BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Islander Aug 28, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
cumberlandis-1.0342445.pdf
Metadata
JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342445.json
JSON-LD: cumberlandis-1.0342445-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): cumberlandis-1.0342445-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: cumberlandis-1.0342445-rdf.json
Turtle: cumberlandis-1.0342445-turtle.txt
N-Triples: cumberlandis-1.0342445-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: cumberlandis-1.0342445-source.json
Full Text
cumberlandis-1.0342445-fulltext.txt
Citation
cumberlandis-1.0342445.ris

Full Text

Array /*P rW VV   ▼ W -^iegtaUSion Libr«y
.1/
i
Largest Circulation in the Comox District.
VOL. VI., No. 22       THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY. AUG. 28. 1915.       Subscription price, $1.50 per year
THE CITMJOUNCIL
The regular meeting of the City
Council was held in the Council
Chambers on Monday evening.
There were presert His Worship
Mayor Parnham, and Aldermen
Henderson, Brown and Banks.
Minutes of the last regular
meeting were read and adopted.
The following accounts were referred to the finance committee:
A. R. Kierstead $ 3.00
Cumberland SteamLaundry   1.50
JackSarter..    6.00
Cum. Electric Light Co. .. 52.10
Cum. Waterworks Co 1,3.30
S. Leiser & Co., Ltd      .50
Waverly Hotel..:  17.75
Total  $94.50
Thomas Conn made application
and was granted ten days' leave
of absence from his day duties.
He will continue his night duties
as usual.
NO ELECTION FIXED
Victoria, Aug. 26—"Nothing
in it-positively." This was Sir
Richard McBride's emphatic
reply yesterday when told that
the Vancouver Sun had a story
to the effect that the Premier
had decided to dissolve the
Legislature at once and appeal
to the electorate on October 6.
Dr. A. McKay Jordan, the
Vancouver eye specialist, will be
here again on Thursday afternoon, Sept. 2nd. Another opportunity is presented for those
whose eyes need the attention of
an expert.
On Saturday afternoon last Mr.
Alex. Cameron while at his work
at No. 4 mine as an engineer,
was so affected by the heat and
smoke that he was removed to his
home at once.
FORMER MANAGER DONATES
The Islander is pleased to acknowledge the receipt of a cheque
for the sum of five dollars as a
donation towards our local machine gun fund from Mr. John Gibson, Jr., president and general
manager of the Pennslyvann'a
Smokeless Coal Co. of Boswell,
U. S. A.
Mr. Gibson when writing Mr.
Geo. W. Clinton local superb;-
tendentof the Canadian Collieries
recently enclosed the cheque
just to show his heart was with
the right place.
The residents appreciate this
donation from a distant subscriber. It will be remembered
that Mr. Gibson was in 1912
superintendent of our local mines
under Mr. W. L. Coulson.
Birth—At the Cumberland hospital, on the 27th inst.. to Mr.
and Mrs. Horace Henderson, a son.
DESTROY GERMAN DIVERS
London, Aug. 26—Several
German submarines were destroyed by Allied warships bombarding the submarine sheds at
Zeebrugge, according to a Central News Agency despatch
from Amsterdam this afternoon.
London, Aug. 26—A German
submarine has been destroyed
near Ostend, Belgium by a
bomb dropped from an aeroplane
Official announcement to this
effect was made here this
evening;
NO USE FOR THE KAISER
The Louisville Courier-Journal
publishes the following letter
from a German-born American
citizen: "It seems to me that you
are not understood by the majority of Germans in this country.
Having read your editorials very
closely, I understand your position
to be about like this; You have
a very high regard for the German masses, both in Germany
and this country, but you believe
that the present war is due to the
greed of the Kaiser and his close
advisers. I was born and reared
in Germany, but came to this
country for more freedom than I
enjoyed in Germany. There are
no better people than the Germans, but they are king-ridden,
and hundreds of thousands of
their best men have been led to
the European slaughter houses to
gratify the ambitions of Emperor
William, whose crowning dream
was a world-wide German empire.
For the noble German soldiers
who are dying by the thousands,
my heart bleeds; but for their
mad emperor I have no smpathy.''
H. S. Fleming, chairman of the
executive of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., and Miss
Bryans, private secretary to Mr.
Fleming, left for Victoria on
Thursday.
Miss Doris Macfarlane. C.P.R.
stenographer at the Victoria
office, returned to that city on
Friday, after spending a week's
vacation with her parents.
The officers of the U.S.S. Albatross gave a very enjoyable
dinner to a select party from
Cumberland and Bevan on Sunday last.
