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The Islander Oct 16, 1915

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Array Largest, Circulation in the Comox Distri
VOL. VI., No. 29        THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, OCT. 16. 1915.        Subscription price, $1.50 per year
MAKING BOMBS IN TERRITORY HELD BY BRITISH ON GALLIPOLI PENINSULA
Old jam tins and other similar receptacles are used in making bombs, whilst, amongst other
things, fragments of Turkish shells and pieces of barbed wire are used as filling.
IMPATIENT AT DELAY
A further letter to Sir Richard
McBride from the prohibition
party, conveying an intimation of
the party's impatience at the
delay in answering their demands
and asking for a pronouncement
at an early date of what the
government proposes to offer as
a means of testing public opinion
and when the test is to be mrde,
was authorised at a special meeting of the prohibition executive
held at headquarters, Vancouver
The meeting was called following the receipt of a letter by Mr.
W.A.Cantelon from the Premier,
stating in reply to a previous
letter requesting an early pronouncement, that the government is engaged in considering
all aspects of the prohibition
question. No other matter came
up for discussion except the
single issue of what action should
be taken in view of the Premier's
letter. The members of the committee did not conceal their belief
that the government has been
marking time on the question,
but it was decided before taking
any further action to write again
and repeat the request from an
early pronouncement,
In the meantime organization
plans and financial plans are in
preparation for an extensive
campaign. Tomorrow the financial committee will meet under
the chairmamship of Mr.J.N.
Harvey to consider what sum of
money will be necessary for a
campaign and what measures will
be desirable to raise the funds,
There is a feeling in view of the
uncertainty of when the vote will
be taken that it is desirable to
largely adopt a scheme of monthly
subscription "until the vote is
taken." Already many have
signed up promises covering
periods up till six monthe ahead.
m . -        -<• -
Harvest Thanksgiving services
will be held in Grace Methodist
Church to-morrow at 11 a.m, and
7 p.m.   Everybody welcome.
Geo. A. Fletcher, of Nanaimo,
dealer in musical instruments was
here on Friday.
Mrs. Hatton returned Wednesday from Toledo.Washington.
John J Weir, editor of the Cumberland News left for Victoria ou
Monday morning.
TO ENCOURAGE PUPILS
In order to encourage the pupils
to put forth their best efforts, the
teacher in every room will at the
end of each month select the five
pupils who have done the best
work. The names of these pupils
selected from each of the rooms
will be published in the local
newspapers, and the pupils so
selected will also receive an
"Honors Card." A record wili
be kept in a conspicuous place in
each room of the pupils who win
the "Honors Cards."
The interest thusurousedarrong
the pupils will surely stimulate a
spirit of emulation calculated to
draw forth their best efforts.
SAD DROWNING FATALITY
Fred Saunders only son of Mr.
and Mrs E. L. Saunders of West
Cumberland, was drowned at
(Jomox Lake on Friday afternoon.
The deceased was in a boat about
thirty yards fn m shore when bv
some means the boat capsized and
threw the young man into the
water. The. parents have the
sympathy of the entire community in this their sad bereavement.
An inquest will be held today.
POSTCARDSPROHIBITED
Washington, Oct, 12.—Postmaster General Burleson has
issued an order excluding from
the United States mails postcards
and envelopes regarded as of
unneutral character, The order
specifically includes cards and
envelopes to which labels have
been applied bearing the words
"Gott Strafe England!" and
pictures denunciatory of Germany's sinking of the Lusitania.
The postmaster-general's order
was as follows;
"Postmasters are directed to
treat as non-mailable envelopes,
postcards and so forth bearing
stickers containing the words or
having printed on them the
words 'Gott 'Strafe England!' or
a picture of the German escutcheon with a red blot labelled 'Lusitania' inscribed 'the blot that
won't come off,' as being not
only unneutral but calculated to
reflect upon certain classes of
persons."
It was said at the postoffice
department that postcards and
envelopes of the character described had been found in big
cities by postmasters and post-
office inspectors and that the
question as to their mailable
character had been referred to
the! department. An examination
of the postal laws and regulations
was made with a view to determ-
ing whether the mailing of such
envelopes and postcards could be
prohibited.
In issuing his order the postmaster-general acted in accordance with a decision reached
recently that the mailing of
postcards or photographs of the
lynching of Leo M. Frank, near
Marietta, Ga., should be prohibited as immoral and likely lo
inflame the passions of certain
people.
RED CROSS TEA
A Red Cross Tea will be hf Id
under the auspices of the Worn-
ens Patriotic Society at the ho <j
of Mrs. Charles J. Parnham on
Thursday Oct, 21st., the anniv, r-
sary of the Battle ofTrafalp;. r
commencing at four o'clock n
the afteroon. The Cumberland
Symphony Orchestra, under the
leadership of Mr, J. H. McMillan
has kindly consented to render
selections during the afternoon.
Arthur Pearson, who is now in
the 67th Scots of British Columbia, was in town for a few days
and left on Friday for  Victoria.
\
(V TWO
THE 1SLANDEK,   CUMBERLAND, B. (J.
i HLWMM
BE OF GOOD CHEER!
VICTORY FOLLOWS
THE FLAG.
5ty? Jfjolatsiker
Published every Saturday by the Islander
Publishing Company at Cumberland,
B.C., Canada.   Teiephoue 3-5.
Subscription: One year in advance, $1.50;
Single copies, 5c. Foreign subscriptions
to countries in Postal Union, $2.00
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16th, 1915.
