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The Islander Sep 30, 1917

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Array 41
^egisla.tiun Libj^jy
THE ISLANDER established 1910.
\ With which is Consolidated The Cumberland News.
ii     i i . 	
THE CUMBERLAND WEWS established 1894
VOL. VIII., No. 28
CUMBERLAND, VANCOUVER ISLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, SEPT! 29,1917.
Subscription price, $2.00 per year
THE BIG CIRCUS.- "It has always been; must ever be."-Grain
Growers' Guide, Winnipeg.
THE "BIG NOISE" OF
Judge Mclnnes has resigned
his seat upon the bench to contest Comox-Alberni in the Liber
al interests. He cannot support
Conscription in any form and
follow Laurier. The district feels
it rather an honor and so should
we all that the Liberals would
ask a Judge to step down from
the^Bench to contest our constituency but when the public know
the full story they will not take
him seriously. Below is a true
synopsis of his wanderings;
While the Conservatives have
been mobilizing- the Man Power
and the Money Power of Canada,
in the Compulsory- Service Act,
the War Profits Act, and the Income Tax Act, the Liberal and
Laurier opposition meet them
with the mobilization of Lung
Power. So " Billy " Mclnnes
ceased to be a judge, and takes
to the political field as the Big
Noise of British Columbia, Significantly, he goes away from his
own territory into Comox-Alberni
the only district on the coast not
connected with previous activities
of this political rocket.
With Billy it is always "time
for a change." That was his
slogan when as the Boy Orator
he contested Nanaimo in 1896,
for the House of Commons. That
was the year when Canada turned from Conservative to Liberal,
and change being in the air Billy
succeeded; and in a few months
he was at Ottawa proclaiming
himself as the Voice of the Pacific. In the Commons he undertook to set right the great
Edward Blake, with the result
that the Toronto Globe administered to the Boy Orator a casti-
gation from which he never recovered, and when the time for
the next election came Billy made
a voluntary exit from the Commons. He determined to save
British Columbia instead of all
Canada, and stood for Nanaimo
for the legislature at Victoria.
The electors gave Billy another
chance; and in the legislature
the problem of the successive
ministries became how to dodge
his attempts to get appointed a
minister without too deeply offending his fond parent who was
Lieutenant Governor. Turner,
Semlin and Martin all could have
had options on his talents within
the short space of two years, but
in turn registered the suggestion.
But Billy worked Col. Prior, who
was next in order of the shortlived array of provincial premiers, and while Prior lasted
Billy was in his glory as Provin'
cial Secretary; but this was a
matter of a few months only.
Then he got himself appointed
Commissioner for the Yukon, on
ly to find that these distant fields
that had looked so green were
but ice-green and cold, so that
in two years he was back again |
claiming nomination in Vancouver for the Commons. But Billy
had made so many voluntary ex
its from good positions that the
people seemed to have tired of
feeding his ambitions, and he
made a very sorry show of this
candidature, and immediately
became a suppliant for another
appointment under the government, resulting in his becoming
a judge of the county court in
1900. Remarkable for him, he
has held that job ever since, but
now once more finds that he has
been a misfit in the place of his
choice. So the ex-M. P. for Nanaimo, the ex-M. P. P., for Nanaimo, the' ex-Provincial Secretary, the ex-Governor of the Yukon, .the ex-candidate for Vancouver, the ex-County Court
Judge with twenty-one years of
failure in these successive trusts,
asks for a new start in Comox-
Alberni.
John Webber, of Union Bay,
was charged in the local police
court with stealing a sheep from
Pickles, of Denman Island. The
accused was sent up for trial and
upon arrival at Nanaimo, he
elected for speedy trial, found
guilty and sentenced to three
months' imprisonment.
THE HEYDAY OF THE MANNIKIN.-The "good luck" of the
little fellow whose conscription is enforced.—Passing bhow.
IDEA OF BRITAIN
IS NOW CHANGED
That three years of war have
completely revolutionized the
Frenchmen's idea of the British
character, and have knit the two
nations in a friendship thai will
last forever, was the opinion expressed by a great French war
correspondent in a letter written
just before he died on the field
of battle. The letter, written to
a British oflicer whom the French
correspondent had known in
peace times, has been given to
the Associated Press for publication.   It soys in part:
"Before the war I tried to
understand the English so far
as a man could who does not
care much for travel and is content to study a people by its
works. I had read those books
which in France we believed to
represent the best of what modern England was writing.
"Modern England to me was a
very sombre country. I saw it
always in my mind with those
gray wet skies that we used to
think (and in that, no doubt, we
were wrong too) as the habitual
sky of England. For such skies
suited the England that I knew.
There were heavy storm clouds
always low oyer the England
where Mr. Hardy's tragic figures
stepped, gravely enough, to their
doom; ahd an unbroken gray
sky over that troubled, unhappy,
mismanaged England of Mr,
Wells.
"I knew that France was often
unhappy, and often led astray,
and yet I knew, too, that the old
unconquerable Gallic soul was
still in her people. But if you
knew her only from the works
of modern French writers, what
would you think? What were
you in England thinking before
the war? I ought to have suspected that I did not know England. Instead, I wondered often
where was the soul of England
that had been, that Shakespeare
had written about and boasted
of. His words on England showed passion almost too great for
words. Were there none to
write of her now, or was she unworthy? There were many in
France thinking the same as I.