A Chinaman by the name of
You Ken committed suicide by
hanging himself in an outhouse in
Chinatown on Saturday last. TWO
THI!; ISLANDtiK,   CUMBERLAND, B. <J.
BE OF GOOD CHEER
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAB.
Sty? Matter
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Telephone 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, AUGUST 28th, 1915.
How to Ship Red Cross Goods.
Persons sending supplies to the
Red Cross Headquarters in Toronto by express or freight should
see that the express agent bills
the goods wherever the description fits,as "Clothing," "Medical
Supplies," or "Surgical Supplies." Merely to state the number of the box, or to bill the contents as "Dry Goods," causes
delays and confusion I
It has been found impossible to
keep an accurate check of all
oharges. paid by individuals in
order to make refunds to those
who desire it. Certain difficulties
have arisen with the express
companies in this connection. In
future those who do not wish to
pay the charges themselves should
send supplies to the Head Office
marked "Collect." It is very
much more simple for the Head
Office to apply for refunds in its
own person. When shipping Red
Cross Supplies, therefore, pay the
charges yourself, or else send
them "Collect."
The Red Cross Society is an
organization which guards jealously the privileges it has gained
under international law after
years of negotiation with all the
governments of the world. It
never lends its name to unauthorized representatives. It does
not permit the promiscuous use of
its brassard or its flag. It carefully scrutinizes the standing of
all organizations which apply to
it for charters. It has become
the fashion to apply the term
"Red Cross " to every form of
charitable undertaking, bu* there
is a great danger in this practice.
The Red Cross has acquired its
unique status by its solidarity and
world-wide organization. Strong
as it is, however, it will be weak-
FALL   OPENING
SATURDAY, SEPT. 4th
NEWEST CREATIONS IN
Millinery of models and ready-to-wear
Hats. IDress goods in all the popular
shades in plain and novelty weaves.
1 Special values in black and black and
white Dress Goods. 1 Coatings in
plain self-color Serges, Sport Checks,
black, white and grey Astrachan.
1" New styles in Ladies', Misses' and
Children's Sweater Coats in all wool
and silk and wool mixtures. 1 New
models in C I C a la Grace Corsets.
1 Perrin's Kid Gloves in black, white
and tans. f*New Fall samples of
Campbell's Made-to-Measure Clothing
have arrived.  Style and fit guaranteed.
ened if its guaranty is used in an
indiscriminate and unauthorized
way. There is an instance of this
in the tour of Miss Joan Arnoldi,
of the Canadian Field Comforts
Commission through the West,
ln a great many towns she was
received, no doubt without her
consent, as an accredited representative of the Canadian Red
Cross. This is not the case. Miss
Arnoldi has a commission from
the Militia Department in connection with field comforts. She
h.as no connection with the international and world-wide Red
Cross. Centralization has been
the keynote of Red Cross success.
Work undertaken without the
authorization of the Red Cross
Society is work over which it has
no control and for which it can
bear no responsibility.    All Red
Cross workers should bear this in
mind that it is to the best interests of the Society to act through
none but the official channels.
Mr. Dalton, the head of the
Red Cross shipping department,
has issued a statement which
shows in striking statistics the
magnitude of the Red Cross operations in Canada. Nearly 16,000
cases of supplies have been sent
up to date, over 2,600 of which
were shipped in the last month.
The chief items in the last shipments are: 15,000 shirts, 31,000
sheets, and 204,000 socks. A
comparison of the shipments
from various Canadian cities the
past three months shows 238 cases
from Calgary, 133 from Cobalt,
136 from Hamilton. 294* from
London, 654 from Montreal. 50
from Quebec, 213 from Victoria
and 131 from Vancouver. One of
the shipments contained a pillow
case with the following inscription; " This pillow-case belonged
to my great-grandmother and is
100 years old. Just look at the
sewing in it." The sewing was
in fact almost microscopic in its
finenesss and constituted an eloquent testimony to the thoroughness and patience of women's
work in the year when Napoleon
was crushed.
The English War Office paid a
tribute to the efficiency of Canadian nursing by selecting, or rather
commandeering, fifteen of the
first detachment of nurses sent
to England by the Canadian Red
Cross. These nurses are now
actively at work in the military
hospitals of Malta.
 ■	 ^\
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
.V
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
SPECIAL LINES IN
WHITE PIQUE
TO-DAY AT
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Alex Henderson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
on Application
MAROCCHI BEOS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Pilsener Beer
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
_■   Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations
COAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan aDd Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
tones and in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
fl an acre. Not .more than 2,600 acres
will be leased to one applicant. JfJiJ
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or lctjal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of ive centa per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting fer the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onoe a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate of
$10.00ansore.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa,  or to  any
Agent or Sub-Agent ofDominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for.
