggest of all May festivals ever held in this district
will take place on Tuesday next, Empire Day, if we are favored
with fine weather. The few people who have taken an active
interest in the affair have been working hard to ensure its success,
and their efforts have so far been crowned with success. All
necessary arrangements are now well under way, a good sum of
money has been collected, and a jolly time is anticipated for all
who attend the celebration.
The chief event of the day's big programme will be the coronation of Miss Margaret Johnsoi* as May Queen. This ceremony
will be performed by Miss Grace Tyson, of Bevan, who last year
had the honor of being crowned May Queen. The Queen's Train-
Bearers will be Edith Humphrey and Doris Good, and her Maids
of Honor, Janet Marshall, Kathleen Muir, Winifred Bov.den, Eva
Baldwin, Greta Kay and Kathleen Haggart; the Pages are
Howard Humphrey and William McKay.
The coronation ceremony will be followed by maypole dances
and platting of the maypole, by these children, all of whom come
from Union Bay.
Grand Parade Starts at 10 o'Clock.
The day's events will commence at 10 o'clock, when the grand
parade will start from the City Hall, headed by ex-service men,
Mayor and Aldermen, City Band, ex-May Queen and attendants,
May Queen and attendants, school children, competitors in costume, decorated bicycles, decorated cars, floats and other cars.
All children taking part in the parade will be presented with a
free ticket by the Celebration Committee, good for the first show
at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre in, the evening. '
Parade Pri»>! List.
Prizes for the parade have been allotted as follows:
Best Decorated Float, Auto Truck (May Queen Float not allowed
to compete), $30; Best Decorated Automobile, $15; Best Decorated Bicycle, $5; Best Dressed Comic Group (three or more), $15;
Best Dressed Comic Boy, $5; Best National Dressed Girl, $5.
Unveiling of Memorial Arch.
The parade will leave the City Hall at 10 a.m., and proceed to
the G. W. V. A. Hall, where one of the most important events of
the day will take place, the unveiling of the Memorial Arch, in
memory of those who gave their lives for the Empire in the Great
War. All ex-service men are requested to be present and take
part in the unveiling ceremony. Those doing so are asked to meet
at the City Hall at 9.30 o'clock in the morning.
The societies, associations and individuals who desire to place
wreaths on the Memorial Arch when it is unveiled, are requested
to do so immediately after the unveiling, and whilst the names
are being read.
After the unveiling ceremony is over the parade will then proceed along Fifth Street, Windemere Avenue and First Street to
the Recreation Grounds, where the crowning of the May Queen
will take place immediately upon arrival.
Following this will come the Maypole dances and the programme
of sports events, the full list of which is printed on page two of
this issue.
$1000 Estimated Value of Prizes.
The Sports Committee have been liberal in their prizes, the
estimated value of which is about $1000. The prize list is comprehensive, embracing races for boys and girls under 0 years and
al) the way up to the football and baseball matches; for the latter
events $217.50 has been allotted as prizes is there is suflicient
competition.
Four teams have entered the Junior Football competition, and
it is causing quite a lot of interest, as all the teams are playing
good ball. It is expected that the first round will be drawn al the
Celebration Committee meeting tonight (Friday) and the lirst
games will probably be played on a date preceding the 24th, and
the final game played on that date.
All children entering the races and other events, and not being
prize winners, will each receive ten cents for each event, so there
should be plenty of entries.
Special Train From Union Bay.
A special train will leave Union Bay at 8.30 a.m., stopping at
way points; returning, the train will leave Cumberland at 9.30 p.m.
Display of Japanese Fireworks.
In the evening there will be a splendid display of Japanese lire-
works on the Recreation Grounds, which will draw a big crowd,
especially of the younger people.
The Recreation Grounds are in good order, and permanent seats
are being erected for the use of the public. All that now remains
for the day to be one long remembered in the annals of Cumberland, is fine weather and the hearty co-operation of all in making
Empire Day 1921 the happiest and jolliest day possible for all,
especially the young folks.
Complimentary
Football Dir.neii
Mr. Chas. Graham Entertained
Members of Club at His Residence Thursday Night.
The Cumberland United Football
team and Hie executive were the guests
of Mr. diaries Graham, President of
the club, on Wednesday evening. An
excellent supper, etc., wns provided.
Afler full justice had been dono to tbe
good things, tbo boys retired lo the
parlor, and singing and short speeches
wero the order of (ho evening. Mr. J.
Quinn of Bevan made au excellent
chairman,
The vocalists who took part in tbe
programme wero Messrs. II. Roberts.
K. Brown, W. Walker, A. Home, A
Rowan, D. Macfarlane, Bobby Brown
and J. Clark. Mr. Pilling gave some
line selections ou the trombone. The
accompanists on tlio piano wore Mr.
W. A. Owen, Mr. T. Bowman and Mr.
J. Brown. Mr. E. Jackson made an
excellent conductor of his famous
football club choir.
The entertainment was brought to
a close hy tbo boys singing "He's a
Jolly Good Fellow" and "Auld Lang
Syne." All the boys exprosed tbelr
thanks and appreciation to their popular president for tlie splendid time
given them, and also to the ladles who
assisted in providing the good things.
Tlle members declared this was the
best time they had enjoyed in their
football careers.
MACCABEES WHIST
DRIVE AND SOCIAL
On Thursday of next week the ladles
of the iMaccabees are holding a whist
drive and social evening ln Fraternal
Hall, commencing at 8 o'clock.
HOSPITAL AUXILIARY
MEETS NEXT FRIDAY
The regular monthly meeting of the
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Cumberland
General Hospital will be held In the
Anglican Church Hall on Friday
May 28, at 3 p.m.
The ladies of the auxiliary desire
to thank Ibe management mf the Ilo
Ho for the use of the hall on the oe
easion of the children's fancy dress
ball, also to the orchestra for the
music, the ladies who instructed the
children and all others who helped In
any wny towards the success of the
affair.
AMY SCOTT, Hon. Secretary.
BIG DISPLAY OF
CUPS AND MEDALS
Some of Football Club's Trophies
Are on Display in Window
of Ralph E. Frost.
The public are not to think that Mr.
Ralph E. Frost has gone into the
jewelry business on a large scale.
The big display of cups and medals In
bis window Is somo of the trophies
recently won by the Cumberland United Football Club. Tlie show includes
the much-coveted McBride Shield, emblematic of the championship of British Columbia, whicb the local team
has won twice In succession,
Then there ls the Brackman-Ker
Cup. which the team holds as champions of the Upper Island (McBride
Shield series). They have also won
this twice in succession.
Along with this trophy are the
medals for tbe Individual players of
tbe team, nnd aro of>a beautiful design.
Another handsome cup is ibe one for
tbo championship of Vancouver Island.
which tbe Cumberland Unitocl secured
when they defeated South Wellington
on Sunday last.
The Grand Challenge Cup of tbe
Nanaimo Football Association was
won by the United loam wheu they
came out victors in the I'pper Island
League.
'llie other sot of medals are from tbe
11. ('. Football Association, aud arc
emblems for tbo players in the B. C.
championship team.
Altogether It is a splendid display
and oue of which Cumberland should
ho very proud. To secure all the
available championships hy a team of
the size of Cumberland Is Indeed
feat of great credit to the team and
individual payors.
BIIITIIIMV PARTY.
On Monday last Mrs. (!. J. Richardson entertained ut a birthday party in
honor of Mr. T. Bowman. The programme consisted of singing, dancing
aud games, afler wheib refreshments
were served by tho hostess, making a
llttlng climax lo a most enjoyable
evening.
United Are Now,
Champions of V.I.
Defeat   South Wellington   and
Arc Now in Proud Possession
Of Tour Championships
The Cumberland United Football
team journeyed tn South Wellington
Inst Sunday m play the long-delayed
Vancouver Islam! league game, Tlie
same team did duly that so decisively
defeated si. And rows in ihe final for
the McBride Shield. Hy winning Uie
Vancouver Island League tlie local
team have doubly demonstrated thai
they are the premier team of British
Columbia. The whole team played ex-
celleut football and it was only on
account of the locals taking things
easy when tliey bad the lead that
South Wellington were enabled to
score.
Pilling and Hitcliens were the shining lights on the Cumberland team,
('filing scoring all three goals. The
best goal of the day was scored by
Hitcliens. but for some unaccountable
reason the referee disallowed the
point.
Cumberland won tbe toss and took
advantage of the slight breeze. South
Wellington went off witli a great deal
of dash and pep, and for a few
minutes were all ovor the Cumberland
boys-but nol t'or long. Tho Cumberland learn began to settle down, tlio
South Wellington defence having a
mosl anxious time, whilst the defence
of tlieir opponents were taking things
easy. Hill Walker was not called on
to exert himself oue iota during the
first half.
Pilling, wbo was playing a magnificent game, obtained the ball, close to
tho centre line, and tricking a couple
of men he tried a long shot, hitting
the post and into the net, making it
the first count for Cumberland. Half-
time was called soon after, without
any further score.
Second Hall".
On resuming the second period the
locals appeared to be content with
one goal lead, aud slackened off considerably. This slackness proved
their undoing, as Crosloy, wben in a
most excellent, position, mado thc
score 1-1, This reverse was just what
the locals wanted, as it put a lot moro
pep into them and thn game became
more exciting. True to their fighting
spirit, tbe Cumberland forwards wont
after the ball for all they wero worth,
and with all five forwards combining
beautifully, the result was dazzling as
well as disastrous to tho southern
team. From a lovely pass from the
left wing, Pilling headed a nice goal,
giving the goalie no chance at all.
Taking up the running once more,
and after some nice combination, in
which all the forwards took part,
Hitcliens scored what appeared to bo
a legitimate goal, but (he referee disallowed it—and, ye gods, what a goal!
One spectator said be had been following football for 91) (?) yours and
had never seen a prettier goal.
The Inside right of the South Wellington (earn, taking advantage of
laekness by tbe Cumberland defence,
scored a beautiful goal, making thu
score even once more.
Pilling Ihe Shilling Light.
The miuutes were rapidly passing
and it looked as if a drawn game
would be the result, and try as the
might (he local forwards could not
find Ibe net for the winning goal.
Once more Pilling, with marvellous
judgment, trapped fhe hall, and going
Btrafght for goal with rare .speed, lie
left Znccarolll standing si ill; with
a couple of men hanging on lo him
he steadied hlmsidf. thereby finding
the pair of his opponents, and BCOred
the winning goal wilh a magnificent
shot. Time was called shortly aftor
with Cumberland winners ol a good
game by a score of three goals lo iwo.
South Wellington played a good game,
but were lucky to score the two goals,
as it was owing to slackness on the
part uf the Cumberland team that
they got anywhere near Walker.
(',. W. V. A. NOTES
Next    regular    mooting,    Tuesday,
May 31, at 7 p.m.
Comrades and friends nm again reminded of tlie C. W. V. A. Smoker tomorrow (Saturday) night, commencing at 7 o'clock. Admission one dollar.
The committee have arranged a good
programme, with plenty of refreshments ami smokes provided. All are
welcome. Come and have a good time.
All cx-^ervice men Who are taking
part lu the parade on Empire Day
are asked to meet outside the City
Hall not later than 0,30 a.m. fwd
Ktfi   CUMBERLAND  (SLANDER
May 21, 1921.
Clean Up = Paint Up
SPRINGTIME GIVES THE CALL
Paints .ire now much more reasonable in price
and many   will   paint   this   spring.    Plan   your
decorating now and make use of our store service
for information.
BAI'CO PUKE PAINT—Every Can Guaranteed
T. E BATE
Phone 31
P. 0. Box 279
NATURAL HISTORY OF
QUEEN CHARLOTTE IS.
