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The Islander Jul 28, 1917

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ii
THE ISLANDER established 1910.
With which is Consolidated The Cumberland News.
THE CUMBERLAND WEWS established 1894
VOL. VIII., No. 19
CUMBERLAND, VANCOUVER ISLAND, B.C., SATURDAY, JULY 28,1917.
Subscription price, $2.00 per year
GETTING HOTTER EVERY MINUTE.—New York Times.
Poit-Nuptial Reception.
On Tuesday in the basement
of the Presbyterian Church, a
most enjoyable evening was
spent in giving a welcome to the
two active members of the
church, Dr. Hicks and Mr. John
Bannerman.
Quite a number of friends met
for the occasion, and among
those who paid their respects to
the happy couples were Dr. and
Mrs. Gillespie and daughter,
who came up from the beach.
The predominance of young
ladies who were present were
very anxious to rub shoulders
with the happy couples so that
the fever might get a better
hold, and also to show how much
they appreciated and envied the
brides. Mr. Taylor entertained
the audience with songs, accompanied by Mr. Parnham on the
organ.
The guessing competition was
won by Mrs. Pearson who hit
the winning number, and so won
the large box of chocolates.
The Ladies' Aid looked after
the refreshments and great credit is due them for the manner in
which they looked after the
needs of those present.
The guests'of   the   evening
were radiant with beaming smiles
for those who had met to wish
them well on their married life.
Rev. Jas. Hood, minister of the
church, presented Dr. Hicks and
Mr, Bannerman each with a solid
oak desk which was given by the
members and adherents of St.
George's Presbyterian Church,
as a token and appreciation of
the esteem they were held in
by the people, and for the years
of untiring service and devotion
to the work of the church in its
various branches.
Mr. Bannerman and the Doctor were completely taken by
surprise but rose to the occasion
in acknowledging the handsome
present made to each and assured
the donors of their appreciation,
which words failed to express,
Mr. Taylor, with his usual wit,
told the two brides that neither
of them had married the "best
man." A very enjoyable'evening was spent and everyone
seemed to enjoy the good natured
banter which took place. The
singing of "God Save the King"
and "Auld Lang Syne," brought
the evening's entertainment to
a close.
Tendeis wanted on alterations
to shop. Apply A. R. Kierstead,
Cumberland, B.C.
LEARNING TO WALK.-New Yorlc Evening World.
MEETING OF
-    CITY COUNCIL
The City Council held their
regular session on Monday evening. Piesent, His Worship
Mayor Bate, Aid. Jas. Brown,
Bannerman, Milligan and Carey.
The Minutes of the previous
neeting were read and adopted.
A communication was received
from the Provincial Treasury department at Victoria, requesting
payment of $35.30 for the keep
of City prisoners. On motion
this was ordered to be paid.
The question of a Patriotic
Demonstration on August 4th,,
the anniversary of the war received the attention of the Council upon the receipt of the following communication from the
Deputy Provincial Secretary:.
Victoria, B. C, July 10.
His Worship, the Mayor,
City of Cumberland.
Sir:—I have the honor, by direction, to acquaint you that the
Honourable the Premier is in receipt of a letter from the Right
Honourable the Prime Minister,
in which Sir Robert Borden refers to meetings held on, the 4th.,
of August last year in.various
parts of the country to commemorate the anniversary of the Declaration of War, and remarks
that this was in accordance with
a similar movement in the United
Kingdom and elsewhere through
out the Empire, and that it is
proposed to repeat this celebration on the 4th., of August next.
The Central Committee for Na.
tlonal PatrlotisT"OrganizatlohBTn
London haa issued a notice on
the subject containing the text
of a resolution which, it is suggested, should be moved at all
meetings, namely:
"That on this anniversary of
the declaration of a righteous
war this meeting of the citizens
of — records its inflexible
determination to continue to a
victorious end the struggle in
maintenance of those ideals of
Liberty and Justice which are
the common and sacred cause of
the Allies."
The purpose of this movement
is to emphasize the unity of-all
the communities of the Empire
in their unwavering determination to crown with victory the
great cause for which this war
has been undertaken.
As it is eminently desirable
that the movement should have
the support and co-operation of
the municipalities, the Honourable Mr. Brewster commends the
subject to your earnest attention
in the confident hope that such
co-operation will be accorded.
I am, Sir, Your obedient servant,
A. CAMPBELL REDDIE,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
After giving the matter careful consideration the Council decided to hold a public demonstration to commemorate the anniversary of the Declaration of
War, in the Ilo Ilo Theatre on
the evening of August the 5th.,
when some of the most able
speakers of tlm district will occupy the platform. The arrangements were left in the hands of
His   Worship  the Mayor.