Doubt Vs. Certainty
Why are the big railroads using the telephone for
dispatching purposes?
Because of its ceratinty and safety.
There is No Quesswork About Long Distance Telephoning
When you finish your conversation you KNOW your
message has been received and you already have the answer.
Remember, also, that you do not pay for messages not
delivered.
NO TALK, NO  PAY.
All the Company's telephones are available for service
day and night.
B. C. Telephone  Co., Ltd.
GUNPOWDER OUT OF DATE
Modern Explosive In Stick, Strip or
Cylinder Form
Gunpowder is really powder no longer, except when it is used for the
manufacture of fireworks. The explosive used for the modern high-
power artillery Is in the form of cylinders, sticks, cr blocks, some of them
of considerable size.
Germans make their "powder" in
strips that look like thick tape. They
cut it oft in lengths and tie it up in
bundles which fit into the breeches
of their big guns. The British powder is made in long sticks which look
l.Ke macaroni without the large hole,
while the French powder looks like
flat pieces of chewing gum.
The bigger the gun the bigger the
grain of powder. For the rifles the
men carry the grains are half as big
as a pinhead; for the largest guns
they are three inches long and three-
quarters of an inch thick. Every
grain is perforated lengthwise. Small
grains have a single nole, while the
larger sizes have seven.
These holes regulate in a wonderful way the rapidity with which the
powder will burn. If ..you light a
scrap of paper all round the edge it
will burn towards the centre and the
burning surface vill steadily decrease. If, however, you make a hole
in the centre of the paper and start
the conflagration there the flame will
steadily grow, and the most rapid
burning will take place just before
the fire has reached the outer edge.
This is the exact principle which
governs the arrangement of the perforations in big gun powder. The
burning starts along the surface exposed by the perforations, and spreads
always faster as the hole is enlarged,
burning fastest at the instant it is
consumed.
It is not intended that the charge
in big guns shall exhaust its i*crce
instantly. The beginning of the explosion starts the projectile ou its
way. The explosion contiuue3, and
as the projectile gains speed the force
behind it continues to push. The
powder is burning fastest and pushing hardest at the instant the projectile reaches the mouth of the gun.
At that insu.it also, it burns out and
exhausts itself.    Its work is done.
WAR SWINDLERS AT WORK
Fortunes Made by Impostors Pretending to be Doing  Relief Work
An investigation into a number of
so-called "charities" in Paris which
have sprung up since the war started
led to some astonishing results. One
of these concerns was installed in a
German hotel in the French capital
and was under the control of a secretary who had come within the clutches of the law on no fewer than eleven
occasions. Two ladies of mature age
who were without a penny at the
time of mobilization to-day possess a
fine motor car and a private house.
They were making something like
$200 per day, and this huge pro.it
appears to have geen gained by spurious agencies for tracing missing soldiers.
The most remarkable feature of the
whole business lies ln the fact that
ln several cases Austrians and Germans who had somehow succeeded in
escaping frr*ni concentration camps
got themselves elected as presidents
of various organizations ln order to
carry on swindling on a large scale.
Some of the concerns which the
police Investigated were commercial
in character, and sold various articles
st exorbitant prices, customers being
induced to buy in tho belief that the
profits were devoted to good works.
Is now open for
business in the
Willard Block
Dunsmuir Ave.
TAKEN.  .
DAY OR
NIGHT
First Class Work Guaranteed
at Low Prices.
Enlarging a
Specialty
Films Developed for Amateurs
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of 11a.m. and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries  (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
»      West Cumberland
FIKE   INSURANCE
For absolute protection
write a policy in the London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co., of Liverpool.
Total Assets • 926,788,930.
W.   WILLARD
LOCAL AGEN1
MEAT!   MEAT!
MEAT!
If you want QUALITY don't
forgot to call at the
City Meat Market
WE BUY FOR   pacu
WE SELL FOR   l-/Aan
THEREFORE:
We are the best.and cheapest
in town.
\ FOUR
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FORTS ALONG STRAITS
SURPRISED THE FLEET
Big  Shells  From   Guns  on  Warships
Smothered Them With Their Fire
But   Material   Damage Small
Mr. E. Ashmead Bartlett, writing
of the operations against the Dardanelles said:
The days of the Turk in Europe are
numbered, but no one will deny tnat
lie is dying hard and game.
It has long been an accepted axiom
of naval warfare that ships are of
no use against forts, or that they
fight at such a disadvantage that It
Is not worh while employing them for
*uch a purpose.