During the next few weeks we
are going to have our columns
spiced with a little fun. Now
there are no rules for funny writing, that is to say, none that are
worth following. If fun doesn't
run off the point of your pen
easy and natural like, it is little
use scratching your head for it
for if it did come it would be a
scratch. If there is any rule
about funny writing it is that the
more you labor to be funny the
less fun you are likely to produce.
Funny isn't it. ? But nevertheless
it is a fact. The greatest failures
in humorous writing have been
caused by the absence of a funny
head on the shoulders of the
writer. If your head be only
funny you can drive right ahead
without regard to rules. Unfortunately we have not a funny
head. We fear some of our sub
scribers will be like the one we
met yesterday, to whom we said:
"Did you read our last paper?"
The answer was, "Oh, yes, I read
it. We then enquired, "How
did you like it?" The answer
came: "My dear sir, I assure you
that I laid it aside with a great
deal of pleasure," Now if you
g"t no new pleasure out of the
"funny come"" of our paper,
like our friend, you may find
pleasure in laying it aside, and
pleasure is what we are all after.
Why does the bank have big
iron bars across the windows,
asked a little boy of his father.
"Hush." ww the reply, "that is
so the cashier will get used to
them."
The widow who marries a second time doesn't deserve to be
•one.
The apparel of a woman oft
proclaims the man.
Hi j-Jf1M41.V/ iii*' ■ CIM»l«nt
Specials in Ladies' Hand-Knit Sweater
Sets,
Made to order in any style, with Sweater Coat and Toque
to match, in shades of reds, browns greens, blues, tango
white and black.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's  All-
wool Sweater Coats
Toques and Aviation Caps in newest styles at popular
prices.
Fall Styles in Ladies' and Misses' Cloth
and Tweed Coats,
Also Coatings in Checks, Serges, and Astrachan. A large
assortment of Children's and Infants' Coats, in scarlet
and navy Serges, white and colored Bearskin.
A full range of Plain and Cord Velvets in all leading shades
A complete stock of all sizes in Watson's Underwear in
Ladies', Misses and Children's.    " The Underwear that
will wear and not shrink."
Blankets, Eiderdown Quilts, Comforter and Flannellette
Sheets.
Ladies', Misses' and Children's Felt and Velvet Slippers.
Special value in 32in. Flanellette," in neat stripes, at 3
yards for $1.00.
We have received our Special Shipment of Ladies' Trimmed
Hats, made up expressly for our trade by Expert Milliners.
anu*i WsttMriHiaMEWie*!W'*vHM3fciiAa
A lady in Buffalo recently gave
her husband a dose of Rough on
Rats because he intimated that
her own hair was enough without
a rat.
Charity suffereth long and so
does the man who lives on it.
Eliminate the grouch or the
grouch will eliminate you.
Many people think they are
psychic when they are only seasick.
A cigarettist; One who is late
every morning and fresh every
evening.
To anxious subscriber! No, you
are wrong—Saratoga chips and
Buffalo chips are not the same
thing.
God must dearly love fools,
otherwise he would not have
made so many of us.
"Fellow citzens," said the
colored orator, "What am education." "Education am the
palladium of our liberties and the
grand pandemonium of civilization."
You can always tell a Boston
woman, but you can't tell her
much.
Mary had a little lamb
But when she heard the price,
She sent the waiter back again
And took a bowl of rice.
Say, young man, you who are
so ready to call everybody a hypocrite that don't suit you would
it not be just as well to look up
your own standing? A man who
keeps his own record all it should
be has not very much time to
devote to the faults of ofhers,
and to go out of his way to fire
rocks at those who are treating
him with civility.
The success of your town depends upon the public spirit of
its leading citzens. If the leading men are not willing to lay
out abundantly their means, erect
neat and attractve buildings,
advertise largely their business
and the inducements offered in
their town, and are not willing
to patronize home trade and all
home industries, then no town
be its advantages ever so great,
can expect to grow or flourish.
The natural advantages are great
accessories to the growth of any
place, but public spirit, backed
up by common sense and energy,
will turn the prairie into a flourishing town or transform it into
an elegant city.
There are always a good many
people who keep the balance of
the community busy wondering
how they live so well. tf
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
LAYRITZ   NURSERIES,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Headquarters for Choice Nursery Stock—all home grown.
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits, Roses, etc.,
and in fact all hardy trees and plants for the Garden.
Largest and best assorted stock in the country. Price list
on application.
[ESTABLISHED 24 YEARS.]
FOR THE LATEST IN
MILLINERY
SEE
Mrs. John Gillespie
West Cumberland
THOS. E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND, B.C.
Phone 67
Agent for the
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Ahx KnieTson, Proprietor
Estimates and Designs furnished
,, on Application
MAROCCHI BEOS.
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for Piisime Ieie
Cumberland    Courtenay
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty
West Cumberland
F.   LIGHTER
PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER
JEWELLER AND OPTICIAN
SPECIALIST ON ENGLISH LEVER
AND SWISS WATCHES.
ILO-ILO   THEATRE   BLOCK
Dunsmuir Avenue.
Synapsis of Coal Mining Regulations
GOAL mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Terri
fcoriea snd in a portion of the Province of
British Columbia, may be leased for a term
of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
$1 an aore. Not more than 2,600 aores
will be leased to one applioant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applioant in person to the Agent or sub
Agent of the district in which the rights
applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or letfal subdivisions
of sections, and in unsurveyed territory
the tract applied for shall be staked out by
theapplicaut himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of $6 which will be refunded if the
rights applied forare not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the
rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns accounting for the full quantity ef merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty
thereon. If the coal miniag rights are
not being operated, such returns shall be
furnished at least onee a year.