We distrusted all politics, and
judged no people by what their
public men said and did.
"And so the war came, and we
wondered during those five days
of suspense what England would
do. How should we know? We
did not know her. I had only
known her from books, and such
knowledge did not seem to promise much at such a crisis.
"And then your army came to
France. I never remember to
have met in any of the English
books any such soldiers. I saw
your armies. How your modern
writers have misrepresented you!
Or was it that you suddenly
changed? Here in the fields and
towns of France I found not
modern England as I knew her.
but the England nf Elizabeth.
"I have seen your army in
many places now, and it has been
like a pageant of English ages
and the old English books to me.
I have seen Sam Weller himself
in khaki and have heard him
talk, though I understood little
of it; and one night in a village
estaminet, smoky and ill-lit,
where your men sat around with
the French mud thick on them,
I felt myself in one of Shakespeare's own taverns. And I
r.ave heard your soldiers' songs.
"This it is that has astonished
me in your soldiers, not their
courtesy, not their kindness,
though  these  have   astonished
67,904 LIABLE BETWEEN AGES 17-30
Winnipeg, Sept 26.—In an article dealing with the statistics
obtained by the National Service
Board, the Free Press Ottawa
correspondent points out that of
the cards received and classified
as "military prospects" the total
numbpr in non-essential occupations was 276,978. These cards
were signed by males between
the ages of 17 and 45.
Between the ages of 17 and 30
|-there were 67,904 unmarried men
with-no dependents and not engaged in essential occupations.
By provinces the national service figures were: 2983 in Alberta,
3164 in British Columbia, 3784 in
Manitoba. 3341 in New Brunswick, 5880 in Nova Scotia. 787
in Prince Edward Island, 3530 in
Saskatchewan, 14,912 in Quebec,
29,487 in Ontario, forty in the
Yukon and six in the Northwest
Territories.
It is to be noted that the registration cards did not by any
means give a complete inventory
of Canada's manpower, since
the signing was voluntary. It is
estimated that about 85 per cent,
of the male population filled in
the cavds sent out.
' LIST IN
LOOKING FOR ELEC
TION BY CHRISTMAS
Ottawa, Sept. 25.—Tne impression still prevails in government circles that the general election will not be delayed longer
than the month of December.
No definite decision will be reached in regard to the dissolution of
Parliament or the fixing of the
date of the election until Sir Robert Borden returns to the capital
early next week but official opinion still inclines to the view that
an effort will be made to have
the vote taken before the Christ
mas holiday season. Owing to
the counting of the soldier's vote
in England and France, a month
will elapse before the final results are known in all constituencies. This is believed here to be
what Sir George Foster meant
when, speaking in Toronto, last
night, he said it would take four,
and perhaps five months to prepare for and decide the election.
The work of preparation for
the revision of the election lists
as provided for by the War-time
Elections Act, will be commenced
as soon as Hon. Mr. Meigh'en,
secretary of state, returns to the
capital.
many, but their great gaiety. So
that I have always the curious
feeling that it is we French, who
have suffeted much, who arc
now the staid, dull people, and
you English who have shown us
those great Gallic types that our
writers, Rostand, Daudetandthe
rest have loved.
"I have seen English soldiers
going down the street waving to
the windows their green trench
helmets, like an old musketeer's,
stuck on with a Gascon swagger,
great rollicking uncouth types
that would have enchanted Rabelais. And these are the men
who have come to us from that
land of the gray skies, that fog-
dull, r$in-sodden, sombte respectable land that I thought was
England. My faith, how little
I knew.her."
Bessie Stewart and Margaret
Bannerman left on Wednesday
morning for Vancouver to attend
the High School in that city.
The following is o list of six
pupils from each division who
have done best work during September:
Div, I. John Stevenson, Edith
Lockard, Orpha Lewis, Walter
Hudson, Mildred Halcrow, Loyal
Macfarlane.
Div. II. Hector Stewart, Frank
Potter, Hugh Strachan, Joe Pic-
ketti. Pearl Hunden, Walter
Taylor.
Div, III. John Strachan, Edna
Marsh, Douglas Sutherland, Etta
Hood, Edith Hood, Agnes Baird.
Div. IV. Thomas McLean,
Drusilla Wilson, Fanny Stiachan,
Phyllis goothman, Blodwyn Williams, Jack Peacey.
Div. V. Katherine. Bartoldi,
Arnold MacDonald, Lilian Banks,
Cyril Ramsell, Dorothy Liddell,
Nellie Smith.
Div. VI. Harriet Gomm, Ti-
bitha Bradley, Tom Abe, Chrissie
Sntherlard, Helen Parnham,
Gwendolyn Williams.
. Div. VII. Lome Fraser, Edna
Smith, Jessie Baird, Leonard
Sholdice, Charlie Enrici, Willie
Stant.
Div. VIII. Leland Harrison,
Margaret Clark, Jenny Boffy,
Annie Portigliatti, Margaret
Adamson, Shigeo Kawagauchi.
Div. IX. Douglas Creech,
Kathleen Cooke, Harry Quinn,
Herbert Wood. Shirley Hate, Barbara Grant.
TOWN   TOPICS
Mitt M. Critchley Diet Suddenly
Maggie Critchley died at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Robt.