The following accounts were
referred to the finance committee lor payment if found correct: .
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Co., $18.78; Ilo llo Theatre $10.
The City Clerk informed the
Council that the. average cost of
the new lighting system for the
past six months of 1917 was $50
per month, an advance of seven
dollars per month over the previous lighting system.
The chairman of thc Board of
LIKELY TO BE LAW
Ottawa, July 25.—After two
months of debate, involving an
unprecedented effacement of
party lines—ao far as English-
speaking members are concerned
—the Conscription Bill is within
hailing distance of becoming Hw.
Its final passage yesterday afternoon coming with a pleasant
abruptness places the measure in
the Senate, where it.probably
will come up tomorrow. It is estimated that the discussion there
can be compassed in tile space of
a week. Then, as soon as the
Royal assent is given the bill will
become law.
Unlike the ordinary enactment
this does not mean that the bill
will immediately be enforced. It
will be put in operation only
when the government elects to
issue a proclamation. There are
divergent views as to when this
proclamation will issue. Some
powerful influences suggest that
it hi done right away, especially
in view of the urgency upon
which the whole thing is based.
On the other hand it is pointed
out that much preparatory work
will be necessary and that if any
difficulty is to attend the enfoi cement, the government's efforts
will necessarily be distracted
from the work of Parliament and
of the impending election campaign.
The preliminaries will be attended to, such as the constitution of boards of selection and
the appellate tribunals to hear
exemption claims, but there is
considerable doubt whether much
else will be done until the people
pronounce at a general election.
The sweeping majorities rolled
up both for the second and final
readings are interpreted as giving the bill the popular lead and
moral force which are desirable
for its successful carrying out.
RESULTS OF ENTRANCE EXAMS.
Works reported progress on
street work and that the new
pole and light had been erected
at the corner of Third street and
Dunsmuir avenue, which.is a
credit to the City and the Electric Light Company.
The Council also decided as a
measure of protection to place
danger sign boards at the corner
of Third and Dunsmuir, warning
autos to go slow.
For the satisfaction of the
Council His Worship the Mayor
reported that the water pressure
of the Cumberland Watei works
was 150 lbs.
The Council gave considerable
discussion to the question nf j
charging a local license to autos |
applying for hire, when the matter Was finally allowed to stand
over until the next night of meeting.
Aid. Carey was given permission to introduce a by-law amend
ing the street traffic by-law,
when the Council adjourned.
The Board of Police Commissioners held a special -meeting on
Monday    evening.      Chairman
Bate,   commissioners   Parnham
and Milligan were present.   The
Board decided to purchase a new
uniform for the City Constable.
The Rev. James Hood was present  and a  communication   was
read from the Rev. Henry Wilson
on the Sunday closing of Cigar,]
Tobacco      and     Confectionery •
stores.   The  Mayor   expressed
his approval of closing the stores;
on Sunday but thought it wise to!
seek legal advice and interview!
the individual owners before* passing a motion which wasgrantrd.
The results of the High School
Entrance Examination, which
was held on the 25th. 26th and
27th ult. at Cumberland and
Courtenay have just been announced by the Department of
Education.
CUMBERLAND CENTRE
Cumberland -Number of candidates, 23; passed 19: r'oon Sien,
773; Ida McFadyen, 734; Gladys
Parks, 724: Edward Creech, 698;
Margaret Cessford, 684; Eu-
phemia Brown, 682; Stanley
Mounce, 659; Jean Potter, 643;
Robert Robertson, 636; William
Marsh, 632; Maude Creech, 622;
Ellen Hunden, 621; Laura Robertson, 612; Maisie Pearcey, 608;
John Macdonald, 602; Lois Peacey, 579; Montgomery Hood, 568;
Valentine Dalby, 560; Jessie
Stevenson, 558.
Non-Municipal Schools
Minto-Number of candidates,
2; passed, 0.
No. 7 Mine—Number of candidates, 7; passed, 0.
Union Bay—Number of candidates, 4; passed, 1: J. Harry
Glover, 635.
COURTENAY CENTRE
Courtenay—Number of candidates, 3; passed, 1: Minnie E.
Leighton, 557.
Non-Municipal Schools
Comox—Number of candidates,
3; passed, 1: Richard Downey,
579.
Denman Island—Number of
candidates, 2; passed, 1: Edith
E. Charmerarm-"
Grantham—Number of candidates, 2; passed, 1: Robert W.
Hall, 596.
Lazo—Number of candidates,
4; passed, 1: Dorothy E, Good,
587.
Nob Hill—Number of candidates, 1; passed, 0.
Sandwick—Number of   candidates, 7; passed, 1: Florence M
J. Cliffe, 562.
CUMBERLAND HIGH SCHOOL
Matriculation Examination Re
suits. Number of candidates, 4;
passed 4.   Possible marks 1,000.