TENDERS
Tenders will be received up to noon
the 1st day of June, 1921, for the
erection of a Residence on Dunsmuir
Avenue, Cumberland, 11. C, for Mr.
Edward W. Bickle. Plans and specifications may he procured at the ollice
of The Islander Printers and Publishers.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
EDWARD W. BICKLE.
May 12, 1921.
TENDERS WANTED
Tenders are Invited for the Painting and Repairing of the Cumberland
General Hospital. Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
Details of the work to be done can
be obtained from the Secretary,
T. MORDY,
Cumberland General Hospital.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN* that
Letters of Administration to the Estate of David Rogers, late of Cumberland, who died on tlie 2Sth day of
March, 1921, intestate, have been
granted out of the Supreme Court to
David Rogers and Bessie Ross, botli or
anaimo.
All persons having claims against
the said estate are required to forward
particulars of same duly verified to
the Administrators or to the under
signed on or hefore tlie 5th day of
June, 1921, after which date the Administrators will proceed to administer the Estate according to law, having regard to such claims of which
they shall then have received notice.
Dated at Nanaimo, B. C, this 5th
day of May, 1921.
C. H. BEEVOU-POTTS,
Commercial St., Nanaimo.
Solicitor for David Rogers and Mrs.
Bessie Ross, the Administrators.
4-23
McLaugfilin
§WmW
Sane progress, both in engineering and body design,
won the unquestioned leadership in motor car sales
enjoyed by the McLaughlin—"Canada's Standard Car."
Thus the Master Six is better known and more widely
used by business men than any other high-quality car.
This nation-wide acceptance has created for tho
Master-Six a fixed value that makes its purchase a
sound business investment.
McLaughlin Motor Car Co.
Limited
PIDCOCK, WILLEMAR &  WAIN
Phone 25 COURTENAY, B. C.     P. 0. Box 153
Stretching out in the Pacific Ocean,
and bounded hy Dixon Entrance anil
Hecate Straits, are a group of large
islands known as Queen Charlotte's.
Two of these islands are one hundred
and fifty miles in length, while one is
forty miles in width. Tlle climate is
milder than in any other portion of
Canada, lt is seldom that snow appears; but from tlie openness to the
whole ocean, and from other causes',
exceptional storms arise, especially
during the winter.
These islands have been noted for
the timber growing thereon, which
supplied the best aeroplane material
used during tlie war. In no other part
of tlie world are trees growing In
such profusion and height. For hundreds of feet, cleaving the sky, the
spruce trees tower, free of branches,
with wood of a tenacity that astonishes even the scientist. Hemlock,
cedar, alder and other species of wood
grow in various places, but the spruce
appears to make progress more rapid
ly than any otlier trees, and there is
little need for forestry work. The
seeds take hold wherever they fall.
Forest fires are unknown, and the
future supply of pulp-wood and aeroplane material will he almost unlimited. Thousands of loggers were
engaged during tlie war cutting and
rafting tlie timber, which grows down
to the shores ot the Inlets ami bays.
"Davis" rafts, each with a million of
feet of timber, glided out of tlie land
lucked harbors; yet there is little sign
of depletion in a country hardly
known to the outside world.
The Queen Charlotte Islands are
within eighty miles of the terminus of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway at
Prince Rupert. There are few farms
on the islands, where the forests preclude the growing of any considerable quantity of fodder for export.
There are open stretches of muskeg
and grass; but nowhere inland from
the shores of tlle ocean can much
open land be found lit for cultivation,
These islands would be ideal for the
raising of herds of wild animals, especially the moose, caribou, mountain
goat and sheep. There ls no reason
why reindeer should not thrive, with
fodder clear of snow, and with a
extending for hundreds of miles.
Strange to relate, only five species
of wild animals exist on the Queen
Charlotte group, viz.: marten, land
otter, weasel and black bear. It Is
said that a herd of caribou inhabit the
north end of Graham Island, but onsSv
three of these deer have been found.
It is possible that the breed of animals now on the islands were im
ported. Indians might have brought
animals in their war canoes from the
mainland. At any rate, it seems
strange, with all manner of wild
animals so short a distance away, on
both the Alaskan and British Colum
bian coast, that so few exist here,
where the opportunities for breeding
appear so good. Fifty miles distant
we find islands on which wolves and
wild deer are so plentiful that they
are a menace to the farmer.
Toads and frogs have been found
on the Islands, but no snakes, squir
rels, ants of a large size, or songbirds that warble more than a few
notes. A few deer were placed on
Graham Island—the largest island of
the group—a few years ago. Tlie declare doing well nnd are multiplying
Black bears are so plentiful that two
Indians, only a short time ago,
trapped fourteen monsters in one
week. Boar trails can be seen all
over the islands, following the trend
of tlio rivers and streams. Bears are
not dangerous on these islands, there
being no Instance of a human being
suffering from the attack of a black
bear. The marten and land otter are
trapped for their hides; hut the pale
color, on account of tlle mildness of
the climate, causes the market prici
of the pelt to be low.
The hundreds of smaller island:
wouhl make Ideal places on which to
raise wild animals. Fish is plentiful
111 the adjacent waters.
Edible seaweed is found by the In
dlans, and some Is shipped to Japan.
Vast beds of seaweed can be found
In all directions, ready for tlie manu
facture of by-products.
Indian Agent. T. J. D.
YOUR DUTY TO YOURSELF IS TO SAVE
The man with a Savings Accouut need never
worry over tlie future.
Saving, backed by determination, is one of
the most satisfying habits to acquire,
A Savings Department at every branch of
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
F. A. McCarthy, Manager Cumberland Branch
The claim that Western Canada is
among the foremost big game countries lu the world is substantiated by
the fact that 2170 animals were secured in the northern part of Central
Saskatchewan by 3t)0l) hunters licensed
last season, as shown by tlie annual
report of the chief gamo warden for
that province. Tlie varieties taken
include 80 caribou, S70 deer and 1200
mooso, all in territory served by the
Canadian National Railways.
The Jlade-in-B.C. Idea is one that
must appeal lo every individual, no
matter what his or her occupation or
walk lu life. It Is the one point
around which tlie future of the pro-
'vince revolves, and as the idea takes
hold of every man, woman and child,
so will the future of British Columbia
broaden, nnd Its status as a prosperous, Industrial province become more
Urmly established.
Programme of Sports For
Empire Day Celebration
NOTE.—All Prizes will be of the values mentioned, and not cash.
No second prize unless three or more entries.
No third prize unless four or more entries.
All children competing In events will receive 10 cents.
1—11.30—Boys, 6 years and under, 50 yards; 1st, $1;
2nd, 75c; 3rd, SOc.
Girls, G years and under, 50 yards; 1st, $1;
2nd, 75c; 3rd, 50c.
2—11.35—Boys, 8 years and under, 50 yards; 1st,
$1.50; 2nd, $1; 3rd, 50c.
Girls, 8 years and under,  50 yards;   1st,
$1.50; 2nd, $1; 3rd, 50c.
3—11.40—Boys, 10 years and under, 75 yards; 1st, $2;
2nd, $1.50; 3rd, $1.
Girls, 10 years and under, 75 yards; 1st, $2;
2nd, $1.50; 3rd, ?1.
4_H.45_Bovs, 12 years and under, 75 yards; 1st, $2;
2nd, $1.50; 3rd, $1.
Girls, 12 years and pnder, 75 yards; 1st, $2;
2nd, $1.50; 3rd, $t.
5—11.50—Bovs, 15 years and under, 75 yards; 1st, $3;
2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
Girls, 15 years and under, 75 yards; 1st, $3;
2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
6—11.55—Bovs' Obstacle Race, 15 years and under;
1st, $4; 2nd, $2.50; 3rd, $1.50.
Girls'  Three-Legged  Race,  15  years  and
under; 1st, $4; 2nd, $2.50; 3rd, $1.50.
7—12.00—Boys' Sack Race, 12 years and under; 1st,
$2.50; 2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
Girls' Potato Race, 12 years and under; 1st,
$2.50; 2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
8—12.05—Boys, 14 years and under, Three-Legged
Race; 1st, $4; 2nd, $2; 3rd, $1.
Girls' Relay Race, 15 years and under, three
to team; 1st, $4.50; 2nd, $3; 3rd, $1.50.
9—12.10—Boys' Pillow Fight,   15 years and  under;
1st, $3; 2nd, $2.50.
Girls, 10 years and under, Skipping Race;
1st, $2; 2nd, $1.50; 3rd, $1.»
10—12.15—Boys' Cracker-Eating Contest 10 years
and under; 1st, $2; 2nd, $1.50; 3rd, $1.
Boys' Human Wheelbarrow Race, 10 years
and under; 1st, $2; 2nd, $1.
11—12.20—Girls' Hopping Race, 15 years and under,
25 yards; 1st, $2; 2nd $1.
12—12.25—Japanese  Obstacle  Race;  1st,  $5;  2nd,
$2.50; 3rd, $1.50.
13—12.30—Chinese Obstacle Race; 1st, $5; 2nd, $2.50;
3rd, $1.50.
14—1.30—Boys' Bicycle Race, 14 years and under; >/2
mile; 1st, goods value $5 (Nakamish);
2nd, $4; 3rd, $2.
Boys' Bicycle Race, 17 years and under; 1
mile; 1st, $7.50; 2nd, $5; 3rd, $2.50.
15—1.30—Boys' Race, under 15 years, 440 yards; 1st,
$5; 2nd, fishing rod and tackle (T. E.
Bate).
16—1.40—Chinese Race, 440 yards; 1st, $5; 2nd, $2.50.
17—1.45—Japanese Race, 440 yds.; 1st, $5; 2nd, $2.50.
18—1.55—Single Ladies' Race, 75 yards; 1st, goods
value $5 (T. D. McLean); 2nd, $2.50.
Old Men's Race; 1st, $5; 2nd, $3.50.
19—2.00—Married Ladies' Race, under 30 years; 1st,
$4; 2nd, $3.
Married Ladies' Race, over 30 years; 1st,
$4; 2nd, $3.
20—2.10—Men's Running High Jump; 1st, $5; 2nd,
$2.50.
21—2.20—Boys' Running High Jump, age 15 to 18
years; 1st, $4; 2nd, $2.
22—2.30—Boys' Running High Jump, under 15 years;
1st, $4; 2nd, $2.
23—2.40—Final Football Match, Juniors; 1st, $44 and
Cup; 2nd, $22.
24—Interval, Football Final—Returned Soldiers' Race,
100 yards; 1st, $8; 2nd, $4.
25—4.20—Ladies'   Nail-Driving   Contest; 1st, goods
value $7   (J. Sutherland); 2nd, goods
value $3 (J. Sutherland).
'26—4.30—Committeemen's   Race,    100   yards;   1st,
$7.50; 2nd, suitcase (VV. W. Willard).
27—4.40—Men's 100-Yard Dash (not open); 1st, ¥8;
2nd, $4.
28—4.50—Bandsmen's Race,   100 yards;   1st, $7.50;
2nd, $4.
29—5.00—Broad Jump, Boys under 17 years; 1st, $4;
2nd, $2.   *
30—5.10—Broad Jump, Men; 1st, $6; 2nd, $4.
31—5.20—Boys' Race, 1 mile, 17 years and under; 1st,
$6; 2nd, $4.
32—5.30—Boys' Relay Race, 15 years and under, 75
yards, 3 to a team; 1st, $4.50; 2nd, $3;
3rd, $1.50.
FOOTBALL FINAL, SENIORS—1st, $55; 2nd, $27.50.