Walker, Penrith Avenue, on Sunday in her twenty-fifth year-The
deceased had been a resident of
the district for the past six years
and was a neice of Mrs. Walker.
The funeral took place on Sunday
to the Catholic Cemetery. The
floral tributes were as follows:
Family, pillow; Mrs. Thos.
Banks, Mrs. Geo. Shearer; Mrs.
Thos. Eccleston. cross; Miss L.
Eccleston, sheath of lillies; Mrs.
Robt. Adamson, wreath; Mrs.
Wm. Braes, spray; Mrs. Cooke;
Miss F. Wooley, spiay; Mrs. F.
Wilcox, wreath; Miss M. Thomson, spray; Mrs. Wheeler, spray;
Mrs. J. R. Gray, spray; Mrs. T.
Boothman, wreath; Mrs. C. F.
Smith, spray; Mrs. Jas. Baird,
wreath; Mrs. J. Thomson,
wreath; Mrs. J. Potter, boquet;
Mrs. M. DeCeur, boquet; Mrs. J.
Clark, spray; Mrs. Wm. Beveridge, jun., spray; Mrs. D. Lock-
art, spray; Mrs. W. McNeil,
spray; Mrs. A. Williamson, spray;
Miss H. Lockart, spray; Mrs. J.
D. Sommerville, spray; Mrs. W.
Weir, spray; Mrs. R. McAllister,
spray.
CARD OF THANKS.
To all the friends whose sympathy and services were so kindly
tendered in our recent bereavement we desire to extend our
sincere thanks.
MR. &MRS. ROBERT WALKER
The second annual meet of the
Vancouuer Island Mine Safety
Association takes place today on
the Sports Grounds, Ladysmith.
Besides first aid competitions
there is a long program of sports.
In the evening-the ambulance
and mine rescue cups and medals
will be presented to winners in
Gould's Hall. The progi am follows:
1. First aid competitions for
Government Cup and Coulson
Cup, also Extension Cup for juveniles, also first and second-class
medals and buttons,
2. Mine rescue shield competition. Teams entered from
Cumberland, Jingle Pot, Nanaimo, South Wellington and Ladysmith, antl program of sports.
Mrs, Harry Wilson is here on a
visit to her parents.
Mrs. E, R. Hicks and Mrs.
Angus Fraser left for Vancouver
this morning.
Ethel Furbow returned on
Thursday from a month's vacation to Southern California.
John Furbow left on Friday
for Summerland, taking a rest
while he is recovei ing from injuries received in No. 4 mine.
Mrs. G. K. MacNaughton will
not receive until the first Monday in November.
Wm. Richards,'of the Freight
Shed, returned on Sunday from
a few days vacation.
E. C. Emde. the Ford man of
Courtenay, has received his first
car load of 1918 Ford cars. Dr.
Hicks purchased one of the new
Fords.
Thomas Graham, general super,
intendent and Charles Graham,
district superintendent of the
Canadian Colliers Company, left
for Ladysmith on Friday.
H. S. Clements, M. P., returned to Vancouver on Tuesday. He
is expected to visit this district
during the coming week.
Matthew Brown, grocery salesman of the Simon Leiser Co., resigned his position and left on
Monday to join the Canadian
forces for Overseas.
The drawing for the picture
which was presented to the Red
Cross Society by Miss Collis, will
take place at Mr. Peacey's Drug
Store on Saturday evening, Sept.
29th., 1917, at nine o'clock.
Usual Dance tonight in Ilo Ilo
Hall, from 9 to 12.
The teachers of the Cumberland Public School contributed
$26.50 to the local Patriotic Fur.d
during the months of July, August and September, 1917.
Dr. R. 'A. McAlister and Gilbert Schvvabe, of Victoria, arrived on Tuesday evening and opened dental parlours in the King
Block on Thursday. They are
now prepared to do high class
dentistry, and specialize in
plates, crowns and bridge work.
Lance Berkley, of Courtenay,
laid information against Albert
Ibbotson, of Happy Valley, charging him with stealing a Jersey
heifer. The accused was committed for trial and sent to Victoria to await the decision of a
higher court.
J. Halliday, proprietor of the
New Home Bakery on Dunsmuir
Avenue, will re-open the bakery
business today with a complete
supply of fresh bread, cakes,
pies & etc. Mr. Halliday some
months ago discontinued the
bakery business on account of the
advance in prices and the depression in trade. Now that the
local mines are working every
day and the population on the
increase, he has decided to reopen his business and solicits a
share of the trade.
The fifteen Chinese gambling
cases, of Chinatown, Cumberland,
which have been adjourned from
week to week, came up for hearing this week. After a three
days' trial the Chinaman charged
with keeping a common gaming
house was dismissetl. The information against the remaining
fourteen Chinese was withdrawn
without going into the defence.
I'. 1'. Harrison, barrister of this
city appeared as counsel for the
prosecution and W. P. Grant for the
Chinese, who celebrated the victory with two fifteen gallon keg*
of beer and a supper of unusut I
varieties.
The regular monthly meeting
of Ladies' Auxilliary of the
Cumberland General Hospital
will be held at the residence of
Mrs. E. D. Pickard, Maryport
Avenue, on Thursday evening,
October 4th, at 8 p.m. It is important that every member
should attend and render such
aid as may be possible in helping
the ladies to carry on this work
of assistance to the Cumberland
General Hospital. This is thc
lirst meeting of the Ladies'
Auxilliary -after the summer
holidays. All members are urgently requested to attend and
ladles wishine to join will be
mado welcome. TWO
THK ISLANDER,  CUMBERLAND, B. C.