This axiom must now be modified,
■after the experience which the fleet
has gained in the present operations
against the Dardanelles. Any fori
built of stone or concrete, however
atrong, can be put out of action by
direct lire from guns, if only a clear
view of it can b* obtained, or provided aeroplanes are available to "spot'
for the gunners, to s.glial back re-
■suits and correct the tire. Vet nothing
amazed the gunners out here more
than the resisting power of these old
forts round the Dardanelles.
For instance, those at Seddul Bahr
and Kum Kale, at the northern and
^southern entrances to the Dardanelles,
were subjected to a terrific bombardment by the combined lieeis. bodh at
long and short range. Tne/ were so
completely smothered witn fire thai
no one believed a stone or a gun could
be left standing. The.r fire was, In
tact, completely silenced. Yet, when
the landing parties were put ashor.
to examine theu, the mat.rial damage was found to be compilative.y
small, although tliey were nier^
shambles.
Obstacles to Overcome
Many of the guns were still intact,
tind one 9-inch was actually founj
loaded. The work of destruction haa
to be completed by the landing parties
and the forts are now heaps of unoccupied ruins, with their guns lyina
about at all angles.
The Turkish soldier fights very wel
behind entrenchments, but he is a
very bad gunner, and possesses absolutely no knowledge of the science of
war. But the Turkish army, directed
by highly trained German officers,
and having the advantage of their
■science and technical ski.l, is a very
different enemy
The old axiom that ships are of ao
use against forts is quite inacvuratb,
but the enemy discovered that even
the heaviest shells can do but a
minimum of damage to a woilcon-
structed emplacement of earth thrown
up in front of a gun. The great shells
from the ships throw up an enormous
amount of smoke and earth, but the
actual damage is small, it ca'i, in
fact, generally be made good during
the night, or when tlie weather is too
thick to allow of shooting. A batt;e-
ship has to score a direct hit on the:
gun itself before guns mounted in
this simple manner can fairly be said
to be out of action. The tiifiiciilty of
scoring direct hits is enormous especially when the Are is indirect and
has to be corrected by aero.jiunes,
which are themselves constantly exposed to heavy shrapnel fire which
it is impossible to keep under.
Difficult Fighting Ground
If the ground on the European and
Asiatic sides of the Straits were hat
the task would be comparatively easy,
because the enemy's guns could be
kept out of range by the long-range
€-inch guns of the ships. Unfortunately it is just the reverse. The Gal-
lipoli Peninsula is a jumble of hills,
valleys, small rivers, low-lying ridges,
and spurs which assume no regular
formation, and which seem to have
been specially designed by Nature to
assist the defence of the Straits. In
parts the country is thickly wooded,
in others the trees are sparse, and
mere are patcnes or low-lying groun'a
which have b.en cultivated. The ascent from the shore is steep aud fairly high, and the ships must clear this
initial obstacle before they can reach
their mark.
Amongst this hilly country there
are innumerable positions where guns
can be concealed, in valleys, behind
hills, or amongst trees. When a gun
or battery has been located by an
aeroplane It is often necessary to fire
right over the top of several ridges
of hills, and the smoke of the bursting projectiles cannot be seen, even
from the control tops. The Asiatic
shore of the Straits is lower, and is
commanded along almost its whole
length by the European. The hills
are not so flush with the water, and
It is therefore easier to locate the
batteries on that side.
SHELLING HEADQUARTERS
Men Sought Refuge in Well as Farm,
house Was Smashed to Pieces,
What happens when the enemy's
artillery gets the range of a field
headquarters is graphically told by
Private H. Edwards of the Royal
FusUers, as follows:
"I and ten others were on guard
at headquarters. We were having our
tea when we heard a Umble crash.
I ran to the door to find that shells
aimed at the headquarters were bursting all around. I knew it was hopeless to run iuto the open, so I and
two chums jumped into a well in the
cellar. There we stood up to the
waist in water, with laces waite waiting for the end. We could hear the
groans of our comrades and the terrible crash of the shells. Suddenly
we saw a blinding flash and heard a
deafening roar. The top of the
well seemed to jump on us. I remember no more.
"When I recovered consciousness I
found that my two chums were dead.
The shelling had ceased, so I climbed
up again. What a temble sight met
my eyes! The farm was levelled to
the ground, and my chums were all
dead and frightfully mangled. Only
three of us were left alive."
England Invincible.
'This England  never did, nor never
shall,
Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror,
But when it first did help to wound
itself.
Now these ler princes are come home
again,
Come the three corners of the world
in arms,
And we shall shock them:    naught
shall  make  us rue,
If England to itself do rest but true."