BASEBALL   COMPETITION,   SENIORS—1st, $50;
2nd, $25.
BASEBALL   COMPETITION,   JUNIORS—1st,  $40;
2nd, $20.
President of Celebration—Mayor D. R. MacDonald.
Secretary—J. O. Brown.
Treasurer—A. MacKinnon.
Sports nnd Programme Committee—S. Davis (chairman), Chas. E. Burbrldge, B. Evans, F. Partridge
and Rev. Geo. Kinney.
Grounds Committee —II. I.. Bates (chairman), T.
Bannerman, T. Bennett, B. Brown, L. Francescini, J. Smith, J. Thompson, S. Walker, H.
Waterfield.
Finance Committee—N. Bevis and J. Davis.
Starters—T. E. Bate, Chas. Graham, C. J. Parnham,
J. Sutherland.
Judges—A. Auchlnvole, Chaa. O'Brien, Geo. O'Brien,
J. Quinn,
No Other Food Has
the Nourishment
of Bread
No other food at any price
can compare with Bread—
In sustaining and up-building
qualities.
A loaf of jrood Bread is food
and tonic in one.
Ir. itself ii, contains all the
essential food elements — food
for bone, food for muscle, food
for brain.
Bread is your Best Food—Eat
more of it.
GOOD  BREAD
is always pure.
A Good Bakery
THE NEWHOM E
BAKERY
J. H. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir  Avenue     -     Cumberland
D. Campbell's
Meat Market
Phone 60
Cumberland
Young Steer Beef, tender
and juicy.
Veal, Pork and Mutton.
SPECIALS
Cambridge Pork Sausages.
Cambridge Pork Sausage
Home-made Sausage
Polish Sausage
Veal Loaf
Boiled Ham
Ham Bologna
Headcheese.
Have you tried our Pickled Pork
and Corned Beef I It Is delicious.
Wood for Sale
$1.50 per Single Load.
$8.50 per Double Load.
Any Length Required.
W. C. WHITE
Happy Valley Phone 92R
At som ie of the fishing stations near
Prince R .upert, this spring, 200 tons
of herrin .g have been taken daily in
pound n ets. The run ls reported to
be the largest known in the history of
the £rirrt;e Rupert fisheries. ^..    I
"My wife thinks money grows on
trees. All the time she keeps pestering me for money."
"What on earth does she do with
the money?"
"I don't know! I haven't given her
any yet."
A MAIL OltDKlt DK.U.
The other day, in Victoria, a man
went into a hardware store to buy a
saw. He found the kind he wanted
and asked the price. It was $1.65 the
dealer said.
"Good gracious," replied the shopper, "I can buy that same saw exactly
from Stlmpson's, the mail order house,
for $1.35."
"That's less than I paid fnr it," replied tho dealer, "but 1 will meet catalogue competition, so I'll make you
that saw for $1.35 also."
"All right," said the customer, "you
send lt to my house and charge it to
my account."
"Not on your life," replied the dealer. "No charge account on this; the
mail order house don't trust you. I
am simply meeting their price and
terms.   Fork oyer the cash."
The customer complied.
"Now 3 cents more for the postage
and 4 cents for the money order," said
the dealer.
"What?"
"Certainly; you have to send a letter
and a money order to a mail order
house, you know."
The customer, Inwardly raving,
handed over tbe money.
"Now, 25 cents for express charges,"
said the dealer, still holding out his
hand.
"Well, I'll be  1" said the customer. But he paid it, saying, "Now
hand me that saw and I'll take it home
myself and be rid of this foolery."
"Hand It to you? Where do you
think you are? You're in Victoria and
I'm in Winnipeg. You'll have to wait
two weeks for that saw."
Whereupon the dealer hung the saw
upon a peg and put the money in the
cash drawer.
"That makes it $1.67," he said. "It
has cost you two cents more and has
taken two weeks longer to get it than
if you had bought it from your local
hardware store "In the first place,"
. t
May 21, 111-21.
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Th
ree
MAKE YOURSELF
COMFORTABLE!
SEAGRASS FURNITURE
LARGE ARM CHAIRS
at •.	
LARGE ARM ROCKERS
at	
$11.50
$12.00
Round and Oblong Tables
$10.50 and $11.50  each
We Invite Your Inspection of Our Lines of
Beds, Springs and Mattresses
IRON AND BRASS BEDS—A full range of prices up
to $50.00 each.
WOVEN WIRE AND COIL SPRINGS.
SANITARY FELT MATTRESSES
at 	
OSTERMOOR AND RESTMORE
MATTRESSES at	
$16.00
$25.00
SEE OUR NEW LINES
OF   WALLPAPERS
R. MacKinnon
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
GOOD EATS
VENDOME
Restuarant
FOR QUALITY.
Oysters, Steaks and Chops.
Also Fish and Chips.
BOXES FOR LADIES.
Open Day nnd Nights
DR. R. P. CHRISTIE
DENTIST
Office:   WILLARD BLOCK
Phone 116 Cumberland, B. C.
P. P. HARRISON
Barrister and Solicitor
Notary Public
CUMBERLAND - ■ B. C.
"The Continental Limited"
A NEW THROUGH TRAIN
ACROSS   CANADA
Leaves Vancouver 7.45 p. ni. Dally.
DIRECT AND FAST SERVICE TO
EDMONTON
SASKATOON
WINNIPEG
PORT ARTHUR
OTTAWA
MONTREAL
Connections for all points In Canada and United States.
Compartment Observation Cars, Standard and Tourist Sleepers.
Canadian NaMonalRailuuaqs
EDWARD W. BICKLE, District Agent.
NEW TOURIST RESORT
OPENED AT QUALICUM
Sunset Inn Has Magnficent Lo
cation and View of Gulf and
Snow-Capped Mountains
On May 16th a first-class tourist
resort was opened at Qualicum Beach,
right at the Golt Links. The resort
will be known as the "Suuset Inn,"
and the name ls very appropriate as
the view of the glorious sunsets so
well known on Vancouver Island will
be Incomparable from this beautiful
location.
The Sunset Inn will be under the
management and proprietorship of
McLean & Fraser, of Qualicum Beach,
and under the supervision of these
two estimable gentlemen a first-class
service is assured.
The plans of the building were
drawn by Mr. A. N. Fraser, one of the
proprietors, and the construction was
under his direct supervision, so that
everything in connection with the
general construction and conveniences for the travelling public is of a
high order.
There are eighteen rooms upstairs,
.with hot and cold water ln each one.
Sixteen of the rooms face the Gulf
and Golf Links, and the view ot the
distant- snow-capped mountains on
the Mainland is unsurpassable.
On the ground floor there Is a very
large lounge room, beautifully furnished, having a view of the Gulf from
the sides. There Is also a large smoking room, office and dining-room on
this floor, and a very large and commodious kitchen In the rear of the
building. Judging by the delicacies
that were brought forth on Monday
evening, at the opening dinner, to
which some sixty guests sat down,
there will be no complaints of being
underfed ln this hostelry. The following was the menu ou this occasion:
Very Appetizing .Menu.
Soup—Cream of tomato.
Fish—Fried halibut, egg sauce.
Entree—Pineapple fritters, lemon
sauce.
Roasts—Roast beef, brown gravy;
roast mutton, mint sauce, jelly.
Boiled—Local chicken, brown bacon,
green peas.
Salad—Cabbage and nut; local
lettuce.
Vegetables—Creamed potatoes and
mashed carrots.
Dessert—Mince pie, lemon pie, jelly
and whipped cream, assorted biscuits,
nuts, fruit, tea, coffee.
There is a very complete staff and
on the night of the opening everything
seemed to run with clock-like precision.
The Sunset Inn is quite an addition
to Qualicum Beach and there should
be no lack of accommodation this yenr
as was the case previously. The
travelling public and tourists should
lose no time in getting reservations,
as quite a number have already been
made, and it is quite possible that
tbere will be a large influx of visitors
to Vancouver Island during the next
three or four months.
At Qualicum there is one of the finest sandy beaches on the Pacific Coast.
It ls several miles in extant and a
splendid place for children to bathe,
being quite safe and only a few
minutes' walk from the Sunset Inn.
Each year sees a larger number of
visitors and tourists during the summer months, but up to the present
there has been uo accommodation for
winter sports, such as hunting, fishing, etc. There ls no better hunting
in the country than in the vicinity
of Qualicum Beach, and it is the intention of the proprietors to keep the
Sunset Inn open all the year round
for the convenience of the public, and
not confine it to a summer resort
only. So plan your summer vacation
now, and don't forget the winter
hunting, fishing, etc.
A vigorous appeal to the manufacturers and retailers of British Colum-
I bla  to  purchase  Made-ln-B.C.  goods
II was made by Mr.  M A. Macdonald.
"IL.A., in the course of an address
list a joint banquet of the two bodies
I1 last week. He pointed out that industrial development was necessary to
the prosperity of the Dominion, and it
could only continue if Canadian people
purchased their own products Instead
W going to foreign countries for them,
I He submitted surprising figures to
show the amount ot business sent out
ot thc Dominion during the year, nnd
declared that If lt had been placed In
this country, tho Dominion, provincial and municipal governments
I1 would have derived very considerable
revenue from It. Employment would
also bave been Increased, aud all-
round prosperity recorded.
THE
RED CROSS
Still Carries On
IN
British Columbia
THE POST WAR WORK OF THE RED
CROSS throughout the world is still a vital
factor—a colossal task. This call for increased
membership is one to which no person in British
Columbia, placed in possession of even a few
facts, will fail to respond.
Returned Men    J«i,he jIM't
tals and sani-
Still In Hospitals j,ar[t£hmsc°,!
umbia there are still over 800 returned men
seeking to regain health. True, these men have
all the attention which crowded hospitals and
over-worked nurses and attendants can bestow,
but they arc lacking these little things of comfort—these small, simple luxuries which mean
50 little to you who are strong and healthy; so
much to them who are ill and suffering. The
Red Cross supplies them with tobacco, socks,
pajamas, underwear, sweaters, slippers, razors.
shaving soap, and so on. Their wants are few
and simple—their needs are great.
Workshops For r^u™
Disabled Soldiers ;d0&ho %
sub-committee of the Victoria Branch of thc
Red Cross for submission to the Federal Government, Clause 1 states:
"That even after all that has been done by the
Government of Canada, through its various
departments, for the welfare of returned men,
there remains in this country 'a residue of disabled men who arc unemployable in ordinary
industry, a residue for which no provision exists,
namely, those who possess some potential capacity, but can only exercise it if some special
arrangements are made to enable them to
do so.'"
WANTED - $1.00
from every man and woman in British
Columbia as enrollment fee in the B. C.
Division of the Canadian Red Cross
Society.
Junior Membership $0.25
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE JUNE 6 TO 11
Mail your Enrollment Fee to your Local Branch or the
CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY
BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION
626 Pender Street West Vancouver, B. C.
FAMILY SHOE REPAIRER
SERVICE, MATERIAL
AND WORKMANSHIP
GUARANTEED
RUBBER HEELS
Fixed While U Walt
PHILLIPS' MILITARY
SOLES AND HEELS.
Dunsmuir
S. DAVIS, UA™
G. W. V. A. MEETS EVERY
TUESDAY EVENING
The meetings of tlie Great War
Veterans Association are held every
Tuesday at 7 o'clock in the Memorial
Hall.
Acreage for Sale
6I/2 acres of Land for sale,
2Vi acres cleared; two miles
from Cumberland.
For further particulars apply
E. W. BICKLE
Rheumatism
Neuiitis, Sciatica, Neuralgia
Templeton's
Rheumatic
Capsules
Have brought good
health to half-a-million
sufferers.