DENTAL  SURGERY
Irritating Teeth Scientifically Removed
by our Safe Methods.
No Gas.    No Danger.     No sickly after-effects.
Examinations Free.    Strictly High-class Dentistry
with specialization of Plate, Crown
and Bridge work.
It becomes a national duty to preserve the health, and to save money.
The body must not be over-fed nor over-clothed, but comfort and efficiency is desirable. Luxuries are taboo. But a fine wholesome mouth,
with sound, useful teeih-this is one of the prime NECESSITIES, not a
luxury.   Good teeth mean good health.
DR. R. A. MCALISTER
DENTAL SURGEON
KING       BLOCK Dunsmuir Avenue
BE OF GOOD CHEER
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription i One year in advance,* $2.C0;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, SEPT. 29, 1917
Manitoba Free Press Approves
C. N. R. Bill
It is noticeable that the strongest leading Liberal papers in the
. country are ably supporting the
government bill for the acquisition of the Canadian Northern
Railway. They realize that it is
fight between the government
and private ownership, and that
if the government is defeated in
this object it means that the C,
P. R. will acquire the system.
This is the only alternative. The
Manitoba Free Press, the leading
Liberal paper in Western Janada,
discussing the bill editorially,
says:
"This is the first C. N. R. deal
on record in which the people
are getting the best of the bargain.
"The howling referred to a-
bove is all about about how Big
Business is being allowed by
Parliament to rob the treasury.
Most of it is being done be politicians and newspapers who, in
bygone years, were enthusiastic
supporters of C. N. R, raids upon the national treasury. By
the present deal the people are
s curing possession of the second
best railway in Canada; of the
largest telegraph company, in
Canada; of one of the biggest
express companies in Canada.
When the people own these public utilities they will be a factor
in rate-making in every section
of Canada.
The people will secure possession of these utilities by purchasing the C. N. II. stock held by
private shareholders, having a
nominal lacevalueof $60,000,000.
The attempt to make it appear
that this amount of money is to
he paid for the stock is dishonest.
The value of the stock is to be
settled by abritration; and if, as
the opponents oi the proposition
insist, the stock is worthless, it
will be the duty of the Board of
Arbitration to make a finding in
keeping with the facts. In that
case the people will not pay a
dollar for the stock. In order ti
support their gloomy predictions
that payment in excess of the
value of the stock is to be made,
it is necessary to assume that
both the Board of Arbitraters
and the Government will be parties to a conspiracy te defraud
the people of Canada. There is
no likelihood of any reward giving the shareholders more than
a small fraction of the face value,
of their stock.
"A great deal of the opposition ''
in Parliament and the country is
not what it seems. Ostensibly
inspired by a desire to protect
the Dominion treasury it actually
arises from other motives. Some
of it is due to a reluctance to see
the principle of government
ownership extended to a transcontinental railway—a quite legitimate objection if openly a-
vowed, as it was by F. B. Car-
veil, M. P., and J. A. Robb, M.
P. More of it arose in.response
to C. P. R. influence. It is, and
has long been, an open secret
that the C. P. R. wants to get
control of the C. N. R. system.
This plan can never be realized
if the road becomes the property
of the people of Canada. Hence
much of this uproar in the public prints and elsewhere about
the 'iniquitous C. N. R. deal.
Should a Wife help her Husband
Quite recently Charles M.
Schwab, the steel magnate, was
added to the long list of successful men who attribute their a-
chievenents to the help given
them by their wives and mothers.
in this list are such names as
Washington, Lincojn, McKinley
and thousands of other men who
have achieved greatness in every
walk of life.
Now Fannie Hurst, in "The
Sieve of Fulfilment" in October
Cosmopolitan, raises a doubt as
to whether the average woman
should sacrifice herself for her
son or her husband.
Instances are not wanting of
men who after reaching the top
find that they have mentally and
spiritually outdistanced the wife
or mother whose stringent self-
sacrifice made their success possible, A notable instance of this
kind received wide publicity several years ago when one of America's multi-millionaires divorced
the wife who had stood by him
in poverty and married a younger and more physically attractive
woman.
Should a wife or mother deny
herself all the little luxuries a
woman's heart craves in order
to give her husbond a start in
business? Should she wear her
lite away, scrimping and saving,
to send her boy to college?
After success comes, the father
has a multitude of interests outside the home the son leaves the
env ronment of the home for
college and the mother finds herself alone and neglected. What
then has her self-sacrifice profited her?
This interesting problem is
handled by Fannie Hurst with
the sure touch of the character
artist. Every wife and mother
—every man who is working for
and longing for succeas should
read this truly remarkable story
and discuss the question it
raiie.', m
•»
FALL GOODS NOW BEING SHOWN
Newest Creations in Millinery and Millinery Accessories
Ladies' and Misses' Tweeds, Beaver Cloth and Astrachan Coats
at Popular Prices
Ladies', Misses' and Children's Sweater Coats and Sweater Sets
Fall Dress Goods and Coatings
Special Value in Dress Goods, fast, dyes' and popular prices in
Serges, Poplins, Cashmeres, Tweeds, Gabardines and Bengalines,
novelty weaves in plain and fancy Voiles, Marquisettes and Silk
Broche, light shades suitable for evening wear in costume lengths
only. Coatings in 54inch widths in Blanket Cloths, Chinchillas,
Sport Checks in light and dark shades; also Shepherd Plaids in
small and large checks.