Phyllis Partridge, 659; Lena
Carey. 625; George Mordy, 613;
Charlotte Jaynes, 607.
All pupils of the Cumberland
High School trying final written
examinations   this   year   have
ssed. This can be said of no
other high school in the province
TOWN    TOPICS
Workmen's Compensation Board
The Workmens' Compensation
Board sends out the following:
To secure prompt payment of
compensation, comply with the
following:
Notify your employer in writing immediately after tho accident (no matter how trivial.)
Give timo, place and nature of
injury.
If medical attendance necessary
see Doctor immediatelv and have
him send in his report tt the
Board. You cannot change doctors without the consent of the
Board.
You can obtain forms for all
claims for compensation, from
your employer, the Government
Agent or your Doctor. If off
work more than three days send
Board your claim form promptly.
Your Doctor is required by law
to assist you in completing your
claim without charge to-you.
Any act on your part which
retards recovery jeopardizes your
claim.
No compensation allowed except it be personal injury by accident arising out if and in 1I12
course of your employment.
THE WOKKMENS" COMPENSATION BOARD.
WANTED-Secondhand Typewriter, Remington or Undei-
wood, in good condition. P.
O. Box 386 Cum berland, B.C.
R. W. Hunter, of Buttar and
Chiene, auditors of the Canadian
Collieries, left for Vancouver on
Monday.   .
Mr. Brown, of the B. C. Telephone Co., Victoria, is on a business trip to Cumberland for a
few days.
James M. Savage, General
Manager of the Canadian Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., is expected
to arrive from Victoria today.
The American Federation of
Labor has agreed that there shall
be no strike while the war lasts.
C. D. Hobbs, Purchasing agent
of the Canadian Collieries, with
headquarters at Victoria, arrived
on Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. David Wilson, of
Bankhead, arrived on Tuesday on
a visit to friends in this city.
Rev. W. C. Mawhinney left for
Nanaimo on Monday and is expected to return today, and will
occupy the pulpit of Grace Methodist Church tomorrow.
John Furbow and John Potter
were taken to the Cumberland
General Hospital on Wednesday
morning suffering from injuries
received by a fall of rock in No.
4 Mine. Both are doing as well
as may be expected.
Cumberland and Ladysmith
teams will play baseball on the
Recreation Grounds on Sunday.
Mrs. N. McFadyen and Miss
Effiie McFadyen left for Vancouver on Monday.
T. D. McLean has sufficiently
recovered from his recent illness
to be able to attend to his business.
Miss Edna Hearns, for the
past two weeks the guest of Mrs.
J. C. Brown, Maryport Ave.,
left on Thursday morning for
her home in Vancouver.
Thomas Graham, General Superintendent of the Canadian
Collieries Dunsmuir Ltd., returned from a visit to Ladysmith
and Victoria Thursday.
F. G. Leslie, of Vancouver, arrived on Thursday morning to act
as relieving manager at the local
branch of the Canadian Bank of
Commerce during the absence of
A. J. Burnside.
Michael Glazebrook, of New
Westminster, is expected to arrive in a few days to relieve D.
R. Hunter, tellerof the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, who is leaving to join the Canadian Over
seas forces in the early part of
August.
Dr. Morris of Vancouver, professional optometrist and eyesight specialist was at T, I). Mc-
Laan's jewellery store on Friday
and left for Vancouver on Saturday morning.
Mr. M. Lawther Brown of the
.stall' of the Royal Bank of Camilla, Saneti Spiritus, Cuba, com-
pleted on Thursday last a two
weeks' visit to his mother, Mr,
George Brown. Mr. Brown purposes spending the remainder of
his two months'holiday in an extended tour of B. C.
A, J. Burnside, Manager of
the local branch ol' the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, left on Friday morning for Toronto on a
month's vacation. Mrs. I-isii-11-
side, who has been visiting
friends during the past lew
weeks at Warner, Alberta, will
proceed Ba?t with Mr. Burnside
upon his arrival at Warner.
^ Edward Towser died at the
Cumberland General Hospital on
Thursday from injuries received
on Wednesday while working in
No. 7 Mine. The deceased had
been a resident of the district
for the past live years and was
very popular among tho colored
people. The funeral takes place
today. FOUR
THE ISLANDER. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
RECOMMENDED  FOR V. C
Hamilton, July 18.— Destruction, single handed, first of a
German submarine and then of
a Zeppeline by Lieut. Basil D.
Hobbs of the Royal Flying Corps
is described in advices received
tod.i.v by his relatives.
His exploits, which have won
him a letter of congratulation
from Admiral Jellicoe and iec
dnmendation for the Victoria
Cross, were accomplished from a
s.-aplane.