A healthful, money-saving remedy.
well known for fifteen years, prescribed by doctors, sold by druggists, 11.00 a box. Ask our agents
or write for a free trial package.
Templetons, 142 King W., Toronto.
Sold by
R. E. FROST    -    Cumberland
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
\VM.MEHHIl''l.'.l,l»,   Proprietor
GOOD ACCOMMODATION
EXCELLENT  CUISINE
Dunsmuir Ave.
Cutnhcrlnnd. 1). C
UNION HOTEL
OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION.
First Class Accommodation.     Heated
throughout by Electricity.
WILLIAM JONES, Proprietor.
Cumberland, 11. C.
The Day of
Judgment
IS THE LAST DAY FOR EVERYTHING!
Saturday, May 21
IS THE LAST DAY ON WHICH YOU CAN
PURCHASE
$8 Hotpoint Irons
FOR ONLY
$4.50
WITH YOUR OLD IRON
.*
m    THEY ARE SELLING QUICKLY—Get Yours NOW!     =
REMEMBER—SATURDAY IS THE LAST DAY
AT THE REDUCED PRICE.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. P. O. 314
CUMBERLAND AND UNION WATER WORKS
COMPANY, LIMITED
Wboroas certain mischievously inclined persons have
tampered wllb iho valves on the mains ot tills company,
thereby allowing a considerable amount of water to run to
waste, we therefore wish to point out tbat it in a serious
offence lo tamper with such valves, and should Ihe onend-
Iiir parties be apprehended Ihey will ho prosecuted lo Iho
very fullest extent of the luw.
Ancient Order of Foresters
Court Bevan No. 0830 merls on the
second and fourth Wednesdays in tlie
Fraternity Hall, Davis Illock, Dunsmuir Avenue, Cumberland, visiting
brethren cordially Invited,
Frank Bond, Chief Hanger; A. G.
Jones, Secretary; Frank .Slaughter.
Treasurer,
Marocchi Bros.
Grocers and
Bakers
Cumberland anrl Courtenay, B.C.
Royston Lumber Co.
MsANUFACTURERS HI*'
ROUGH  AND  DRESSED
LUMBER
Slab Wood (double load) ..$5.00 fW
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
May 21, 1921.
THE CUMBERLAND ISLANDER
Published every Saturday morning at Cumberland, B. C.
EDWARD W. BICKLE  Manager and Publisher.
BEN H. GOWEN - Editor.
SATURDAY, .MAY 21, 1921.
DISARMAMENT
As the subject of disarmament is treated to wider discussion it will gradually dawn upon tlie peoples of the
world that a substantial reduction in naval and military
organizations would guarantee relief from the oppressive
burden of taxation which their maintenance involves. Mr.
McAdoo told the National League of Masonic Clubs in
Washington that disarmament could be looked upon as a
curative for the economic and social troubles of the world.
But he very naturally objected to espouse the cause of
disarmament in his country unless there could be an
understanding with other powers and a uniform course
agreed upon. .Mr. McAdoo's address may not have the
Weight that it would have had were he stilt In the position
)f Secretary of the United States Treasury. Hut the value
lies in the publicity to which his utterance will attract
to the subject, lie sets the pattern which could he profitably emulated by prominent men on this and on the other
side of the Atlantic. Only hy pegging away with every
ao"t of propaganda will it he possible to awaken popular
sentiment to a realization of its own power to lighten the
burdens which are taxing the national and the individual
purse out of all proportion to the need. It may still he
argued that an opportunity to render a gigantic service
to mankind lies within the grasp of the President of the
United States. When lie calls the nations into conference
upon the subject of disarmament none may refuse to take
part and escape universal disapproval.—-Times.
JUDGE LINDSAY PAYS
Judge Ben Lindsey, the noted juvenile judge of Denver,
has paid a. §5U0 (ine for "contempt of court." It will be
recalled that Judge Lindsey refused to disclose evidence
which he secured through statements made to him by a
boy coming under his notice in his juvenile court work.
He refused to   "snitch."
This refusal to betray the confidence of a boy resulted
in a stone-age judge sentencing Judge Lindsey to jail and
ordering him to pay a fine. The case was fought to tlie
supreme court. The jail sentence was remitted but the
fine stood. So now Judge Lindsey pays the fine and the
incident is closed.
By his courageous stand Judge Lindsey has earned the
confidence and respect of every right-thinking citizen.
Conversely, the judge who declared him in "contempt" has
earned the contempt of everyone who believes in decency
and honorable treatment of children.
One judge pays a price of $500 to establish the principle
of the sacredness of the confessional while the other judge
pays every shred of esteem in which he might have been
held by decent people for his refusal to recognize that
principle.—Union Record.
BEER NOT A FOOD
Whatever other doctors may think on the matter, there
can be no question that Dr. C. W. Saleeby, the well known
London physician, is quite satisfied, not only that beer
cannot be regarded as "medicine," but that it cannot in any
circumstances be held to have any food value. "We have
conducted scientific experiments in London," he declared
to a representative of the Christian Science Monitor in
Chicago, the other day, "which conclusively prove that beer
is absolutely without value as food or as medicine. Not
only does the alcohol in beer destroy any food value it
might have, but we have proved that, even with alcohol
removed, it has not a particle of food value."
TAX  SPINSTERS  TOO j|!
Anticipatory of the time when Washington shall have :
bachelors* poll tax. the Wenatchee World views with interest the .announcement that the constitutionality of the
Montana act is to be determined in court. Says the World:
"That old bachelor over in Montana who refuses to pay
the $3 poll tax levied against bachelors lias put the powurs
that he up against quite a problem. A news item regarding
the matter says:
"'Declaring that "spinsters are respqnsible for my not
being married in their refusals of my wooing iu the past,"
William Ttzinge. thirty-five years old, of Grea* Falls.
Mont., has notified the assessors that he will refuse to pay
the poll tax of $3 levied by the last legislature against
bachelors. "Tax the spinsters of the same age and I will
gladly pay, but otherwise it is class legislation and I stand
upon my rights," he declared. "Furthermore, I refuse to
get married to escape jail and I refuse to pay a bachelor
tax to escape jail."-
THE RAILWAY GOT AN ANSWER
A new story Is being told about the C. P. K. It appears
the company Issued notices to some hotels, restaurants and
storekeepers protesting against the unauthorized use of Its
Initials. "C. P, It." One such notice was mailed to Timothy
O'Brien, who wos the proud proprietor of the "C. P. It.
Barber Shop" in a prairie village. Tim's reply is entitled
to a niche in tlie temple ol' fame, and is here given iu full:
"Dear Sir,—I got your notis. I don't want no law soot
with yure big company, or 1 don't want to paint a new
sine on my shop. Times is bad. and 1. have a large wife
and family to sport. I no yure company owns most everything— raleroads, sleemers, most of the best land and the
time, hut 1 don't know as you own the hole alphabet. The
letters on my shop don't stand for yure ralerode but for
sumthln better. I left a muther in Ireland, she is dead
and gawn, but Iter memories dear to me. Her maiden
name was Catherine Patricia Heardon, and what I want
to no is what you are going to do about it. I suppose you
won't argue that the balance of my sine what refers to cut
rates has got anything to do with your raleroads. There
ain't been no cut rates round these parts as I nos of.
"(Signed)  TIMOTHY O'BRIEN*."
The officials of the big railroad are reported to havo
acknowledged themselves answered.
England lias a female Luther Burbank In the person of
Miss Breeze, who is called the potato queen because Of her
success in producing new varieties of potatoes. Miss
Breeze is a bachelor of science and flrst developed her
genius for hybridizing while attending the Cambridge
School of Agriculture.
AMERICANS CONTROL OUR RESOURCES
Americans control 95 per cent, of the mining investments
in Canada, 100 per cent of the pulp and paper investments
In Western Canada; 75 per cent, of the lumber Industries,
and 75 per cent, of tbe fisheries.—Mining and Engineering
Record.
THINKING MAKES IT SO
If you would gain control of your ability and increase it,
you must avoid as you would poison everything that tends
to make your mind negative—worry, anxiety, jealousy,
envy, fear, cowardice, the whole family of depressing,
despondent thoughts. They are all confessions of weakness, non-producers, power-destroyers.—Xew Success.
CLEARANCE SALE
FOR ONE
WEEK ONLY
FOR ONE
WEEK ONLY
Commenced   On  Thursday
LADIES' DEPARTMENT
Specials in Whitewear, Ladies' Coats, Suits,
Summer Underwear, Silk Sweater Coats,
Dress Skirts, Hosiery, Crepe and Voile Waists
and a special discount of 10c/o on all Ladies'
and Misses' Shoes during this Sale.
| SPECIAL SALE of WOOLS in BLACK and GREY |
[ MEN'S DEPARTMENT |
1        Work Shirts, Pants,  Neckwear,  Footwear        i
I and Half Hose |
|   An Extra Special in       ^A,  Q C\    |
|   Men's Sport Sweaters at   cp^.c/U    j
H m
1 Campbell's    -    Cumberland 1
Carlyle or Walt Whitman, is but an attempt to look upon
the human state with such largeness of view as shall enable us to rise from the consideration of living to the
Definition- of Life.
The deans of sixty women's colleges decided in convention that college girls are too frisky.—Denver Xews.
I    £ AIKAWA
I Boat Builder and General
I Carpenter
I  Boats built to order.    All sizes
I of Boats for Sale
■  F. AIKAWA
Royston Rd. n
a
George Grossmith, the English actor, once played a practical joke at
Madame Tussaud's museum of wax
works. He placed himself in a line of
waxen celebrities. No one suspected
that his motionless figure was the real
George Grossmith, and as people
went by tliey commented on the excellence of the likeness. Finally a
group collected. This wns Gros-
smith's opportunity. He nodded grotesquely, and slowly extended a comic
Grossmithian hand. Every one fled
as though he had been shot at.
j|||llll!!l!l!i!liii!!!ii
Jlllllllllllll!
"Say, Doc," said the scrubwoman,
"yer gettln' a party good thing out o'
tendin' that rich Smith boy, aint yer?"
"Well," said the doctor, "I get a
pretty good fee, yes.  Why?"
"Well, Doc, I 'opes yer won't forgit
that my Willie threw the brick Hint *u
'im."
WITTY SIMILE
The last speaker ot a long programme at a recent banquet said:
'My speech will be like modern stvle
n woman's dress—long enough to
cover the subject and short enough to
be Interesting."
m
Public Notice
I take this opportunity of informing the general
public and my customers in particular that there is no
truth whatsoever in certain rumors regarding any of
my cows being infected with tuberculosis. My solicitor
has interviewed Mr. R. Machin of the Comox Creamery
Association in reference %o such rumors, and Mr.
Machin emphatically denies that he ever asserted or
insinuated that my cows were so infected.
I might add that my cows are properly and duly
tested and inspected, and are now and always have
been, in perfect health.
Dated, Api» 22, 1921.
H.   LEIGHTON
DAIRYMAN ROYSTON, B. C.
Illlllllllllllllllllllllllll
"How do you like lhat cigar I gave
you. olil man? For two hundred hands
of that brand they give you a gramophone."
"Vou don't say! If I smoked two
hundred of those cigars I wouldn't
want a gramophone—I'd want a harp."
The Studebaker
Light-Six
Sailor: "We huve just seen somo
orange peel and banana skins floating
on the starboard, sir."
Columbus: "Was there any chewing mum?"
Sailor: "No, sir."
Columbus: "Then it must be the
West Indies we're coming to, and I'd
hoped It was going to he America."