C.C. a La Grace Corsets.—Comfort, good style, perfect fitting and
durability emphasized in every pair. Complete range of
new models now being shown.
Special Value in Invictus Shoes.—(The best good shoe for women)
in light grey and chamois, color cloth tops with patent and
vici kid vamps, Cuban and Louis heels.
i
^,
Telephoning   is   Face-to-
Face Conversation
When a person speaks over the telephone the
tones and accents of the voice are very distinct;
each talker recognises instantly the voice of the
other.
That's what makes Long Distance telephoning so satisfactory. You know whom you are
talking to, you know your message is being received, and you get your answer.
Every telephone is a Long Distance telephone.
British Columbia Telephone Co., Ltd.
THE   CANADIAN   BANK
OF   COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President.
SIR JOHN AIRD, General Manager      H.V.F. JONES, A»s't den. Manager
CAPITAL, 15,000,000.       RESERVE FUND, 13,500,000.
SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNTS
Interest at the current rate is allowed on all deposits of $1 and
upwards. Careful attention is given to every account. Small accounts are welcomed. Accounts may be opened and operated by mail.
Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons,
withdrawals to be made by any one of them or by the survivor.
SAVINGS   BANK:-This Bank pays interest at 3% per :
annum on all deposits of $1 and upwards in this department.
Small accounts are welcomed.
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
Prohibition Oct. 1
PUT  IN A STOCK OF
U.B.C.Beer
DO IT RIGHT NOW
There are only a few days left,
So DONT DELAY
U.B.C Beer is the people's favorite drink. U.B.C.
is brewed from the highest grade malt and hops,
and will keep in any climate for any length of time.
UNION BREWING CO., LTD.
NANAIMO, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden'.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
UNION TAILOR
U. WATANABE, Prop.
Ladies' and Gents'
Fashionable Tailor
CLEANING,  REPAIRING AND PRESSING
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B.C.
I
,'
'1 %
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Stoves & Ranges
Fnriiitnre, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
(xraphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279 Phone 31
Charlie Sing Chong
General Merchant
Dealer in  '
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, and
General Merchandise, at the
Lowest Prices.
Chinatown, West Cumberland,
And
Hong Chong & Co.,
Bevan, B.C.
Synopeli ol Coal Mining Regulation!
(!0 iLisiinini!'lulita of the Dominion
in Manitoba, 8»>k»tchew»n mi Alberta,
thu Yukon Tortitoiy. thoNnrthweit Terri
toiie»«ndiii» portion if the Provinoe of
British Columbia, may be leaaed for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
11 an acre. Not more than 2,500 acres
wiilbeliMipd to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or »ub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are aitua'ed.
in surveyed tonitory the land must be
deicribed bv sections.orlcnalsubdisisions
nf sections, slid in unsuiveyed erritory
this iracr. applied for shall he staked out by
tlisapp ioaut himself.
Ksoh application must be ncenmuanied
by a fee nf |o which will he refunded if the
rights applied forare not availab'e, but not
otherwise. A royalty shnll be paid on I he
merchantable output nf the mine at the
rale of live cents per tun.
The person operating Ihe mine shall
furnish the Agent wilh sworn returns ao
counting for the full quantity of ms-roh
tillable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the ooal iniuiag i ights are
not being operated, such returns shall he
furnished at least once a year.
The lease will include the coal minim;
rights only, but the I ssee may be permitted to purohase whatever available aur
face rights may be comidered necessary
for the'working of the mineat the rate of
llO.OOanacie.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department i.f the Interior, Ottawi,  or to  any
Aiient or Sub Aeent cfDnmiiiion Lands.
W   W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of I he Interior.
N.B- nnauthoriiedpublication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect    :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
This is to urge you
that you get your Suits Cleaned, Repaired and Pressed for
oni month. Then form your
own conclusion. If it leads to
better spirits, better health,
continue if. If it does away
with dirt, improves your. appearance, continue it. Remember a well-dressed man always
wants the best.
Also you must (ret your shoes
clsaned; and don't throw vour
tan shoes away because they
are old—have them dyed.
Ask for the Monthly Rates.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Work*,
Victoria, B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
MAROCCHI   BROS
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
•Cumberland    Courtenay
TAX  SALES
Corporation of the City of Cumberland
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
Notice of Sale of Lands for Delinquent Taxes in the Municipality of the City of Cumberland.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that, pursuant to the " Municipal
Act, 1914," and amendments thereto, on Wednesday, the
10th day of October, 1917, at the hour of two o'clock in the
afternoon, in the Council Chambers, City Buildings, Cumberland
B.C., I shall sell at Public Auction the lands and real property as
hereinafter set forth for the delinquent taxes unpaid for the year
1914, and subsequent taxes in arrears, together with interest, and
the cost of advertising the said sale, if the total amount is not
sooner paid.