A SOLDIER'S CAMEL RIDE
An Australian soldier ln Cairo w ota
the following description of a ride oe
a camel. "Before a camel gets down
it makes a noise like a sitz bath being dragged along Oxford road at the
rate of about four miles an hour.
Then lt folds its legs under it like
a four-fold two-foot rule, and then you
start. It's your turn r.ow. vou get
on its back and its leg? unbsnd, and
you clutch and think of all the bad
deeds you have ever done, and then
open your ryes expecting to t.nd the
Pyramids far beneath you. The motion when it starts is that of riding
astride the banner ln a Good Templars' procession, and when the beggar
runs it's like being astride the banner
in a Bad Templars' procession.
"It's when a camel gets dewn that
one really begins to see life. Have
you ever trodden on a loose stair rod?
That is the second sensation. The
flrst is like one you get when you
come across the top stair from above
ln the dark, when you don't know
it's there, and the last makes you
remember the day the hammock rope
broke."
GERMANY'S GREATER
DREANOUGHT SUNK
LONDON, Aug. 24.—The capitals of the Entente
Allies are jubilant today over the unexpected naval
victory which the Russians have won in the Gulf
of Riga. Britain had more than a sympathetic
interert in the battle, as a British submarine accounted for the German battle cruiser Moltke, the
loss of which, added to the destruction of three
cruisers, seven torpedo boats and four transports,
constitutes the greatest naval disaster since the
beginning of the war. The moral effect of this
action oh the Russian people will be great, as it
probably will allay the depression incident to the
continued Russian retreat, which has been arrested
nowhere except in the northern sector, from Riga
to Kovno.
AMSTERDAM, Aug. 24.-The Telegraaf today
printed the following: " At a secret conference of
Berlin writers, politicians and members of the
cabinet, prior to the recent war loan, Treasurer
Heffelich explained the loan would exhaust the
nation's resources and pointed out the necessity
for honourable peace. Chancellor Von Bethmann-
Hollweg told the conference that the financial
difficulties of Germany were increasing, and urged
the Reichstag to abandon bellicose declarations
and to prepare peace proposals which might be
acceptable to the Allies. His stand was sunported
by General Von Moltke, who declared those who
expected Russia's complete defeat in any case were
misled and misunderstood the situation. Despite
the attitude of the chancellor, the conference refused to adopt a resolution advocating moderation
in the Reichstag, whereupon Von Bethmann-
Hollwegg threatened to resign if bellicose proposals
were pressed, declaring he refused to be held responsible for the disaster which might follow.
Washington, Aug. 26.—-In Washington it is confidently believed the next word from Germany will
be an announcement that, pending further negotiations, submarine warfare on passenger ships
will be disnontinued, and that submarine commanders already have been instructed to sink no
merchant ships without warning. Germany, it is
understood, considers that the victories to her
arms in the campaign against Russia permit her
to recede a step on the sea.
London, Aug. 27.-London critics believe that
the Russian commander in chief is preparing a
gigantic offensive when the enemy is far enough
advanced upon Russian soil. Italian troops are
now engaged in a smash on Trent, and have
reached the outer fortifications. Everywhere they
are successful.
Paris, Aug. 27.-The French war office says: An
aerial squadron composed of 62 aviators flew over
Dellingen, in Rhenish Prussia, where there is a
shell and armor factory, dropping with precision
over 150 bombs. THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
1/
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,    Wednesday,
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Service at Bevan, 2 o'clock p.m.
Bible Study (Sunday School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 13th Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m.,  Holy Communion
11 a. m. Matins.
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M. Forces on Wednesday at 8-30 p.m.
Arthur Bischlager, Vicar.
When you require
anything in the
MUSICAL LINE
It will pay you to examine our
stock before purchasing.    We
are sole agents for the following high-grade pianos:
Steinway,
Gerhard-Heintzman,
Brinsmead,
-   Karn-Morris, and
Kohler& Campbell.
A complete stock of the world-
renowned
EDISON
Diamond  Disc and  Cylinder
Phonographs and records. Also
the famous
COLUMBIA
Grafonola and Records.
Our stock of small goods was never so
complete as it is now: Violins, Guitars,
Banjos, Accordeons. and in fact everything in the music line. All the latest
music arriving daily at 15c. a copy.
We  will  be pleased to have you call
any time and let us show you around.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
Now is the time to purchase
screen doors and window screens
before the hot weather comes on.
A full line at Tarbell's Hardware
Store.
V
&£,
When is a Kitche
Not a "Kitchen"?