Ij   The World's  Greatest   Light-Weight  Automobile   §f
THE NEW STUDEBAKER LIGHT-SIX was designed and is produced to meet the world-wide demand
for an efficient, durable and economical light-weight
car. It is a real achievement in advanced automobile
engineering for—
—refined and improved design, with exact
balance of weight.
—quick acceleration, flexibility and power
per pound of car weight.
—ease of operation, quietness and freedom
from vibration.
—economy of tires, gasoline and oil consumption.
I*. M. BliELLEU
'I trust, Miss Tappitt," said the
kindly employer to his stenographer,
"that you have something In reserve
for a rainy day."
"Yes, sir," answered the young
woman. "I am going to marry a man
named Mackintosh."
"He doesn't seem to have altered in
the least during the last ten years."
"No—but be imagines he has. He's
always saying what a fool he was."
Wasn't a Fulr Trial.
"Fired!   What did they fire §|
Bill:
you for?"
Alf.: "Cos I got drunk once."
Bill: '"Ow long was yer with 'em?
Alf.: "A day."
Weeks  Motors
LIMITED
j§     WALLACE STREET
NANAIMO, B. C.
ill
llllllllllIIIIHIIll <fl
May 21, i921.
fHB   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
Wljat is a
Recommendation Worth?
That depends very much upon who gives
it. For instance, we recommend Ames
Holden "Auto-Shoes" as the cheapest
mileage you can buy.
1 And we know a lot about tires. We have
to in our business.
Hence our recommendation should carry
some weight, apart from the fact that
we are benefiting to some extent by your
custom.
We know that if you buy once, you will
buy again—because you will find that
our recommendation saves you money
on mileage.
We will ejvc you a guarantee with Ames Holden
"Auto-Shoes too—a guarantee that protects you
against any defect in material or workmanship
which may arise at any time iu the life of the
tire. And we will get you an adjustment on that
basis should necessity arise, without quibble or
red-tape. Drop in and let us show you Ames
Holden "Auto-Shocs" to-day if you can.
AMES HOLDEN
"AUTO-SHOES"
Cord and Fabric Tires in all Standard Sizes
Cumberland
Motor Works
Dunsmuir Avenue
Cumberland Phone 77
TASTE is the TEST "
of ihe DRINKS
THAT ARE BEST
Buy the products of the
BRITISH   COLUMBIA  BREWERIES,  LIMITED
Ask for the Brands that are the Best
Alexandra Stout is Sure to satisfy.
U.B.C. Beer  The Beer of Quality.
Silver Top Soda Water FFruJ|fcf Pure
Cascade Beer  The Beer Without a Peer.
UNION BREWING CO.,   LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
Reacfy To Help a Man With
His Business
Willi trade reviving, every reliance may be placed on the
telephone, which is such a principal factor In Industrial development. British Columbia Is particularly fortunate In that telephone lines radiate from the principal cities to all points, 80
that instant means of communication are always available.
The duplicate submarine between Point Grey aud Nanaimo
was laid tills month, doubling the facilities for telephoning
between the .Mainland and Vancouver Island. New long distance
lines have been built on Vancouver Island and throughout the
lower Fraser Valley, both north and south of the river. Very
few applications are unfilled because of lack of facilities, so
that the telephone, always taken for granted, will not fall you.
British Columbia Telephone Co.
Deposit Your Savings
Regularity in depositing in our Savings Bank, even
in small suras, will make your balance increase surprisingly.   For example:
End End End
Deposits of: 1st Vr.       Slid Yr.       ShrVr.
$ 1.00 Weekly       f 52.69        $106.95        $162.84
10.00  Monthly        121.65 246.92 375.98
OPEN A SAVINGS ACCOUNT AND PROVE IT
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
PAID-UP CAPITAL
RESERVE FUND
CUMBERLAND BRANCH
- $15,000,000
- $15,000,000
J. GRAINGER, Manager.
MASONIC ROYAL ARCH
CHAPTERS OF ISLAND
BRILLIANT RE-UNION
(Continued (rom Page One)
where the members of Cumberland
Lodge No. 26 had, in the meantime,
entertained the visiting ladles and
friends at a Masonic whist drive, and
dancing continued until au early hour
in the morning.
The visitors were completely surprised and greatly pleased at tbe extent and thoroughness of the preparations made to receive and entertaiu
them, and with the exception of a
breakdown at Deep Bay of a party of
15 from Nanaimo, the whole trip was
without accident, and will long be remembered as one of the most successful events Iu Cumberland.
Several parties (rom Victoria visited
the mines next morning, one parly of
four men and two ladies venturing
down No. 6 mine under the genial
guidance of Mr. Brown, the manager.
They carried away several pieces of
coal picked from the cars below as
mementoes. The purty afterwards
inspected the Athletic Club, and their
sentiments, (rcely aud frequently expressed, were that Cumberland was a
real live town where everybody
helped the otber fellow, and they declared they are all coming back again.
Tbe list of visitors Included: F. R.
Exham, P. J. Hall, N. Nlblock, C. R.
McLachlan, David Nicol, J. Watson
Logan, R. F. Davidson, H. H. Davis,
D. Cook, W. Lunay, W. S. Wigles-
worth, J. W. Thompson, A. W. Ward,
W. Gibson, J. Robo, C. O. Van Camp,
A. G. W. Burbrldge, J. WUlcpmb, G.
A. Vantrelght, Chas. I. Harris, H. R.
Savage, R. Peden, W. J. Wilson, V.
W. Stewart, A. M. Hilton, Waldo
Skillings, Stewart M. Manual, Fred H.
Fatt, Peter B. Schwelk, G. McDonald,
John Frame, Edward B. Paul, C. G.
L. Reid, P. Miles, J. E. Painter, T. C
Buckingham, F. A. Wilton, W. M. Day
D. W. Warnock, W. I. Angar, J. D.
Galloway, Geo. Merrllleld, W. R. Yale,
John F. Doyle, W. Baxter, Fred G.
Cox, W. Mlddleton, O. S. Wandell, H.
Wright, R. Campbell, W. P. Marchand,
F. G. Bacon, Z. Drake, Thos. Cook,
Wm. Strang, Jas. Strang, W. S. Amp-
son, Jas. C. Allan, Alex. Gibbons, T.
Thomson, C. Thompson, Thos. Matthews, E. W. Harding, Con Reifel, F.
Beban, Jas. D. Juner, S. Gordon, J.
Flaherty, J. Little, Jas. Russell, with
many ladles.
Milk Consumers
Notice the Cream Line on the
Comox Creamery Milk Bottles
THAT TELLS THE TALE
OUR MILK IS CAREFULLY SELECTED FROM COMOX JERSEY
HERDS KNOWN TO BE ABSOLUTELY   HEALTHY  AND  KEPT
UNDER THE BEST HYGIENIC CONDITIONS
| You are taking no risk on Comox Creamery Milk- i
g Milk is now being delivered daily in Cumberland and Courtenay
Wz - Phone 8, Courtenay, for Representative to Call. 8
( Comox Creamery Assn. 1
COURTENAY, B. C
II
11
MASONIC WHIST DRIVE
AND DANCE IN ILO-ILO
One of Most Enjoyable Affairs
Ever Held in Cumberland.
A merry company gathered In the
Ilo-Ilo Hall on Tuesday evening,
when the Cumberland Masonic Lodges,
assisted by their ladles, entertained
the visiting members of the Island
Chapters at a delightful whist drive
aud dance. The event, which was the
occasion ot the Re-Uuion of the Royal
Arch Chapters of the Island, was
thoroughly enjoyed by the visitors
from the Island town, the members'
families and the members themselves.
Mrs.T. Mordy, assisted by Mrs. G. W.
Clinton, received the ladles, who expressed their great appreciation at the
cordial hospitality extended lo them.
Whist continued until 9.30, when,
during the counting of scores, light
refreshments were served. Mr. R.
Stacey, the able and genial master of
ceremonies, then announced the
prize winners, aud Mrs. T. Mordy.
with a few appropriate remarks,
awarded tho prizes. Mrs. A. C. Lymn
was the fortunate recipient of the
lady's first prize, a china fruit bowl.
Miss Charlotte Carey receiving the
consolation, a French ivory shoe-horn
Of the gentlemen, Mr. Fletcher, of
Courtenay, had the honor of winning
the first prize, whist Mr. Rickson
also of Courtenay, obtained the consolation.
After the distribution of prizes the
card tables were cleared from Ibe
floor and the dance began. At this
point the merrlness of the company
waa Increased by the arrival of the
members and visitors of the Royal
Arch Chapter, who had just completed
a successful meeting, %nd who joined
in the dancing until the small hours
of the morning.
Special mention must be made of thc
refreshments, the ice cream and milkshakes becoming exceedingly popular
after every dance. The decorations
were very pretty and were greatly
admired by the visitors. Tbe evening
was voted a huge success by (He entire
crowd and we feel sure that the visitors were pleasantly surprised at the
entertaining ability of our little town.
HIDES EIGHT CENTS EACH
Percy Champion, of Melitn, Man.,
recently sent the hides of two cows
to Brandon for sale. After freight
charges were deducted, all he received
for the hides was sixteen cents In
postage stamps.
Federal government plans for opening up communications and other development work in the Mackenzie
River oil district are about complete.
Three different government departments are interested, and probably
from seventy to one hundred men will
be sent north to carry out tlio government's plans. The surveyor-general's
department is sending in four parties
in all; there will he four or live parties
of geologists and others from tho
Mines Branch; while the department
of the interior is sending iu au administrative party of twenty or more,
who will carry out (ho general administrative  work,  erect   the   necessary
ees, establish the details of civil
governments, etc.       i
The Prince of Wales has consented
to be patron of the Chinook Jockey
Club, Calgary. The club plans to encourage the breeding of thoroughbreds in Alberta and will endeavor to
produce a Derby winner. Already
$94,000 has been invested and a further sum of $75,000 will be raised to
complete Its plant at Calgary. Prof.
Carlyle, who has charge of the
Prince's ranch, entertains the opinion
that a phenomenal success awaits Ihe
breeding of the llioroughbred in Alberta, the true type which all breeders
sought to Improve. With the climate
and grasses of Alberta, a wonderful
opportunity awaits the breeding of a
thoroughbred that will not only advertise the possibilities of the province as a breeding centre, but be a
credit to tlie Dominion also.
Moving out of his bed. which was
flush witli (lie open window, Berlino
Dlno, 43, roomer at 33 St. Antolne St.,
Montreal, fell through the window to
the street below, a drop of thirty feet,
and broke his neck, dying a few
minutes later.
In a report just made puhlic, Lieut
Colonel A. C. Garner, who made a
journey over Northern Saskatchewan
at the request of Hon. Charles A.
Dunning, provincial treasurer, with
a view of investigating llie natural
resources, says: "Great possibilities
of immense wealth await development
in (he northern part of Haskatcho
wan." He declares that It will Ink'
time, money and much energy to sue
cessfully develop the immense urea
covered by his Journey. In the report tho discovery of gold, silver,
copper, asbestos and other mineral
Is claimed.
COMMITTEE EXTENDS
THANKS TO CITIZENS
The members of the Entertainment
Committee of Cyrus Royal Arch Chapter No. 10 desire to express Iheir sincere thanks and appreciation at the
ready and cordial co-operation of the
merchants and otber citizens in mak
ing the town so bright and attractive
on the occasion of the visit of the Is
land Chapters to Cumberland, and in
Elder McTavlsli: "Wool, Donald, au'
hoo's the worrld treating you?"
Donald: "Vena seldom. Mr. Mo-
I'avlsb."
abolish worry saraa
FINANCIAL
A CANADIAN GOVERNMENT ANNUITY WILL DO IT
Gives a larger return for life than is obtainable
from any other form of investment with absolute
security.