Description
Robertson, R. H Lot 3. .Blk. E
Union Brewing Co... "   6..  " E
Funk, Mrs. M  "   2..  " F
Magnone, M. Estate. "   6..   " 4
Ramsay, Frank  "   7.. " 14
Ramsay. Frank  " J 8.. " 14
Gleason, William.... "   3.. " 3
Gleason. William....WHO.. " 3
Watkins, R. S  "   2.. " 15
Robins, F.W  "   3.. " 15
Aida, K  "   3.. " 11
Martin, H., Estate... " 10.. " 16
u
fa
>
i
i
u
$ 13.15
$ 30.26
$2.00
75.34
46.93
2.00
43.15
70.68
2.00
23.59
66.21
2.00
24.15
40.82
2.00
25.27
45.33
2.00
125.35
550.84
2.00
14.27
40.06
2.00
101.58
390.06
2.00
101.58
390.06
2.00
43.05
72.63
2.00
24.15
321.56
2.00
$ 45.41
124.27
115.83
91.80
66.97
72.60
678.19
56.33
493.64
493.64
117.68
347.71
Dated at Cumberland, B.C., this 26th day of September, 1917.
ALEX. MACKINNON, '
Clerk and Collector for the Corporation of the City of Cumberland.
The Corporation of Cumberland is ready to receive information
from any source that any person having an interest in any of the
lands advertised herein is entitled to protection under the "War
Relief Act," and amendments thereto. Any person having such
knowledge is requested to communicate in writing with the Clerk
orCollectot, Cumberland, B.C,
Cumberland Patriotic War Fund.
Statement for the month of August, 1917:
RECEIPTS.
Balance on hand end of July... .$4190.88
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Limited      25.00
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir),
Limited, Employees  1112.00
Govt. Employees      10.601.
City Collections      41.70
Interest from Royal Bank for 3
months      42.91
Total $5423.09
EXPENDITURE.
Mrs. E. Pearson $   17.50
"   M. E. Scott  12.50
"   J.E.White  12.50
"   J. C. Brown  22.00
E Simms  12.50
C. Jewitt  15.00
"   B. Nicholas  17.50
"   M.Brown  15.00
"   J.Elliott  12.50
"   G. H. Darby  12.50
"   G.F.White  15.00
"   S. Cameron  29.50
"   D. T. Cameron  30.00
"   E.Davis  23.50
"   C.Thompson  33.50
"   F.Brentnall  12.50
"   J. Scougall  23.00
"   R.Peters    19.50
"   H.Thompson  32.00
"   R. Herd  19.50
"   L. Piket  17.50
"   M. Cope > 17.50
"   A. Ponder  15.00
"   C, Macintosh  15.00
"   M.Ellison  23.50
"   H.M.Wallace  17.50
"   G. Brown  17.50
"   H. B. Conrod  25.50
"   W.J. Fraser  19.50
"   M. Walker    15.00
. "  F.Slaughter  15.00
"   J.Ward  18.50
"   F. P. Davidson  21.00
"   A. Barber  12.50
"   Florence Davis  18.50
"   M. Watson  12.50
"   E.Haywood  12.50
Postage and War Tax  1.49
Balance on hand  4740.10
Total $5423.09
W. WILLARD, Pres.
R. HENDERSON, Sec.
F. A. MCCARTHY, Treas.
COMING TO ILO ILO.
The following films are booked
for Bhowing in the near future,
thedates being subject to change.
REDFEATHERS.
Flower of Doom, Wedgewood
Nowell and Gypsey Hart, Saturday, September 29th.
The Hero of the Hour, Jack
Mullhall, October 6th.
Birth of Patriotism, a five-reel
modern war story.
Eternal Love for Saturday,
October 20th., a Butterfly special.
The Phantom's Secret, Mignon
Anderson, and Haywood Mack,
in Butterfly feature.
FAMOUS PLAYERS.
The Valentine Girl, Marguerite
Clarke.
„ Sacrifice, Margaret Illington.
The Primrose Ring, Mae Murray.
The Marcellini Millions, Geo.
Beban.
The Highway of Hope, House.
Peters & Kathlyn Williams.
Unconquered, Fannie Ward.
Silent Partner, Blanche Sweet,
Freckles, Louise Huff and Jack
Pickford.
ECONOMISE.
Have your Suits. Silks, and
Household Furnishings Cleaned,
Dyed and Repaired at
PAUL'S DYE WORKS,
1223-1231 Gladstone Avenue. Victoria, B. C.
not in any spirit of criticism,
that the nation as a whole has
not lived up to that obligation.
But we have done it because we
did not understand. Therefore
it is the duty of everyone to explain to the people what the position really is: that every time
we spend money unnecessarily
we absorb material and labour-
goods and services—required for
the purposes of the war."
BANKING AND FINANCE.
At the end of three years ol
war it is of interest to compare
the present position.of the chartered banks of Canada with that
at the close of July, 1914. During thf»t three years' period total
liabilities increased from $1,323,-
000,000 to$l,827,000, or $504,000-
000 an advance of over 38 per
cent. The total deposits rose
from $1,159,000,000 to $1,606,000-
000 or $447,000,000, while on the
asset side cash, notes and cheques
of other banks increased $126,-
000, call loans, and balances due
by other banks $50,000,000, oth
er loanp $45,000,000, and investments (Canadian Government,
Imperial Goverment, Municipal,
etc.) $275,000,000. These very
substantial increases reflect the
industrial development that has
taken place in Canada since the
outbreak of wdr and the prosperity consequent on good crops
NATIONAL WAR SAVINGS.