The lease will include the oeal mining
rights only, but the lessee may ke permitted to purohase whatever available surface rights may be considered necessary
for the working of the mine at the rate ef
llO.OOenaere.
For full information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department ef the Interior, Ottawa, er to  any
Agent or Sub-Asrent ofDeminien Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will net be paid fer.
DIRECT
INSTANT
SATISFACTORY
You put in a long distance call, we do the rest. We
hunt up the party you want wherever he may be, so long as
he can be reached.
By long distance telephone you go direct to the person
you want to reach and you get instant, personal action.
You can telephone any time, day or night. Special rates
between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m.
British Columbia Telephone Company, Limited
GOAL INDUSTRY IMPROVES
The coal mining industry shows
improved conditious. The Canadian Colleries are now running
60 coke ovens at Union Bay,
supplying coke for the Granby
Company's   smelter, at Anoyx.
Pulverized coal is now being
used for steamship fuel, and the
New York Central Railway system has converted a number of its
engines to use fuel .in this form.
This is estimated to effect a saving of $190,000,000 a year in the
cost of railroad operation in the
United States, and the adoption
of the system on Canadian railways will be attended with like
economical results, solving the
problem of competition with
California oil as fuel. This development is of;immense importance
to a country like British Columbia
which possesses such vast coal
resources.
The demand for Vancouver
Island coal for bunkering ships
has recently shown considerable
improvement.
RED GROSS AMALGAMATES
London, via Toronto, Sept 29, 15.
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor of the province of British
Columbia, at Victoria:
I beg to inform you that the
British Red Cross Society and
the Order of St. John in view of
the great demands upon their
resources both in France and tho
near East have decided to make
an appeal throughout the Empire
by street and other collections
upon the twenty first day of
October next the money received
from this appeal will be devoted
entirely to relieving the sufferings of our wounded soldiers and
sailors from home and overseas
at the various seats of the war
from all parts of the Kings Dominions. We have already received
generous assistance in our work
but with the increase of British
and overseas forces at the front
there is a corresponding increase
in our expenditure and we shall
be truly grateful to you if you
will help us by organizing an
appeal and sending the proceeds
to us for the objects which I
have named. I shall be greatly
obliged if you will kindly communicate the foregoing to your
government.
Their Majesties the King and
Queen and Her Majesty Queen
Alexandra are giving us their
gracious patronage and I trust
that you will also be able to see
your way to help.
LANDSDOWNE,
President Red Cross Society,
83 Pall Mall, London.
A. W. Lee, inspector of the
Dominion Express Company arrived on Thursday and left on
Friday for Victoria.
THREE
•ot^tttmwsm ... hi ii
CROWN PRINCE_WANTED WAR
Mr. Ian Malcolm, M.P., in a
book entitled 'War Pictures Behind the Lines.' just published in
London, relates a conversation he
had with the Crown Prince of
Germany at Berlin in January,
1914, in which the latter expressed the opinion that the British
after all should be better friends
with Germany, but could not be
trusted while allied with France
and Russia: that Great Britain
and Germany together could divide Europe and keep the peace
of the world, Britain meanwhile
keeping her eyes shut and ignoring treaties while Germany was
taking France's colonies. The
interview closed by Mr. Malcolm
making the remark that nowadays nobody wanted war which
injured victors and vanquished, to
which the Crown Prince vigorously replied: 'I beg your pardon,
I want war. I want to have a
smack at those French swine as
soon as ever I can.'
Widespread interest has been
aroused by the recent publication
entitled "How to finish British
Columbia wood," which is being
circulated under the direction of
the Hon. W.R.Ross, Minister of
Lands. Numerous requests for
copies are being received, not
only from within the Province,
but also from the prairie and
eastern provinces, and already it
has been found necessary to issue
a second edition. In addition to
the lumber companies, applications are .coming in from architects, builders, house decorators'
carpenters, manual instructers
in schools, and others interested
in the use of wood. The manner
in which the pamphlets has been
received by the public indicates
that the use of wood for interior
finish of homes, offices and other
buildings is a subject calling for
much attention. Copies of the
publication will be mailed free, so
long as the supply permits, upon,
application to the Forest Branch,
Victoria, British Columbia.
Young man, you had better goto school while you now have an
opportunity and thus secure an
education that will enable you to-
command   more   than  common
wages  when   you grow up to-
manhood.    It is the fellows who*
play "hookey" in their boyhood
who will growl the most about
hard times and work for a dollar
a day,   Go to school and go there
to learn and not for the purpose
of acting cute in order to attract
the attention of the "big girls."
There are eight families residing at Puntledge. FOUR
THE    ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
■
UK LEE
SHow He Provided for His Wife's
Safety When Called on
to Fight.
By GEORGE MUNSON.
Nobody ever suspected that there
were two Chinamen in Lin Lee's
laundry until we met Lin Loo. For
the matter of that, nobody cared, or
would have cared, if there had been
half a dozen. Chinamen come and go
suid nobody takes any stock of them
except the immigration officials, mainly because all Chinamen look alike, at
flrst glance, to the untrained Caucasian eye. And the flrst glance is likely in most cases, to be the last, also.
In that part of Virginia where Lin
Lee had his temporary residence
Chinamen are not common. The
slight prejudice against them in the
north and the considerable antagonism of the west do not exist. If
they were not pig-tailed heathen they
might pass among us whites as equals
—and I come of the Ramsay family.