Free from Dominion Income Tax.
Any person resident or domidled in Canada over
the age of 5 may purchase, to begin at once, or at any
later date desired,an Annuity of from $50 to $5,000,
to be paid in monthly or quarterly instalments.
Any two persons may purchase jointly.
Employers may purchase for their employees.
Apply to your postmaster, or write, postage free, lo S. T. Bastcdu,
Superintendent of Annuities, Ottawa, for new booklet and other
information required.    Mention age last birthday.
Because she lias no legal existence
a woman Is being denied a marriage
licence in Belgium. The woman, it appears, does not know her own name,
age or birthplace. In (lie eyes of tho
authorities she has no legal existence
and thereforo cannot marry.
tsslsting to receive and accommodate
■•uch a large number of visitors.
Owing to unforseen obstacles, at
least fifty or more Intending visitors
iad lo cancel the trip; many who had
provided liberally for these had llieir
time and trouble in vain, and we wish
to particularly extend our regret to
those who had provided so liberally
at a big expense of time, trouble and
money for tho accommodation of so
many guests, and  were disappointed.
Thanks are also due to the members
of the Cumberland City Hand, who so
kindly turned out in the evening and
gave everyone pleasure with Iheir delightful music.
T. H. CAREV,
Director of Committee of
Enlertalnment.
Cumberland, May 26, 1021,
The New System
We do not operate our business on the ohl system of lone
credits—our aim Is to sell as cheaply as possible. If you deal
at this store you can rest assured thai you are uot paying
exorbitant prices to cover the loss sustained through bad ch'bts.
Wc claim the old system of making those who pay up their
accounts bear the cost of those who do not pay at all, is not fair
dealing.
Patronize this siore and pay just for whal you get. Don't
pay the otlier fellow's had debts by paying high prices,
FLOUR   DOWN   AGAIN—Per* TEAS
49-lb. sack   ft!.!MI
SUOAB-Per 20-lb. sack fcMIU DECICAJULIE TEA, II,.     05o
COMOX BUTTER, 8 lbs. #1.11.-. GR:EAT WEST TEA. R<"'. !"/'
Tr,Kl:"..,.:'.™:.% "KAn-imoAi/T,,,,;;;::
11I.'.    11 >i      S i .fill
HAM AND BACON VEGETABLES AND
BOILED HAM, per ib. ,  .. 7<)c FRUIT
ROAST PORK, per Ib.         7,*ic
KAW HAM, per Ib (Wc LOCAL    HOTHOUSE    TO.MA
AYRSHIRE 1(01.1,. per Ib. .V.r T0BS' l"1' "'*          *         OSo
PEA-MEAL BACON, per lb, «flc N'M'|,;    PKBBH    STRAWBER-
SIDE BACON, per Ib           .',.»■ lilKS* m* hi""*"1              '0o
ORtDEN ONIONS, per b h Bo
SOAP  DOWN   AGAIN rhubarb             :i ii... ■•;„■
PELS   NAPTHA   SOAP- Por ROYAL ANN CHERRIES, per
carton of 10 bars    turn pound..                    .... «0c
Specials in Hose
LADIES' SILKOLINE HOSE, In Black, White and ni\»
Navy, per r IvC
'•'.Jia^r ",TT"X IIIIS":' 40c, 50c, 60c
Shoes
CHILDREN'S  PATENT  LEATHER SLIPPERS  -       <J«*1 nr
Per pair     tD^t.ID
OIRLS' LOW HEEL PATENT PUMPS- tj>r nr
Per pair     tDO.lD
\ Kl'1,1, LINE OP HIIITK OUTING SHOES
In all styles and sizes for Men, Women and Children,
WE SELL EVERYTHING WITH A MONEY-B.U'K
GUARANTEE, THUS ENSURING SATISFACTION.
The Corner Store
WM. GORDON
Phone 133 Six
THS  emffififttAND  ISLANDER
May Si, 1921.
It Is Our Ambition
To Give You
The Best
WE HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN OBTAINING
THE AGENCY FOR
Bullen   Bros/  Specialties
JUST RECEIVED A SHIPMENT OF
MARMALADE, I's in jars and 4's in tins.
MAYONNAISE SALAD DRESSING
MUMFORD'S
GROCERY
T. H. MUMFORD
J. WALTON
YOUR TEETH
CHEWING
By Rea Proctor McGee, M.D., D.D.S.
Editor of "Oral Hygiene."
CHUM'S SHOES
FOR CHILDREN
m  All Sizes.
All Kinds   m
These are without
doubt the   Best
CHILDREN'S
SHOES
on the market
Cavin's
Cash Shoe Store
Remember that we have a de,vlc« for every foot trouble
idjlll!lllllllllillllllEI!llllllt[lllllllllllllllll[lllllllllli»iillttUUV.i,
When a Frenchman has a deformity
of tlie jaw that throws his chin over
to one side, the French doctor says
lie has the face of the "village chanter." Have yon noticed the tendency
of amateur singers to spoil an otherwise good performance hy singing
out of one corner of the mouth or by
twisting the face in a displeasing
manner? This face distortion is nol
nei-essarily confined to singers; we
all do it to some extent. Tiie reason
is nearly always to he found in the
mouth. Yesterday I broke a tooth
and ever since 1 have drawn my lip
down  to try to hide the spot.    Our
I natural inclination is to try to hide
any Infirmity, particularly wlven it. is
| now. If ihe cause of this effort is
uot removed, the cover-up act will become a habit that will remain long
after the original reason for its use
will have been forgotten.
It' a tooth becomes tender or the
surrounding gum becomes iutlnmcd
the bolus of food that is to be chewed
will unconsciously be sfiifted to a
spot that is more nearly normal. This
results in tlie rapid progress of tartar
formation upon tbe teeth in the whole
unused area.- Soft foods and mucus
will join tlie tartar so that presently
a vile tasting and smelling mess,
seething with bacteria, is permanently
located in the waiting room of the
main station of the route between
your dinner-table and your stomach.
In addition to being contaminated
when this condition is present, the
food is only partly chewed. When a
habit in chewing is formed that is not
normal, the contour of the faco is
always altered and the facial expression is changed. This is because
some of the muscles of the face,
which are also muscles of mastication,
are not doing their proper share of
the work, so they atrophy, which
means, grow smaller. Some of the
face muscles have more than their
usual amount of work to do, so they
grow larger. With one side of your
face growing smaller and one side
growing larger it doesn't take much
of an architect to figure out the fact
that you will have a crooked face if
you don't chew riglit. You cannot
chew right unless your mouth is
healthy.
Copyright, by Rea Proctor McGee.
STAR   LIVERY   STABLE
ALEX MAXWELL, Proprietor
Autos for Hire.     Coal and "Wood Hauling given very
prompt attention.    Furniture and Piano
Storage if desired.
Phones 4 and 61
Cumberland, B.C.
Appearances
Count!
If you desire a good appearance call at the
CUMBERLAND BARBER
SHOP
A. OATZ, Proprietor
Our Motto:   TO PLEASE
Get a Kodak  and  keep  a picture;
story. Front's for Kodaks.
She: "Do you love me, John?"
He: "Sure."
She: "Then why don't your chest
go up and down like the man ln the
movies?"
Smith:  "That barber Is an artist."
Jones: "I should say he ls.   Look at
my face.   He always works tn a few
cuts with his stories.
Thos. H. Carey
F1HE AND LIFE INSURANCE
Cumberland, B. C.
POST-WAR WORK OF
THE RED CROSS SOCIETY
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
A fastidious party, being down in
the less-frequented part of tho town
on business, the other day, dropped
into a hashery for lunch. It wus a
rough, ill-smelling place, but he
thought he could manage to get down
a cup of coffee and a doughnut, so he
ordered them. The waitress brought
his coffee in a thick, heavy cup.
"Where's the saucer?" inquired our
fastidious friend.
"We don't give no saucers here,"
repied the girl, turning her wad of
gum. "If we did, some lowbrow would
come blowin' and drink out of liis
saucer, and we'd lose a lot of out-
swell trade."
The magnitude of tlie post-war work
which the Uritish Columbia Division
of the Canadian Red Cross is still engaged in, is unknown to and naturally
unappreciated, by a very large proportion of the people in British Columbia. Hence the question which so
often arises, "Why the Red Cross in
times of Peace?" As a matter of fact,
there are over 800 returned men still
confined to tlie hospitals and sanitariums of tlie province. In these institutions the men have the same
siuius as any ordinary patient, but
Ihey are lucking the small comforts
which moan so much to sick or ailing
persons, lu this situation, the Red
Cross steps in, giving to these men
tho Utile things which make life bearable, This work on Ihe part of the
Rod CrosH is going on. and will go on
until its mission ln this particular
branch is fulfilled,
Nexl in order of importance In the
post-war work, which the Red Cross
is now conducting, is the workshop
for disabled soldiers. There is now
established lu the city of Victoria, in
ihe former 0. \V. V. A. headquarters,
one of these workshops. As yet, lu Its
initial stage, this workshop is on a
comparatively small scale, but It is
now furnishing employment to twelve
disabled men who, from the nature of
their disabilities, are unable to undertake work In the open labor market.
It is Ihe idea behind this workshop to
teach these men a trade which will
finally make them self-supporting,
| and, while teaching them, to pay them
wages, which, at present, are based
on a miiniuiu of 40 cents au hour, increasing as they acquire a knowledge
ot the particular craft for which they
are fitted, It is modeled somewhat
along the lines of the Lord Roberts
.Memorial Workshops in England,
where marvelous results have been
obtained by the training of apparently
hopelessly crippled men.
The workshop itself has bright
airy rooms, iitted with workman-like
machinery, specially designed to suit
thc needs of the crippled mechanics.
It has a spacious show-room and
ollice, and by no means least in importance—a rest room, which tells its
sad tale of men impaired in health by
the vicissitudes of war.
Some of tiie men now employed are
capable of but a few hours* work a
day, but as they improve In health
and skill, six or seven hours' work
can be undertaken. This workshop is
the second of its kind in Canada. It is
hoped to extend" its quarters, aud in
lime establish workshops of a similar
nature at different pjoints throughout
the province.
Devote your spare time to the consideration of your own faults, for a
change, and you will have less to say
about the faults of your friends.
A dispatch from Prince Rupert
states that Inspector J. T. C. Williams
declares that all varieties of salmon
in the district are as prolific this year
'as twenty years ago. No depletion is
noted anywhere, he states.
We sell Genuine
Ford Parts at
prices set by the
Company.    Our
labor charges
also are set.
You know the
cost before you
buy Ford Service
E. C. EMDE
Ford Dealer
COURTENAY, B. C.
British Columbia last your imported
^i."J,ooo,oo() worth of goods that came
into direct competition with products
of this province. This meant that not
only the wages and taxation derived
from the industries that turned those
products out were lost to the province, hut the industrial expansion
that would have been necessary upon
Ihe existence of a population large
enough lo produce that amount of
goods was also lost.
"Oue of the most noticeable effects
in this province of the budget pronouncements will be the impetus given
the Made-ln-B.C. movement," says Mr.
J. T. Crowder, president of the B. C.
Branch of the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada. British Columbia has been the heaviest importer of
foreign goods per capita of any province iu the Dominion. Ho points out
that under tlie customs regulations
now effective, it will be morl difficult
and considerably more expensive to
obtain foreign goods in preference to
similar articles manufactured iu B.C,
Henderson's
Ice Cream
PARLORS
\ •      m
Now   Open
for Business
Paolo Monte
Shoemaker
Shoe Repairing a Sueclalty.