He swooped down over the U-
boat and di-npped bombs .on it
until i* sank. A few day? latef
li ■ ai tucked the airship and sen!
ii crashing to the eaith in flames, causing the death of its en
lire crew.
R. W, Hunter and Mr. Bland
of Buttar and Chiene, auditors of
the Canadian Collieries Duns-
in nr Ltd.. arrived on Tuesday
evening.
AUTO-OWNERS
Stop! Look! Listen!
.Just let your cars run
another ten days, then
■rive
A. R. KIERSTEAD
and
L. R. WADDINGTON
a trial on repairs.
Mechanical and Electrical
Engineers.
THOS. E, BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND.B.C
A (it'll l fur tlie
NANAIMO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Mas It Ibik I'rnpilulm
Hullllllllp. ami hoiiiiis fnnilislHHl
Mrs. F. Oliver
R.A.M., London, England, nnd
Conservatoire of Music,Dresden
Teacher of Pianoforte,
Theory, etc.
No. I'l. Camp.
_
The Spirella Cm-set is made to
your measure and lilted by au
expert corsetiore. (jives modish-
ness, style, refinement lo dress;
perfect comforl and freedom of
movement; retains its original
form permanently, The Spirella Service provides a trained cor-
Betiere to serve you in your home.
Slu- will submit styles, fabrics
and trimmings lor youi-selection;
■•■liow you the exclusive Spirella
boning and advise with you without obligation on youi- part.
Appointmenl nl your convenience ni
Mrs, Roy Hideout's
Millinery parlors,
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland,B.C.
LISTEN!
"The
Voice
On The
Wire"
Tonight, At Ilo Ilo
f
SmmSi
THE   BIG  STORE
To the Ladies of Cumberland and
District:
Never wear a Corset smaller than two inches less than
your actual waist measure. If you do tlie corset will not
correspond to your figure. Always insist on getting tlie
right size.
Do not wear the same corset continuously.. Alternate
with another.   Both will wear longer.
When putting on your corsets,
never pull them together at top
and bottom, leave a wide open
space at waist-line. Have an
equal distance from top to bottom in lacing before drawing
loops at waist-line and over hips.
igmmiMw
When taking off and putting on your corsets, always
loosen the laces first; by doing this your corsets will
give you better service.
Style 540
Q
Never bend from the waist-line when stooping;
always bend from the hips. This will avoid
breaking your corset.
Always ask for "La
Diva" and "D. & A."
non - rustable corsets.
They are the most stylish and in every way
' the most serviceable
models you can buy.
BRA&SILP-t
You can secure most of the latest models in these
corsets by visiting the "Big Store," who are sole
agents in the district.
COBJE.'I 7, I '
V
SIMON LEISER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG  STORE.
Phone 3-8
ac
3
[B
CHARLIE YING WAH & CO.
Merchant Tailors
The Latest in Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring
Dyeing, Pressing and Repairing executed to your entire satisfaction.
Phone 5-5
Opposite Postoffice, Cumberland, B.C.
P. 0. Box 350
Mr. TAXPAYER!
A  Few Illuminating Facts:
"THE TAXPAYERS of a town are the Stock-
* holders in that town. As such they should
be vitally Interested in its propertv. Unless the
town pays them dividends in the shape of rising
real estate values and increased trade, they are
losing money on their investment. Insignificant
street lights, like insignificant funds, pay insignificant dividends.
All other things being equal, the town with
tlie WHITE WAY pays largest dividends. ,
It receives more favorable publicity.
It attracts more desirable residents.
Its real estate values rise faster.
Did you ever consider it in that LIGHT before?
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. Q. 314
i
FIRE   INSURANCE
Queen Insurance Company,
i   (Fire and Automobile,) and       § /.-,
National Fire of Hartford.
FOR RATES AND PAsRTICULARS APPLY TO
EDWARD   W.   BICKLE
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.. CUMBERLAND
w>o»»onoHo»oi)OBOiwaiwa« ioijcwo«ho»)o»ohoho»»o»o<o
1
}
I
"V
Eyes
Tested
Glasses
Fitted
We have arranged with DR. MORRIS, of Vancouver.  Professional Optometrist, Eyesight Specialist, to be at our store
On Friday, July 27th
This is an opportunity to consult the oldest and most experienced Optometrist and Optician in  Western Canada,   an
authority on the subject.
T. D, McLEAN
The Jeweller        Cumberland, B.C.
>
'£=
High-Grade
ORGANS
If ynu are interested in the
purchase of an Organ for Chapel,
School, Lodge or Home, you will
find at our store a most complete
selection, embracing instruments
by the most highly reputed Canadian and American manufacturers, including the famous
Karn and Goodrich Organs
These well known Organs enjoy a world-wide reputation for their superb
tone and other excellent qualities.   Our stock comprizes Organs at prices
from as low as $75.CO up, in Oak and Mahogany cases.