To say that Is quite enough in our
part of the country.
Everybody liked Lin Lee. He had
cut off his pigtail and he attended
the Episcopal church. When he
brought home the laundry he was generally asked to come Into the parlor
and have a glass of wine. Yes, it
sounds odd, I know, but Lee was a
very intelligent man, a member of the
Chinese Reform association, and had
studied law in Canton, he told us,
before the Manchus drove him from
the country on account of his participation in a seditious movement. Like
all Chinamen, he had a natural genius
for the washtub.
So Lin Lee became a resident of
our village and, as I said, everybody
thought he occupied his shanty alone.
We though so until the evening
when, having brought home the laundry in its usual highly starched condition, and having received the red
paper with its mysterious hieroglyphics which he always left as security,
It Was Un Lee.
Tie turned round and whistled and another Chinaman came out of the darkness.
"My cousin, Lin Loo," he volunteered. "He washes well—as well as
me.   He take your laundry tonight."
"Where are you going, Lin?" asked
my father.
Lin grinned. "Me going to China,"
he said. "Me fight in grand army of
the republic."
Tbls sounded a little like blasphemy
to my father, who was a Grand Army
man, and fought under Grant, though
it cost him his estates to do so and he
was boycotted by the neighbors until
an indefinite time in the seventies.
However, all that is forgotten now,
thank God. We understood that Lin
Lee had felt the breath of patriotism
stirring in the dry, sapless bones of
his native land and wished to enroll
himself under the Dragon flag to fight
against the tyrant, and, as patriotic
Americans, we could not but approve
his choice.
Lin Lee disappeared just as mysteriously as Lin Loo had come, but
that made no difference. Lin Loo
was just as capable a laundryman as
Lin Lee. The ladles of our family,
in fact, maintained that Lin Loo had a
special genius for interpreting the
laundry needs of their own garments
and, as a result, Lin Loo was to be
seen ironing until far Into the night
in his little store on Main street.
It Is strange, by the way, isn't lt,
that one always sees Chinamen ironing and never washing.
Lin Loo was also an Episcopalian,
we found, and when he made his flrst
visit to our church everyone sat up
and gasped. He was attired in quite
the extreme of fashion, ln a silk hat
and frockcoat and patent leather
shoes. He carried a silver-he* d cane,
too, and was very devotional ln the
responses. The rector took a great
fancy to him and Invited him to hia
home to discuss theology. Mrs.
Stubbs, hia wife, was equally attached
to him.
Tea, lt was odd what a general favorite Lin Loo became. Of course
ladies are apt to take a fancy to
Chinamen, especially when they are
converted. People say that they only
pretend to believe, for the sake of
advantages. I don't know much about
that, but anyhow, the ladies all liked
him and, what is stranger, the men
too. Lin Loo was astonishingly well
posted ln western ways. But he
wouldn't drink and wouldn't swear.
None of us thought the less of him on
that account
"Any news of your cousin, Loo?"
we would ask, aB we stopped in to
watch him bending over his iron and
pressing with his scrawny arms. And
Loo always looked up and smiled and
shook his head.
Whether or not any news of the
missing cousin filtered through to
him, he always denied knowledge of
his relative. Yet somehow he never I
seemed to doubt that Lee would return. And when a year had rolled
by and Lin had become only a memory, he still maintained the same
assurance. Imperturbable, suave,
courteous, jolly, Lin Loo was a social
asset ln our town.
And then the missing cousin turned
up just as unexpectedly as he had
gone. One evening Lin Lee Btepped
into our parlor, his basket on his
arm, as though he had only left us the
night before, and received the red
paper from my mother. Then he announced:
"Me going to leave tomorrow. No
more wash. My cousin, Sam Hong,
has bought my shop."
"And your other cousin—Lin Loo?"
we asked.
"He go away," replied our visitor.
"No see any more."
That was all. Sam Hong was a
very "ornary" kind of Chinaman, with
a thick pigtail, a surly expression,
snd an ugly oast in his eye. He
was a rank heathen and was suspected of smoking opium ln his little
shack behind the store on Sunday
afternoons. Our Interest ln the Celestial race rapidly evanesced.
It must bave been nearly a year
after our friends' departure that business Culled me to Richmond. I was
strolling down one of the side streets
when I caiiEbt slant of Lin Lee ba-
nina tne giass window of a laundry,
ironing as hard as ever. I walked
in.
He greeted me with the same cheerful smile as ever. We shook hands
and discussed old times.
"Why did you leave us so suddenly,
Lin Lee?" I asked. "We all miss
you in our town. What was the matter?   Didn't we treat you well?"
"Sure—fine," answered Lin Lee
with a broad grin. "I come to Richmond to open bigger place, more business.   I get married."
Then I ventured upon a very bold
experiment. I asked if he would present me to Mrs. Lin Lee. I knew it
was not Chinese etiquette and I was
not surprised when he told me that
she was out.
But she wasn't out, because at that
moment the door opened and a
Chinese woman, with a little, black-
haired, squint-eyed baby in her arms,
peered out I knew her too. It was
Mrs. Lin Lee—once Mr. Lin Loo. She
nodded and smiled and shut the door
ln my face and I said good-bye quickly
and went out.
Now I hold no brief for or against
Chinamen, but I will say I waB offended at this horrible deception at
the time. But afterward I began
thinking; could he have been assured
of his wife's safety, living alone in
our town, the only Celestial- wfthin
twenty miles? I think he could; I
know he could. But I can imagine
what dangers he may have feared
for her—the young husband, called
back eight thousand miles to fight his
country's battles, with all he loved
dwelling alone among white-faced barbarians.