CUMBERLAND. B.O.
Clings Wonderfully!
FACE POWDER JONTEEL
gives the skin a soft, velvety
smoothness suid beauty. Acceptable to the molt Kfuitlve ikin,
became it is yure. And delightfully
fragrant—perfumed with Jonteel,
the costly new odor of 26 flowers.
Try Face Powder Jonteel.
Tobacco,   Cigars
Cigarettes
We have your Favorite Brand
Always in JUST RIGHT
condition
Frost's Pharmacy
THE REXALL STORE
LUMBER
SHINGLES
AND f
KILN-DRIED FINISH
We have just installed a large
Dry Kiln and are now in a position to supply complete house
bills.
Send us your specifications
and we will give you a close
figure on it.
The
Gwilt Lumber Co.
Puntledge
SEE
Wm. Douglas
for
Mill Feed
Hay, Grain and
Poultry Supplies
FOR
WINDOWS, DOORS, FRAMES,
INTERIOR TRIM AND
GENERAL  FACTORY WORK
write for prices to
THE MOORE-WHITTINGTON
LUMBER CO. LTD.
Office 2C20 Bridge Street, Victoria, B.C. t
May 21, ld21.
THE  CUMBERLAND  ISLANDER
Seven
$§^   Music and Photoplays
DOUGLAS
FAIRBANKS!
The Mollycoddle
Showing at Ilo-Ilo on Saturday, May 21.
LIFE'S FACTORS
PICTURE THEME
Heredity and Environment Utilized by "Doug" Fairbanks
in "The Mollycoddle"
Two of tlio greatest factors In life,
today, heredity ami environment, have
been used by Douglas Fairbanks in
supplying the tlieme for his third
United Artists Corporation production, "Tiie Mollycoddle," which will
be Iho feature attraction at the llo-llo
on Saturday night.
In "The Mollycoddle" Douglas Fair-
bunks, as Richard Marshall, the Fifth,
is an offesprlng of many generations
of fearless lighters. His ancestors
fought all the way through the Revolution; all across the plains and all
down the coast of the western country. They were not dainty or even
civilized in tlieir undertakings and it
mattered little just how they gained
a point, just so long as lt was gained
quickly.
Iu the title role, Fairbanks Is
transplanted in England at an early
age. Ilo arrives at his youth through
the so-called hothouse cultivation,
with the result that his early manhood
found him gentle in manner, quiet of
voice, fastidious in dress and addicted
to such affectations as monocle, perfume and cigarette holders.
There Is no question hut that he
went very well with his environment;
but everything about him grated on
the Americans with whom he came in
contact, for their knowledge of Englishmen had been gained from Action.
He was considered just a plain
""Mollycoddle."
But something happens in his life
and he gets back to America. A girl
is the causo and for her he tries to
crack the shell of his English exterior. He is not much of a success at
the start for he1 had been too thoroughly saddled witli environment,
Conditions were different then.
Many obstacles crossed his path and
he was called upon in numerous emergencies. Then his ancestry took
hold. He forged to Ihe front and
scouted us his plainsman grandfather
might have scouted; stood up under
fire as his Revolutionary grandfather
must have; rescued beauty in distress
as his cavalier father surely did, and
fought as all four of his grandfathers
would have if rolled Into one.
Wallace Beery as the "villain" has
considerable to do In developing the
ancestry of "The .Mollycoddle" over
his environment und Ruth llenick, as
the pretty girl who starts the turning
point of it all, Is responsible for many
of the thrilling situations.
their headquarters at Fort Lauder-
ville, some thirty miles north of
Miami, where tbey used a wide stretch
of beach. Here they erected a number of huts ln the true fashion of
South Sea Islanders. The fisheries,
cocoanut groves, and tropical vegetation needed for the general atmosphere were all ideally located.
"Idols of Clay" casts Mae Murray
as the unsophisticated daughter of a
South Sea recluse and pearl smuggler,
who in time reaches the heights of
London society and ln the end ls rescued just in time from a horrible existence in a Chinese den in the Lime-
house slums. David Powell bas the
role of a young English sculptor who
has lost all faith in women and his
art, but regains both through the devotion of the girl from the South Seas
PEARL WHITE COMING
IN "THE WHITE MOLL"
DOES YOUTH DESERVE
FRUITS OF HIS FOLLY?
"When We Were Twenty-One"
Shows How a Youth Fell for
An Adventuress' Wiles
Does youth deserve the fruits of its
folly? Is it headed for the rocks when
lt plunges through the breakers of Indiscretion? In "When We Were
Twenty-One," In which H. B. Warner
is starring at the Ilo-Ilo Theatre on
Thursday next, views that bubble-
some, troublesome age from the angle
of present and past.
"When We Were Twenty-One" Is a
photoplay version of H. V. Esmond's
stage drama, ln whicb Nat Goodwin,
with Maxine Elliott, scored his greatest triumph. It tells the story of the
sacrificial love of a man for a youth
to whom he has been father, mother
and brother.
The youth falls for tbe wiles of a
scheming adventuress. She marries
him for his money but promptly leaves
him for another man when she finds
him penniless. It Is a terrific blow
to the boy, who thought his love was
a noble, beautiful thing that was willing to shield a misunderstood woman
from the slandering tongues of a lying world.
A splendid cast has been assembled
by Director Henry King. Mr. Warner
plays Nat Goodwin's role—that of the
wiser man who tries to shield the boy
at the expense of his honor and his
love. James W. Morrison ls the boy,
and Claire Anderson the girl who,
though engaged to the boy, loved the
older man. Christine Mayo Is the adventuress.
BUCK JONES TO SHOW
US A LIVELY CHASE
Pearl White, "the marvel of the
screen," is coming to the Ilo-Ilo on
Wednesday next, being presented by
William Fox in a special production
"The White Moll," a stirring story of
life In New York's underworld. This
is her lirst big production—she having
heretofore devoted her screen work
to serials.
The story was written by Frank L.
Packard, author of "The Miracle
Man." It deals with Rhoda, a girl
crook of the slums, who, having seen
the light In a stratling miracle performed In St. Agnes' Church—where
her father ls killed trying to rob the
poor box—determines to reform and
labor to aid those in the underworld.
As a settlement worker she becomes
known by the crooks and gangsters as
"The White Moll."
Her work has started to bear fruit.
"The Sparrow," a notorious safe
burglar who has served a long term in
prison, is released. When "The Dangler," leader of the gang, tempts the released convict to return to his unlawful trado, "The White Moll," who has
been caring for his aged mother, steps
in aud wins the Sparrow's promise to
go straight. But she Incurs the en
mlty of the Dangler, who determines
to "frame" tlie Sparrow. Then begins
a series of thrilling experiences
which, It is said, make the picture one
of the most fascinating and heart-
appealing ever screened.
The story, written In Mr, Packard's
Inimitable style, carries an appeal
even stronger than bis famous tale,
"The Miracle Mau."
The wildest ride that Victorvllle,
Cat, once the headquarters of the
toughest men the West has produced,
has seen in many years, was that of
Buck Jones, the Fox star, and Pat
Harmon In the making of "Firebrand
Trevison," on the great Verde ranch.
The picture Is coming to the Ilo-Ilo
Theatre on Friday next. One scene
called for a ride of nearly a mile iu
which Harmon, as the villain, was
pursued by Buck Jones. The villain
on a light pony, the fleetest of foot on
the ranch, was turned loose tn a pasture some two miles ln length lying
in a bottom along the Mojave river.
Buck, on Blondy, his sorrel horse,
fifteen hands high and weighing 1000
pounds, thought he would bave an
easy time to catch Harmon, as the picture required; bnt the pony ran with
such speed that Buck had to chase
him for more than half a mile to get
within shooting distance.
"Blondy Is one of the fastest horses
I ever rode," said Buck, "but that
pony sure can travel."
Half the population of Victorvllle
was out to see the race, which furnishes one of the big thrills in "Firebrand Trevison."
FROSTED LEAVES
FLORIDA BECOMES A
SOUTH SEA ISLAND
George Fitzmaurice Transforms
Sections of the Beach for
"Idols of Clay"
George Fitzmaurice transferred a
bit of tho South Sea Islands to the
coast of Florida for his latest Paramount production, "Idols of Clay,"
which local screen admirers will have
the pleasure of viewing at the Ilo-Ilo
Theatre on Tuesday next.
Mr. Fitzmaurice and his company,
which included Mac .Murray nnd David
Powell us the featured players, made
"For beating your wife, I will fine
you $1.10," said the judge.
"I don't know that I object to the
dollar, judge," said the prisoner, "but
what ls the ten 'cents for?"
"That," said the judge, "is the provincial tax on amusements."
Too many gaze upon yon mount
Where truth and fancy meet
And fail to note the bubbling fount
A-sparkllng at their feet;
It seems the luscious fruit hangs high
Upon the utmost bough,
And far away, the distant sky
Seems lovelier somehow.
I recollect when but a boy
I climbed an apple tree;
The fruit thereon was a decoy
Yet looked the best to me:
While all around upon the grass
The ruddy pippins lay,
And I let all the prize ones pass
And scaled the tree that day.
When way up ln the very top,
That looked line from the ground,
I lost my footing, took a flop,
And came down with a bound.
While lying there quite bruised and
sore
On the grass beside the fence,
I gazed up at the tree once more
With mind more dazed than dense.
And up among the branches there
Bright red leaves I could see
That swaying In the autumn air
Appeared to apples be.
And so as on through life we go
It's often proven true
That things assume a different show
When seen from a closer view.
Sentimental Smith; "Old friends are
the best, are they not?"
Harriet Hardfax;- "They  are  not
They have an unerring memory for
your age and your family secrets, and
they tell 'em."
m
ILO-ILO THEATRE
Saturday, May 21st
Biff!   Bing!!
Bang!!!
He's here again
Douglas
Fairbanks
In Six Reels of
Fairbanks
humour, thrills
love, speed and
action.
It's "Doug" at
his best as
The  Mollycoddle
"Doug," the Crown Prince in the Kingdom of Fun, in a United Artists production
that upsets the Army of Glooms with a laughter barrage that will make your sides
ache. It's new and original in story and action. Far from anything that has ever
been attempted before.   It's speedy and happy, full of love and .suspense.
Tuesday, May 24th-EMPIRE DAY "
Mae Murray&David Powell
— IN —
IDOLS OF CLAY
See Mae Murray's Chiffon Dance
Harold   Lloyd
In NUMBER PLEASE
Wednesday, May 25th
PEARL WHITE
In THE WHITE MOU.
A COLOSSAL SUPER CROOK DRAMA WITH AN AMAZING SPIRITUAL TWIST.
THE STORY OF A GIRL WHO FOUGHT HER WAV RACK AGAINST TREMENDOUS ODDS.   SOUNDS TIIE UTTERMOST DEPTHS OF HUMAN EMOTIONS.
Thursday, May 26th
H. B. WARNER
— IN
Somehow it's always a shook to a
girl who has spent her youth In cultivating "the soul" and acquiring a
higher education to discover that a
man has fallen ln love with her for
the way her hair curls at the back of
her neck.
Tlie lVng*s of Sin
"Bredren!" exclaimed thc preacher
as he came across a portion of his
flock engaged in pursuing the goddess
of chance. "Don' yo' all know it's
wrong to shoot craps?"
"Yas, pahson," admitted one parishioner, sadly, "an' b'lieve me, Ah's pay-
in' for mah sins I"
Mrs. Pig (with newspaper): "Do
you know, Henry, that every time you
draw your breath someone dies?"