From the Commercial letter of
the Canadian Bank of Commerce:
It cannot be too often reiterated
that the financing of industrial
activity in Canada is dependent
upon the extent to which the
people economize. The resources
of the United Kingdom are not
inexhaustable,   every day adds
to the immense strain placed upon them, and a realization of this
fact impels to greater effort those
who are seeking to organize the
savings of the people.  Much has
been done in Canada,  but as yet
the Canadian  people have not
submitted to sacrifices, nor assumed burdens, proportionate to
those borne in the United Kingdom, although there is no difference in the relative degrees of
responsibility.   Occasionally citizens question the need of drastic limitations of personal expenditure, but the address of Mr. R.
M. Kindersley,  chairman of the
National War Savings Associa-
ciation at Southampton recently,
the substance of which is given
below, is  sufficient answer  to
such objections:
"If the Government is to carry
on the war and find the necessary material and labour, it seems
to me without doubt, speaking
in the broadest possible way,
that you and I must do without
a thousand and one things that
we have been used to. I cannot
conceive any other way to enable
the Government to do what it
has to do and to win the war.
That is the' broad aspect of the
matter: we cannot look at it from
any other point of view but the
broadest, the national, point of
view."
"We must not forget that you
and I sent other men to fight for
us. We undertook that responsibility, and when we did that
we took upon our shoulders a
moral obligation to do everything
in our power to help our fighting
forces, and to see that no act of
ours lessened their chances of
safe return to these shores. Have
we really lived up to that moral
obligation since we undertook it?
I say   without hesitation,   and
and high prices, as well as the
extent to which the banks are
aiding in financing Canada's part
in the war.
The Minister of Finance has
intimated to the press that another loan will be issued in the
course of a few weeks. It is
commonly understood that the
amount of the loan will be $150,-
000,000, but this and the terms
are not yet settled. The expenditure on war account in July
was $23,038,043, somewhat less
than in the same month a year
ago, but in excess of the June
expenditure. It is becoming evident that a continuance of the
large exports of Canadian products, munitions, wheat, bacon
cheese, etc,, to England for account of the British Government
is dependent on the ability of the
Dominion Government to finance
them. Great Britain is compelled
at the present time, in order to
protect her exchanges and prevent an undue outflow of gold,
to make her purchases where
she can do so without having to
pay cash, and unless Canada can
make advances to the full extent
of these purchases the bulk of
them will be made in the United
States.
EDWARD W. BICKLE
notary public ano general
Insurance aunt
Representing:
i'»<i»>,'ss»-*;c'ts»i.sii Qt.iauit-
HEsftS, s4.sVt.sts.Vh,  fist.sj. •
JUVieRttlS,u«,£Mi.fa(j.
<W«s5s;t, it.isi-.it.tti Ci.
Sv4aU4Utj.9ls\e6B.VxSus
itsi»;iWiiCi., H.)b.
Ssi'i'ssiitstti'OJyiiWsts^siU •
it.i'^-.itsii  <tUit«.v<->ls'si
SiuV.jlsv &st>>'r.i \m«*«-
wsttsrea' vw,i*»isj
aeKVyOsHsli «,i sttiV.'sUssV-.i
PHONES:
OFFICE 35
RESIDENCE 78
The ISLANDER BUILDINQ
DUNSMUIR »Vi„ CtlUBErHJUD. I.C.
AMUSEMENT TAX OPERATIVE ON
OCTOBER 1st.
ILO ILO THEATRE.
• Commencing Monday, October 1st., the new Amusement
Tax By-law goes into effect, and on and after that date any
man, woman or child entering any place of amusement must,
upon each admission thereto, pay to His Majesty for the
public uses of the Province, a tax as follows:
(a.) When the price of admission is not more than five
cents, a tax of one cent.
(b.) When the price of admission is more than five cents,
and not more than fifteen cents, a tax of two cents.
(c.) When the price of admission is more than twenty-
five cents, a tax of three cents.
(d.) When the price of admission is more than twenty-
five cents and not more than forty cents, a tax of four
cents. /
(e.) When the price of admission is more than forty cents
and not more than seventy-five cents, a tax of five cents.
(And so forth up to admission prices of $2.50)
Penalties for not complying with the Act are as follows:
7. Every person who, without having previously paid
the tax provided for by this Act, enters a place of amusement in the Province for the purpose of attending an exhibition, performance or entertainment shall be liable, on
summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than ten dollars and not more than two hundred dollars.
The same penalty applies to any owner or any employee,
with an added provision for suspension or cancellation of
license for any breach of the provisions of the Amusement
Tax Act.
II,® II*€> Theatft
Saturday, September 29th.
WEDGEWOOD NOWELL AND
GYPSY HART,
In a Five-Act Redfeather Drama Entitled,
"THE FLOWER OF DOOM." FOUR
THE I&ANDEfe. CUMBERLAND, 8.6.
BAKERY RE-OPENS
TODAY, SATURDAY Sept. 29,
The NEW HOME BAKERY
Will be open again in the Old
Stand with a full supply of
Fresh Bread, Cakes,
Pies, etc.