(Copyright, 1913, by W. G. Chapman.)
A Heavy Jod
Jaok: 'What did her father say
when he found her olttlng on your
lap?"
Tom: "He remarked that I had
taken a great deal on myself."
'Earl  'carl
Jones: "Hello, Binks, I thought you
were serving on the jury to-day."
Binks: "No, I was excused because
I am deaf in one ear!"
Jones: "What difference does that
make?"
Binks: "Oh! the judge told me it
was necessary  to hear both sides!"
MENTAL LABOR IN OLD AGE
Writer Points Out How Impossible l\
Is to Mark Culminating Point      j
In Man's Career.
Who talks of fifty years as the culminating point in man's career? Were
all the great work performed by men
even beyond seventy erased from history the human race would be bereft
of some very proud achievements.
Jefferson founded a university by
his own activity after he had passed
three score years and ten. John
Quincy Adams, although he had been
president of the United States and
five times a foreign minister, wrought
as a congressman by far his greatest
deeds after he was sixty-five. His robust father sat in a constitutional convention when he was almost a nonagenarian. Franklin did valiant serv<
Ice in helping to frame the Constitution of the United States after he had
turned a serene and contented eighty.
Seventy saw Gladstone so vigorous
that he was still good for the greatest
battle of his political life and a premiership. England's foremost living
historian, Sir George Otto Trevelyan,
who is even now completing his monumental story of the American revolution, occupied a seat in parliament
half a century ago. This brilliant nephew of Lord Macaulay has done his
best writing since reaching seventy.
Germany's first emperor, the venerable William, saw Waterloo as a soldier, but fifty-five years later he was
directing armies at Sedan and welding,
an empire after the fall of Paris. John
Bigelow at four score was mentally as
virile as a boy, and his powers as an
author were not dimmed.
Our own Frederick Fraley was an
active business man, president of a
bank and the national board of trade
since the Spanish-American war, and
lyet he was prominent enough in 1844
to serve on a committee that welcomed to Philadelphia Daniel Webster.
Science is making lives longer than
they were in the days of our grandfathers, and also far more comfortable. The same agency that prolongs
bodily vigor will surely lengthen the
age of man's most virile mental labor.
—Philadelphia Ledger.
Unfortunate in Either Case
A man had stayed out at a banqu t
very, very late. He awoke In th■•■
lawn, and saw, perched on the foot of
his bed, aa organ-grinder's monkey
that had climbed in through the window.
His hands trembling, his eyes bloodshot, the man drew his revolver from
beneath his pillow and said:
"If you're a real monkey, It's a bad
look-out for you, and if you're not
It's a bad look-out for me."
She Was An  Expert
"Julia, do you know what love is?"
The love-sick young man put  the
question ln an intense voice.
"Yes," replied the fair maid firmly.
"But do you really know?" he asked
again.   "Have you ever been the object of a love as undying as the sun,
as all-pervading as the air, as wonderful and sparkling   as the stars?
Have you ever loved and been loved
like that, Julia?"
"Have it" she presently murmured.
"I can show you a trunk full of letters,
and three albums full ot photographs,
and in my Jewel case are seven engagement rings I"
Nothing so  Rash
"I'm going to give you back our
engagement ring," she said. "I love
.another."
"Will you give me his name and
address?" he enquired, as he took the
ring.
"His address I" she exclaimed ts surprise. "What are you going to doT
Kill him?"
"No, Indeed," was the reply. "I
want to sen him this ring."
Acute Indigestion
Marcella: "Mr. Beanborough seems
to be greatly bothered with Indigestion."
Waverty: "I shonld say sol He refused to attend a moving picture show
the other evening because one of ths
had a banquet in It" THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
FIVE
St. George's Presbyterian
Church
Services, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Bible Class, 1.30 p.m.
Sunday School. 2.30 p.m.
Prayer    Meeting,     Wednesday
evening 7.30.
Choir Practice, Wednesday evening 8.30.
Pastor, Rev. Jas. Hood.
Methodist Church.
Services: Morning at 11 o'clock.
Evening at 7 o'clock.
Bible Study (Sunday School),
2.30 p.m.
Choir Practice, Friday, 7.30 p.m.
Ladies' Aid Society, First Tuesday of each month at7.30 p.m.
Rev. Henry Wilson, Pastor.
Holy Trinity Church.
(Anglican.)
Services for 19th Sunday after
Tiinity:
8.30 a. m.,  Holy Communion
2.30 p.m., Sunday School
7 p.m., Evensong.
Service of Intercession in behalf of H.M. Forces on Wednesday at 8-30 p.m.
The Vicar of Cumberland will conduct
Divine Service for the soldiers at Union
Bay next Sunday at 11 a.m. in the Institutional Church.
Arthur Bischlager. Vicar.
Dance to the perfect rhythm of the
Edison
Diamond Disc
Phonograph
If- you are just learninglthe
new dances, start right. Get
the rhythm of them firmly fixed
ln your mind through the well-
chosen, well - played records
rendered by Mr. Edison's latest
invention.
If you are already an "expert
you will appreciate thfifjsplen-
did interpretation which the
mellow, fully-rounded tone of
this wonderful instrument produces,
No Needles to Change. A Permanent Diamond is the
Reproducingr'Point.
Mr.   Edison's  perfect  mechanism  insures uniform pitch
and uniform speed from the
first revolution to the last.