Mr. Fig: "Well, I'm sorry, but I can't
help lt. If I stop drawing my breath
I'll die too!"
When We Were 21
YOUTH PLAYED! YOUTH PAID! On his twenly-lirst birthday "The Imp" wenl
on a wild tear. He sowed his wild oats in one wild night. Folly called. And the little
girl, and the surprise party, waited and waited. But the boy never came. It's a
drama of youth, a romance of the joys and tollies of the heedless age. It makes boys
and girls laugh with appreciation; men and women will smile with understanding.
i  — 	
Friday, May 27th
BUCK   JONES
IN
You
"I feel very old today."
"What are you talking about?
are not- a day over 30."
"I know, but I've just been listening
to a boy of 14 tell about tho things
he used to do when he was a kid."
FIREBRAND   TREVISON
A new and absorbing Western story by the noted Charles Alden Seltzer. A story
of love and conspiracy in the great unsettled stretches of the West. A Western
romance of lightning speed and desperate daring, in which a clever villain encounters
honesty that is cleverer and courage that he cannot match. Eight
THE   CUMBERLAND   ISLANDER
May 21, 1921.
YOU   ARE   INVITED   TO   SEE   THE   NEW
Spring Suits>Coats
Cloth Dresses
taffeta, Satin and
cTricolette Gowns
also Skirts
Shown by
SCURRAH'S LIMITED
Of Victoria
f        *"ty ^^<
On Sale Friday and Saturday
May 20th and 21st at
DRYGOODS
GENTS FURNISHINGS
Personal Mention
Mr. ami -Mrs. John J. Wier went
Lo Victoria for a few days on Satur-
iiuy, returning%m Wednesday.
Mr. A. T. Stephenson, formerly of
Cumberland, was in town Tuesday.
Mr. Con Heitle and Mr. H. Reifle, of
Nanaimo, were in town during the
week.   -
Mr. D. C. Macfarlane, Purchasing
Aggnt or the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd., Victoria, arrived in
town Wednesday.
Mr. Thomas Graham, Ceneral Superintendent of the Canadian Collieries
(Duiisinnir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs.
Graham, left for Victoria Friday
morning,
Mr. J. Kerr was a passenger to Victoria Friday morning.
Mr. Noel McFarlane of Nanaimo arrived in tOWU Tuesday.
Mr, Philip itowe left for Nanaimo
Saturday for a few days.
Mr. Until.nu, of the Royal Insurance
Co., Victoria, was iu town during the
week.
Ml'. Ceo. O'Brien and family motored
to Qualicum and Nanaimo ou Tuesday.
.Mr. and .Mrs. It. Robertson and Mr.
R. Robertson, Jr., left for Victoria on
Saturday.
.Mrs. 11. Farmer left for Nanaimo on
Saturdayt where she was called owing
to tbe death of her father.
Mr. Louis Marks, of the Canadian
Explosives, Vancouver, arrived in
town Wednesday and returned to
Vancouver Friday.
Mrs. Caleb Dando, Jr., arrived from
Ladysmith on Monday.
Mr, Henry Devlin, Inspector of
Mines, was in town during the week.
Holiday
DANCE
Tuesday, May 24th
EMPIRE  DAY
IN  THE
ILO-ILO DANCE HALL
*■ * i
Gentlemen, $1.00
Ladies, 25c.
It Is Just As Easy
to own u genuine
" Ye Olde Firme'
Heintzir.ian & Co. Piano
•W it i's to own one of inferior quality.
Our revised prices bring the Heintzman Piano
within the reach of all.
Terms cau be arranged to suit your convenience.
Write for catalogue and prices.
Heintzman & Co.
GIDEON HICKS, Manager—Box 233, Victoria
Nanaimo VICTORIA Cumberland
JIOIA I'lUNlTX U1U11C11
Rev. \V. Lcversedgo.
.Miij 22nd—Trinity Sunday.
Holy Communion, S.3U u.m.
Sunday bciiool, l.'it) p.m.
Evensong, 7 p.m.
jlny 29lli—first Sunday niter Trinity.
Matins and Holy Communion at 11
a.m.
Sunday Softool, 2.30 p.m.
Children's Evensong, 7 p.m. All
parents cordially invited.
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHUBCH.
Rev. Father R. Beaton, Comox.
Hay 22nd—
.Mass, 9 a.m.
l'KESlll'TEKlAN SERVICES
Rev. Jas. Hood, Pastor.
Morning Service at 11.
Evening Service at 7.
GRACE METHODIST CHURCH
Hot. U. 11. Kinney, !Un F.It.ti.S.
Sunday Junior Congregation, 11 a.m
Sunday School and Bible Class, 2.30.
Regular Preaching Service, 7 p.m.
PUNTLEDGE
Enjoyable Time at Whilst Drive and
Dance on Friday Nielli.
A very successful whist drive anil
dance was held at Puntledge School
on Friday last under the auspices of
Chairman Mrs. Pettys. The whist
prizes were won by Miss M. P. Marshall and Mr. G. Bell, the booby prizes
going to Mrs. Blalock and Mr, Foley.
After the cards, dancing was the
order of the evening. During the intervals songs were rendered by Mrs.
Watson, accompanied by Miss V. A
Marshall.
Thanks are given to Mosdames
Mitchell and Blalock for their donation of prizes.
Whist Drive
and Social Evening
wil lie held on
THURSDAY, MAY 2fi
In the
FRATERNITY HALL
under the auspices of the
WOMEN'S BENEFIT ASSN.
OF THE MACABEES
llciri'sliiai'iils Provided.
Births
Patient: "What shall I take to remove the redness from my nose?
Doctor: "Take nothing-especlally
between meals."
They say some men have so much
tongue for hrenkfast and dinner, It's
no wonder they want chicken for
lunch.
BOYD—To Mr. and Mrs. Boyd, at the
Cumberland General Hospital, May
18, a son.
HEW—At   the   Cumlierland   General
Hospital, May 18, to Mr. and .Mrs,
Hew, a son.
MATSU—To Mr. nnd .Mrs. Mntsu. at
the  Cumberland  General  Hospital,
May 18, a son.
SHIPPING AT CANADIAN
COLLIERIES' COALING
WHARF, UNION BAY
May 12—J. C. Potter, Ocean Falls;
Tartar, Ocean Falls; Joyful, coastwise; Dola and Scows, Victoria.
May 13—Charmer, Vancouver; Progressive, coastwise; Chemainus, coastwise; Plunger and Scows, Vancouver.
.May 14—Alcedo, .Moresby, Massel,
Active, Chieftain, coastwise.
May IS—Taikai Maru, Japan.
May Iti—Eastern Admiral, Manila;
Faultless, coastwise; Restless, coastwise.
May 17—Daring, coastwise; Waio,
tapu, Sun Francisco.
.May 18—Bantu, Tacoma;  Katahdlu
Progressive, coastwise,
and Scows, Seattle;   Beatrice,   Earl,
PRIVATE NURSING
.MISS M. BOND, R.N., is prepared to
undertake private nursing. Address
P.O. Box 353. Residence, New Town-
site. 4-25
WANTED
CAPABLE GIRL;  PLAIN COOKING
fond  of children;   sleep  in;   good
home.   Apply P.O. Box 36.        3-23
FOR SALE
1921 FORD TOURING CAR, SLIGHT-
ly used; owner going East about
June 10th. P. C. Frazee, c-o Cum
berland Hotel. 1-21
CHEVROLET CAR, 11118, IN Al CON
dition; thoroughly overhauled; new
battery, spare tire. Price $575. Box
343, Cumberland.
FORD TOURING, 1918; SPARE TIRE
and tubes; Al condition. Price
$450. Apply P.O. Box 343, Cumlierland.
GRAY-DORT TOURING CAR—Late
model; in llrst-class condition; new
tires, with spare tire and tube; $850.
Apply Cameron's Garage. 1-20
FORD CAR, 1919, GOOD CONDITION.
Demountable rims, shock absorbers.
Call and see at Chas. McMillan's,
53, Camp. 3-20
CHEVROLET CAR FOR SALE—1920
model; run only 1500 miles; Is in
splendid condition. Will sell cheap
for quick sale. Apply A. R, Wesley,
R. It. No. 1, Cumberland, B.C.   4-22
LOOSE OAT HAY, FRO.M ONE TON
upwards; cheap for cash. Apply R.
Waddcll,  R.  M.  D. 1,  Cumberland.
,'HltEE ACRES GOOD LAND, partly
cleared;  house, barn   nnd   garage
one cow, two dozen chickens; mile
nnd a half from town.  For further
particulars apply Islander Ollice.
3-17
CHEVROLET 5-PASSENGER CAR,
1919 model, in first-class condition;
fully equipped, five new tires, five-
spare tulies. Open for inspection to
any mechanic. Price $650 cash.
Apply Ben Evaus, Camp, Cumberland. 4-17
LOST
LOST—EYEGLASS CASE, CONTAIN-
lug small chain nnd sum of money.
Finder rewarded on returning to
Henderson's Confectionery Store.
FOUND
FOUND—A HONORABLE SERVICE
BADGE, No. 23590. Owner can
have same by applying to Islander
OUlco.
Bums & Brown
B. & B. GROCERY
FOR
.Service        Quality
Value
Holiday Suggestions for 24th May
Crest Apricots, I's, 25c tin 5 for $1.00
Ginger Nuts, 35c per lb 3 lbs. $1.00
Mixed Cookies, 35c per lb 3 lbs. $1.00
Sodas, large packets, 35c each 3 pkts. $1.00
Finest Cut Macaroni, 1-lb. pkts., 20c 2 for 35c
Finest Bulk Tea, No. 1, per lb 50c
Finest Bulk Tea, No. 2, per lb 40c
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 1, per lb 55c
Fresh Ground Coffee, No. 2, per lb 45c
Sugar, 18-lb. sack !  $2.50
Cream of the West Flour—"Guaranteed  the  Best."
Try a sack with your next grocery order.
49-lb. sack, $3.10 24-lb. sack, $1.60
Choice Dried Apples, 20c lb 3 lbs. SOc
Large Dried Prunes, 25c lb 2 lbs. 45c
FRUITS
Gold Elephant Navel Oranges 3 dozen $1.00
Also, per dozen 60c and 90c
Marmalade Oranges, dozen  75c
Sunkist Lemons, large size, 35c dozen, 3 dozen $1.00
Sunkist Grape Fruit, per dozen 75c
Eating and Cooking Apples—Bananas
Fresh Strawberries—Fresh Tomatoes
Finest Quality Bulk Dates J 2 lbs. 35c
VEGETABLES
Hothouse Cucumbers, Local Asparagus, Green Onions,
Radishes, Head Lettuce, Rhubarb, Cabbage and Cauliflowers, Turnips,  Beets,  Parsnips,  Carrots,  Onions,
Sweet Potatoes.
Netted Gem Potatoes, per sack $1.00
NOTICE
Having sold our interests in Cumberland,
we wish to make known to our many customers that Miss Graham, who has been in
charge of our office affairs during the past
year, will still retain the office at Simon
Leiser & Co.'s during the final straightening
out of our affairs.
So that Bills may be settled as expeditiously
as possible we will appreciate it very much if
all outstanding accounts will be paid at oJice.
All those having any accounts against
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd., may have them
settled by presenting same to Miss Graham.
Simon Leiser & Co., Ltd.
CANADIAN COLLIERIES (DUNSMUIR) LIMITED
St. John's First Aid and Mine
Rescue Association
The above Association will meet at 10.30 a.m. on
SUNDAY, JUNE 5th, IN THE FIRST AID HALL
Mr. Charles Grahjtm will read a most important
paper at this meeting.

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