We can Arrant ;e E*»y Monthly Paymenti.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
22 Commercial St.,
"Nanaimo's Muiic House,"
Nanaimo, B.C. 06
THE ISLANDER.CUMBERLAND, B.C.
THREE
Charlie Sing Chong
General Merchant
Dealer in
Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, and
General Merchandise, at the
Lowest Prices.
Chinatown) West Cumberland,
And
Hong Chong & Co.,
Bevan, B.C.
UNION   HOTEL
Opposite the Railway Station
WM. JONES.
This Hotel has been renovated throughout and is now a strictly first-class Hotel
ih every respect.    The best and finest
supply of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.
"See The
'Voice on the Wire'
Every Saturday
At Ilo Ilo Theatre
When in need of a car ring up
86L.     Nanaimo and return the
same  day.    Terms   reasonable.
Fire wood  for sale.     Apply to
THOMAS PIERCE.
Phone 86 L. Happy Valley
WANTED:—A second hand cook-
inir range and couch, cheap. Ap-
pVy to Cumberland Dye Works.
FOR SALE: A five room house
with hot and cold water. Apply
William Potter, Cumberland,
FIREWOOD
Slab Wood for Sale at $3.00 per
Load.   Cash or. Delivery.  Phone
95 L.
RoystonSawmill Co.
Ltd.
King George Hotel
VICTOR BONORA, Prop.
First Class in Every
Respect    :    :   :   :
Terms moderate.
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland.B.C.
E. L. SAUNDERS
PRACTICAL BOOT AND
SHOE MAKER
Orders Receive Prompt Attention
Repairing a Specialty '
West Cumberland
This is to urge you
that you get your Suits Cleaned, Repaired and Pressed for
on<! month. Then form your
own conclusion. If it leads to
better spirits, better health,
continue it. If it does away
with dirt, improves your appearance, continue it. Remember a well-dressed man always
wants the best.
Also you must get your shoes
cleaned; and don't throw vour
tan shoes away because they
are old—have them dyed.
Aik for the Monthly Rates.
Local agents for
The Victoria Hat Work*.
Victoria, B.C.
Cumberland
DYE WORKS
WAROCCHI   BRO-
Grocers and Bakers
Agents for PtLSEN'BR Beek
Cumberland    Courtenay
isaNtsaNntsaHnewnatKjaaRatsnc^
len. Min Bentonr he uked, detain-   ********* UNM**********************'
UTTLE JIDEREILA
She Was Used as a Foil for a
More Fortunate
Cousin.
■y H. N. EGBERT.
Cinderella waa a foil (or Beatrice.
Tbat, perhaps, was the real reason
why Mrs, Lanham, wbo had never
been known to do an unselfish act,
surprised her Intimates by asking her
little orphaned niece to make her
home with ber after her brother's
death.
Esther and Oliver Benton bad
grown up together In the same home
In Ohio, and Oliver had supported his
widowed mother and sister until
Esther's brilliant marriage to a
wealthy lawyer. The Lanhams had
gone up ln the world and when Mi'.
Lanham died be was one of the richest corporation lawyers In the country. Esther mourned her husband decently for a year; then ahe moved to
New York and soon became a member
of tbe rich and not very Intellectual
society that finds Its doings recorded
dally In the newspapers.
Why Mrs. Lanham should have taken little Cinderella—whose real
name was Elisabeth—Into her borne
was a mystery until Mrs. Bentham-
Jenklna solved lt
"Why, my dear, the reason Is per-
pectly obvious," she said to a friend.
"It Is only necessary to look at the
children's faces. Did you ever see a
more glaring contrast between beauty
and homeliness? Beauty and the
Beast, I should call tt; and that charity child won't Improve with years,
either."
Elisabeth heard lt and ran away to
cry. But She had always known instinctively that the difference between
herself and Beatrice was as that between darkness and daylight. Beatrice
bad an abundance of flaxen balr, merry blue eyea, a contagious laugh, and
• figure which gave promise of that
quality which Is called "svelte." Elizabeth was thin and sallow and lanky,
Snd nobody ever stopped to admire
er as they did her cousin.
Perbapa this was partly due to the
fact that Elisabeth wore Beatrice's
cast-off dresses, after the trimmings
bad been removed and a certain dowd-
lness Imparted by Mra. Lanham'a deft
fingers. That excellent woman knew
the value of a foil for ber   daughter,
CUMBERLAND   HOTEL
DUNSMUIR   AVENUE
First Class Hotel at Moderate Bates
WILLIAM   MERRIFIELD, Projrietor.