Wedding Cakes a Specialty
NEW HOME BAKERY
.1. HALLIDAY
Dunsmuir Ave.,       Cumberland.
i
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND.B.C
Ai»ia tor llie
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Hmiiletsuii, Proprietor
Eatiniateaat.il pcsigtis furnished
on Application
Mrs. F. Oliver
R.A.M,. London, England, and
Cgnservatoireoi Music, Dresden
Teacher of Pianoforte,
Theory, etc.
No. 43, Camp.
LADIES' BLOUSES
Just received a shipment of
Ladies' Ci'epe dn Chene and Silk
Blouses in exclusive designs.
Colors include dainty shades of
yellow, pink, blue, grey and
salmon pink, etc.
Mrs. Roy Rideout's
Millinery Parlors,
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland,B.C.
Do you realize the Comfort, the Convenience, the Cleanliness, and the Real Economy of
Electrically heated household appliances?
And do you know that you can have them
as willing servants to do your bidding, ironing,
cooking, and heating.
Look over the following list of Electrically
heated appliances.
Here are a few of the comfort makers:—
ELECTRIC EOILER, for handy or quick  hot
drinks in the evening.
ELECTRIC PERCOLATOR, you  never tasted
scch good coffee.
ELECTRIC TOASTER, which saves running back
and forth to the kitchen for breakfast toast.
ELECTRIC CHAFING DISH, which makes it so
easy lo entertain evening parties.
But anyhow have the "MISSUS" enjoy one
of our famous UNIVERSAL ELECTRIC IRONS
which save so much DRUDGERY.
We will be pleased to give you easy payments
on any of the above appliances. See us about it
now.
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., Ltd.
Phone 75
P. O. 314
i iinuruuu', \
$f<m UAL»Jb
IkM "
P|T|
U|p L -_
i&=s
High-Grade
ORGANS
22 Commercial St.,
" Nanaimo'* Muiic House,"
Nanaimo, B.C.
T
Give Your Wife One!
HOUSANDS of wives and daughters run their own Ford cars.   They use them for shopping, calling,
attending the theatre, taking the children for a run in the country or to school.   .
The Ford is as easy to operate as a kitchen range, no knowledge of mechanical details being necessary. Inexpensive to operate. A woman can call around town all afternoon, or take a 25-mile spin in
the country, at the minimum of cost for gasoline, oil, wear on tires, etc.
You couldn't give "her" a present she would appreciate more than this beautiful, modern car, with
its slream-line effect, tapered hood and crown fenders.
OVER 700 FORD SERVICE STATIONS IN CANADA.
&d
Runabout
.
$475.«
Touring
.
495
Coupelet
.
695
Town Car
.
780
Sedan
.
890
F.O.B. Foil Ont.
E. C. EMDE
Courtenay, B.C.
If you are interested in the
purchase of an Organ for Chapel,
School, Lodge or Home, you will
find at our store a most complete
selection, embracing instruments
by the most highly reputed Canadian and American manufacturers, including the famous
Karn and Goodrich Organs
There well known Organs enjoy a world-wide reputation for their superb
tone and other excellent qualities.   Our stock comprizes Organs at prices
from as low as $75.00 up, in Oak and. Mahogany cases.
We can Arrange Easy Monthly Payment*.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
(T
3DE
ac
a^
THE   BIG  STORE
FALL  MILLINERY
Several consignments of New Fall Millinery have
arrived and will be on view Saturday. Black high-
crown sailor shape in velour and velvet are good
style. Flop shapes, in two toned effect, look very
natty and are right up to the minute. Our showing
in new millinery is very comprehensive, and will
include choice models, at reasonable prices.
Ladies' Coats
A most complete showing of snappy up-to-date coats
have arrived, in smart styles comprizing all the new
belt styles, as well as showing the latest collars,
which are predominant in the up-to-date coats.
New Fall Hosiery
Many new lines have come to hand, included with
our very full stock of Hose, which are marked a
long way below present day prices:
PENMANS' SILK LISLE HOSE for Ladies, all sizes, 50c. per pair; same
price as they were two years ago. 0
CIRCLE-BAR HOSE for Ladies and Children will give you good satisfaction.
We can save money for you by inducing you to purchase your Fall stock of hose now, especially considering the prices at which we have marked them.
Children, Girls' and Misses' Rainproof Coats for Fall
A full line in all sizes of Waterproof Capes for the
girls for school wear.   Prices $2.95 up.
Fall Flanellette Sheets
Colors white, also in grey, full 12-4 size, suitable for
the largest bed.   Our price $2.50 per pair.
Men's New Suits for Fall
A large consignment of men's suits have just arrived from Coppley Noyes & Randall, makers of the
high class clothes. Every suit has that cut and
style to it that at once makes it an attractive and
desirable garment to wear.
La Diva and D. & A. Corsets are our leading line in
popular priced corsets. You will see them advertised in most of the papers, and compare our prices
when you will find them no more and in some cases
less than the catalogue prices. For front laced corsets the Gossard still leads the way and is the best.
^B
SIMON LOSER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8
IDE
ac
*J
CHARLIE YING WAH & CO.
Merchant Tailors
The Latest in Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring
Dyeing, Pressing and Repairing executed to your entire satisfaction.
Phone 5-5
Opposite Postoffice, Cumberland, B.C.
P. O. Box 350

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