With a Hughes Electric Range, it
is a parlor. Just as cool and clean
.and airy.
The modern "kitchen" deserves a
better na/ne. In truth, it is a cooking apartment—as bright and tidy
as any other room. For since the
perfection of electric cooking, all
the clumsy ugliness and every
trace of dirt and soot and gas
have gone.
The modern cook works with her
head and not her hands." She has
hours of time that were never
hers before. Simple figures show
that in a life time five solid years
of drudgery are .saved by this
practical invention.
And that isn't all. Consider the sacrifice of
happiness, health and youthful charm. Old-
fashioned .methods have truly exacted a heavy
toll.
ectric Ranges
Beauty fades fast ever a hot, dirty coal stove. Gas positively poisons! In combustion, gas takes up oxygen and gives out poisonous fumes. That is why plants
will not live where gas is burned.
Mr. Master-of-the-House, this is not a luxury but a choice—not a choice but a necessity! Think it over. Then come in and see this Range. You will hear some facts
that will astonish you.
FOR SALE BY
CUMBERLAND ELECTRIC LIGHTING Co., Ltd.
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Rates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Proprietor.
On Monday F. Dalby, station
agent of the Canadian Collieries,
was tak^n ill while at his work
and removed by automobile to his
residence.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Union & Comox District Hospital
will, hold their regular monthly
meeting at the home of Mrs. Alex.
McKinnon on Thursday evening,
September 2nd.
E. C. Emde, the Courtenay
automobile man, was here on
Wednesday with a brand new
Overland for sale.
The eight-year-old son of Mrs.
A. Haywood, of West Cumberland, fell off the coal shed on
Tuesday and broke his wrist.
Furniture, Crockery. Enamel ware
Paints, Oils, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
mw—amsm
ovelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31 SIX
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
-
B.C. TELEPHONE SERVICE
Prompt use of the telephone
saved the residence of a Saanich,
Vancouver Island, rancher from
fire recently. The incident also
served to show how the B. C.
Telephone Company strives to
impress upon its employees to be
ever ready to serve:
"On the morning of July 23rd
Mr. F. W. Sproule, a subscriber
at Sidney, Vancouver Island, exchange, called up the local manager, Mr. R. L. Pickering, and
asking for a number incidentally
mentioned that his ranch was on
fire. After making the connection, Mr. Pickering had the fire
alarm rung by two people and he
also called up all the people in
Sidney who had automobiles, requesting them to proceed to the
fire hall and pick up available
help and rush to the fire which
was two miles away. There is no
fire wagon at Sidney, but the
people appealed to responded
willingly, and gathering the fire
buckets, were soon on their way
to the scene of the fire. As Mr,
Pickering was concluding his
messages the first arrival called
up from Mr. Sproule's and reported that the house could be
saved, as only the corner was
ablaze. A bucket brigade had
been formed and water was being
transported from the well and the
creek by those who hurried to
the scene."
The Sidney and Island Review,
made very favorable comment on
the incident under the heading of
"Telephone Efficiency." Its article closed as follows: "People
do not live in isolation in the present time when their house is
equipped with the telephone. You
are brought into touch with your
neighbor just as if you lived in
the next house to him in the city
street."
TODAY IS "TAG BAY"
The members of the Women's
Patriotic Society of this city are
holding a "Tag Day " today, to
assist in the raising of $25,000 to
equip the British Columbia Base
Hospital, No. 5, with motor ambulance and surgical supplies.
Today is "Tag Day" all over the
province, with the exception of
Nanaimo and South Wellington,
and in their case the date has
been postponed until September
11th. The 311 volunteer doctors,
nurses, and orderlies, composing
the Hospital Corps, have left Vic
toria and are now on their way
to the front and the money collected will be cabled to the commanding officer, Col. C. C. Hart.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
ilyliP.ff
wsmm
>'0»' ■••*
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECT VE   MAY
1st.
1915.
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ   DOWN                                   1
Sat.
Fri.
Thurj Wed.
Tue
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri,
Sat.
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.     P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A. M.
7:00
A.M.
10;30
A.M.
7:00 |
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10     3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
10:55
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05     3.05
Puntledge
7.30
1.30
11:00
2:30
11:00
7:30
11:00
7:30
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4,00
9.00     3.00
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
j   3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
1
8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
i
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50     2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
3.45  i
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45     2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
11:20
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
!