Hear the new dance records
which we have just received.
Come in any time and  hear
as many as you like.
Q.A.Fletcher
Music Company,
22 Commercial St., Nanaimo
5t
His Method
M.s. Brown s.jod in the doorway of
her suburban home and eyed the tramp
critically.
"Are you willing to work for a
meal?" she asked at last.
The tramp extended his hands expansively as though work was the one
thing in life he hankered after; and
his apparent sincerity overcame Mrs.
Brown's last scruple.
She retired into the house and presently returned carrying a large plate
of food and a businesslike-looking hoe.
When the tramp had eatei. the food
she handed him the hce, and, pointing
towards the garden path, remarked:
"Now, I want you to clean out thai
gutter.   You see it's tilled with mud.'
The tramp glanced at the gutter,
then at the hoe.
"I never use a hoe," he said, "when
cleaning out a gutter."
"Never use a hoe! Then, what do
you use?  'A shovel?
"No," said the tramp, as he moved
towards the gate. "My method is ti
pray for rain!"
Naturally
"Do yer know why false eyes are
always made of glass, Willie?"
"Sure! How else could a fellow
see through them?"
One Good Effect
He was a lover of hiusic who had
Just been to hear one of the great
operas, and he was expatiating upon
its beauties to an unresponsive friend,
whom he observed to yawn. The
music-lover was hurt.
"Look here, John," ho protested,
don't you think music is of some
practical benefit in lift)?"
"Oh, ye-," said the unresponsive
one. "Why, judging from the portraits I have seen of eminent music-
lans, especially pianists, I should say
that music is great to keep the hair
from falling out."
Money no Object
"Yes, sir," said a pompous ignoramus, "I believe in education, sir—the
best education that money can buy.
My father spared no expense on my
schooling, and I shall spare none on
my children's."
"Then I suppose you will give them
sll an academic education?" remarked
his friend.
"Yes, sir," was the reply; "of course
I will. That's the kind of education
i got, and if lt takes every shilling
of my fortune my boys and girls
shall all be macadamized as their
father was."
\
A   FEW IRONS
LEFT
AT    OUR   COST    PRICE   OF
$2.95
This is your last chance to purchase our 10 - year guaranteed
" Cumberland Special"' Electric
Iron at this low price.
Cumberland Electric lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. o. 314
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oik, Edison & Columbia
Graphophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
f»h»ne31 SIX
CIVIC IMPROVEMENT
Ottawa, Oct. 12.-The commission of conservation is endeavoring to create a Dominion-
wide movement and organization
in connection witn the scsentific
study of municipal affairs and the
best, principles of civic improvement and growth. Under the
auspices of the town-planning
branch of the commission, a preliminary conference is to be held
on November next to which representatives of existing civic
improvement leagues and other
bodies which have been formed
for the purpose of promoting
public healtti. town-planning,
housing and associated movements are being invited. A draft
scheme for a Dominion Federation
for the adequate organization
and advancement of the objects
in view will bd submitted at this
November conference and in January next it is expected that the
whole scheme will be adexuately
worked out and launched by a
representative conference to be
held in Ottawa during the annual
meeting of the commission ot
conservation.
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
BOY SCOUTS
Cumberland Troop No. 1 will
parade at 6.30 p.m. on Friday,
October 22, in the ClubRoom for
the following practices:
Knot-tying, Ambulance, Gymnastic Practice. Stave Drill and
Signalling.
Orderly Patrol—Foxes.
Orderly Officer — A>ssist a n t
Scoutmaster VV. Wl yte.
Boys between the ages of 11
and 18 years are eligible to join
the troop, accompanying a written consent by their parents.
Scouts must te in full uniform.
By order,
A. J. Taylor,
Acting Scoutmaster.
Go where you will you will find
people, both men and women,
who are always waiting for some-
i nHCTrrow^i
-, ■
thing to turn up to better their
conditions in life. Yet this class
of people is the last one to try
and turn something up that will
be a benefit to them in any way,
but still wait from day to day.
If you want something to turn
up, get a move on you, get out,
hustle and see if you can't find
something you can turn up to
your advantage. There are plenty
of chances for every one if they
are sought after, but they will
not come to you if you do not
hunt them up.
We Recom-
mend the
use of
'QUEEN'
BEER.
A beer you can't help liking—so
mild, so pure, so very good.
Every possible precaution is taken
in the brewing and bottling.  Ask
at the hotels for QUEEN BEER,
—you'll like it.
Pilsener Brewing Co., Ltd.
Cumberland, B.C.
Wellington Colliery Railway Company
TIME TABLE No. 2.
EFFECTIVE   MAY
1st.
1915
DOWN                                 I
READ   UP
STATIONS
READ
Sat.
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Tue
1
Mon.
Sun.
Sun.
Mon.
Tu6s.
Wed.
Thurs
Fri.
Sat. |
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
7.35
P.M.
4.35
P.M.
4,35
A.M.    P.M.
9.35    3.35
Cumberland
A.M
7.00
P.M.
1.00
A.M.
10:30
P.M.
2.00
A.M.
10:30
A.M.
7:00
A.M.