Would Dreaa Herself In ths Gown.
particularly now that Beatrice was ot
a marriageable age. Beatrice was
kinder. Once ahe gave Elisabeth, one
of her cast-off ball gowns.
I "Some day you may be Invited to a
[ball,' abe said, wltb Innocent acorn,
"'and then you will be glad to have
something to wear. But don't tell
mamma or she will be angry.
; She did not know tbat little Cinder'
alia treaaured ln ber mom a pair ot
Beatrice's old slippers which she bad
rescued from tbe lumber room just as
Ita contents were about to be thrown,
away. In tbe seclusion of her little
attic chamber abe would dress hersellj
la the gown and ln Imagination abe|
would be the belle of some ball, thei
admiration ot all eyea. But nobody
ever Invited Cinderella to a ball; flrst,
because she waa only a sort of companion and never met anybody; secondly, becauae lt waa understood tbat
latter Beatrice'! marriage abe was to
{go out Into the world and work for her
living.
' And that date, toward which Cinder)
sella looked forward with rapturous
'anticipation, waa likely to be long
[delayed, tf one could believe ln signs.
Lester Martin had been a frequent
taller at Mra. Lanbam's house of re-
tent weeks. Martin was the son of
aid Roger Martin, the banker, but he
Waa more than tbat, although It count-
el for lesa with Mra. Lanham—counted for notbing at all, ln fact. He waa
the moat famoua architect in America and was the man who had designed
the new frieze for the state capltol.
ike was always very kind to Elizabeth,
and because be waa the only person
wbo ever noticed her she longed for
a sight of him. And one day something
,rery surprising happened.
1 Lester was calling at the Lanham
borne, and Beatrice, baring heard the
news from her maid, was hurrying Into ber reception gown. Cinderella
waa all alone. She waa just going upstairs—for Mrs. Lanham did not like
bar to receive ber guests—when sbe
tast Lester at the door.
"Why don't-1 ever aee anything ot
lag her.
Elisabeth did not know what to aay,
so ahe aaid nothing.
"Tou dear little Cinderella," aaid
Lester Martin, and bent down and
kissed her.
How she got out ot the room Elizabeth did not know, but she waa in
ber room at last, and sobbing as
though her heart would break. She
cried wildly for hours, until Beatrice
came In and found her there.
Beatrice waa too much excited to notice Elizabeth's red eyes. She began
chattering about Lester.
"Mamma thinks that he la ln love
with me," she aaid. "She says he
wouldn't come here so much lt he
waan't. And lt will be such a Una
match for me, for hia father Is worth
a cool ten millions, and I shall have
carriages and autos and go to Paris
each year and—"
"Do you love him, Beatrice?" Inquired Elizabeth,
"I don't know, I guess I could,"
said Beatrice, whirling about. "Mamma says you needn't come down tonight because we are having guests."
She came back presently. "Do you
know old Roger Lester la giving a
fancy dress ball next month?" ahe
asked. "Yes, tbe Invitations have
Just come. And, oh, I forgot to nay
that there la one for you. Mamma has
written accepting for me and declining for you."
Wben ehe waa gone the girl gave
Way to an access of unrestrained grief.
For the first time rebellious thoughts
came Into her mind. Lester loved her.
Else why had he kissed her? No man
lever kissed ber before. To kiss meant,
In her simple view, to plight one's
troth for ever. Or bad be been playing with her? It was obvious that he
Want to marry Beatrice; but then be
must have had a passing affection for
her. Suddenly an amazing plan took
root within her. She would go to the
ball. She had never been to a ball,
but why should she not go once? It
was to be a fancy dress and nobody
would recognize her, masked and disguised. There waa Beatrice's dress,
but that bad been altered and Beatrice
had bad ao many dresses tbat sbe
would never remember tbat one. And
there were Beatrice's slippers.
She trod on air during the next four'
Veeks. She went ao happily about her
duties tbat more tban once she caught
'sight of Mrs. Lanham surveying ber
Iwith amazed disapproval. At last the
Bight of the ball arrived.
"You need* not alt-up for-us," said
Mrs. Lanham condescendingly. "We
■ball probably not be back until late,
land you must be up early in tbe morning to accompany the parlor maid to
the station to put her on the train.
Poor Mary could never find her way
about tbe streets alone."
. Mary, tbe parlor maid, was going
home to pay a visit to ber sick mother.
But Elizabeth did not care, for ber
heart was beating wildly from sheer
ecstacy. When tbe auto rolled away
ahe hurried upstairs and slipped into
the ball dress and slippers. Then,
with her head and shoulders shrouded
In her wrap ahe went Into the street
and entered a street car.
Nobody stopped ber at the door.