6.30
3.30
3.30
8.30     2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
11:35
3.00
11:35
8:00
11:35
8:00
An extra train will leavp Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY THE  ISLANDER, UtlMBKKJbAlNJL). h  O
SEVEN
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., L L. D., D.CJU Preddent
•ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Manager JOHN AIRD. Aeat General Manager
CUPim, $15,000,000    RESERVE FOND, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
This Bank offers vosurpassad facilities! to thoae doing business with
foreign countries. It is specially equipped for the purchase and sale of
Sterling and other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and exports of merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che.
quei and Letters of Credit issued aad availaMc in all paits of the world.
Collections efycttd promptly at renewable rates. S22
CUMBERLAND BRANCH.       A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. G. CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOWiFULLYJgTOCKED AND IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY CAN BE MADE.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
Phones Y91 and R99.
IMPORTANT  TO  CUSTOMERS:--No  Orientals,  Agents,  or  Solicitors
employed. ,,
SweepinqReduction
•IN-
LADIES' and GENTS'
TAILOR-MADE
CLOTHING
Suits made to order that were $30.00 and
$35.00.   Your choice now for	
$25.00
When material is supplied making i3 reduced from $23.00
to $14.00.
S.   ISAKA,
Cumberland   Tailor
Maker of Ladies' and Gsnts' High-chis Clothing
Dunsmuir Ave., Cumberland, B.C.
%*
LtM
lOHfMI
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUE
CUMBERLAND, * C.
Phone 14
am
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
ammmmmmmsmmsmammm
I
J
V
Profits In Forestry.
The Vanderbilt experiment in forestry near Ashevlllle, N. C, seems to be
turning out very well. By a sale made
of large timber on 68,000 acres of
mountain forest land at $12 an acre, or
$816,000, to Louis Carr and W. P.
.Decker, George Vanderbilt will receive a profit of $680,000 on an investment of $136,000 made twenty years
ago when he bought this land at $2 an
acre. In addition to this he retains
the land Itself and all timber under
fourteen inches in diameter. The purchasers have twenty yearB in which to
remove the 250,0.00,000 feet of lumber
estimated to be on the tract. Mr. Vanderbilt retains about 15,000 acres immediately surrounding Biltmore house.
u*rmans Brutal to Prisoners
Mrs. C. E. Morgan of Guildford,
England, communicated to the English
press a letter in which she said: "I
have to-day received a letter from a
company sergeant-major in the
Queen's Regiment interned in a German camp. .Writing on a postcard
to thank me for a parcel, he adds:
'Three men have died quite recently';
he gives the names, ail men of the
Queen's Regiment. A private, writing to his wife said: 'For the love
of Heaven, send me bread. If you
knew what .as going on out here
you would not wait to be asked
twice,' How many more of our prisoners of war are to be allowed to die
without any effort being made to save
them?"
Legends of National Embltms
Most people are acquainted with
the legend of St. Patrick and tlie
shamrock, which has given Irishmen
their special lecoration. In somewhat similar manner most nations
have equipped themselves with a symbolical filant to which is generally
attached a legend.
Scotsmen are said <o owe their
symbol of a thistle to the fact that
when a party of invading Danes wera
approaching the slumbering camp in
the darkness, one of them trod on the
prickly thistle, and announced his
contact with it in rather Toud tones,
which awakened the Scots, who drove
off the enemy.
Patriotic Welshmen decorate their
caps with a leek on St. David's Day
because that saint is supposed to have
advised the Britons on the eve of a
battle with the Saxons, to wear leeks
in their caps so as'to distingui.-h
easily, friends from foes.
England has always been famed for
her roses, but the adoption of the
rose as- the national symbol does not
seem to have taken place till Edward
IV. introduced it on his seal.
The lily of France has been traced
to very early times, but probably
owes its adoption to the Franks at
the battle of Tolbiac, who crownsd
themselves with lilies after the battle.
SPRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don t you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumberl,and
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CL.EAN.ERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next door to Bank of Commerce,
Dunsmuir Ave.,        Cumberland, B.C.
•mi i    *t*m wisj—a
Practical Carriage and Wagon
Builders.
General  Blacksmiths.      Horse-
Shoeing  a specialty.   Auto
Wheels Rebuilt, or
Repaired.
Any kind of Body built to order.
All Work Guaranteed.
Kierstead & Burton
P.O. Box 410   Cumberland. B.C.