1030
A.M.  fl
7:00 I
4.10
7.10
4.10
7.10
4.10
4,10
9.10    3.10
Bevan
7.25
1.25
10:55
2.25
10:55
7:25
1035
7:25
4.05
7.05
4.05
7.05
4.05
4.05
9.05    3.05
Puntledge
(f) Lake Trail Road
7.30
1.30
11:00
230
11:00
730
11:00
730
4.00
7.00
4.00
7.00
4.00
4.00
9.00    3.00
7.35
1.35
11:05
2.35
11:05
7:35
11:05
7:35
3.55
6.55
3.55
6.55
3.55
3.55
8.55    2.55
(f)Courtenay Road
7.40
1.40
11:10
2.40
11:10
7:40
11:10
7:40
3.50
6.50
3.50
6.50
3.50
3.50
8.50    2.50
(f)    Minto Road
7.45
1.45
11:15
2.45
11:15
7:45
11:15
7:45
/
3.45
6.45
3.45
6.45
3.45
3.45
8.45    2.45
Royston
7.50
1.50
11:20
2:50
1130
7:50
11:20
7:50
3.30
6.30
3.30
6.30
3.30
3,30
8.30    2.30
Union Bay
8.00
2.00
1135
3.00
11:35
8:00
1135
8:00 I
An extra train will leave Cumberland for Bevan on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 9:30 p. m.
Stations marked (f) are flag stops only.
WELLINGTON COLLIERY RAILWAY COMPANY ~r*?.1?
TH&   18LANBKK, CW'WKttKUAlNi;. «. U.
SEVEN
t
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR BDMUND WAIJCER,CV«0,LL.D,aC.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Murager JOHN AIRD. Ass't General Manaeer
CAPITAL $15,0004)00    RESERVE FID, $13,500,000
FOREIGN BUSINESS
Thb Buk offers oaswpaaaod facilities to those doing' business with
forties countries. It is spsoiafly equipped fer the purchase and sale of
Stsrusf ud other Foreign exchange, drafts and Cable Transfers, and
for the financing of imports and experts ef merchandise.
Commercial credits, Foreign Drafts, Money Orders, Travellers' Che.
quos md Letters of Credto israod .tad available in all parts of the world.
Collections effected promptly at reasonable rates. S82
OfnraSRLAHD BRANCH.        A. J. BURNSIDE, Manager.
MRS. B. a CRAWFORD,
DEALER IN
HAY, FLOUR and
GENERAL FEED
BARN IS NOW PULLY STOCKMI AND IMMEDIATE
umuvmr can m mak.
Warehouse at Courtenay.
PImms Y»l aad R99.
IMPORTANT TO,SCUSTOMntS:—No Orient^  Amenta,  or poMcitors
ChowLee&Sons
Importers and Dealers in Silks
——mmstms—ssssssssssls——sssss—SMS.—.—s. i si ll      ssssr
Dry Goods, Hosiery, Underwear
and Negligee Shirts, Whitewear,
Silk Goods, Boots and Shoes, etc.
Chow Lee ®l Dons,
CHINATOWN,     West Cumberland
m
SPECIAL SALE OF
DINNER SETS
AND
TOILETWARE
DUNSMUIR AVENUB
CVMBBRLAND, « C.
PkoaoM
A. McKlNNON
THE FURNITURE  STORE
FINDS JOHN WESLEY'S DIARY
Dickens as a Reporter.
Mr. J. D. Irvine, one of tbe best
knoyn London journalists, has just
retired from the press gallery of the
British house commons after thirty
years' service. In the course of some
reminiscences he tells that when be
flrst entered the gallery, he came into contact with a chief reporter who
had had Charles Dickens on his staff.
The chief h%d a very poor opinion of
the novelist, and in supercilious tones,
used to say—"He waB a very poor reporter; but I believe the silly fool
made money by writing books."
England Invincible.
'This England never did, nor never
shall,
Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror,
But wheni it first did help to wound
itself.
Now these 1 er princes are come horns
again,
Come the three corners of the world
in arms,
And  we  shall  shock  them:     naught
shall  make  us  rue,
If England to itself dc rest but true."
Shorthand Notes, It Is Learned, Cover
the Ten Years of the Great
Methodist's Life.
I
In the old strong room in City Road, j I
London, England, where the Wesleyan '■ j
Methodist book room keeps the ar-l *
chieves of nearly two centuries    of
Methodism, the Rev. Nehemiah Gur-
nock, editor of the new official edition of John Wesley's Journals, has
made a surprising discovery of Wesley manuscripts.   The chief of these
is a diary in shorthand covering the
greater part of the last ten years of
Wesley's life.
This dairy has been hidden in the
last pages of a little book known as
"Wesley's Last Account Book," and
until Mr. Curnock re-examined it no
one suspected that the hieroglyphics
at the end were priceless notes writ
ten by Wesley himself ln his old age.
Mr. Curnock is the discoverer of the
key to the cipher in which Jobn Wesley wrote his early journals.
This last account book, which Wesley closed on July 16, 1790, also contains the shorthand diary from 1782
to 1790 which has now been discovered. The book shows in minute detail how the old man, almost to the
very last, kept his accounts "exactly,"
ending the record with the often
quoted sentence, written with a tremulous hand, "I will not attempt it
any longer, being satisfied with the
continual conviction tbat I save all I
can. and give aB I can, that Is, all I
have."
fc~
PRINGTIME
After the fires your house with dirt
gets thick,
So don t you think you had better be
quick,
And call on the painter and  have
your house fixed.
H. PARKINSON
Painter and   Paperhanger
SIGN WORK A SPECIALTY
Cumberland. B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
HIGH-CLASS
DYERS  AND   CLEAN1ERS
Cleaning,
Dyeing and
Pressing.
Next iter to Bank of Centaur**,
DuMMuir Ave.,        Cumberland, B.C.
NOTICE.
Effective from oct. 1st, 1914.