Maaked, among a hundrod Other
masked women, her presence excited
no comment She recognized Beatrice,
la ber creation of filmy white, and ber
aunt, seated among the chaperons and
watching her daughter with an expression of admiration ln her eyea. But
nobody dreamed that Cinderella waa
thero. It waa ten o'clock. Two hours
—and then she must go home as
silently as she had left.
The music Intoxicated her. Elizabeth could dance divinely. The little
drudge was in heaven as one partner
after another took her upon his arm
and swung her out among the dancing
couples. But when she saw Lester approach and gravely ask ber, her head
awam and her eyes filled with sudden
tears.
"Shall we go Into the conservatory?" he asked, when the music
stopped. He offered her his arm. At
the door of tbe ballroom they passed
Beatrice and her mother. Their eyes
rested on her, and with a sudden terror Elizabeth perceived tbat she was
recognized.
Mrs. Lanham rose to her feet with
an exclamation of anger, and, orer
coming herself with an effort, scowled
at her. Elizabeth trembled with fear.
She had not calculated upon the aftermath.
"What is the-matter?" Lester asked,
aa they oat down. "You are not feeling well? May I get you a glass of
water?"
She shook ber head. Lester placed
bla band upon hers.
"Do you think I do not know who
you are, Cinderella?" he asked, "tor
all that maak? See If I can guess.
Vou are Misa Benton and you ran
away to the dance because Gorgon
would not let you go."
"And I can never go borne," said
Elizabeth In panic. "She recognized
me. I naff never been to a ball before and I could not bear not to just
onoe.  I don't know what I shall do."
"I'll tell you," said Lester. "You
need never go home again If you will
marry me."
I He mistook the look In her eyes.
! "0, Cinderella," he cried, stretching
iout his arms longingly, "I love you
iwtth all my soul. It waa you I went
to aee, not Miss Lanham. I know all
bbout your circumstances and your un-
happy life. But, Cinderella, I' want
sou for my own, and I know-a clergyman over ln Jersey who doesn't go to
jbed till twelve, and If we take a taxi-
cab we can Just make it. Will you
come with me, Cinderella, dear?"
"Yes," sighed Cinderella happily,
and that was the second time be
kissed her.
(Copj-rliht. Ull, bv W. O. Chapman.)
,  ™
Theatre I
CUMBERLAND, B. C.
•
Showing Films From All Best Producers.   Pictures
Shown Here Include Bluebirds, Redfeathers
and Famous Players, which are run in
Leading Theatres of Vancouver, Vic-
Victoria and Nanaimo.
CHANGE OF PROGRAM DAILY EXCEPT FRIDAY
Every Saturday-
An Episode of the "Voice On The ;
Wire" a Serial in 16 Parts, is Shown,
together with a Mixed Program of
Comedy and Drama.
On All Other Days Of The Week-
Fiveand Six Reel Feature Films and
One Reel of Comedy.
Next Week's Bluebird Photoplay
Louise Lovely, in A
-Five Act Drama-
"The Gift Girl"
5 Reel Paramount
Films.
"On Record" and
"Those Without Sin"
Watch For  "THE WAR OF THE TONGS," a play
written and acted by Chinese.   August 15.
!
EVENINGS 6.30 To 10.30
Admission-Children Under 15, 10c.
Adults 15c. Box Seats 25c.
'• Matinee Every Saturday, at 3 Oclock ;
Children 5c. FOUlt
RED CROSS
The following amounts
are the
results of the  collections
for the
month of July 1917:
Dunsmuir Ave. .. _	
$ 28.80
Camp	
Windermere Ave. 	
Maryport Ave  _
14.85
9.00
6.10
Peivith Ave. _   ..
Derwent and Allen Ave,
'Chinatown  	
Bevan	
13.85
11.85
19.38
10. G5
Total    	
$114.48
A. M. COOKE,
Hon. Secy. Treas.,
pro tern.
LOSSES TO SUBMARINES.
London, July 25. England's
losses lo the U-boats for the
week announced today are under
last week's in the number of total ships sunk, but there are more
of Ihe larger vessels lost.
Twentj'tone^.hips of more than
1600 tons were sunk, three smaller than that tonnage and one
fishing vessel. Unsuccessful attacks were more numerous than
heretofore.
 ss>     	
The West Virginia Legislature
has passed a law requiring every
aMe bodied etizen of the state
between Ihe ages of sixteen and
sixty to work at least thirty-six
hours a week. The measure includes persons having incomes
and no specific employment. The
law becomes operative thirty
days after its passage. The penalty for violation is forced employment by counties or municipalities. A similar law in this
province would affect a few who
seem to have no visible occupation.
THE ISLANDEft. CUMBERLAND, B.C.
AUTO-OWNERS
Stop! Look! Listen!