"Kitchener's Way"
For many years "Kitchener's way"
has been a sort of saying in the British army. Innumerable stories >iave
been told about it since the war began, and some.of them are true anil
some are not—mostly not. Here,
however, is a true one. When tho
Field-Marshal went to the War Office,
he found himself threatened by a
shortage of guns and ammunition
which later developed seriously. It
so happened, however, that he knew
that in a famous city of a certain
neutral nation, in Europe, a great
modern plant for the manufacture ol
war material had recently been erected. . He purchased the entire works,
shipped all the machinery to England, where, so considerable is it, it
Is not yet entirely ln working order,
When it is in thorough order, it la
calculated a great part of the difficulties arising from want of guns end
ammunition will have been overcome
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS   SERVED
J.H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Ave.
jj EDWARD W.   BICKLE
NOTARY PUBLIC
1 FINANCIAL  AND  INSURANCE   AGENT
I PHONES; OFFICE. 3-5     RESIDENCE 7-8
I P.O. DRAWER 430
j OFFICE,   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
J DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND EIGHT
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
F. J. Curran, of Mud Bay, was
in town on business on Friday.
Dr. E. R. Hicks left for Dorchester, N.B., on Friday.
Mrs. Frank Ramsay and family
left for San FranciscoWednesday.
Louis Tapeila left for the United States on Wednesday.
David Tully and John Sloan left
Nanaimo on Tuesday for Scotland.
Matthew Brown, of the Big
Store, returned from a .week's
vacation on Sunday.
Harry White left for Union Bay
on Wednesday to join the Canadian Forces.
Frank Hurford arrived on Monday and left again for Vernon on
Thursday.
H. Simms left on Thursday for
Union Bay to join the Canadian
Expeditionary Forces.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Martin, of
Bevan, are the proud parents of
a brand new baby girl.
Mrs. Thomas and Miss Louisa
Bickle left for Victoria on Wednesday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Spicer were
passengers by Friday's outgoing
train.
John Sutherland left for Union
Bay on Thursday to join the Canadian Forces.
D. C. Macfarlane, W. K. Hancock and Allan NiUnns have been
camping at Royston for the past
three weeks.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Bryan have
left for Chillivvack. Mrs. Bryan
will spend a few weeks on the
mainland.
A number of men left this city
on Tuesday's train to fight bush
fires near Anderson's logging
camps.
Joseph Hunter, of Victoria,
chief engineer of the Canadian
Collieries, was here on an official
visit during the week.
Alex. Peden. of the New York
Life, was calling upon some of
tiie most likely prospects on Wednesday
The Married Men defeated the
Single Men at a game of baseball
on the Recreation Grounds by a
score of 18 to 13.
J. R. Lockard, general superintendent of the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., accompanied by Mrs. LocMcard, left for
Victoria on Thui busy.
I;' the persons who vi.site<i the
•An at the  Islander   building
Friday morning will call at the
£N^s*N%
' sssV^Vs^-fk
O'l
office this afternoon they will be
presented with a ticket for a roast
o1"' beef.     Potatoes taste ever sol
much nicer with gravy.
THE   BIG   STORE
s
.'•* SHOES
Ladies' One-Strap Slipper, extra wide
fitting, low heel. Just what d*1 Ad
is wanted for the house,     «P *■ •&&
Ladies' One-Strap Dress Slipper, medium heel, very comfortable; d»o C/\
Kingsbury make.   Price    »P^«Ol/
Ladies' Strap Slipper, patent front,
medium heel, newest last. d»o C A
Price   aP^.OU
Ladies' New York patent Mary Jane
pumps, medium heel, the d>o Qg
very latest.   Price------   tyOe%/D
Ladies' Shoes, cloth tops, patent front;
one toe cap, new last. (ho QC
Price  *pO.*70
For ladies who want comfort we have
the Hospital Oxford, the two easiest
fitting shoes to be had on the market.
Try a pair and have no more tired and
sore feet. <J*»o AC 5 0Q OC
Prices at   W**»VD   g   tyO.mmD
Ladies' Gun Metal Blue, short vamp,
Cuban heel, a smart and d»o "rC
dressy shoe.   Price      tpO. i O
Children's Blue,' in tan and black,
Eclipse^make. ^Wideeasy <hl CA
fitting.;     Prices $1.25 to^ «P A •«*v
Children's Shoes in tan and black, also
black with red top; Eclipse <fcO OC
make.     Prices $1.35 to   M>£.«SO
Girls' Leckie Shoes, every pair guaranteed to give satisfaction; no better
shoe for school wear. Try d»o AC
a pair.    Prices $2.25 and «P*wO
Children's Patent Slippers with strap,
in all sizes. Splendid wearing quality.
They are of the well known Eclipse
brand, and very easy fitters.
For Boys we recommend the Leckie
Shoe, which we guarantee to give good
satisfaction.
We have on sale still quite a number of odd lines
which we intend clearing out cheap.    Come early.
PLACE FOR SHOES
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
L
• N^N^O

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.cumberlandis.1-0342445/manifest

Comment

Related Items