No games of any kind will be
permitted  on    the   Recreation
Grounds on Sundays between the
hours of lli.m.and 12 noon, and
between 2 p.m. and 3.p.m.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir)
Limited,
J. R. Lockard,
General Superintendent.
A SOLDIER'S CAMEL R!DE
An Australian soldier in Cairo w ote
the following description of a ride ob
a camel. "Before a camel gets down
it makes a noise like a sitz bath being dragged along Oxford road at the
rate of about four miles an hour.
Then it folds its legs under it like
a four-fold two-foot rule, and then you
start. It's your turn now. Vou get
on its back and its leg3 unbend, and
you clutch and think of all the bad
deeds you have ever done, and then
open your eyes expecting to find the
Pyramids far beneath you. The motion when it starts is that of riding
astride the banner in a Good Templars' procession, and when the beggar
runs it's like being astride the banner
ln a Bad Templars' procession.
"It's when a camel gets down that
one really begins to see life. Hsve
you ever trodden on a loose stair rod?
That is the second' sensation. The
first is like one you get when you
come across the top stair from above
in the dark, when you don't know
it's there, and the last makes you
remember the day the hammock rope
broke."
The
New Home
Bakery
A fine selection of cakes, pies and
small pastry made daily.
Fresh   Bread   Daily
AFTERNOON   TEAS  SERVED
J. H. Halliday
Dunsmuir Are.
EDWARD W.  BICKLE
NOTARY PUBLIC
FINANCIAL AND  IN8URANCE  AOINT
PHONIii OFFICE. S-8   RMIDCNCB 7-0
P.O. DRAWER 430
OFFICE:  THE   ISLANDER  BLDG.,
DUNSMUIR AVE., CUMBERLAND
A< EIGHT
THE ISLANDER, CUMBERLAND, B.C.
TOWN    TOPICS
Mrs. Gillespie's sister left on
Monday after a short visit.
J. A. Ollie returned to Powell
River on Sunday's train.
Mi. Gordon of Wenatchee was
in town during the week.
Henry Devlin, inspector of
mines, left for Nanaimo on
Wednesday.
Robert Henderson, manager of
No. 4 mine, left for Victoria on
Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. R, Lockard
returned from a visit to Victoria
on Saturday.
Mrs. W. H. Harrison of Seattle
arrived on Sunday on a visit to
her parents Mr. and Mrs. John
Frame.
The Misses Jones and party of
Ladysmith visited Bevan by auto
on Sunday and returned on Monday.
Carpenters are busy remodelling the interior of Mr. J. H.
McMillan's residence at West
Cumberland.
J. H. Stevens is acting as paymaster of the Canadian Collieries
Dunsmuir Ltd. during the ab-
scence of Mr. P, S. Fagan.
A. McKelvie left for Ladysmith
on Friday. He expeets to visit
the Panama Exposition at San
Francisco before returning to
Cumberland.
Born—On Sunday October 10th
at the Union and Conox District
Hospital to Mr. andMrs. Andrew
Thomson of Bevan,  a daughter.
Mr. Joseph Shaw is offeaing
a reward of fifty dollars ior the
arrest and conviction of the person or persons who shot and kill-
ee his heifer on Oct. 9th.
Mr. and Mrs Frank Dalby and
family returned from Denman
Island on Wednesday. The many
friends of Mr. Dalby will be
pleased to hear that he is almost
fully recovered from his illness.
Householders who wish to vote
at the coming municipal election
to be held in January 1915 must
pay their road tax and register
with the city clerk on or before
the 31st day of October.
The beautiful and elaborate cup
presented to St. John's Ambulance Class of this district by
the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir
Ltd has arrived and was on view
at T. D. McLean's jeweller store.
The Ladies Basket Ball Club
assisted by the West Cumberland
Conservative Band will give a
grand dance in the Band Hall on
Friday evening the 29th October.
Admission, gents 75 cents, Ladies free. The hall wi'l be decorated
for the  ocassion by the ladies.
Some fifty or sixty miners are
leaving here for the Old Country
towards the end of the month.
They will go to various coal mining districts that have become
short-handed on account of so
manv British miners enlisting.
It is expected that more will follow
fiom other points in Canada.
THE   BIG   STORE
Real Ayrshire Blankets
When you buy a genuine Ayrshire
blanket you are purchasing one of
the best that money can buy. We
have a new stock of this line of blan
kets. For comfort, wear and value,
try a pair.    Prices, $7.50 to $9.50.
Penman's Sweater Coats
the coat with a guarantee. The name
of 'Penman' on your coat is the best
recommendation. Today we received
a shipment of the latest in Ladies'
and Gents' Sweater Coate.
A specially good Sweater, made of heavy wool, with
a beautiful roll collar, made to lit; shades (J*'7 CA
Cardinal. Maroon, White, Grey andMole ip I .O\J
Boys'
Suit
Department:
Our stock comprises the most
complete showing of Boys'
Suits we have ever shown.
If it price you want we have
suits at
$2.95 ;
Up to size 28.
If you want quality we can
equally meet your approval,
and we are prepared to give
you the best price on all our
suits.
Leckie's Boots for
Men and Boys:
Again and again we ask you to
give Leckie's Boots a trial, and
so add another to our list of sat
isfied customers who have got a
shoe they can depend on.
The "Eclipse Shoe" will give
you satisfaction. See our new
line delivered this week ^q Q(-
in Misses' Patent Button ^L.vo
Wv^w'*
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
%w«>^s^^w^^^*VwO

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