Just let your cars run
another ten days, then
eive
A. R. KIERSTEAD
and
L. R. WADDINGTON
a trial on repairs.
Mechanical and Electrical
Engineers.
I
THOS, E. BANKS
FUNERAL
DIRECTOR AND
UNDERTAKER
CUMBERLAND.B.C
Altl'lll for HUMAN Al MO
MARBLE & GRANITE
WORKS
Mrs. F. Oliver
R.A.M,, London, England, and
Conservatoire of Mus[c,DrGsden
Teacher of Pianoforte,
Theory, etc.
No. i:i. Camp,
The Spirella Corset is made to
yuur measure and fitted by an
experl corsetiere. Gives modish-
ness, style, refinement to dress;
perfect comfort, and freedom of
movement; retains its original
form permanently. The Spirella Service provides a trained corsetiere to serve you in your home.
She will submit styles, fabrics
and trimmings for your selection;
show you the exclusive Spirella
boning and advise with you without obligation on your part.
Appointment at youi- convenience at
Mrs.  Roy Rideout's
Millinery Parlors,
Dunsmuir Ave. Cumberland, B.C
f*
ac
WW
tmXSm
I
THE   BIG  STORE
"^
To the Ladies of Cumberland aod
District:
Never wear a Corset smaller than two inches less than
your actual waist measure. If you do the corset will not
correspond to your figure. Always insist on getting the
right size.
Do not wear the same corset continuously,
with another.   Both will wear longer.
When putting on your corsets,
never pull them together at top
and bottom, leave a wide open
space at waist-line. Have an
equal distance from top to bottom in lacing before drawing
loops at waist-line and over hips.
1 Alternate
vwamu-nr
When taking off and putting on your corsets, always
loosen the laces first; by doing this your corsets will .
give you better service. .
Never bend from the waist-line when stooping;
always bend from the hips. This will avoid
breaking your corset.
Always ask for "La
Diva" and "D. & A."
non - rustable corsets.
They are the most stylish and in every way
the most serviceable
models you can buy.
Brassiere
You can secure most of the latest models in these
corsets by visiting the " Big Store," who are sole
agents in the district.
V.
SIMON LOSER & CO.,
LIMITED.
THE   BIG   STORE.
Phone 3-8
ac
3E3
3E
*J
CHARLIE YING WAH & CO.
Merchant Tailors
The Latest in Ladies' and Gents' Tailoring
Dyeing, Pressing and Repairing executed to your entire satisfaction.
Phone 5-5
Opposite Postoffice, Cumberland, B.C.
P. O. Box 350
Mr. TAXPAYER!
A  Few Illuminating Facts:
•T-HE TAXPAYERS of a town are ihe Stock-
*■ holders in that town. As such they should
be vitally interested in its property. Unless the
town pays them dividends in the shape of rising
real estate values and increased trade, they are
losing money on .their investment. Insignificant
street lights, like insignificant funds, pay insignificant dividends.
All other things being equal, the town with
the WHITE WAY pays largest dividends.
It receives more favorable publicity.
It attracts more desirable residents.
Its real estate values rise faster.
Did you ever consider it in that LIGHT before?
Cumberland Electric Lighting
Phone 75 Co., Ltd. p. O. 314
»oi»i>w)o«>o<>o<i«>oi>o<iot0io<'<o«!O(io<t«w(>o»>o>«(so«a
|      FIRE   INSURANCE
Queen Insurance Company,
(Fire and Automobile,) and
National Fire of Hartford.
FOR RATES AND PARTICULARS APPLY  TO
EDWARD  W.   BICKLE
8
OFFICE:   THE   ISLANDER   BLDG..
DUNSMUIR AVE.,   CUMBERLAND
X)OttO(>Otm>Ot->0()OI>0()Qf)Of>0<)0(B)Ot<)s«)Ot'»»KK»t)0(,0(i
Stoves & Ranges
Furniture, Crockery, Enamelware
Paints, Oik, Edison & Columbia
Grapliophones
Novelties, Toys, Etc.
T. E. BATE
Magnet Cash Store
P. O. Box 279
Phone 31
High-Grade
ORGANS
i If you !ire interested in the
purchase of an Organ for Chapel,
School, Lodge or Home, you will
find at our store a most complete
selection, embracing instruments
by the most highly reputed Canadian and American manufacturers, including the famous
Kara and Goodrich Organs
These well known Organs enjoy a world-wide reputation for  their superb
tone and other excellent qualities.   Our stock comprizes Organs at prices
from as low as $75.00 up, in Oak and Mahogany cases.
We can Arrange Easy Monthly Payments.
G. A. Fletcher Music Co.
22 Commercial St.,
" Nanaimo's Music House,"
Nanaimo, B.C.

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